Science.gov

Sample records for air-water gas transfer

  1. Tide and Wind Forcing of Estuarine Air-Water Gas Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, P. M.; Zappa, C. J.; McGillis, W. R.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that while gas transfer is primarily driven by wind, tidal currents can drive gas exchange in estuaries. Studies have also shown that the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation just below the sea surface is a good proxy for the gas exchange velocity (k) for a wide range of forcing processes (e.g. wind, currents, rain). However, the connection between tidally-driven turbulence and gas exchange has not been investigated in detail. In this study, an autonomous instrumented surface platform deployment and one-dimensional numerical modeling are used to examine the influence of wind, tidal current shear, and water column bottom boundary layer (BBL) growth on gas transfer in an estuary. An autonomous instrumented surface platform was deployed for one month at a shallow site in the Hudson River estuary, measuring wind velocity, water velocity, TKE dissipation, air-water CO2 gradient and flux, and gas transfer velocity. Currents were 0-0.8 m s-1, winds 0-14 m s-1, depths 4.7-6.2 m, significant wave heights 0-0.8 m, and water pCO2 700-1600 μatm during the study. Surveys spanning the entire estuary from 2002 to the present broaden our understanding of tidal currents, stratification and turbulence to the entire estuary, with over a billion acoustic velocity measurements, millions of turbulence measurements, and 50 CTD surveys up the entire length of the estuary. The estuarine observations show a strong relationship between wind and k, but several recent parameterizations of k as a function of wind speed under-predict k for low-to-moderate winds (1-6 m s- 1). Upper water-column TKE dissipation and k are correlated, consistent with a recent parameterization. Both processes show enhancement when the turbulent BBL nears the sea surface. One-dimensional turbulence modeling is used to expand these results to a broad range of estuaries.

  2. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  3. On the coefficients of small eddy and surface divergence models for the air-water gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binbin; Liao, Qian; Fillingham, Joseph H.; Bootsma, Harvey A.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggested that under low to moderate wind conditions without bubble entraining wave breaking, the air-water gas transfer velocity k+ can be mechanistically parameterized by the near-surface turbulence, following the small eddy model (SEM). Field measurements have supported this model in a variety of environmental forcing systems. Alternatively, surface divergence model (SDM) has also been shown to predict the gas transfer velocity across the air-water interface in laboratory settings. However, the empirically determined model coefficients (α in SEM and c1 in SDM) scattered over a wide range. Here we present the first field measurement of the near-surface turbulence with a novel floating PIV system on Lake Michigan, which allows us to evaluate the SEM and SDM in situ in the natural environment. k+ was derived from the CO2 flux that was measured simultaneously with a floating gas chamber. Measured results indicate that α and c1 are not universal constants. Regression analysis showed that α˜log>(ɛ>) while the near-surface turbulence dissipation rate ɛ is approximately greater than 10-6 m2 s-3 according to data measured for this study as well as from other published results measured in similar environments or in laboratory settings. It also showed that α scales linearly with the turbulent Reynolds number. Similarly, coefficient c1 in the SDM was found to linearly scale with the Reynolds number. These findings suggest that larger eddies are also important parameters, and the dissipation rate in the SEM or the surface divergence β' in the SDM alone may not be adequate to determine k+ completely.

  4. Turbulence at the Air-Water Interface in Lakes of Different Sizes: Consequences for Gas Transfer Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, S.; Crowe, A. T.; Amaral, J. H.; Arneborg, L.; Bastviken, D.; Forsberg, B. R.; Melack, J. M.; Tota, J.; Tedford, E. W.; Karlsson, J.; Podgrajsek, E.; Andersson, A.; Rutgersson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Similarity scaling predicts that wind induced shear will be the dominant source of turbulence near the air-water interface in lakes with low to moderate wind forcing. Turbulence is expected to be enhanced with wave activity; results are conflicting on the effects of heating and cooling. We measured turbulence with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and / or a temperature-gradient microstructure profiler and obtained correlative time series measurements of meteorology and water column temperature in a 800 m2 arctic pond, a 1 ha boreal lake, and a large tropical reservoir. Turbulence measurements with both instruments corroborated those calculated from similarity scaling in the boreal lake. Within the arctic pond, dissipation rates obtained with the ADV were in agreement with those from similarity scaling when winds exceeded ~1.5 m/s with a greater frequency of measurable dissipation rates when surface waves were present. Dissipation rates in the tropical reservoir reached and often exceeded 10-6 m2 s-3 in the upper meter under light winds and decreased by an order of magnitude with cooling or rainfall. Under cooling, dissipation rates were at least an order of magnitude higher in the uppermost 25 cm bin than in the water column below. Gas transfer coefficients calculated from concurrent measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes with floating chambers and the surface renewal model using the estimates of turbulence were in agreement. These results support the predictions of Monin-Obuhov similarity scaling in that shear dominates turbulence production near the air-water interface under heating and cooling, illustrate spatial variability in turbulence production in small water bodies due to the intermittency of wind interacting with the water's surface, are in agreement with prior oceanic observations that shear and associated turbulence can be intensified in shallow mixing layers under heating with light winds, and illustrate the utility of similarity scaling for

  5. Gas transfer velocities for quantifying methane, oxygen and other gas fluxes through the air-water interface of wetlands with emergent vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Empirical models for the gas transfer velocity, k, in the ocean, lakes and rivers are fairly well established, but there are few data to predict k for wetlands. We have conducted experiments in a simulated emergent marsh in the laboratory to explore the relationship between k, wind shear and thermal convection. Now we identify the implications of these results for gas transfer in actual wetlands by (1) quantifying the range of wind conditions in emergent vegetation canopies and the range of thermal convection intensities in wetland water columns, and (2) describing the non-linear interaction of these two stirring forces over their relevant ranges in wetlands. We measured mean wind speeds and wind speed variance within the shearless region of a Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh canopy in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Northern California, USA). The mean wind speed within this region, , is significantly smaller than wind above the canopy. Based on our laboratory experiments, for calm or even average wind conditions in this emergent marsh k600 is only on the order 0.1 cm hr-1 (for neutrally or stably stratified water columns). We parameterize unstable thermal stratification and the resulting thermal convection using the heat flux through the air-water interface, q. We analyzed a water temperature record for the Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh to obtain a long-term heat flux record. We used these heat flux data along with short-term heat flux data from other wetlands in the literature to identify the range of the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection in wetlands. The typical range of heat fluxes through water columns shaded by closed emergent canopies (-200 W m-2 to +200 W m-2) yields k600 values of 0.5 - 2.5 cm hr-1 according to the model we developed in the laboratory. Thus for calm or average wind conditions, the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection is significantly larger than the gas transfer velocity associated with wind

  6. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  7. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  8. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  9. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  10. Air-Water Gas Exchange in Wetland Water Columns Due To Wind and Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work is to provide a parameterization of the air-water gas transfer rate in wetlands, and do so in terms of easily measured environmental variables. This parameterization is intended to support biogeochemical modeling in wetlands by providing an interfacial flux of key importance. Our approach uses laboratory experiments describe the oxygen transfer across an air-water interface in a model wetland. The oxygen transfer is sensitive to the externally imposed wind, vegetation characteristics, and vertical thermal convection. We vary these systematically, determining the gas transfer (or "piston") velocity that describes interfacial gas flux. We measure velocity vector fields near the air-water interface using particle image velocimetry, and use these measurements to help explain the mechanisms behind the measured trends in oxygen transfer. The explanatory power of these measurements includes the relationship between plant geometry and surface divergence. We explore the potential impact of our results on wetland modeling and management, for issues such as carbon sequestration and methane emission.

  11. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  12. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h-1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m-2 d-1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  13. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  14. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow around arrays of cylinders at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers has been studied numerically, analytically and experimentally. Early results demonstrated that at flow around randomly oriented cylinders exhibits reduced turbulent length scales and reduced diffusivity when compared to similarly forced, unimpeded flows (Nepf 1999). While horizontal dispersion in flows through cylinder arrays has received considerable research attention, the case of vertical dispersion of reactive constituents has not. This case is relevant to the vertical transfer of dissolved gases in wetlands with emergent vegetation. We present results showing that the presence of vegetation can significantly enhance vertical transport, including gas transfer across the air-water interface. Specifically, we study a wind-sheared air-water interface in which randomly arrayed cylinders represent emergent vegetation. Wind is one of several processes that may govern physical dispersion of dissolved gases in wetlands. Wind represents the dominant force for gas transfer across the air-water interface in the ocean. Empirical relationships between wind and the gas transfer coefficient, k, have been used to estimate spatial variability of CO2 exchange across the worlds’ oceans. Because wetlands with emergent vegetation are different from oceans, different model of wind effects is needed. We investigated the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen in a scaled wetland model built inside a laboratory tank equipped with an open-ended wind tunnel. Plastic tubing immersed in water to a depth of approximately 40 cm represented emergent vegetation of cylindrical form such as hard-stem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). After partially removing the oxygen from the tank water via reaction with sodium sulfite, we used an optical probe to measure dissolved oxygen at mid-depth as the tank water re-equilibrated with the air above. We used dissolved oxygen time-series for a range of mean wind speeds to estimate the

  15. Gas exchange in wetlands with emergent vegetation: The effects of wind and thermal convection at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Cristina M.; Variano, Evan A.

    2013-07-01

    Methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen are exchanged between wetlands and the atmosphere through multiple pathways. One of these pathways, the hydrodynamic transport of dissolved gas through the surface water, is often underestimated in importance. We constructed a model wetland in the laboratory with artificial emergent plants to investigate the mechanisms and magnitude of this transport. We measured gas transfer velocities, which characterize the near-surface stirring driving air-water gas transfer, while varying two stirring processes important to gas exchange in other aquatic environments: wind and thermal convection. To isolate the effects of thermal convection, we identified a semiempirical model for the gas transfer velocity as a function of surface heat loss. The laboratory results indicate that thermal convection will be the dominant mechanism of air-water gas exchange in marshes with emergent vegetation. Thermal convection yielded peak gas transfer velocities of 1 cm h-1. Because of the sheltering of the water surface by emergent vegetation, gas transfer velocities for wind-driven stirring alone are likely to exceed this value only in extreme cases.

  16. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  17. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  18. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Blayne; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainty of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of benthic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water interface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2–6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models.

  19. DNS and measurements of scalar transfer across an air-water interface during inception and growth of Langmuir circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, A.; Ma, Y.; Buckley, M.; Tejada-Martinez, A. E.; Veron, F.

    2016-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of an initially quiescent coupled air-water interface driven by an air flow with free stream speed of 5 m/s have been conducted and scalar transfer from the air side to the water side and subsequent vertical transport in the water column have been analysed. Two simulations are compared: one with a freely deforming interface, giving rise to gravity-capillary waves and aqueous Langmuir turbulence (LT) characterized by small-scale (centimeter-scale) Langmuir cells (LC), and the other with the interface intentionally held flat, i.e., without LC. It is concluded that LT serves to enhance vertical transport of the scalar in the water side and in the process increases scalar transfer efficiency from the air side to the water side relative to the shear-dominated turbulence in the flat interface case. Furthermore, transition to LT was observed to be accompanied by a spike in scalar flux characterized by an order of magnitude increase. These episodic flux increases, if linked to gusts and overall unsteadiness in the wind field, are expected to be an important contributor in determining the long-term average of the air-sea gas fluxes.

  20. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  1. Micrometeorological measurement of hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyl compound air-water gas exchange in Lake Superior and comparison to model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, M. D.; Perlinger, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water exchange fluxes of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) substances are frequently estimated using the Whitman two-film (W2F) method, but micrometeorological flux measurements of these compounds over water are rarely attempted. We measured air-water exchange fluxes of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on 14 July 2006 in Lake Superior using the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. Measured fluxes were compared to estimates using the W2F method, and to estimates from an Internal Boundary Layer Transport and Exchange (IBLTE) model that implements the NOAA COARE bulk flux algorithm and gas transfer model. We reveal an inaccuracy in the estimate of water vapor transfer velocity that is commonly used with the W2F method for PBT flux estimation, and demonstrate the effect of use of an improved estimation method. Flux measurements were conducted at three stations with increasing fetch in offshore flow (15, 30, and 60 km) in southeastern Lake Superior. This sampling strategy enabled comparison of measured and predicted flux, as well as modification in near-surface atmospheric concentration with fetch, using the IBLTE model. Fluxes estimated using the W2F model were compared to fluxes measured by MBR. In five of seven cases in which the MBR flux was significantly greater than zero, concentration increased with fetch at 1-m height, which is qualitatively consistent with the measured volatilization flux. As far as we are aware, these are the first reported micrometeorological air-water exchange flux measurements of PCBs.

  2. Bacterioneuston control of air-water methane exchange determined with a laboratory gas exchange tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upstill-Goddard, Robert C.; Frost, Thomas; Henry, Gordon R.; Franklin, Mark; Murrell, J. Colin; Owens, Nicholas J. P.

    2003-12-01

    The apparent transfer velocities (kw) of CH4, N2O, and SF6 were determined for gas invasion and evasion in a closed laboratory exchange tank. Tank water (pure Milli-RO® water or artificial seawater prepared in Milli-RO®) and/or tank air gas compositions were adjusted, with monitoring of subsequent gas transfer by gas chromatography. Derived kw was converted to "apparent k600," the value for CO2 in freshwater at 20°C. For CH4, analytical constraints precluded estimating apparent k600 based on tank air measurements. In some experiments we added strains of live methanotrophs. In others we added chemically deactivated methanotrophs, non-CH4 oxidizers (Vibrio), or bacterially associated surfactants, as controls. For all individual controls, apparent k600 estimated from CH4, N2O, or SF6 was indistinguishable. However, invasive estimates always exceeded evasive estimates, implying some control of gas invasion by bubbles. Estimates of apparent k600 differed significantly between methanotroph strains, possibly reflecting species-specific surfactant release. For individual strains during gas invasion, apparent k600 estimated from CH4, N2O, or SF6 was indistinguishable, whereas during gas evasion, k600-CH4 was significantly higher than either k600-N2O or k600-SF6, which were identical. Hence evasive k600-CH4/k600-SF6 was always significantly above unity, whereas invasive k600-CH4/k600-SF6 was not significantly different from unity. Similarly, k600-CH4/k600-SF6 for the controls and k600-N2O/k600-SF6 for all experiments did not differ significantly from unity. Our results are consistent with active metabolic control of CH4 exchange by added methanotrophs in the tank microlayer, giving enhancements of ˜12 ± 10% for k600-CH4. Hence reactive trace gas fluxes determined by conventional tracer methods at sea may be in error, prompting a need for detailed study of the role of the sea surface microlayer in gas exchange.

  3. Micrometeorological measurement of hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyl compound air-water gas exchange in Lake Superior and comparison to model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, M. D.; Perlinger, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    Air-water exchange fluxes of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) substances are frequently estimated using the Whitman two-film (W2F) method, but micrometeorological flux measurements of these compounds over water are rarely attempted. We measured air-water exchange fluxes of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on 14 July 2006 in Lake Superior using the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. Measured fluxes were compared to estimates using the W2F method, and to estimates from an Internal Boundary Layer Transport and Exchange (IBLTE) model that implements the NOAA COARE bulk flux algorithm and gas transfer model. We reveal an inaccuracy in the estimate of water vapor transfer velocity that is commonly used with the W2F method for PBT flux estimation, and demonstrate the effect of use of an improved estimation method. Flux measurements were conducted at three stations with increasing fetch in offshore flow (15, 30, and 60 km) in southeastern Lake Superior. This sampling strategy enabled comparison of measured and predicted flux, as well as modification in near-surface atmospheric concentration with fetch, using the IBLTE model. Fluxes estimated using the W2F model were compared to fluxes measured by MBR. In five of seven cases in which the MBR flux was significantly greater than zero, concentration increased with fetch at 1-m height, which is qualitatively consistent with the measured volatilization flux. As far as we are aware, these are the first reported ship-based micrometeorological air-water exchange flux measurements of PCBs.

  4. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals. PMID:26196214

  5. Air-water Gas Exchange Rates on a Large Impounded River Measured Using Floating Domes (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in rivers typically serve as the basis for whole-system estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. An important component of these models is the exchange of dissolved gases between air and water. Controls on gas exchange rates (K) have be...

  6. Influence of dissolved humic substances on the mass transfer of organic compounds across the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Ksenia; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dissolved humic substances (DHS) on the rate of water-gas exchange of two volatile organic compounds was studied under various conditions of agitation intensity, solution pH and ionic strength. Mass-transfer coefficients were determined from the rate of depletion of model compounds from an apparatus containing a stirred aqueous solution with continuous purging of the headspace above the solution (dynamic system). Under these conditions, the overall transfer rate is controlled by the mass-transfer resistance on the water side of the water-gas interface. The experimental results show that the presence of DHS hinders the transport of the organic molecules from the water into the gas phase under all investigated conditions. Mass-transfer coefficients were significantly reduced even by low, environmentally relevant concentrations of DHS. The retardation effect increased with increasing DHS concentration. The magnitude of the retardation effect on water-gas exchange was compared for Suwannee River fulvic and humic acids, a commercially available leonardite humic acid and two synthetic surfactants. The observed results are in accordance with the concept of hydrodynamic effects. Surface pressure forces due to surface film formation change the hydrodynamic characteristics of water motion at the water-air interface and thus impede surface renewal. PMID:22051345

  7. Liquefied Natural Gas Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Chicago Bridge & Iron Company's tanks and associated piping are parts of system for transferring liquefied natural gas from ship to shore and storing it. LNG is a "cryogenic" fluid meaning that it must be contained and transferred at very low temperatures, about 260 degrees below Fahrenheit. Before the LNG can be pumped from the ship to the storage tanks, the two foot diameter transfer pipes must be cooled in order to avoid difficulties associated with sharp differences of temperature between the supercold fluid and relatively warm pipes. Cooldown is accomplished by sending small steady flow of the cryogenic substance through the pipeline; the rate of flow must be precisely controlled or the transfer line will be subjected to undesirable thermal stress.

  8. Gas transfer - A gas tension method for studying equilibration across a gas-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Meredith L.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    1992-11-01

    New strategies are required in the study of gas exchange under energetic and changeable conditions where current techniques are limited, especially in their ability to represent the contribution of injected bubbles. We have developed a gas tension device (GTD) that uses a solid-state differential pressure sensor to make continuous in situ measurements of the difference between pressure of dissolved gas (gas tension, for succinctness) and pressure of gas in the gas phase above a water parcel. This information allows the determination of the rate of approach to a dynamic equilibrium and of the degree of water phase saturation at steady state. The method is demonstrated in the lab by following the invasion of CO2 into seawater with bubble injection. The GTD introduces a new and versatile measurement method for the study of gas transfer across air-water interfaces, one which avoids many of the sampling and bias problems of traditional approaches.

  9. Isothermal-Gas-Transfer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Don I.

    1989-01-01

    Isothermal Gas Transfer program (GASXFER) solves variety of problems in which gas or gas mixture transferred between two containers. Special features of program include ease of entering data and ease of obtaining output. Program displays, prints, or graphs complete pressure history of each gas as function of time. Written in Lotus Symphony macrolanguage.

  10. Heat transfer to two-phase air/water mixtures flowing in small tubes with inlet disequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, J. M.; Florschuetz, L. W.; Fiszdon, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The cooling of gas turbine components was the subject of considerable research. The problem is difficult because the available coolant, compressor bleed air, is itself quite hot and has relatively poor thermophysical properties for a coolant. Injecting liquid water to evaporatively cool the air prior to its contact with the hot components was proposed and studied, particularly as a method of cooling for contingency power applications. Injection of a small quantity of cold liquid water into a relatively hot coolant air stream such that evaporation of the liquid is still in process when the coolant contacts the hot component was studied. No approach was found whereby heat transfer characteristics could be confidently predicted for such a case based solely on prior studies. It was not clear whether disequilibrium between phases at the inlet to the hot component section would improve cooling relative to that obtained where equilibrium was established prior to contact with the hot surface.

  11. The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program: Lessons Learned by Pairing Scientists and Teachers to Develop Curriculum on Global Climate Change and Regional Unconventional Oil and Gas Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Rogers, J. D.; Casey, J. G.; Lackey, G.; Birdsell, D.; Brown, K.; Polmear, M.; Capps, S.; Rosenblum, J.; Sitterley, K.; Hafich, K. A.; Hannigan, M.; Knight, D.

    2015-12-01

    The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program, run by the UCAR Center for Science Education, brought together scientists and secondary science teachers in a yearlong program culminating in the development of curriculum related to the impacts of unconventional oil and gas development. Graduate students and research scientists taught about their research area and its relationship to oil and gas throughout three online courses during the 2015-16 school year, during which teachers and scientists engaged in active online discussions. Topics covered included climate change, oil and gas infrastructure, air quality, water quality, public health, and practices and policies relating to oil and gas development. Building upon their initial online interactions and a face-to-face meeting in March, teachers were paired with appropriate AirWaterGas team members as science advisors during a month-long residency in Boulder, Colorado. During the residency, graduate student scientists provided resources and feedback as teachers developed curriculum projects in collaboration with each other and UCAR science educators. Additionally, teachers and AirWaterGas researchers shared experiences on an oil and gas well site tour, and a short course on drilling methods with a drilling rig simulator. Here, we share lessons learned from both sides of the aisle, including initial results from program assessment conducted with the participating teachers.

  12. A mixing length model for the aqueous boundary layer including the effect of wave breaking on enhancing gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donelan, M. A.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    A mixing length model for air-water gas transfer is developed to include the effects of wave breaking. The model requires both the shear velocity induced by the wind and the integrated wave dissipation. Both of these can be calculated for tanks and oceans by a full spectrum wave model. The gas transfer model is calibrated, with laboratory tank measurements of carbon dioxide flux, and transported to oceanic conditions to yield air-sea transfer velocity versus wind speed.

  13. Relationship between surface velocity divergence and gas transfer in open-channel flows with submerged simulated vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjou, M.; Okamoto, T.; Nezu, I.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity and gas concentration measurements were carried out to reveal gas transfer phenomena in open-channel turbulent flows with flat bottom and submerged vegetation bottom conditions. A large-scale coherent vortex appears near the vegetation top due to shear instability, and the submerged vegetation was found to promote gas transfer beneath the air- water interface. Furthermore, we revealed a great dependency of gas transfer on vegetation density. The present measurement results propose a new surface divergence model with wide generality, connecting reasonably the gas transfer velocity and the surface divergence intensity in open-channel flows, irrespective of bottom roughness conditions.

  14. Experimental Study of the Morphology and Dynamics of Gas-Laden Layers Under the Anodes in an Air-Water Model of Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vékony, Klára; Kiss, László I.

    2012-10-01

    The bubble layer formed under an anode and the bubble-induced flow play a significant role in the aluminum electrolysis process. The bubbles covering the anode bottom reduce the efficient surface that can carry current. In our experiments, we filmed and studied the bubble layer under the anode in a real-size air-water electrolysis cell model. Three different flow regimes were found depending on the gas generation rate. The covering factor was found to be proportional to the gas generation rate and inversely proportional to the angle of inclination. A correlation between the average height of the entire bubble layer and the position under the anode was determined. From this correlation and the measured contact sizes, the volume of the accumulated gas was calculated. The sweeping effect of large bubbles was observed. Moreover, the small bubbles under the inner edge of the anode were observed to move backward as a result of the escape of huge gas pockets, which means large momentum transport occurs in the bath.

  15. Waving Vegetation Facilitates Gas Transfer in Wetland Surface Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. R.; Variano, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Wind-driven movement of flexible vegetation has been an overlooked mechanism in wetland gas models. To understand the magnitude of this effect, a laboratory experiment was conducted. An array of plastic tubes, representing vegetation, was mechanically forced at a range of frequencies and amplitudes matching those observed in the field. Starting from deoxygenated water, we measured dissolved oxygen at mid-depth in the water column using a YSI ProODO as the water re-equilibrated with the atmosphere. From this DO timeseries, we calculated the gas transfer velocity, k, using the thin film gas transport model. This measurement of k was independent of the water-wall interactions, which can be significant in laboratory-scale tanks. Our experiments have shown that the movement of vegetation stirs the water column and thus contributes to the transfer of dissolved gases across the air-water interface. Increased transfer was observed with movements of higher frequency and amplitude. To estimate the occurrence of this phenomena in natural systems, data (e.g. velocity profiles) from a long-term monitoring project in the Florida Everglades will be analyzed. The results can help improve current gas budgets and predict biogeochemical processes.

  16. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  17. Heat Transfer in Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    The turbine gas path is a very complex flow field. This is due to a variety of flow and heat transfer phenomena encountered in turbine passages. This manuscript provides an overview of the current work in this field at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Also, based on the author's preference, more emphasis is on the computational work. There is much more experimental work in progress at GRC than that reported here. While much has been achieved, more needs to be done in terms of validating the predictions against experimental data. More experimental data, especially on film cooled and rough turbine blades, are required for code validation. Also, the combined film cooling and internal cooling flow computation for a real blade is yet to be performed. While most computational work to date has assumed steady state conditions, the flow is clearly unsteady due to the presence of wakes. All this points to a long road ahead. However, we are well on course.

  18. Controls on gas transfer velocities in a large river

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emission of biogenic gases from large rivers can be an important component of regional greenhouse gas budgets. However, emission rate estimates are often poorly constrained due to uncertainties in the air-water gas exchange rate. We used the floating chamber method to estim...

  19. The influence of bubble plumes on air-seawater gas transfer velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, W. E.; Karle, L. M.; Higgins, B. J.; Farley, P. J.; Monahan, E. C.; Leifer, I. S.

    1996-05-01

    Laboratory results have demonstrated that bubble plumes are a very efficient air-water gas transfer mechanism. Because breaking waves generate bubble plumes, it could be possible to correlate the air-sea gas transport velocity kL with whitecap coverage. This correlation would then allow kL to be predicted from measurements of apparent microwave brightness temperature through the increase in sea surface microwave emissivity associated with breaking waves. In order to develop this remote-sensing-based method for predicting air-sea gas fluxes, a whitecap simulation tank was used to measure evasive and invasive kL values for air-seawater transfer of carbon dioxide, oxygen, helium, sulfur hexafluoride, and dimethyl sulfide at cleaned and surfactant-influenced water surfaces. An empirical model has been developed that can predict kL from bubble plume coverage, diffusivity, and solubility. The observed dependence of kL on molecular diffusivity and aqueous-phase solubility agrees with the predictions of modeling studies of bubble-driven air-water gas transfer. It has also been shown that soluble surfactants can decrease kL even in the presence of breaking waves.

  20. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L. A.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) University of Colorado light-emitting diode cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas-phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive dicarbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and < 1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples.

  1. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  2. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and light-emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive di-carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and <1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples. The potential impact of such chemistry on the atmosphere of the marine boundary layer is discussed.

  3. Measurement of Gas and Liquid Velocities in an Air-Water Two-Phase Flow using Cross-Correlation of Signals from a Double Senor Hot-Film Probe

    SciTech Connect

    B. Gurau; P. Vassalo; K. Keller

    2002-02-19

    Local gas and liquid velocities are measured by cross-correlating signals from a double sensor hot-film anemometer probe in pure water flow and air water two-phase flow. The gas phase velocity measured in two-phase flow agrees with velocity data obtained using high-speed video to within +/-5%. A turbulent structure, present in the liquid phase, allows a correlation to be taken, which is consistent with the expected velocity profiles in pure liquid flow. This turbulent structure is also present in the liquid phase of a two-phase flow system. Therefore, a similar technique can be applied to measure the local liquid velocity in a two-phase system, when conditions permit.

  4. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  5. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  6. Gas Blowing: Mass Transfer in Gas and Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortland, Øyvind Sunde; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Metallurgical routes for solar grade silicon production are being developed as alternatives to chemical processes for their potential to achieve cost reductions, increased production volume, and reduced environmental and safety concerns. An important challenge in the development of metallurgical routes relates to the higher impurity concentrations in the silicon product, particularly for boron and other elements that are not efficiently segregated in solidification techniques. The reactive gas refining process is studied for its potential to remove boron below the solar grade silicon target concentration in a single step by blowing steam and hydrogen gas jets onto the melt surface. Boron in a silicon melt is extracted to HBO gas in parallel to active oxidation of silicon. The literature is not unified regarding the rate determining step in this process. Relevant theories and equations for gas blowing in induction furnaces are combined and used to explain mass transfer in experiments. Mass transfer in the melt and gas is investigated by comparing resistance and induction heating of the melt, and varying gas flow rate, crucible diameter, diameter of the gas lance, and the position of the gas lance above the melt surface. The rate of boron removal is found to increase with increasing gas flow rate and crucible diameter. A relatively high fraction of the reactive gas is utilized in the process, and supply of steam in the bulk gas is the only identified rate determining step.

  7. New Mechanistic Pathways for Criegee-Water Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kumar, Manoj; Zhong, Jie; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Understanding Criegee chemistry has become one of central topics in atmospheric research recently. The reaction of Criegee intermediates with gas-phase water clusters has been widely viewed as a key Criegee reaction in the troposphere. However, the effect of aerosols or clouds on Criegee chemistry has received little attention. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, and water clusters in the gas phase, as well as at the air/water surface using ab initio quantum chemical calculations and adaptive buffered force quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that the typical time scale for the reaction of CH2OO with water at the air/water interface is on the order of a few picoseconds, 2-3 orders of magnitude shorter than that in the gas phase. Importantly, the adbf-QM/MM dynamics simulations suggest several reaction pathways for the CH2OO + water reaction at the air/water interface, including the loop-structure-mediated mechanism and the stepwise mechanism. Contrary to the conventional gas-phase CH2OO reaction, the loop-structure is not a prerequisite for the stepwise mechanism. For the latter, a water molecule and the CH2OO at the air/water interface, upon their interaction, can result in the formation of (H3O)(+) and (OH)CH2(OO)(-). Thereafter, a hydrogen bond can be formed between (H3O)(+) and the terminal oxygen atom of (OH)CH2(OO)(-), leading to direct proton transfer and the formation of α-hydroxy methylperoxide, HOCH2OOH. The mechanistic insights obtained from this simulation study should motivate future experimental studies of the effect of water clouds on Criegee chemistry. PMID:27509207

  8. An automated gas exchange tank for determining gas transfer velocities in natural seawater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Zapp, K.; Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    In order to advance understanding of the role of seawater surfactants in the air-sea exchange of climatically active trace gases via suppression of the gas transfer velocity (kw), we constructed a fully automated, closed air-water gas exchange tank and coupled analytical system. The system allows water-side turbulence in the tank to be precisely controlled with an electronically operated baffle. Two coupled gas chromatographs and an integral equilibrator, connected to the tank in a continuous gas-tight system, allow temporal changes in the partial pressures of SF6, CH4 and N2O to be measured simultaneously in the tank water and headspace at multiple turbulence settings, during a typical experimental run of 3.25 h. PC software developed by the authors controls all operations and data acquisition, enabling the optimisation of experimental conditions with high reproducibility. The use of three gases allows three independent estimates of kw for each turbulence setting; these values are subsequently normalised to a constant Schmidt number for direct comparison. The normalised kw estimates show close agreement. Repeated experiments with Milli-Q water demonstrate a typical measurement accuracy of 4% for kw. Experiments with natural seawater show that the system clearly resolves the effects on kw of spatial and temporal trends in natural surfactant activity. The system is an effective tool with which to probe the relationships between kw, surfactant activity and biogeochemical indices of primary productivity, and should assist in providing valuable new insights into the air-sea gas exchange process.

  9. An automated gas exchange tank for determining gas transfer velocities in natural seawater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Zapp, K.; Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.

    2014-02-01

    In order to advance understanding of the role of seawater surfactants in the air-sea exchange of climatically active trace gases via suppression of the gas transfer velocity (kw), we constructed a fully automated, closed air-water gas exchange tank and coupled analytical system. The system allows water-side turbulence in the tank to be precisely controlled with an electronically operated baffle. Two coupled gas chromatographs and an integral equilibrator, connected to the tank in a continuous gas-tight system, allow temporal changes in the partial pressures of SF6, CH4 and N2O to be measured simultaneously in the tank water and headspace at multiple turbulence settings, during a typical experimental run of 3.25 h. PC software developed by the authors controls all operations and data acquisition, enabling the optimisation of experimental conditions with high reproducibility. The use of three gases allows three independent estimates of kw for each turbulence setting; these values are subsequently normalised to a constant Schmidt number for direct comparison. The normalised kw estimates show close agreement. Repeated experiments with MilliQ water demonstrate a typical measurement accuracy of 4% for kw. Experiments with natural seawater show that the system clearly resolves the effects on kw of spatial and temporal trends in natural surfactant activity. The system is an effective tool with which to probe the relationships between kw, surfactant activity and biogeochemical indices of primary productivity, and should assist in providing valuable new insights into the air-sea gas exchange process.

  10. The influence of polymeric membrane gas spargers on hydrodynamics and mass transfer in bubble column bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Tirunehe, Gossaye; Norddahl, B

    2016-04-01

    Gas sparging performances of a flat sheet and tubular polymeric membranes were investigated in 3.1 m bubble column bioreactor operated in a semi batch mode. Air-water and air-CMC (Carboxymethyl cellulose) solutions of 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 % w/w were used as interacting gas-liquid mediums. CMC solutions were employed in the study to simulate rheological properties of bioreactor broth. Gas holdup, bubble size distribution, interfacial area and gas-liquid mass transfer were studied in the homogeneous bubbly flow hydrodynamic regime with superficial gas velocity (U G) range of 0.0004-0.0025 m/s. The study indicated that the tubular membrane sparger produced the highest gas holdup and densely populated fine bubbles with narrow size distribution. An increase in liquid viscosity promoted a shift in bubble size distribution to large stable bubbles and smaller specific interfacial area. The tubular membrane sparger achieved greater interfacial area and an enhanced overall mass transfer coefficient (K La) by a factor of 1.2-1.9 compared to the flat sheet membrane. PMID:26857370

  11. Propagation of density disturbances in air-water flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassos, G. P.

    1969-01-01

    Study investigated the behavior of density waves propagating vertically in an atmospheric pressure air-water system using a technique based on the correlation between density change and electric resistivity. This information is of interest to industries working with heat transfer systems and fluid power and control systems.

  12. Gas Transfer in Cellularized Collagen-Membrane Gas Exchange Devices

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Justin H.; Bassett, Erik K.; Penson, Elliot J. N.; Hoganson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lower respiratory disease is highly prevalent in the United States, and there remains a need for alternatives to lung transplant for patients who progress to end-stage lung disease. Portable or implantable gas oxygenators based on microfluidic technologies can address this need, provided they operate both efficiently and biocompatibly. Incorporating biomimetic materials into such devices can help replicate native gas exchange function and additionally support cellular components. In this work, we have developed microfluidic devices that enable blood gas exchange across ultra-thin collagen membranes (as thin as 2 μm). Endothelial, stromal, and parenchymal cells readily adhere to these membranes, and long-term culture with cellular components results in remodeling, reflected by reduced membrane thickness. Functionally, acellular collagen-membrane lung devices can mediate effective gas exchange up to ∼288 mL/min/m2 of oxygen and ∼685 mL/min/m2 of carbon dioxide, approaching the gas exchange efficiency noted in the native lung. Testing several configurations of lung devices to explore various physical parameters of the device design, we concluded that thinner membranes and longer gas exchange distances result in improved hemoglobin saturation and increases in pO2. However, in the design space tested, these effects are relatively small compared to the improvement in overall oxygen and carbon dioxide transfer by increasing the blood flow rate. Finally, devices cultured with endothelial and parenchymal cells achieved similar gas exchange rates compared with acellular devices. Biomimetic blood oxygenator design opens the possibility of creating portable or implantable microfluidic devices that achieve efficient gas transfer while also maintaining physiologic conditions. PMID:26020102

  13. Penning transfer in argon-based gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Ö.; Tapan, İ.; Özmutlu, E. N.; Veenhof, R.

    2010-05-01

    Penning transfers, a group of processes by which excitation energy is used to ionise the gas, increase the gas gain in some detectors. Both the probability that such transfers occur and the mechanism by which the transfer takes place, vary with the gas composition and pressure. With a view to developing a microscopic electron transport model that takes Penning transfers into account, we use this dependence to identify the transfer mechanisms at play. We do this for a number of argon-based gas mixtures, using gain curves from the literature.

  14. An evaluation of gas transfer velocity parameterizations during natural convection using DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, Sam T.; Arneborg, Lars; Nilsson, Hâkan; Zhang, Qi; Handler, Robert A.

    2016-02-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of free surface flows driven by natural convection are used to evaluate different methods of estimating air-water gas exchange at no-wind conditions. These methods estimate the transfer velocity as a function of either the horizontal flow divergence at the surface, the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation beneath the surface, the heat flux through the surface, or the wind speed above the surface. The gas transfer is modeled via a passive scalar. The Schmidt number dependence is studied for Schmidt numbers of 7, 150 and 600. The methods using divergence, dissipation and heat flux estimate the transfer velocity well for a range of varying surface heat flux values, and domain depths. The two evaluated empirical methods using wind (in the limit of no wind) give reasonable estimates of the transfer velocity, depending however on the surface heat flux and surfactant saturation. The transfer velocity is shown to be well represented by the expression, ks=A |Bν|1/4 Sc-n, where A is a constant, B is the buoyancy flux, ν is the kinematic viscosity, Sc is the Schmidt number, and the exponent n depends on the water surface characteristics. The results suggest that A=0.39 and n≈1/2 and n≈2/3 for slip and no-slip boundary conditions at the surface, respectively. It is further shown that slip and no-slip boundary conditions predict the heat transfer velocity corresponding to the limits of clean and highly surfactant contaminated surfaces, respectively. This article was corrected on 22 MAR 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  15. Transferring pharmaceuticals into the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Wolfgang; Krause, Tim; Rademann, Klaus

    2008-11-01

    The dissolution of molecules of biological interest in supercritical carbon dioxide is investigated using pulsed molecular beam mass spectrometry. Due to the mild processing temperatures of most supercritical fluids, their adiabatic expansion into vacuum permits to transfer even thermally very sensitive substances into the gas phase, which is particularly attractive for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In addition, supercritical CO2constitutes a chemically inert solvent that is compatible with hydrocarbon-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Here, we report on the dissolution and pulsed supersonic jet expansion of caffeine (C8H10N4O2), the provitamin menadione (C11H8O2), and the amino acid derivative l-phenylalanine tert-butyl ester hydrochloride (C6H5CH2CH(NH2)COOC(CH3)3[dot operator]HCl), into vacuum. An on-axis residual gas analyzer is used to monitor the relative amounts of solute and solvent in the molecular beam as a function of solvent densityE The excellent selectivity and sensitivity provided by mass spectrometry permits to probe even trace amounts of solutes. The strong density variation of CO2 close to the critical point results in a pronounced pressure dependence of the relative ion currents of solute and solvent molecules, reflecting a substantial change in solubility.

  16. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air/water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Subroutine WETAIR calculates properties at nearly 1,500 K and 4,500 atmospheres. Necessary inputs are assigned values of combinations of density, pressure, temperature, and entropy. Interpolation of property tables obtains dry air and water (steam) properties, and simple mixing laws calculate properties of air/water mixture. WETAIR is used to test gas turbine engines and components operating in relatively humid air. Program is written in SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  17. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  18. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  19. The Gas Transfer through Polar Sea ice experiment: Insights into the rates and pathways that determine geochemical fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovely, A.; Loose, B.; Schlosser, P.; McGillis, W.; Zappa, C.; Perovich, D.; Brown, S.; Morell, T.; Hsueh, D.; Friedrich, R.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice is a defining feature of the polar marine environment. It is a critical domain for marine biota and it regulates ocean-atmosphere exchange, including the exchange of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. In this study, we determined the rates and pathways that govern gas transport through a mixed sea ice cover. N2O, SF6, 3He, 4He, and Ne were used as gas tracers of the exchange processes that take place at the ice-water and air-water interfaces in a laboratory sea ice experiment. Observation of the changes in gas concentrations during freezing revealed that He is indeed more soluble in ice than in water; Ne is less soluble in ice, and the larger gases (N2O and SF6) are mostly excluded during the freezing process. Model estimates of gas diffusion through ice were calibrated using measurements of bulk gas content in ice cores, yielding gas transfer velocity through ice (kice) of ˜5 × 10-4 m d-1. In comparison, the effective air-sea gas transfer velocities (keff) ranged up to 0.33 m d-1 providing further evidence that very little mixed-layer ventilation takes place via gas diffusion through columnar sea ice. However, this ventilation is distinct from air-ice gas fluxes driven by sea ice biogeochemistry. The magnitude of keff showed a clear increasing trend with wind speed and current velocity beneath the ice, as well as the combination of the two. This result indicates that gas transfer cannot be uniquely predicted by wind speed alone in the presence of sea ice.

  20. Micrometeorological Measurement of Fetch- and Atmospheric Stability-Dependent Air- Water Exchange of Legacy Semivolatile Organic Contaminants in Lake Superior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlinger, J. A.; Tobias, D. E.; Rowe, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    Coastal waters including the Laurentian Great Lakes are particularly susceptible to local, regional, and long- range transport and deposition of semivolatile organic contaminants (SOCs) as gases and/or associated with particles. Recently-marketed SOCs can be expected to undergo net deposition in surface waters, whereas legacy SOCs such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are likely to be at equilibrium with respect to air-water exchange, or, if atmospheric concentrations decrease through, e.g., policy implementation, to undergo net gas emission. SOC air-water exchange flux is usually estimated using the two-film model. This model describes molecular diffusion through the air and water films adjacent to the air-water interface. Air-water exchange flux is estimated as the product of SOC fugacity, typically based on on-shore gaseous concentration measurements, and a transfer coefficient, the latter which is estimated from SOC properties and environmental conditions. The transfer coefficient formulation commonly applied neglects resistance to exchange in the internal boundary layer under atmospherically stable conditions, and the use of on-shore gaseous concentration neglects fetch-dependent equilibration, both of which will tend to cause overestimation of flux magnitude. Thus, for legacy chemicals or in any highly contaminated surface water, the rate at which the water is cleansed through gas emission tends to be over-predicted using this approach. Micrometeorological measurement of air-water exchange rates of legacy SOCs was carried out on ships during four transect experiments during off-shore flow in Lake Superior using novel multicapillary collection devices and thermal extraction technology to measure parts-per-quadrillion SOC levels. Employing sensible heat in the modified Bowen ratio, fluxes at three over-water stations along the transects were measured, along with up-wind, onshore gaseous concentration and aqueous concentration. The atmosphere was unstable for

  1. Gas/gas and gas/wall average energy transfer from very low-pressure pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Robert G.; King, Keith D.

    1980-07-01

    It is shown that data obtained using very low-pressure pyrolysis (VLPP) on the pressure and temperature dependence of unimolecular rate coefficients of reactants with several reaction channels yield average energies transferred in gas/gas and gas/wall collisions (the wall being seasoned quartz at 800-1200 K). The downward average energy transferred, «Δ Eå, for chlorocyclobutane/ethylene collisions is found to be 1600 cm -1 at 970 K; «Δ Eå for chlorocyclobutane/wall collisions varies from 5000 cm -1 (wall efficiency β w = 0.8) at 930 K to 3500 cm -1 (β w = 0.4) at 1150 K; similar values are found from published data on cycloheptatriene and cyclopropane- d2. This indicates that the assumption of unit wall efficiency usually used in fitting VLPP experiments to RRKM theory needs revision.

  2. 71. DETAIL OF NITROGEN GAS STORAGE TANKS AND TRANSFER TUBING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. DETAIL OF NITROGEN GAS STORAGE TANKS AND TRANSFER TUBING ON SLC-3W LIQUID OXYGEN APRON - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Correlations of whitecap coverage and gas transfer velocity with microwave brightness temperature for plunging and spilling breaking waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qin; Monahan, E.C.; Asher, W.E.

    1995-07-01

    Bubbles and bubble plumes generated by wind-induced breaking waves significantly enhance the gas exchange across the interface between the ocean and atmosphere under high-wind conditions. Whitcaps, or active spilling wave crests, are the sea-surface manifestation of the bubbles and bubble plumes in the subsurface mixed layer, and the fractional area of the sea surface covered by which has been proposed to correlate linearly with the air-sea gas transfer velocity. The presence of whitecaps substantially increases the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface. It could be possible to estimate the whitecap coverage from the sea-surface microwave brightness temperature would also be very helpful in developing a remote-sensing model for predicting air-sea gas transfer velocities from microwave brightness temperatures. As a part of an air-water gas exchange experiment conducted in an outdoor surf pool, measurements were made that were designed to investigate the correlation between whitecap coverage and microwave brightness temperature. A mechanical wave maker was located at the deep end of the pool and the generated waves propagate and break towards the shallow end of the pool. Two wave patterns characteristic of plunging and spilling breaking waves at four wave heights from 0.3 m to 1.2 m were produced.

  4. Membrane-based gas transfer: an environmental engineering laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kilduff, J; Liu, J X; Komisar, S J

    2004-01-01

    We propose an educational experience in which students design a membrane gas transfer reactor, construct a bench-scale version in the laboratory, and employ the reactor to measure mass transfer coefficients. The membrane reactor is useful for teaching mass transfer principles because the mass transfer interface is well defined and easily observed. The system can be modeled successfully using straightforward mathematics. The reactor can be designed and constructed by students, using the mathematical model as a basis, providing insight into the physical meaning of model parameters. The proposed membrane system can be readily operated to obtain data that can be employed to develop or modify existing mass transfer correlations. This can provide students with significant insight into the development of mass transfer correlations and how the constants in such correlations are typically determined. These features help promote a deeper understanding of mass transfer principles. PMID:15193094

  5. Gas transfer under high wind and its dependence on wave breaking and sea state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, Sophia; Zappa, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Blomquist, Byron; Brooks, Ian; Yang, Mingxi

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying greenhouse gas fluxes on regional and global scales relies on parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity K. To first order, K is dictated by wind speed (U) and is typically parameterized as a non-linear functions of U. There is however a large spread in K predicted by the traditional parameterizations at high wind speed. This is because a large variety of environmental forcing and processes (Wind, Currents, Rain, Waves, Breaking, Surfactants, Fetch) actually influence K and wind speed alone cannot capture the variability of air-water gas exchange. At high wind speed especially, breaking waves become a key factor to take into account when estimating gas fluxes. The High Wind Gas exchange Study (HiWinGS) presents the unique opportunity to gain new insights on this poorly understood aspects of air-sea interaction under high winds. The HiWinGS cruise took place in the North Atlantic during October and November 2013. Wind speeds exceeded 15 m s‑1 25% of the time, including 48 hrs with U10 > 20 m s‑1. Continuous measurements of turbulent fluxes of heat, momentum, and gas (CO2, DMS, acetone and methanol) were taken from the bow of the R/V Knorr. The wave field was sampled by a wave rider buoy and breaking events were tracked in visible imagery was acquired from the port and starboard side of the flying bridge during daylight hours at 20Hz. Taking advantage of the range of physical forcing and wave conditions sampled during HiWinGS, we test existing parameterizations and explore ways of better constraining K based on whitecap coverage, sea state and breaking statistics contrasting pure windseas to swell dominated periods. We distinguish between windseas and swell based on a separation algorithm applied to directional wave spectra for mixed seas, system alignment is considered when interpreting results. The four gases sampled during HiWinGS ranged from being mostly waterside controlled to almost entirely airside controlled. While bubble-mediated transfer

  6. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  7. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Waste Transfer Systems

    SciTech Connect

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-06-28

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems (i.e., waste transfer piping and waste transfer-associated structures) made at control decision meetings on November 30, 1999a and April 19, 2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996). Following the Contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval. The control decision meeting on November 30, 1999 to address flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems followed the control decision process and the criteria for control decisions described in Section 3.3.1.5 of the FSAR. The control decision meeting agenda, attendance list, and introductory and background presentations are included in Attachments 1 through 4. The control decision discussions on existing and other possible controls for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems and the basis for selecting or not selecting specific controls are summarized in this report.

  8. Air-sea transfer of gas phase controlled compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Bell, T. G.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Brooks, I. M.; Nightingale, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Gases in the atmosphere/ocean have solubility that spans several orders of magnitude. Resistance in the molecular sublayer on the waterside limits the air-sea exchange of sparingly soluble gases such as SF6 and CO2. In contrast, both aerodynamic and molecular diffusive resistances on the airside limit the exchange of highly soluble gases (as well as heat). Here we present direct measurements of air-sea methanol and acetone transfer from two open cruises: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The transfer of the highly soluble methanol is essentially completely airside controlled, while the less soluble acetone is subject to both airside and waterside resistances. Both compounds were measured concurrently using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, with their fluxes quantified by the eddy covariance method. Up to a wind speed of 15 m s-1, observed air-sea transfer velocities of these two gases are largely consistent with the expected near linear wind speed dependence. Measured acetone transfer velocity is ∼30% lower than that of methanol, which is primarily due to the lower solubility of acetone. From this difference we estimate the “zero bubble” waterside transfer velocity, which agrees fairly well with interfacial gas transfer velocities predicted by the COARE model. At wind speeds above 15 m s-1, the transfer velocities of both compounds are lower than expected in the mean. Air-sea transfer of sensible heat (also airside controlled) also appears to be reduced at wind speeds over 20 m s-1. During these conditions, large waves and abundant whitecaps generate large amounts of sea spray, which is predicted to alter heat transfer and could also affect the air-sea exchange of soluble trace gases. We make an order of magnitude estimate for the impacts of sea spray on air-sea methanol transfer.

  9. Energy transfer in silver-doped rare gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Kolb, D. M.

    1989-08-01

    The energy transfer between Ag atoms and dimers isolated in rare gas matrices has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. In the presence of dimers, excitation of the atomic 5s→5p transitions produces not only the emission bands of the Ag atom, but also those of the Ag dimer. This process has been investigated and the mechanism identified as a Förster-Dexter-type energy transfer from silver atoms (donor) to dimers (acceptor). Rise and decay curves of the emissions from atoms and dimers have been analyzed in a concentration dependence study and a critical radius for the energy transfer of 39±5 Å was derived.

  10. Multivariable synthesis with transfer functions. [applications to gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peczkowski, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A transfer function design theory for multivariable control synthesis is highlighted. The use of unique transfer function matrices and two simple, basic relationships - a synthesis equation and a design equation - are presented and illustrated. This multivariable transfer function approach provides the designer with a capability to specify directly desired dynamic relationships between command variables and controlled or response variables. At the same time, insight and influence over response, simplifications, and internal stability is afforded by the method. A general, comprehensive multivariable synthesis capability is indicated including nonminmum phase and unstable plants. Gas turbine engine examples are used to illustrate the ideas and method.

  11. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G. A.; Schwarz, C. E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments were performed with nonreactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies were performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model.

  12. Energy transfer at gas-liquid interface: Towards energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Tamas

    Physicochemical surface processes have great importance in the different fields of everyday life and science. Computational characterization of collisional energy transfer at a gas-liquid interface is a helpful tool to interpret recent experimental studies and to yield insight into the energy feedback mechanism of multiphase combustion problems. As a first step, a simple Lennard-Jones system was used to investigate the dependence of the collisional energy transfer and the gas atom trapping probabilities on the temperature of the bulk liquid, on the gas/liquid particle mass ratios, on the incident angle of the impinging projectile, and on the gas-liquid interaction strength. We find in accord with the experimental results that the kinematic effects dominate the energy transfer dynamics, but the importance of the role of surface roughening as the temperature of the liquid increases is also seen. The second system, nitromethane was chosen to extend the range of simulations. It is a molecular model system, representing nitramine-type energetic materials. Having had a good potential description for the nitromethane molecule including all internal degrees of freedom, we generated simplified molecular systems based on the original nitromethane model to isolate particular features of the dynamics. We have investigated the effect of the initial incident energy, of the inclusion of the internal degrees of freedom, of the initial incident kinetic energy and of the gas-surface interaction strength. The incorporation of internal degrees of freedom enhanced the collisional energy transfer. These calculations also point to the importance of simple kinematics as it predicts the increase of the ratio of energy transferred with increased initial incident energy of the gas particle.

  13. Stagnation Point Heat Transfer with Gas Injection Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancrayenest, B.; Tran, M. D.; Fletcher, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper deals with an experimental study of the stagnation-point heat transfer to a cooled copper surface with gas injection under subsonic conditions. Test were made with a probe that combined a steady-state water-cooled calorimeter that allows the capability to study convective blockage and to perform heat transfer measurements in presence of gas injection in the stagnation region. The copper probe was pierced by 52 holes, representing 2.4% of the total probe surface. The 1.2 MW high enthalpy plasma wind tunnel was operated at anode powers between 130 and 230 kW and a static pressures from 35 hPa up to 200 hPa. Air, carbon dioxide and argon were injected in the mass flow range 0-0.4 g/s in the boundary layer developed around the 50 mm diameter probe. The measured stagnation-point heat transfer rates are reported and discussed.

  14. Heat transfer and flow characteristics on a gas turbine shroud.

    PubMed

    Obata, M; Kumada, M; Ijichi, N

    2001-05-01

    The work described in this paper is an experimental investigation of the heat transfer from the main flow to a turbine shroud surface, which may be applicable to ceramic gas turbines. Three kinds of turbine shrouds are considered with a flat surface, a taper surface and a spiral groove surface opposite to the blades in an axial flow turbine of actual turbo-charger. Heat transfer measurements were performed for the experimental conditions of a uniform heat flux or a uniform wall temperature. The effects of the inlet flow angle, rotational speed, and tip clearance on the heat transfer coefficient were clarified under on- and off-design flow conditions. The mean heat transfer coefficient was correlated to the blade Reynolds number and tip clearance, and compared with an experimental correlation and measurements of a flat surface. A comparison was also made for the measurement of static pressure distributions. PMID:11460639

  15. Use of influence diagrams in gas transfer system option prioritization

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, A.S.; Garcia, M.D.

    1995-08-01

    A formal decision-analysis methodology was applied to aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in deciding which of several gas transfer system (GTS) options should be selected. The decision objectives for this case study, i.e., risk and cost, were directly derived from the DOE guidelines. Influence diagrams were used to define the structure of the decision problem and clearly delineate the flow if information. A set of performance matrices wee used in conjunction with the influence diagrams to assess and evaluate the degree to which the objectives of the case study were met. These performance measures were extracted from technical models, design and operating data, and professional judgments. The results were aggregated to provide an overall evaluation of the different design options of the gas transfer system. Consequently, the results of this analysis were used as an aid to DOE to select a viable GTS option.

  16. Fundamental heat transfer research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, D. E. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven experts from industry and the universities joined 24 NASA Lewis staff members in an exchange of ideas on trends in aeropropulsion research and technology, basic analyses, computational analyses, basic experiments, near-engine environment experiments, fundamental fluid mechanics and heat transfer, and hot technology as related to gas turbine engines. The workshop proceedings described include pre-workshop input from participants, presentations of current activity by the Lewis staff, reports of the four working groups, and a workshop summary.

  17. Toward the Active Control of Heat Transfer in the Hot Gas Path of Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oertling, Jeremiah E.

    2003-01-01

    The work at NASA this summer has focused on assisting the Professor's project, namely "Toward the Active Control of Heat Transfer in the Hot Gas Path of Gas Turbines." The mode of controlling the Heat Transfer that the project focuses on is film cooling. Film cooling is used in high temperature regions of a gas turbine and extends the life of the components exposed to these extreme temperatures. A "cool" jet of air is injected along the surface of the blade and this layer of cool air shields the blade from the high temperatures. Cool is a relative term. The hot gas path temperatures reach on the order of 1500 to 2000 K. The "coo" air is on the order of 700 to 1000 K. This cooler air is bled off of an appropriate compressor stage. The next parameter of interest is the jet s position and orientation in the flow-field.

  18. 77 FR 2293 - AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy Transfer...'') with AmeriGas Propane, L.P. (``AmeriGas''), AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. (``ETP''), and Energy Transfer Partners GP, L.P. (``ETP GP''), which is designed to guard...

  19. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  20. Influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Hoff, R.M.

    2000-03-15

    The influence of eutrophication on the biogeochemical cycles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is largely unknown. In this paper, the application of a dynamic air-water-phytoplankton exchange model to Lake Ontario is used as a framework to study the influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of POPs. The results of these simulations demonstrate that air-water exchange controls phytoplankton concentrations in remote aquatic environments with little influence from land-based sources of pollutants and supports levels in even historically contaminated systems. Furthermore, eutrophication or high biomass leads to a disequilibrium between the gas and dissolved phase, enhanced air-water exchange, and vertical sinking fluxes of PCBs. Increasing biomass also depletes the water concentrations leading to lower than equilibrium PCB concentrations in phytoplankton. Implications to future trends in PCB pollution in Lake Ontario are also discussed.

  1. Gas transfer velocities of methane and carbon dioxide in a subtropical shallow pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin

    2015-04-01

    Two diel field campaigns under different weather patterns were carried out in the summer and autumn of 2013 to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes and to probe the rates of gas exchange across the air-water interface in a subtropical eutrophic pond in China. Bubble emissions of CH4 accounted for 99.7% and 91.67% of the total CH4 emission measured at two sites in the summer; however, no bubble was observed in the autumn. The pond was supersaturated with CO2 and CH4 during the monitoring period, and the saturation ratios (i.e., observed concentration / equilibrium concentration) of CH4 were much higher than that of CO2. Although the concentration of dissolved CO2 in the surface water collected in the autumn was 1.24 times of that in the summer, the mean diffusive CO2 flux across the water-air interface measured in the summer is almost twice compared with that in the autumn. The mean concentration of dissolved CH4 in the surface water in the autumn was around half of that in the summer, but the mean diffusive CH4 flux in the summer is 4-5 times of that in the autumn. Our data showed that the variation in gas exchange rate was dominated by differences in weather patterns and primary production. Averaged k600-CO2 and k600-CH4 (the gas transfer velocity normalized to a Schmidt number of 600) were 0.65 and 0.55 cm/h in the autumn, and 2.83 and 1.64 cm/h in the summer respectively. No statistically significant correlation was found between k600 and U10 (wind speed at 10 m height) in the summer at low wind speeds in clear weather. Diffusive gas fluxes increased during the nights, which resulted from the nighttime cooling effect of water surface and stronger turbulent mixing in the water column. The chemical enhancements for CO2 was estimated up to 1.94-fold in the hot and clear summer with low wind speeds, which might have been resulted from the increasing hydration reactions in water due to the high water temperature and active metabolism in planktonic algae. However, both the air

  2. A modular radiative transfer program for gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of a computer program, simulated monochromatic atmospheric radiative transfer (SMART), which calculates atmospheric path transmission, solar radiation, and thermal radiation in the 4.6 micrometer spectral region, are described. A brief outline of atmospheric absorption properties and line by line transmission calculations is explained in conjunction with an outline of the SMART computational procedures. Program flexibility is demonstrated by simulating the response of a gas filter correlation radiometer as one example of an atmospheric infrared sensor. Program limitations, input data requirements, program listing, and comparison of SMART transmission calculations are presented.

  3. Pulmonary gas transfer 20 years after pneumonectomy for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, F; Kraan, J K; Orie, N G; Peset, R

    1977-01-01

    The changes in pulmonary function after pneumonectomy in 13 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis have been studied. The data at the time of two follow-up studies are compared with those obtained before the pneumonectomy. The first follow-up was carried out between 5 and 30 months postoperatively and the second between 20 and 24 years later. The results of this second follow-up show a relatively normal arterial oxygen saturation and gas transfer factor but an increased residual volume which cannot be explained by increasing age alone. PMID:841538

  4. Standardisation of gas mixtures for estimating carbon monoxide transfer factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, A. H.; Laszlo, G.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The American Thoracic Society recommends that the inspired concentration used for the estimation of carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO) mixture should be 0.25-0.35% carbon monoxide, 10-14% helium, 17-21% oxygen, balance nitrogen. Inspired oxygen influences alveolar oxygen and hence carbon monoxide uptake, such that transfer factor increases by 0.35% per mm Hg decrease in alveolar oxygen. To aid in the standardisation of TLCO either a known inspired oxygen concentration should be used, or TLCO should be corrected to a standard inspired oxygen concentration. The range of gas mixtures used in practice and the implications for cost and accuracy have been investigated. METHODS--A questionnaire was sent to 185 respiratory units in the UK requesting information on (1) the method used to estimate TLCO, (2) the manufacturer of the equipment, (3) the mixture used, (4) whether "medical quality" gas was ordered, and (5) the level of satisfaction with supplier service. RESULTS--Replies were received from 106 units. Most used the single breath breath holding method for which 17 different test mixtures were ordered. One unit also used the single breath exhalation method. Inspired oxygen ranged from 17.94% to 25%, giving a wide variation in alveolar oxygen and hence TLCO. Forty seven units ordered a specific inspired oxygen, the rest ordering "air" as balance. The cost per litre of gas varied greatly, with the mixture 14% helium, 0.28% carbon monoxide, balance air (17.9% oxygen) and 10% helium, 0.28% carbon monoxide, balance air (18.8% oxygen) being cheapest to produce. Ordering a specific inspired oxygen concentration increased the cost. Large cylinders of gas were cheaper for the same mixture. The mixture for the exhalation method was the most expensive. Sixty seven units ordered "medical quality" gas and six assumed this was supplied. Twenty nine (27%) were dissatisfied with their supplier due to (1) poor service, (2) long delivery times, (3) costs, or (4

  5. Mass transfer at gas-evolving surfaces in electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, D.W.; Tobias, C.W.

    1983-09-01

    A novel micro-mosaic electrode was developed to resolve time-dependent, mass-transfer distribution in the close vicinity of bubble phenomena. The electrode, prepared on a silicon wafer using integrated circuit manufacturing technology, consists of a 10 by 10 matrix of coplanar, electrically isolated, square platinum segments on 100 micron centers, surrounded by a relatively large buffer segment. A computer-actuated data acquisition and control system was assembled and the software developed to monitor the current to each of the segments and control the potential of selected segments. The utility of the electrode to examine interfacial mass transport phenomena which have characteristic lengths as small as 100 microns has been clearly demonstrated. The effect of a single hydrogen bubble disengagement and of the coalescence of two bubbles, on the limiting current of the reduction of ferric to ferrous ion was measured using the micro-mosaic electrode in a horizontal: facing-up orientation. In the absence of gas evolution, large regular fluctuations in the limiting current to the segments with a period of 29 sec were observed. This periodic behavior is attributed to free convection: a cellular fluid motion moving across the electrode with a velocity of 40 microns/second. It was found that the mass-transfer enhancement due to bubble disengagement is small when compared to that due to coalescence. Increases in the mass-transfer rate of more than an order of magnitude over the free convection limiting current were observed for the coalescence phenomena. Two theoretical models were developed to account for the observed effect of a bubble disengagement on the mass transfer-rate to the surface.

  6. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  7. A Lagrangian Model to Predict the Modification of Near-Surface Scalar Mixing Ratios and Air-Water Exchange Fluxes in Offshore Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Mark D.; Perlinger, Judith A.; Fairall, Christopher W.

    2011-07-01

    A model was developed to predict the modification with fetch in offshore flow of mixing ratio, air-water exchange flux, and near-surface vertical gradients in mixing ratio of a scalar due to air-water exchange. The model was developed for planning and interpretation of air-water exchange flux measurements in the coastal zone. The Lagrangian model applies a mass balance over the internal boundary layer (IBL) using the integral depth scale approach, previously applied to development of the nocturnal boundary layer overland. Surface fluxes and vertical profiles in the surface layer were calculated using the NOAA COARE bulk algorithm and gas transfer model (e.g., Blomquist et al. 2006, Geophys Res Lett 33:1-4). IBL height was assumed proportional to the square root of fetch, and estimates of the IBL growth rate coefficient, α, were obtained by three methods: (1) calibration of the model to a large dataset of air temperature and humidity modification over Lake Ontario in 1973, (2) atmospheric soundings from the 2004 New England Air Quality Study and (3) solution of a simplified diffusion equation and an estimate of eddy diffusivity from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST). Reasonable agreement was obtained between the calibrated and MOST values of α for stable, neutral, and unstable conditions, and estimates of α agreed with previously published parametrizations that were valid for the stable IBL only. The parametrization of α provides estimates of IBL height, and the model estimates modification of scalar mixing ratio, fluxes, and near-surface gradients, under conditions of coastal offshore flow (0-50 km) over a wide range in stability.

  8. Two Heat-Transfer Improvements for Gas Liquefiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.

    2005-01-01

    Two improvements in heat-transfer design have been investigated with a view toward increasing the efficiency of refrigerators used to liquefy gases. The improvements could contribute to the development of relatively inexpensive, portable oxygen liquefiers for medical use. A description of the heat-transfer problem in a pulse-tube refrigerator is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the first improvement. In a pulse-tube refrigerator in particular, one of in-line configuration heat must be rejected from two locations: an aftercooler (where most of the heat is rejected) and a warm heat exchanger (where a small fraction of the total input power must be rejected as heat). Rejection of heat from the warm heat exchanger can be problematic because this heat exchanger is usually inside a vacuum vessel. When an acoustic-inertance tube is used to provide a phase shift needed in the pulse-tube cooling cycle, another problem arises: Inasmuch as the acoustic power in the acoustic-inertance tube is dissipated over the entire length of the tube, the gas in the tube must be warmer than the warm heat exchanger in order to reject heat at the warm heat exchanger. This is disadvantageous because the increase in viscosity with temperature causes an undesired increase in dissipation of acoustic energy and an undesired decrease in the achievable phase shift. Consequently, the overall performance of the pulse-tube refrigerator decreases with increasing temperature in the acoustic-inertance tube. In the first improvement, the acoustic-inertance tube is made to serve as the warm heat exchanger and to operate in an approximately isothermal condition at a lower temperature, thereby increasing the achievable phase shift and the overall performance of the refrigerator. This is accomplished by placing the acoustic-inertance tube inside another tube and pumping a cooling fluid (e.g., water) in the annular space between the tubes. Another benefit of this improvement is added flexibility of

  9. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  10. 77 FR 10373 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Electronics Manufacturing: Revisions to Heat Transfer Fluid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ...The EPA is finalizing technical revisions to the electronics manufacturing source category of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule related to fluorinated heat transfer fluids. More specifically, EPA is finalizing amendments to the definition of fluorinated heat transfer fluids and to the provisions to estimate and report emissions from fluorinated heat transfer fluids. This final rule is narrow......

  11. Quenching using air-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, R.A.; Garwood, R.; Ward, J.; Xia, Q.

    1996-12-31

    With the current trend toward reduced manufacturing cycle time there is considerable interest in minimizing heat treatment related distortion and the residual stresses that are present in components. There is therefore a need to optimize the quenching process for a particular part such that the desired cooling rate, and hence mechanical properties, are obtained while minimizing distortion. This paper describes work aimed at developing a system to provide heat transfer rates between those obtained for oil quenching and fan cooling. Tests are described in which quenching was carried out by spraying water into the stream of air exiting a fan cooling system. Data are also presented for air mist quenching using atomizing nozzles. Comparison of computer predicted cooling rates and residual stress levels in components are presented for oil quenching, fan cooling, fan plus water injection cooling and air-mist cooling.

  12. Dimethylsulfide gas transfer coefficients from algal blooms in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. G.; De Bruyn, W.; Marandino, C. A.; Miller, S. D.; Law, C. S.; Smith, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2015-02-01

    Air-sea dimethylsulfide (DMS) fluxes and bulk air-sea gradients were measured over the Southern Ocean in February-March 2012 during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) study. The cruise encountered three distinct phytoplankton bloom regions, consisting of two blooms with moderate DMS levels, and a high biomass, dinoflagellate-dominated bloom with high seawater DMS levels (> 15 nM). Gas transfer coefficients were considerably scattered at wind speeds above 5 m s-1. Bin averaging the data resulted in a linear relationship between wind speed and mean gas transfer velocity consistent with that previously observed. However, the wind-speed-binned gas transfer data distribution at all wind speeds is positively skewed. The flux and seawater DMS distributions were also positively skewed, which suggests that eddy covariance-derived gas transfer velocities are consistently influenced by additional, log-normal noise. A flux footprint analysis was conducted during a transect into the prevailing wind and through elevated DMS levels in the dinoflagellate bloom. Accounting for the temporal/spatial separation between flux and seawater concentration significantly reduces the scatter in computed transfer velocity. The SOAP gas transfer velocity data show no obvious modification of the gas transfer-wind speed relationship by biological activity or waves. This study highlights the challenges associated with eddy covariance gas transfer measurements in biologically active and heterogeneous bloom environments.

  13. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements. PMID:26999022

  14. Coupling of phytoplankton uptake and air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Baker, J.E.; Ko, F.C.; Jeremiason, J.D.

    1999-10-15

    A dynamic model that couples air-water exchange and phytoplankton uptake of persistent organic pollutants has been developed and then applied to PCB data from a small experimental lake. A sensitivity analysis of the model, taking into account the influence of physical environmental conditions such as temperature, wind speed, and mixing depth as well as plankton-related parameters such as biomass and growth rate was carried out for a number of PCBs with different physical-chemical properties. The results indicate that air-water exchange dynamics are influenced not only by physical parameters but also by phytoplankton biomass and growth rate. New phytoplankton production results in substantially longer times to reach equilibrium. Phytoplankton uptake-induced depletion of the dissolved phase concentration maintains air and water phases out of equilibrium. Furthermore, PCBs in phytoplankton also take longer times to reach equilibrium with the dissolved water phase when the latter is supported by diffusive air-water exchange. However, both model analysis and model application to the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario (Canada) suggest that the gas phase supports the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs, in atmospherically driven aquatic environments.

  15. Fundamental mechanisms that influence the estimate of heat transfer to gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Estimates of the heat transfer from the gas to stationary (vanes) or rotating blades poses a major uncertainty due to the complexity of the heat transfer processes. The gas flow through these blade rows is three dimensional with complex secondary viscous flow patterns that interact with the endwalls and blade surfaces. In addition, upstream disturbances, stagnation flow, curvature effects, and flow acceleration complicate the thermal transport mechanisms in the boundary layers. Some of these fundamental heat transfer effects are discussed. The chief purpose of the discussion is to acquaint those in the heat transfer community, not directly involved in gas turbines, of the seriousness of the problem and to recommend some basic research that would improve the capability for predicting gas-side heat transfer on turbine blades and vanes.

  16. Heat transfer between a stationary granular packing and a descending flow of dusty gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dryabin, V.A.; Galershtein, D.M.

    1988-10-01

    The transfer of heat from a stationary granular bed (packing) to a gas-particle flow has been investigated experimentally. Heat transfer experiments were carried out on an apparatus with an open gas-particle flow system. Monodisperse packing comprised of smooth steel balls or round porcelain granules was used. Particles used in the gas flow consisted of grades of sand and electrical corundum. The external heat transfer coefficient was determined by local modeling of heat transfer in the steady temperature field regime. Calorimetry was used for determining this regime as well as the temperature of the air and dusty gas. A correlation was obtained for calculating the heat-transfer coefficient in the system.

  17. The air-water CO2 exchange of a coastal sea—A sensitivity study on factors that influence the absorption and outgassing of CO2 in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Erik; Omstedt, Anders; Gustafsson, Bo G.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the BALTSEM model is used to estimate how air-water CO2 fluxes in the Baltic Sea respond to parameterizations of organic alkalinity (Aorg), gas transfer, and phytoplankton growth, and further to changes in river loads. The forcing data include the most complete compilation of Baltic river loads for dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC) and total alkalinity (TA). In addition, we apply the most recent estimates of internal TA generation in the system. Our results clearly demonstrate how air-water CO2 fluxes of a coastal sea depend on river loads of carbon, TA, and nutrients as well the freshwater import itself. Long-term changes in DIC loads are shown to be compensated by corresponding changes in air-water CO2 exchange. By adding Aorg, a discrepancy in the carbonate system calculations was removed, and the simulated net CO2 absorption of the system decreased by 11%. A new parameterization for cyanobacteria growth significantly improved the seasonal development of pCO2 in the central Baltic Sea, although the net effect on CO2 fluxes was below 5%. By applying either a linear, quadratic, or cubic wind speed dependence for gas transfer, the long-term net CO2 exchange was adjusted by less than 5%. There is no clear indication that any one of these parameterizations provides a more accurate estimate of CO2 fluxes than the other two. Our findings are applicable in other coastal areas that are heavily influenced by river loads of TA, DIC, and DOC.

  18. The potential role of sea spray droplets in facilitating air-sea gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, E. L.; Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    For over 30 years, air-sea interaction specialists have been evaluating and parameterizing the role of whitecap bubbles in air-sea gas exchange. To our knowledge, no one, however, has studied the mirror image process of whether sea spray droplets can facilitate air-sea gas exchange. We are therefore using theory, data analysis, and numerical modeling to quantify the role of spray on air-sea gas transfer. In this, our first formal work on this subject, we seek the rate-limiting step in spray-mediated gas transfer by evaluating the three time scales that govern the exchange: τ air , which quantifies the rate of transfer between the atmospheric gas reservoir and the surface of the droplet; τ int , which quantifies the exchange rate across the air-droplet interface; and τ aq , which quantifies gas mixing within the aqueous solution droplet.

  19. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.

  20. Electron Transfer versus Proton Transfer in Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions of Polyprotonated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Harsha P.; He, Min; Chrisman, Paul A.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Hogan, Jason M.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    The ion/ion reactions of several dozen reagent anions with triply protonated cations of the model peptide KGAILKGAILR have been examined to evaluate predictions of a Landau–Zener-based model for the likelihood for electron transfer. Evidence for electron transfer was provided by the appearance of fragment ions unique to electron transfer or electron capture dissociation. Proton transfer and electron transfer are competitive processes for any combination of anionic and cationic reactants. For reagent anions in reactions with protonated peptides, proton transfer is usually significantly more exothermic than electron transfer. If charge transfer occurs at relatively long distances, electron transfer should, therefore, be favored on kinetic grounds because the reactant and product channels cross at greater distances, provided conditions are favorable for electron transfer at the crossing point. The results are consistent with a model based on Landau–Zener theory that indicates both thermodynamic and geometric criteria apply for electron transfer involving polyatomic anions. Both the model and the data suggest that electron affinities associated with the anionic reagents greater than about 60–70 kcal/mol minimize the likelihood that electron transfer will be observed. Provided the electron affinity is not too high, the Franck–Condon factors associated with the anion and its corresponding neutral must not be too low. When one or the other of these criteria is not met, proton transfer tends to occur essentially exclusively. Experiments involving ion/ion attachment products also suggest that a significant barrier exists to the isomerization between chemical complexes that, if formed, lead to either proton transfer or electron transfer. PMID:16144411

  1. Heat transfer between stratified immiscible liquid layers driven by gas bubbling across the interface

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The modeling of molten core debris in the CORCON and VANESA computer codes as overlying, immiscible liquid layers is discussed as it relates to the transfer of heat and mass between the layers. This initial structure is identified and possible configurations are discussed. The stratified, gas-sparged configuration that is presently employed in CORCON and VANESA is examined and the existing literature for interlayer heat transfer is assessed. An experiment which was designed to measure interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is described. The results are presented and compared to previously existing models. A dimensionless correlation for stratified, interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is developed. This relationship is recommended for inclusion in CORCON-MOD2 for heat transfer between stratified, molten liquid layers. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  3. Pion transfer from hydrogen to deuterium in H2+D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P.; Armstrong, D. S.; Measday, D. F.; Noble, A. J.; Stanislaus, S.; Harston, M. R.; Aniol, K. A.; Horváth, D.

    1990-01-01

    The transfer of negative pions from pionic hydrogen to deuterium has been investigated in gas mixtures of H2 and D2 as a function of the D2 concentration (C). The concentration dependence of the transfer rate was fitted using a phenomenological model with two parameters. For C-->∞ (32+/-3)% of the pions undergo transfer. The fitted parameters reflect the ratio of pion capture to pion transfer in collisions of pionic hydrogen with protons or deuterons. No pressure dependence for pion transfer was found.

  4. Dissolved gas dynamics in wetland soils: Root-mediated gas transfer kinetics determined via push-pull tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Matthew C.; Pal, David S.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2015-09-01

    Gas transfer processes are fundamental to the biogeochemical and water quality functions of wetlands, yet there is limited knowledge of the rates and pathways of soil-atmosphere exchange for gases other than oxygen and methane (CH4). In this study, we use a novel push-pull technique with sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) as dissolved gas tracers to quantify the kinetics of root-mediated gas transfer, which is a critical efflux pathway for gases from wetland soils. This tracer approach disentangles the effects of physical transport from simultaneous reaction in saturated, vegetated wetland soils. We measured significant seasonal variation in first-order gas exchange rate constants, with smaller spatial variations between different soil depths and vegetation zones in a New Jersey tidal marsh. Gas transfer rates for most biogeochemical trace gases are expected to be bracketed by the rate constants for SF6 and He, which ranged from ˜10-2 to 2 × 10-1 h-1 at our site. A modified Damköhler number analysis is used to evaluate the balance between biochemical reaction and root-driven gas exchange in governing the fate of environmental trace gases in rooted, anaerobic soils. This approach confirmed the importance of plant gas transport for CH4, and showed that root-driven transport may affect nitrous oxide (N2O) balances in settings where N2O reduction rates are slow.

  5. Unsteady heat transfer measurements on a rotating gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, M. A.; Ainsworth, R. W.

    1990-06-01

    This paper presents heat transfer measurements made on the rotor blade of a full-stage model turbine operating at engine representative conditions. The measurement technique of mounting thin film heat transfer gauges on enamel-coated turbine blades enables the heat transfer rate to be measured across a frequency range of dc to 100 KHz. A calibration experiment in which the gauge is pulsed with a laser beam is described in detail. The results are compared with data from a previous 2D simulation of wake-passing flow in the midheight section of the same blade. The mean heat transfer rate recorded in the two experiments shows reasonable agreement. Fluctuations in the unsteady heat transfer signal at nozzle-guide-vane passing frequency are seen at the same locations in data from both experiments. The magnitude of the fluctuations seen on the rotor are much smaller than those recorded in the 2D simulation. Frequency spectra and correlation analysis of heat transfer traces recorded on the rotor are also presented.

  6. DIFFUSIVE EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS ACROSS THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. (R825245)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved and gas-phase concentrations of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 46 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured at eight sites on the Chesapeake Bay at four different times of the year to estimate net diffusive air-water gas exchange rates. Gaseous PAHs ar...

  7. Physical modeling of liquid/liquid mass transfer in gas stirred ladles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Hyo; Fruehan, R. J.

    1987-06-01

    Several of the metallurgical reactions occurring in gas stirred steel ladles are controlled by liquid phase mass transfer between the metal and slag. In order to calculate the rate of these reactions, information about the two phase mass transfer parameter is necessary. The mass transfer between two immiscible liquids, oil and water simulating slag and steel, respectively, was measured in a scale model of a ladle. The mass transferred species was thymol which has an equilibrium partition ratio between oil and water similar to that for sulfur between slag and metal. The mass transfer rate was measured as a function of gas flow rate, tuyere position and size, method of injection, oil viscosity, and oil/water volume ratio. In addition, mixing times in the presence of the oil layer and mass transfer coefficient for the dissolution of solid benzoic acid rods were measured. The results show that there are three gas flow rate regimes in which the dependence of mass transfer on gas flow rate is different. At a critical gas flow rate, the oil layer breaks into droplets which are entrained into the water, resulting in an increase in the two phase interfacial area. This critical gas flow rate was found to be a function of tuyere position, oil volume, densities of two phases, and interfacial tension. Two phase mass transfer for a lance and a tuyere was found to be the same for the same stirring energy in low energy regions regardless of lance depth. Mass transfer is faster for a center tuyere as compared to an offcenter tuyere, but mixing times are smaller for the offcenter tuyere. From the results obtained, the optimum stirring conditions for metallurgical reactions are qualitatively discussed.

  8. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. ); Irvine, T.F., Jr. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured (0 to 8.5 cm/s), the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  9. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F., Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus_minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured [0 to 8.5 cm/s], the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  10. Gas flow environment and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is provided. These data are to be used to evaluate, and verify, three-dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical contract objective is to select a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results obtained. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated. Internal flow in a large rectangular cross-sectioned 90 deg. bend turning duct was studied. The duct construction was designed to allow detailed measurements to be made for the following three duct wall conditions: (1) an isothermal wall with isothermal flow; (2) an adiabatic wall with convective heat transfer by mixing between an unheated surrounding flow; and (3) an isothermal wall with heat transfer from a uniformly hot inlet flow.

  11. Heat transfer effects during cold dense gas dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreiev, G.; Neff, D. E.; Meroney, R. N.

    1983-11-01

    Wind tunnel concentration data were obtained for continuous area releases of isothermal, cold N2, cold CO2 and cold CH4 clouds. Wind tunnel results were compared to field test results and to a computer model simulation. Heat transfer and humidity effects on model concentration distributions were significant for methane plumes when surface Richardson numbers, Ri, were large (i.e., low wind speed and high boiloff rates conditions). At field scales heat transfer and humidity still play a role in the dispersion of methane spill cases, but plume dilution and lift off are not as exaggerated as for the model cases.

  12. Gas-liquid mass transfer in filamentous slurries in airlift bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chisti, M.Y.; Moo-Young, M. )

    1988-01-01

    Biotechnology production processes are often critically dependent on oxygen transfer in gas-liquid-solid multiphase systems. Some of these biofluid slurries are composed of fibrous or filamentous, mycelial, solids suspended in a water-like medium. Examples are the broths of Aspergilli, Penicillia, Neurospora and Streptomyces, all of which are of commercial importance. This paper reports of the gas-liquid mass transfer behaviour of aqueous slurries of cellulose fibre solids (1-3 wt./vol. % solids in 0.15 kmol m/sup -3/ NaCl) which simulate the filamentous fermentation broths of interest. Fundamental investigations into the relationship between the mass transfer coefficient (k/sub L/) and bubble diameter (d/sub B/) are undertaken. The observations can be usefully employed for scale-up of bioreactors for gas-liquid mass transfer as demonstrated in the paper.

  13. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  14. Air-water ‘tornado’-type microwave plasmas applied for sugarcane biomass treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lino da Silva, M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Amorim, J.

    2014-02-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol from sugarcane biomass is an attractive alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Pretreatment is needed to separate the cellulosic material, which is packed with hemicellulose and lignin in cell wall of sugarcane biomass. A microwave ‘tornado’-type air-water plasma source operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been applied for this purpose. Samples of dry and wet biomass (˜2 g) have been exposed to the late afterglow plasma stream. The experiments demonstrate that the air-water highly reactive plasma environment provides a number of long-lived active species able to destroy the cellulosic wrapping. Scanning electron microscopy has been applied to analyse the morphological changes occurring due to plasma treatment. The effluent gas streams have been analysed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Optical emission spectroscopy and FT-IR have been applied to determine the gas temperature in the discharge and late afterglow plasma zones, respectively. The optimal range of the operational parameters is discussed along with the main active species involved in the treatment process. Synergistic effects can result from the action of singlet O2(a 1Δg) oxygen, NO2, nitrous acid HNO2 and OH hydroxyl radical.

  15. Gas Turbine/Solar Parabolic Trough Hybrid Design Using Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C. S.; Ma, Z.

    2011-08-01

    Parabolic trough power plants can provide reliable power by incorporating either thermal energy storage (TES) or backup heat from fossil fuels. This paper describes a gas turbine / parabolic trough hybrid design that combines a solar contribution greater than 50% with gas heat rates that rival those of natural gas combined-cycle plants. Previous work illustrated benefits of integrating gas turbines with conventional oil heat-transfer-fluid (HTF) troughs running at 390?C. This work extends that analysis to examine the integration of gas turbines with salt-HTF troughs running at 450 degrees C and including TES. Using gas turbine waste heat to supplement the TES system provides greater operating flexibility while enhancing the efficiency of gas utilization. The analysis indicates that the hybrid plant design produces solar-derived electricity and gas-derived electricity at lower cost than either system operating alone.

  16. Proton transfer in gas-phase ammonium dinitramide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Thompson, Donald L.

    2003-02-01

    Proton transfer in gaseous ammonium dinitramide (ADN) clusters up to (ADN)2 is studied by using density-functional theory. Proton transfer between the hydrogen dinitramide and ammonia units does not occur in the ADN monomer, rather the ammonia-hydrogen dinitramide complex is stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding. However, proton transfer between hydrogen dinitramide and ammonia is observed in the ADN dimer [NH3HN(NO2)2]2, ADN solvated with a single ammonia molecule [NH3NH(NO2)2]NH3, and ADN solvated with a hydrogen dinitramide molecule [NH3HN(NO2)2]HN(NO2)2. Structural changes in the complexes relative to the free molecules and the binding energies of the clusters are given. Using population analysis, the total electrostatic interaction energy in each cluster is calculated. The electrostatic energy is a measure that distinguishes between the ionic or hydrogen-bonded nature of the clusters. Some implications of proton transfer in ADN clusters on the decomposition mechanism of ADN are discussed.

  17. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  18. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Denninger, Kate; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Bell, Sean; Jacobs, Amelia; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Tilley, Mitch; Quick, Ralph

    2015-09-02

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling. This study of drilling operations seeks opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies. The scope of this study included analyzing 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'Perfect Well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.) and poor data collection practices An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate figures for analysis. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/ equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averaged 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million was spent on non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells, compared with only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry using Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time services, and official glossary terms to describe rig operations, and advanced drilling rigs/technology.

  19. Analysis of Gas Turbine Rotor Blade Tip and Shroud Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Steinthorsson, E.

    1996-01-01

    Predictions of the rate of heat transfer to the tip and shroud of a gas turbine rotor blade are presented. The simulations are performed with a multiblock computer code which solves the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The effect of inlet boundary layer thickness as well as rotation rate on the tip and shroud heat transfer is examined. The predictions of the blade tip and shroud heat transfer are in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements. Areas of large heat transfer rates are identified and physical reasoning for the phenomena presented.

  20. Air/sea DMS gas transfer in the North Atlantic: evidence for limited interfacial gas exchange at high wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. G.; De Bruyn, W.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.; Christensen, K.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Shipboard measurements of eddy covariance DMS air/sea fluxes and seawater concentration were carried out in the North Atlantic bloom region in June/July 2011. Gas transfer coefficients (k660) show a linear dependence on mean horizontal wind speed at wind speeds up to 11 m s-1. At higher wind speeds the relationship between k660 and wind speed weakens. At high winds, measured DMS fluxes were lower than predicted based on the linear relationship between wind speed and interfacial stress extrapolated from low to intermediate wind speeds. In contrast, the transfer coefficient for sensible heat did not exhibit this effect. The apparent suppression of air/sea gas flux at higher wind speeds appears to be related to sea state, as determined from shipboard wave measurements. These observations are consistent with the idea that long waves suppress near surface water side turbulence, and decrease interfacial gas transfer. This effect may be more easily observed for DMS than for less soluble gases, such as CO2, because the air/sea exchange of DMS is controlled by interfacial rather than bubble-mediated gas transfer under high wind speed conditions.

  1. Space-based retrievals of air-sea gas transfer velocities using altimeters: Calibration for dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddijn-Murphy, Lonneke; Woolf, David K.; Marandino, Christa

    2012-08-01

    This study is the first to directly correlate gas transfer velocity, measured at sea using the eddy-correlation (EC) technique, and satellite altimeter backscattering. During eight research cruises in different parts of the world, gas transfer velocity of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was measured. The sample times and locations were compared with overpass times and locations of remote sensing satellites carrying Ku-band altimeters: ERS-1, ERS-2, TOPEX, POSEIDON, GEOSAT Follow-On, JASON-1, JASON-2 and ENVISAT. The result was 179 pairs of gas transfer velocity measurements and backscattering coefficients. An inter-calibration of the different altimeters significantly reduced data scatter. The inter-calibrated data was best fitted to a quadratic relation between the inverse of the backscattering coefficients and the gas transfer velocity measurements. A gas transfer parameterization based on backscattering, corresponding with sea surface roughness, might be expected to perform better than wind speed-based parameterizations. Our results, however, did not show improvement compared to direct correlation of shipboard wind speeds. The relationship of gas transfer velocity to satellite-derived backscatter, or wind speed, is useful to provide retrieval algorithms. Gas transfer velocity (cm/hr), corrected to a Schmidt number of 660, is proportional to wind speed (m/s). The measured gas transfer velocity is controlled by both the individual water-side and air-side gas transfer velocities. We calculated the latter using a numerical scheme, to derive water-side gas transfer velocity. DMS is sufficiently soluble to neglect bubble-mediated gas transfer, thus, the DMS transfer velocities could be applied to estimate water-side gas transfer velocities through the unbroken surface of any other gas.

  2. Recent progress in research pertaining to estimates of gas-side heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    A decade ago several important fundamental heat transfer phenomena were identified which were considered basic to the ability to predict heat transfer loads in aircraft gas turbines. The progress in addressing these fundamentals over the past ten years is assessed. Much reseach effort has been devoted to their study in university, industry and government labs and significant progress has been achieved. Advances in computer technology have enabled the modeling of complex 3-D fluid flow in gas turbines so necessary for heat transfer calculations. Advances in instrumentation plus improved data acquisition have brought about more reliable data sets. While much has advanced in the 1980's, much challenging research remains to be done. Several of these areas are suggested.

  3. Blast waves in inhomogeneous atmospheres including real gas and heat transfer effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gretler, W.

    1994-10-01

    The real gas and heat transfer effects, particularly at the early state of the propagation of a very strong blast wave resulting from a point explosion in an atmosphere whose density varies with altitude, are addressed by numerical computation. The new twist in this classical blast wave problem is that the simplistic perfect gas equation of state is abandoned, and replaced with a set of realistic, albeit approximate equilibrium gas properties, including internal energy for intermolecular forces, vibration, exitation of electrons, dissociation, ionization and conductive and radiative heat transfer. The whole complex problem is then solved by the method of characteristics. The computations are carried out for blast waves propagating upward and downward in an isothermal atmosphere. The results are compared with results obtained using a perfect gas model. From the comparison it appears that temperature profiles and, accordingly, density profiles are affected most by the real gas.

  4. Couette flow regimes with heat transfer in rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A. A. Butkovskii, A. V.

    2013-06-15

    Based on numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation by direct statistic simulation, the Couette flow with heat transfer is studied in a broad range of ratios of plate temperatures and Mach numbers of a moving plate. Flow regime classification by the form of the dependences of the energy flux and friction stress on the Knudsen number Kn is proposed. These dependences can be simultaneously monotonic and nonmonotonic and have maxima. Situations are possible in which the dependence of the energy flux transferred to a plate on Kn has a minimum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic or even has a maximum. Also, regimes exist in which the dependence of the energy flux on Kn has a maximum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic, and vice versa.

  5. Heat transfer characteristics of gas-insulated transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Minaguchi, D.; Ginno, M.; Itaka, F.; Ninomiya, K.; Hayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the heat transfer characteristics of GILs under constant temperatures and under changing temperatures influenced by solar radiation and wind. It was verified that values calculated by our heat transfer furmulas coincided well with measured values both for current-induced temperature rise of the conductor and enclosure and for temperature changes caused by solar radiation and wind. In addition, the influence of installation angle on conductor and enclosure temperature rises was investigated, and it was confirmed that the highest local temperature rises of a conductor and an enclosure above ambient temperature generally do not exceed the temperature rises of horizontal installation, although heat spots existed in tests.

  6. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geil, T.; Steinhoff, J.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is being compiled. These data will be used to evaluate and verify three dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  7. A conjugate heat transfer procedure for gas turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Croce, G

    2001-05-01

    A conjugate heat transfer procedure, allowing for the use of different solvers on the solid and fluid domain(s), is presented. Information exchange between solid and fluid solution is limited to boundary condition values, and this exchange is carried out at any pseudo-time step. Global convergence rate of the procedure is, thus, of the same order of magnitude of stand-alone computations. PMID:11460637

  8. Corrosion of copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated air/water vapor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.

    1992-04-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the atmospheric corrosion of copper-based materials in an irradiated air/water vapor system. The three materials investigated were oxygen-free copper (CDA-102), 7% aluminum-bronze (CDA-613), and 70-30 cupronickel (CDA-715). To support the corrosion studies, a number of irradiation studies were performed to characterize the gas phase radiation chemistry of the system. Both copper oxide and nitrate phases were identified as corrosion products depending on the dose rate, humidity and temperature. Uniform corrosion rates increased with temperature, humidity, and dose rate. A clear tie between the radiolytic products generated in the gas phase and the corrosion observed was established.

  9. Corrosion of copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated air/water vapor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the atmospheric corrosion of copper-based materials in an irradiated air/water vapor system. The three materials investigated were oxygen-free copper (CDA-102), 7% aluminum-bronze (CDA-613), and 70-30 cupronickel (CDA-715). To support the corrosion studies, a number of irradiation studies were performed to characterize the gas phase radiation chemistry of the system. Both copper oxide and nitrate phases were identified as corrosion products depending on the dose rate, humidity and temperature. Uniform corrosion rates increased with temperature, humidity, and dose rate. A clear tie between the radiolytic products generated in the gas phase and the corrosion observed was established.

  10. Trapping of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate at the Air-Water Interface of Oscillating Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Corti, Mario; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    We report that at very low initial bulk concentrations, a couple of hundred times below the critical micellar concentration (CMC), anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) adsorbed at the air-water interface of a gas bubble cannot be removed, on the time scale of the experiment (hours), when the surrounding solution is gently replaced by pure water. Extremely sensitive interferometric measurements of the resonance frequency of the bubble-forced oscillations give precise access to the concentration of the surfactant monolayer. The bulk-interface dynamic exchange of SDS molecules is shown to be inhibited below a concentration which we believe refers to a kind of gas-liquid phase transition of the surface monolayer. Above this threshold we recover the expected concentration-dependent desorption. The experimental observations are interpreted within simple energetic considerations supported by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. PMID:26039913

  11. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time

  12. Hydrodynamic characteristics and gas-liquid mass transfer in a biofilm airlift suspension reactor.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, C; van Loosdrecht, M C; van der Lans, R G; Heijnen, J J

    1998-12-01

    The hydrodynamics and mass transfer, specifically the effects of gas velocity and the presence and type of solids on the gas hold-up and volumetric mass transfer coefficient, were studied on a lab-scale airlift reactor with internal draft tube. Basalt particles and biofilm-coated particles were used as solid phase. Three distinct flow regimes were observed with increasing gas flow rate. The influence of the solid phase on the hydrodynamics was a peculiar characteristic of the regimes. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was found to decrease with increasing solid loading and particle size. This could be predominantly related to the influence that the solid has on gas hold-up. The ratio between gas hold-up and volumetric mass transfer coefficient was found to be independent of solid loading, size, or density, and it was proven that the presence of solids in airlift reactors lowers the number of gas bubbles without changing their size. To evaluate scale effects, experimental results were compared with theoretical and empirical models proposed for similar systems. PMID:10099471

  13. Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Harvey, Karen; Ferrada, Juan J

    2011-02-01

    A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

  14. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. 1274... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.926 Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative agreement or...

  15. The boomerang area: An example of oil and gas fields related to a transfer zone development

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, M.; Colletta, B.; Letouzey, J. ); Baby, P. ); Oller, J.; Montemuro, G. ); Guillier, B. )

    1993-02-01

    We present results of a study realized from petroleum data of Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos of the most important transfer zone of the Bolivian Andean belt: the Santa Cruz transfer zone. Frontal part of the Bolivian Andean belt consists of a thick series (6 to 8 km) of paleozoic to cenozoic sedimentary rocks thrusted eastwards on a sole thrust located in paleozoic series. The frontal part of the belt, globally N-S oriented, undergoes an important deviation East of Santa Cruz with a left lateral offset of 100 Km. Taking into account the E-W shortening direction, this transfer zone can be interpreted as a lateral ramp. The Santa Cruz transfer zone coincide with a set of small oil and gas fields whereas frontal structures lack hydrocarbon occurrences. We are then faced with a two-fold problem: (1) what is the origin of the transfer zone (2) why are the oil and gas concentrated in the transfer zone Our synthesis shows that the transfer zone is superimposed on the limit of a detached Paleozoic basin whose border direction is oblique to the regional shortening direction. We then interpret the oil and gas formation in two steps: (1) source rock maturation and hydrocarbon migration towards the top of the Paleozoic sedimentary wedge before Andean deformation. (2) hydrocarbon dismigration towards anticlinal structures developed during the lateral ramp propagation. In order to test our interpretation we performed a set of analog model experiments whose 3D visualization was analyzed by computerized X-ray tomography.

  16. Gas transfer velocities measured at low wind speed over a lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, J.; Wanninkhof, R.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and wind speed was evaluated at low wind speeds by quantifying the rate of evasion of the deliberate tracer, SF6, from a small oligotrophic lake. Several possible relationships between gas transfer velocity and low wind speed were evaluated by using 1-min-averaged wind speeds as a measure of the instantaneous wind speed values. Gas transfer velocities in this data set can be estimated virtually equally well by assuming any of three widely used relationships between k600 and winds referenced to 10-m height, U10: (1) a bilinear dependence with a break in the slope at ???3.7 m s-1, which resulted in the best fit; (2) a power dependence; and (3) a constant transfer velocity for U10 3.7 m s-1 which, coupled with the typical variability in instantaneous wind speeds observed in the field, leads to average transfer velocity estimates that are higher than those predicted for steady wind trends. The transfer velocities predicted by the bilinear steady wind relationship for U10 < ???3.7 m s-1 are virtually identical to the theoretical predictions for transfer across a smooth surface.

  17. Rapid Facial Fabrication of Silica Colloidal Crystal Film at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Wang, Yun; Chen, Qiming

    2015-12-01

    A rapid and facial strategy has been developed to self-assemble 2D or 3D silica colloidal crystals at the air/water interface. The surface hydrophilicity of monodisperse silica microspheres were prepared by the Stöber method and modified by physical adsorption of a cationic surfactant (CTAB). The surface-modified silica microspheres were dispersed into an organic solvent and readily self-assemble at the air/water interface to form 2D monolayer film. The surface potential (ζ ) of silica microspheres could be changed with different concentration of CTAB aqueous solution. When the surface potential of silica particles was of -36.67 mV, a 2D monolayer film with close-packed and high-ordered structure could be easily obtained and may further be transferred onto a solid substrate layer by layer to develop a 3D multilayer film. UV-visible spectrophotometer was used to analyze the orderliness of colloidal crystal film, the Bragg diffraction positions and silica diameters were in good agreement with those were theoretically calculated. In addition, Atomic Force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe the arrangement of colloidal crystals. PMID:26682401

  18. Langmuir-Blodgett film of hydrophobin protein from Pleurotus ostreatus at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Houmadi, S; Ciuchi, F; De Santo, M P; De Stefano, L; Rea, I; Giardina, P; Armenante, A; Lacaze, E; Giocondo, M

    2008-11-18

    We present results concerning the formation of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of a class I hydrophobin from Pleurotus ostreatus at the air-water interface, and their structure as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films when deposited on silicon substrates. LB films of the hydrophobin were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We observed that the compressed film at the air-water interface exhibits a molecular depletion even at low surface pressure. In order to estimate the surface molecular concentration, we fit the experimental isotherm with Volmer's equation describing the equation of state for molecular monolayers. We found that about (1)/ 10 of the molecules contribute to the surface film formation. When transferred on silicon substrates, compact and uniform monomolecular layers about 2.5 nm thick, comparable to a typical molecular size, were observed. The monolayers coexist with protein aggregates, under the typical rodlet form with a uniform thickness of about 5.0 nm. The observed rodlets appear to be a hydrophilic bilayer and can then be responsible for the surface molecular depletion. PMID:18925762

  19. Gas transfer model to design a ventilator for neonatal total liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Mirko; Cammi, Antonio; Bagnoli, Paola

    2015-12-01

    The study was aimed to optimize the gas transfer in an innovative ventilator for neonatal Total Liquid Ventilation (TLV) that integrates the pumping and oxygenation functions in a non-volumetric pulsatile device made of parallel flat silicone membranes. A computational approach was adopted to evaluate oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges between the liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) and the oxygenating gas, as a function of the geometrical parameter of the device. A 2D semi-empirical model was implemented to this purpose using Comsol Multiphysics to study both the fluid dynamics and the gas exchange in the ventilator. Experimental gas exchanges measured with a preliminary prototype were compared to the simulation outcomes to prove the model reliability. Different device configurations were modeled to identify the optimal design able to guarantee the desired gas transfer. Good agreement between experimental and simulation outcomes was obtained, validating the model. The optimal configuration, able to achieve the desired gas exchange (ΔpCO2 = 16.5 mmHg and ΔpO2 = 69 mmHg), is a device comprising 40 modules, 300 mm in length (total exchange area = 2.28 m(2)). With this configuration gas transfer performance is satisfactory for all the simulated settings, proving good adaptability of the device. PMID:26475493

  20. Heat Transfer in a Turbulent Liquid or Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latzko, H.

    1944-01-01

    The,theory of heat.transfer from a solid body to a liquid stream could he presented previously** only with limiting assumptions about the movement of the fluid (potential flow, laminar frictional flow). (See references 1, 2, and 3). For turbulent flow, the most important practical case, the previous theoretical considerations did not go beyond dimensionless formulas and certain conclusions as to the analogy between the friction factor and the unit thermal conductance, (See references 4, 5, 6, and 7,) In order to obtain numerical results, an experimental treatment of the problem was resorted to, which gave rise to numerous investigations because of the importance of this problem in many branches of technology. However, the results of these investigations frequently deviate from one another. The experimental results are especially dependent upon the overall dimensions and the specific proportions of the equipment. In the present work, the attempt will be made to develop systematically the theory of the heat transfer and of the dependence of the unit thermal conductance upon shape and dimensions, using as a basis the velocity distribution for turbulent flow set up by Prandtl and Von Karman.

  1. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  2. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszczuk, Artur

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR) on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater) and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  3. Effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi Y; Gitiafroz, Roya; Acosta, Edgar; Policova, Zdenka; Cox, Peter N; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2005-11-01

    The in vitro adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces is affected by both the composition of the surfactant preparations and the conditions under which the assessment is conducted. Relevant experimental conditions are surfactant concentration, temperature, subphase pH, electrolyte concentration, humidity, and gas composition of the atmosphere exposed to the interface. The effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of a therapeutic lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), was studied by measuring the dynamic surface tension (DST). Axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) was used in conjunction with three different experimental methodologies, i.e., captive bubble (CB), pendant drop (PD), and constrained sessile drop (CSD), to measure the DST. The experimental results obtained from these three methodologies show that for 100% relative humidity (RH) at 37 degrees C the rate of adsorption of BLES at an air-water interface is substantially slower than for low humidity. It is also found that there is a difference in the rate of surface tension decrease measured from the PD and CB/CSD methods. These experimental results agree well with an adsorption model that considers the combined effects of entropic force, electrostatic interaction, and gravity. These findings have implications for the development and evaluation of new formulations for surfactant replacement therapy. PMID:16262325

  4. Green's function solution to heat transfer of a transparent gas through a tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer analysis of a transparent gas flowing through a circular tube of finite thickness is presented. This study includes the effects of wall conduction, internal radiative exchange, and convective heat transfer. The natural mathematical formulation produces a nonlinear, integrodifferential equation governing the wall temperature and an ordinary differential equation describing the gas temperature. This investigation proposes to convert the original system of equations into an equivalent system of integral equations. The Green's function method permits the conversion of an integrodifferential equation into a pure integral equation. The proposed integral formulation and subsequent computational procedure are shown to be stable and accurate.

  5. Chemical reactions and gas transfer in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, D.J. |

    1998-02-01

    Many chemical reactions of environmental significance involve reactants or end products that exchange with the atmosphere. The transferable constituents are the atmospheric gases--oxygen, carbon dioxide, and, to a more limited degree, nitrogen--and volatile substances that are not usually present in the atmosphere, such as ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. Reactions of this type have many applications in natural water systems, as well as water and waste treatment processes. It is the general purpose of this paper to present a mathematical approach to the analysis of these reactions and to demonstrate the application to various environmental problems. Both variable and constant pH conditions are addressed. The latter frequently characterizes laboratory experiments in batch reactions, in which a constant pH is maintained. The former is commonly present in natural waters, in which the pH changes through the course of the chemical reaction.

  6. Tuning a physically-based model of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. D.; Robinson, I. S.; Woolf, D. K.

    Air-sea gas transfer velocities are estimated for one year using a 1-D upper-ocean model (GOTM) and a modified version of the NOAA-COARE transfer velocity parameterization. Tuning parameters are evaluated with the aim of bringing the physically based NOAA-COARE parameterization in line with current estimates, based on simple wind-speed dependent models derived from bomb-radiocarbon inventories and deliberate tracer release experiments. We suggest that A = 1.3 and B = 1.0, for the sub-layer scaling parameter and the bubble mediated exchange, respectively, are consistent with the global average CO 2 transfer velocity k. Using these parameters and a simple 2nd order polynomial approximation, with respect to wind speed, we estimate a global annual average k for CO 2 of 16.4 ± 5.6 cm h -1 when using global mean winds of 6.89 m s -1 from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 1954-2000. The tuned model can be used to predict the transfer velocity of any gas, with appropriate treatment of the dependence on molecular properties including the strong solubility dependence of bubble-mediated transfer. For example, an initial estimate of the global average transfer velocity of DMS (a relatively soluble gas) is only 11.9 cm h -1 whilst for less soluble methane the estimate is 18.0 cm h -1.

  7. Heat Transfer and Pressure Distributions on a Gas Turbine Blade Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azad, Gm S.; Han, Je-Chin; Teng, Shuye; Boyle, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and static pressure distributions are experimentally investigated on a gas turbine blade tip in a five-bladed stationary linear cascade. The blade is a 2-dimensional model of a first stage gas turbine rotor blade with a blade tip profile of a GE-E(sup 3) aircraft gas turbine engine rotor blade. The flow condition in the test cascade corresponds to an overall pressure ratio of 1.32 and exit Reynolds number based on axial chord of 1.1 x 10(exp 6). The middle 3-blade has a variable tip gap clearance. All measurements are made at three different tip gap clearances of about 1%, 1.5%, and 2.5% of the blade span. Heat transfer measurements are also made at two different turbulence intensity levels of 6.1 % and 9.7% at the cascade inlet. Static pressure measurements are made in the mid-span and the near-tip regions as well as on the shroud surface, opposite the blade tip surface. Detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions on the plane tip surface are measured using a transient liquid crystal technique. Results show various regions of high and low heat transfer coefficient on the tip surface. Tip clearance has a significant influence on local tip beat transfer coefficient distribution. Heat transfer coefficient also increases about 15-20% along the leakage flow path at higher turbulence intensity level of 9.7% over 6.1 %.

  8. Optimization of heat transfer in cooled shell elements of gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, N. G.; Grinkrug, M. S.

    1985-08-01

    A theoretical solution is presented for the problem of finding an optimum distribution of the coefficients of heat transfer from the coolant in the shell structures of gas-turbine engines. The approach proposed here provides a way to efficiently use the mechanical properties of materials, to optimize coolant distribution over the shell surface, and, ultimately to improve the economy and performance of gas-turbine engines.

  9. Precision cleaning verification of fluid components by air/water impingement and total carbon analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 sq m. Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging/diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg/sq ft of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVRs impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 sq m.

  10. Precision Cleaning Verification of Fluid Components by Air/Water Impingement and Total Carbon Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1995-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 m(exp 2). Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging-diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC-113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg-ft(exp 2) of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVR's impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 m(exp 2).

  11. Heat transfer measurements to a gas turbine cooling passage with inclined ribs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ireland, P.T.; Kohler, S.T.; Chew, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The local heat transfer coefficient distribution over all four walls of a large-scale model of a gas turbine cooling passage have been measured in great detail. A new method of determining the heat transfer coefficient to the rib surface has been developed and the contribution of the rib, at 5% blockage, to the overall roughened heat transfer coefficient was found to be considerable. The vortex-dominated flow field was interpreted from the detailed form of the measured local heat transfer contours. Computational Fluid Dynamics calculations support this model of the flow and yield friction factors that agree with measured values. Advances in the heat transfer measuring technique and data analysis procedure that confirm the accuracy of the transient method are described in full.

  12. Tangential stress beneath wind-driven air water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banner, Michael L.; Peirson, William L.

    1998-06-01

    The detailed structure of the aqueous surface sublayer flow immediately adjacent to the wind-driven air water interface is investigated in a laboratory wind-wave flume using particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. The goal is to investigate quantitatively the character of the flow in this crucial, very thin region which is often disrupted by microscale breaking events. In this study, we also examine critically the conclusions of Okuda, Kawai & Toba (1977), who argued that for very short, strongly forced wind-wave conditions, shear stress is the dominant mechanism for transmitting the atmospheric wind stress into the water motion waves and surface drift currents. In strong contrast, other authors have more recently observed very substantial normal stress contributions on the air side. The availability of PIV and associated image technology now permits a timely re-examination of the results of Okuda et al., which have been influential in shaping present perceptions of the physics of this dynamically important region. The PIV technique used in the present study overcomes many of the inherent shortcomings of the hydrogen bubble measurements, and allows reliable determination of the fluid velocity and shear within 200 [mu]m of the instantaneous wind-driven air water interface.

  13. Air/water oxydesulfurization of coal: laboratory investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Warzinski, R. P.; Friedman, S.; Ruether, J. A.; LaCount, R. B.

    1980-08-01

    Air/water oxidative desulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major US coal basins. This experimentation has shown that the reaction proceeds effectively for pulverized coals at temperatures of 150 to 200/sup 0/C with air at a total system pressure of 500 to 1500 psig. Above 200/sup 0/C, the loss of coal and product heating value increases due to oxidative consumption of carbon and hydrogen. The pyritic sulfur solubilization reactions are typically complete (95 percent removal) within 15 to 40 minutes at temperature; however, significant apparent organic sulfur removal requires residence times of up to 60 minutes at the higher temperatures. The principal products of the reaction are sulfuric acid, which can be neutralized with limestone, and iron oxide. Under certain conditions, especially for high pyritic sulfur coals, the precipitation of sulfur-containing compounds from the products of the pyrite reaction may cause anomalous variations in the sulfur form data. The influence of various parameters on the efficiency of sulfur removal from coal by air/water oxydesulfurization has been studied.

  14. Transfer of dipolar gas through the discrete localized mode.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2013-12-01

    By considering the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model with dipole-dipole interactions for dipolar condensate, the existence, the types, the stability, and the dynamics of the localized modes in a nonlinear lattice are discussed. It is found that the contact interaction and the dipole-dipole interactions play important roles in determining the existence, the type, and the stability of the localized modes. Because of the coupled effects of the contact interaction and the dipole-dipole interactions, rich localized modes and their stability nature can exist: when the contact interaction is larger and the dipole-dipole interactions is smaller, a discrete bright breather occurs. In this case, while the on-site interaction can stabilize the discrete breather, the dipole-dipole interactions will destabilize the discrete breather; when both the contact interaction and the dipole-dipole interactions are larger, a discrete kink appears. In this case, both the on-site interaction and the dipole-dipole interactions can stabilize the discrete kink, but the discrete kink is more unstable than the ordinary discrete breather. The predicted results provide a deep insight into the dynamics of blocking, filtering, and transfer of the norm in nonlinear lattices for dipolar condensates. PMID:24483540

  15. Specific ion adsorption at the air/water interface: The role of hydrophobic solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinek, Dominik; Herz, Alexander; Vrbka, Lubos; Sedlmeier, Felix; Mamatkulov, Shavkat I.; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-09-01

    Classical force fields for molecular simulations of aqueous electrolytes are still controversial. We study alkali and halide ions at the air/water interface using novel non-polarizable force fields that were optimized based on bulk thermodynamics. In qualitative agreement with polarizable force-field simulations, ion repulsion from the interface decreases with increasing ion size. Iodide is even enhanced at the interface, which is rationalized by hydrophobic solvation at the interface, but exhibits a smaller surface propensity than in previous polarizable simulations. Surprisingly, lithium is less repelled than other cations because of its tightly bound hydration shell. A generalized Poisson-Boltzmann approach that includes ionic potentials of mean force from simulation almost quantitatively matches experimental interfacial tension increments for 1 molar sodium halides and alkali chlorides. We conclude that properly optimized non-polarizable force fields are transferable to interfacial environments and hold the potential for unravelling ion-specific effects even in biological situations involving peptidic surfaces.

  16. Influence of Waves, Whitecaps, and Turbulence on the Gas Transfer during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, C. J.; Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Edson, J. B.; McGillis, W. R.; Bariteau, L.; Fairall, C. W.

    2008-12-01

    The exchange of carbon dioxide and other trace gases across the air-sea interface plays an important role in global and regional biogeochemical cycles. The gas transfer velocity (k) is thought to be controlled by near- surface turbulence at low to moderate wind speeds and by bubble-mediated processes at higher wind speeds. At low to moderate wind speeds, small-scale waves including microbreaking disrupt the diffusive boundary layer, contribute to mixing at the surface, and enhance exchange. Likewise, at higher wind speeds, large-scale wave breaking, or whitecapping, generates mixing and additionally enhances gas transfer via bubble-mediated exchange. The parameterization for k based on the direct covariance fluxes is shown to have a cubic dependence on wind speed. This result supports the hypothesis that, if bubble mediated exchange is important, the transfer velocity should increase proportionally with whitecap coverage, since whitecap coverage been shown to increase with at least a cubic dependence on wind speed. However, the very large uncertainties under high wind speed conditions limit the universality of this result and the role of breaking waves and bubble modulated transfer. Here, we present results of the combination of turbulence, deep-ocean wave statistics, whitecapping, and CO2 gas exchange measured during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment (SO GasEx) with sustained conditions between 10-20 m s-1. Directional ocean wave spectra, significant wave height, peak wave period, and peak wave direction were obtained with a Wave and Surface Current Monitoring System (WaMoS® II). WaMoS® II also has the capability to resolve two-dimensional maps of surface elevation snapshots with the significant advantage of continuous availability of wave data in rough seas. In addition, significant wave height was measured using a laser altimeter as well as a nadir-looking microwave system. Oceanic turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates were measured using a pulse

  17. Simulating the Vapour Phase Air/Water Exchange of p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDT, Lindane, and 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uncertainties in our understanding of gaseous air/water exchange have emerged as major sources of concern in efforts to construct global and regional mass balances of both the green house gas carbon dioxide and semi-volatile persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals. Hoff e...

  18. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  19. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-22

    While developing dry sorbent duct injection flue gas desulfurization processes may offer significant improvement in capital cost and process simplicity compared to wet scrubbing systems, the economics of this technology can be improved significantly by an improvement in sorbent utilization. While a general understanding of the mechanism by which the sorbents operate is known, a much more detailed knowledge of reaction rate-controlling phenomena, the role of inherent reactivity, and mass transfer effects and their interaction in needed. Objectives of this project are threefold: 1. Mass transfer investigation--determine the controlling physical and chemical processes that limit sorbent utilization. In particular, determine whether mass transfer is a controlling factor in in-duct flue gas desulfurization and establish the relative contributions of gas- and liquid-phase mass transfer and inherent sorbent reactivity. 2. Field test support--evaluate various sorbents, operating conditions and process schemes to support large-scale field testings at Meredosia and Beverly. 3. Mass transfer enhancement--examine various techniques that will enable sorbent utilization rates of at least 75 percent to be achieved. Sorbents investigated were Ca(OH){sub 2}, Mississippi hydrate and Mississippi slaked lime. Epsom Salt was investigated as an additive. Agglomeration of Ca(OH){sub 2} solids was also investigated. 3 refs., 92 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Modeling of Aerobrake Ballute Stagnation Point Temperature and Heat Transfer to Inflation Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    2012-01-01

    A trailing Ballute drag device concept for spacecraft aerocapture is considered. A thermal model for calculation of the Ballute membrane temperature and the inflation gas temperature is developed. An algorithm capturing the most salient features of the concept is implemented. In conjunction with the thermal model, trajectory calculations for two candidate missions, Titan Explorer and Neptune Orbiter missions, are used to estimate the stagnation point temperature and the inflation gas temperature. Radiation from both sides of the membrane at the stagnation point and conduction to the inflating gas is included. The results showed that the radiation from the membrane and to a much lesser extent conduction to the inflating gas, are likely to be the controlling heat transfer mechanisms and that the increase in gas temperature due to aerodynamic heating is of secondary importance.

  1. "Ene" Reactions of Singlet Oxygen at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Malek, Belaid; Fang, William; Abramova, Inna; Walalawela, Niluksha; Ghogare, Ashwini A; Greer, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Prenylsurfactants [(CH3)2C═CH(CH2)nSO3(-) Na(+) (n = 4, 6, or 8)] were designed to probe the "ene" reaction mechanism of singlet oxygen at the air-water interface. Increasing the number of carbon atoms in the hydrophobic chain caused an increase in the regioselectivity for a secondary rather than tertiary surfactant hydroperoxide, arguing for an orthogonal alkene on water. The use of water, deuterium oxide, and H2O/D2O mixtures helped to distinguish mechanistic alternatives to homogeneous solution conditions that include dewetting of the π bond and an unsymmetrical perepoxide transition state in the hydroperoxide-forming step. The prenylsurfactants and a photoreactor technique allowed a certain degree of interfacial control of the hydroperoxidation reaction on a liquid support, where the oxidant (airborne (1)O2) is delivered as a gas. PMID:27385423

  2. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid-coated air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids-covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation. PMID:27516601

  3. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid–coated air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D. James; George, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids–covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation.

  4. Progress towards understanding and predicting convection heat transfer in the turbine gas path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, Robert J.; Simon, Frederick F.

    1992-01-01

    A new era is drawing in the ability to predict convection heat transfer in the turbine gas path. We feel that the technical community now has the capability to mount a major assault on this problem, which has eluded significant progress for a long time. We hope to make a case for this bold statement by reviewing the state of the art in three major heat transfer, configuration-specific experiments, whose data have provided the big picture and guided both the fundamental modeling research and the code development. Following that, we review progress and directions in the development of computer codes to predict turbine gas path heat transfer. Finally, we cite examples and make observations on the more recent efforts to do all this work in a simultaneous, interactive, and more synergistic manner. We conclude with an assessment of progress, suggestions for how to use the current state of the art, and recommendations for the future.

  5. Estuary Turbulence and Air-Water Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Philip Mark

    The mixing of constituents between estuarine bottom and surface waters or between estuarine surface waters and the atmosphere are two topics of growing interest, in part due to the potentially important role of estuaries in global carbon budgets. These two types of mixing are typically driven by turbulence, and a research project was developed to improve the scientific understanding of atmospheric and tidal controls on estuary turbulence and airwater exchange processes. Highlights of method development and field research on the Hudson River estuary include several deployments of bottom mounted current profilers to quantify the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget, and construction and deployment of an instrumented catamaran that makes autonomous measurements of air-water CO2 exchange (FCO2), water TKE dissipation at 50 cm depth (epsilon50), and other physical properties just above and below the air-water interface. On the Hudson, wind correlates strongly with epsilon50, but surface water speed and airwater heat flux also have moderate correlations with epsilon50. In partially mixed estuaries such as the Hudson, as well as salt wedge estuaries, baroclinic pressure forcing typically causes spring ebb tides to have much stronger upper water column shear than flood tides. The Hudson data are used to show that this shear leads to local shear instability and stronger near-surface turbulence on spring ebbs. Also, buoyancy budget terms are compared to demonstrate how water-to-air heat fluxes can influence stratification and indirectly influence epsilon50. Looking more closely at the role of wind forcing, it is demonstrated that inland propagation of the sea breeze on warm sunny days leads to arrival in phase with peak solar forcing at seaward stations, but several hours later at up-estuary stations. Passage of the sea breeze front raises the air-water CO2 flux by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and drives epsilon50 comparable to spring tide levels in the upper meter of the water

  6. Air-water exchange fluxes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the tropical coast, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-O; Ko, Fung-Chi; Lee, Chon-Lin; Fang, Meng-Der

    2013-03-01

    Air-water exchange fluxes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were simultaneously measured in air and water samples from two sites on the Kenting coast, located at the southern tip of Taiwan, from January to December 2010. There was no significant difference in the total PAH (t-PAH) concentrations in both gas and dissolved phases between these two sites due to the less local input which also coincided to the low levels of t-PAH concentration; the gas and dissolved phases averaged 1.29±0.59 ng m(-3) and 2.17±1.19 ng L(-1) respectively. The direction and magnitude of the daily flux of PAHs were significantly influenced by wind speed and dissolved PAH concentrations. Individual PAH flux ranged from 627 ng m(-2) d(-1) volatilization of phenanthrene during the rainy season with storm-water discharges raising dissolved phase concentration, to 67 ng m(-2) d(-1) absorption of fluoranthene during high wind speed periods. Due to PAH annual fluxes through air-water exchange, Kenting seawater is a source of low molecular weight PAHs and a reservoir of high molecular weight PAHs. Estimated annual volatilization fluxes ranged from 7.3 μg m(-2) yr(-1) for pyrene to 50 μg m(-2) yr(-1) for phenanthrene and the absorption fluxes ranged from -2.6 μg m(-2) yr(-1) for chrysene to -3.5 μg m(-2) yr(-1) for fluoranthene. PMID:23260251

  7. Air/water oxidative desulfurization of coal and sulfur-containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzinski, R. P.; Freidman, S.; LaCount, R. B.

    1981-02-01

    Air/water Oxydesulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major U. S. coal basins. The applicability at present of this treatment for producing an environmentally acceptable coal has been restricted by recently proposed SO2 emission standards for utility boilers. The product would, however, be attractive to the many smaller industrial coal users who cannot afford to operate and maintain flue gas desulfurization systems. It is also possible that the utility industry could realize a benefit by using chemically cleaned coal with partial flue gas scrubbing. The higher cost of the cleaned coal would be offset by the reduction in capital and operating costs resulting from decreased FGD requirements. The susceptibility of sulfur in coal to oxidative removal varies with the nature of the sulfur-containing species. The inorganic sulfur compounds, primarily pyrite, marcasite, and iron sulfate, are more amenable to treatment than the organically bound sulfur which exhibits varying degrees of resistance depending on its chemical environment. Air/water Oxydesulfurization consistently removes in excess of 90 percent of the pyritic sulfur; the extent and efficiency of organic sulfur removal however, depends on the type of coal and severity of treatment used. In general, the organic sulfur of the higher rank coals exhibits more resistance to treatment than that of the lower rank coals; however, the accompanying heating value is greater for the latter. Similar treatment of sulfur-containing model compounds further illustrates the relative susceptibilities of different chemical species to oxidation. Application of these data to the understanding of the complex chemistry involved in the treatment of coal is a preliminary step toward improving the efficiency of Oxydesulfurization.

  8. Gas-Phase Fragmentation of Protonated N,2-Diphenyl- N'-( p-Toluenesulfonyl)Ethanimidamides: Tosyl Cation Transfer Versus Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Yu, Lian; Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Cheng; Zhang, Ningwen; Jiang, Kezhi

    2015-08-01

    The gas-phase dissociation chemistry of protonated N,2-diphenyl- N'-( p-toluenesulfonyl) ethanimidamides was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in combination with density functional theory calculation. The protonated molecules underwent fragmentation via two main competing channels: (1) migration of the tosyl cation to the anilinic N atom and the subsequent loss of 2-phenylacetonitrile to afford protonated N-phenyl p-toluenesulfonamide ( m/z 248); and (2) transfer of the ionizing proton to the anilinic N atom to give an ion/neutral complex of [tosyl cation / 2-phenylacetonitrile] ( m/z 272) and the subsequent decomposition to yield tosyl cation ( m/z 155). To the best of our knowledge, the gas-phase tosyl cation transfer has not been reported previously. For the para-substituted sulfonamides, the presence of electron-donating groups on the anilinic ring inhibits the reaction channel of the tosyl cation migration, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups favors this pathway.

  9. Gas-Phase Fragmentation of Protonated N,2-Diphenyl-N'-(p-Toluenesulfonyl)Ethanimidamides: Tosyl Cation Transfer Versus Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Yu, Lian; Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Cheng; Zhang, Ningwen; Jiang, Kezhi

    2015-08-01

    The gas-phase dissociation chemistry of protonated N,2-diphenyl-N'-(p-toluenesulfonyl) ethanimidamides was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in combination with density functional theory calculation. The protonated molecules underwent fragmentation via two main competing channels: (1) migration of the tosyl cation to the anilinic N atom and the subsequent loss of 2-phenylacetonitrile to afford protonated N-phenyl p-toluenesulfonamide (m/z 248); and (2) transfer of the ionizing proton to the anilinic N atom to give an ion/neutral complex of [tosyl cation / 2-phenylacetonitrile] (m/z 272) and the subsequent decomposition to yield tosyl cation (m/z 155). To the best of our knowledge, the gas-phase tosyl cation transfer has not been reported previously. For the para-substituted sulfonamides, the presence of electron-donating groups on the anilinic ring inhibits the reaction channel of the tosyl cation migration, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups favors this pathway. PMID:25962367

  10. Gas-transfer analysis. Section H - real gas results via the van der Waals equation of state and virial expansion extension of its limiting Abel-Noble form

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, D R

    1983-06-01

    An ideal-gas, quasi-steady, duct-flow model previously formulated for small scale gas-transfer problems is extended to real gases via the van der Waals equation of state as well as general virial expansions. The model is applicable for an arbitrary series of ducting components where each is described empirically by total pressure and total temperature change correlations. The adequacy of the van der Waals model for gas-transfer calculations is verified by comparisons with: (1) real gas PVT data; (2) the magnitudes of the controlling effects; and (3) approximate limiting case solutions with numerical results using more accurate real-gas modeling. 25 figures.

  11. Microscopic dynamics of nanoparticle monolayers at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R; Basu, J K

    2013-04-15

    We present results of surface mechanical and particle tracking measurements of nanoparticles trapped at the air-water interface as a function of their areal density. We monitor both the surface pressure (Π) and isothermal compression modulus (ϵ) as well as the dynamics of nanoparticle clusters, using fluorescence confocal microscopy while they are compressed to very high density near the two dimensional close packing density Φ∼0.82. We observe non-monotonic variation in both ϵ and the dynamic heterogeneity, characterized by the dynamical susceptibility χ4 with Φ, in such high density monolayers. We provide insight into the underlying nature of such transitions in close packed high density nanoparticle monolayers in terms of the morphology and flexibility of these soft colloidal particles. We discuss the significance our results in the context of related studies on two dimensional granular or colloidal systems. PMID:23411354

  12. Microrheology Using Optical Tweezers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, Thomas; Levine, Alex; Dennin, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Microrheological techniques have been used successfully to determine mechanical properties of materials important in cellular structure. Also critical to cellular mechanical functions are biological membranes. Many aspects of biological membranes can be modeled using Langmuir monolayers, which are single layers surfactants at the air-water interface. The macroscopic mechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers have been extensively characterized. In contrast to macroscopic measurements, we report on experimental methods for studying the rheological properties of Langmuir monolayers on the micron scale. A water immersion optical tweezers system is used to trap ˜1 micron diameter beads in a monolayer. The passive motion of the trapped beads is recorded at high frequency and the complex shear modulus is calculated. Preliminary microrheological data of a fatty acid monolayer showing dependence on surface pressure will be presented. Experimental obstacles will also be discussed.

  13. Charge-transfer-based Gas Sensing Using Atomic-layer MoS2

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byungjin; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Choi, Minseok; Yoon, Jongwon; Kim, Ah Ra; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Sung-Gyu; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Kim, Chang Su; Song, Myungkwan; Jeong, Yongsoo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Lee, Sangchul; Yoo, Tae Jin; Kang, Chang Goo; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) atomic layers have a strong potential to be used as 2D electronic sensor components. However, intrinsic synthesis challenges have made this task difficult. In addition, the detection mechanisms for gas molecules are not fully understood. Here, we report a high-performance gas sensor constructed using atomic-layered MoS2 synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). A highly sensitive and selective gas sensor based on the CVD-synthesised MoS2 was developed. In situ photoluminescence characterisation revealed the charge transfer mechanism between the gas molecules and MoS2, which was validated by theoretical calculations. First-principles density functional theory calculations indicated that NO2 and NH3 molecules have negative adsorption energies (i.e., the adsorption processes are exothermic). Thus, NO2 and NH3 molecules are likely to adsorb onto the surface of the MoS2. The in situ PL characterisation of the changes in the peaks corresponding to charged trions and neutral excitons via gas adsorption processes was used to elucidate the mechanisms of charge transfer between the MoS2 and the gas molecules. PMID:25623472

  14. Charge-transfer-based Gas Sensing Using Atomic-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungjin; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Choi, Minseok; Yoon, Jongwon; Kim, Ah Ra; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Sung-Gyu; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Kim, Chang Su; Song, Myungkwan; Jeong, Yongsoo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Lee, Sangchul; Yoo, Tae Jin; Kang, Chang Goo; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) atomic layers have a strong potential to be used as 2D electronic sensor components. However, intrinsic synthesis challenges have made this task difficult. In addition, the detection mechanisms for gas molecules are not fully understood. Here, we report a high-performance gas sensor constructed using atomic-layered MoS2 synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). A highly sensitive and selective gas sensor based on the CVD-synthesised MoS2 was developed. In situ photoluminescence characterisation revealed the charge transfer mechanism between the gas molecules and MoS2, which was validated by theoretical calculations. First-principles density functional theory calculations indicated that NO2 and NH3 molecules have negative adsorption energies (i.e., the adsorption processes are exothermic). Thus, NO2 and NH3 molecules are likely to adsorb onto the surface of the MoS2. The in situ PL characterisation of the changes in the peaks corresponding to charged trions and neutral excitons via gas adsorption processes was used to elucidate the mechanisms of charge transfer between the MoS2 and the gas molecules.

  15. Effect of impeller geometry on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients in filamentous suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dronawat, S N; Svihla, C K; Hanley, T R

    1997-01-01

    Volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients were measured in suspensions of cellulose fibers with concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 g/L. The mass transfer coefficients were measured using the dynamic method. Results are presented for three different combinations of impellers at a variety of gassing rates and agitation speeds. Rheological properties of the cellulose fibers were also measured using the impeller viscometer method. Tests were conducted in a 20 L stirred-tank fermentor and in 65 L tank with a height to diameter ratio of 3:1. Power consumption was measured in both vessels. At low agitation rates, two Rushton turbines gave 20% better performance than the Rushton and hydrofoil combination and 40% better performance than the Rushton and propeller combination for oxygen transfer. At higher agitation rates, the Rushton and hydrofoil combination gave 14 and 25% better performance for oxygen transfer than two Rushton turbines and the Rushton and hydrofoil combination, respectively. PMID:18576095

  16. A reconciliation of empirical and mechanistic models of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddijn-Murphy, Lonneke; Woolf, David K.; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Nightingale, Philip D.; Shutler, Jamie D.

    2016-01-01

    Models of the air-sea transfer velocity of gases may be either empirical or mechanistic. Extrapolations of empirical models to an unmeasured gas or to another water temperature can be erroneous if the basis of that extrapolation is flawed. This issue is readily demonstrated for the most well-known empirical gas transfer velocity models where the influence of bubble-mediated transfer, which can vary between gases, is not explicitly accounted for. Mechanistic models are hindered by an incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms of air-sea gas transfer. We describe a hybrid model that incorporates a simple mechanistic view—strictly enforcing a distinction between direct and bubble-mediated transfer—but also uses parameterizations based on data from eddy flux measurements of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) to calibrate the model together with dual tracer results to evaluate the model. This model underpins simple algorithms that can be easily applied within schemes to calculate local, regional, or global air-sea fluxes of gases.

  17. Spatially distributed flame transfer functions for predicting combustion dynamics in lean premixed gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper describes a methodology to improve the accuracy of prediction of the eigenfrequencies and growth rates of self-induced instabilities and demonstrates its application to a laboratory-scale, swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed, gas turbine combustor. The influence of the spatial heat release distribution is accounted for using local flame transfer function (FTF) measurements. The two-microphone technique and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence intensity measurements are used to determine the input (inlet velocity perturbation) and the output functions (heat release oscillation), respectively, for the local flame transfer functions. The experimentally determined local flame transfer functions are superposed using the flame transfer function superposition principle, and the result is incorporated into an analytic thermoacoustic model, in order to predict the linear stability characteristics of a given system. Results show that when the flame length is not acoustically compact the model prediction calculated using the local flame transfer functions is better than the prediction made using the global flame transfer function. In the case of a flame in the compact flame regime, accurate predictions of eigenfrequencies and growth rates can be obtained using the global flame transfer function. It was also found that the general response characteristics of the local FTF (gain and phase) are qualitatively the same as those of the global FTF. (author)

  18. Using eddy covariance to estimate air–sea gas transfer velocity for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Air-sea gas transfer velocity for O2 is calculated using directly measured fluxes with the eddy covariance technique. It is a direct method and is frequently used to determine fluxes of heat, humidity, and CO2, but has not previously been used to estimate transfer velocities for O2, using atmospheric eddy covariance data. The measured O2 fluxes are upward directed, in agreement with the measured air-sea gradient of the O2 concentration, and opposite to the direction of the simultaneously measured CO2 fluxes. The transfer velocities estimated from measurements are compared with prominent wind speed parameterizations of the transfer velocity for CO2 and O2, previously established from various measurement techniques. Our result indicates stronger wind speed dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2 starting at intermediate wind speeds. This stronger wind speed dependence appears to coincide with the onset of whitecap formation in the flux footprint and the strong curvature of a cubic wind-dependent function for the transfer velocity provides the best fit to the data. Additional data using the measured O2 flux and an indirect method (based on the Photosynthetic Quotient) to estimate oxygen concentration in water, support the stronger wind dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2.

  19. Absence of a charge-transfer instability for rare-gas atoms adsorbed on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, N. D.; Williams, A. R.; Himpsel, F. J.; Reihl, B.; Eastman, D. E.

    1982-08-01

    Recent optical-absorption experiments on rare-gas atoms bonded to metals dramatically segregate various rare-gas-metal systems into two classes. Cunningham, Greenlaw, and Flynn have hypothesized that these two classes are characterized by the presence or absence of charge transfer from the (excited) rare-gas atom to the metal, and that such charge transfer is controlled by the sign of the difference Φ-I*, where Φ is the metal work function and I* is the energy required to ionize the rare-gas atom in its lowest excited state. Flynn and Chen have, in addition, collected data describing the dipole moments of adsorbed Xe; these also suggest a dramatic dependence on the quantity Φ-I*. As a test of this hypothesis, we have measured the dipole moment of Xe adsorbed on a low-work-function substrate [Gd(0001), with Φ=3.3+/-0.1 eV for the clean surface]. The central new result is that both the Gd measurement and a variety of existing experimental data are inconsistent with the interpretation emphasizing Φ-I*. New calculations using the atom-on-jellium model are also introduced to supplement the discussion. Our analysis suggests that the behavior seen in the optical-absorption measurements could represent a physical effect even more unusual than the charge-transfer instability proposed by Flynn et al.

  20. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W. . Environmental Systems Div.); Rochelle, G.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-29

    Removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal- burning power plants can be achieved by duct spray drying using calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) slurries. A primary objective of this research was to discover the aspects of mass transfer into Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries which limit SO{sub 2} absorption. A bench- scale stirred tank reactor with a flat gas/liquid interface was used to simulate SO{sub 2} absorption in a slurry droplet. The absorption rate of SO{sub 2} from gas concentrations of 500 to 5000 ppm was measured at 55{degrees}C in clear solutions and slurries of Ca(OH){sub 2} up to 1.0 M (7 wt percent). Results are reported in terms of the enhancement factor, {O}. This research will allow prediction of conditions where the absorption of SO{sub 2} in Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries can be enhanced by changes to liquid phase constituents (under which SO{sub 2} absorption is controlled by liquid film mass transfer). Experiments in the stirred tank have shown that SO{sub 2} absorption in a 1.0 M Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry was completely dominated by gas film mass transfer with a large excess of Ca(OH){sub 2} but becomes controlled by liquid film resistance at greater than 50 percent Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization. (VC)

  1. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Gas Taylor Flows incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.; Walsh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the heat transfer characteristics associated with liquid-gas Taylor flows in mini channels incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM). Taylor flows have been shown to result in heat transfer enhancements due to the fluid recirculation experienced within liquid slugs which is attributable to the alternating liquid slug and gas bubble flow structure. Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) also offer significant potential with increased thermal capacity due to the latent heat required to cause phase change. The primary aim of this work was to examine the overall heat transfer potential associated with combining these two novel liquid cooling technologies. By investigating the local heat transfer characteristics, the augmentation/degradation over single phase liquid cooling was quantified while examining the effects of dimensionless variables, including Reynolds number, liquid slug length and gas void fraction. An experimental test facility was developed which had a heated test section and allowed MPCM-air Taylor flows to be subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. Infrared thermography was used to record high resolution experimental wall temperature measurements and determine local heat transfer coefficients from the thermal entrance point. 30.2% mass particle concentration of the MPCM suspension fluid was examined as it provided the maximum latent heat for absorption. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in experimental wall temperatures associated with MPCM-air Taylor flows when compared with the Graetz solution for conventional single phase coolants. Total enhancement in the thermally developed region is observed to be a combination of the individual contributions due to recirculation within the liquid slugs and also absorption of latent heat. Overall, the study highlights the potential heat transfer enhancements that are attainable within heat exchange devices employing MPCM

  2. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  3. Dispersed bubble reactor for enhanced gas-liquid-solids contact and mass transfer

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang; Bonsu, Alexander

    2016-01-26

    An apparatus to promote gas-liquid contact and facilitate enhanced mass transfer. The dispersed bubble reactor (DBR) operates in the dispersed bubble flow regime to selectively absorb gas phase constituents into the liquid phase. The dispersion is achieved by shearing the large inlet gas bubbles into fine bubbles with circulating liquid and additional pumped liquid solvent when necessary. The DBR is capable of handling precipitates that may form during absorption or fine catalysts that may be necessary to promote liquid phase reactions. The DBR can be configured with multistage counter current flow sections by inserting concentric cylindrical sections into the riser to facilitate annular flow. While the DBR can absorb CO.sub.2 in liquid solvents that may lead to precipitates at high loadings, it is equally capable of handling many different types of chemical processes involving solids (precipitates/catalysts) along with gas and liquid phases.

  4. Systematic gas gain measurements and Penning energy transfer rates in Ne - CO2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Ö.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    In Ne - CO2 mixtures, excitation energy of Ne atom can be used to ionize CO2 molecule by the mechanisms called Penning transfers. In the present work, we have measured the gas gain systematically in various Ne - CO2 mixtures (Ne + 0.6 - 60% CO2) at 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.8 atm. The experimental data have been fitted to investigate the Penning energy transfer rates and the secondary processes playing a role in avalanche formations.

  5. Heat transfer during nonlinear gas oscillations in a pipe open at one end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalimov, G. G.; Galiullin, R. G.; Podymov, V. N.

    1983-02-01

    The results of an experimental study of heat transfer in a pipe open at one end in which gas oscillations are generated by a flat piston moving harmonically are presented. The oscillograms of pressure and velocity pulsations in those sections of the pipe that are near the linear and second nonlinear resonance provide evidence of pressure and velocity discontinuities. The frequency distributions of the velocity half-amplitudes and Nusselt numbers have a resonant character, and the resonant frequencies are coincident. Heat transfer in pipes open at one end under nonlinear pulsations with the generation of periodic shock waves is adequately described by a quasi-stationary theory with allowance for thermoacoustic effects.

  6. [Virus adsorption from batch experiments as influenced by air-water interface].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Bing-zi; Zhang, Jia-bao; Zhang, Cong-zhi; Wang, Qiu-ying; Chen, Ji

    2007-12-01

    The presence of air-water interface in batch sorption experiments may result in inaccurate estimation of virus adsorption onto various soils. A batch sorption experiment was conducted to compare the adsorption results of MS2 in different soils under presence/absence of air-water interface. Soils with sterilization/nonterilization treatment were used. Virus recovery efficiency in a blank experiment (no soil) was also evaluated as affected by different amount of air-water interface. The presence of air-water interface altered the results of virus adsorption in different soils with different extent, with Sandy fluvo-aquic soil being the most considerably affected, followed by Red loam soil, and the least being Red clay soil, probably because of different soil properties associated with virus adsorption/inactivation. Soil sterilization resulted in more significant difference of virus adsorption onto the Sandy fluvo-aquic soil between the presence and absence of air-water interface, while a reduced difference was observed in the Red loam soil. The presence of air-water interface significantly decreased virus recovery efficiency, with the values being decreased with increase in the amount of air-water interface. Soil particles likely prohibit viruses from reaching the air-water interface or alter the forces at the solid-water-air interface so that the results from the blank experiment did not truly represent results from control blank, which probably resulted in adsorption difference between presence and absence of the air-water interface. PMID:18290440

  7. ISSUES IN SIMULATING ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE AND AQUEOUS MONOMETHYLMERCURY SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation focuses on two areas relevant to assessing the global fate and bioavailability of mercury: elemental mercury air/water exchange and aqueous environmental monomethylmercury speciation.

  8. Heat Transfer and Flow on the Squealer Tip of a Gas Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azad, Gm S.; Han, Je-Chin; Boyle, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental investigations are performed to measure the detailed heat transfer coefficient and static pressure distributions on the squealer tip of a gas turbine blade in a five-bladed stationary linear cascade. The blade is a 2-dimensional model of a modem first stage gas turbine rotor blade with a blade tip profile of a GE-E(sup 3) aircraft gas turbine engine rotor blade. A squealer (recessed) tip with a 3.77% recess is considered here. The data on the squealer tip are also compared with a flat tip case. All measurements are made at three different tip gap clearances of about 1%, 1.5%, and 2.5% of the blade span. Two different turbulence intensities of 6.1% and 9.7% at the cascade inlet are also considered for heat transfer measurements. Static pressure measurements are made in the mid-span and near-tip regions, as well as on the shroud surface opposite to the blade tip surface. The flow condition in the test cascade corresponds to an overall pressure ratio of 1.32 and an exit Reynolds number based on the axial chord of 1.1 x 10(exp 6). A transient liquid crystal technique is used to measure the heat transfer coefficients. Results show that the heat transfer coefficient on the cavity surface and rim increases with an increase in tip clearance. 'Me heat transfer coefficient on the rim is higher than the cavity surface. The cavity surface has a higher heat transfer coefficient near the leading edge region than the trailing edge region. The heat transfer coefficient on the pressure side rim and trailing edge region is higher at a higher turbulence intensity level of 9.7% over 6.1 % case. However, no significant difference in local heat transfer coefficient is observed inside the cavity and the suction side rim for the two turbulence intensities. The squealer tip blade provides a lower overall heat transfer coefficient when compared to the flat tip blade.

  9. Examination of charge transfer in Au/YSZ for high-temperature optical gas sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrus, John P.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Au-nanoparticle incorporated oxide thin film materials demonstrate significant promise as functionalsensor materials for high temperature optical gas sensing in severe environments relevant for fossil andnuclear based power generation. The Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) system has been extensivelystudied in the literature and serves as a model system for fundamental investigations that seek to betterunderstand the mechanistic origin of the plasmonic gas sensing response. In this work, X-ray photoelec-tron spectroscopy techniques are applied to Au/YSZ films in an attempt to provide further experimentalevidence for a proposed sensing mechanism involving a change in free carrier density of Au nanoparticles due to charge transfer.

  10. On the performance of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for breath-relevant gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, J.; Herbig, J.; Dunkl, J.; Singer, W.; Hansel, A.

    2013-12-01

    The accuracy of quantitative volatile organic compound (VOC) detection by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is substantially enhanced if the instrument is calibrated. Although quantification of a compound is in principle possible by mathematical methods based on kinetic theory, the underlying picture can become complicated depending on the gas matrix, leading to error. A simple, reliable method to overcome this is to calibrate the instrument using standard gas mixtures containing VOCs at known concentrations, which enables the compound-dependent sensitivity of the instrument to be determined. A dynamic gas calibration unit was developed to generate variable but known quantities of selected standard compounds in a carrier gas of variable relative humidity (RH; up to 100% at 37 °C) and CO2 content (≤10%v) to reflect the changing conditions of a breath-gas sample matrix. Besides individual compound sensitivities, calibration also yields the limits of detection and quantification of the experimental method. Extensive calibrations of PTR-MS with several breath-relevant compounds were made at varying RH and CO2. Gas matrix effects of several compounds were negligible when appropriate mass-dependent transmission correction and normalization to the primary ions (m/z 21 and m/z 37) were applied. Two compounds are discussed in particular, namely acetaldehyde, which interferes with a CO2-related background, and formaldehyde, which shows a nonlinear dependence on sample gas humidity.

  11. Experimental investigation on liquid film asymmetry in air-water horizontal annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Andriyanto; Deendarlianto, Indarto, Neo, Fredrick

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetry of circumferential liquid film thickness distribution in an air-water horizontal annular flow has been experimentally investigated using superficial gas and liquid velocity of 10 - 40 m/s and 0.025 to 0.4 m/s, respectively. In general, the film at the bottom of the pipe will be thicker than that of the side and the top. The asymmetry parameter could be expressed in the ratio of average film thickness to the bottom film thickness or the ratio of the top-to-bottom film thickness. Measurement using compact multiple probe instrument shows that the circumferential film thickness distribution is strongly affected by superficial gas velocity. The higher gas velocity results in the more uniform liquid film circumferential distribution. In comparison to the existing correlations, the asymmetry parameter resulted from the experiment shows a good agreement. It is also shown from the experiment that a less symmetry of film thickness distribution is resulted when the gravity force is dominant. A more symmetry distribution is resulted when the inertial force takes control.

  12. Flow Regimes of Air-Water Counterflow Through Cross Corrugated Parallel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, V.F.

    2000-06-07

    Heretofore unknown flow regimes of air-water counterflow through a pair of transparent vertical parallel cross corrugated plates were observed via high-speed video. Air flows upward driven by pressure gradient and water, downward driven by gravity. The crimp geometry of the corrugations was drawn from typical corrugated sheets used as filling material in modern structured packed towers. Four regimes were featured, namely, rivulet, bicontinuous, flooding fronts, and flooding waves. It is conceivable that the regimes observed might constitute the basis for understanding how gas and liquid phases contend for available space in the interstices of structured packings in packed towers. Flow regime transitions were expressed in terms of liquid load (liquid superficial velocity) and gas flow factor parameters commonly used in pressure drop and capacity curves. We have carefully examined the range of parameters equivalent to the ill-understood high-liquid-flow operation in packed towers. More importantly, our findings should prove valuable in validating improved first-principles modeling of gas-liquid flows in these industrially important devices.

  13. Air-water CO2 exchange in five hypereutrophic lakes in Bangalore, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Ghosh, P.; Bala, G.; Bastviken, D.

    2014-12-01

    Inland water bodies play a significant role in terrestrial carbon cycling, rather than being just conduits for the transport of terrestrial carbon to the oceans. Recent syntheses estimate that freshwaters emit substantial amounts of CO2 (1.4 Pg C yr-1) (Tranvik et al. 2009) and CH4 (0.65 Pg C yr-1) (Bastviken et al. 2011), which are similar in magnitude to the global terrestrial carbon sink (2.5 ± 1.7 Pg C yr-1) (IPCC 2013). However, eutrophic waters, which constitute the majority of the global freshwater supply (ILEC/UNEP 1994, Liu et al. 2012, Carpenter et al. 1998), are vastly underrepresented in these estimates. These waters, due to high primary productivity leading to CO2 undersaturation, can act as sinks rather than sources of CO2, thus reversing the role of lakes in the carbon cycle (Balmer and Downing 2011, Pacheco et al. 2013). We are investigating the air-water CO2 exchange of five hypereutrophic lakes in urban Bangalore using a novel Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR)-based CO2 sensor installed in flux chambers that can be used to measure CO2 exchange in lakes in situ. This work is a part of a larger study called Bangalore Carbon Mapping Study that aims to track the spatial flows of carbon in an urban area of a developing country. Preliminary observations reveal that these lakes absorb CO2 during the photosynthetic hours, at an average rate of 3.4 mg C m-2 h-1. The ongoing study will characterize the complete diurnal cycle of CO2 exchange, its variation over different seasons, and its relationships with various limnological and catchment characteristics. The flux estimates thus produced will also be compared with those predicted by the current models for air-water gas exchange based on wind speed.

  14. Growth and decay of acceleration waves in non-ideal gas flow with radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lal; Singh, Raghwendra; Ram, Subedar

    2012-09-01

    The present paper is concerned with the study of the propagation of acceleration waves along the characteristic path in a non-ideal gas flow with effect of radiative heat transfer. It is shown that a linear solution in the characteristic plane can exhibit non-linear behavior in the physical plane. It is also investigated as to how the radiative heat transfer under the optically thin limit will affect the formation of shock in planer, cylindrical and spherically symmetric flows. We conclude that there exists critical amplitude such that any compressive waves with initial amplitude greater than the critical one terminate into shock waves while an initial amplitude less than the critical one results in the decay of the disturbance. The critical time for shock formation has been computed. In this paper we also compare/contrast the nature of solution in ideal and non ideal gas flows.

  15. Determination of heat transfer coefficient for an interaction of sub-cooled gas and metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi Sidek, Mohd; Syahidan Kamarudin, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for a hot metal surface and their surrounding is one of the need be defined parameter in hot forming process. This study has been conducted to determine the HTC for an interaction between sub-cooled gas sprayed on a hot metal surface. Both experiments and finite element have been adopted in this work. Initially, the designated experiment was conducted to obtain temperature history of spray cooling process. Then, an inverse method was adopted to calculate the HTC value before we validate in a finite element simulation model. The result shows that the heat transfer coefficient for interaction of subcooled gas and hot metal surface is 1000 W/m2K.

  16. An experimental investigation of convective heat transfer at the leading edge of a gas turbine airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron, S.; Marchand, N. J.; Korn, C.; Immarigeon, J. P.; Kacprzynski, J. J.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental methods used to determine the surface temperatures and heat-transfer coefficients at the leading edge, and elsewhere over the surface, of a specially designed double-edge wedge shell specimen subjected to cyclic heating in a high velocity hot gas stream generated by a burner rig. The methods included temperature measurements with thermocouples (embedded below the surface) as well as surface temperature measurements by optical pyrometry. The experiments were carried out at gas temperatures between 806 to 1323 C and velocities in the range from Mach 0.32 to Mach 0.39. The calibration procedures for each method, the various testing conditions to which the airfoil-like specimen was exposed and the results pertaining to the determination of the surface temperatures and heat-transfer coefficients are described and discussed.

  17. Hydrocarbon Release During Fuel Storage and Transfer at Gas Stations: Environmental and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Hilpert, Markus; Mora, Bernat Adria; Ni, Jian; Rule, Ana M; Nachman, Keeve E

    2015-12-01

    At gas stations, fuel is stored and transferred between tanker trucks, storage tanks, and vehicle tanks. During both storage and transfer, a small fraction of unburned fuel is typically released to the environment unless pollution prevention technology is used. While the fraction may be small, the cumulative release can be substantial because of the large quantities of fuel sold. The cumulative release of unburned fuel is a public health concern because gas stations are widely distributed in residential areas and because fuel contains toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. We review the pathways through which gasoline is chronically released to atmospheric, aqueous, and subsurface environments, and how these releases may adversely affect human health. Adoption of suitable pollution prevention technology should not only be based on equipment and maintenance cost but also on energy- and health care-saving benefits. PMID:26435043

  18. Flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, A. A.; Mujumdar, A. S.; Saniei, N.

    Microchannels are currently being used in many areas and have high potential for applications in many other areas, which are considered realistic by experts. The application areas include medicine, biotechnology, avionics, consumer electronics, telecommunications, metrology, computer technology, office equipment and home appliances, safety technology, process engineering, robotics, automotive engineering and environmental protection. A number of these applications are introduced in this paper, followed by a critical review of the works on the flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels. The results show that the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a gas flowing in microchannels can not be adequately predicted by the theories and correlations developed for conventional sized channels. The results of theoretical and experimental works are discussed and summarized along with suggestions for future research directions.

  19. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale

  20. Method of calculating gas dynamics and heat transfer in single stage refrigeration units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhitomirskiy, I. S.; Popolskiy, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized mathematical model of gas-dynamic and heat transfer processes in single-stage regenerative installations operating in Stirling, MacMahon, Gifford-MacMahon, and pulsating tube cycles is proposed. A numerical method os solving initial equations on a digital computer is given. This makes it possible to calculate the change in the thermodynamic parameters in the working cycle in different machine components, as well as the dependence of cold productivity on the temperature level in the steady regime.

  1. Heat Transfer in the Turbulent Boundary Layer of a Compressible Gas at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.

    1942-01-01

    The Reynolds law of heat transfer from a wall to a turbulent stream is extended to the case of flow of a compressible gas at high speeds. The analysis is based on the modern theory of the turbulent boundary layer with laminar sublayer. The investigation is carried out for the case of a plate situated in a parallel stream. The results are obtained independently of the velocity distribution in the turbulent boundar layer.

  2. NIF Target Capsule Wall And Hohlraum Transfer Gas Effects On Deuterium-Tritium Redistribution Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, W H; Sanchez, J J

    2005-06-27

    The effects of temperature and age on the times required for beta-heating-induced redistribution of a 50-50 mole percent mixture of deuterium and tritium (DT) in a spherical capsule are investigated analytically and numerically. The derivation of an analytical solution for the redistribution time in a one-dimensional binary diffusion model, which includes the capsule thermal resistance, is first described. This result shows that the redistribution time for a high conductivity capsule wall is approximately doubled after 8 days of {sup 3}He formation. In contrast, with a low thermal conductivity capsule wall (e.g., polyimide), the redistribution time would increase by less than 10%. The substantial effect of the capsule wall resistance suggested that the resistance to heat transfer from the capsule through the surrounding transfer gas to the hohlraum wall would also influence the redistribution process. This was investigated with a spherical model, which was based on accounting for energy transfer by diffusion with a conduction heat transfer approximation. This made it possible to solve for the continuous temperature distribution throughout the capsule and surrounding gas. As with the capsule the redistribution times depended on the relative values of the thermal resistances of the vapor, the capsule, and the transfer gas. With increasing thermal resistance of the vapor (increased concentration of {sup 3}He) redistributions times for hydrocarbon capsules were significantly less than predicted by the one-dimensional model, which included the capsule wall resistance. In particular for low {sup 3}He concentrations the time constant was approximately 10% less than the minimum one-dimensional value of 27 minutes. Further analytical and experimental investigation focused on defining the relations between the thermal resistances under which the one-dimensional model analysis applies is recommended.

  3. Open ocean gas transfer velocity derived from long-term direct measurements of the CO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytherch, John; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin W.; Moat, Bengamin I.; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Srokosz, Meric A.

    2010-12-01

    Air-sea open ocean CO2 flux measurements have been made using the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique onboard the weathership Polarfront in the North Atlantic between September 2006 and December 2009. Flux measurements were made using an autonomous system ‘AutoFlux’. CO2 mass density was measured with an open-path infrared gas analyzer. Following quality control procedures, 3938 20-minute flux measurements were made at mean wind speeds up to 19.6 m/s, significantly higher wind speeds than previously published results. The uncertainty in the determination of gas transfer velocities is large, but the mean relationship to wind speed allows a new parameterisation of the gas transfer velocity to be determined. A cubic dependence of gas transfer on wind speed is found, suggesting a significant influence of bubble-mediated exchange on gas transfer.

  4. pH effects on the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin modified air-water interfaces and its impact on foam rheology.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Lexis, Meike; Gochev, Georgi; Konnerth, Christoph; Miller, Reinhard; Willenbacher, Norbert; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-09-17

    Macroscopic properties of aqueous β-lactoglobulin (BLG) foams and the molecular properties of BLG modified air-water interfaces as their major structural element were investigated with a unique combination of foam rheology measurements and interfacial sensitive methods such as sum-frequency generation and interfacial dilatational rheology. The molecular structure and protein-protein interactions at the air-water interface can be changed substantially with the solution pH and result in major changes in interfacial dilational and foam rheology. At a pH near the interfacial isoelectric point BLG molecules carry zero net charge and disordered multilayers with the highest interfacial dilatational elasticity are formed at the air-water interface. Increasing or decreasing the pH with respect to the isoelectric point leads to the formation of a BLG monolayer with repulsive electrostatic interactions among the adsorbed molecules which decrease the interfacial dilational elasticity. The latter molecular information does explain the behavior of BLG foams in our rheological studies, where in fact the highest apparent yield stresses and storage moduli are established with foams from electrolyte solutions with a pH close to the isoelectric point of BLG. At this pH the gas bubbles of the foam are stabilized by BLG multilayers with attractive intermolecular interactions at the ubiquitous air-water interfaces, while BLG layers with repulsive interactions decrease the apparent yield stress and storage moduli as stabilization of gas bubbles with a monolayer of BLG is less effective. PMID:23961700

  5. Intraday evaporation and heat fluxes variation at air-water interface of extremely shallow lakes in Chilean Andean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Jaime; de la Fuente, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Salars are landscapes formed by evapo-concentration of salts that usually have extremely shallow terminal lagoons (de la Fuente & Niño, 2010). They are located in the altiplanic region of the Andes Mountains of Chile, Argentina, Bolivia and Peru, and they sustain highly vulnerable and isolated ecosystems in the Andean Desert. These ecosystems are sustained by benthic primary production, which is directly linked to mass, heat and momentum transfer between the water column and the atmosphere (de la Fuente, 2014). Despite the importance of these transport processes across the air-water interface, there are few studies describing their intraday variation and how they are influenced by the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer in the altiplano. The main objective of this work is to analyze the intraday vertical transport variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum between the atmosphere and a shallow water body on Salar del Huasco located in northern Chile (20°19'40"S, 68°51'25"W). To achieve this goal, we measured atmospheric and water variables in a campaign realized on late October 2015, using high frequency meteorological instruments (a sonic anemometer with an incorporated infrared gas analyzer, and a standard meteorological station) and water sensors. From these data, we characterize the intraday variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum fluxes, we quantify the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer stability on them, and we estimate transfer coefficients associated to latent heat, sensible heat, hydrodynamic drag and vertical transport of water vapor. As first results, we found that latent and sensible heat fluxes are highly influenced by wind speed rather buoyancy, and we can identify four intraday intervals with different thermo-hydrodynamic features: (1) cooling under stable condition with wind speed near 0 from midnight until sunrise; (2) free convection with nearly no wind speed under unstable condition from sunrise until midday

  6. Mass Transfer from Gas Bubbles to Impinging Flow of Biological Fluids with Chemical Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jei; Echigo, R.; Wotton, D. R.; Ou, J. W.; Hwang, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The rates of mass transfer from a gas bubble to an impinging flow of a biological fluid such as whole blood and plasma are investigated analytically and experimentally. Gases commonly found dissolved in body fluids are included. Consideration is given to the effects of the chemical reaction between the dissolved gas and the liquid on the rate of mass transfer. Through the application of boundary layer theory the over-all transfer is found to be Sh/(Re)1/2 = 0.845 Sc1/3 in the absence of chemical reaction, and Sh/(Re) 1/2 = F′ (0) in the presence of chemical reaction, where Sh, Re, and Sc are the Sherwood, Reynolds, and Schmidt numbers, respectively, and F′ (0) is a function of Sc and the dimensionless reaction rate constant. Analytical results are also obtained for the bubble lifetime and the bubble radius-time history. These results, which are not incompatible with experimental results, can be applied to predict the dissolution of the entrapped gas emboli in the circulatory system of the human body. PMID:4642218

  7. Pulmonary Gas Transfer Related to Markers of Angiogenesis during the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Asosingh, Kewal; Laskowski, Daniel; Licina, Lauren; Sekigushi, Haruki; Losordo, Douglas W.; Dweik, Raed A.; Wiedemann, Herbert P.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2010-01-01

    Gas transfer in the female lung varies over the menstrual cycle in parallel with the cyclic angiogenesis that occurs in the uterine endometrium. Given that vessels form and regress in the uterus under the control of hormones, angiogenic factors and pro-angiogenic circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells, we tested the possibility that variation in pulmonary gas transfer over the menstrual cycle is related to a systemic cyclic pro-angiogenic state that influences lung vascularity. Women were evaluated over the menstrual cycle with weekly measures of lung diffusing capacity and its components, the pulmonary vascular capillary bed and membrane diffusing capacity, and their relation to circulating CD34+CD133+ progenitor cells, hemoglobin, factors affecting hemoglobin binding affinity, and pro-angiogenic factors. Lung diffusing capacity varied over the menstrual cycle, reaching a nadir during the follicular phase following menses. The decline in lung diffusing capacity was accounted for by ~25% decrease in pulmonary capillary blood volume. In parallel, circulating CD34+CD133+ progenitor cells decreased by ~24%, and were directly related to angiogenic factors, and to lung diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume. The finding of greater number of lung microvessels in ovariectomized female mice receiving estrogen as compared to placebo verified that pulmonary vascularity is influenced by hormonal changes. These findings suggest that angiogenesis in the lungs may participate in the cyclic changes in gas transfer that occur over the menstrual cycle. PMID:17717117

  8. Numerical calculation of the radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yipeng; Zhu, Dingqiang

    2014-11-01

    The heat flux density of radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas is one of the most important factors to decide temperature of nozzle's wall. It also provides an invaluable references advice for choosing the material of wall and type of cooling. The numerical calculation based on finite volume method is introduced in the paper. After analysis of the formula of FVM without the influence of scattering, a formula that is used to let spectral radiant intensity that is the calculation of FVM be converted into heat flux density of radiation heat transfer is deduced. It is compiled that the program based on FVM is used to calculate the heat flux density. At the end, the heat flux density of radiation heat transfer of 3D model of double-arc nozzle's wall is calculated under different condition, then simply analysis cooling system is performed.

  9. Measuring interactions between polydimethylsiloxane and serum proteins at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhengzheng; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Baumgart, Tobias; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2013-07-30

    The interaction between synthetic polymers and proteins at interfaces is relevant to basic science as well as a wide range of applications in biotechnology and medicine. One particularly common and important interface is the air-water interface (AWI). Due to the special energetics and dynamics of molecules at the AWI, the interplay between synthetic polymer and protein can be very different from that in bulk solution. In this paper, we applied the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the compression state of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film at the AWI affects the subsequent adsorption of serum protein [e.g., human serum albumin (HSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG)] and the interaction between PDMS and protein. Of particular note is our observation of circular PDMS domains with micrometer diameters that form at the AWI in the highly compressed state of the surface film: proteins were shown to adsorb preferentially to the surface of these circular PDMS domains, accompanied by a greater than 4-fold increase in protein found in the interfacial film. The PDMS-only film and the PDMS-IgG composite film were transferred to cover glass, and platinum-carbon replicas of the transferred films were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We conclude that the structure of the PDMS film greatly affects the amount and distribution of protein at the interface. PMID:23819833

  10. Bond-Specific Dissociation Following Excitation Energy Transfer for Distance Constraint Determination in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  11. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  12. Numerical studies of heat transfer and gas migration processes in relation to in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.

    1990-09-01

    This document presents numerical studies conducted in support of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) treatability study. These results will be used for support of hardware design and performance assessments of ISV processes. Four models are presented and analyzed using finite element techniques: (1) heat transport and melting during the ISV process, (2) heat transfer calculations on the Intermediate Field Test (IFT) off-gas confinement hood, (3) gas migration in permeable soil surrounding the vitrified zone, and (4) melt rate calculations. Heat transport in the ISV process describes the temperature field and melt growth in the soil. Thermal radiation heat transfer calculations for the IFT hood demonstrate the sensitivity of the hood temperatures to melt temperature, melt radius, and exterior hood emissivity. The study of gas migration in permeable soil resulting from a buried source predicts that gas may migrate to the soil surface. The one-dimensional melt rate calculations conservatively predict a melt rate of 6 cm/hr. 11 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Image processing analysis on the air-water slug two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinaryanto, Okto; Widyatama, Arif; Majid, Akmal Irfan; Deendarlianto, Indarto

    2016-06-01

    Slug flow is a part of intermittent flow which is avoided in industrial application because of its irregularity and high pressure fluctuation. Those characteristics cause some problems such as internal corrosion and the damage of the pipeline construction. In order to understand the slug characteristics, some of the measurement techniques can be applied such as wire-mesh sensors, CECM, and high speed camera. The present study was aimed to determine slug characteristics by using image processing techniques. Experiment has been carried out in 26 mm i.d. acrylic horizontal pipe with 9 m long. Air-water flow was recorded 5 m from the air-water mixer using high speed video camera. Each of image sequence was processed using MATLAB. There are some steps including image complement, background subtraction, and image filtering that used in this algorithm to produce binary images. Special treatments also were applied to reduce the disturbance effect of dispersed bubble around the bubble. Furthermore, binary images were used to describe bubble contour and calculate slug parameter such as gas slug length, gas slug velocity, and slug frequency. As a result the effect of superficial gas velocity and superficial liquid velocity on the fundamental parameters can be understood. After comparing the results to the previous experimental results, the image processing techniques is a useful and potential technique to explain the slug characteristics.

  14. A simple technique for continuous measurement of time-variable gas transfer in surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Harvey, Judson W.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Tobias, Craig R.

    2009-01-01

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in streams, lakes, and rivers serve as the basis for estimating wholeecosystem rates for various biogeochemical processes. Rates of gas exchange between water and the atmosphere are important and error-prone components of these models. Here we present a simple and efficient modification of the SF6 gas tracer approach that can be used concurrently while collecting other dissolved gas samples for dissolved gas mass balance studies in streams. It consists of continuously metering SF6-saturated water directly into the stream at a low rate of flow. This approach has advantages over pulse injection of aqueous solutions or bubbling large amounts of SF6 into the stream. By adding the SF6 as a saturated solution, we minimize the possibility that other dissolved gas measurements are affected by sparging and/or bubble injecta. Because the SF6 is added continuously we have a record of changing gas transfer velocity (GTV) that is contemporaneous with the sampling of other nonconservative ambient dissolved gases. Over a single diel period, a 30% variation in GTV was observed in a second-order stream (Sugar Creek, Indiana, USA). The changing GTV could be attributed in part to changes in temperature and windspeed that occurred on hourly to diel timescales.

  15. A simple technique for continuous measurement of time-variable gas transfer in surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobias, C.R.; Böhlke, J.K.; Harvey, J.W.; Busenberg, E.

    2009-01-01

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in streams, lakes, and rivers serve as the basis for estimating wholeecosystem rates for various biogeochemical processes. Rates of gas exchange between water and the atmosphere are important and error-prone components of these models. Here we present a simple and efficient modification of the SF6 gas tracer approach that can be used concurrently while collecting other dissolved gas samples for dissolved gas mass balance studies in streams. It consists of continuously metering SF 6-saturated water directly into the stream at a low rate of flow. This approach has advantages over pulse injection of aqueous solutions or bubbling large amounts of SF6 into the stream. By adding the SF 6 as a saturated solution, we minimize the possibility that other dissolved gas measurements are affected by sparging and/or bubble injecta. Because the SF6 is added continuously we have a record of changing gas transfer velocity (GTV) that is contemporaneous with the sampling of other nonconservative ambient dissolved gases. Over a single diel period, a 30% variation in GTV was observed in a second-order stream (Sugar Creek, Indiana, USA). The changing GTV could be attributed in part to changes in temperature and windspeed that occurred on hourly to diel timescales.

  16. Sulfur Transfer via Gas Phase in Iron-making Blast Furnace under Intensive Coal Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiyuki, Matsui; Rikizou, Tadai; Kenji, Ito; Tadasu, Matsuo; Korehito, Kadoguchi; Reiji, Ono

    The steel industry will move toward more value additive products in the future. In order to support the value additive steel products, iron sources have to be secured with stable operation of furnaces and control of furnace have to be evolved. Environment consciousness including CO2 reduction leads more toward lower reducing agents ratio operation. It is common technical issue on both the more value additive products the environment consciousness to control the sulfur in the hot metal, slag and gas phase.In the present study, the amount of sulfur gasification was measured by combustion experiments with the attention on the simultaneous gasification of sulfur with carbon. By description of sulfurization from gas to burden materials based on the temperature distribution measured in actual furnace, the amount of sulfur transferred to gas was evaluated.

  17. Application of the gas tracer method for measuring oxygen transfer rates in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tyroller, Lina; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Santa, Santa; García, Joan

    2010-07-01

    The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) has a significant impact on the design, optimal operation and modelling of constructed wetlands treating wastewater. Oxygen consumption is very fast in wetlands and the OTR cannot be determined using an oxygen mass balance. This problem is circumvented in this study by applying the gas tracer method. Experiments were conducted in an unplanted gravel bed (dimensions L x W x d 125 x 50 x 35 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 10-11-mm gravel) and a planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSFCW) (L x W x d 110 x 70 x 38 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 3.5-mm gravel with Phragmites australis). Tap water saturated with propane as gas tracer (pure or commercial cooking gas, depending on the test) was used. The mass transfer ratio between oxygen and commercial propane gas was quite constant and averaged R = 1.03, which is slightly lower than the value of R = 1.39 that is usually reported for pure propane. The OTR ranged from 0.31 to 5.04 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the unplanted gravel bed and from 0.3 to 3.2 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the HSSFCW, depending on the hydraulic retention time (HRT). The results of this study suggest that the OTR in HSSFCW is very low for the oxygen demand of standard wastewater and the OTR calculations based on mass balances and theoretical stoichiometric considerations overestimate OTR values by a factor that ranges from 10 to 100. The gas tracer method is a promising tool for determining OTR in constructed wetlands, with commercial gas proving to be a viable low-cost alternative for determining OTR. PMID:20542312

  18. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... Violating Facilities” published pursuant to 40 CFR 15.20. By acceptance of a cooperative agreement in...

  19. 14 CFR § 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Â...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... Violating Facilities” published pursuant to 40 CFR 15.20. By acceptance of a cooperative agreement in...

  20. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... Violating Facilities” published pursuant to 40 CFR 15.20. By acceptance of a cooperative agreement in...

  1. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. 1274.926 Section 1274.926 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.926 Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean...

  2. Effects of gas bubble production on heat transfer from a volumetrically heated liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Geoffrey R.

    Aqueous solutions of uranium salts may provide a new supply chain to fill potential shortfalls in the availability of the most common radiopharmaceuticals currently in use worldwide, including Tc99m which is a decay product of Mo99. The fissioning of the uranium in these solutions creates Mo99 but also generates large amounts of hydrogen and oxygen from the radiolysis of the water. When the dissolved gases reach a critical concentration, bubbles will form in the solution. Bubbles in the solution affect both the fission power and the heat transfer out of the solution. As a result, for safety and production calculations, the effects of the bubbles on heat transfer must be understood. A high aspect ratio tank was constructed to simulate a section of an annulus with heat exchangers on the inner and outer steel walls to provide cooling. Temperature measurements via thermocouples inside the tank and along the outside of the steel walls allowed the calculation of overall and local heat transfer coefficients. Different air injection manifolds allowed the exploration of various bubble characteristics and patterns on heat transfer from the pool. The manifold type did not appear to have significant impact on the bubble size distributions in water. However, air injected into solutions of magnesium sulfate resulted in smaller bubble sizes and larger void fractions than those in water at the same injection rates. One dimensional calculations provide heat transfer coefficient values as functions of the superficial gas velocity in the pool.

  3. Development of heat transfer method for non-intrusive pressure measurement in natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.T.; Holderbaum, G.S.; Philips, D.B.; Stulen, F.B.; Eberle, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    A method for non-intrusive measurement of internal pressures in flowing and non-flowing natural gas distribution pipelines has been developed. The method is based on temperature changes observed at various locations on the outside wall of the pipe in response to a circumferential band of heat applied to it. Because of the complex flow patterns in the pipe, the pressure-related phenomena induce second-order effects on the heat transfer to the gas or liquid in the pipeline. Experimental results from both laboratory and field measurements have been compared with predictions from TEMPEST, a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) model, to aid in understanding the flow characteristics. In this method, a 2.5-in. band or ring heater device placed around the outer circumference of the pipe is used to apply that to the outer wall of the pipe. The effect of heat input ranging from 250 to 1,000 watts has been evaluated for pipe diameters ranging from 4 in. to 12 in. The expected range of Reynolds numbers spans the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes, thus adding significant complexity to the problem. Results have shown that a heater power of about 1,000 watts for flowing gas and 250 watts for non-flowing gas enables an acceptable estimate of pressures for most cases. The method can be used to effectively determine whether a pipe is filled with gas or liquid. It can also indicate whether the gas is flowing or static. For flowing gas, upstream-to-downstream and top-to-bottom temperature differences at the surface of the pipe are jointly used to determine gas flow rate and pressure. For no-flow conditions, the upstream-to-downstream temperature difference is zero, and pressures ranging from 0 to 150 psig can be differentiated solely by the temperatures along the outside wall of the pipe.

  4. Seasonal air-water exchange fluxes of polychlorinated biphenyls in the Hudson River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shu; Rodenburg, Lisa A; Dachs, Jordi; Eisenreich, Steven J

    2008-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in the air and water over the Hudson River Estuary during six intensive field campaigns from December 1999 to April 2001. Over-water gas-phase SigmaPCB concentrations averaged 1100 pg/m3 and varied with temperature. Dissolved-phase SigmaPCB concentrations averaged 1100 pg/L and displayed no seasonal trend. Uncertainty analysis of the results suggests that PCBs with 5 or fewer chlorines exhibited net volatilization. The direction of net air/water exchange could not be determined for PCBs with 6 or more chlorines. Instantaneous net fluxes of SigmaPCBs ranged from +0.2 to +630 ng m(-2) d(-1). Annual fluxes of SigmaPCBs were predicted from modeled gas-phase concentrations, measured dissolved-phase concentrations, daily surface water temperatures and wind speeds. The net volatilization flux was +62 microg m(-2) yr(-1), corresponding to an annual loss of +28 kg/yr of SigmaPCBs from the Hudson River Estuary for the year of 2000. PMID:17854962

  5. Analysis of Effect of Gas-Liquid Interfacial Disturbance on Mass Transfer Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honda; Chung, Tsair-Wang

    In order to study the mass transfer phenomena for water vapor absorbed by triethylene glycol (TEG) solution and to elucidate effect of interfacial disturbance on absorption performance, the interfacial phenomena for water drop instilling on the surface of TEG solution and mass transfer process were observed and operated in this study. Besides liquid and gas flow rates, the interfacial disturbance can also affect the mass transfer performance in the absorption system with continuous liquid phase, and the advanced mass transfer phenomena must be discussed from the interface of matter. Therefore, the surface tensions of desiccant solutions were measured to analyze the disturbed phenomena of water drop instilling on the surface of TEG solution. Since the Marangoni-Index (MI) means the maximum surface tension difference on the surface of liquid layer, the values of MI were calculated and compared with the mass transfer performance of packed-bed absorber. Generally speaking, the interfacial disturbance, resulted from the surface tension difference, would promote the contacting area of gas and liquid phases. The observation of water drop instilling on surface of TEG solution found that the interfacial disturbance existed between water drop and TEG solution, and the interfacial instability was found in the peripheral region of the water drop. On the other hand, the values of MI were increased by the increased TEG concentrations, and it can be deduced that the surface tension effect should be significant in the higher concentration of TEG solution and the interfacial disturbance would be heavier above 95 wt.% TEG solutions. Finally, the absorption performance for 95 and 96 wt.% TEG solutions were much larger than that of 90 and 88.6 wt.% TEG solutions in the operation of packed-bed absorber.

  6. Characterization of carbon dioxide transfer in a hollow fiber membrane module as a solution for gas-liquid transfer in microgravity conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Berangere; Duchez, David; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Cornet, Jean-F.

    In microgravity, one of the major difficulties encountered in closed photosynthetic reactors is the gas-liquid transfer with the necessity to provide CO2 (carbon source, pH control) and to recover the produced O2 . Indeed, reduced gravity is expected to modify gas liquid transfer and liquid phase mixing characteristics inside photobioreactors conceived to regenerate atmosphere of closed life-support systems. To obtain efficient mass transfer conditions and mixing of phases, several solutions are possible: use of rotating reactor (centrifugal field), use of forced, co-current convective reactor with gas-liquid separator and use of membrane modules. In terms of space process engineering, the membrane reactor can be a valuable alternative in which the gas and liquid phases are separated with a selectively permeable membrane. The rate-limiting factors in this reactor were demonstrated to be the surface of membrane A needed for diffusion of gases and the CO2 and O2 mass transfer coefficients in the liquid phase kL. How-ever, the major advantages of the membrane reactor are that it is composed of a hydrophobic membrane (here PTFE) which showed a high hydrophobicity, an important chemical resis-tance, a very long term stability and overall which is favourable to gas transfer. Moreover, the volumetric mass transfer coefficients are sufficiently high to build compact systems with small footprints, no complex rotating devices and lighter weights. This paper describes first the development of a system enabling the accurate characterization of the mass transfer limiting step for a PTFE membrane module. This original technical apparatus, together with a technical assessment of membrane permeability to different gases, is associated with a balance model, determining thus completely the CO2 mass transfer problem between phases. First results are given and discussed for the CO2 mass transfer coefficient CO kL 2 obtained in case of an absorption experiment at pH = 8 using the

  7. Computer program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-0 and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, G.; Gibson, G.

    1968-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-O and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas. The equations used are based on the conditions that there is isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass coordinate system, the scattering cross section is constant, and the target nuclear velocities satisfy a Maxwellian distribution.

  8. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, G. W.; Navin, J. K.; Valadez, L.; Johánek, V.; Harrison, I.

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(Tg, Ts; ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, Tg, and surface temperature, Ts, can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with Tg = Ts = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(Tg, Ts; ϑ) measurements for which Tg ≠ Ts provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the Tg of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  9. Surfactant control of gas transfer velocity along an offshore coastal transect: results from a laboratory gas exchange tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; Schneider-Zapp, K.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the physical and biogeochemical controls of air-sea gas exchange is necessary for establishing biogeochemical models for predicting regional- and global-scale trace gas fluxes and feedbacks. To this end we report the results of experiments designed to constrain the effect of surfactants in the sea surface microlayer (SML) on the gas transfer velocity (kw; cm h-1), seasonally (2012-2013) along a 20 km coastal transect (North East UK). We measured total surfactant activity (SA), chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and chlorophyll a (Chl a) in the SML and in sub-surface water (SSW) and we evaluated corresponding kw values using a custom-designed air-sea gas exchange tank. Temporal SA variability exceeded its spatial variability. Overall, SA varied 5-fold between all samples (0.08 to 0.38 mg L-1 T-X-100), being highest in the SML during summer. SML SA enrichment factors (EFs) relative to SSW were ˜ 1.0 to 1.9, except for two values (0.75; 0.89: February 2013). The range in corresponding k660 (kw for CO2 in seawater at 20 °C) was 6.8 to 22.0 cm h-1. The film factor R660 (the ratio of k660 for seawater to k660 for "clean", i.e. surfactant-free, laboratory water) was strongly correlated with SML SA (r ≥ 0.70, p ≤ 0.002, each n = 16). High SML SA typically corresponded to k660 suppressions ˜ 14 to 51 % relative to clean laboratory water, highlighting strong spatiotemporal gradients in gas exchange due to varying surfactant in these coastal waters. Such variability should be taken account of when evaluating marine trace gas sources and sinks. Total CDOM absorbance (250 to 450 nm), the CDOM spectral slope ratio (SR = S275 - 295/S350 - 400), the 250 : 365 nm CDOM absorption ratio (E2 : E3), and Chl a all indicated spatial and temporal signals in the quantity and composition of organic matter in the SML and SSW. This prompts us to hypothesise that spatiotemporal variation in R660 and its relationship with SA is a consequence of compositional

  10. Preliminary characterization of carbon dioxide transfer in a hollow fiber membrane module as a possible solution for gas-liquid transfer in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Bérangère; Duchez, David; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Cornet, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    In microgravity, one of the major challenge encountered in biological life support systems (BLSS) is the gas-liquid transfer with, for instance, the necessity to provide CO2 (carbon source, pH control) and to recover the evolved O2 in photobioreactors used as atmosphere bioregenerative systems.This paper describes first the development of a system enabling the accurate characterization of the mass transfer limiting step for a PTFE membrane module used as a possible efficient solution to the microgravity gas-liquid transfer. This original technical apparatus, together with a technical assessment of membrane permeability to different gases, is associated with a balance model, determining thus completely the CO2 mass transfer problem between phases. First results are given and discussed for the CO2 mass transfer coefficient kLCO obtained in case of absorption experiments at pH 8 using the hollow fiber membrane module. The consistency of the proposed method, based on a gas and liquid phase balances verifying carbon conservation enables a very accurate determination of the kLCO value as a main limiting step of the whole process. Nevertheless, further experiments are still needed to demonstrate that the proposed method could serve in the future as reference method for mass transfer coefficient determination if using membrane modules for BLSS in reduced or microgravity conditions.

  11. Computational prediction of heat transfer to gas turbine nozzle guide vanes with roughened surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S.M.; Jones, T.V.; Lock, G.D.; Dancer, S.N.

    1998-04-01

    The local Mach number and heat transfer coefficient over the aerofoil surfaces and endwalls of a transonic gas turbine nozzle guide vane have been calculated. the computations were performed by solving the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a fully three-dimensional computational code (CFDS), which is well established at Rolls-Royce. A model to predict the effects of roughness has been incorporated into CFDS and heat transfer levels have been calculated for both hydraulically smooth and transitionally rough surfaces. The roughness influences the calculations in two ways; first the mixing length at a certain height above the surface is increased; second the wall function used to reconcile the wall condition with the first grid point above the wall is also altered. The first involves a relatively straightforward shift of the origin in the van Driest damping function description, the second requires an integration of the momentum equation across the wall layer. A similar treatment applies to the energy equation. The calculations are compared with experimental contours of heat transfer coefficient obtained using both thin-film gages and the transient liquid crystal technique. Measurements were performed using both hydraulically smooth and roughened surfaces, and at engine-representative Mach and Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer results are discussed and interpreted in terms of surface-shear flow visualization using oil and dye techniques.

  12. Dynamics of pulsed expansion of polyatomic gas cloud: Internal-translational energy transfer contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.

    2007-08-15

    Polyatomic gas cloud expansion under pulsed laser evaporation is studied on the basis of one-dimensional direct Monte Carlo simulation. The effect of rotational-translational (RT) and vibrational-translational (VT) energy transfer on dynamics of the cloud expansion is considered. Efficiency of VT energy transfer dependence on the amount of evaporated matter is discussed. To analyze VT energy transfer impact, the number of collisions per molecule during the expansion is calculated. The data are generally in good agreement with available analytical and numerical predictions. Dependencies of the effective number of vibrational degrees of freedom on the number of vibrationally inelastic collisions are obtained and generalized. The importance of the consideration of energy transfer from the internal degrees of freedom to the translational ones is illustrated by an example of pulsed laser evaporation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Based on the obtained regularities, analysis of experimental data on pulsed laser evaporation of aniline is performed. The calculated aniline vibrational temperature correlates well with the experimentally measured one.

  13. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Duttlinger

    1999-12-01

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  14. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-10-31

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  15. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry: on-line trace gas analysis at the ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-11-01

    A system for trace gas analysis using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of analysis of breath taken from smokers and non-smokers as well as from patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, and of air in buildings as well as of ambient air taken at a road crossing demonstrate the wide range of applicability of this method. An enhanced level of acetonitrile in the breath is a most suitable indicator that a person is a smoker. Enhanced levels of propanol strongly indicate that a person has a severe liver deficiency.

  16. A high-power ultrasonic microreactor and its application in gas-liquid mass transfer intensification.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhengya; Yao, Chaoqun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xu, Jie; Chen, Guangwen; Zhao, Yuchao; Yuan, Quan

    2015-02-21

    The combination of ultrasound and microreactor is an emerging and promising area, but the report of designing high-power ultrasonic microreactor (USMR) is still limited. This work presents a robust, high-power and highly efficient USMR by directly coupling a microreactor plate with a Langevin-type transducer. The USMR is designed as a longitudinal half wavelength resonator, for which the antinode plane of the highest sound intensity is located at the microreactor. According to one dimension design theory, numerical simulation and impedance analysis, a USMR with a maximum power of 100 W and a resonance frequency of 20 kHz was built. The strong and uniform sound field in the USMR was then applied to intensify gas-liquid mass transfer of slug flow in a microfluidic channel. Non-inertial cavitation with multiple surface wave oscillation was excited on the slug bubbles, enhancing the overall mass transfer coefficient by 3.3-5.7 times. PMID:25537767

  17. Microbial synthesis gas utilization and ways to resolve kinetic and mass-transfer limitations.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Jeong, Yeseul; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Jiyeong; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lovitt, Robert W; Kim, Byung Hong; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2015-02-01

    Microbial conversion of syngas to energy-dense biofuels and valuable chemicals is a potential technology for the efficient utilization of fossils (e.g., coal) and renewable resources (e.g., lignocellulosic biomass) in an environmentally friendly manner. However, gas-liquid mass transfer and kinetic limitations are still major constraints that limit the widespread adoption and successful commercialization of the technology. This review paper provides rationales for syngas bioconversion and summarizes the reaction limited conditions along with the possible strategies to overcome these challenges. Mass transfer and economic performances of various reactor configurations are compared, and an ideal case for optimum bioreactor operation is presented. Overall, the challenges with the bioprocessing steps are highlighted, and potential solutions are suggested. Future research directions are provided and a conceptual design for a membrane-based syngas biorefinery is proposed. PMID:25443672

  18. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-05-01

    During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  19. Diffusive transfer of polarized 3He gas through depolarizing magnetic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, J. D.; Epstein, C. S.; Milner, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Transfer of polarized 3He gas across spatially varying magnetic fields will facilitate a new source of polarized 3He ions for particle accelerators. In this context, depolarization of atoms as they pass through regions of significant transverse field gradients is a major concern. To understand these depolarization effects, we have built a system consisting of a Helmholtz coil pair and a solenoid, both with central magnetic fields of order 30 gauss. The atoms are polarized via metastability exchange optical pumping in the Helmholtz coil and are in diffusive contact via a glass tube with a second test cell in the solenoid. We have carried out measurements of the spin relaxation during transfer of polarization in 3He at 1 torr by diffusion. We explore the use of measurements of the loss of polarization taken in one cell to infer the polarization in the other cell.

  20. On which timescales do gas transfer velocities control North Atlantic CO2 flux variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couldrey, Matthew P.; Oliver, Kevin I. C.; Yool, Andrew; Halloran, Paul R.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2016-05-01

    The North Atlantic is an important basin for the global ocean's uptake of anthropogenic and natural carbon dioxide (CO2), but the mechanisms controlling this carbon flux are not fully understood. The air-sea flux of CO2, F, is the product of a gas transfer velocity, k, the air-sea CO2 concentration gradient, ΔpCO2, and the temperature- and salinity-dependent solubility coefficient, α. k is difficult to constrain, representing the dominant uncertainty in F on short (instantaneous to interannual) timescales. Previous work shows that in the North Atlantic, ΔpCO2 and k both contribute significantly to interannual F variability but that k is unimportant for multidecadal variability. On some timescale between interannual and multidecadal, gas transfer velocity variability and its associated uncertainty become negligible. Here we quantify this critical timescale for the first time. Using an ocean model, we determine the importance of k, ΔpCO2, and α on a range of timescales. On interannual and shorter timescales, both ΔpCO2 and k are important controls on F. In contrast, pentadal to multidecadal North Atlantic flux variability is driven almost entirely by ΔpCO2; k contributes less than 25%. Finally, we explore how accurately one can estimate North Atlantic F without a knowledge of nonseasonal k variability, finding it possible for interannual and longer timescales. These findings suggest that continued efforts to better constrain gas transfer velocities are necessary to quantify interannual variability in the North Atlantic carbon sink. However, uncertainty in k variability is unlikely to limit the accuracy of estimates of longer-term flux variability.

  1. Heat Transfer to Bodies in a High-speed Rarified-Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Goodwin, Glen; Creager, Marcus O

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation to determine the equilibrium temperature and heat-transfer coefficients for transverse cylinders in a high-speed stream of rarefied gas measured over a range of Knudsen numbers (ratio of molecular-mean-free path to cylinder diameter) from 0.025 to 11.8 and for Mach numbers from 2.0 to 3.3. The range of free-stream Reynolds numbers was from 0.28 to 203. The models tested were 0.0010-, 0.0050-, 0.030-, 0.051-, 0.080-, and 0.126-inch -diameter cylinders held normal to the stream.

  2. A numerical study of the heat transfer through a rarefied gas confined in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Anirudh S.; Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Struchtrup, Henning

    2015-05-01

    Flow and heat transfer in a bottom-heated square cavity in a moderately rarefied gas is investigated using the R13 equations and the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations. The results obtained are compared with those from the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with emphasis on understanding thermal flow characteristics from the slip flow to the early transition regime. The R13 theory gives satisfying results—including flow patterns in fair agreement with DSMC—in the transition regime, which the conventional Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations are not able to capture.

  3. Heat and mass transfer for turbulent flow of chemically reacting gas in eccentric annular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Besedina, T.V.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Udot, A.V.; Yakushev, A.P.

    1988-02-01

    Because of the possibility of using dissociating gases as coolants and working bodies of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to develop computational algorithms for calculating heat and mass transfer processes under conditions of nonequilibrium flow of chemically reacting gases not only in axisymmetric channels, but also in channels with a complex transverse cross section (including also in eccentric annular channels). An algorithm is proposed for calculating the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields under conditions of cooling of a cylindrical heat-releasing rod, placed off-center in a circular casing pipe, by a longitudinal flow of chemically reacting gas (N/sub 2/O/sub 4/).

  4. Buoyancy flux, turbulence, and the gas transfer coefficient in a stratified lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, Sally; Jonsson, Anders; Jansson, Mats; Aberg, Jan; Turney, Damon E.; Miller, Scott D.

    2010-12-01

    Gas fluxes from lakes and other stratified water bodies, computed using conservative values of the gas transfer coefficient k600, have been shown to be a significant component of the carbon cycle. We present a mechanistic analysis of the dominant physical processes modifying k600 in a stratified lake and resulting new models of k600 whose use will enable improved computation of carbon fluxes. Using eddy covariance results, we demonstrate that i) higher values of k600 occur during low to moderate winds with surface cooling than with surface heating; ii) under overnight low wind conditions k600 depends on buoyancy flux β rather than wind speed; iii) the meteorological conditions at the time of measurement and the inertia within the lake determine k600; and iv) eddy covariance estimates of k600 compare well with predictions of k600 using a surface renewal model based on wind speed and β.

  5. Coumarin meets fluorescein: a Förster resonance energy transfer enhanced optical ammonia gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Susanne; Dorrestijn, Marko; Camerlo, Agathe; Urek, Špela Korent; Lobnik, Aleksandra; Housecroft, Catherine E; Constable, Edwin C; Scherer, Lukas J

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on the development of an optical ammonia gas sensor, the sensing mechanism of which is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between coumarin and fluorescein. The dyes were immobilized into an organically modified silicate matrix during polymerizing methyltriethoxysilane with trifluoropropyltrimethoxysilane on a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate. The resulting dye-doped xerogel films were exposed to different gaseous ammonia concentrations. A logarithmic decrease of the coumarin fluorescence emission band at 442 nm was observed with increasing gaseous ammonia concentrations, which was due to enhanced FRET between coumarin and fluorescein. The coumarin/fluorescein composition was optimized in order to obtain the best ammonia sensitivity. First experiments in a flow cell gas sensor setup demonstrated a sensitive and reversible response to gaseous ammonia. PMID:25004956

  6. Hot-Gas-Slide and Coolant-Side Heat Transfer in Liquid Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Luong, Van

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to develop a multidisciplinary, computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in film cooling assisted, regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors, and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a developmental combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40-k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine main combustion chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the advanced main combustion chamber to find a strategy for a proposed coolant channel design.

  7. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2003-04-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

  8. Spread Films of Human Serum Albumin at the Air-Water Interface: Optimization, Morphology, and Durability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard A; Ang, Joo Chuan; Sebastiani, Federica; Tummino, Andrea; White, John W

    2015-12-22

    It has been known for almost one hundred years that a lower surface tension can be achieved at the air-water interface by spreading protein from a concentrated solution than by adsorption from an equivalent total bulk concentration. Nevertheless, the factors that control this nonequilibrium process have not been fully understood. In the present work, we apply ellipsometry, neutron reflectometry, X-ray reflectometry, and Brewster angle microscopy to elaborate the surface loading of human serum albumin in terms of both the macroscopic film morphology and the spreading dynamics. We show that the dominant contribution to the surface loading mechanism is the Marangoni spreading of protein from the bulk of the droplets rather than the direct transfer of their surface films. The films can be spread on a dilute subphase if the concentration of the spreading solution is sufficient; if not, dissolution of the protein occurs, and only a textured adsorbed layer slowly forms. The morphology of the spread protein films comprises an extended network with regions of less textured material or gaps. Further, mechanical cycling of the surface area of the spread films anneals the network into a membrane that approach constant compressibility and has increased durability. Our work provides a new perspective on an old problem in colloid and interface science. The scope for optimization of the surface loading mechanism in a range of systems leading to its exploitation in deposition-based technologies in the future is discussed. PMID:26607026

  9. Substrateless Welding of Self-Assembled Silver Nanowires at Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hang; Wang, Zhongyong; Ye, Qinxian; He, Jiaqing; Nie, Xiao; He, Gufeng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao

    2016-08-10

    Integrating connected silver nanowire networks with flexible polymers has appeared as a popular way to prepare flexible electronics. To reduce the contact resistance and enhance the connectivity between silver nanowires, various welding techniques have been developed. Herein, rather than welding on solid supporting substrates, which often requires complicated transferring operations and also may pose damage to heat-sensitive substrates, we report an alternative approach to prepare easily transferrable conductive networks through welding of self-assembled silver nanowires at the air/water interface using plasmonic heating. The intriguing welding behavior of partially aligned silver nanowires was analyzed with combined experimental observation and theoretical modeling. The underlying water not only physically supports the assembled silver nanowires but also buffers potential overheating during the welding process, thereby enabling effective welding within a broad range of illumination power density and illumination duration. The welded networks could be directly integrated with PDMS substrates to prepare high-performance stable flexible heaters that are stretchable, bendable, and can be easily patterned to explore selective heating applications. PMID:27437907

  10. Gas-grain energy transfer in solar nebula shock waves: Implications for the origin of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Horanyi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Meteoritic chondrules provide evidence for the occurrence of rapid transient heating events in the protoplanetary nebula. Astronomical evidence suggests that gas dynamic shock waves are likely to be excited in protostellar accretion disks by processes such as protosolar mass ejections, nonaxisymmetric structures in an evolving disk, and impact on the nebula surface of infalling 'clumps' of circumstellar gas. Previous detailed calculations of gas-grain energy and momentum transfer have supported the possibility that such shock waves could have melted pre-existing chondrule-sized grains. The main requirement for grains to reach melting temperatures in shock waves with plausibly low Mach numbers is that grains existed in dust-rich zones (optical depth greater than 1) where radiative cooling of a given grain can be nearly balanced by radiation from surrounding grains. Localized dust-rich zones also provide a means of explaining the apparent small spatial scale of heating events. For example, the scale size of at least some optically thick dust-rich zones must have been relatively small (less than 10 kilometers) to be consistent with petrologic evidence for accretion of hot material onto cold chondrules. The implied number density of mm-sized grains for these zones would be greater than 30 m(exp -3). In this paper, we make several improvements of our earlier calculations to include radiation self-consistently in the shock jump conditions, and we include heating of grains due to radiation from the shocked gas. In addition, we estimate the importance of momentum feedback of dust concentrations onto the shocked gas which would tend to reduce the efficiency of gas dynamic heating of grains in the center of the dust cloud.

  11. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages. PMID:25813029

  12. Implementation of empirical total pressure loss data into the DUCTFLO and TOPAZ gas transfer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.; Kanouff, M.P.

    1984-11-01

    Sandia presently has two computer codes capable of modeling local pressure and enthalpy losses in lines connecting gas reservoirs and receivers. Each code conserves flow continuity, momentum, and energy as a function of position along the flow path. The first of these codes, DUCTFLO, models gas flow by solving a set of coupled algebraic equations. The DUCTFLO code has been formulated to make direct use of laboratory total pressure and enthalpy loss data. The second code, TOPAZ, models gas flow by solving a set of coupled ordinary differential equations using a conventional finite difference technique. The TOPAZ finite difference equations must be altered slightly in order to make use of laboratory total pressure and enthalpy loss data. In this report, methods for implementing empirical loss data in the two codes are discussed. In quasi-steady flow situations, it is shown that the two codes predict the same gas transfer for a given set of empirical loss data. This is demonstrated in an example problem consisting of a reservoir and receiver connected by a series of seven flow components each having unique loss characteristics. 11 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  14. Reliable quantification of phthalates in environmental matrices (air, water, sludge, sediment and soil): a review.

    PubMed

    Net, Sopheak; Delmont, Anne; Sempéré, Richard; Paluselli, Andrea; Ouddane, Baghdad

    2015-05-15

    Because of their widespread application, phthalates or phthalic acid esters (PAEs) are ubiquitous in the environment. Their presence has attracted considerable attention due to their potential impacts on ecosystem functioning and on public health, so their quantification has become a necessity. Various extraction procedures as well as gas/liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection techniques are found as suitable for reliable detection of such compounds. However, PAEs are ubiquitous in the laboratory environment including ambient air, reagents, sampling equipment, and various analytical devices, that induces difficult analysis of real samples with a low PAE background. Therefore, accurate PAE analysis in environmental matrices is a challenging task. This paper reviews the extensive literature data on the techniques for PAE quantification in natural media. Sampling, sample extraction/pretreatment and detection for quantifying PAEs in different environmental matrices (air, water, sludge, sediment and soil) have been reviewed and compared. The concept of "green analytical chemistry" for PAE determination is also discussed. Moreover useful information about the material preparation and the procedures of quality control and quality assurance are presented to overcome the problem of sample contamination and these encountered due to matrix effects in order to avoid overestimating PAE concentrations in the environment. PMID:25723871

  15. Time-resolved Fast Neutron Radiography of Air-water Two-phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zboray, Robert; Dangendorf, Volker; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Bromberger, Benjamin; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    Neutron imaging, in general, is a useful technique for visualizing low-Z materials (such as water or plastics) obscured by high-Z materials. However, when significant amounts of both materials are present and full-bodied samples have to be examined, cold and thermal neutrons rapidly reach their applicability limit as the samples become opaque. In such cases one can benefit from the high penetrating power of fast neutrons. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of time-resolved, fast neutron radiography of generic air-water two-phase flows in a 1.5 cm thick flow channel with Aluminum walls and rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the high-intensity, white-beam facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. Exposure times down to 3.33 ms have been achieved at reasonable image quality and acceptable motion artifacts. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two-phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and bubble velocities have been measured.

  16. Evaluation of the swell effect on the air-sea gas transfer in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Air-sea gas transfer processes are one of the most important factors regarding global climate and long-term global climate changes. Despite its importance, there is still a huge uncertainty on how to better parametrize these processes in order to include them on the global climate models. This uncertainty exposes the need to increase our knowledge on gas transfer controlling mechanisms. In the coastal regions, breaking waves become a key factor to take into account when estimating gas fluxes, however, there is still a lack of information and the influence of the ocean surface waves on the air-sea interaction and gas flux behavior must be validated. In this study, as part of the "Sea Surface Roughness as Air-Sea Interaction Control" project, we evaluate the effect of the ocean surface waves on the gas exchange in the coastal zone. Direct estimates of the flux of CO2 (FCO2) and water vapor (FH2O) through eddy covariance, were carried out from May 2014 to April 2015 in a coastal station located at the Northwest of Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México. For the same period, ocean surface waves are recorded using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) with a sampling rate of 2 Hz and located at 10 m depth about 350 m away from the tower. We found the study area to be a weak sink of CO2 under moderate wind and wave conditions with a mean flux of -1.32 μmol/m2s. The correlation between the wind speed and FCO2 was found to be weak, suggesting that other physical processes besides wind may be important factors for the gas exchange modulation at coastal waters. The results of the quantile regression analysis computed between FCO2 and (1) wind speed, (2) significant wave height, (3) wave steepness and (4) water temperature, show that the significant wave height is the most correlated parameter with FCO2; Nevertheless, the behavior of their relation varies along the probability distribution of FCO2, with the linear regression

  17. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1998-10-31

    In pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) functions as a cohesive national organization that implements industry's directives through active regional programs. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) organization includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. PTTC relies on 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) as its main program delivery mechanism to industry. Through its regions, PTTC connects with independent oil and gas producers--through technology workshops, resources centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY98, and its strategy for achieving further growth in the future.

  18. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

  19. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  20. Contribution of heat transfer to turbine blades and vanes for high temperature industrial gas turbines. Part 2: Heat transfer on serpentine flow passage.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, K; Aoki, S

    2001-05-01

    The improvement of the heat transfer coefficient of the 1st row blades in high temperature industrial gas turbines is one of the most important issues to ensure reliable performance of these components and to attain high thermal efficiency of the facility. This paper deals with the contribution of heat transfer to increase the turbine inlet temperature of such gas turbines in order to attain efficient and environmentally benign engines. Following the experiments described in Part 1, a set of trials was conducted to clarify the influence of the blade's rotating motion on the heat transfer coefficient for internal serpentine flow passages with turbulence promoters. Test results are shown and discussed in this second part of the contribution. PMID:11460663

  1. Characterization of gas-liquid mass transfer phenomena in microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Robert; Lehmann, Mathias; Büchs, Jochen

    2003-01-20

    Gas-liquid mass transfer properties of shaken 96-well microtiter plates were characterized using a recently described method. The maximum oxygen transfer capacity (OTR(max)), the specific mass transfer area (a), and the mass transfer coefficient (k(L)) in a single well were determined at different shaking intensities (different shaking frequencies and shaking diameters at constant filling volume) and different filling volumes by means of sulfite oxidation as a chemical model system. The shape (round and square cross-sections) and the size (up to 2 mL maximum filling volume) of a microtiter plate well were also considered as influencing parameters. To get an indication of the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid phase in a well, images were taken during shaking and the liquid height derived as a characteristic parameter. The investigations revealed that the OTR(max) is predominantly dependent on the specific mass transfer area (a) for the considered conditions in round-shaped wells. The mass transfer coefficient (k(L)) in round-shaped wells remains at a nearly constant value of about 0.2 m/h for all shaking intensities, thus within the range reported in the literature for surface-aerated bioreactors. The OTR(max) in round-shaped wells is strongly influenced by the interfacial tension, determined by the surface tension of the medium used and the surface properties of the well material. Up to a specific shaking intensity the liquid surface in the wells remains horizontal and no liquid movement can be observed. This critical shaking intensity must be exceeded to overcome the surface tension and, thus, to increase the liquid height and enlarge the specific mass transfer area. This behavior is solely specific to microtiter plates and has not yet been observed for larger shaking bioreactors such as shaking flasks. In square-shaped microtiter plate wells the corners act as baffles and cause a significant increase of OTR(max), a, and k(L). An OTR(max) of up to 0.15 mol

  2. Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Injestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines featuring high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. A designer is concerned about the level of stresses in the turbine rotor disk and its durability, both of which are affected significantly by the disk temperature distribution. This distribution also plays a major role in the radial position of the blade tip and thus, in establishing the clearance between the tip and the shroud. To counteract mainstream gas ingestion as well as to cool the rotor and the stator disks, it is necessary to inject cooling air (bled from the compressor discharge) into the wheel space. Since this bleeding of compressor air imposes a penalty on the engine cycle performance, the designers of disk cavity cooling and sealing systems need to accomplish these tasks with the minimum possible amount of bleed air without risking disk failure. This requires detailed knowledge of the flow characteristics and convective heat transfer in the cavity. The flow in the wheel space between the rotor and stator disks is quite complex. It is usually turbulent and contains recirculation regions. Instabilities such as vortices oscillating in space have been observed in the flow. It becomes necessary to obtain both a qualitative understanding of the general pattern of the fluid motion as well as a quantitative map of the velocity and pressure fields.

  3. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE PARTNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evasion of elemental mercury from aquatic systems can significantly deplete net mercury accumulation resulting from atmospheric deposition, the current ability to model elemental mercury air/water exchange is limited by uncertainties in our understanding of all gaseous a...

  4. Monolayers at air-water interfaces: from origins-of-life to nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P

    2011-08-01

    The air-water interface presents several interesting features, namely a) a molecularly flat environment, b) a boundary region between two phases with different dielectric constants, c) permits or promotes dynamic interactions within the interface region, and d) a point of interaction between hydrophobic compounds and aqueous molecules. Accordingly, Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface have several unique characteristics and properties, which require investigation. In this review-type personal account, typical examples of molecular recognition and molecular patterning at air-water interfaces are first introduced, followed by descriptions of specific and unusual properties of monolayers on water. In addition, two examples of our own results concerning Langmuir monolayers are explained. We have selected examples from two apparently unrelated research areas, these being the origin of life and future nanotechnology, in order to emphasize the diverse scientific contribution of research on monolayers at the air-water interface. PMID:21739568

  5. Effect of current waveforms on metal transfer in pulsed gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Chen, M. A.; Lu, Y. F.

    2005-12-01

    With new types of welding power supply based on higher performance power electronic devices and digital control techniques, advanced pulse waveforms can be produced to offer more characteristics that can be fine tuned to optimize the welding process. In this paper, pulsed current waveforms with four basic parameters and six secondary parameters are used to study the effect of waveform parameters on the mode of metal transfer in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P). An experimental system is developed to sense, observe and analyse the images of droplet/wire, and the transient data of welding current and arc voltage. Experiments are conducted to study the influence of the ratio of the pulsing-current time to the droplet-detachment time as well as the droplet-detachment current level on the mode of metal transfer. Appropriate sets of welding conditions including pulse waveform and parameters are obtained to achieve the ideal transfer mode of one-droplet-per-pulse in GMAW-P.

  6. Heat transfer in horizontal tubes during two phase natural circulation with presence of noncondensing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, S.; Lischke, W.

    The condensation process of steam inside horizontal tubes during natural circulation gains in importance regarding the reactor safety research for existing and future nuclear power plants. Experimental investigations due to the condensation process were realized with the rig HORUS to study the behaviour of water-steam-gas mixtures in horizontal tubes. The paper includes statements regarding the flow and heat transfer conditions inside the tube and the temperature distribution inside the small tube wall. The experiments showed a blockade of the heat transfer area with Nitrogen which is connected with an increasing primary pressure followed by a compression of the Nitrogen and a reentry of steam into the tube. The experiments serve for the creation of an experimental data base. A model development for calculation of the heat transfer is described. The model was implemented in the German thermal-hydraulic code ATHLET. The comparison of calculated data and the measured parameters of HORUS rig show the code improvement for the simulation of noncondensing gases.

  7. An assessment of oxygen transfer efficiency in a gas permeable hollow fibre membrane biological reactor.

    PubMed

    Soreanu, G; Lishman, L; Dunlop, S; Behmann, H; Seto, P

    2010-01-01

    The clean water oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) of a full scale non-porous hollow fibre gas permeable (GP) membrane (surface area of 500 m(2)) was evaluated at inlet air pressures of 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8 atm using two established testing methods. To form a basis of comparison with traditional aeration technologies, additional testing was done with conventional aerators (fine bubble and coarse bubble diffusers) replacing the GP membrane. OTE can be established based on the re-aeration of deoxygenated water or by monitoring the catalytic oxidation of a sodium sulphite (Na(2)SO(3)) solution. In this study, OTE values determined by sulphite oxidation (SOTE(S)) were consistently higher than those established during re-aeration (SOTE(R)) suggesting that the chemical reaction was enhancing the mass transfer. The chemical reaction was sufficiently fast in the case of the GP membrane, that the gas phase limited the mass transfer. The GP membrane operating at 1.2 atm had a SOTE(S) of 70.6% and a SOTER of 52.2%. SOTE(R) for the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusers were 3.8% and 23.6%, respectively. This is comparable to the manufacturer's values, corrected for depth of 3.4% and 18.3%, respectively. Particularly, the derived OTE values were used to evaluate differences in energy consumption for a conventional treatment plant achieving carbon removal and nitrification. This analysis highlights the potential energy efficiency of GP membranes, which could be considered for the design of the membrane modules. PMID:20220238

  8. OH-Radical Oxidation of Surface-Active cis-Pinonic Acid at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Yosuke

    2016-05-26

    Gaseous biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are immediately oxidized by gaseous oxidants to form BVOC-acids that rapidly condense onto aqueous aerosol phase and thus contribute to the growth of atmospheric particles. Because BVOC-acids are highly hydrophobic and hence surface-active in nature, it seems critical to study the oxidation by gaseous hydroxyl radical (·OH(g)) at the air-water interface. Here we report on the fast (≤10 μs) oxidation of aqueous cis-pinonic acid (C10H16O3, CPA, cis-pinonate anion's m/z = 183), a representative BVOC-acid, by ·OH(g) at the air-water interface for the first time. We find that cis-pinonate anion is more enriched at the air-water interface by ∼4 and ∼14 times than n-octanoate anion at 10 and 100 μM, respectively, as revealed by an interface-specific mass spectrometry of the equimolar mixture of microjets. Exposure of aqueous CPA microjets to ·OH(g) pulses from the 266 nm laser photolysis of O3(g)/O2(g)/H2O(g)/N2(g) mixtures yields pinonic peroxyl radicals (m/z = 214) that lead to the functionalization products carbonyls (m/z = 197), alcohols (m/z = 199), and pinonic hydroperoxides (m/z = 215) in addition to smaller-mass products including carbonyls (m/z = 155 and 157). We confirmed the formation of the corresponding alcohols, aldehydes, and hydroperoxides in experiments performed in D2O solvent. The analysis of total mass balance implies a significant amount (>70%) of products would be emitted into the gas-phase during the heterogeneous ·OH-oxidations. Our results suggest ·OH-oxidations of amphiphilic BVOC-acids at the air-water interface may play a far more significant role in photochemical aging process of aqueous aerosols than previously assumed. PMID:27098046

  9. Dissecting the Molecular Structure of the Air/Water Interface from Quantum Simulations of the Sum-Frequency Generation Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Medders, Gregory R; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-03-23

    The molecular characterization of the air/water interface is a key step in understanding fundamental multiphase phenomena ranging from heterogeneous chemical processes in the atmosphere to the hydration of biomolecules. The apparent simplicity of the air/water interface, however, masks an underlying complexity associated with the dynamic nature of the water hydrogen-bond network that has so far hindered an unambiguous characterization of its microscopic properties. Here, we demonstrate that the application of quantum many-body molecular dynamics, which enables spectroscopically accurate simulations of water from the gas to the condensed phase, leads to a definitive molecular-level picture of the interface region. For the first time, excellent agreement is obtained between the simulated vibrational sum-frequency generation spectrum and the most recent state-of-the-art measurements, without requiring any empirical frequency shift or ad hoc scaling of the spectral intensity. A systematic dissection of the spectral features demonstrates that a rigorous representation of nuclear quantum effects as well as of many-body energy and electrostatic contributions is necessary for a quantitative reproduction of the experimental data. The unprecedented accuracy of the simulations presented here indicates that quantum many-body molecular dynamics can enable predictive studies of aqueous interfaces, which by complementing analogous experimental measurements will provide unique molecular insights into multiphase and heterogeneous processes of relevance in chemistry, biology, materials science, and environmental research. PMID:26943730

  10. Selective gas transfer through binary polymeric systems based on block-copolymers.

    PubMed

    Beckman, I N; Teplyakov, V V

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of several versions of phenomenological theory of gas permeability in selective polymeric membranes is presented, along with the appropriate experimental methods for verification of these versions. The main focus is on a description of stationary mass transfer across membranes (films) containing dispersion inclusions of various shapes of one polymer in a matrix of another. Considering heterogeneous media as a membrane material, it was assumed that diffusion and sorption properties of inclusions are different from those of the dispersing medium. The problem of choosing optimal shape of inclusions is evaluated from the point of view of targeted permeability and selectivity of a membrane with respect to gases. To confirm this theoretical approach, the experimental results of the studies of diffusion (permeability) of permanent gases in polymeric membranes of different structures were used. The target gases included noble gases, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, CO2, and methane. The target polymers included glassy polyvinyltrimethylsilane (PVTMS, T(gl)=155-180 °C), rubberlike polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, T(gl)=-120 °C), and two-phase block-copolymers based on these materials within a wide range of composition, including the region of phase inversion. In addition, available experimental literature data on gas permeation parameters for polyarylat-polysiloxane, polysulfon-polysiloxane, and polycarbonate-polysiloxane block-copolymers are utilized. In order to describe the stationary gas permeability for two-phase systems (from diluted dispersion of one polymer in another to concentrated dispersion and complete phase inversion) the empiric approaches based on modified Maxwell equations are offered. The requirements for two-phase systems with high permeability and selectivity parameters for gas separation are identified. The permeability parameters are predicted for C1-C4 hydrocarbons in block-copolymers based on PDMS dispersion in PVTMS, phase inversion, and PVTMS

  11. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is managed through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which deploys a national natural gas program via the Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCNG) and a national oil program through the National Petroleum Technology Office (NTPO). This technical progress report summarizes PTTC

  12. Heat transfer coefficients in bubbly and slug flows under microgravity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rezkallah, K.S.; Rite, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Experimental local heat transfer data were collected onboard NASA`s KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft for two-phase, air-water flow in vertical, upward, co-current flow through a 9.53 mm circular tube. It was found that in the bubbly and slug flow regimes (surface tension dominated regimes), reduced gravity has a tendency to lower the heat transfer coefficient by up to 50% at the lowest gas qualities. As the gas quality is increased (transition to annular flow), the difference between the 1-g and {micro}-g heat transfer coefficients is much less significant. Empirical correlations were developed in terms of the pertinent dimensionless groups; namely the superficial liquid Reynolds number, the Froude number, the Graetz number and the Morton number. The correlations predicted the experimental data within 10--25%, depending on the flow regime and the superficial gas Weber number.

  13. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-05-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's Board made a strategic decision to relocate the Headquarters (HQ) office from Washington, DC to Houston, Texas. Driving force behind relocation was to better connect with independent producers, but cost savings could also be realized. Relocation was accomplished in late December 2000, with the HQ office being fully operational by January 2001. Early indications are that the HQ relocation is, in fact, enabling better networking with senior executives of independents in the Houston oil community. New Board leadership, elected in March 2001, will continue to effectively guide PTTC.

  14. Model for analysis of counter-current gas transfer in fish gills.

    PubMed

    Scheid, P; Hook, C; Piiper, J

    1986-06-01

    The validity of previously used simplified models for the analysis of gas transfer in fish gills was tested using an integrated model which includes water flow and blood flow in counter-current arrangement. The model accounts for the resistance to diffusion of O2 both in the water-blood barrier and in the interlamellar water, which is assumed to flow with a parabolic velocity profile between the secondary lamellae. The O2 diffusing capacity (transfer factor) for this model (Dint) was compared to that (Dm + w) calculated from the diffusing capacity of the water-blood barrier (Dm), and from the effective diffusive conductance of the parabolically streaming interlamellar water (Dw) as 1/Dm + w = 1/Dm + 1/Dw. These diffusing capacities were compared with that (Dadd) calculated from Dm and diffusing capacity of a water layer of 1/4 thickness of the interlamellar space (Dw) as 1/Dadd = 1/Dm + 1/Dw. Calculations with morphometric and gas exchange parameters in the elasmobranch Scyliorhinus stellaris reveal the following features: (1) In physiological conditions, Dm + w and Dint are similar to within 10%, but Dint is always higher. (2) Dint and Dm + w increase with increasing ventilation; Dint increases with decreasing perfusion, while Dm + w remains constant. (3) Both Dint and Dm + w agree reasonably well with Dadd. In other anatomical and physiological conditions, particularly for relatively high Dm, Dw, and Dw and high ventilation, greater discrepancies between Dint and Dm + w may occur but Dm + w appears to represent a reasonable approximation of the effective O2 diffusing capacity, which is best modelled as Dint. PMID:3738259

  15. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for gray radiative transfer equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun

    2015-03-15

    The solutions of radiative transport equations can cover both optical thin and optical thick regimes due to the large variation of photon's mean-free path and its interaction with the material. In the small mean free path limit, the nonlinear time-dependent radiative transfer equations can converge to an equilibrium diffusion equation due to the intensive interaction between radiation and material. In the optical thin limit, the photon free transport mechanism will emerge. In this paper, we are going to develop an accurate and robust asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme (AP-UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations, where the radiation transport equation is coupled with the material thermal energy equation. The current work is based on the UGKS framework for the rarefied gas dynamics [14], and is an extension of a recent work [12] from a one-dimensional linear radiation transport equation to a nonlinear two-dimensional gray radiative system. The newly developed scheme has the asymptotic preserving (AP) property in the optically thick regime in the capturing of diffusive solution without using a cell size being smaller than the photon's mean free path and time step being less than the photon collision time. Besides the diffusion limit, the scheme can capture the exact solution in the optical thin regime as well. The current scheme is a finite volume method. Due to the direct modeling for the time evolution solution of the interface radiative intensity, a smooth transition of the transport physics from optical thin to optical thick can be accurately recovered. Many numerical examples are included to validate the current approach.

  16. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Duttlinger

    2001-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization efficiently has an

  17. Contribution of heat transfer to turbine blades and vanes for high temperature industrial gas turbines. Part 1: Film cooling.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, K; Aoki, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper deals with the contribution of heat transfer to increase the turbine inlet temperature of industrial gas turbines in order to attain efficient and environmentally benign engines. High efficiency film cooling, in the form of shaped film cooling and full coverage film cooling, is one of the most important cooling technologies. Corresponding heat transfer tests to optimize the film cooling effectiveness are shown and discussed in this first part of the contribution. PMID:11460641

  18. Air-sea dimethylsulfide (DMS) gas transfer in the North Atlantic: evidence for limited interfacial gas exchange at high wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. G.; De Bruyn, W.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.; Christensen, K.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-11-01

    Shipboard measurements of eddy covariance dimethylsulfide (DMS) air-sea fluxes and seawater concentration were carried out in the North Atlantic bloom region in June/July 2011. Gas transfer coefficients (k660) show a linear dependence on mean horizontal wind speed at wind speeds up to 11 m s-1. At higher wind speeds the relationship between k660 and wind speed weakens. At high winds, measured DMS fluxes were lower than predicted based on the linear relationship between wind speed and interfacial stress extrapolated from low to intermediate wind speeds. In contrast, the transfer coefficient for sensible heat did not exhibit this effect. The apparent suppression of air-sea gas flux at higher wind speeds appears to be related to sea state, as determined from shipboard wave measurements. These observations are consistent with the idea that long waves suppress near-surface water-side turbulence, and decrease interfacial gas transfer. This effect may be more easily observed for DMS than for less soluble gases, such as CO2, because the air-sea exchange of DMS is controlled by interfacial rather than bubble-mediated gas transfer under high wind speed conditions.

  19. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways from Smackover source rocks to younger reservoir traps in the Monroe gas field, NE Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.K. )

    1993-09-01

    The Monroe gas field contained more than 7 tcf of gas in its virgin state. Much of the original gas reserves have been produced through wells penetrating the Upper Cretaceous Monroe Gas Rock Formation reservoir. Other secondary reservoirs in the field area are Eocene Wilcox, the Upper Cretaceous Arkadelphia, Nacatoch, Ozan, Lower Cretaceous, Hosston, Jurassic Schuler, and Smackover. As producing zones, these secondary producing zones reservoirs have contributed an insignificant amount gas to the field. The source of much of this gas appears to have been in the lower part of the Jurassic Smackover Formation. Maturation and migration of the hydrocarbons from a Smackover source into Upper Cretaceous traps was enhanced and helped by igneous activity, and wrench faults/unconformity conduits, respectively. are present in the pre-Paleocene section. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways appear to be more vertically direct in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous section than the complex pattern present in the Upper Cretaceous section.

  20. Gas transfer system in Alvinella pompejana (Annelida polychaeta, Terebellida): functional properties of intracellular and extracellular hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Hourdez, S; Lallier, F H; De Cian, M C; Green, B N; Weber, R E; Toulmond, A

    2000-01-01

    Alvinella pompejana is a tubicolous polychaete that dwells in the hottest part of the hydrothermal vent ecosystem in a highly variable mixture of vent (350 degrees C, anoxic, CO(2)- and sulfide-rich) and deep-sea (2 degrees C, mildly hypoxic) waters. This species has developed distinct-and specifically respiratory-adaptations to this challenging environment. An internal gas exchange system has recently been described, along with the report of an intracellular coelomic hemoglobin, in addition to the previously known extracellular vascular hemoglobin. This article reports the structure of coelomic hemoglobin and the functional properties of both hemoglobins in order to assess possible oxygen transfer. Coelomocytes contain a unique monomeric hemoglobin with a molecular weight of 14,810+/-1.5 Da, as determined by mass spectrometry. The functional properties of both hemoglobins are unexpectedly very similar under the same conditions of pH (6.1-8.2) and temperature (10 degrees -40 degrees C). The oxygen affinity of both proteins is relatively high (P50=0.66 Torr at 20 degrees C and pH 7), which facilitates oxygen uptake from the hypoxic environment. A strong Bohr effect (Phi ranging from -0.8 to -1.0) allows the release of oxygen to acidic tissues. Such similar properties imply a possible bidirectional transfer of oxygen between the two hemoglobins in the perioesophagal pouch, a mechanism that could moderate environmental variations of oxygen concentration and maintain brain oxygenation. PMID:10893176

  1. Experimental study of heat transfer from shaft in cooled radial bearing of GNT-25 gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukhlinskiy, V. V.; Usayev, I. D.; Yermolenko, A. V.

    1984-02-01

    The heat transfer from the shaft in a cooled radial bearing design was studied experimentally in a GTN-25 gas turbine. The basic dimensions of the bearing were 315 mm inside diameter and 140 mm width. This split bearing had two oil feed orifices in the plane of separation and its housing was cooled with oil fed through an annular chamber. Heating of the shaft neck and the bearing housing under operating conditions was simulated. The experimental data have been processed according to methods of similarity and dimensional analysis, the results yielding semiempirical relations for the temperature and the thermal flux at the rubbing surface during laminar and transitional flow. Relations have also been obtained from these data for the hot spot temperature and the friction coefficient at the rubbing surface. The former characterizes the cooling system design and performance, the latter characterizes the bearing efficiency and economy. The results confirm that the effect of energy dissipation in the lubricant on the intensity of heat transfer from the shaft depends largely on the size and the shape of the shaft bearing clearance.

  2. Energy Characterization of Short-Circuiting Transfer of Metal Droplet in Gas Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Luo; Yang, Zhu; Xiaojian, Xie; Rui, Wan

    2015-08-01

    The structure-borne acoustic emission (AE) signals were detected in real time in gas metal arc (GMA) welding and pulse GMA (P-GMA) welding. According to the AE signals, the mode of short-circuiting transfer was analyzed, and the energy gradient and total energy were calculated. The calculation to the AE signals of one metal droplet transfer (MDT) showed that the energy gradient increased with increasing welding heat input not only in GMA welding but also in P-GMA welding. The energy gradient of one MDT in P-GMA welding was higher than that in GMA welding, which indicated that a high energy gradient was the basic reason for the additional vibration energy provided by pulse effect in P-GMA welding. The total energy of AE signals increased with increasing welding heat input not only in GMA welding but also in P-GMA welding. The total energy of AE signals in P-GMA welding was higher than that in GMA welding, which indicated that the additional vibration energy provided by welding pulses was the main cause of the grain structure refining in P-GMA welding. So, the results provided another means to predict the weld grain size and optimize the welding process by AE signals detected in welding.

  3. Transfer of retention patterns in gas chromatography by means of response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chhaganlal, Milan; Skartland, Liv K; Mjøs, Svein A

    2014-03-01

    Accurate transfer of retention patterns in temperature-programmed gas chromatography is challenging because minor variations in column properties and experimental conditions may have significant impact on the elution patterns. An experimental method for accurate transfer of retention indices is proposed and validated. The methodology is based on response surface methodology and experimental design. The temperature rate and the start temperature of the rate are varied systematically in the region where the optimal conditions are expected to be found. Response surfaces that explain the absolute deviation to the target retention indices are calculated for each compound. These response surfaces are thereafter averaged and the minimum in the average surface is regarded as optimal conditions for reproduction of the retention pattern. The methodology was applied on fatty acid methyl esters using equivalent chain lengths as the retention index system. Two different target patterns were tested on two BPX-70 columns with different dimensions. Validation of the proposed conditions showed that the retention patterns could be reproduced with an error that was only fractions of a peak width. PMID:24529956

  4. Advances in simulating radiance signatures for dynamic air/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.; Gerace, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    The air-water interface poses a number of problems for both collecting and simulating imagery. At the surface, the magnitude of observed radiance can change by multiple orders of magnitude at high spatiotemporal frequency due to glinting effects. In the volume, similarly high frequency focusing of photons by a dynamic wave surface significantly changes the reflected radiance of in-water objects and the scattered return of the volume itself. These phenomena are often manifest as saturated pixels and artifacts in collected imagery (often enhanced by time delays between neighboring pixels or interpolation between adjacent filters) and as noise and greater required computation times in simulated imagery. This paper describes recent advances made to the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model to address the simulation issues to better facilitate an understanding of a multi/hyper-spectral collection. Glint effects are simulated using a dynamic height field that can be driven by wave frequency models and generates a sea state at arbitrary time scales. The volume scattering problem is handled by coupling the geometry representing the surface (facetization by the height field) with the single scattering contribution at any point in the water. The problem is constrained somewhat by assuming that contributions come from a Snell's window above the scattering point and by assuming a direct source (sun). Diffuse single scattered and multiple scattered energy contributions are handled by Monte Carlo techniques employed previously. The model is compared to existing radiative transfer codes where possible, with the objective of providing a robust movel of time-dependent absolute radiance at many wavelengths.

  5. Surfactant-Induced Flow in Unsaturated Porous Media: Implications for Air-Water Interfacial Area Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, M. S.; Zheng, Z.; Estabrook, B.; Henry, E. J.; Littlefield, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Air-water interfacial area (AI) in porous media is an important factor governing equilibrium contaminant retention, as well as the kinetics of interphase mass transfer. Interfacial-partitioning tracer (IPT) tests are a common technique for measuring AI at a given moisture saturation (SW), where AI is calculated based on the ratio of arrival times of a surfactant and a non-reactive tracer. At surfactant concentrations often used, the aqueous surface tension of the interfacial tracer solution is ~30% lower than that of the resident porewater in the system, creating transient surface tension gradients during the IPT measurement. Because surface tension gradients create capillary pressure gradients, surfactant-induced unsaturated flow may occur during IPT tests, a process that would violate fundamental assumptions of constant SW, of steady-state flow, and of nonreactive and surfactant tracers experiencing the same transport conditions. To examine the occurrence and magnitude of surfactant-induced flow, we conducted IPT tests for unsaturated systems at ~84% initial SW using surfactant input concentrations that bracket concentrations commonly used. Despite constant boundary conditions (constant inlet flux and outlet pressure), the introduction of the surfactant solution induced considerable transience in column effluent flowrate and SW. Real-time system mass measurements revealed drainage of 20-40% SW, with the amount of drainage and the maximum rate of drainage proportional to the influent surfactant concentration, as would be expected. Because AI is inversely related to SW, the use of higher surfactant concentrations should yield larger AI estimates. Measured AI values, however, showed no clear relationship to surfactant concentration or the time-averaged SW of the system. These findings cast doubt on the reliability of IPT for AI determination.

  6. A one-dimensional model for gas-solid heat transfer in pneumatic conveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajstrla, Kody Wayne

    A one-dimensional ODE model reduced from a two-fluid model of a higher dimensional order is developed to study dilute, two-phase (air and solid particles) flows with heat transfer in a horizontal pneumatic conveying pipe. Instead of using constant air properties (e.g., density, viscosity, thermal conductivity) evaluated at the initial flow temperature and pressure, this model uses an iteration approach to couple the air properties with flow pressure and temperature. Multiple studies comparing the use of constant or variable air density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are conducted to study the impact of the changing properties to system performance. The results show that the fully constant property calculation will overestimate the results of the fully variable calculation by 11.4%, while the constant density with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity calculation resulted in an 8.7% overestimation, the constant viscosity with variable density and thermal conductivity overestimated by 2.7%, and the constant thermal conductivity with variable density and viscosity calculation resulted in a 1.2% underestimation. These results demonstrate that gas properties varying with gas temperature can have a significant impact on a conveying system and that the varying density accounts for the majority of that impact. The accuracy of the model is also validated by comparing the simulation results to the experimental values found in the literature.

  7. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-06-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  8. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-25

    During this reporting period, bench- and pilot-scale experiments have been concluded to measure mass transfer and kinetic rates at simulated duct injection conditions. Section 2 describes the tank reactor test results. Present work is focused on running the slurry absorption model for solution compositions which are representative of the tests performed in the stirred tank reactor. The slurry absorption model has been run successfully to simulate most of the clear solution experiments. Section 3 presents the results of a special study investigating the use of Epsom Salt (magnesium sulfate heptahydrate, MgSO{sub 4}{center dot}7H{sub 2}O) as an additive for in-duct dry injection to reduce the amount of water needed for humidification. Industrial grade Epsom Salt was injected into a 50-cfm pilot plant at {approximately}3.4 lb/h. Section 4 summarizes the status of slaking modification tests. The present study focuses on an evaluation of techniques for the production of a fine particulate Ca(OH){sub 2} during slaking. Section 5 reports on differential reactor (Task 4) tests. The reactor has been modified to allow contact of solids containing varying amounts of surface water with humidified flue gas for 10--120 s. Preliminary gas and wet solids experiments have been performed using lime/flyash mixtures containing 5--40 percent initial free moisture. 3 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-04-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  10. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-05-31

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSFER ACROSS THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE DUE TO NATURAL CONVECTION IN LAKES. (R825428)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Experimental verification of the four-sensor probe model for flow diagnosis in air water flow in vertical pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.; Mishra, R.

    2012-05-01

    Measuring the volumetric flow rate of each of the flowing components is required to be monitored in production logging applications. Hence it is necessary to measure the flow rates of gas, oil and water in vertical and inclined oil wells. An increasing level of interest has been shown by the researchers in developing system for the flow rate measurement in multiphase flows. This paper describes the experimental methodology using a miniature, local four-sensor probe for the measurement of dispersed flow parameters in bubbly two-phase flow for spherical bubbles. To establish interdependent among different parameters corresponding to dispersed flow, the available model has been used to experimentally obtain different parameters such as volume fraction, velocity and bubble shape of the dispersed phase in the bubbly air-water flow.

  13. Gas transfer between the atmosphere and irrigated sugarcane plantation sites under different rainfall in Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Crow, S. E.; Mudd, R. G.; Youkhana, A.; Nullet, M.; Nakahata, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sugarcane plantation land cover is increasing in area in Brazil, South Asia and the Pacific Islands because of the growing demand for sugar and biofuel production. While a large portion of sugarcane cultivated in Brazil is rain-fed and experiences drought influences on gas exchange, sugarcane in Hawai'i is thought to be buffered from drought effects because it is drip irrigated. Knowledge about carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration rates is fundamental both for the prediction of sugar and biofuel production and for water resource management for the large plantations. To understand gas transfer under spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments, we investigated the leaf- soil- and stand-scale gas transfer processes at two irrigated sugarcane plantation study sites in Hawai'i with contrasting rainfall. Gas and energy transfers were monitored using eddy covariance systems for a full- and later half- crop cycle. Leaf ecophysiological traits were measured for stands of different ages to evaluate the effects of stand age on gas transfer. Carbon sequestration rates (Fc) showed a strong relationship with solar radiation with small differences between sites. Latent heat flux expressed as the evapotranspiration rates (ET) also had a strong relationship with solar radiation, but showed seasonality due to variations in biological control (surface conductance) and atmospheric evaporative demand. The difference in ET and its responses to environments was less clear partly buffered by the differences in the stand age and seasons. The stable Fc-solar radiation relationship despite the variation in surface conductance was partly due to the saturation of net photosynthetic rates with intercellular CO2 concentration and the low sensitivity of net photosynthesis to variations in surface conductance in sugarcane with the C4 photosynthesis pathway. The response of gas transfer to periodic irrigation, rainfall and age-related changes in leaf ecophysiological traits will be

  14. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  15. Experimental investigation on the interfacial characteristics of stratified air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudaya, Akhmad Zidni; Kuntoro, Hadiyan Yusuf; Dinaryanto, Okto; Deendarlianto, Indarto

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial wave characteristics of stratified air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe were experimentally investigated by using the flush-mounted constant electric current method (CECM) sensors. The experiments were conducted in a horizontal two-phase flow loop 9.5 m long (L) consisting of transparent acrylic pipe of 26 mm i.d. (D). To obtain the stratified flow pattern, the superficial gas and liquid velocities were set to 1.02 - 3.77 m/s and 0.016 - 0.92 m/s, respectively. Several interfacial wave patterns as described by several investigators were identified. The common parameters such as liquid hold-up, probability distribution function, wave velocity and wave frequency were investigated as the function of the liquid and gas flow rates. The interfacial curvature was calculated on the basis of the liquid hold-up data from the CECM sensors and the liquid film thickness data from the image processing technique in the previous work. As a result, it was found that the mean liquid hold-up decreases with the increase of the superficial gas velocity. In the same sub flow pattern, the wave velocity increases as the superficial gas velocity increases. On the other hand, in the two-dimensional wave region, the dominant frequency decreases with the increase of the superficial liquid velocity.

  16. Lung cancer detection by proton transfer reaction mass-spectrometric analysis of human breath gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehinger, Andreas; Schmid, Alex; Mechtcheriakov, Sergei; Ledochowski, Maximilian; Grabmer, Christoph; Gastl, Guenther A.; Amann, Anton

    2007-08-01

    Background Determination of the diagnostic usefulness of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for detecting primary lung cancer through analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled human breath was demonstrated in this investigation. Unlike, for example, gas-chromatographic analyses, PTR-MS can be used without time-consuming preconcentration of the gas samples.Methods By means of PTR-MS, exhaled breath samples from primary lung cancer patients (n = 17) were analyzed and compared with both an overall control collective (controls total, n = 170) and three sub-collectives: hospital personnel (controls hospital, n = 35), age-matched persons (controls age, n = 25), and smokers (controls s, n = 60), respectively.Results Among the VOCs present at reasonably high concentrations, the ones leading to the product ion at m/z = 31 (VOC-31, tentatively protonated formaldehyde) and m/z = 43 (VOC-43, tentatively a fragment of protonated iso-propanol), were found at significantly higher concentrations in the breath gas of the primary lung cancer patients as compared to the healthy controls at the following median concentrations (with interquartile distance, iqr): For VOC-31 the median concentrations were 7.0 ppb (iqr, 15.5 ppb) versus 3.0 ppb (iqr, 1.9 ppb) with P < 10-4. For VOC-43 the median concentrations were 244.1 ppb (iqr, 236.2 ppb) versus 94.1 ppb (iqr, 55.2 ppb) with P < 10-6. The discriminative power between the two collectives was further assessed by ROC-curves obtained upon variation of the chosen threshold concentration and by Fisher's Quadratic Discriminant Method.Conclusions Within the limits of pilot study, VOC-31 and -43 were found to best discriminate between exhaled breath of primary lung cancer cases and healthy controls. Simple and time-saving breath gas analysis by PTR-MS makes this method attractive for a larger clinical evaluation. It may become a new valuable tool for diagnosing primary lung cancer.

  17. 40 CFR 63.984 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 63.984 Section 63.984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR...

  18. 40 CFR 65.144 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 65.144 Section 65.144 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed...

  19. 40 CFR 63.984 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 63.984 Section 63.984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR...

  20. 40 CFR 63.984 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 63.984 Section 63.984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR...

  1. 40 CFR 65.144 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 65.144 Section 65.144 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed...

  2. 40 CFR 65.144 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 65.144 Section 65.144 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed...

  3. 40 CFR 65.144 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 65.144 Section 65.144 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed...

  4. 40 CFR 65.144 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 65.144 Section 65.144 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed...

  5. 40 CFR 63.984 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 63.984 Section 63.984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR...

  6. 40 CFR 63.984 - Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel gas systems and processes to which storage vessel, transfer rack, or equipment leak regulated material emissions are routed. 63.984 Section 63.984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR...

  7. Performance of a hollow-fiber spiral disk for effective gas dispersion toward high mass transfer rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Katsumi; Haryono, M.H.; Tomida, Tahei; Hatano, Hiroyuki; Oaki, Hiroshi

    1996-02-01

    Gas-dispersive capability of a hollow-fiber membrane, manufactured specifically for the use in fine bubbles generation, is tested for attaining high gas-liquid mass transfer rate under low-gas-throughput, shallow-sparging (at depths < 0.7 m) conditions. The hollow fiber is wound in a plane spiral form, each of which can be piled in a cylindrical module. A bubble column is used in the presence as well as absence of a draft tube, which the module can fit to and serve as part of. To enhance the effectiveness in the module`s generating fine bubbles, electrolytes are added to the liquid phase, water. Over a superficial gas velocity range of 0.1--2 mm/s, the hollow-fiber module (in comparison to conventional perforated-plate distributors) demonstrates, even with moderate gas-supply pressures (< 0.3 MPa), as high as 3-fold and 20-fold increases in the volumetric mass transfer coefficient in the absence and presence of the electrolytes, respectively. The former has been attained with a negligible increase in the gas holdup; the latter has accompanied a large ({approximately} 20-fold) increase in the gas holdup. While in the latter case the bubbles are very finely dispersed, the draft-tube model of operation secures still reasonable liquid circulation with nonclustering, spherical bubbles uniformly dispersed in each of the core and annular regions of the bubble column.

  8. Critical air/water blow-down in safety valves at low qualities.

    PubMed

    Moncalvo, D; Friedel, L

    2011-02-28

    Critical air/water blow-downs in safety valves for qualities from 0.01 to 0.113 and mass flow rates from 1.5 up to 4.3 kg/s have been observed in our test facility. These critical blow-downs are characterized by a large void fraction and by an intense mixing of the phases both in the valve body and in the outlet pipe. A qualitative estimation of the flow pattern in the outlet pipe using the map of Taitel and Dukler suggests that these air/water flows are intermittent flows--presumably slug flows--evolving to annular flows for qualities above 0.1. Intermittent flows are also predicted for critical air/water and air/glycerine flows taken from the literature for the same safety valve at slightly larger relieving pressures. PMID:21227579

  9. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  10. Analysis of transient heat flow to thick-walled plates and cylinders. [to determine gas heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    A methodology is described for the analysis of a transient temperature measurement made in a flat or curved plate subjected to convective heat transfer, such that the surface heat flux, the hot-gas temperture, and the gas heat transfer coefficient can be determined. It is shown that if the transient temperature measurement is made at a particular point located nearly midway in the thickness of the plate there is an important simplification in the data analysis process, in that the factor relating the surface heat flux to the measured rate of rise of temperature becomes invariant for a Fourier Number above 0.60 and for all values of the Biot Number. Parameters are derived, tabulated, and plotted which enable straightforward determination of the surface heat flux, the hot-gas temperature, of the plate, the rate of rise of temperature, the plate thickness and curvature, and the mean thermal properties of the plate material at the test temperature.

  11. Thermocapillary convection around gas bubbles: an important natural effect for the enhancement of heat transfer in liquids under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Betz, J; Straub, J

    2002-10-01

    In the presence of a temperature gradient at a liquid-gas or liquid-liquid interface, thermocapillary or Marangoni convection develops. This convection is a special type of natural convection that was not paid much attention in heat transfer for a long time, although it is strong enough to drive liquids against the direction of buoyancy on Earth. In a microgravity environment, however, it is the remaining mode of natural convection and supports heat and mass transfer. During boiling in microgravity it was observed at subcooled liquid conditions. Therefore, the question arises about its contribution to heat transfer without phase change. Thermocapillary convection was quantitatively studied at single gas bubbles in various liquids, both experimentally and numerically. A two-dimensional mathematical model described in this article was developed. The coupled mechanism of heat transfer and fluid flow in pure liquids around a single gas bubble was simulated with a control-volume FE-method. The simulation was accompanied and compared with experiments on Earth. The numerical results are in good accordance with the experiments performed on Earth at various Marangoni numbers using various alcohols of varying chain length and Prandtl numbers. As well as calculations on Earth, the numerical method also allows simulations at stationary spherical gas bubbles in a microgravity environment. The results demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is a natural heat transfer mechanism that can partially replace the buoyancy in a microgravity environment, if extreme precautions are taken concerning the purity of the liquids, because impurities accumulate predominantly at the interface. Under Earth conditions, an enhancement of the heat transfer in a liquid volume is even found in the case where thermocapillary flow is counteracted by buoyancy. In particular, the obstructing influence of surface active substances could be observed during the experiments on Earth in water and also in

  12. Interaction of Charged Colloidal Particles at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-07-01

    We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles. PMID:26551757

  13. Hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics of subscale, plug-nozzle rocket calorimeter chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.; Roncace, Elizabeth A.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics for a liquid-hydrogen-cooled, subscale, plug-nozzle rocket test apparatus. This apparatus has been used since 1975 to evaluate rocket engine advanced cooling concepts and fabrication techniques, to screen candidate combustion chamber liner materials, and to provide data for model development. In order to obtain the data, a water-cooled calorimeter chamber having the same geometric configuration as the plug-nozzle test apparatus was tested. It also used the same two showerhead injector types that were used on the test apparatus: one having a Rigimesh faceplate and the other having a platelet faceplate. The tests were conducted using liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as the propellants over a mixture ratio range of 5.8 to 6.3 at a nominal chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia). The two injectors showed similar performance characteristics with the Rigimesh faceplate having a slightly higher average characteristic-exhaust-velocity efficiency of 96 percent versus 94.4 percent for the platelet faceplate. The throat heat flux was 54 MW/m(sup 2) (33 Btu/in.(sup 2)-sec) at the nominal operating condition, which was a chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia), a hot-gas-side wall temperature of 730 K (1314 R), and a mixture ratio of 6.0. The chamber throat region correlation coefficient C(sub g) for a Nusselt number correlation of the form Nu =C(sub g)Re(sup 0.8)Pr(sup 0.3) averaged 0.023 for the Rigimesh faceplate and 0.026 for the platelet faceplate.

  14. Detection of nerve agents using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry with ammonia as reagent gas.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Joachim M

    2013-01-01

    The chemical warfare agents (CWA) Sarin, Soman, Cyclosarin and Tabun were characterised by proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTRMS). It was found that PTRMS is a suitable technique to detect nerve agents highly sensitively, highly selectively and in near real-time. Methods were found to suppress molecule fragmentation which is significant under PTRMS hollow cathode ionisation conditions. In this context, the drift voltage (as one of the most important system parameters) was varied and ammonia was introduced as an additional chemical reagent gas. Auxiliary chemicals such as ammonia affect ionisation processes and are quite common in context with detectors for CWAs based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). With both, variation of drift voltage and ammonia as the reagent gas, fragmentation can be suppressed effectively. Suppression of fragmentation is crucial particularly concerning the implementation of an algorithm for automated agent identification in field applications. On the other hand, appearance of particular fragments might deliver additional information. Degradation and rearrangement products of nerve agents are not distinctive for the particular agent but for the chemical class they belong to. It was found that switching between ammonia doped and ordinary water ionisation chemistry can easily be performed within a few seconds. Making use of this effect it is possible to switch between fragment and molecular ion peak spectra. Thus, targeted fragmentation can be used to confirm identification based only on single peak detection. PTRMS turned out to be a promising technique for future CWA detectors. In terms of sensitivity, response time and selectivity (or confidence of identification, respectively) PTRMS performs as a bridging technique between IMS and GC-MS. PMID:24308198

  15. Thermal-Flow Code for Modeling Gas Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qunzhen; Mathias, Edward C.; Heman, Joe R.; Smith, Cory W.

    2000-01-01

    A new, thermal-flow simulation code, called SFLOW. has been developed to model the gas dynamics, heat transfer, as well as O-ring and flow path erosion inside the space shuttle solid rocket motor joints by combining SINDA/Glo, a commercial thermal analyzer. and SHARPO, a general-purpose CFD code developed at Thiokol Propulsion. SHARP was modified so that friction, heat transfer, mass addition, as well as minor losses in one-dimensional flow can be taken into account. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the combustion gas in the leak paths are calculated in SHARP by solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations while the heat conduction in the solid is modeled by SINDA/G. The two codes are coupled by the heat flux at the solid-gas interface. A few test cases are presented and the results from SFLOW agree very well with the exact solutions or experimental data. These cases include Fanno flow where friction is important, Rayleigh flow where heat transfer between gas and solid is important, flow with mass addition due to the erosion of the solid wall, a transient volume venting process, as well as some transient one-dimensional flows with analytical solutions. In addition, SFLOW is applied to model the RSRM nozzle joint 4 subscale hot-flow tests and the predicted pressures, temperatures (both gas and solid), and O-ring erosions agree well with the experimental data. It was also found that the heat transfer between gas and solid has a major effect on the pressures and temperatures of the fill bottles in the RSRM nozzle joint 4 configuration No. 8 test.

  16. Large eddy simulation for predicting turbulent heat transfer in gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Danesh K; He, Long; Nagendra, K

    2014-08-13

    Blade cooling technology will play a critical role in the next generation of propulsion and power generation gas turbines. Accurate prediction of blade metal temperature can avoid the use of excessive compressed bypass air and allow higher turbine inlet temperature, increasing fuel efficiency and decreasing emissions. Large eddy simulation (LES) has been established to predict heat transfer coefficients with good accuracy under various non-canonical flows, but is still limited to relatively simple geometries and low Reynolds numbers. It is envisioned that the projected increase in computational power combined with a drop in price-to-performance ratio will make system-level simulations using LES in complex blade geometries at engine conditions accessible to the design process in the coming one to two decades. In making this possible, two key challenges are addressed in this paper: working with complex intricate blade geometries and simulating high-Reynolds-number (Re) flows. It is proposed to use the immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with LES wall functions. A ribbed duct at Re=20 000 is simulated using the IBM, and a two-pass ribbed duct is simulated at Re=100 000 with and without rotation (rotation number Ro=0.2) using LES with wall functions. The results validate that the IBM is a viable alternative to body-conforming grids and that LES with wall functions reproduces experimental results at a much lower computational cost. PMID:25024418

  17. Large eddy simulation for predicting turbulent heat transfer in gas turbines

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Danesh K.; He, Long; Nagendra, K.

    2014-01-01

    Blade cooling technology will play a critical role in the next generation of propulsion and power generation gas turbines. Accurate prediction of blade metal temperature can avoid the use of excessive compressed bypass air and allow higher turbine inlet temperature, increasing fuel efficiency and decreasing emissions. Large eddy simulation (LES) has been established to predict heat transfer coefficients with good accuracy under various non-canonical flows, but is still limited to relatively simple geometries and low Reynolds numbers. It is envisioned that the projected increase in computational power combined with a drop in price-to-performance ratio will make system-level simulations using LES in complex blade geometries at engine conditions accessible to the design process in the coming one to two decades. In making this possible, two key challenges are addressed in this paper: working with complex intricate blade geometries and simulating high-Reynolds-number (Re) flows. It is proposed to use the immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with LES wall functions. A ribbed duct at Re=20 000 is simulated using the IBM, and a two-pass ribbed duct is simulated at Re=100 000 with and without rotation (rotation number Ro=0.2) using LES with wall functions. The results validate that the IBM is a viable alternative to body-conforming grids and that LES with wall functions reproduces experimental results at a much lower computational cost. PMID:25024418

  18. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W. . Environmental Systems Div.); Rochelle, G.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-29

    This report presents the results of fundamental mass transfer testing for in-duct removal of SO{sub 2}. Following this initial part of an experimental program, it became clear that the amount of initial moisture on the sorbent strongly affected the extent of Ca(OH){sub 2} conversion. Novel techniques aimed at increasing sorbent utilization were investigated and are described. Major novel technique investigated and reported on here was the reaction with SO{sub 2} of sorbents with initial free moisture (damp sorbents). The duct injection process using damp solids has the following steps: preparation of sorbent as a slurry, blending of the slurry with dry recycle materials to create damp solids, injection of the solids into the duct, reaction and drying of the solids with flue gas in the duct, collection in particulate control equipment, and finally recycle of dry solids with some bleed to disposal. The moisture content of the solids at each step affects system performance. Various factors favor high moisture whereas others favor low moisture. (VC)

  19. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Driven Swirl Boiling Liquid/Gas Separator under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji; Nguyen, Ngoc; Dickes, Neil; Kurwitz, Richard C.; Best, Frederick R.

    2009-03-01

    Under reduced gravity conditions, conventional gravity-assisted steam generators do not function properly and shear-driven or swirl type of devices must be used. Once-through boilers with special inserts such as twisted-tapes or swirl devices and rotating boilers have been previously studied. The once-through boiler requires a liquid-vapor phase separator due to the inability to vaporize all liquid completely to avoid burn-out. These devices also encounter instabilities due to the sudden formation or collapse of vapor. The rotating boiler requires a large power input to operate and has less reliability due to moving parts and dynamic seals at high temperature. A liquid-driven vortex boiling separator is categorized as a shear-driven boiler, but creates centripetal-driven buoyancy forces to form a gas-liquid vortex by injecting liquid tangentially along the inner wall of the cylinder rather than rotating the body itself. The vortex boiling separator eliminates the disadvantages of devices mentioned above, having a low pressure drop, no moving parts and generating dry vapor at its outlet. Texas A&M University carried out a reduced gravity flight experiment on the NASA C-9 aircraft to investigate the heat transfer characteristics and performance based on similar devices developed at Texas A&M.

  20. Two-component co-injection and transfer molding and gas-assisted injection molding of polymers: Simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengtao

    Two-component molding is a novel process for manufacturing polymer products with a sandwich structure or a hollow structure. Typically, two different materials are injected or transferred into a mold sequentially or simultaneously. The skin is generally a prime polymer with required surface and bulk properties for intended use. The core can be solid, foam or gas. Obtaining a uniform encapsulated structure is difficult and there are no science-based rules for optimization of process setup. Thus, a physical model and process simulations have been developed based on the kinematics and dynamics of a moving interface, and Hele-Shaw approximation. The model has incorporated temperature and shear rate dependences of viscosity of both skin and core component into the transient interface evolution. Based on the developed model, simulations have been carried out to study flow rate controlled simultaneous co-injection molding of thermoplastics, pressure-controlled sequential transfer molding of rubber compounds, and gas-assisted injection molding (GAIM). The simulation results were compared with the experimental data, and in general, good agreement was found between the predicted and experimentally measured interface distribution in moldings. For simultaneous co-injection molding, it is found that material pairs with a broad range of viscosities may be utilized. Breakthrough phenomena are mainly determined by the volume of melt of initial single phase injection and rheological properties of material combinations. When the core has a lower viscosity than the skin, or the volume of initial injection of skin melt is smaller, breakthrough is very likely. However, the breakthrough can be eliminated by controlling injection rate of the skin and core melts. For sequential transfer molding, it is found that the rubber distribution in moldings are dominated by the rheological properties of components and the volume fraction transferred, but independent of the gate pressure. When the

  1. Reactivity of aldehydes at the air-water interface. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Martins-Costa, Marilia T C; García-Prieto, Francisco F; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-02-14

    Understanding the influence of solute-solvent interactions on chemical reactivity has been a subject of intense research in the last few decades. Theoretical studies have focused on bulk solvation phenomena and a variety of models and methods have been developed that are now widely used by both theoreticians and experimentalists. Much less attention has been paid, however, to processes that occur at liquid interfaces despite the important role such interfaces play in chemistry and biology. In this study, we have carried out sequential molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanical calculations to analyse the influence of the air-water interface on the reactivity of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde, three simple aldehydes of atmospheric interest. The calculated free-energy profiles exhibit a minimum at the interface, where the average reactivity indices may display large solvation effects. The study emphasizes the role of solvation dynamics, which are responsible for large fluctuations of some molecular properties. We also show that the photolysis rate constant of benzaldehyde in the range 290-308 nm increases by one order of magnitude at the surface of a water droplet, from 2.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) in the gas phase to 2.8 × 10(-4) s(-1) at the air-water interface, and we discuss the potential impact of this result on the chemistry of the troposphere. Experimental data in this domain are still scarce and computer simulations like those presented in this work may provide some insights that can be useful to design new experiments. PMID:25451554

  2. Treatment of source-separated urine by a combination of bipolar electrodialysis and a gas transfer membrane.

    PubMed

    Pronk, W; Biebow, M; Boller, M

    2006-01-01

    Urine contains nutrients which can be applied usefully as a fertiliser in agriculture, but the relatively high pH can lead to ammonia evaporation. Electrodialysis with bipolar membranes was combined with an additional mass transfer unit in order to render a product containing ammonium and phosphate at a low pH. In one case, the additional mass transfer unit consisted of bubble columns placed in acid and basic concentrate streams, connected with a circulating gas phase. In the other case, the unit consisted of a gas-filled (hydrophobic) membrane placed in between the circulating acid and basic concentrate streams. The results showed that ammonia was transferred through the gas phase, but also carbonate, which is present in stored urine originating from the hydrolysis of urea. Although the pH in the product stream decreases initially, it rises above pH 7 at longer operation times. This pH increase can be attributed to a combination of proton compensating effects. The use of ammonia-selective membranes for the transfer into the acid concentrate could provide a solution to generate an ammonium phosphate product at low pH and high recoveries. PMID:16605026

  3. Studies of the Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer Regime for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Decay Heat Removal System

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong Ik Lee; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kazimi, Mujid S.; Saha, Pradip

    2006-07-01

    Increased reliance on passive emergency cooling using natural circulation of gas at elevated pressure is one of the major goals for the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Since GFR cores have high power density and low thermal inertia, the decay heat removal (DHR) in depressurization accidents is a key challenge. Furthermore, due to its high surface heat flux and low velocities under natural circulation in any post-LOCA scenario, three effects impair the capability of turbulent gas flow to remove heat from the GFR core, namely: (1) Acceleration effect (2) Buoyancy effect (3) Properties variation. This paper reviews previous work on heat transfer mechanisms and flow characteristics of the Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime. It is shown that the GFR's DHR system has a potential for operating in the DTHT regime by performing a simple analysis. A description of the MIT/INL experimental facility designed and built to investigate the DTHT regime is provided together with the first test results. The first runs were performed in the forced convection regime to verify facility operation against well-established forced convection correlations. The results of the three runs at Reynolds numbers 6700, 8000 and 12800 showed good agreement with the Gnielinsky correlation [4], which is considered the best available heat transfer correlation in the forced convection regime and is valid for a large range of Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. However, even in the forced convection regime, the effect of heat transfer properties variation of the fluid was found to be still significant. (authors)

  4. FORMALDEHYDE AND TRACER GAS TRANSFER BETWEEN AIRSTREAMS IN ENTHALPY-TYPE AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W. J.; Pedersen, B. S.; Hekmat, D.; Chant, R. E.; Kaboli, H.

    1984-07-01

    Enthalpy exchangers are frequently employed to transfer heat and water between the supply and exhaust airstreams of mechanical ventilation systems. Concern has been expressed that some indoor-generated air pollutants, especially formaldehyde, may be transferred between airstreams by this type of heat exchanger and, thus, returned to the indoor space. This paper describes an experimental study in which the formaldehyde, tracer gas, and water vapor transfer rates in two enthalpy exchangers were measured. The first exchanger uses a crossflow core fabricated from a treated paper. The core of the second heat exchanger is a rotating heat wheel coated with lithium chloride. To reduce the transfer of gases by air leakage each core was installed in a specially fabricated case. Only 5% to 8% of the two tracer gases and 7% to 15% of the formaldehyde injected into the exhaust airstream was transferred to the supply airstream. Therefore, formaldehyde transfer between airstreams by processes other than air leakage does not seriously compromise the performance of these enthalpy exchangers. Theoretical calculations indicate, however, that the transfer of water vapor between airstreams in enthalpy exchangers can significantly diminish their ability to lower indoor formaldehyde concentrations because of the positive coupling between indoor humidity and the emission rates of formaldehyde from building materials.

  5. Heat transfer analysis in rotating gas turbine components - Experimental techniques and non-intrusive diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, S.

    Measurement techniques which can be applied for the determination of heat transfer coefficients in rotating components of turbomachines are illustrated, using specific examples from the heat transfer research at the Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery at the University of Karlsruhe. The following topics are presented in detail: the effect of wakes on the mean heat transfer of an air foil; some aspects of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in labyrinth seals; analysis of the local heat transfer downstream of a jet in a cross flow using an IR camera; and the measurement of local heat transfer coefficients in turbine disk cavities with liquid crystals.

  6. It's Alive!: Students Observe Air-Water Interface Samples Rich with Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an experiment, designed by Cindy Henk, manager of the Socolofsky Microscopy Center at Louisiana State University (LSU), that involved collecting and viewing microorganisms in the air-water interface. The experiment was participated by Leesville High School microbiology students. The students found that the air-water…

  7. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants. PMID:25358083

  8. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA laboratory in Athens, Georgia i spursuing the goal of developing a model for describing toxicant vapor phase air/water exchange under all relevant environmental conditions. To date, the two-layer exchange model (suitable for low wind speed conditions) has been modif...

  9. The behavior of NaOH at the air-water interface, a computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations with a polarizable multi-state empirical valence bond model were carried out to investigate NaOH dissociation and pairing in water bulk and at the air-water interface. It was found that NaOH readily dissociates in the bulk, and the effect of the air-water interface on NaOH dissociation is fairly minor. Also, NaOH complexes were found to be strongly repelled from the air-water interface, which is consistent with surface tension measurements. At the same time, a very strong preference for the hydroxide anion to be oriented towards the air was found that persisted a few angstroms towards the liquid from the Gibbs dividing surface of the air-water interface. This was due to a preference for the hydroxide anion to have its hydrogen pointing towards the air, and the fact that the sodium ion was more likely to be found near the hydroxide oxygen than hydrogen. As a consequence, the simulation results show that surfaces of NaOH solutions should be negatively charged, in agreement with experimental observations, but also that the hydroxide has little surface affinity. This provides the possibility that the surface of water can be devoid of hydroxide anions, but still have a strong negative charge. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  11. Excitonic splitting and coherent electronic energy transfer in the gas-phase benzoic acid dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2012-11-28

    The benzoic acid dimer, (BZA){sub 2}, is a paradigmatic symmetric hydrogen bonded dimer with two strong antiparallel hydrogen bonds. The excitonic S{sub 1}/S{sub 2} state splitting and coherent electronic energy transfer within supersonically cooled (BZA){sub 2} and its {sup 13}C-, d{sub 1}-, d{sub 2}-, and {sup 13}C/d{sub 1}- isotopomers have been investigated by mass-resolved two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. The (BZA){sub 2}-(h-h) and (BZA){sub 2}-(d-d) dimers are C{sub 2h} symmetric, hence only the S{sub 2} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} transition can be observed, the S{sub 1} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} transition being strictly electric-dipole forbidden. A single {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C or H/D isotopic substitution reduces the symmetry of the dimer to C{sub s}, so that the isotopic heterodimers (BZA){sub 2}-{sup 13}C, (BZA){sub 2}-(h-d), (BZA){sub 2}-(h{sup 13}C-d), and (BZA){sub 2}-(h-d{sup 13}C) show both S{sub 1} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} and S{sub 2} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} bands. The S{sub 1}/S{sub 2} exciton splitting inferred is {Delta}{sub exc}= 0.94 {+-} 0.1 cm{sup -1}. This is the smallest splitting observed so far for any H-bonded gas-phase dimer. Additional isotope-dependent contributions to the splittings, {Delta}{sub iso}, arise from the change of the zero-point vibrational energy upon electronic excitation and range from {Delta}{sub iso}= 3.3 cm{sup -1} upon {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C substitution to 14.8 cm{sup -1} for carboxy H/D substitution. The degree of excitonic localization/delocalization can be sensitively measured via the relative intensities of the S{sub 1} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} and S{sub 2} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} origin bands; near-complete localization is observed even for a single {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C substitution. The S{sub 1}/ S{sub 2} energy gap of (BZA){sub 2} is {Delta}{sub calc}{sup exc}=11 cm{sup -1} when calculated by the approximate second-order perturbation theory (CC2) method. Upon correction for vibronic

  12. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  13. Kinetics of gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-solid transfer of particles in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Rana, F.; Moitra, A.; Kacar, S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical models for transfer of particles from gas to liquid and from liquid to solid are introduced. The model for calculation of the pushing/engulfment transition in directionally solidified particulate metal matrix composites, considers process thermodynamics, process kinetics, thermophysical properties and buoyant forces. Based on processing variables (solidification velocity and direction) and on material variables (interface energies, particle size, particle and liquid density, volume fraction of particles and particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio) four types of behavior were predicted. Also, two numerical models for liquid-to-solid transfer are discussed, as well as the limitations of presently available models.

  14. Application of new parameterizations of gas transfer velocity and their impact on regional and global marine CO 2 budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangohr, Susanne; Woolf, David K.

    2007-06-01

    One of the dominant sources of uncertainty in the calculation of air-sea flux of carbon dioxide on a global scale originates from the various parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity, k, that are in use. Whilst it is undisputed that most of these parameterizations have shortcomings and neglect processes which influence air-sea gas exchange and do not scale with wind speed alone, there is no general agreement about their relative accuracy. The most widely used parameterizations are based on non-linear functions of wind speed and, to a lesser extent, on sea surface temperature and salinity. Processes such as surface film damping and whitecapping are known to have an effect on air-sea exchange. More recently published parameterizations use friction velocity, sea surface roughness, and significant wave height. These new parameters can account to some extent for processes such as film damping and whitecapping and could potentially explain the spread of wind-speed based transfer velocities published in the literature. We combine some of the principles of two recently published k parameterizations [Glover, D.M., Frew, N.M., McCue, S.J. and Bock, E.J., 2002. A multiyear time series of global gas transfer velocity from the TOPEX dual frequency, normalized radar backscatter algorithm. In: Donelan, M.A., Drennan, W.M., Saltzman, E.S., and Wanninkhof, R. (Eds.), Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces, Geophys. Monograph 127. AGU,Washington, DC, 325-331; Woolf, D.K., 2005. Parameterization of gas transfer velocities and sea-state dependent wave breaking. Tellus, 57B: 87-94] to calculate k as the sum of a linear function of total mean square slope of the sea surface and a wave breaking parameter. This separates contributions from direct and bubble-mediated gas transfer as suggested by Woolf [Woolf, D.K., 2005. Parameterization of gas transfer velocities and sea-state dependent wave breaking. Tellus, 57B: 87-94] and allows us to quantify contributions from these two processes

  15. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2003-12-15

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers to make timely, informed technology decisions. Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 3 Satellite Offices that encompass all of the oil- and natural gas-producing regions in the U.S. Active volunteer leadership from the Board and regional Producer Advisory Groups keeps activities focused on producer's needs. Technical expertise and personal networks of national and regional staff enable PTTC to deliver focused, technology-related information in a manner that is cost and time effective for independents. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with matching state and industry funding, forming a unique partnership. This final report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments. In this final fiscal year of the contract, activities exceeded prior annual activity levels by significant percentages. Strategic planning implemented during the year is focusing PTTC's attention on changes that will bear fruit in the future. Networking and connections are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom-line information stimulates cooperative ventures. In FY03 PTTC's regions held 169 workshops, drawing 8,616 attendees. There were nearly 25,000 reported contacts. This represents a 38% increase in attendance and 34% increase in contacts as compared to FY02 activity. Repeat attendance at regional workshops, a measure of customer satisfaction and value received, remained strong at 50%. 39% of participants in regional workshops respond ''Yes'' on feedback forms when asked if they are applying technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC. This feedback confirms that producers are taking action with the

  16. Secondary flow and heat transfer control in gas turbine inlet nozzle guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Steven Wayne

    1998-12-01

    Endwall heat transfer is a very serious problem in the inlet nozzle guide vane region of gas turbine engines. To resolve heat transfer concerns and provide the desired thermal protection, modern cooling flows for the vane endwalls tend to be excessive leading to lossy and inefficient designs. Coolant introduction is further complicated by the flow patterns along vane endwall surfaces. They are three-dimensional and dominated by strong, complex secondary flows. To achieve performance goals for next-generation engines, more aerodynamically efficient and advanced cooling concepts, including combustor bleed cooling, must be investigated. To this end, the overall performance characteristics of several combustor bleed flow designs are assessed in this experimental study. In particular, their contributions toward secondary flow control and component cooling are documented. Testing is performed in a large-scale, guide vane simulator comprised of three airfoils encased between one contoured and one flat endwall. Core flow is supplied to this simulator at an inlet chord Reynolds number of 350,000 and turbulence intensity of 9.5%. Combustor bleed cooling flow is injected through the contoured endwall via inclined slots. The slots vary in cross-sectional area, have equivalent slot widths, and are positioned with their leeward edges 10% of the axial chord ahead of the airfoil leading edges. Measurements with hot-wire anemometry characterize the inlet and exit flow fields of the cascade. Total and static pressure measurements document aerodynamic performance. Thermocouple measurements detail thermal fields and permit evaluation of surface adiabatic effectiveness. To elucidate the effects of bleed injection, data are compared to an experiment taken without bleed. The influence of bleed mass flow rate and slot geometry on the aerodynamic losses and thermal protection arc given. This study suggests that such combustor bleed flow cooling offers significant thermal protection without

  17. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Luong, V.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to develop computational methods to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer, and to use these methods in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the coolant channels, was developed. The mode was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods. Parametric studies were performed to find a strategy for optimized combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  18. Interfacial area transport across vertical elbows in air-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Mohan Singh

    The accurate prediction of two-phase flow using the two-fluid model requires closure relations for the interfacial area concentration ( ai), which can be provided by the interfacial area transport equation (IATE). Models have been developed for the IATE in straight pipe geometries. However, to analyze practical systems, it is important that the IATE accounts for flows in pipes with varying orientation that are interconnected via different flow restrictions. In view of this, the current study performs experiments to investigate the geometric effects of 90- degree vertical elbows in air-water two-phase flows and develops a one-group IATE applicable to vertical-upward-to-horizontal two-phase flows. The experimental facility consists of both vertical and horizontal sections constructed from 50.8 mm inner diameter acrylic pipes that are interconnected via 90-degree glass elbows. The elbows have a radius of curvature of Rc/D = 3 and are installed at L/D = 63 and 244.7 from the inlet. Experiments are performed to characterize the elbow-effect on both global and local two-phase flow parameters. A four-sensor conductivity probe is used to acquire detailed measurements of local two-phase flow parameters at thirteen axial locations along the test section in eight flow conditions that are within the bubbly flow regime at inlet. The measurements show that in bubbly flow conditions, the vertical-upward elbow causes a characteristic bimodal-type bubble distribution and the change in this distribution farther downstream of the elbow corresponds to the dissipation of the elbow-effects. In view of developing the IATE for vertical-upward to horizontal two-phase flows, predictive models for the dissipation length of the elbow-effect and closure relations for advection of gas-phase, pressure loss, and covariance of bubble interactions are developed. The new models are evaluated against the current experimental database. Overall, the model predictions agree with the data within +/-7

  19. Advanced online monitoring of cell culture off-gas using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Timo; Gutmann, Rene; Bayer, Karl; Kronthaler, Jennifer; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been frequently applied to monitor the O₂ and CO₂ content in the off-gas of animal cell culture fermentations. In contrast to classical mass spectrometry the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) provides additional information of volatile organic compounds by application of a soft ionization technology. Hence, the spectra show less fragments and can more accurately assigned to particular compounds. In order to discriminate between compounds of non-metabolic and metabolic origin cell free experiments and fed-batch cultivations with a recombinant CHO cell line were conducted. As a result, in total eight volatiles showing high relevance to individual cultivation or cultivation conditions could be identified. Among the detected compounds methanethiol, with a mass-to-charge ratio of 49, qualifies as a key candidate in process monitoring due to its strong connectivity to lactate formation. Moreover, the versatile and complex data sets acquired by PTR MS provide a valuable resource for statistical modeling to predict non direct measurable parameters. Hence, partial least square regression was applied to the complete spectra of volatiles measured and important cell culture parameters such as viable cell density estimated (R²  = 0.86). As a whole, the results of this study clearly show that PTR-MS provides a powerful tool to improve bioprocess-monitoring for mammalian cell culture. Thus, specific volatiles emitted by cells and measured online by the PTR-MS and complex variables gained through statistical modeling will contribute to a deeper process understanding in the future and open promising perspectives to bioprocess control. PMID:24376199

  20. Heat transfer technology for internal passages of air-cooled blades for heavy-duty gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Weigand, B; Semmler, K; von Wolfersdorf, J

    2001-05-01

    The present review paper, although far from being complete, aims to give an overview about the present state of the art in the field of heat transfer technology for internal cooling of gas turbine blades. After showing some typical modern cooled blades, the different methods to enhance heat transfer in the internal passages of air-cooled blades are discussed. The complicated flows occurring in bends are described in detail, because of their increasing importance for modern cooling designs. A short review about testing of cooling design elements is given, showing the interaction of the different cooling features as well. The special focus of the present review has been put on the cooling of blades for heavy-duty gas turbines, which show several differences compared to aero-engine blades. PMID:11460627

  1. A transient liquid crystal thermography technique for gas turbine heat transfer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekkad, Srinath V.; Han, Je-Chin

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents in detail the transient liquid crystal technique for convective heat transfer measurements. A historical perspective on the active development of liquid crystal techniques for convective heat transfer measurement is also presented. The experimental technique involves using a thermochromic liquid crystal coating on the test surface. The colour change time of the coating at every pixel location on the heat transfer surface during a transient test is measured using an image processing system. The heat transfer coefficients are calculated from the measured time responses of these thermochromic coatings. This technique has been used for turbine blade internal coolant passage heat transfer measurements as well as turbine blade film cooling heat transfer measurements. Results can be obtained on complex geometry surfaces if visually accessible. Some heat transfer results for experiments with jet impingement, internal cooling channels with ribs, flow over simulated TBC spallation, flat plate film cooling, cylindrical leading edge and turbine blade film cooling are presented for demonstration.

  2. A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Boiko; S.V. Pachkovskii

    2008-12-15

    A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pulverized state at different treatment conditions and different model parameters are presented. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of thermochemical conversion of solid organic fuels with allowance for complex physicochemical phenomena of heat-and-mass exchange between coal particles and the gaseous environment.

  3. A survey of gas-side fouling in industrial heat-transfer equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Gas-side fouling and corrosion problems occur in all of the energy intensive industries including the chemical, petroleum, primary metals, pulp and paper, glass, cement, foodstuffs, and textile industries. Topics of major interest include: (1) heat exchanger design procedures for gas-side fouling service; (2) gas-side fouling factors which are presently available; (3) startup and shutdown procedures used to minimize the effects of gas-side fouling; (4) gas-side fouling prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques; (5) economic impact of gas-side fouling on capital costs, maintenance costs, loss of production, and energy losses; and (6) miscellaneous considerations related to gas-side fouling. The present state-of-the-art for industrial gas-side fouling is summarized by a list of recommendations for further work in this area.

  4. Air-water partition coefficients for a suite of polycyclic aromatic and other C10 through C20 unsaturated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2016-09-18

    The air-water partition coefficients (Kaw) for 86 large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their unsaturated relatives were estimated using high-level G4(MP2) gas and aqueous phase calculations with the SMD, IEFPCM-UFF, and CPCM solvation models. An extensive method validation effort was undertaken which involved confirming that, via comparisons to experimental enthalpies of formation, gas-phase energies at the G4(MP2) level for the compounds of interest were at or near thermochemical accuracy. Investigations of the three solvation models using a range of neutral and ionic compounds suggested that while no clear preferential solvation model could be chosen in advance for accurate Kaw estimates of the target compounds, the employment of increasingly higher levels of theory would result in lower Kaw errors. Subsequent calculations on the polycyclic aromatic and unsaturated hydrocarbons at the G4(MP2) level revealed excellent agreement for the IEFPCM-UFF and CPCM models against limited available experimental data. The IEFPCM-UFF-G4(MP2) and CPCM-G4(MP2) solvation energy calculation approaches are anticipated to give Kaw estimates within typical experimental ranges, each having general Kaw errors of less than 0.5 log10 units. When applied to other large organic compounds, the method should allow development of a broad and reliable Kaw database for multimedia environmental modeling efforts on various contaminants. PMID:27336293

  5. Distribution of air-water mixtures in parallel vertical channels as an effect of the header geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marchitto, Annalisa; Fossa, Marco; Guglielmini, Giovanni

    2009-07-15

    Uneven phase distribution in heat exchangers is a cause of severe reductions in thermal performances of refrigeration equipment. To date, no general design rules are available to avoid phase separation in manifolds with several outlet channels, and even predicting the phase and mass distribution in parallel channels is a demanding task. In the present paper, measurements of two-phase air-water distributions are reported with reference to a horizontal header supplying 16 vertical upward channels. The effects of the operating conditions, the header geometry and the inlet port nozzle were investigated in the ranges of liquid and gas superficial velocities of 0.2-1.2 and 1.5-16.5 m/s, respectively. Among the fitting devices used, the insertion of a co-axial, multi-hole distributor inside the header confirmed the possibility of greatly improving the liquid and gas flow distribution by the proper selection of position, diameter and number of the flow openings between the supplying distributor and the system of parallel channels connected to the header. (author)

  6. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjie; Yang, Weihuang; Zhu, Huili

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS2 upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS2 with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH3, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS2 are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H2, H2O, NH3, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O2, NO, and NO2 are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26049513

  7. A Computationally-Efficient Kinetic Approach for Gas/Particle Mass Transfer Treatments: Development, Testing, and 3-D Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast/Chemistry Model (WRF/Chem) that simulates chemistry simultaneously with meteorology has recently been developed for real-time forecasting by the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). As one of the six air quality models, WRF/Chem with a modal aerosol module has been applied for ozone and PM2.5 ensemble forecasts over eastern North America as part of the 2004 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS) program (NEAQS-2004). Significant differences exist in the partitioning of volatile species (e.g., ammonium and nitrate) simulated by the six models. Model biases are partially attributed to the equilibrium assumption used in the gas/particles mass transfer approach in some models. Development of a more accurate, yet computationally- efficient gas/particle mass transfer approach for three-dimensional (3-D) applications, in particular, real-time forecasting, is therefore warranted. Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution (MADRID) has been implemented into WRF/Chem (referred to as WRF/Chem-MADRID). WRF/Chem-MADRID offers three gas/particle partitioning treatments: equilibrium, kinetic, and hybrid approaches. The equilibrium approach is computationally-efficient and commonly used in 3-D air quality models but less accurate under certain conditions (e.g., in the presence of coarse, reactive particles such as PM containing sea-salts in the coastal areas). The kinetic approach is accurate but computationally-expensive, limiting its 3-D applications. The hybrid approach attempts to provide a compromise between merits and drawbacks of the two approaches by treating fine PM (typically < ~ 1 μm) with the equilibrium approach and coarse PM with the kinetic approach. A computationally-efficient kinetic gas/particle mass transfer approach in MADRID has recently been developed for 3-D applications based on an Analytical Predictor of Condensation (referred

  8. Cooling conditions and heat transfer in oil and high-pressure gas quenching of steel components - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Segerberg, S.; Bodin, J.

    1996-12-31

    Recent developments in gas quenching technology prove to be a promising approach to overcome the disadvantage of liquid quenching. The results of gas quenching depend highly on the part geometry, batch design and the interrelation of the parameters like gas type, pressure or gas flow characteristic. Today, gas quenching is cost intensive and restricted to a few applications in small batch production due to the limitations according to the cooling capacity, material, part geometry and batch design. The large advantage with gas quenching is that it is environmentally friendly; no oil smoke, no detergent, no waste water and no fire risk. In this paper comparisons have been made about the cooling characteristics between oils and gases and also how different parameters affect both quenchants. Different ways to correlate quenching curves and hardening results have been shown and explained. Calculation and use of the heat transfer coefficient can not be done in the same way for oil. With the new knowledge it is possible to use data from test probes and be able to predict temperature-time curves for actual component.

  9. Convective heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of a liquid into a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarshinov, B. F.; Volchkov, E. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    1985-10-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes associated with liquid evaporation are analyzed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic conditions. Experimental data are then presented on heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of water and ethyl alcohol from a porous surface. It is shown that heat and mass transfer under conditions of evaporation can be described by using expressions for flow past a 'dry' wall. A diagram is presented for determining the magnitudes of additional heat sources in the case of nonadiabatic evaporation. Finally, the effect of various factors, such as temperature, flow humidity, and liquid type, on heat and mass transfer during evaporation is analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows.

  10. Optimization of heat and mass transfers in counterflow corrugated-plate liquid-gas exchangers used in a greenhouse dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentounes, N.; Jaffrin, A.

    1998-09-01

    Heat and mass transfers occuring in a counterflow direct contact liquid-gas exchanger determine the performance of a new greenhouse air dehumidifier designed at INRA. This prototype uses triethylene glycol (TEG) as the desiccant fluid which extracts water vapor from the air. The regeneration of the TEG desiccant fluid is then performed by direct contact with combustion gas from a high efficiency boiler equipped with a condensor. The heat and mass transfers between the thin film of diluted TEG and the hot gas were simulated by a model which uses correlation formula from the literature specifically relevant to the present cross-corrugated plates geometry. A simple set of analytical solutions is first derived, which explains why some possible processes can clearly be far from optimal. Then, more exact numerical calculations confirm that some undesirable water recondensations on the upper part of the exchanger were limiting the performance of this prototype. More suitable conditions were defined for the process, which lead to a new design of the apparatus. In this second prototype, a gas-gas exchanger provides dryer and cooler gas to the basis of the regenerators, while a warmer TEG is fed on the top. A whole range of operating conditions was experimented and measured parameters were compared with numerical simulations of this new configuration: recondensation did not occur any more. As a consequence, this second prototype was able to concentrate the desiccant fluid at the desired rate of 20 kg H_{2O}/hour, under temperature and humidity conditions which correspond to the dehumidification of a 1000 m2 greenhouse heated at night during the winter season.

  11. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface. PMID:26697736

  12. Structure of phospholipid monolayers containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipids at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, J.; Smith, G.S.; Kuhl, T.L.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-04-17

    The density distribution of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface mixed with varying amounts of lipid with poly(ethylene glycol)polymer headgroups (polymer-lipid or PEG-lipid) was measured using neutron reflectometry. The structure of the monolayer at the interface was greatly perturbed by the presence of the bulky polymer-lipid headgroups resulting in a large increase in the thickness of the headgroup region normal to the interface and a systematic roughening of the interface with increasing polymer-lipid content. These results show how bulky hydrophilic moieties cause significant deformations and out-of-place protrusions of phospholipid monolayers and presumably bilayers, vesicles and biological membranes. In terms of polymer physics, very short polymer chains tethered to the air-water interface follow scaling behavior with a mushroom to brush transition with increasing polymer grafting density. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. WETAIR: A computer code for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of air-water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program subroutine, WETAIR, was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of air water mixtures. It determines the thermodynamic state from assigned values of temperature and density, pressure and density, temperature and pressure, pressure and entropy, or pressure and enthalpy. The WETAIR calculates the properties of dry air and water (steam) by interpolating to obtain values from property tables. Then it uses simple mixing laws to calculate the properties of air water mixtures. Properties of mixtures with water contents below 40 percent (by mass) can be calculated at temperatures from 273.2 to 1497 K and pressures to 450 MN/sq m. Dry air properties can be calculated at temperatures as low as 150 K. Water properties can be calculated at temperatures to 1747 K and pressures to 100 MN/sq m. The WETAIR is available in both SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  14. Gas hold-up and oxygen mass transfer in three pneumatic bioreactors operating with sugarcane bagasse suspensions.

    PubMed

    Esperança, M N; Cunha, F M; Cerri, M O; Zangirolami, T C; Farinas, C S; Badino, A C

    2014-05-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a low-cost and abundant by-product generated by the bioethanol industry, and is a potential substrate for cellulolytic enzyme production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of air flow rate (QAIR), solids loading (%S), sugarcane bagasse type, and particle size on the gas hold-up (εG) and volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) in three different pneumatic bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Concentric tube airlift (CTA), split-cylinder airlift (SCA), and bubble column (BC) bioreactor types were tested. QAIR and %S affected oxygen mass transfer positively and negatively, respectively, while sugarcane bagasse type and particle size (within the range studied) did not influence kLa. Using large particles of untreated sugarcane bagasse, the loop-type bioreactors (CTA and SCA) exhibited higher mass transfer, compared to the BC reactor. At higher %S, SCA presented a higher kLa value (0.0448 s−1) than CTA, and the best operational conditions in terms of oxygen mass transfer were achieved for %S < 10.0 g L−1 and QAIR > 27.0 L min−1. These results demonstrated that pneumatic bioreactors can provide elevated oxygen transfer in the presence of vegetal biomass, making them an excellent option for use in three-phase systems for cellulolytic enzyme production by filamentous fungi. PMID:24078146

  15. Gas Transfer in the Pluto-Charon System: A Charon Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, O. J.; Johnson, R. E.; Young, L. A.; Jia, X.; Tenishev, V.

    2014-12-01

    Recent hybrid fluid/molecular kinetic models demonstrated that Pluto's upper atmosphere is warmer and more extended than previously thought (Erwin et al., 2013; Tucker et al. 2012). This extended atmosphere is a source of molecules to Charon's surface. For approximate solar medium conditions at ~33AU about ~0.2% of the flux from Pluto's exobase impinges on Charon at a rate of ~5.7×1025 N2/s. This is a source of condensed N2 for Charon's night side, and molecules re-emitted from warmer (>20 K) surface regions form a tenuous atmosphere. For the approximate range of surface temperatures, the residence time of N2 on the surface can range from a fraction of a second to 10's of years with the near surface line of sight column densities varying from ~3×1018 N2/m2 up to >6×1019N2/m2. Additional mechanisms that can eject N2molecules from the surface include cometary impacts (Stern et al. 2014) and electronic sputtering (Johnson et al., 2013). A Charon atmosphere could be detectable during the solar occultation that will occur during the New Horizon encounter providing a measure of the transfer of gas between bodies in this binary system. Tucker, O.J., Erwin, J.T., Deighan, J.I., Volkov, A.N., Johnson, R.E., 2012. Thermally driven escape from Pluto's atmosphere: A combined fluid/kinetic model. Icarus 217, pp 408-415.; Erwin, J.T., Tucker, O.J., Johnson, R.E., 2013. Hybrid fluid/kinetic modeling of Pluto's escapingatmosphere. Icarus 226, 375-384. Stern, S.A., R. Gladstone, A. Zangari, D. Goldstein,T.Fleming 2014. Transient Atmospheres on Charon and Other Water-Ice Covered KBOs, Resulting from Comet Impacts, Icarus. DOI: 10.1016/j.icarus.2014.03.008 Johnson, R.E., R. Carlson, T.A. Cassidy, M. Fama, "Sputtering of ices", Chapter in The Science of Solar System Ices. ed. M. Gutopati, J. Castillo-Rogez, Astrophysics and Space Science Library, 356, pp551-581 (2013).

  16. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A.; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-02-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface.The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes

  17. Rheology and microrheology of materials at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Robert Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The study of materials at the air-water interface is an important area of research in soft condensed matter physics. Films at the air-water interface have been a system of interest to physics, chemistry and biology for the last 20 years. The unique properties of these surface films provide ideal models for 2-d films, surface chemistry and provide a platform for creating 2 dimensional analogue materials to cellular membranes. Measurements of the surface rheology of cross-linked F-actin networks associated with a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface of a Langmuir monolayer have been performed. The rheological measurements are made using a Couette cell. These data demonstrate that the network has a finite elastic modulus that grows as a function of the cross-linking concentration. We also note that under steady-state flow the system behaves as a power law fluid in which the effective viscosity decreases with imposed shear. A Langmuir monolayer trough that is equipped for simultaneous microrheology and standard rheology measurements has been constructed. The central elements are the trough itself with a full range of optical tools accessing the air-water interface from below the trough and a portable knife-edge torsion pendulum that can access the interface from above. The ability to simultaneously measure the mechanical response of Langmuir monolayers on very different length scales is an important step for our understanding of the mechanical response of two-dimensional viscoelastic networks. The optical tweezer microrheometer is used to study the micromechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers. Microrheology measurements are made a variety of surface pressures that correspond to different ordered phases of the monolayer. The complex shear modulus shows an order of magnitude increase for the liquid condensed phase of DPPC compared to the liquid expanded phase.

  18. Ecosystem Metabolism and Air-Water Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in High Arctic Wetland Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnherr, I.; Venkiteswaran, J.; St. Louis, V. L.; Emmerton, C.; Schiff, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Freshwater lakes and wetlands can be very productive systems on the Arctic landscape compared to terrestrial tundra ecosystems and provide valuable resources to many organisms, including waterfowl, fish and humans. Rates of ecosystem productivity dictate how much energy flows through food webs, impacting the abundance of higher-level organisms (e.g., fish), as well as the net carbon balance, which determines whether a particular ecosystem is a source or sink of carbon. Climate change is predicted to result in warmer temperatures, increased precipitation and permafrost melting in the Arctic and is already altering northern ecosystems at unprecedented rates; however, it is not known how freshwater systems are responding to these changes. To predict how freshwater systems will respond to complex environmental changes, it is necessary to understand the key processes, such as primary production and ecosystem respiration, that are driving these systems. We sampled wetland ponds (n=8) and lakes (n=2) on northern Ellesmere Island (81° N, Nunavut, Canada) during the open water season for a suite of biogeochemical parameters, including concentrations of dissolved gases (O2, CO2, CH4, N2O) as well as stable-isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC), dissolved oxygen (δ18O-DO), and water (δ18O-H2O). We will present rates of primary production and ecosystem respiration, modeled from the concentration and stable isotope ratios of DIC and DO, as well as air-water gas exchange of greenhouse gases in these high Arctic ponds and lakes. Preliminary results demonstrate that ecosystem metabolism in these ponds was high enough to result in significant deviations in the isotope ratios of DIC and DO from atmospheric equilibrium conditions. In other words ecosystem rates of primary production and respiration were faster than gas exchange even in these small, shallow, well-mixed ponds. Furthermore, primary production was elevated enough at all sites except Lake Hazen, a

  19. Demonstration of adaptive optics for mitigating laser propagation through a random air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Phillip; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new concept of mitigating signal distortions caused by random air-water interface using an adaptive optics (AO) system. This is the first time the concept of using an AO for mitigating the effects of distortions caused mainly by a random air-water interface is presented. We have demonstrated the feasibility of correcting the distortions using AO in a laboratory water tank for investigating the propagation effects of a laser beam through an airwater interface. The AO system consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor for mitigating surface water distortions has a unique way of stabilizing and aiming a laser onto an object underneath the water. Essentially the AO system mathematically takes the complex conjugate of the random phase caused by air-water interface allowing the laser beam to penetrate through the water by cancelling with the complex conjugates. The results show the improvement of a number of metrics including Strehl ratio, a measure of the quality of optical image formation for diffraction limited optical system. These are the first results demonstrating the feasibility of developing a new sensor system such as Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) utilizing AO for mitigating surface water distortions.

  20. Thermodynamic and dynamic characteristics of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose adsorbed films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Oscar E; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2006-01-01

    Surface pressure isotherms and structural and surface dilatational properties of three hydroxypropylmethycelluloses (HPMCs, called E4M, E50LV, and F4M) adsorbed films at the air-water interface were determined. In this work we present evidence that HPMC molecules are able to diffuse and saturate the air-water interface at very low concentrations in the bulk phase. As bulk concentration increased, structural changes at a molecular level occurred at the interface. These changes corresponded to transition from an expanded structure (structure I) to a condensed one (structure II). When the surface concentration of HPMC was high enough, the collapse of the monolayer was observed. The three HPMCs formed very elastic films at the air-water interface, even at low surface pressures. E4M showed features that make it unique. For instance it showed the highest surface activity, mainly at low bulk concentrations (<10(-4) wt %). The differences observed in surface activity may be attributed to differences in the hydroxypropyl molar substitution and molecular weight of HPMC. All three HPMCs formed films of similar viscoelasticity and elastic dilatational modulus, which can be accounted for by their similar degree of methyl substitution. PMID:16398540

  1. Anisotropic orientational motion of molecular adsorbates at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zimdars, D.; Dadap, J.I.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Heinz, T.F.

    1999-04-29

    The ultrafast orientational motions of coumarin 314 (C314) adsorbed at the air/water interface were investigated by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TRSHG). The theory and method of using TRSHG to detect both out-of-plane and in-plane orientational motions are discussed. The interfacial solute motions were found to be anisotropic, with differing out-of-plane and in-plane reorientation time constants. This report presents the first direct observation of in-plane orientational motion of a molecule (C314) at the air/water interface using TRSHG. The in-plane reorientation time constant is 600 {+-} 40 ps. The out-of-plane reorientation time constant is 350 {+-} 20 ps. The out-of-plane orientational motion of C314 is similar to the previous results on rhodamine 6G at the air/water interface which indicated increased interfacial friction compared with bulk aqueous solution. The surface reorientation times are 2--3 times slower than the bulk isotropic orientational diffusion time.

  2. Microstructure of Hairy-Rod Polymers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, B. T.; Riou, S. A.; Su, Z.; Hsu, S. L.

    1997-03-01

    To better understand the role of long flexible side groups on the microstructure of "hairy-rod" polymer thin films, a series of poly(γ-methyl-L-glutamate-co-γ-n-octadecyl-L- glutamate) of varying degree copolymerization has been investigated at the air-water interface by external reflectance infrared spectroscopy. Coupled with a Langmuir trough, the microstructure of the monolayer films was charaterized directly at the air-water interface as a function of varying surface packing density. The conformational order of the n-octadecyl side groups was subsequently shown to vary strongly as a function of n-octadecyl side group content as well as surface packing density. When conformationally disordered, the n-octadecyl side groups could be likened to that of a Rsolvent-likeS matrix for the rigid- rod main chains in the plane of the interface. By controlling the conformational order and therefore the Rsolvent-likeS character of the n-octadecyl side groups, it was possible to control an in-plane orientation of the rigid-rod main chains relative to that of the compression axis of the Langmuir trough. The orientation of the n- octadecyl side groups out of the plane of the air-water interface was also determined.

  3. Hydrodynamics of a fixed camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhiraj; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Ravi; Mandre, Shreyas; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when introduced at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and the camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface. This radial spreading of camphor is due to Marangoni forces setup by the camphor concentration gradient. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of this process for a camphor tablet held fixed at the air-water interface. During the initial transient, the time-dependent spread radius R (t) of camphor scales algebraically with time t (R (t) ~t 1 / 2) in agreement with empirical scalings reported for spreading of volatile oils on water surface. But unlike surfactants, the camphor stops spreading when the influx of camphor from the tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the outflux of camphor due to evaporation, and a steady-state condition is reached. The spreading camphor however, shears the underlying fluid and sets up bulk convective flow. We explain the coupled steady-state dynamics between the interfacial camphor spreading and bulk convective flow with a boundary layer approximation, supported by experimental evidence. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  4. A self-consistent field study of a hydrocarbon droplet at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Emilia; Leermakers, Frans A M; Vermeer, Arnoldus W P

    2012-04-14

    A molecularly detailed self-consistent field (SCF) approach is applied to describe a sessile hydrocarbon droplet placed at the air-water interface. Predictions of the contact angle for macroscopic droplets follow from using Neumann's equation, wherein the macroscopic interfacial tensions are computed from one-gradient calculations for flat interfaces. A two-gradient cylindrical coordinate system with mirror-like boundary conditions is used to analyse the three dimensional shape of the nano-scale oil droplet at the air-water interface. These small droplets have a finite value of the Laplace pressure and concomitant line tension. It has been calculated that the oil-water and oil-vapour interfacial tensions are curvature dependent and increase slightly with increasing interfacial curvature. In contrast, the line tension tends to decrease with curvature. In all cases there is only a weak influence of the line tension on the droplet shape. We therefore argue that the nano-scale droplets, which are described in the SCF approach, are representative for macroscopic droplets and that the method can be used to efficiently generate accurate information on the spreading of oil droplets at the air-water interface in molecularly more complex situations. As an example, non-ionic surfactants have been included in the system to illustrate how a molecularly more complex situation will change the wetting properties of the sessile drop. This short forecast is aimed to outline and to stress the potential of the method. PMID:22395192

  5. Simulation of metal transfer and weld pool development in gas metal arc welding of thin sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang

    Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is the most commonly used arc welding method in industry for joining steels and aluminum alloys. But due to the mathematical difficulties associated with the free surface motion of the molten droplet and the weld pool, the process is not well understood and the development of new welding procedures in the manufacturing industry highly depends on expensive, time-consuming and experience-based trial and error. In this dissertation, numerical methods are developed to overcome the difficulties and to simulate the metal transfer and weld pool development in the GMAW of sheet metals. The simulations are validated by experiments and used to study an industrial welding process. A numerical procedure is first developed to model the free surface motion in fusion welding processes. Thermal and electromagnetic models are integrated with the fluid models. Recommendations are made on the selection and improvement of publicly available numerical algorithms, while alternative methods are also reviewed. A model combining the enthalpy, effective-viscosity and volume-of-fluid methods is then developed to simulate the metal transfer process in globular, spray and short-circuiting transfer modes. The model not only describes the influence of gravity, electromagnetic force and surface tension on droplet profile and transfer frequency, but also models the nonisothermal phenomena such as heat transfer and phase change. The melting front motion, the droplet detachment and oscillation, the satellite formation and the fluid convection within the droplet are analyzed. It has been found that the taper formation in spray transfer is closely related to the heat input on the unmelted portion of the welding wire, and the taper formation affects the globular-spray transition by decelerating the transfer process. Experiments with a high-speed motion analyzer validate the simulation results. The model is then extended to simulate the initiation, development and

  6. The effect of microbubbles on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient and degradation rate of COD in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kangning; Chi, Yong; Wang, Fei; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    A commonly used aeration device at present has the disadvantages of low mass transfer rate because the generated bubbles are several millimeters in diameter which are much bigger than microbubbles. Therefore, the effect of a microbubble on gas-liquid mass transfer and wastewater treatment process was investigated. To evaluate the effect of each bubble type, the volumetric mass transfer coefficients for microbubbles and conventional bubbles were determined. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was 0.02905 s(-1) and 0.02191 s(-1) at a gas flow rate of 0.67 L min(-1) in tap water for microbubbles and conventional bubbles, respectively. The degradation rate of simulated municipal wastewater was also investigated, using aerobic activated sludge and ozone. Compared with the conventional bubble generator, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 2.04, 5.9, 3.26 times higher than those of the conventional bubble contactor at the same initial COD concentration of COD 200 mg L(-1), 400 mg L(-1), and 600 mg L(-1), while aerobic activated sludge was used. For the ozonation process, the rate of COD removal using microbubble generator was 2.38, 2.51, 2.89 times of those of the conventional bubble generator. Based on the results, the effect of initial COD concentration on the specific COD degradation rate were discussed in different systems. Thus, the results revealed that microbubbles could enhance mass transfer in wastewater treatment and be an effective method to improve the degradation of wastewater. PMID:27120652

  7. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow using V and broken V ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sourabh; Amano, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land-based power generation, and various industrial applications. With an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures, developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output; these advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine designs to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream of gas are based on an increase in the heat transfer areas and on the promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, an improvement in performance is obtained by casting repeated continuous V- and broken V-shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channels into the core of the blade. A detailed experimental investigation is done for two pass square channels with a 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for a steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° V- and broken 60° V-ribs in a channel are considered. A series of thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for Reynolds numbers 16,000, 56,000 and 85,000 within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the rib. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. A series of experimental measurements is performed to predict the overall performance of the channel. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the Nusselt number, the pressure drop and the overall performance of the eight different ribbed ducts at the specified Reynolds number. The main contribution of this study is to evaluate the best combination of rib arrangements

  8. Dust Control with Use of Air-Water Spraying System / Redukcja Zapylenia Powietrza Z Wykorzystaniem Zraszania Powietrzno-Wodnego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prostański, Dariusz

    2012-12-01

    Results from testing the dust control efficiency, when using air-water spraying system in comparison to the typical water spraying system are presented in the paper. The tests were carried out in conditions of longwall mining and at the places of run-of-mine transportation. Also the results of stand tests of different types of nozzles both for air-water and for water spaying systems carried out at KOMAG's laboratory and in real conditions are presented. The benefits resulting from air-water spraying system have been determined.

  9. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovic, E.; O'Brien, J. E.; Pepper, D. W.

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  10. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elovic, E. (Editor); O'Brien, J. E. (Editor); Pepper, D. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  11. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  12. Optimizing gas transfer to improve growth rate of Haematococcus pluvialis in a raceway pond with chute and oscillating baffles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Li, Ke; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-08-01

    Up-down chute and oscillating (UCO) baffles were used to generate vortex and oscillating flow field to improve growth rate of Haematococcus pluvialis in a raceway pond. Effects of gas flow rate, solution velocity, and solution depth on solution mass transfer coefficient and mixing time were evaluated using online pH and dissolved oxygen probes. Mass transfer coefficient increased by 1.3 times and mixing time decreased by 33% when UCO baffles were used in the H. pluvialis solution, resulting in an 18% increase in biomass yield with 2% CO2. The H. pluvialis biomass yield further increased to 1.5g/L, and astaxanthin composition accumulated to 29.7mg/L under relatively higher light intensity and salinity. PMID:27140817

  13. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger

  14. Intramolecular Halogen Transfer via Halonium Ion Intermediates in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yunfeng; Xiong, Xingchuang; Yue, Lei; Jiang, You; Pan, Yuanjiang; Fang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The fragmentation of halogen-substituted protonated amines and quaternary ammonium ions (R1R2R3N+CH2(CH2)nX, where X = F, Cl, Br, I, n = 1, 2, 3, 4) was studied by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A characteristic fragment ion (R1R2R3N+X) resulting from halogen transfer was observed in collision-induced dissociation. A new mechanism for the intramolecular halogen transfer was proposed that involves a reactive intermediate, [amine/halonium ion]. A potential energy surface scan using DFT calculation for CH2-N bond cleavage process of protonated 2-bromo -N,N-dimethylethanamine supports the formation of this intermediate. The bromonium ion intermediate-involved halogen transfer mechanism is supported by an examination of the ion/molecule reaction between isolated ethylenebromonium ion and triethylamine, which generates the N-bromo- N,N,N-triethylammonium cation. For other halogens, Cl and I also can be involved in similar intramolecular halogen transfer, but F cannot be involved. With the elongation of the carbon chain between the halogen (bromine as a representative example) and amine, the migration ability of halogen decreases. When the carbon chain contains two or three CH2 units (n = 1, 2), formal bromine cation transfer can take place, and the transfer is easier when n = 1. When the carbon chain contains four or five CH2 units (n = 3, 4), formal bromine cation transfer does not occur, probably because the five- and six-membered cyclic bromonium ions are very stable and do not donate the bromine to the amine.

  15. Intramolecular Halogen Transfer via Halonium Ion Intermediates in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yunfeng; Xiong, Xingchuang; Yue, Lei; Jiang, You; Pan, Yuanjiang; Fang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The fragmentation of halogen-substituted protonated amines and quaternary ammonium ions (R(1)R(2)R(3)N(+)CH2(CH2)nX, where X = F, Cl, Br, I, n = 1, 2, 3, 4) was studied by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A characteristic fragment ion (R(1)R(2)R(3)N(+)X) resulting from halogen transfer was observed in collision-induced dissociation. A new mechanism for the intramolecular halogen transfer was proposed that involves a reactive intermediate, [amine/halonium ion]. A potential energy surface scan using DFT calculation for CH2-N bond cleavage process of protonated 2-bromo-N,N-dimethylethanamine supports the formation of this intermediate. The bromonium ion intermediate-involved halogen transfer mechanism is supported by an examination of the ion/molecule reaction between isolated ethylenebromonium ion and triethylamine, which generates the N-bromo-N,N,N-triethylammonium cation. For other halogens, Cl and I also can be involved in similar intramolecular halogen transfer, but F cannot be involved. With the elongation of the carbon chain between the halogen (bromine as a representative example) and amine, the migration ability of halogen decreases. When the carbon chain contains two or three CH2 units (n = 1, 2), formal bromine cation transfer can take place, and the transfer is easier when n = 1. When the carbon chain contains four or five CH2 units (n = 3, 4), formal bromine cation transfer does not occur, probably because the five- and six-membered cyclic bromonium ions are very stable and do not donate the bromine to the amine. PMID:26383734

  16. A novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.M.; Fridman, A.; Viskanta, R.; Neff, D.

    1997-11-01

    Phase I of the project focused on acquiring the market needs, modeling, design, and test plan information for a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. All goals and objectives were achieved. The key component of the system is an innovative burner technology which combines high temperature natural gas preheating with soot formation and subsequent soot burnout in the flame, increases the system`s energy efficiency and furnace throughput, while minimizing the furnace air emissions, all without external parasitic systems. Work has included identifying industry`s needs and constraints, modeling the high luminosity burner system, designing the prototype burner for initial laboratory-scale testing, defining the test plan, adapting the burner technology to meet the industry`s needs and constraints, and outlining the Industrial Adoption Plan.

  17. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Van, Luong

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper are to develop a multidisciplinary computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates CFD for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40 k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine Main Combustion Chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the Advanced Main Combustion Chamber to find a strategy for a proposed combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  18. A new flooding correlation development and its critical heat flux predictions under low air-water flow conditions in Savannah River Site assembly channels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y. )

    1993-10-01

    The upper limit to countercurrent flow, namely, flooding, is important to analyze the reactor coolability during an emergency cooling system (ECS) phase as a result of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) such as a double-ended guillotine break in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor system. During normal operation, the reactor coolant system utilizes downward flow through concentric heated tubes with ribs, which subdivided each annular channel into four subchannels. In this paper, a new flooding correlation has been developed based on the analytical models and literature data for adiabatic, steady-state, one-dimensional, air-water flow to predict flooding phenomenon in the SRS reactor assembly channel, which may have a counter-current air-water flow pattern during the ECS phase. In addition, the correlation was benchmarked against the experimental data conducted under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory multislit channel, which is close to the SRS assembly geometry. Furthermore, the correlation has also been used as a constitutive relationship in a new two-component two-phase thermal-hydraulics code FLOWTRAN-TF, which has been developed for a detailed analysis of SRS reactor assembly behavior during LOCA scenarios. Finally, the flooding correlation was applied to the predictions of critical heat flux, and the results were compared with the data taken by the SRS heat transfer laboratory under a single annular channel with ribs and a multiannular prototypic test rig.

  19. How does spacer length of imidazolium gemini surfactants control the fabrication of 2D-Langmuir films of silver-nanoparticles at the air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Datta, Sougata; Biswas, Joydeep; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-09-15

    A series of gemini surfactants based on cationic imidazolium ring as polar headgroup, abbreviated as [Im-n-Im], 2Br(-) (n=2, 5, 6 and 12), was synthesized. Their ability to stabilize silver nanoparticles in aqueous media was investigated. The resulting suspensions were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They exhibit specific morphologies by adopting different supramolecular assemblies in aqueous media depending on the internal packing arrangements and on the number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-]. Individual colloids were extracted from the aqueous to chloroform layer and spread at the air/water interface to allow the formation of well-defined Langmuir films. By analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms, the details about the packing behavior and orientation of the imidazolium gemini surfactant capped silver nanoparticles were obtained. Morphological features of the dynamic process of monolayer compression at the air-water interface were elucidated using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). These monolayers were further transferred on mica sheets by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique at their associated collapse pressure and the morphology of these monolayers was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-] of the gemini surfactants exerted critical influence in modulating the characteristics of the resulting Langmuir films. PMID:24998058

  20. Effect of internal pressure and gas/liquid interface area on the CO mass transfer coefficient using hollow fibre membranes as a high mass transfer gas diffusing system for microbial syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Yeseul; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2014-10-01

    This study proposed a submerged hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMBR) system capable of achieving high carbon monoxide (CO) mass transfer for applications in microbial synthesis gas conversion systems. Hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fibres were used to fabricate a membrane module, which was used for pressurising CO in water phase. Pressure through the hollow fibre lumen (P) and membrane surface area per unit working volume of the liquid (A(S)/V(L)) were used as controllable parameters to determine gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) values. We found a k(L)a of 135.72 h(-1) when P was 93.76 kPa and AS/VL was fixed at 27.5m(-1). A higher k(L)a of 155.16 h(-1) was achieved by increasing AS/VL to 62.5m(-1) at a lower P of 37.23 kPa. Practicality of HFMBR to support microbial growth and organic product formation was assessed by CO/CO2 fermentation using Eubacterium limosum KIST612. PMID:25105269

  1. A Novel High-Heat Transfer Low-NO{sub x} Natural Gas Combustion System. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, H.

    2004-01-01

    A novel high-heat transfer low NO(sub x) natural gas combustion system. The objectives of this program are to research, develop, test, and commercialize a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system for oxygen-, oxygen-enriched air, and air-fired furnaces. This technology will improve the process efficiency (productivity and product quality) and the energy efficiency of high-temperature industrial furnaces by at least 20%. GTI's high-heat transfer burner has applications in high-temperature air, oxygen-enriched air, and oxygen furnaces used in the glass, metals, cement, and other industries. Development work in this program is focused on using this burner to improve the energy efficiency and productivity of glass melting furnaces that are major industrial energy consumers. The following specific project objectives are defined to provide a means of achieving the overall project objectives. (1) Identify topics to be covered, problems requiring attention, equipment to be used in the program, and test plans to be followed in Phase II and Phase III. (2) Use existing codes to develop models of gas combustion and soot nucleation and growth as well as a thermodynamic and parametric description of furnace heat transfer issues. (3) Conduct a parametric study to confirm the increase in process and energy efficiency. (4) Design and fabricate a high-heat transfer low-NOx natural gas burners for laboratory, pilot- and demonstration-scale tests. (5) Test the high-heat transfer burner in one of GTI's laboratory-scale high-temperature furnaces. (6) Design and demonstrate the high-heat transfer burner on GTI's unique pilot-scale glass tank simulator. (7) Complete one long term demonstration test of this burner technology on an Owens Corning full-scale industrial glass melting furnace. (8) Prepare an Industrial Adoption Plan. This Plan will be updated in each program Phase as additional information becomes available. The Plan will include technical and

  2. Techniques for obtaining detailed heat transfer coefficient measurements within gas turbine blade and vane cooling passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, R. J.; Jones, T. V.; Dunnne, S. T.

    1983-03-01

    Techniques developed jointly by Rolls-Royce Bristol and Oxford University for determining detailed heat transfer distributions inside turbine blade and vane cooling passages are reviewed. Use is made of a low temperature phase change paint to map the heat flux distributions within models of the cooling passages; the paints change from an opaque coating to a clear liquid at a well-defined melting point. In this way the surface temperature history of a model subjected to transient convective heating is recorded. The heat transfer coefficient distribution is deduced from this history using a transient conduction analysis within the model. Results are presented on detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions within a variety of cooling passages; and data obtained from a comprehensive study of a typical engine multipass cooling geometry are examined.

  3. Investigation of gas/particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, B.; Sulyma, P.

    1992-07-01

    The ability of the current Nusselt number prediction technique developed by Kavanau (1955) to accurately predict alumina particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket nozzles and plumes is investigated. For the solid rocket motors SRMS) analyzed, the transitional regime is the dominant regime for the majority of particles in the flowfield. The analytical approach to determine accuracy of the Kavanau correlation utilized the G2R Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. With this method, both sphere drag, and heat transfer rates were predicted. The sphere drag prediction were compared to the Hermsen, and Henderson drag correlations, while the heat transfer results were compared to the current theory. Results have indicated, that the predicted drag coefficient is bounded by the drag correlations considered. However, the Nusselt number varies significantly from the extrapolated profile through all flowfield regimes.

  4. Development and investigations of compact heat-transfer equipment for a nuclear power station equipped with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovko, V. F.; Dmitrieva, I. V.; Kodochigov, N. G.; Bykh, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    The project of a nuclear power station the reactor coolant system of which includes a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor combined with a gas-turbine energy conversion unit supposes the use of high-efficient gas-cycle-based heat-transfer equipment. An analysis aimed at selecting the optimal heat-transfer surfaces is presented together with the results from their calculated and experimental investigation. The design features of recuperators arranged integrally with end and intermediate coolers and placed in a vertical sealed high-pressure vessel of limited sizes are considered.

  5. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  6. Comparison of the hydrodynamics and mass transfer characteristics in internal-loop airlift bioreactors utilizing either a novel membrane-tube sparger or perforated plate sparger.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ce; Wu, Bing; Li, Ganlu; Chen, Kequan; Jiang, Min; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-11-01

    Two gas spargers, a novel membrane-tube sparger and a perforated plate sparger, were compared in terms of hydrodynamics and mass transfer (or oxygen transfer) performance in an internal-loop airlift bioreactor. The overall gas holdup ε T, downcomer liquid velocity V d, and volumetric mass transfer coefficient K L a were examined depending on superficial gas velocity U G increased in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids for the both spargers. Compared with the perforated plate sparger, the bioreactor with the membrane-tube sparger increased the values of ε T by 4.9-48.8% in air-water system when the U G was from 0.004 to 0.04 m/s, and by 65.1-512.6% in air-CMC solution system. The V d value for the membrane-tube sparger was improved by 40.0-86.3%. The value of K L a was increased by 52.8-84.4% in air-water system, and by 63.3-836.3% in air-CMC solution system. Empirical correlations of ε T, V d, and K L a were proposed, and well corresponding with the experimental data with the deviation of 10%. PMID:24828491

  7. Effect Of Air-Water Interface On Microorganism Transport Under Unsaturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkzaban, S.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Schijven, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater may become contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms from land application of treated wastewater, septic wells, and effluent from septic tanks, and leaking sewage pipes. The unsaturated zone is of special importance since it often represents the first line of natural defense against groundwater pollution. Moreover, many experimental studies have shown that contaminant removal is more significant under lower saturation levels. Interaction of microbial particles with the air-water interfaces (AWI) has been previously suggested to explain high removal of pathogenic microorganisms during transport through unsaturated soil. The objective of this research was to explore the effect of AWI on virus transport. The transport of bacteriophages MS2 and FiX174 in sand columns was studied under various conditions, such as different pH, and saturation levels. Fitting of a transport model to the breakthrough curves was performed to determine the adsorption parameters. FiX174 with isoelectric point of 6.7 exhibited high affinity to the air-water interface by decreasing pH from 7.5 to 6.2. MS2 with isoelectric point of 3.5 has lower affinity to air-water interfaces than FiX174, but has similar pH- dependence. These results show the importance of electrostatic interactions, instead of hydrophobic, between the AWI and viruses. Adsorption to AWI is strongly pH dependent, increasing as pH decreases. It was found that two-site kinetic model should be used for modeling of virus transport under unsaturated conditions Moreover, by draining the unsaturated column, we found out that the attached viruses to AWI are viable, which is in contrast with the literature where retained viruses to AWI are considered as inactivated.

  8. Propensity of Hydrated Excess Protons and Hydroxide Anions for the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Chen, Chen; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Kumar, Revati; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Significant effort has been undertaken to better understand the molecular details governing the propensity of ions for the air-water interface. Facilitated by computationally efficient reactive molecular dynamics simulations, new and statistically conclusive molecular-scale results on the affinity of the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide anion for the air-water interface are presented. These simulations capture the dynamic bond breaking and formation processes (charge defect delocalization) that are important for correctly describing the solvation and transport of these complex species. The excess proton is found to be attracted to the interface, which is correlated with a favorable enthalpic contribution and consistent with reducing the disruption in the hydrogen bond network caused by the ion complex. However, a recent refinement of the underlying reactive potential energy function for the hydrated excess proton shows the interfacial attraction to be weaker, albeit nonzero, a result that is consistent with the experimental surface tension measurements. The influence of a weak hydrogen bond donated from water to the protonated oxygen, recently found to play an important role in excess hydrated proton transport in bulk water, is seen to also be important for this study. In contrast, the hydroxide ion is found to be repelled from the air-water interface. This repulsion is characterized by a reduction of the energetically favorable ion-water interactions, which creates an enthalpic penalty as the ion approaches the interface. Finally, we find that the fluctuation in the coordination number around water sheds new light on the observed entropic trends for both ions. PMID:26366480

  9. Communication: Vibrational sum-frequency spectrum of the air-water interface, revisited.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J L

    2016-07-21

    Before 2015, heterodyne-detected sum-frequency-generation experiments on the air-water interface showed the presence of a positive feature at low frequency in the imaginary part of the susceptibility. However, three very recent experiments indicate that this positive feature is in fact absent. Armed with a better understanding, developed by others, of how to calculate sum-frequency spectra, we recalculate the spectrum and find good agreement with these new experiments. In addition, we provide a revised interpretation of the spectrum. PMID:27448864

  10. Air-Water Exchange of Legacy and Emerging Organic Pollutants across the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, R.; Ruge, Z.; Khairy, M.; Muir, D.; Helm, P.

    2014-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are transported to great water bodies via long-range atmospheric transport and released from the surface water as air concentrations continue to diminish. As the largest fresh water bodies in North America, the Great Lakes have both the potential to accumulate and serve as a secondary source of persistent bioaccumulative toxins. OCP and PCB concentrations were sampled at 30+ sites across Lake Superior, Ontario and Erie in the summer of 2011. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine air-water gaseous exchange of OCPs and PCBs. In Lake Superior, surface water and atmospheric concentrations were dominated by α-HCH (average 250 pg/L and 4.2 pg/m3, respectively), followed by HCB (average 17 pg/L and 89 pg/m3, respectively). Air-water exchange varied greatly between sites and individual OCPs, however α-endosulfan was consistently deposited into the surface water (average 19 pg/m2/day). PCBs in the air and water were characterized by penta- and hexachlorobiphenyls with distribution along the coast correlated with proximity to developed areas. Air-water exchange gradients generally yielded net volatilization of PCBs out of Lake Superior. Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin and chlordanes were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at Lake Erie than Lake Ontario. A multiple linear regression that incorporated meteorological, landuse and population data was used to explain variability in the atmospheric concentrations. Results indicated that landuse (urban and/or cropland) greatly explained the variability in the data. Freely dissolved concentrations of OCPs (

  11. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  12. Communication: Vibrational sum-frequency spectrum of the air-water interface, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    Before 2015, heterodyne-detected sum-frequency-generation experiments on the air-water interface showed the presence of a positive feature at low frequency in the imaginary part of the susceptibility. However, three very recent experiments indicate that this positive feature is in fact absent. Armed with a better understanding, developed by others, of how to calculate sum-frequency spectra, we recalculate the spectrum and find good agreement with these new experiments. In addition, we provide a revised interpretation of the spectrum.

  13. Ligand interaction with the purified serotonin transporter in solution and at the air/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Faivre, V.; Manivet, P.; Callaway, J.C.; Morimoto, H.; Airaksinen, M.M.; Baszkin, A.; Launay, J.M.; Rosilio, V.

    2000-06-01

    The purified serotonin transporter (SERT) was spread at the air/water interface and the effects both of its surface density and of the temperature on its interfacial behavior were studied. The recorded isotherms evidenced the existence of a stable monolayer undergoing a lengthy rearrangement. SERT/ligand interactions appeared to be dependent on the nature of the studied molecules. Whereas an unrelated drug (chlorcyclizine) did not bind to the spread SERT, it interacted with its specific ligands. Compared to heterocyclic drugs, for which binding appeared to be concentration-dependent, a 'two-site' mechanism was evidenced for pinoline and imipramine.

  14. Mass Transfer Study of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Through Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A continuous system for measuring the mass transfer of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent and used in food and pharmaceutical packaging, through 10 different types of polymeric packaging material was developed utilizing electrochemical sensor as a detector. Permeability, diff...

  15. Gas transfer rates from airlifts used for concurrent aeration, carbon dioxide stripping, and recirculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airlifts simplify recirculating aquaculture systems and can potentially reduce capital costs and minimize maintenance issues. Airlifts have the ability to move and aerate water as well as degass the water of any carbon dioxide. This study evaluated the oxygen transfer and carbon dioxide removal abil...

  16. Heat transfer and friction in a high-enthalpy converging gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkov, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper turbulent flow in the boundary layer of a convergent nozzle is considered. On the basis of the Prandtl two-layer model expressions are obtained for determining the relative laws of friction, heat transfer, velocity and enthalpy profiles taking into account the mutual effect of such disturbing factors as nonisothermicity, compressibility and a negative pressure gradient.

  17. Mass transfer coefficients for volatilization of polychlorinated biphenyls from the Hudson River, New York measured using micrometeorological approaches.

    PubMed

    Sandy, Andy L; Guo, Jia; Miskewitz, Robert J; McGillis, Wade R; Rodenburg, Lisa A

    2013-02-01

    Air-water exchange is an important process controlling the fate of many organic chemicals in the environment. Modeling this process is hampered by the lack of direct observations. Thus, the purpose of this work was to derive direct measurements of the mass transfer coefficients for air-water exchange (v(aw)) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that may be used to check the validity of values derived from tracer gas experiments. v(aw) values for PCBs were determined using previously published turbulent fluxes divided by the corresponding dissolved phase concentrations. The median v(aw) values for each homolog decreased with increasing molecular weight and ranged from 0.29 for hexachlorobiphenyls to 2.2 m d(-1) for monochlorobiphenyls with a propagated uncertainty of about 70%, lower than in previous studies. Due to relatively low wind speeds and possible sorption of PCBs to colloids, these numbers may be biased low. These field measurements of v(aw) differ by as much as a factor of 23 from predictions based on the widely-used Whitman two-film model. Therefore a new formulation for the calculation of v(aw) based on field measurements is needed. This study demonstrates that micrometeorological approaches are a viable option for the measurement of v(aw) for hydrophobic organics such as PCBs and should be used to generate enough field data on the air-water exchange of hydrophobic organics to allow the development of new predictive models. PMID:23040647

  18. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  19. Numerical simulation of gas flow and heat transfer in a rough microchannel using the lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Dorari, Elaheh; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Mansoori, Zohreh

    2015-12-01

    In microfluidics, two important factors responsible for the differences between the characteristics of the flow and heat transfer in microchannels and conventional channels are rarefaction and surface roughness which are studied in the present work. An incompressible gas flow in a microchannel is simulated two dimensionally using the lattice Boltzmann method. The flow is in the slip regime and surface roughness is modeled by both regular and Gaussian random distribution of rectangular modules. The effects of relative surface roughness height and Knudsen number on gaseous flow and heat transfer are studied. It was shown that as the relative roughness height increases, the Poiseuille number increases and the Nusselt number has a decreasing or increasing trend, depending on the degree of rarefaction. A comparison between the flow and heat transfer characteristics in regular and random distribution of surface roughness demonstrates that in regular roughness, circular flows are more pronounced; Poiseuille number is higher and Nusselt number is lower than that of its equivalent random roughness. PMID:26764830

  20. Numerical simulation of gas flow and heat transfer in a rough microchannel using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorari, Elaheh; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Mansoori, Zohreh

    2015-12-01

    In microfluidics, two important factors responsible for the differences between the characteristics of the flow and heat transfer in microchannels and conventional channels are rarefaction and surface roughness which are studied in the present work. An incompressible gas flow in a microchannel is simulated two dimensionally using the lattice Boltzmann method. The flow is in the slip regime and surface roughness is modeled by both regular and Gaussian random distribution of rectangular modules. The effects of relative surface roughness height and Knudsen number on gaseous flow and heat transfer are studied. It was shown that as the relative roughness height increases, the Poiseuille number increases and the Nusselt number has a decreasing or increasing trend, depending on the degree of rarefaction. A comparison between the flow and heat transfer characteristics in regular and random distribution of surface roughness demonstrates that in regular roughness, circular flows are more pronounced; Poiseuille number is higher and Nusselt number is lower than that of its equivalent random roughness.

  1. Mechanisms of Polyelectrolyte Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption at the Air-Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Patrick C.; Palazoglu, Omer A.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally occurring cationic polyelectrolyte, restores the adsorption of the clinical lung surfactant Survanta to the air-water interface in the presence of albumin at much lower concentrations than uncharged polymers such as polyethylene glycol. This is consistent with the positively charged chitosan forming ion pairs with negative charges on the albumin and lung surfactant particles, reducing the net charge in the double-layer, and decreasing the electrostatic energy barrier to adsorption to the air-water interface. However, chitosan, like other polyelectrolytes, cannot perfectly match the charge distribution on the surfactant, which leads to patches of positive and negative charge at net neutrality. Increasing the chitosan concentration further leads to a reduction in the rate of surfactant adsorption consistent with an over-compensation of the negative charge on the surfactant and albumin surfaces, which creates a new repulsive electrostatic potential between the now cationic surfaces. This charge neutralization followed by charge inversion explains the window of polyelectrolyte concentration that enhances surfactant adsorption; the same physical mechanism is observed in flocculation and re-stabilization of anionic colloids by chitosan and in alternate layer deposition of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on charged colloids. PMID:19366599

  2. Free Energies of Cavity and Noncavity Hydrated Electrons Near the Instantaneous Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jennifer R; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Glover, William J

    2016-08-18

    The properties of the hydrated electron at the air/water interface are computed for both a cavity and a noncavity model using mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulation. We take advantage of our recently developed formalism for umbrella sampling with a restrained quantum expectation value to calculate free-energy profiles of the hydrated electron's position relative to the water surface. We show that it is critical to use an instantaneous description of the air/water interface rather than the Gibbs' dividing surface to obtain accurate potentials of mean force. We find that noncavity electrons, which prefer to encompass several water molecules, avoid the interface where water molecules are scarce. In contrast, cavity models of the hydrated electron, which prefer to expel water, have a local free-energy minimum near the interface. When the cavity electron occupies this minimum, its absorption spectrum is quite red-shifted, its binding energy is significantly lowered, and its dynamics speed up quite a bit compared with the bulk, features that have not been found by experiment. The surface activity of the electron therefore serves as a useful test of cavity versus noncavity electron solvation. PMID:27479028

  3. Formation, disruption and mechanical properties of a rigid hydrophobin film at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lynn; Kirby, Stephanie; Anna, Shelley; CMU Team

    Hydrophobins are small, globular proteins with distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions that make them extremely surface active. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential industrial applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams and emulsions, and as dispersants. Practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, both individually and in the presence of surfactants. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been shown to strongly stabilize air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. In this work, we characterize the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to strongly, irreversibly adsorb at air/water interfaces; the magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure, until the CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the addition of SDS, a strong surfactant, to the bulk. SDS is found to co-adsorb to interfaces pre-coated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU. These results lend insight into the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. Funding from GoMRI.

  4. Effect of Particulate Contaminants on the Development of Biofilms at Air/Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-03-22

    The development of biofilms at air/water or oil/water interfaces has important ramifications on several applications, but it has received less attention than biofilm formation on solid surfaces. A key difference between the growth of biofilms on solid surfaces versus liquid interfaces is the range of complicated boundary conditions the liquid interface can create that may affect bacteria, as they adsorb onto and grow on the interface. This situation is exacerbated by the existence of complex interfaces in which interfacially adsorbed components can even more greatly affect interfacial boundary conditions. In this work, we present evidence as to how particle-laden interfaces impact biofilm growth at an air/water interface. We find that particles can enhance the rate of growth and final strength of biofilms at liquid interfaces by providing sites of increased adhesive strength for bacteria. The increased adhesion stems from creating localized areas of hydrophobicity that protrude in the water phase and provide sites where bacteria preferentially adhere. This mechanism is found to be primarily controlled by particle composition, with particle size providing a secondary effect. This increased adhesion through interfacial conditions creates biofilms with properties similar to those observed when adhesion is increased through biological means. Because of the generally understood ubiquity of increased bacteria attachment to hydrophobic surfaces, this result has general applicability to pellicle formation for many pellicle-forming bacteria. PMID:26943272

  5. Novel methods for measuring air-water interfacial area in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; El Ouni, Asma; Araujo, Juliana B; Zhong, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  6. NOVEL METHODS FOR MEASURING AIR-WATER INTERFACIAL AREA IN UNSATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Ouni, Asma El; Araujo, Juliana B.; Zhong, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  7. Predicting Air-Water Geysers and Their Implications on Reducing Combined Sewer Overflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2014-12-01

    An air-water geyser in a closed conduit system is characterized by an explosive jetting of a mixture of air and water through drop-shafts. In this study, three scenarios of geysers are numerically simulated using a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The three tested scenarios are comprised of a drop shaft that is closed at its bottom and partially or fully open at the top. Initially, the lower section of the drop shaft is filled with pressurized air, the middle section with stagnant water and the upper section with air at atmospheric pressure. The pressure and volume of the pressurized air, and hence the stored energy, is different for all three test cases. The volume of the stagnant water and the air at atmospheric pressure are kept constant in the tests. The numerical simulations aim to identify the correlation between dimensionless energy stored in the pressurized air pocket and dimensionless maximum pressure reached at the outlet. This dimensionless correlation could be used to determine the energy threshold that does not produce air-water geyser, which in turn could be used in the design of combined sewer systems for minimizing geysers.

  8. Photosensitized Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols above the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Ciuraru, R; Boréave, A; George, C

    2016-08-16

    In this study, we evaluated photosensitized chemistry at the air-sea interface as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our results show that, in addition to biogenic emissions, abiotic processes could also be important in the marine boundary layer. Photosensitized production of marine secondary organic aerosol was studied in a custom-built multiphase atmospheric simulation chamber. The experimental chamber contained water, humic acid (1-10 mg L(-1)) as a proxy for dissolved organic matter, and nonanoic acid (0.1-10 mM), a fatty acid proxy which formed an organic film at the air-water interface. Dark secondary reaction with ozone after illumination resulted in SOA particle concentrations in excess of 1000 cm(-3), illustrating the production of unsaturated compounds by chemical reactions at the air-water interface. SOA numbers via photosensitization alone and in the absence of ozone did not exceed background levels. From these results, we derived a dependence of SOA numbers on nonanoic acid surface coverage and dissolved organic matter concentration. We present a discussion on the potential role of the air-sea interface in the production of atmospheric organic aerosol from photosensitized origins. PMID:27434860

  9. Spatial Distribution and Air-Water Exchange of Organic Flame Retardants in the Lower Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Carrie A; Puggioni, Gavino; Helm, Paul A; Muir, Derek; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Organic flame retardants (OFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel halogenated flame retardants (NHFRs) are ubiquitous, persistent, and bioaccumulative contaminants that have been used in consumer goods to slow combustion. In this study, polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were deployed throughout the lower Great Lakes (Lake Erie and Lake Ontario) to measure OFRs in air and water, calculate air-water exchange fluxes, and investigate spatial trends. Dissolved Σ12BDE was greatest in Lake Ontario near Toronto (18 pg/L), whereas gaseous Σ12BDE was greatest on the southern shoreline of Lake Erie (11 pg/m(3)). NHFRs were generally below detection limits. Air-water exchange was dominated by absorption of BDEs 47 and 99, ranging from -964 pg/m(2)/day to -30 pg/m(2)/day. Σ12BDE in air and water was significantly correlated with surrounding population density, suggesting that phased-out PBDEs continued to be emitted from population centers along the Great Lakes shoreline in 2012. Correlation with dissolved Σ12BDE was strongest when considering population within 25 km while correlation with gaseous Σ12BDE was strongest when using population within 3 km to the south of each site. Bayesian kriging was used to predict dissolved Σ12BDE over the lakes, illustrating the utility of relatively highly spatially resolved measurements in identifying potential hot spots for future study. PMID:27458653

  10. Thermometric measurements of the molecular sublayer at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B.; Donelan, M. A.

    2006-04-01

    A series of measurements was conducted in the Air-Sea Interaction Saltwater Tank (ASIST) to study the response of the air-water interfacial molecular sublayer under various heat flux and wind speed conditions. In-situ gradients were measured with a platinum-plated tungsten wire microthermometer, which resolved the temperature of the thermally conductive sublayer. Air-sea heat flux was controlled by changing the air-water temperature difference (ΔTAW) and the wind speed, and measurements were made for three ΔTAW regimes over a range of wind speeds. A function was fitted to the measured temperature profiles as a way of extracting the boundary layer thickness in a consistent fashion, from which the λ coefficient after Saunders (1967) was computed. This dataset returned a mean λ coefficient of 2.4 +/- 0.5, which was generally lower than previous studies, and was found to be independent of wind speed in the range of 1 to 9 ms-1.

  11. Interfacial properties of mixed films of long-chain organics at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Jessica B.; Tervahattu, Heikki; Vaida, Veronica

    Organic molecules residing at the air-water interface of atmospheric aerosols will have a critical and direct effect on the aerosols' chemical, physical, and optical properties. It is important to study the interfacial properties of such compounds in order to accurately assess these effects. In this study, the compositions of two organic binary films at the air-water interface were monitored as a function of exposure time to the ambient atmosphere. One film was composed of tetracosanoic acid (lignoceric acid, CH 3(CH 2) 22COOH) and nonacosane (C 29H 60), and the second film was composed of octadecanoic acid (stearic acid, CH 3(CH 2) 16COOH) and octadecane (C 18H 38). These films were used as simplified proxies for the organic coating on atmospheric aerosols. The effect of lengthening the hydrocarbon chain on the interfacial longevity of the compounds in the mixed organic film at the air-aqueous interface was determined. The results show that octadecane in a mixed film desorbs from the interface after 72 h while octadecanoic acid remains. For nonacosane, further lengthening of the carbon chain greatly increased its interfacial longevity so that it was comparable with the fatty acids, which remained stable at the interface for at least 144 h. These results are used to explain the preponderance of long-chain fatty acids on the surfaces of collected aerosols and give insight into the degree to which the presence of other long-chain organics may affect the aerosol's chemical and physical properties.

  12. An air-water interfacial area based variable tortuosity model for unsaturated sands

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Raziuddin; Saripalli, Prasad

    2006-05-01

    Based on Kozeny-Carman equation for saturated media permeability, a new model is developed for the prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, K as a function of moisture content, ?. The K(???) estimates are obtained using laboratory measurements of moisture retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and a saturation-dependent tortuosity based on the immiscible fluid (air-water) interfacial area. Tortuosity (?a) for unsaturated media is defined as aaw/aaw,o (ratio of the specific air-water interfacial area of a real and the corresponding idealized porous medium). A correspondence between the real and idealized media is established by using the laboratory-measured soil moisture retention curve to calculate the interfacial area. The general trend in prediction of ?a as a function water saturation is in agreement with similar recent predictions based on diffusion theory. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities measured for a number of coarse-textured, repacked Hanford sediments agree well with predictions based on the modified Kozeny-Carman relation. Because of the use of saturated hydraulic conductivity, a slight bias is apparent in measured and predicted K at low ?. While the modified Kozeny-Carman relation was found to be reasonably accurate in predicting K(??) for the repacked, sandy soils considered in this study, a further testing of the new model for undisturbed sediments and other soil textures would be useful.

  13. Semifluorinated Alkanes at the Air-Water Interface: Tailoring Structure and Rheology at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, Rene; Keller, Rabea; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vermant, Jan; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Semifluorinated alkanes form monolayers with interesting properties at the air-water interface due to their pronounced amphi-solvophobic nature and the stiffness of the fluorocarbons. In the present work, using a combination of structural and dynamic probes, we investigated how small molecular changes can be used to control the properties of such an interface, in particular its organization, rheology, and reversibility during compression-expansion cycles. Starting from a reference system perfluor(dodecyl)dodecane, we first retained the linear structure but changed the linkage groups between the alkyl chains and the fluorocarbons, by introducing either a phenyl group or two oxygens. Next, the molecular structure was changed from linear to branched, with four side chains (two fluorocarbons and two hydrocarbons) connected to extended aromatic cores. Neutron reflectivity at the air-water interface and scanning force microscopy on deposited films show how the changes in the molecular structure affect molecular arrangement relative to the interface. Rheological and compression-expansion measurements demonstrate the significant consequences of these changes in molecular structure and interactions on the interfacial properties. Remarkably, even with these simple molecules, a wide range of surface rheological behaviors can be engineered, from viscous over viscoelastic to brittle solids, for very similar values of the surface pressure. PMID:26978461

  14. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  15. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Study of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in non-Newtonian liquid-gas two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Non-Newtonian liquid-gas stratified flow data in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes were obtained. Interfacial level gradients between the two phases were observed. The Heywood-Charles model is found to be valid for pseudoplastic liquid-gas uniform stratified flow. Two-phase drag reduction in non-Newtonian systems was not achieved as the transition to semi-slug flow occurred before the model criteria were reached. Interfacial liquid and gas shear stresses were compared. A new parameter ..sigma../sup 2/ is introduced which is a numerical indication of the interfacial level gradient. Two-phase drag reduction was experimentally observed in polymer solution-air plug-slug flow in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes. The Hubbard-Dukler pressure drop model was extended to non-Newtonian systems. Reasonable agreement between the experiment and the model predictions is obtained. However, more work needs to be done in order to better understand the two-phase drag reduction phenomena. Liquid holdup correlations were developed for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian systems which successfully correlate the holdup over a wide range of parameters. The Petukhov correlation is found to be better than the Dittus-Boelter correlation in predicting the single-phase water heat-transfer coefficients.

  17. Exploring Salt Bridge Structures of Gas-Phase Protein Ions using Multiple Stages of Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2014-04-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting noncovalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas-phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase.

  18. 3D modeling of heat transfer and gas flow in a grooved ring fuel element for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkett, Laura Ashley

    In the past, fuel elements with multiple axial coolant channels have been used in nuclear propulsion applications. A novel fuel element concept that reduces weight and increases efficiency uses a stack of grooved rings. Each fuel ring consists of a hole on the interior and grooves across the top face. Many grooved ring configurations have been modeled, and a single flow channel for each design has been analyzed. For increased efficiency, a fuel ring with a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio is ideal. When grooves are shallower and they have a lower surface area, the results show that the exit temperature is higher. By coupling the physics of fluid flow with those of heat transfer, the effects on the cooler gas flowing through the grooves of the hot, fissioning ring can be predicted. Models also show differences in velocities and temperatures after dense boundary nodes are applied. Parametric studies were done to show how a pressure drop across the length of the channels will affect the exit temperatures of the gas. Geometric optimization was done to show the temperature distributions and pressure drops that result from the manipulation of various parameters, and the effects of model scaling was also investigated. The inverse Graetz numbers are plotted against Nusselt numbers, and the results of these values suggest that the gas quickly becomes fully developed, laminar flow, rather than constant turbulent conditions.

  19. Exploring Salt Bridge Structures of Gas-Phase Protein Ions using Multiple Stages of Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting non-covalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase. PMID:24496600

  20. Air-sea gas transfer for two gases of different solubility (CO2 and O2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutgersson, A.; Andersson, A.; Sahlée, E.

    2016-05-01

    At the land-based marine measuring site Östergarnsholm in the Baltic Sea, the eddy covariance technique was used to measure air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. High- frequency measurements of oxygen were taken with a Microx TX3 optode using the luminescence lifetime technique. The system gives reasonable oxygen fluxes after the limited frequency response of the sensor was corrected for. For fluxes of carbon dioxide the LICOR-7500 instrument was used. Using flux data to estimate transfer velocities indicates higher transfer velocity for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide for winds above 5 m/s. There are too few data for any extensive conclusions, but a least-square fit of the data gives a cubic wind speed dependence of oxygen corresponding to k 660 = 0.074U 3 10. The more effective transfer for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide above 5 m/s is most likely due to enhanced efficiency of oxygen exchange across the surface. Oxygen has lower solubility compared with carbon dioxide and might be more influenced by near surface processes such as microscale wave breaking or sea spray.

  1. Self-assembly of diblock co-polymers at air-water interface: A microscopy and x-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, R. P.; Mukhopadhyay, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    The spontaneous surface aggregation of diblock copolymer, containing polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane or PS-PDMS, have been studied at air-water interface using Brewster's angle microscopy (BAM) and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) technique. Pronounced differences in the molecular weight and solvent dependence of the size of aggregation on the water surface are observed. Structural characterization is done using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a monolayer transferred to Si substrate. It shows that, individual polymer chains coalesce to form some disc like micelle aggregation on the Si surface which is also evident from the BAM image of the water floated monolayer. GISAXS study is also corroborating the same result.

  2. Concentrations, atmospheric partitioning, and air-water/soil surface exchange of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran along the upper reaches of the Haihe River basin, North China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiqiang; Die, Qingqi; Yang, Yufei; Tang, Zhenwu; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qifei

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/PCDF) were overall measured and compared in ambient air, water, soils, and sediments along the upper reaches of the Haihe River of North China, so as to evaluate their concentrations, profiles, and to understand the processes of gas-particle partitioning and air-water/soil exchange. The following results were obtained: (1) The average concentrations (toxic equivalents, TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/PCDF in air, water, sediment, and soil samples were 4,855 fg/m(3), 9.5 pg/L, 99.2 pg/g dry weight (dw), and 56.4 pg/g (203 fg TEQ/m(3), 0.46 pg TEQ/L, 2.2 pg TEQ/g dw, and 1.3 pg TEQ/g, respectively), respectively. (2) Although OCDF, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF, OCDD, and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD were the dominant congeners among four environmental sinks, obvious discrepancies of these congener and homologue patterns of PCDD/PCDF were observed still. (3) Significant linear correlations for PCDD/PCDF were observed between the gas-particle partition coefficient (K p) and the subcooled liquid vapor pressure (P L (0)) and octanol-air partition coefficient (K oa). (4) Fugacity fraction values of air-water exchange indicated that most of PCDD/PCDF homologues were dominated by net volatilization from water into air. The low-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (tetra- to hexa-) presented a strong net volatilization from the soil into air, while high-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (hepta- to octa-) were mainly close to equilibrium for air-soil exchange. PMID:24643387

  3. Transient heat transfer in viscous rarefied gas between concentric cylinders. Effect of curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gospodinov, P.; Roussinov, V.; Dankov, D.

    2015-10-01

    The thermoacoustic waves arising in cylindrical or planar Couette rarefied gas flow between rotating cylinders is studied in the cases of suddenly cylinder (active) wall velocity direction turn on. An unlimited increase in the radius of the inner cylinder flow can be interpreted as Couette flow between the two flat plates. Based on the developed in previous publications Navier-Stockes-Fourier (NSF) model and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method and their numerical solutions, are considered transient processes in the gas phase. Macroscopic flow characteristics (velocity, density, temperature) are received. The cylindrical flow cases for fixed velocity and temperature of the both walls are considered. The curvature effects over the wave's distribution and attenuation are studied numerically.

  4. Calculation of a laminar flow of a compressible gas in plane curvilinear ducts with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovskii, V. I.; Zhestkov, G. B.

    1983-04-01

    A laminar flow (Re = 1000 or less) of a compressible heated gas in a plane duct having the shape of an elbow with a curved section and two long straight sections is analyzed, with emphasis on the interaction between the thermal and gas-dynamic characteristics of the flow in the curved section. The flow is described by a complete system of Navier-Stokes equations, and these are solved using a modified version of the well known integration methods. Attention is given to the formation of closed separation zones at the duct walls, their deformation with changes in flow conditions, and pressure loss. The regions of the maximum and minimum heat fluxes are identified, and the relationship between these and the separation zones is examined.

  5. Extension of Weighted Sum of Gray Gas Data to Mathematical Simulation of Radiative Heat Transfer in a Boiler with Gas-Soot Media

    PubMed Central

    Nouri-Borujerdi, Ali; Kazi, Salim Newaz

    2014-01-01

    In this study an expression for soot absorption coefficient is introduced to extend the weighted-sum-of-gray gases data to the furnace medium containing gas-soot mixture in a utility boiler 150 MWe. Heat transfer and temperature distribution of walls and within the furnace space are predicted by zone method technique. Analyses have been done considering both cases of presence and absence of soot particles at 100% load. To validate the proposed soot absorption coefficient, the expression is coupled with the Taylor and Foster's data as well as Truelove's data for CO2-H2O mixture and the total emissivities are calculated and compared with the Truelove's parameters for 3-term and 4-term gray gases plus two soot absorption coefficients. In addition, some experiments were conducted at 100% and 75% loads to measure furnace exit gas temperature as well as the rate of steam production. The predicted results show good agreement with the measured data at the power plant site. PMID:25143981

  6. Extension of weighted sum of gray gas data to mathematical simulation of radiative heat transfer in a boiler with gas-soot media.

    PubMed

    Gharehkhani, Samira; Nouri-Borujerdi, Ali; Kazi, Salim Newaz; Yarmand, Hooman

    2014-01-01

    In this study an expression for soot absorption coefficient is introduced to extend the weighted-sum-of-gray gases data to the furnace medium containing gas-soot mixture in a utility boiler 150 MWe. Heat transfer and temperature distribution of walls and within the furnace space are predicted by zone method technique. Analyses have been done considering both cases of presence and absence of soot particles at 100% load. To validate the proposed soot absorption coefficient, the expression is coupled with the Taylor and Foster's data as well as Truelove's data for CO2-H2O mixture and the total emissivities are calculated and compared with the Truelove's parameters for 3-term and 4-term gray gases plus two soot absorption coefficients. In addition, some experiments were conducted at 100% and 75% loads to measure furnace exit gas temperature as well as the rate of steam production. The predicted results show good agreement with the measured data at the power plant site. PMID:25143981

  7. The potential for buoyant displacement gas release events in Tank 241-SY-102 after waste transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    BE Wells; PE Meyer; G Chen

    2000-05-10

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is a double-shell, radioactive waste storage tank with waste that, before the recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing buoyant displacement (BD) gas release events (GREs). Some BD GREs caused gas concentrations in the tank headspace to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of its stored gas. The installation of a mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has since prevented BD GREs. However, operation of the mixer pump over the years caused gas retention in the floating crust layer and a corresponding accelerated waste level growth. The accelerating crust growth trend observed in 1997--98 led to initiation of sequences of waste removal and water back-dilutions in December 1999. Waste is removed from the mixed slurry layer in Tank SY-101 and transferred into Tank 241-Sy-102 (SY-102). Water is then added back to dissolve soluble solids that retain gas. The initial transfer of 89,500 gallons of SY-101 waste, diluted in-line at 0.94:1 by volume with water, to SY-102 was conducted in December 1999. The second transfer of 230,000 gallons of original SY-101 waste, diluted approximately 0.9:1, was completed in January 2000, and the third transfer of 205,500 gallons of original SY-101 waste diluted at 0.9:1 was completed in March 2000.

  8. Subparsec-scale dynamics of a dusty gas disk exposed to anisotropic AGN radiation with frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namekata, Daisuke; Umemura, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    We explore the gas dynamics near the dust sublimation radius of active galactic nucleus (AGN). For the purpose, we perform axisymmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations of a dusty gas disk of radius ≈1 pc around a supermassive black hole of mass 107 M⊙ taking into account (1) anisotropic radiation of accretion disk, (2) X-ray heating by corona, (3) radiative transfer of infrared (IR) photons reemitted by dust, (4) frequency dependency of direct and IR radiations, and (5) separate temperatures for gas and dust. As a result, we find that for Eddington ratio ≈0.77, a nearly neutral, dense (≈106 - 8 cm-3), geometrically-thin (h/r < 0.06) disk forms with a high velocity (≈200 ˜ 3000 km s-1) dusty outflow launched from the disk surface. The disk temperature is determined by the balance between X-ray heating and various cooling, and the disk is almost supported by thermal pressure. Contrary to Krolik (2007), the radiation pressure by IR photons is not effective to thicken the disk, but rather compresses it. Thus, it seems difficult for a radiation-supported, geometrically-thick, obscuring torus to form near the dust sublimation radius as far as the Eddington ratio is high (˜1). The mass outflow rate is 0.05 - 0.1 M⊙/yr and the column density of the outflow is NH ≲ 1021 cm-2. To explain observed type-II AGN fraction, it is required that outflow gas is extended to larger radii (r ≳ 10 pc) or that a denser dusty wind is launched from smaller radii (r ˜ 104 Rg).

  9. Investigating Langmuir films at the air-water interface using a planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Shin

    In this work, a new planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph (PA-IRRAS) was developed to investigate a broad range of Langmuir films at the air-water interface. This instrument is capable of recording sample and reference spectra simultaneously with an optical setup that is the same as that of a single-beam instrument but splits the incident infrared beam into two sections on a plane mirror (H) or a water trough. With this design, the instrument could accommodate large infrared accessories, such as a water trough. In addition, water bands were subtracted to obtain a high quality spectrum for a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) Langmuir film on the water subphase with a resolution of about 8 cm-1 in 10.8 sec. With this instrument, two types of monolayer systems were studied; polymeric and lipid Langmuir films at the air-water interface. For the polymeric monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was used as a probe to follow the real-time conformational changes associated with intermolecular interactions of the polymer chains during the compression of the monolayers. It was found that the mixture of poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) (D/L) formed a stereocomplex when the mixed solution developed the two-dimensional monolayer at the air-water interface. The stereocomplexation occurred before film compression, indicating that there is no direct correlation between film compression and stereocomplexation. For the lipid monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was also used as a probe to investigate the origin of the disruption of a lipid monolayer upon protein adsorption at the air-water interface. Analysis of the time-resolved PA-IRRAS spectra revealed that Cu(II) ion-chelated DSIDA lipid monolayer (Cu 2+-DSIDA) was readily disrupted by myoglobin adsorption as demonstrated by a blue shift of 1.7 cm-1 and a lower intensity in the vas(CH2) stretch mode of the lipid monolayer over a period of five hours. To find the origin of the disruption of the lipid monolayer, a

  10. Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. H. Oh; C. Davis; S. Sherman

    2008-08-01

    A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycleefficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. This paper also includes a portion of stress analyses performed on pipe configurations.

  11. Prediction of rotating disc flow and heat transfer in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, John W.

    Motivated by the need to improve design techniques for aero engines considerable effort has been put into developing predictive techniques for rotating disc flow and heat transfer. Some notable advances have been made recently and these are reviewed here. The theoretical techniques employed include analytical solutions for laminar flow, momentum-integral methods for turbulent flow, and finite difference solutions of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Each of these methods is discussed and predictive capability is illustrated through comparisons with experimental data.

  12. Numerical simulation of bubble collapse and the transfer of vapor and noncondensable gas through the bubble interface using the ghost fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinbo, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Watanabe, M.; Takahira, H.

    2015-12-01

    The ghost fluid method is improved to include heat and mass transfer across the gas- liquid interface during the bubble collapse in a compressible liquid. This transfer is due to both nonequilibrium phase transition at the interface and diffusion of the noncondensable gas across the interface. In the present method, the ghost fluids are defined with the intention of conserving the total mass, momentum, and energy, as well as the mass of each component while considering the heat and mass fluxes across the interface. The gas phase inside the bubble is a mixture of vapor and noncondensable gas, where binary diffusion between the mixture components is taken into account. The gas diffusion in the surrounding liquid is also considered. This method is applied to a simulation of a single spherical bubble collapse with heat and mass transfer across the interface in a compressible liquid. When noncondensable gas is present, it accumulates near the interface due to vapor condensation, thereby preventing further condensation. This results in a weaker bubble collapse than the case without noncondensable gas.

  13. Heat Transfer Measurements and Predictions on a Power Generation Gas Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giel, Paul W.; Bunker, Ronald S.; VanFossen, G. James; Boyle, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed heat transfer measurements and predictions are given for a power generation turbine rotor with 129 deg of nominal turning and an axial chord of 137 mm. Data were obtained for a set of four exit Reynolds numbers comprised of the design point of 628,000, -20%, +20%, and +40%. Three ideal exit pressure ratios were examined including the design point of 1.378, -10%, and +10%. Inlet incidence angles of 0 deg and +/-2 deg were also examined. Measurements were made in a linear cascade with highly three-dimensional blade passage flows that resulted from the high flow turning and thick inlet boundary layers. Inlet turbulence was generated with a blown square bar grid. The purpose of the work is the extension of three-dimensional predictive modeling capability for airfoil external heat transfer to engine specific conditions including blade shape, Reynolds numbers, and Mach numbers. Data were obtained by a steady-state technique using a thin-foil heater wrapped around a low thermal conductivity blade. Surface temperatures were measured using calibrated liquid crystals. The results show the effects of strong secondary vortical flows, laminar-to-turbulent transition, and also show good detail in the stagnation region.

  14. Influence of Mode of Metal Transfer on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded Modified Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-06-01

    This article describes in detail the effect of the modes of metal transfer on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas metal arc-welded modified ferritic stainless steel (SSP 409M) sheets (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared under three modes of metal transfer, i.e., short-circuit (SC), spray (S), transfer, and mix (M) mode transfer using two different austenitic filler wires (308L and 316L) and shielding gas composition of Ar + 5 pct CO2. The welded joints were evaluated by means of microstructural, hardness, notched tensile strength, Charpy impact toughness, and high cycle fatigue. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on modes of metal transfer and filler wires has been determined by dilution calculation, WRC-1992 diagram, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE), optical microscopy (OM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the microstructure as well as the tensile, Charpy impact, and high cycle fatigue of weld metal is significantly affected by the mode of metal transfer and filler wire used. However, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is affected only by the modes of metal transfer. The results have been correlated with the microstructures of weld and HAZ developed under different modes of metal transfer.

  15. Determining Spatial Distribution And Air-Water Exchange Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Stormwater Runoff Catchment Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaraneni, V. K.; Schifman, L. A.; Craver, V.; Boving, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    Stormwater runoff is a conduit for several pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in to surface and ground water bodies. The control of runoff and pollutants is typically addressed by best management practices (BMPs), such as retention/detention ponds or catchment basins in general. The effectiveness of catchment basins in reducing the volume of runoff and removal of some contaminants has been established. However, very little is known about the fate of the contaminants settled within these structures. In coastal regions and places with shallow groundwater tables accumulation of high concentrations of PAHs in the bottom sediments poses a potential threat for groundwater contamination. The concentrations of PAHs accumulated in the sediments of these catchment basins will primarily depend on the sources of runoff origin and the surrounding land use. Due to the physico-chemical characteristics of PAHs, their transport not only can occur in the liquid and solid phase, but it is also possible that gaseous emissions can be produced from BMP systems. For the purpose of this study, five stormwater catchment basins along the I-95 corridor in Rhode Island were selected based on the stormwater runoff origin and covering (industrial, urban, highway, and commercial) land uses. To study the stratification of PAHs sediment cores one foot were collected and analyzed for 31PAHs (16 EPA parent PAH and 15 methylated PAHs). In order to determine whether the catchment basins are a source of atmospheric pollution polyethylene passive samplers were deployed to determine the freely dissolved PAHs in the water column and gas phase PAHs at the air-water interface. This presentation will describe how PAH fluxes move between three environmental compartments (sediments, water column, atmosphere) within the five stormwater catchment basins. Further, it will be investigated whether these BMP structures can act as contaminant sources rather than sinks and whether BMP

  16. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  17. An Air-water Interfacial Area Based Variable Tortuosity Model for Unsaturated Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleel, R.; Saripalli, P.

    2005-12-01

    A new variable tortuosity definition is introduced that is based on the immiscible fluid (air-water) interfacial area. Unsaturated media tortuosity (τa) is defined as the ratio of aaw to aaw,o where aaw is the estimated air-water interfacial area in a real unsaturated medium (i.e., a soil sample), and aaw,o is the same variable for the corresponding, idealized capillary bundle. We establish equivalence between the real and the idealized media by letting the laboratory-measured retention curve calculate the distribution of capillary tubes, thereby resulting in an identical pore-size distribution but a new retention curve for the idealized medium. The air-water interfacial area for both real and idealized media is directly proportional to the area under their respective retention curves. With τ being the saturated tortuosity, we relate the variable tortuosity ratio (ττa) to the Seɛ term in Mualem's (ɛ=0.5) and Burdine's (ɛ=2) pore-size distribution models. Thus, instead of using tortuosity and/or pore connectivity formulations that have empirical exponents of either 0.5 or 2, the new model depends on variable interfacial area for varying saturation and soil texture, as reflected in the measured retention data. We tested the new definition of tortuosity for 22 repacked Hanford sediments that are comprised of mostly coarse and fine sands but some also contain a sizeable fraction (as high as 27%) of fines (silt and clay). Replacing the Se2 term in van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model by the new interfacial area based variable tortuosity ratio, and still using saturated conductivity and retention parameters, as used in the conventional approach, we obtain interfacial area based K(θ) predictions that are nearly identical to the conventional VGM model predictions. We also compare the interfacial area based K(θ) predictions with the standard Brooks-Corey-Burdine (BCB) model predictions. Compared to the VGM model predictions, interfacial area based BCB K(θ) predictions

  18. Interfacial area measurement and transport modeling in air-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinyu

    In two-fluid model, the interfacial area concentration (IAC) is an important parameter that characterizes the interaction of two-phases at the interface. The accuracy of IAC modeling and local measurements largely affects the efficiency of designing and assessing two-phase flow systems. The prediction of the dynamical evolution of IAC is one of the most challenging tasks in research and application. This thesis is focused on developing advanced local measurement techniques to obtain reliable two-phase parameters and implementing efficient theoretical models for IAC source and sink terms in a two-group interfacial area transport equation based on experiments. In this study, an advanced local measurement technique using a four-sensor conductivity probe has been presented for obtaining IAC in air-water flows. It extends the existing conductivity probe method to slug and churn-turbulent flows with a unified probe design and comprehensive signal processing system. Sophisticated algorithm and software have been implemented that is robust in handling most practical conditions with high reliability. Systematic analyses on the issues of probe applications and benchmarks have been performed. The improved four-sensor method has also been applied to flow conditions with significant local recirculation, which was considered the most challenging situation for local measurement in two-phase flow. Using the well-established instrumentation, solid databases for a two-inch air-water loop have been built with sufficient information on the axial development and the radial distribution of the local parameters. Mechanistic models of major fluid particle interaction phenomena involving two bubble groups have been proposed, including the shearing-off of small bubbles from slug/cap bubbles, the wake entrainment of group-1 bubble into group-2 bubble, the wake acceleration and coalescence between group-2 bubbles, and the breakup of group-2 bubbles due to surface instability. Prediction of

  19. An experimental and analytical investigation into the performance of centrifugal pumps operating with air-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterrett, John Douglas

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was made into the performance of centrifugal pumps when two-phase non-condensable mixtures of gas and liquid are flowing. This problem is encountered during loss-of-coolant accidents in nuclear reactor systems and in the pumping of oil where natural gas may be present in the mixture. Analytical and experimental techniques were used to address the issues of scaling between a model and a prototype pump and the validity of the single-phase pump affinity laws when two-phase flows are present. The results from this effort have also provided insight into the physical phenomena which cause the degradation in pump performance. An analytical model for the motion of a single bubble through a pump impeller is provided. The results from this fundamental problem show that the Coriolis and buoyancy forces are important in describing the kinematics of a gas phase. These results show that dynamic similitude is not preserved between a model and prototype impeller when the standard single-phase pump scaling relationships are used. The motion of a single bubble is also shown to be influenced by the magnitude of the pump suction pressure. The results from an extensive series of air-water two phase pump tests are provided. A 1/4 scale pump, modeled after the Savannah River Site K-reactor pumps, was tested over a wide range of pump speeds, flow rates, and suction pressures. These results indicate that the single-phase pump affinity laws are not applicable to two-phase pump flows and that the magnitude of the pump suction pressure is an important quantity in determining the pump performance. A second analytical model is developed for two-phase flow through a pump impeller. The results from this one-dimensional, two-fluid, non-homogeneous streamline model show good agreement with the experimental data. The model results support the experimental data in showing that the single-phase pump affinity relationships are not valid for two-phase pump flows and that dynamic

  20. Gas Transfer Controls Carbon Limitation During Biomass Production by Marine Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Evenhuis, Christian R; Suggett, David J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Raven, John A; Ralph, Peter J

    2015-08-24

    This study presents the first in-depth analysis of CO2 limitation on the biomass productivity of the biofuel candidate marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata. Net photosynthesis decreased by 60% from 125 to 50 μmol O2 L(-1)h(-1) over a 12 h light cycle as a direct result of carbon limitation. Continuous dissolved O2 and pH measurements were used to develop a detailed diurnal mechanism for the interaction between photosynthesis, gas exchange and carbonate chemistry in the photo-bioreactor. Gas exchange determined the degree of carbon limitation experienced by the algae. Carbon limitation was confirmed by delivering more CO2 , which increased net photosynthesis back to its steady-state maximum. This study highlights the importance of maintaining replete carbon concentrations in photo-bioreactors and other culturing facilities, either by constant pH operation or preferably by designing a feedback loop based on the dissolved O2 concentration. PMID:26212226

  1. Ion/Ion Reactions with "Onium" Reagents: An Approach for the Gas-phase Transfer of Organic Cations to Multiply-Charged Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-05-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl- N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase.

  2. Ion/Ion Reactions with “Onium” Reagents: An Approach for the Gas-phase Transfer of Organic Cations to Multiply-Charged Anions

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge “onium” cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl-N′-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase. PMID:25652935

  3. Ion/ion reactions with "onium" reagents: an approach for the gas-phase transfer of organic cations to multiply-charged anions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Joshua D; Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-05-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase. PMID:25652935

  4. Online exhaled gas measurements for radiotherapy patients by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xue; Zhou, Wenzhao; Shen, Chengyin; Wang, Hongmei; Lu, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Chu, Yannan

    2016-08-01

    The present study assessed whether exhaled breath analysis using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) could screen for radiation exposure. As the intensity of proton transfer reaction reagent ion H3(16)O(+) can be calculated with the intensity of H3(18)O(+), the intensity of H3(18)O(+) was monitored to observe the stability of the PTR-MS instrument during the experiment. The PTR-MS was applied for detecting the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaled breath from 42 radiotherapy patients and other 61 patients who had not received radiotherapy. All patients were enrolled in the local cancer hospital. In the experiment, the subjects breathe slowly to the PTR-MS through a direct inlet system without any sampling bag or tube. The breath mass spectrometric data was statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and stepwise discriminant analysis to find the characteristic ions of radiation exposure. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was applied for a combination of the characteristic ions. The PTR-MS instrument was stable as the intensity of reaction ion H3(16)O(+) was maintained in 1.1%. Through statistically analysis, we found 6 kinds of characteristic ions of radiation exposure, specifically mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) 93, m/z 41, m/z 102, m/z 79, m/z 131, and m/z 143. The sensitivity (true positive rate) and specificity (true negative rate) were 78.6% and 82.0% respectively. The integrated area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.869. The results in our study demonstrated the potential of the online breath tester PTR-MS as a non-invasive screening for radiation exposure. PMID:27209162

  5. Microwave-assisted phase-transfer catalysis for the rapid one-pot methylation and gas chromatographic determination of phenolics.

    PubMed

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C; Karatapanis, Andreas; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2010-01-29

    Microwave-assisted phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) is reported for the first time, for the one-step extraction-derivatization-preconcentration and gas chromatographic determination of twenty phenols and ten phenolic acids. The well established phase-transfer catalytic methylation is largely accelerated when heating is replaced with the "greener" microwave irradiation. The overall procedure was thoroughly optimized and the analytes were determined by GC/MS. The method presented adequate analytical characteristics being more sensitive in analyzing phenols than phenolic acids. The limits of detection without any additional preconcentration steps (e.g. solvent evaporation) were adequate and ranged from 0.4 to 15.8ng/mL while limits of quantitation were between 1.2 and 33.3ng/mL. The method was applied to the determination of phenols, in spiked environmental samples and phenolic acids in aqueous infusions of commercially available pharmaceutical dry plants. The recoveries of fortified composite lake water samples and Mentha spicata aqueous infusions ranged from 89.3% to 117.3% for phenols and 93.3% to 115.2% for phenolic acids. PMID:20022019

  6. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initialmore » monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.« less

  7. Linear and nonlinear microrheology of lysozyme layers forming at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Allan, Daniel B; Firester, Daniel M; Allard, Victor P; Reich, Daniel H; Stebe, Kathleen J; Leheny, Robert L

    2014-09-28

    We report experiments studying the mechanical evolution of layers of the protein lysozyme adsorbing at the air-water interface using passive and active microrheology techniques to investigate the linear and nonlinear rheological response, respectively. Following formation of a new interface, the linear shear rheology, which we interrogate through the Brownian motion of spherical colloids at the interface, becomes viscoelastic with a complex modulus that has approximately power-law frequency dependence. The power-law exponent characterizing this frequency dependence decreases steadily with increasing layer age. Meanwhile, the nonlinear microrheology, probed via the rotational motion of magnetic nanowires at the interface, reveals a layer response characteristic of a shear-thinning power-law fluid with a flow index that decreases with age. We discuss two possible frameworks for understanding this mechanical evolution: gelation and the formation of a soft glass phase. PMID:24969505

  8. Conformational changes of a calix[8]arene derivative at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Pedrosa, José M; Martín-Romero, María T; Muñoz, Eulogia; Richardson, Tim H; Camacho, Luis

    2005-03-10

    The particular behavior of a p-tert-butyl calix[8]arene derivative (C8A) has been studied at the air-water interface using surface pressure-area isotherms, surface potential-area isotherms, film relaxation measurements, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and infrared spectroscopy for Langmuir-Blodgett films. Thus, it is observed that the properties of the film, for example, isotherms, domain formation, and FTIR spectra, recorded during the first compression cycle differ appreciably from those during the second compression and following cycles. The results obtained are interpreted on the basis of the conformational changes of the C8A molecules by surface pressure, allowing us to inquire into the inter- and intramolecular interactions (hydrogen bonds) of those molecules. Thus, the compression induces changes in the kind of hydrogen bonds from intra- and intermolecular with other C8A molecules to hydrogen bonds with water molecules. PMID:16851456

  9. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.

  10. Thermodynamics of iodide adsorption at the instantaneous air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2013-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations using both polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study the adsorption of iodide to the air-water interface. A novel aspect of our analysis is that the progress of ion adsorption is measured as the distance from the instantaneous interface, which is defined by a coarse-graining scheme proposed recently by Willard and Chandler ["Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010), 10.1021/jp909219k]. Referring structural and thermodynamic quantities to the instantaneous interface unmasks molecular-scale details that are obscured by thermal fluctuations when the same quantities are referred to an average measure of the position of the interface, such as the Gibbs dividing surface. Our results suggest that an ion adsorbed at the interface resides primarily in the topmost water layer, and the interfacial location of the ion is favored by enthalpy and opposed by entropy.

  11. Thermodynamics of Iodide Adsorption at the Instantaneous Air-Water Interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2013-03-21

    We perform simulations using both polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study the adsorption of iodide to the air-water interface. A novel aspect of our analysis is that the progress of the adsorption is measured as the distance from the instantaneous interface, which is defined by a coarse-graining scheme proposed recently by Willard and Chandler.\\cite{chandler1} Referring structural and thermodynamic quantities to the instantaneous interface unmasks molecular-scale details that are obscured by thermal fluctuations when the same quantities are referred to an average measure of the position of the interface, such as the Gibbs dividing surface. Our results suggest that an ion adsorbed at the interface resides primarily in the topmost layer water.

  12. Self-Assembly of Peptides at the Air/Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayar, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    Peptides are commonly used as building blocks for design and development of novel materials with a variety of application areas ranging from drug design to biotechnology. The precise control of molecular architecture and specific nature of the nonbonded interactions among peptides enable aggregates with well defined structural and functional properties. The interaction of peptides with interfaces leads to dramatic changes in their conformational and aggregation behavior. In this talk, I will discuss our research on the interplay of intermolecular forces and influence of interfaces. In the first part the amphiphilic nature of short peptide oligomers and their behavior at the air/water interface will be discussed. The surface driving force and its decomposition will be analyzed. In the second part aggregation of peptides in bulk water and at an interface will be discussed. Different design features which can be tuned to control aggregation behavior will be analyzed.

  13. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  14. Measuring Air-Water Interfacial Area via the Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouni, A.; Zhong, H.; Mainhagu, J.; Araujo, J. B.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are one method available for measuring air-water interfacial area (Aa-w). Two variations of the aqueous IPTT method are compared. One involves the standard approach comprising tracer injection under steady unsaturated-flow conditions with a uniform water-saturation distribution within the column. The other involves tracer injection under steady saturated-flowconditions in the presence of trapped residual air. Sodium dodecylbezenesulfonate (SDBS) and pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA) were used as the partitioning andnonreactive tracers, respectively. A sandy soil with a median grain diameter of 0.234 mm was used as the porous medium. Initial water saturation, Sw,was approximately 80%. Water saturation was monitored gravimetrically during the experiments. The results of the experiments will be assessed and compared to those of prior studies.

  15. Transition States for Submerged Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Partially-Pinned Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Hooman; Hemeda, Ahmed; VCU Team

    2015-11-01

    The pressure at which a superhydrophobic surface transitions from the Cassie state to the Wenzel state is often referred to as the critical pressure. Our mathematical simulations have shown that the Cassie-to-Wenzel transition is a gradual process that takes place over a range of pressures as oppose to an event that happens at a certain pressure. During the transition period, the air-water interface may go through a series pinned, partially-pinned, and de-pinned states that depend on the geometry of the surface asperities. This in turn indicates that the drag-reduction effect produced by a submerged superhydrophobic surface can vary with the hydrostatic pressure, and is highly dependent on sharpness of the surface asperities. The study reported here reviews our recent discoveries in simulating the wetted area and drag reduction effect of superhydrophobic surfaces with different microstructures. National Science Foundation CMM 1029924 and CBET 1402655 programs.

  16. Sea breeze forcing of estuary turbulence and air-water CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Philip M.; McGillis, Wade R.; Zappa, Christopher J.

    2010-07-01

    The sea breeze is often a dominant meteorological feature at the coastline, but little is known about its estuarine impacts. Measurements at an anchored catamaran and meteorological stations along the Hudson River and New York Bay estuarine system are used to illustrate some basic characteristics and impacts of the feature. The sea breeze propagates inland, arriving in phase with peak solar forcing at seaward stations, but several hours later at up-estuary stations. Passage of the sea breeze front raises the water-to-air CO2 flux by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and drives turbulence comparable to spring tide levels in the upper meter of the water column, where most primary productivity occurs in this highly turbid system. Modeling and observational studies often use remotely-measured winds to compute air-water fluxes (e.g., momentum, CO2), and this leads to a factor of two flux error on sea breeze days during the study.

  17. Proteins at air-water interfaces: a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Marek; Allan, Daniel B; Leheny, Robert L; Reich, Daniel H

    2014-11-01

    We present a coarse-grained model to describe the adsorption and deformation of proteins at an air-water interface. The interface is introduced empirically in the form of a localized field that couples to a hydropathy scale of amino acids. We consider three kinds of proteins: protein G, egg-white lysozyme, and hydrophobin. We characterize the nature of the deformation and the orientation of the proteins induced by their proximity to and association with the interface. We also study protein diffusion in the layer formed at the interface and show that the diffusion slows with increasing concentration in a manner similar to that for a colloidal suspension approaching the glass transition. PMID:25310625

  18. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate. PMID:25687953

  19. Near-surface turbulence for evaporative convection at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, K. A.; Saylor, J. R.; Smith, G. B.

    2001-11-01

    Turbulence measurements are reported for the flow beneath an air/water interface undergoing evaporative convection. Measurements were obtained using a two component laser Doppler velocimeter system. Two hydrodynamic boundary conditions were considered for the free surface: a shear free surface, which is the case when surfactants are absent, and a constant elasticity surface, created by depositing a monolayer of oleyl alcohol. The shear free boundary condition case results in significantly higher levels of near surface turbulence than the constant elasticity case. This difference between the two cases decreases with distance from the free surface. Profiles of the turbulent fluctuations were obtained for the horizontal and vertical velocity components and are compared with the somewhat analogous case of a heated solid wall.

  20. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  1. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  2. Brewster Angle Microscopy Study of Model Stratum Corneum Lipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Ellen; Champagne, Alex; William, Joseph; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    As the first and last barrier in the body, the stratum corneum (SC) is essential to life. Understanding the interactions and organization of lipids within the SC provides insight into essential physiological processes, including water loss prevention and the adsorption of substances from the environment. Langmuir monolayers have long been used to study complex systems, such as biological membranes and marine aerosols, due to their ability to shed light on intermolecular interactions. In this study, lipid mixtures with varying cholesterol and cerebroside ratios were investigated at the air/water interface. Surface tension measurements along with Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images were used to examine the lipid phase transitions. Results indicate that cholesterol and cerebrosides form miscible monolayers, exhibiting ideal behavior. BAM images of a singular, uniform collapse phase also suggest formation of a miscible monolayer.

  3. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  4. Characterization of Gas-Phase Organics Using Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Cooking Emissions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen M; Farren, Naomi J; Detournay, Anais; Bruns, Emily A; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R; Kilic, Dogushan; Kumar, Nivedita K; Pieber, Simone M; Slowik, Jay G; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S H; El Haddad, Imad

    2016-02-01

    Cooking processes produce gaseous and particle emissions that are potentially deleterious to human health. Using a highly controlled experimental setup involving a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), we investigate the emission factors and the detailed chemical composition of gas phase emissions from a broad variety of cooking styles and techniques. A total of 95 experiments were conducted to characterize nonmethane organic gas (NMOG) emissions from boiling, charbroiling, shallow frying, and deep frying of various vegetables and meats, as well as emissions from vegetable oils heated to different temperatures. Emissions from boiling vegetables are dominated by methanol. Significant amounts of dimethyl sulfide are emitted from cruciferous vegetables. Emissions from shallow frying, deep frying and charbroiling are dominated by aldehydes of differing relative composition depending on the oil used. We show that the emission factors of some aldehydes are particularly large which may result in considerable negative impacts on human health in indoor environments. The suitability of some of the aldehydes as tracers for the identification of cooking emissions in ambient air is discussed. PMID:26766423

  5. Contribution of Liquid/Gas Mass-Transfer Limitations to Dissolved Methane Oversaturation in Anaerobic Treatment of Dilute Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hyeongu; An, Junyeong; Reid, Robertson; Rittmann, Bruce E; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms controlling the accumulation of dissolved methane in anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) treating a synthetic dilute wastewater (a glucose medium) were assessed experimentally and theoretically. The AnMBR was maintained at a temperature of 24-26 °C as the organic loading rate increased from 0.39 to 1.1 kg COD/m(3)-d. The measured concentration of dissolved methane was consistently 2.2- to 2.5-fold larger than the concentration of dissolved methane at thermodynamic equilibrium with the measured CH4 partial pressure, and the fraction of dissolved methane was as high as 76% of the total methane produced. The low gas production rate in the AnMBR significantly slowed the mass transport of dissolved methane to the gas phase. Although the production rate of total methane increased linearly with the COD loading rate, the concentration of dissolved methane only slightly increased with an increasing organic loading rate, because the mass-transfer rate increased by almost 5-fold as the COD loading increased from 0.39 to 1.1 kg COD/m(3)-d. Thus, slow mass transport kinetics exacerbated the situation in which dissolved methane accounted for a substantial fraction of the total methane generated from the AnMBR. PMID:26238158

  6. Validation of a predictive model coupling gas transfer and microbial growth in fresh food packed under modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Guillard, V; Couvert, O; Stahl, V; Hanin, A; Denis, C; Huchet, V; Chaix, E; Loriot, C; Vincelot, T; Thuault, D

    2016-09-01

    Predicting microbial safety of fresh products in modified atmosphere packaging implies to take into account the dynamic of O2, CO2 and N2 exchanges in the system and its effect on microbial growth. In this paper a mechanistic model coupling gas transfer and predictive microbiology was validated using dedicated challenge-tests performed on poultry meat, fresh salmon and processed cheese, inoculated with either Listeria monocytogenes or Pseudomonas fluorescens and packed in commercially used packaging materials (tray + lid films). The model succeeded in predicting the relative variation of O2, CO2 and N2 partial pressure in headspace and the growth of the studied microorganisms without any parameter identification. This work highlighted that the respiration of the targeted microorganism itself and/or that of the naturally present microflora could not be neglected in most of the cases, and could, in the particular case of aerobic microbes contribute to limit the growth by removing all residual O2 in the package. This work also confirmed the low sensitivity of L. monocytogenes toward CO2 while that of P. fluorescens permitted to efficiently prevent its growth by choosing the right combination of packaging gas permeability value and initial % of CO2 initially flushed in the pack. PMID:27217358

  7. Protein adsorption at the electrified air-water interface: implications on foam stability.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Rumpel, Armin; Walter, Johannes; Dombrowski, Jannika; Kulozik, Ulrich; Braunschweig, Björn; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2012-05-22

    The surface chemistry of ions, water molecules, and proteins as well as their ability to form stable networks in foams can influence and control macroscopic properties such as taste and texture of dairy products considerably. Despite the significant relevance of protein adsorption at liquid interfaces, a molecular level understanding on the arrangement of proteins at interfaces and their interactions has been elusive. Therefore, we have addressed the adsorption of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the air-water interface with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry. SFG provides specific information on the composition and average orientation of molecules at interfaces, while complementary information on the thickness of the adsorbed layer can be obtained with ellipsometry. Adsorption of charged BSA proteins at the water surface leads to an electrified interface, pH dependent charging, and electric field-induced polar ordering of interfacial H(2)O and BSA. Varying the bulk pH of protein solutions changes the intensities of the protein related vibrational bands substantially, while dramatic changes in vibrational bands of interfacial H(2)O are simultaneously observed. These observations have allowed us to determine the isoelectric point of BSA directly at the electrolyte-air interface for the first time. BSA covered air-water interfaces with a pH near the isoelectric point form an amorphous network of possibly agglomerated BSA proteins. Finally, we provide a direct correlation of the molecular structure of BSA interfaces with foam stability and new information on the link between microscopic properties of BSA at water surfaces and macroscopic properties such as the stability of protein foams. PMID:22530646

  8. Real-time imaging of crystallization in polylactide enantiomeric monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Shin; Snively, Christopher M; Liu, Yujuan; Rabolt, John F; Chase, D Bruce

    2008-10-01

    A newly developed planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph (PA-IRRAS) offers significant advantages over conventional approaches including fast acquisition speed, excellent compensation for water vapor, and an excellent capacity for large infrared accessories, e.g., a water trough. In this study, the origin of stereocomplexation in a polylactide enantiomeric monolayer at the air-water interface was investigated using PA-IRRAS. PA-IRRAS was used as a probe to follow the real-time conformational changes associated with intermolecular interactions of polymer chains during the compression of the monolayers. It was found that a mixture of poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) (D/L) formed a stereocomplex when the two-dimensional monolayer developed at the air-water interface before film compression, indicating that there is no direct correlation between film compression and stereocomplexation. PA-IRRAS spectra of the stereocomplex exhibited distinct band shifts in crystalline sensitive components, e.g., the vas(C-O-C, h) mode, as well as amorphous-dependent components, e.g., the vs(C-O-C) mode, when compared with the spectra of PLLA alone. On the other hand, time-resolved PA-IRRAS spectra, which were obtained as the films were being compressed, revealed that both monolayers of PLLA and mixed PLLA/PDLA stereocomplex were crystallized into a 10(3)-helix and a 3(1)-helix, respectively, with a distinct band shift in crystalline sensitive components only. Fourier self-deconvolution of the spectra demonstrated that the band shift in crystalline sensitive components is correlated with the intermolecular interaction of polymer chains. PMID:18781784

  9. Catechol oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Camm, Robert C; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2014-12-16

    Anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons promptly react with hydroxyl radicals undergoing oxidation to form phenols and polyphenols (e.g., catechol) typically identified in the complex mixture of humic-like substances (HULIS). Because further processing of polyphenols in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can continue mediated by a mechanism of ozonolysis at interfaces, a better understanding about how these reactions proceed at the air-water interface is needed. This work shows how catechol, a molecular probe of the oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in SOA, can contribute interfacial reactive species that enhance the production of HULIS under atmospheric conditions. Reactive semiquinone radicals are quickly produced upon the encounter of 40 ppbv-6.0 ppmv O3(g) with microdroplets containing [catechol] = 1-150 μM. While the previous pathway results in the instantaneous formation of mono- and polyhydroxylated aromatic rings (PHA) and chromophoric mono- and polyhydroxylated quinones (PHQ), a different channel produces oxo- and dicarboxylic acids of low molecular weight (LMW). The cleavage of catechol occurs at the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-water interface through the formation of (1) an ozonide intermediate, (2) a hydroperoxide, and (3) cis,cis-muconic acid. However, variable [catechol] and [O3(g)] can affect the ratio of the primary products (cis,cis-muconic acid and trihydroxybenzenes) and higher order products observed (PHA, PHQ, and LMW oxo- and dicarboxylic acids). Secondary processing is confirmed by mass spectrometry, showing the production of crotonic, maleinaldehydic, maleic, glyoxylic, and oxalic acids. The proposed pathway can contribute precursors to aqueous SOA (AqSOA) formation, converting aromatic hydrocarbons into polyfunctional species widely found in tropospheric aerosols with light-absorbing brown carbon. PMID:25423038

  10. Condensation heat transfer in rotating heat pipes in the presence of a non-condensable gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, T. C.; Medwell, J. O.; Williams, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of condensation problems in rotating heat pipes containing vapors with different concentrations of non-condensable gases is given. In situations such as this, temperature and concentration gradients are set up in the vapor-gas mixture. There is a transport of mass due to temperature gradients accompanied by an energy transport phenomena due to a concentration gradient. A Nusselt type analysis is not suited to this type of problem; however, a boundary layer type approach has successfully been used to analyze stationary condensation systems with non-condensable gases present. The present boundary layer analysis is presented for condensation processes on the inside of a rotating heat pipe in the presence of non-condensable gases.

  11. Heat transfer in a compact tubular heat exchanger with helium gas at 3.5 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Douglas A.; Glover, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of circular tubes in parallel brazed to a grooved base plate. This tube specimen heat exchanger was tested in an apparatus which radiatively heated the specimen on one side at a heat flux of up to 54 W/sq cm, and cooled the specimen with helium gas at 3.5 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 3000 to 35,000. The measured friction factor of the tube specimen was lower than that of a circular tube with fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to entrance and exit losses. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in circular tubes.

  12. Experimental Measurements and Analysis of Heat Transfer and Gas Dynamics in a Rotating Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Rae, W. J.; George, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    The life-cycle fatigue of a particular component of a high-pressure turbine stage is influenced by the local heat flux and the resulting metal temperature excursions experienced by this component during normal operation. Flow through a turbine stage is seldom uniform and is often influenced by non-uniform incoming gas streams that can result in locally high heat fluxes. In the case of the rotor blades passing through the nozzle guide vane wakes and passages, these local heat rates translate into local temperature fluctuations that will likely affect the fatigue life of the blade. In order to better understand the influence of the heat load on the component life, one would like to have both the local steady-state heat flux and the high-frequency component of the heat flux.

  13. Spatiotemporal patterns in methane flux and gas transfer velocity at low wind speeds: Implications for upscaling studies on small lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, J.; Bastviken, D.; Hardenbroek, M.; Heiri, O.

    2016-06-01

    Lakes contribute significantly to the global natural emissions of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide. However, to accurately incorporate them into the continental carbon balance more detailed surveys of lacustrine greenhouse gas emissions are needed, especially in respect to spatiotemporal variability and to how this affects the upscaling of results. We investigated CH4 flux from a small, wind-shielded lake during 10 field trips over a 14 month period. We show that floating chambers may be used to calibrate the relationship between gas transfer velocity (k) and wind speed at 10 m height (U10) to the local system, in order to obtain more accurate estimates of diffusive CH4 flux than by applying general models predicting k based on U10. We confirm earlier studies indicating strong within-lake spatial variation in this relationship and in ebullitive CH4 flux within the lake basin. However, in contrast to the pattern reported in other studies, ebullitive CH4 flux was highest in the central parts of the lake. Our results indicate positive relationships between k and U10 at very low U10 (0-3 m s-1), which disagrees with earlier suggestions that this relationship may be negligible at low U10 values. We estimate annually averaged open water CH4 emission from Lake Gerzensee to be 3.6-5.8 mmol m-2 d-1. Our data suggest that estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from aquatic systems to the atmosphere based on the upscaling of short-term and small-scale measurements can be improved if both spatial and temporal variabilities of emissions are taken into account.

  14. Folding of Protein Ions in the Gas Phase after Cation-to-Anion Proton-Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Kenneth J; Munger, Eleanor B; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-08-01

    The structure and folding of a protein in solution depends on noncovalent interactions within the protein and those with surrounding ions and molecules. Decoupling these interactions in solution is challenging, which has hindered the development of accurate physics-based models for structure prediction. Investigations of proteins in the gas phase can be used to selectively decouple factors affecting the structures of proteins. Here, we use cation-to-anion proton-transfer reactions (CAPTR) to reduce the charge states of denatured ubiquitin ions in the gas phase, and ion mobility to probe their structures. In CAPTR, a precursor charge state is selected (P) and reacted with monoanions to generate charge-reduced product ions (C). Following each CAPTR event, denatured ubiquitin ions (13+ to 6+) yield products that rapidly isomerize to structures that have smaller collision cross sections (Ω). The Ω values of CAPTR product ions depend strongly on C and very weakly on P. Pre- and post-CAPTR activation was then used to probe the potential-energy surfaces of the precursor and product ions, respectively. Post-CAPTR activation showed that ions of different P fold differently and populate different regions of the potential-energy surface of that ion. Finally, pre-CAPTR activation showed that the structures of protein ions can be indirectly investigated using ion mobility of their CAPTR product ions, even for subtle structural differences that are not apparent from ion mobility characterization of the activated precursor ions. More generally, these results show that CAPTR strongly complements existing techniques for characterizing the structures and dynamics of biological molecules in the gas phase. PMID:27399988

  15. The Potential for Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Tank 241-SY-102 after Waste Transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Meyer, Perry A.; Chen, Guang

    2000-04-10

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double-shell radioactive waste storage tank containing waste that, before recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing flammable buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GREs). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer waste retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of the stored gas. Installing the mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has prevented BD GREs. Gas retention in the floating drust layer and the corresponding accelerated waste level growth made it necessary to begin waste removal and back-dilution with water in December 1999. During these operations, some of the SY-101 mixed slurry layer is removed and transferred into Tank 241-SY-102. There was some concern that adding the SY-101 waste into SY-102 could create a waste configuration in SY-102 capable of BD GREs. This report updates and extends earlier assessments of the potential for BD GRE conditions in SY-102 after waste is transferred from SY-101. We determined that, under the given assumptions, no possibility of BD GREs exists in SY-102 from the SY-101 waste being added during from December 1999 through March 2000.

  16. Developing Oxidized Nitrogen Atmospheric Deposition Source Attribution from CMAQ for Air-Water Trading for Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, R. L.; Napelenok, S. L.; Linker, L. C.; Dudek, M.

    2012-12-01

    Estuaries are adversely impacted by excess reactive nitrogen, Nr, from many point and nonpoint sources, including atmospheric deposition to the watershed and the estuary itself as a nonpoint source. For effective mitigation, trading among sources of Nr is being considered. The Chesapeake Bay Program is working to bring air into its trading scheme, which requires some special air computations. Airsheds are much larger than watersheds; thus, wide-spread or national emissions controls are put in place to achieve major reductions in atmospheric Nr deposition. The tributary nitrogen load reductions allocated to the states to meet the TMDL target for Chesapeake Bay are large and not easy to attain via controls on water point and nonpoint sources. It would help the TMDL process to take advantage of air emissions reductions that would occur with State Implementation Plans that go beyond the national air rules put in place to help meet national ambient air quality standards. There are still incremental benefits from these local or state-level controls on atmospheric emissions. The additional air deposition reductions could then be used to offset water quality controls (air-water trading). What is needed is a source to receptor transfer function that connects air emissions from a state to deposition to a tributary. There is a special source attribution version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model, CMAQ, (termed DDM-3D) that can estimate the fraction of deposition contributed by labeled emissions (labeled by source or region) to the total deposition across space. We use the CMAQ DDM-3D to estimate simplified state-level delta-emissions to delta-atmospheric-deposition transfer coefficients for each major emission source sector within a state, since local air regulations are promulgated at the state level. The CMAQ 4.7.1 calculations are performed at a 12 km grid size over the airshed domain covering Chesapeake Bay for 2020 CAIR emissions. For results, we first present

  17. Keto-enol tautomerization and intermolecular proton transfer in photoionized cyclopentanone dimer in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arup K.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2014-07-28

    Time-of-flight mass spectra of cyclopentanone and its clusters cooled in a supersonic jet expansion have been measured following 4-, 3-, and 2-photon ionizations by the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonic wavelengths, respectively, of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The mass spectra reveal signatures of energetically favored keto to enol tautomerization of the molecular ion leading to intermolecular proton transfer, and this observation is found sharply dependent on the ionization wavelengths used. Electronic structure calculation predicts that in spite of the energetic preference, keto-enol conversion barrier of isolated molecular ion is high. However, the barrier is significantly reduced in a CH⋯O hydrogen-bonded dimer of the molecule. The transition states associated with tautomeric conversion of both cyclopentanone monomer and dimer cations have been identified by means of intrinsic reaction co-ordinate calculation. In a supersonic jet expansion, although a weakly bound dimer is readily generated, the corresponding cation and also the protonated counterpart are observed only for ionization by 532 nm. For other two ionization wavelengths, these species do not register in the mass spectra, where the competing reaction channels via α-cleavage of the ring become dominant. In contrast to the report of a recent study, we notice that the intact molecular ion largely survives fragmentations when ionized from the 2-photon resonant 3p Rydberg state as intermediate using nanosecond laser pulses, and the corresponding resonant 3-photon ionization spectrum has been recorded probing the intact molecular ion.

  18. Heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger containing rectangular channels and using helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which will fly at hypersonic speeds, require novel cooling techniques to manage the anticipated high heat fluxes on various components. A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of 12 parallel, rectangular channels in a flat piece of commercially pure nickel. The channel specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes of up to 77 W/sq cm, insulated on the back side, and cooled with helium gas flowing in the channels at 3.5 to 7.0 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 1400 to 28,000. The measured friction factor was lower than that of the accepted correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to uncertainty in the channel height and a high ratio of dynamic pressure to pressure drop. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in channels. Flow nonuniformity from channel-to-channel was as high as 12 pct above and 19 pct below the mean flow.

  19. Sound Absorption in Molecular Gas Mixtures: Master Equation for Rotational and Vibrational Excitation, Relaxation, and Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory sound absorption measurements provide much of what we know about the vibrational kinetics of air mixtures, forming the core basis for retrieving the altitude profile of water in the mesosphere from infrared emissions between 6.3 and 6.9 μm. Here we show that sound-absorption and laser-excitation experiments follow exactly the same kinetics, reflect the same underlying reaction rates, and can be vulnerable to similar ambiguities. This has not been obvious because the literature lacks a consistent prescription for calculating the sound absorption frequency spectrum from the reaction rate coefficients. We have developed the first general theoretical formalism for calculating the absolute magnitude of sound absorption per-unit-length, versus sound frequency, for any number of collisional excitation, relaxation, and energy transfer processes, for any mixture of atomic and molecular gases. This new formalism, and the computer code that implements it, provide the first systematic means for inferring collisional rate coefficients from sound absorption measurements in which more than one rotational or vibrational mode is active, such as N2/O2/H2O/CO2 gas mixtures in the laboratory and the atmosphere. When a sound wave travels through a gas, the alternating compression and expansion cycles heat and cool the gas. If the acoustic frequency roughly matches the rate of vibrational relaxation, then the effective vibrational temperature lags behind the translational temperature and the energy in the sound wave is attenuated. The measured frequency of maximum absorption is proportional to the vibrational relaxation rate. In the simplest laser-based experiment, we excite a single molecular level and record its exponential time decay, with the vibrational relaxation rate being proportional to the decay frequency. In both experiments we derive the relaxation rate coefficient from the linear graph versus gas pressure. The technical problem is that any mixture of molecular

  20. Keto-enol tautomerization and intermolecular proton transfer in photoionized cyclopentanone dimer in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arup K.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2014-07-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectra of cyclopentanone and its clusters cooled in a supersonic jet expansion have been measured following 4-, 3-, and 2-photon ionizations by the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonic wavelengths, respectively, of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The mass spectra reveal signatures of energetically favored keto to enol tautomerization of the molecular ion leading to intermolecular proton transfer, and this observation is found sharply dependent on the ionization wavelengths used. Electronic structure calculation predicts that in spite of the energetic preference, keto-enol conversion barrier of isolated molecular ion is high. However, the barrier is significantly reduced in a CH⋯O hydrogen-bonded dimer of the molecule. The transition states associated with tautomeric conversion of both cyclopentanone monomer and dimer cations have been identified by means of intrinsic reaction co-ordinate calculation. In a supersonic jet expansion, although a weakly bound dimer is readily generated, the corresponding cation and also the protonated counterpart are observed only for ionization by 532 nm. For other two ionization wavelengths, these species do not register in the mass spectra, where the competing reaction channels via α-cleavage of the ring become dominant. In contrast to the report of a recent study, we notice that the intact molecular ion largely survives fragmentations when ionized from the 2-photon resonant 3p Rydberg state as intermediate using nanosecond laser pulses, and the corresponding resonant 3-photon ionization spectrum has been recorded probing the intact molecular ion.

  1. Quantum chemical analysis of the energy of proton transfer from phenol and chlorophenols to H2O in the gas phase and in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüürmann, Gerrit

    1998-12-01

    Proton transfer energies of phenol and 14 chlorophenols with H2O as a base are analyzed in the gas phase and in solution using quantum chemical methods at the semiempirical and ab initio level of computation. The effect of aqueous solution was accounted for by applying the density functional theory (DFT) implementation of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) as well as semiempirical continuum-solvation models. The results reveal substantial and systematic overestimations of the free energies of proton transfer as derived from experimental solution-phase pKa data. This can be traced back to both deficiencies in the current model parameterization as well as to limitations of the underlying gas-phase quantum chemical models, which is further illustrated by additional complete-basis-set (CBS) calculations for the proton transfer reaction with phenol. In contrast, the relative pKa trend is reflected well by COSMO-DFT calculations with correlation coefficients (adjusted for degrees of freedom) of 0.96. Decomposition of the dissociation energy in aqueous solution into a gas-phase term and a term summarizing the solvation contributions provides new insights into the effect of solvation on proton transfer energies, and yields mechanistic explanations for the observed differences in the gas-phase and solution-phase acidity orders of various subgroups of the compounds.

  2. Observational Studies of Parameters Influencing Air-sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, U.; Frew, N. M.; Bock, E. J.; Hara, T.; Garbe, C. S.; Jaehne, B.

    A physically-based modeling of the air-sea gas transfer that can be used to predict the gas transfer rates with sufficient accuracy as a function of micrometeorological parameters is still lacking. State of the art are still simple gas transfer rate/wind speed relationships. Previous measurements from Coastal Ocean Experiment in the Atlantic revealed positive correlations between mean square slope, near surface turbulent dis- sipation, and wind stress. It also demonstrated a strong negative correlation between mean square slope and the fluorescence of surface-enriched colored dissolved organic matter. Using heat as a proxy tracer for gases the exchange process at the air/water interface and the micro turbulence at the water surface can be investigated. The anal- ysis of infrared image sequences allow the determination of the net heat flux at the ocean surface, the temperature gradient across the air/sea interface and thus the heat transfer velocity and gas transfer velocity respectively. Laboratory studies were carried out in the new Heidelberg wind-wave facility AELOTRON. Direct measurements of the Schmidt number exponent were done in conjunction with classical mass balance methods to estimate the transfer velocity. The laboratory results allowed to validate the basic assumptions of the so called controlled flux technique by applying differ- ent tracers for the gas exchange in a large Schmidt number regime. Thus a modeling of the Schmidt number exponent is able to fill the gap between laboratory and field measurements field. Both, the results from the laboratory and the field measurements should be able to give a further understanding of the mechanisms controlling the trans- port processes across the aqueous boundary layer and to relate the forcing functions to parameters measured by remote sensing.

  3. Sulfur hexafluoride gas tracer studies in streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, D.E.; Gulliver, J.S.; Parkhill, K.L.

    1998-08-01

    Gas tracers are useful investigative tools in the study of reaeration and the fate of volatile organic contaminants in many natural streams. They enable the direct measurement of a variety of stream parameters, including the gas exchange rates between the stream and the atmosphere, as well as the spreading rate for dissolved pollutants downstream of a discharge point or spill site. The air-water mass transfer coefficients, dispersion coefficients, and mean residence times in two experimental streams and one natural stream are measured using a variation of the standard volatile tracer-dye technique. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is used as the volatile tracer and rhodamine WT is used as the conservative tracer. The low limit of quantification of SF{sub 6} makes it possible to inject SF{sub 6}-rich water into many streams and avoid complications with dosing a stream with a gaseous tracer. The experimental methods are described in detail. The SF{sub 6} measurements were extremely precise, producing smooth concentration time curves. The SF{sub 6} measurements collected in side-by-side experimental channels yielded similar values of the gas transfer coefficient.

  4. Simultaneous multi-determination and transfer of eight pesticide residues from green tea leaves to infusion using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon-Kil; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Shim, Jae-Han

    2014-12-15

    A method for determining eight pesticide (cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, fenitrothion, EPN, bifenthrin, difenoconazole, triflumizole, and azoxystrobin) residues in made green tea as well as a tea infusion (under various brewing water temperatures; 60, 80, and 100°C) using gas chromatography (GC) micro-electron capture detector (μECD) was developed and validated. The extraction method adopted the relatively commonly used approach of solid sample hydration, with the green tea hydrated before being extracted through salting out with acetonitrile followed by a cleanup procedure. The analytes were confirmed using GC-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) with a triple quadrupole. The linearity of the calibration curves yielded determination coefficients (R(2)) >0.995. Recoveries were carried out using blank samples spiked with all analytes at two levels. The results demonstrated that all pesticides were recovered within the range of 77-116% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) ⩽14%. The quantification limits of 0.015-0.03 mg/kg were lower than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) set by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) for all analytes (0.05-10mg/kg). The infusion study indicated that cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, and bifenthrin did not infuse into the tea brew from the made tea. Increases in brewing time resulted in increased transfer of azoxystrobin, fenitrothion, and difenoconazole from the made tea to the brew; however, this was not the case with triflumizole or EPN. We conclude that transfer of pesticides appeared to be dependent on their water solubilities and drinking a cup of tea is recommended to be at a water temperature of 60°C. PMID:25038708

  5. Modelling of heat and mass transfer in a granular medium during high-temperature air drying. Effect of the internal gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Hammouda; Hassini, Lamine; Lamloumi, Raja; El Cafsi, Mohamed Afif

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive internal heat and water transfer model including the gas pressure effect has been proposed in order to improve the industrial high-temperature air drying of inserts made of agglomerated sand. In this model, the internal gas phase pressure effect was made perfectly explicit, by considering the liquid and vapour transfer by filtration and the liquid expulsion at the surface. Wet sand enclosed in a tight cylindrical glass bottle dried convectively at a high temperature was chosen as an application case. The model was validated on the basis of the experimental average water content and core temperature curves for drying trials at different operating conditions. The simulations of the spatio-temporal distribution of internal gas pressure were performed and interpreted in terms of product potential damage. Based on a compromise between the drying time and the pressure increase, a simple drying cycle was implemented in order to optimize the drying process.

  6. Characterization of predominantly hydrophobic poly(styrene)-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers at air/water and cyclohexane/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gragson, D.E.; Jensen, J.M.; Baker, S.M.

    1999-09-14

    Interfacial tension measurements are employed to explore the spreading behavior of predominantly hydrophobic poly(styrene)--poly(ethylene oxide), PS-PEO, diblock copolymers at air/water and cyclohexane/water interfaces. Two copolymers with 7%- and 15.5%-PEO are examined in this study. The former is expected to have a PS block limiting area in air roughly equal to the limiting PEO pancake area, whereas the latter is expected to have a limiting PS block area in air approximately 3 times smaller than the limiting PEO pancake area. At the air/water interface, the 7%-PEO copolymer does not spread well, which is attributed to interference from the hydrophobic PS block. In contrast, the 7%-PEO copolymer spreads well at the cyclohexane/water interface, producing an isotherm with a terminating mean molecular area 3 times smaller than that obtained at the air/water interface. The 15.5%-PEO copolymer spreads well at both the air/water ad cyclohexane/water interfaces due to less interference from the smaller hydrophobic PS block. These observations are compared to compression isotherms, and the results are discussed in terms of the solvating nature of the adjacent cyclohexane phase for the PS block.

  7. Pollution: A Selected Bibliography of U.S. Government Publications on Air, Water, and Land Pollution 1965-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiraldi, Louis, Comp.; Burk, Janet L., Comp.

    Materials on environmental pollution published by the various offices of the federal government are presented in this select bibliography. Limited in scope to publications on air, water, and land pollution, the document is designed to serve teachers and researchers working in the field of environmental problems who wish reference to public…

  8. epi-Fluorescence imaging at the air-water interface of fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Kristen; Sacks, Stuart; Li, Shanghao; Leblanc, Roger M

    2014-08-18

    Protein fibrillization is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases. This process has been studied using spectroscopic and microscopic methods. In this study, epi-fluorescence at the air-water interface was developed as an innovative technique for observing fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin. PMID:24976597

  9. Effect of grafted polymer species on particle monolayer structure at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Emiko; Okazaki, Yoshitaka; Komune, Seishu; Yoshinaga, Kohji

    2011-03-01

    We have studied poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted(PMMA) particle monolayer systems at the air-water interface. In previous papers, we reported that PMMA chains grafted from particles (silica particle and polystyrene latex) were extended on water surfaces. Through observing deposited particle monolayers on substrates using SEM, we have confirmed that PMMA of large molecular weights were either dispersed or arrayed in structure with long inter-particle distances approximately 500 nm. In contrast, low molecular weight PMMA were observed to aggregate upon deposition. We speculated that the difference in morphology in deposited particle monolayers would be attributed to the affinity between the grafted polymer and the substrate. To examine the effect of this affinity three new polymer-grafted silica particles were synthesized with a fairly high graft density of about 0.14 approximately 0.43 nm(-2). As well as PMMA-grafted silica particles (SiO2-PMMA), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and poly(t-butyl methacrylate)--grafted silica particles (SiO2-PHEMA and SiO2-PtBuMA) were also prepared and subjected to pi-A isotherm measurements and SEM observations. These pi-A isotherms indicated that polymer-grafted silica formed monolayer at the air-water interface, and the onset area of increasing surface pressure suggests that the polymer chains are extended on a water surface. However, the morphology of the deposited monolayer is highly dependent on polymer species: SiO2-PHEMA showed that the dispersed particle monolayer structure was independent of grafted molecular weight while SiO2-tBuMA showed an aggregated structure that was also independent of grafted moleculer weight. SiO2-PMMA showed intermediate tendencies: dispersed structure was observed with high grafted molecular weight and aggregated structure was observed with low grafted molecule weight. The morphology on glass substrate would be explaiened by hydrophilic interaction between grafted polymer and hydrophilic glass

  10. Submm Observations of Massive Star Formation in the Giant Molecular Cloud NGC 6334 : Gas Kinematics with Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zernickel, A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. How massive stars (M>8 Ms) form and how they accrete gas is still an open research field, but it is known that their influence on the interstellar medium (ISM) is immense. Star formation involves the gravitational collapse of gas from scales of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) down to dense hot molecular cores (HMCs). Thus, it is important to understand the mass flows and kinematics in the ISM. Aims. This dissertation focuses on the detailed study of the region NGC 6334, located in the Galaxy at a distance of 1.7 kpc. It is aimed to trace the gas velocities in the filamentary, massive star-forming region NGC 6334 at several scales and to explain its dynamics. For that purpose, different scales are examined from 0.01-10 pc to collect information about the density, molecular abundance, temperature and velocity, and consequently to gain insights about the physio-chemical conditions of molecular clouds. The two embedded massive protostellar clusters NGC 6334I and I(N), which are at different stages of development, were selected to determine their infall velocities and mass accretion rates. Methods. This astronomical source was surveyed by a combination of different observatories, namely with the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the single-dish telescope Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), and the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO). It was mapped with APEX in carbon monoxide (13CO and C18O, J=2-1) at 220.4 GHz to study the filamentary structure and turbulent kinematics on the largest scales of 10 pc. The spectral line profiles are decomposed by Gaussian fitting and a dendrogram algorithm is applied to distinguish velocity-coherent structures and to derive statistical properties. The velocity gradient method is used to derive mass flow rates. The main filament was mapped with APEX in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and oxomethylium (HCO+, J=3-2) at 267.6 GHz to trace the dense gas. To reproduce the position- velocity diagram (PVD), a cylindrical model with the radiative transfer

  11. Regularities pertinent to heat transfer between torch gas layers and steam boiler firebox waterwalls. Part I. Geometrical and physical torch model as a source of heat radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-09-01

    The progress seen in the 19th-21st centuries in the development of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces, fireboxes, and combustion chambers is analyzed. Throughout the 20th century, calculations of heat transfer were carried out based on the law for radiation from solid bodies deduced by Y. Stefan and L. Boltzmann. It is shown that the use of this law for calculating heat transfer of a torch (a gaseous source of radiation) in heating furnaces and power-generating installations leads to incorrect results. It is substantiated that there is crisis of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces and power-generating installations. Geometrical and physical torch models in the form of radiating cylindrical gas volumes as sources of heat radiation are proposed for overcoming this crisis.

  12. Dipolar interactions between domains in lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rufeil-Fiori, Elena; Wilke, Natalia; Banchio, Adolfo J

    2016-05-25

    A great variety of biologically relevant monolayers present phase coexistence characterized by domains formed by lipids in an ordered phase state dispersed in a continuous, disordered phase. From the difference in surface densities between these phases, inter-domain dipolar interactions arise. These interactions are relevant for the determination of the spacial distribution of domains as well as their dynamics. In this work, we propose a novel way of estimating the dipolar repulsion using a passive method that involves the analysis of images of the monolayer with phase coexistence. This method is based on the comparison of the pair correlation function obtained from experiments with that obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations of a model system. As an example, we determined the difference in dipolar density of a binary monolayer of DSPC/DMPC at the air-water interface from the analysis of the radial distribution of domains, and the results are compared with those obtained by surface potential determinations. A systematic analysis for the experimentally relevant parameter range is given, which may be used as a working curve for obtaining the dipolar repulsion in different systems. PMID:27139819

  13. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  14. Halide anion dependence of ionic surfactant adsorption in air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doseok; Wang, Wenjie; Sung, Woongmo; Ao, Mingqi; Vaknin, David

    2014-03-01

    It was recently proposed that there is surface excess of halide anions at the air/water interface, and more surface excess of I- than Br- or Cl-, which cannot be explained by Debye-Huckel theory. In case of charged surfaces such as Gibbs monolayer consisting of cationic surfactant molecules, surface excess of anions can also be expected. In this study, by using surface-sensitive grazing angle X-ray fluorescence in conjunction with surface tension measurement, we investigated adsorption behavior of [C12mim]Cl, [C12mim]Br, [C12mim]I aqueous solutions, in which the surface is first covered by [C12mim]+ cations at low concentrations, and the adsorption of the halide anions to this charged interface would follow with the increase in the concentration of solutes. From the surface tension measurements, it was observed that critical micelle concentration of [C12mim]I solution was 4.6 mM, much smaller than that of [C12mim]Cl (16.7 mM) indicating surface activity of surfactant increases with size of halide anions. From X-ray fluorescence, surface excess of halide anion was measured quantitatively from the interface of these solutions. By putting NaCl and NaI in [C12mim]I and [C12mim]Cl solutions, respectively, competition between Cl- and I- adsorption was investigated, to find that I- has stronger adsorption on the charged surface than Cl-.

  15. Field observations of turbulent dissipation rate profiles immediately below the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binbin; Liao, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Near surface profiles of turbulence immediately below the air-water interface were measured with a free-floating Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system on Lake Michigan. The surface-following configuration allowed the system to measure the statistics of the aqueous-side turbulence in the topmost layer immediately below the water surface (z≈0˜15 cm, z points downward with 0 at the interface). Profiles of turbulent dissipation rate (ɛ) were investigated under a variety of wind and wave conditions. Various methods were applied to estimate the dissipation rate. Results suggest that these methods yield consistent dissipation rate profiles with reasonable scattering. In general, the dissipation rate decreases from the water surface following a power law relation in the top layer, ɛ˜z-0.7, i.e., the slope of the decrease was lower than that predicted by the wall turbulence theory, and the dissipation was considerably higher in the top layer for cases with higher wave ages. The measured dissipation rate profiles collapse when they were normalized with the wave speed, wave height, water-side friction velocity, and the wave age. This scaling suggests that the enhanced turbulence may be attributed to the additional source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) at the "skin layer" (likely due to micro-breaking), and its downward transport in the water column.

  16. Sea Breeze Forcing of Estuary Turbulence and Air-Water Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, P. M.; McGillis, W. R.; Zappa, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The sea breeze is often a dominant meteorological feature at the coastline, but little is known about its estuarine impacts. It arises on sunny days with weak synoptic weather forcing, due to O(100 km) scale atmospheric pressure differences that develop as a result of the different solar absorption properties of sea and land. Here, measurements at an anchored catamaran and meteorological stations along the Hudson River and New York Bay estuarine system are used to illustrate some basic characteristics and impacts of the feature. The sea breeze propagates inland, arriving in phase with peak solar forcing at seaward stations, but several hours later at up-estuary stations. Passage of the sea breeze front raises the water-to-air CO2 flux by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and drives turbulence comparable to spring tide levels in the upper meter of the water column, where most primary productivity occurs in this highly turbid system. Modeling and observational studies often use remotely-measured winds with quadratic parameterizations to compute air-water fluxes (e.g. momentum, CO2), and this leads to a factor of two flux error on sea breeze days during the study. We conclude with a survey of how common these features are in the Hudson as well as other estuaries.

  17. Dynamic mechanical properties of a polyelectrolyte adsorbed insoluble lipid monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Young; Kim, Mahn Won

    2015-04-23

    Polymers have been used to stabilize interfaces or to tune the mechanical properties of interfaces in various contexts, such as in oil emulsions or biological membranes. Although the structural properties of these systems are relatively well-studied, instrumental limitations continue to make it difficult to understand how the addition of polymer affects the dynamic mechanical properties of thin and soft films. We have solved this challenge by developing a new instrument, an optical-tweezer-based interface shear microrheometer (ISMR). With this technique, we observed that the interface shear modulus, G*, of a dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) monolayer at the air-water interface significantly increased with adsorption of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS). In addition, the viscous film (DODAC monolayer) became a viscoelastic film with PSS adsorption. At a low salt concentration, 10 mM of NaCl in the subphase, the viscoelasticity of the DODAC/PSS composite was predominantly determined by a particular property of PSS, that is, it behaves as a Gaussian chain in a θ-solvent. At a high salt concentration, 316 mM of NaCl, the thin film behaved as a polymer melt excluding water molecules. PMID:25826703

  18. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-04-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw , the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β , the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  19. Hydration, Orientation, and Conformation of Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Wren, Sumi N; Gordon, Brittany P; Valley, Nicholas A; McWilliams, Laura E; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2015-06-18

    Aqueous-phase processing of methylglyoxal (MG) has been suggested to constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected because its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form geminal diols, as well as because MG and its hydration products can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active, but an improved description of its surface behavior is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation. These studies investigate MG adsorption, focusing on its hydration state at the air-water interface, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach that involves vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. Together, the experimental and theoretical data show that MG exists predominantly in a singly hydrated state (diol) at the interface, with a diol-tetrol ratio at the surface higher than that for the bulk. In addition to exhibiting a strong surface activity, we find that MG significantly perturbs the water structure at the interface. The results have implications for understanding the atmospheric fate of methylglyoxal. PMID:25989368

  20. Equation of state and adsorption dynamics of soft microgel particles at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Omkar S; Maestro, Armando; Duits, Michel H G; van den Ende, Dirk; Stuart, Martien Cohen; Mugele, Frieder

    2014-09-28

    Understanding the adsorption dynamics of soft microgel particles is a key step in designing such particles for potential applications as stimuli-responsive Pickering stabilizers for foams or emulsions. In this study we experimentally determine an equation of state (EOS) for poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles adsorbed onto an air-water interface using a Langmuir film balance. We detect a finite surface pressure at very low surface concentration of particles, for which standard theories based on hard disk models predict negligible pressures, implying that the particles must deform strongly upon adsorption to the interface. Furthermore, we study the evolution of the surface pressure due to the adsorption of PNIPAM particles as a function of time using pendant drop tensiometry. The equation of state determined in the equilibrium measurements allows us to extract the adsorbed amount as a function of time. We find a mixed-kinetic adsorption that is initially controlled by the diffusion of particles towards the interface. At later stages, a slow exponential relaxation indicates the presence of a coverage-dependent adsorption barrier related to crowding of particles at the interface. PMID:24954112