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Sample records for air-water surface tension

  1. Surface Tension Drives the Orientation of Crystals at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nicolas R; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-07-21

    The fabrication of oriented crystalline thin films is essential for a range of applications ranging from semiconductors to optical components, sensors, and catalysis. Here we show by depositing micrometric crystal particles on a liquid interface from an aerosol phase that the surface tension of the liquid alone can drive the crystallographic orientation of initially randomly oriented particles. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the particles at the interface are identical to those of a monocrystalline sample cleaved along the {104} (CaCO3) or {111} (CaF2) face. We show how this orientation effect can be used to produce thin coatings of oriented crystals on a solid substrate. These results also have important implications for our understanding of heterogeneous crystal growth beneath amphiphile monolayers and for 2D self-assembly processes at the air-liquid interface. PMID:27389283

  2. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  3. Correlation of Oil-Water and Air-Water Contact Angles of Diverse Silanized Surfaces and Relationship to Fluid Interfacial Tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2012-02-24

    The use of air-water, {Theta}{sub wa}, or air-liquid contact angles is customary in surface science, while oil-water contact angles {Theta}{sub ow}, are of paramount importance in subsurface multiphase flow phenomena including petroleum reocovery, nonaqueous phase liquid fate and transport, and geological carbon sequestration. In this paper we determine both the air-water and oil-water contact angles of silica surfaces modified with a diverse selection of silanes, using hexadecane as the oil. The silanes included alkylsilanes, alkylarylsilanes, and silanes with alkyl or aryl groups that are functionalized with heteroatoms such as N, O, and S. These silanes yielded surfaces with wettabilities from water-wet to oil wet, including specific silanized surfaces functionalized with heteroatoms that yield intermediate wet surfaces. The oil-water contact angles for clean and silanized surfaces, excluding one partially fluorinated surface, correlate linearly with air-water contact angles with a slope of 1.41 (R = 0.981, n = 13). These data were used to examine a previously untested theoretical treatment relating air-water and oil-water contact angles in terms of fluid interfacial energies. Plotting the cosines of these contact angles against one another, we obtain a linear relationship in excellent agreement with the theoretical treatment; the data fit cos {Theta}{sub ow} = 0.667 cos {Theta}{sub ow} + 0.384 (R = 0.981, n = 13), intercepting cos {Theta}{sub ow} = -1 at -0.284. The theoretical slope, based on the fluid interfacial tensions {Theta}{sub wa}, {Theta}{sub ow}, and {Theta}{sub oa}, is 0.67. We also demonstrate how silanes can be used to alter the wettability of the interior of a pore network micromodel device constructed in silicon/silica with a glass cover plate. Such micromodels are used to study multiphase flow phenomena. The contact angle of the resulting interior was determined in situ. An intermediate wet micromodel gave a contact angle in excellent agreement

  4. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  5. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  6. Surface tension driven convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, S.

    1979-01-01

    In a normal gravitational environment, the free surface of a liquid in a container plays a passive role in the transport processes. However, at microgravity, the free surface can become the dominant factor. A simple but meaningful spaceflight experiment is proposed to investigate the nature and extent of flows induced by surface-tension gradients along the free surface. The influences of container geometry, wetability, contamination, and imposed heating modes will be investigated.

  7. Nonequilibrium surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2015-12-01

    A weakly nonlocal phase-field model is used to define surface tension in liquid binary mixtures in terms of the composition gradient in the interfacial region so that, at equilibrium, it depends linearly on the characteristic length that defines the interfacial width. In nonequilibrium conditions, surface tension changes with time: during mixing, it decreases as the inverse square root of time, while during phase separation, when nuclei coagulate, it increases exponentially to its equilibrium value. In addition, since temperature gradients modify the steepness of the concentration profile in the interfacial region, they induce gradients in the nonequilibrium surface tension, leading to the Marangoni thermocapillary migration of an isolated drop. Similarly, Marangoni stresses are induced in a composition gradient, leading to diffusiophoresis.

  8. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Stoltz, G.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  9. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    SciTech Connect

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  10. Rainbow surface tension analysis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Charles L; Smith, Valen A; Haddad, Natalie M

    2008-03-31

    In this paper we outline a new all-optical non-contact technique for measurement of the surface tension of a Newtonian fluid. It is based on the accurate measurement of the spacing of the supernumerary fringes produced by the diffraction pattern of a laser beam transmitted through or reflected by a thin vertically-draining film of the liquid. We discuss the basic theory and application of this technique, and several issues which must be addressed before it can be used commercially. PMID:18542611

  11. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  12. Phases, line tension and pattern formation in molecularly thin films at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pritam

    A Langmuir film, which is a molecularly thin insoluble film on a liquid substrate, is one practical realization of a quasi-two dimensional matter. The major advantages of this system for the study of phase separation and phase co-existence are (a) it allows accurate control of the components and molecular area of the film and (b) it can be studied by various methods that require very flat films. Phase separation in molecularly thin films plays an important role in a range of systems from biomembranes to biosensors. For example, phase-separated lipid nano-domains in biomembranes are thought to play crucial roles in membrane function. I use Brewster Angel Microscopy (BAM) coupled with Fluorescence Microscopy (FM) and static Light Scattering Microscopy (LSM) to image phases and patterns within Langmuir films. The three microscopic techniques --- BAM, FM and LSM --- are complimentary to each other, providing distinct sets of information. They allow direct comparison with literature results in lipid systems. I have quantitatively validated the use of detailed hydrodynamic simulations to determine line tension in monolayers. Line tension decreases as temperature rises. This decrease gives us information on the entropy associated with the line, and thus about line structure. I carefully consider the thermodynamics of line energy and entropy to make this connection. In the longer run, LSM will be exploited to give us further information about line structure. I have also extended the technique by testing it on domains within the curved surface of a bilayer vesicle. I also note that in the same way that the presence of surface-active agents, known as surfactants, affects surface energy, the addiction of line active agents alters the inter-phase line energy. Thus my results set to stage to systematically study the influence of line active agents ---'linactants' --- on the inter-phase line energy. Hierarchal self-assembled chiral patterns were observed as a function of

  13. Measurement of the Surface Dilatational Viscosity of an Insoluble Surfactant Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface Using a Pendant Drop Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Jose; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When a fluid interface with surfactants is at rest, the interfacial stress is isotropic (as given by the equilibrium interfacial tension), and is described by the equation of state which relates the surface tension to the surfactant surface concentration. When surfactants are subjected to shear and dilatational flows, flow induced interaction of the surfactants; can create interfacial stresses apart from the equilibrium surface tension. The simplest relationship between surface strain rate and surface stress is the Boussinesq-Scriven constitutive equation completely characterized by three coefficients: equilibrium interfacial tension, surface shear viscosity, and surface dilatational viscosity Equilibrium interfacial tension and surface shear viscosity measurements are very well established. On the other hand, surface dilatational viscosity measurements are difficult because a flow which change the surface area also changes the surfactant surface concentration creating changes in the equilibrium interfacial tension that must be also taken into account. Surface dilatational viscosity measurements of existing techniques differ by five orders of magnitude and use spatially damped surface waves and rapidly expanding bubbles. In this presentation we introduce a new technique for measuring the surface dilatational viscosity by contracting an aqueous pendant drop attached to a needle tip and having and insoluble surfactant monolayer at the air-water interface. The isotropic total tension on the surface consists of the equilibrium surface tension and the tension due to the dilation. Compression rates are undertaken slow enough so that bulk hydrodynamic stresses are small compared to the surface tension force. Under these conditions we show that the total tension is uniform along the surface and that the Young-Laplace equation governs the drop shape with the equilibrium surface tension replaced by the constant surface isotropic stress. We illustrate this technique using

  14. Apparatus for determining surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razouk, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    System for studying capillary action uses pressure transducer and chart recorder instead of manometer. Apparatus enables measurements to be made under controlled atmospheres. It also may be remotely operated. These features are particularly useful when dealing with noxious liquids and for study of surface tension under high-pressure conditions that require use of all-metal apparatus.

  15. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  16. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  17. Light Scattering by Surface Tension Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbuch, G.; Garbay, F.

    1979-01-01

    This simple and inexpensive experiment is an illustration of the physical concepts of interaction between light and surface tension waves, and provides a new method of measuring surface tension. (Author/GA)

  18. Surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Thermocapillary flow is driven by a thermally induced surface tension variation along a liquid free surface. In the Earth-gravity environment such flows are usually overshadowed by buoyancy driven flows, but at reduced gravity conditions their influence could be significant. A comprehensive theoretical and experimental research program was stated 12 years ago and is still being continued. Past work done at Case Western Reserve University as well as work done by others is reviewed. The justification for low-gravity experiments is presented.

  19. Surface tension dominates insect flight on fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Bardon, Thibaut C; Kim, Dong Hyun; Prakash, Manu

    2016-03-01

    Flight on the 2D air-water interface, with body weight supported by surface tension, is a unique locomotion strategy well adapted for the environmental niche on the surface of water. Although previously described in aquatic insects like stoneflies, the biomechanics of interfacial flight has never been analysed. Here, we report interfacial flight as an adapted behaviour in waterlily beetles (Galerucella nymphaeae) which are also dexterous airborne fliers. We present the first quantitative biomechanical model of interfacial flight in insects, uncovering an intricate interplay of capillary, aerodynamic and neuromuscular forces. We show that waterlily beetles use their tarsal claws to attach themselves to the interface, via a fluid contact line pinned at the claw. We investigate the kinematics of interfacial flight trajectories using high-speed imaging and construct a mathematical model describing the flight dynamics. Our results show that non-linear surface tension forces make interfacial flight energetically expensive compared with airborne flight at the relatively high speeds characteristic of waterlily beetles, and cause chaotic dynamics to arise naturally in these regimes. We identify the crucial roles of capillary-gravity wave drag and oscillatory surface tension forces which dominate interfacial flight, showing that the air-water interface presents a radically modified force landscape for flapping wing flight compared with air. PMID:26936640

  20. Axelrod's model with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Bruno; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we propose a subtle change in Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture. The mechanism consists of excluding from the set of potentially interacting neighbors those that would never possibly exchange. Although the alteration proposed does not alter the state space topologically, it yields significant qualitative changes, specifically the emergence of surface tension, driving the system in some cases to metastable states. The transient behavior is considerably richer, and cultural regions become stable leading to the formation of different spatiotemporal patterns. A metastable "glassy" phase emerges between the globalized phase and the disordered, multicultural phase.

  1. Dynamical Modeling of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, Jeremiah U.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent review it is said that free-surface flows 'represent some of the difficult remaining challenges in computational fluid dynamics'. There has been progress with the development of new approaches to treating interfaces, such as the level-set method and the improvement of older methods such as the VOF method. A common theme of many of the new developments has been the regularization of discontinuities at the interface. One example of this approach is the continuum surface force (CSF) formulation for surface tension, which replaces the surface stress given by Laplace's equation by an equivalent volume force. Here, we describe how CSF formulation might be made more useful. Specifically, we consider a derivation of the CSF equations from a minimization of surface energy as outlined by Jacqmin (1996). This reformulation suggests that if one eliminates the computation of curvature in terms of a unit normal vector, parasitic currents may be eliminated. For this reformulation to work, it is necessary that transition region thickness be controlled. Various means for this, in addition to the one discussed by Jacqmin (1996), are discussed.

  2. Effect of Gravity on Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, M. M.; Azzam, M. O. J.; Mann, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of liquid-vapor interfaces are made in +/- 1-g environments to note the effect of gravity on surface tension. A slight increase is detected at -1-g0, but is arguably within the uncertainty of the measurement technique. An increased dependence of surface tension on the orientation and magnitude of the gravitational vector is anticipated as the critical point is approached.

  3. Surface Tension Measurements of Chemically Modified Oleochemical

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface tension is an important physical property of a substance, which plays a part in a variety of physical phenomenon relevant to many industrial processes. For example, the efficiency of the atomization of a fuel has been shown to be effected dramatically by surface tension and viscosity. Beca...

  4. Small membranes under negative surface tension.

    PubMed

    Avital, Yotam Y; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-28

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes-(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability. PMID:25833604

  5. Small membranes under negative surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Yotam Y.; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-01

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes—(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability.

  6. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  7. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  8. Transition States for Submerged Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Partially-Pinned Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Hooman; Hemeda, Ahmed; VCU Team

    2015-11-01

    The pressure at which a superhydrophobic surface transitions from the Cassie state to the Wenzel state is often referred to as the critical pressure. Our mathematical simulations have shown that the Cassie-to-Wenzel transition is a gradual process that takes place over a range of pressures as oppose to an event that happens at a certain pressure. During the transition period, the air-water interface may go through a series pinned, partially-pinned, and de-pinned states that depend on the geometry of the surface asperities. This in turn indicates that the drag-reduction effect produced by a submerged superhydrophobic surface can vary with the hydrostatic pressure, and is highly dependent on sharpness of the surface asperities. The study reported here reviews our recent discoveries in simulating the wetted area and drag reduction effect of superhydrophobic surfaces with different microstructures. National Science Foundation CMM 1029924 and CBET 1402655 programs.

  9. Near-surface turbulence for evaporative convection at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, K. A.; Saylor, J. R.; Smith, G. B.

    2001-11-01

    Turbulence measurements are reported for the flow beneath an air/water interface undergoing evaporative convection. Measurements were obtained using a two component laser Doppler velocimeter system. Two hydrodynamic boundary conditions were considered for the free surface: a shear free surface, which is the case when surfactants are absent, and a constant elasticity surface, created by depositing a monolayer of oleyl alcohol. The shear free boundary condition case results in significantly higher levels of near surface turbulence than the constant elasticity case. This difference between the two cases decreases with distance from the free surface. Profiles of the turbulent fluctuations were obtained for the horizontal and vertical velocity components and are compared with the somewhat analogous case of a heated solid wall.

  10. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  11. A continuum method for modeling surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.; Kothe, D. B.; Zemach, C.

    1992-01-01

    In the novel method presented for modeling the effects of surface tension on fluid motion, the interfaces between fluids with different, color-represented properties are finite-thickness transition regions across which the color varies continuously. A force density proportional to the surface curvature of constant color is defined at each point in the transition region; this force-density is normalized in such a way that the conventional description of surface tension on an interface is recovered when the ratio of local transition-reion thickness to local curvature radius approaches zero. The properties of the method are illustrated by computational results for 2D flows.

  12. Equilibrium surface tension, dynamic surface tension, and micellization properties of lactobionamide-type sugar-based gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Umezawa, Shin; Fujino, Akihiko; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Esumi, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    A sugar-based gemini surfactant N,N'-dialkyl-N,N'-dilactobionamideethylenediamine (2C(n)Lac, where n represents alkyl chain lengths of 8, 10, 12, and 14) was synthesized by reacting N,N'-dialkylethylenediamine with lactobionic acid. The adsorption properties of 2C(n)Lac were characterized by equilibrium and dynamic surface tension measurements. Their micellization properties were investigated by steady-state fluorescence using pyrene as a probe and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The dependence of these properties on the alkyl chain length and the number of sugars was determined through a comparison with the corresponding monomeric surfactants C(n)MLA and previously reported sugar-based gemini surfactants containing monosaccharide gluconamide or disaccharide lactobionamide groups with a hexanediamide spacer. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) and surface tension of 2C(n)Lac are both lower than those of C(n)MLA surfactants. These lower values indicate that the synthesized sugar-based gemini surfactants have excellent micelle-forming ability in solution and high adsorption ability at the air-water interface, which result from strong interactions of the hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyls in lactobionamide groups. When the alkyl chain length of 2C(n)Lac increases to 14, premicellar formation occurs in the solution along with adsorption at the air-water interface at concentrations below the cmc. Furthermore, 2C(n)Lac forms micelles measuring 4 to 12 nm in solution, with no dependence on the alkyl chain length, and their size slightly increases with increasing concentration. PMID:23728326

  13. Surface tension maximum of liquid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Hasegawa, Syuichi; Suzuki, Masaru; Okuda, Yuichi

    2000-07-01

    The surface tension of liquid 3He was measured using the capillary-rise method. Suzuki et al. have reported that its temperature dependence was almost quenched below 120 mK. Here we have examined it with higher precision and found that it has a small maximum around 100 mK. The amount of the maximum is about 3×10 -4 as a fraction of the surface tension at 0 K. The density of liquid 3He increases with temperature by about 5×10 -4 in Δ ρ/ ρ between 0 and 100 mK. This density change could be one of the reasons of the surface tension maximum around 100 mK.

  14. Carbon speciation and surface tension of fog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Gunde, R.; Zurcher, F.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    The speciation of carbon (dissolved/particulate, organic/inorganic) and surface tension of a number of radiation fogs from the urban area of Zurich, Switzerland, were measured. The carbon species were dominated by "dissolved" organic carbon (DOC; i.e., the fraction that passes through a filter), which was typically present at levels of 40-200 mg/L. Less than 10% of the DOC was identified as specific individual organic compounds. Particulate organic carbon (POC) accounted for 26-41% of the mass of the particles, but usually less than 10% of the total organic carbon mass. Inorganic carbon species were relatively minor. The surface tensions of all the measured samples were less than pure water and were correlated with their DOC concentrations. The combination of high DOC and POC and low surface tension suggests a mechanism for the concentration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in the fog droplet, which have been observed by numerous investigators. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  15. Measuring the surface tension of soap bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are for students to gain an understanding of surface tension, to see that pressure inside a small bubble is larger than that inside a large bubble. These concepts can be used to explain the behavior of liquid foams as well as precipitate coarsening and grain growth. Equipment, supplies, and procedures are explained.

  16. Surface tension of evaporating nanofluid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruey-Hung; Phuoc, Tran X.; Martello, Donald

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of nanofluid surface tension were made using the pendant droplet method. Three different types of nanoparticles were used - laponite, silver and Fe2O3 - with de-ionized water (DW) as the base fluid. The reported results focus on the following categories; (1) because some nanoparticles require surfactants to form stable colloids, the individual effects of the surfactant and the particles were investigated; (2) due to evaporation of the pendant droplet, the particle concentration increases, affecting the apparent surface tension; (3) because of the evaporation process, a hysteresis was found where the evaporating droplet can only achieve lower values of surface tension than that of nanofluids at the same prepared concentrations: and (4) the Stefan equation relating the apparent surface tension and heat of evaporation was found to be inapplicable for nanofluids investigated. Comparisons with findings for sessile droplets are also discussed, pointing to additional effects of nanoparticles other than the non-equilibrium evaporation process.

  17. The effects of surface tension on flooding in counter-current two-phase flow in an inclined tube

    SciTech Connect

    Deendarlianto; Ousaka, Akiharu; Indarto; Kariyasaki, Akira; Lucas, Dirk; Vallee, Christophe; Vierow, Karen; Hogan, Kevin

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of surface tension on flooding phenomena in counter-current two-phase flow in an inclined tube. Previous studies by other researchers have shown that surface tension has a stabilizing effect on the falling liquid film under certain conditions and a destabilizing or unclear trend under other conditions. Experimental results are reported herein for air-water systems in which a surfactant has been added to vary the liquid surface tension without altering other liquid properties. The flooding section is a tube of 16 mm in inner diameter and 1.1 m length, inclined at 30-60 from horizontal. The flooding mechanisms were observed by using two high-speed video cameras and by measuring the time variation of liquid hold-up along the test tube. The results show that effects of surface tension are significant. The gas velocity needed to induce flooding is lower for a lower surface tension. There was no upward motion of the air-water interfacial waves upon flooding occurrence, even for lower a surface tension. Observations on the liquid film behavior after flooding occurred suggest that the entrainment of liquid droplets plays an important role in the upward transport of liquid. Finally, an empirical correlation for flooding velocities is proposed that includes functional dependencies on surface tension and tube inclination. (author)

  18. Surface tension and deformation in soft adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Katharine

    Modern contact mechanics was originally developed to account for the competition between adhesion and elasticity for relatively stiff deformable materials like rubber, but much softer sticky materials are ubiquitous in biology, engineering, and everyday consumer products. In such soft materials, the solid surface tension can also play an important role in resisting shape change, and significantly modify the physics of contact with soft matter. We report indentation and pull-off experiments that bring small, rigid spheres into adhesive contact with compliant silicone gel substrates, varying both the surface functionalization of the spheres and the bulk elastic properties of the gels. We map the resulting deformation profiles using optical microscopy and image analysis. We examine the substrate geometry in light of capillary and elastic theories in order to explore the interplay of surface tension and bulk elasticity in governing soft adhesion.

  19. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H. (Inventor); Schein, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is provided for use in craft such as launch, orbital, and space vehicles subject to substantial vibration, changes in orientation, and weightlessness. The cooler contains a small pore, large free volume, low density material to restrain a cryogen through surface tension effects during launch and zero-g operations and maintains instrumentation within the temperature range of 10 to 140 K. The cooler operation is completely passive, with no inherent vibration or power requirements.

  20. Surface Tension Demonstration Aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, photographed this view of a surface tension demonstration using water that is held in place by a metal loop. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). The Expedition Six crew was delivered to the station via the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-113 mission which was launched on November 23, 2002.

  1. Pumpless Transport of Low Surface Tension Liquids in Surface Tension Confined (STC) Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megaridis, Constantine; Schutzius, Thomas; Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Tiwari, Manish

    2012-11-01

    Surfaces with patterned wettability have potential applications in microfluidics, fog capture, pool boiling, etc. With recent fabrication advancements, surfaces with adjacent superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic regions are feasible at a reasonable cost; with properly designed patterns, one can produce microfluidic paths (a.k.a. surface tension confined or STC tracks) where a liquid is confined and transported by surface tension alone. The surface tension of water is relatively high (72 mN/m), as compared with oils (~25 mN/m) and organic solvents (~20 mN/m). This makes the design of STC channels for oils and organic solvents far more difficult. In this study, open STC tracks for pumpless transport of low-surface tension liquids (acetone, ethanol, and hexadecane) on microfluidic chips are fabricated using a large-area, wet-processing technique. Wettable, wax-based, submillimeter-wide tracks are applied by a fountain-pen procedure on superoleophobic, fluoroacrylic carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite coatings. The fabricated anisotropic wetting patterns confine the low-surface tension liquids onto the flow tracks, driving them with meniscus velocities exceeding 3 cm/s. Scaling arguments and Washburn's equation provide estimates of the liquid velocities measured in these tracks, which also act as rails for directional sliding control of mm-sized water droplets. The present facile patterned wettability approach can be extended to deposit micrometer-wide tracks.

  2. Surface potential of methyl isobutyl carbinol adsorption layer at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chi M; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu; Moroi, Yoshikiyo; Le, Thu N; Ang, Ha M

    2012-01-26

    The surface potential (ΔV) and surface tension (γ) of MIBC (methyl isobutyl carbinol) were measured on the subphase of pure water and electrolyte solutions (NaCl at 0.02 and 2 M). In contrast to ionic surfactants, it was found that surface potential gradually increased with MIBC concentration. The ΔV curves were strongly influenced by the presence of NaCl. The available model in literature, in which surface potential is linearly proportional to surface excess, failed to describe the experimental data. Consequently, a new model, employing a partial charge of alcohol adsorption layer, was proposed. The new model predicted the experimental data consistently for MIBC in different NaCl solutions. However, the model required additional information for ionic impurity to predict adsorption in the absence of electrolyte. Such inclusion of impurities is, however, unnecessary for industrial applications. The modeling results successfully quantify the influence of electrolytes on surface potential of MIBC, which is critical for froth stability. PMID:22172075

  3. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Thomas P.; Sedlak, Deborah A.

    1997-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) was designed to study basic fluid mechanics and heat transfer on thermocapillary flows generated by temperature variations along the free surfaces of liquids in microgravity. STDCE first flew on the USML-1 mission in July 1992 and was rebuilt for the USML-2 mission that was launched in October 1995. This was a collaborative project with principal investigators from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), Professors Simon Ostrach and Yasuhiro Kamotani, along with a team from the NASA Lewis Research Center composed of civil servants and contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication, Inc. (ADF), Analex, and NYMA, Inc.

  4. Lump Solitons in Surface Tension Dominated Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewski, Paul; Berger, Kurt

    1999-11-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvilli I equation (KPI) which models small-amplitude, weakly three-dimensional surface-tension dominated long waves is integrable and allows for algebraically decaying lump solitary waves. It is not known (theoretically or numerically) whether the full free-surface Euler equations support such solutions. We consider an intermediate model, the generalised Benney-Luke equation (gBL) which is isotropic (not weakly three-dimensional) and contains KPI as a limit. We show numerically that: 1. gBL supports lump solitary waves; 2. These waves collide elastically and are stable; 3. They are generated by resonant flow over an obstacle.

  5. Surface Tension and Fingering of Miscible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abib, Mohammed; Liu, Jian-Bang; Ronney, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments on miscible, buoyantly unstable reaction-diffusion fronts and non-reacting displacement fronts in Hele-Shaw cells show a fingering-type instability whose wavelengths (lambda*) are consistent with an interfacial tension (sigma) at the front caused by the change in chemical composition, even though the solutions are miscible in all proportions. In conjunction with the Saffman-Taylor model, the relation sigma = K/tau, where tau is the interface thickness and K approximately equal 4 +/- 2 x 10(exp -6) dyne, enables prediction of our measured values of lambda* as well as results from prior experiments on miscible interfaces. These results indicate that even for miscible fluids, surface tension is generally a more significant factor than diffusion in interfacial stability and flow characteristics.

  6. Dropwise Condensation of Low Surface Tension Fluids on Omniphobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T.; Staymates, Matthew; Walker, Marlon L.; Sun, Xiaoda; Anand, Sushant; Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H.; Chinn, Jeff; Scott, John Henry J.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2014-03-01

    Compared to the significant body of work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer of steam, much less attention has been dedicated to fluids with lower interfacial tension. A vast array of low-surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants are used in a number of industrial applications, and the development of passive means for increasing their condensation heat transfer coefficients has potential for significant efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of liquids with surface tensions in the range of 12 to 28 mN/m on three types of omniphobic surfaces: smooth oleophobic, re-entrant superomniphobic, and lubricant-impregnated surfaces. We demonstrate that although smooth oleophobic and lubricant-impregnated surfaces can promote dropwise condensation of the majority of these fluids, re-entrant omniphobic surfaces became flooded and reverted to filmwise condensation. We also demonstrate that on the lubricant-impregnated surfaces, the choice of lubricant and underlying surface texture play a crucial role in stabilizing the lubricant and reducing pinning of the condensate. With properly engineered surfaces to promote dropwise condensation of low-surface tension fluids, we demonstrate a four to eight-fold improvement in the heat transfer coefficient.

  7. Dropwise condensation of low surface tension fluids on omniphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T; Staymates, Matthew; Walker, Marlon L; Sun, Xiaoda; Anand, Sushant; Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Chinn, Jeff; Scott, John Henry J; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the significant body of work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer of steam, much less attention has been dedicated to fluids with lower interfacial tension. A vast array of low-surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants are used in a number of industrial applications, and the development of passive means for increasing their condensation heat transfer coefficients has potential for significant efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of liquids with surface tensions in the range of 12 to 28 mN/m on three types of omniphobic surfaces: smooth oleophobic, re-entrant superomniphobic, and lubricant-impregnated surfaces. We demonstrate that although smooth oleophobic and lubricant-impregnated surfaces can promote dropwise condensation of the majority of these fluids, re-entrant omniphobic surfaces became flooded and reverted to filmwise condensation. We also demonstrate that on the lubricant-impregnated surfaces, the choice of lubricant and underlying surface texture play a crucial role in stabilizing the lubricant and reducing pinning of the condensate. With properly engineered surfaces to promote dropwise condensation of low-surface tension fluids, we demonstrate a four to eight-fold improvement in the heat transfer coefficient. PMID:24595171

  8. Dropwise Condensation of Low Surface Tension Fluids on Omniphobic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T.; Staymates, Matthew; Walker, Marlon L.; Sun, Xiaoda; Anand, Sushant; Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H.; Chinn, Jeff; Scott, John Henry J.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the significant body of work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer of steam, much less attention has been dedicated to fluids with lower interfacial tension. A vast array of low-surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants are used in a number of industrial applications, and the development of passive means for increasing their condensation heat transfer coefficients has potential for significant efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of liquids with surface tensions in the range of 12 to 28 mN/m on three types of omniphobic surfaces: smooth oleophobic, re-entrant superomniphobic, and lubricant-impregnated surfaces. We demonstrate that although smooth oleophobic and lubricant-impregnated surfaces can promote dropwise condensation of the majority of these fluids, re-entrant omniphobic surfaces became flooded and reverted to filmwise condensation. We also demonstrate that on the lubricant-impregnated surfaces, the choice of lubricant and underlying surface texture play a crucial role in stabilizing the lubricant and reducing pinning of the condensate. With properly engineered surfaces to promote dropwise condensation of low-surface tension fluids, we demonstrate a four to eight-fold improvement in the heat transfer coefficient. PMID:24595171

  9. Adsorption of egg phosphatidylcholine to an air/water and triolein/water bubble interface: use of the 2-dimensional phase rule to estimate the surface composition of a phospholipid/triolein/water surface as a function of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Mitsche, Matthew A; Wang, Libo; Small, Donald M

    2010-03-11

    Phospholipid monolayers play a critical role in the structure and stabilization of biological interfaces, including all membranes, the alveoli of the lungs, fat droplets in adipose tissue, and lipoproteins. The behavior of phospholipids in bilayers and at an air-water interface is well understood. However, the study of phospholipids at oil-water interfaces is limited due to technical challenges. In this study, egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) was deposited from small unilamellar vesicles onto a bubble of either air or triolein (TO) formed in a low-salt buffer. The surface tension (gamma) was measured using a drop tensiometer. We observed that EPC binds irreversibly to both interfaces and at equilibrium exerts approximately 12 and 15 mN/m of pressure (Pi) at an air and TO interface, respectively. After EPC was bound to the interface, the unbound EPC was washed out of the cuvette, and the surface was compressed to study the Pi/area relationship. To determine the surface concentration (Gamma), which cannot be measured directly, compression isotherms from a Langmuir trough and drop tensiometer were compared. The air-water interfaces had identical characteristics using both techniques; thus, Gamma on the bubble can be determined by overlaying the two isotherms. Both TO and EPC are surface-active, so in a mixed TO/EPC monolayer, both molecules will be exposed to water. Since TO is less surface-active than EPC, as Pi increases, the TO is progressively ejected. To understand the Pi/area isotherm of EPC on a TO bubble, a variety of TO-EPC mixtures were spread at the air-water interface. The isotherms show an abrupt break in the curve caused by the ejection of TO from the monolayer into a new bulk phase. By overlaying the compression isotherm above the ejection point with a TO bubble compression isotherm, Gamma can be estimated. This allows determination of Gamma of EPC on a TO bubble as a function of Pi. PMID:20151713

  10. Surface energy and surface tension at holes and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajapakse, Y. D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of surface tension and surface energy of solids was used by Griffith to obtain a criterion for the extension of cracks in brittle materials. Griffith, however, neglected the stresses due to the normal traction at the crack implied by the surface tension. A complete solution to the problem of an elliptic hole in an infinite plate with surface tension loading at the hole is given. Complex potentials are given in closed form in terms of elliptic integrals of the first, second, and third kinds. Stress distributions are studied. For a flat crack, the nature of the singularity at the tip is shown to be radically different from that usually encountered in fracture mechanics. The implications of our analysis for theories of fracture in brittle materials are discussed.

  11. Surface adsorption behaviour of milk whey protein and pectin mixtures under conditions of air-water interface saturation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adrián A; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Patino, Juan M Rodríguez; Rubiolo, Amelia C; Santiago, Liliana G

    2011-07-01

    Milk whey proteins (MWP) and pectins (Ps) are biopolymer ingredients commonly used in the manufacture of colloidal food products. Therefore, knowledge of the interfacial characteristics of these biopolymers and their mixtures is very important for the design of food dispersion formulations (foams and/or emulsions). In this paper, we examine the adsorption and surface dilatational behaviour of MWP/Ps systems under conditions in which biopolymers can saturate the air-water interface on their own. Experiments were performed at constant temperature (20 °C), pH 7 and ionic strength 0.05 M. Two MWP samples, β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) and whey protein concentrate (WPC), and two Ps samples, low-methoxyl pectin (LMP) and high-methoxyl pectin (HMP) were evaluated. The contribution of biopolymers (MWP and Ps) to the interfacial properties of mixed systems was evaluated on the basis of their individual surface molecular characteristics. Biopolymer bulk concentration capable of saturating the air-water interface was estimated from surface pressure isotherms. Under conditions of interfacial saturation, dynamic adsorption behaviour (surface pressure and dilatational rheological characteristics) of MWP/Ps systems was discussed from a kinetic point of view, in terms of molecular diffusion, penetration and configurational rearrangement at the air-water interface. The main adsorption mechanism in MWP/LMP mixtures might be the MWP interfacial segregation due to the thermodynamic incompatibility between MWP and LMP (synergistic mechanism); while the interfacial adsorption in MWP/HMP mixtures could be characterized by a competitive mechanism between MWP and HMP at the air-water interface (antagonistic mechanism). The magnitude of these phenomena could be closely related to differences in molecular composition and/or aggregation state of MWP (β-LG and WPC). PMID:21440425

  12. Surface tension measurement from the indentation of clamped thin films.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuejuan; Jagota, Anand; Paretkar, Dadhichi; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2016-06-21

    We developed an indentation technique to measure the surface tension of relatively stiff solids. In the proposed method, a suspended thin solid film is indented by a rigid sphere and its deflection is measured by optical interferometry. The film deflection is jointly resisted by surface tension, elasticity and residual stress. Using a version of nonlinear von Karman plate theory that includes surface tension, we are able to separate the contribution of elasticity to the total tension in the film. Surface tension is determined by extrapolating the sum of surface tension and residual stress to zero film thickness. We measured the surface tension of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using this technique and obtained a value of 19.5 ± 3.6 mN m(-1), consistent with the surface energy of PDMS reported in the literature. PMID:27189735

  13. Review of literature surface tension data for molten silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the surface tension of molten silicon are reported. For marangoni flow, the important parameter is the variation of surface tension with temperature, not the absolute value of the surface tension. It is not possible to calculate temperature coefficients using surface tension measurements from different experiments because the systematic errors are usually larger than the changes in surface tension because of temperature variations. The lack of good surface tension data for liquid silicon is probably due to its extreme chemical reactivity. A material which resists attack by molten silicon is not found. It is suggested that all of the sessile drip surface tension measurements are probably for silicon which is contaminated by the substrate materials.

  14. Tunable superomniphobic surfaces for sorting droplets by surface tension.

    PubMed

    Movafaghi, S; Wang, W; Metzger, A; Williams, D D; Williams, J D; Kota, A K

    2016-08-16

    We utilized tunable superomniphobic surfaces with flower-like TiO2 nanostructures to fabricate a simple device with precisely tailored surface energy domains that, for the first time, can sort droplets by surface tension. We envision that our methodology for droplet sorting will enable inexpensive and energy-efficient analytical devices for personalized point-of-care diagnostic platforms, lab-on-a-chip systems, biochemical assays and biosensors. PMID:27412084

  15. Surface tension effects on submerged electrosprays

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Álvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Electrosprays are a powerful technique to generate charged micro/nanodroplets. In the last century, the technique has been extensively studied, developed, and recognized with a shared Nobel price in Chemistry in 2002 for its wide spread application in mass spectrometry. However, nowadays techniques based on microfluidic devices are competing to be the next generation in atomization techniques. Therefore, an interesting development would be to integrate the electrospray technique into a microfluidic liquid-liquid device. Several works in the literature have attempted to build a microfluidic electrospray with disputable results. The main problem for its integration is the lack of knowledge of the working parameters of the liquid-liquid electrospray. The “submerged electrosprays” share similar properties as their counterparts in air. However, in the microfluidic generation of micro/nanodroplets, the liquid-liquid interfaces are normally stabilized with surface active agents, which might have critical effects on the electrospray behavior. In this work, we review the main properties of the submerged electrosprays in liquid baths with no surfactant, and we methodically study the behavior of the system for increasing surfactant concentrations. The different regimes found are then analyzed and compared with both classical and more recent experimental, theoretical and numerical studies. A very rich phenomenology is found when the surface tension is allowed to vary in the system. More concretely, the lower states of electrification achieved with the reduced surface tension regimes might be of interest in biological or biomedical applications in which excessive electrification can be hazardous for the encapsulated entities. PMID:24155865

  16. On the Surface Tension of Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Grogan, Joseph; Norton, Michael; Ross, Frances

    2013-11-01

    Using our custom-made liquid cell, the nanoaquarium, we imaged with a transmission electron microscope the formation, growth, and detachment of single nanobubbles, nucleating in a supersaturated aqueous solution. The supersaturation results from electron-induced radiolysis of water. The bubbles are first observed when their radii are about 20 nm and detach when their radii are about 200 nm. Based on our experimental data, we determined the bubbles' growth rates as functions of time, and found the growth rates to be highly reproducible and nearly independent of time (and bubbles' radii). Comparison of the theoretical predictions for bubble growth rate with our experimental observations suggests that the surface tension of the bubble-liquid interface must depend on the bubble's radius. The work was supported, in part, by NSF grants 1066573 and 1129722.

  17. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Y.; Pline, A.

    1994-01-01

    Results are reported of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) aboard the USML-1 (first United States Microgravity Laboratory) Spacelab which was launched on June 25, 1992. In the experiment 10 cSt silicone oil was placed in an open circular container which was 10 cm wide by 5 cm deep. The fluid was heated either by a cylindrical heater (1.11 cm dia.) located along the container centerline or by a CO2 laser beam to induce thermocapillary flow. The flow field was studied by flow visualization. Several thermistor probes were placed in the fluid to measure the temperature distribution. The temperature distribution along the liquid free surface was measured by an infrared imager. Tests were conducted over a range of heating powers, laser beam diameters, and free surface shapes. In conjunction with the experiments an extensive numerical modeling of the flow was conducted. In this paper some results of the velocity and temperature measurements with flat and curved free surfaces are presented and they are shown to agree well with the numerical predictions.

  18. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, S.; Kamotani, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This document reports the results obtained from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) conducted aboard the USML-1 Spacelab in 1992. The experiments used 10 cSt silicone oil placed in an open circular container that was 10 cm wide and 5 cm deep. Thermocapillary flow was induced by using either a cylindrical heater placed along the container centerline or by a CO2 laser. The tests were conducted under various power settings, laser beam diameters, and free surface shapes. Thermistors located at various positions in the test section recorded the temperature of the fluid, heater, walls, and air. An infrared imager was used to measure the free surface temperature. The flow field was studied by flow visualization and the data was analyzed by a PTV technique. The results from the flow visualization and the temperature measurements are compared with the numerical analysis that was conducted in conjunction with the experiment. The compared results include the experimental and numerical velocity vector plots, the streamline plots, the fluid temperature, and the surface temperature distribution.

  19. Surface tension of low-temperature aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Horibe, A.; Fukusako, S.; Yamada, M.

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of the surface tension have been carried out to determine the effects of both temperature and concentration on the surface tension of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, propylene glycol, and ethylene glycol. A differential capillary-rise method was employed for the measurements. The results show that the surface tension of the ethylene glycol solution and the propylene glycol solution increases as the concentration of the solution decreases, while for the sodium chloride solution the surface tension increases monotonically as the concentration increases. The surface tension of the liquids was found to be an almost-linear function of temperature from 20{degrees}C to just above the freezing temperature. Equations for the surface tension of the three binary aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and concentration are presented.

  20. The free boundary Euler equations with large surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disconzi, Marcelo M.; Ebin, David G.

    2016-07-01

    We study the free boundary Euler equations with surface tension in three spatial dimensions, showing that the equations are well-posed if the coefficient of surface tension is positive. Then we prove that under natural assumptions, the solutions of the free boundary motion converge to solutions of the Euler equations in a domain with fixed boundary when the coefficient of surface tension tends to infinity.

  1. Surface Tension and Adsorption without a Dividing Surface.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2015-11-24

    The ingenious concept of a dividing surface of zero thickness that was introduced by Gibbs is the basis of the theory of surface tension and adsorption. However, some fundamental questions, mainly those related to the location of the dividing surface and the proper definition of relative adsorption, have remained open over the years. To avoid these questions, the present paper proposes to analyze an interfacial phase by defining a thermodynamic system of constant, but nonzero thickness. The interfacial phase is analyzed as it really is, namely a nonuniform three-dimensional entity. The current analysis redevelops the equation for calculating surface tension, though with different assumptions. However, the main point in the proposed model is that the thermodynamic interfacial system, due to its fixed thickness, conforms to the requirement of first-order homogeneity of the internal energy. This property is the key that allows using the Gibbs adsorption isotherm. It is also characteristic of the Gibbs dividing surface model, but has not always been discussed with regard to subsequent models. The resulting equation leads to a simple, "natural" expression for the relative adsorption. This expression may be compared with simulations and sophisticated surface concentration measurements, and from which the dependence of interfacial tension on the solution composition can be derived. Finally, it is important to point out that in order to calculate the interfacial tension as well as the relative adsorption from data on the properties of the interfacial phase, there is no need to know its exact thickness, as long as it is bigger than the actual thickness but sufficiently small. PMID:26523466

  2. Surface Partitioning and Stability of Mixed Films of Fluorinated Alcohols and Acids at the Air- Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontu, N. A.; Vaida, V.

    2007-05-01

    The production of fluorinated compounds over the past 50 years has had numerous industrial applications. For example, perfluorinated carboxylic acids are used in the synthesis of polymers and fire retardants, perfluoroalkyl sulfonates act as surface protectors, and fluorotelomer alcohols are incorporated into products such as paints, coatings, polymers, and adhesives. Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) are linear polyfluorinated alcohols with the formula CF3(CF2)nCH2CH2OH (n=1,3,5,...). They have been suggested as possible precursors for perfluorinated carboxylic acids and detected in the troposphere over several North American sites. Perfluorocarboxylic acids have even been detected in the arctic food chain, human blood, tissues of animals and environmental waters. We report the surface activity of fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorinated carboxylic acids at the air-water interface by using a Langmuir trough. Isotherms of the pure compounds along with mixed films with other organic carboxylic acids were collected. The main objective of these experiments was to understand their heterogeneous chemistry by characterizing the pure and mixed films, which serves as a representative model for organic films on atmospheric surfaces such as those found on oceans and aqueous aerosols. Film properties and behavior, notably stabilization, evaporation from the subphase, and miscibility in the single-component mixtures as well as in the mixed films will be discussed. An important consequence of FTOHs and perfluorocarboxylic acids being found to partition to the air-water interface is the possibility of their transport and widespread distribution and deposition using atmospheric aerosols.

  3. Electrochemical Surface Potential due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Stern, Abraham C.; Levin, Yan; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-06-07

    Herein, we present research that suggests that the underlying physics that drive simple empirical models of anions (e.g. point charge, no polarization) to the air-water interface, with water described by SPC/E, or related partial charge models is different than when both ions and water are modeled with quantum mechanical based interactions. Specifically, we will show that the driving force of ions to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and the negative electrochemical surface potential. We will demonstrate that we can fully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory (DCT). Our research suggests that a significant part of the electrochemical surface potential in empirical models appears to be an artifact of the failure of point charge models in the vicinity of a broken symmetry. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle.

  4. The Surface Tension of Pure Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Ian Frank; Taylor, John Andrew

    2013-08-01

    The surface tension of high purity and commercial purity aluminum in vacuo was determined using the sessile drop method and the results were found to compare favorably with published data. The effects of holding atmosphere, substrate, and "surface fracture" of the sessile drop on the measured surface tension values were investigated together with the effects of different solute elements commonly present in commercial aluminum alloys. The results obtained suggest that the nature of the surface oxide film formed on the droplets (affected by alloy composition and atmosphere) and the rupture of this film are the dominant factors influencing the surface tension values obtained. Changes in surface tension values of up to 60 pct were observed. The possible effect of this variable surface tension on practical casting processes, such as direct chill casting, is suggested.

  5. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bourasseau, E.; Ghoufi, A.

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  6. Curved and diffuse interface effects on the nuclear surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomietz, V. M.; Lukyanov, S. V.; Sanzhur, A. I.

    2012-08-01

    We redefine the surface tension coefficient for a nuclear Fermi-liquid drop with a finite diffuse layer. Following the Gibbs-Tolman concept, we introduce the equimolar radius Re of the droplet surface at which the surface tension is applied and the radius of tension surface Rs which provides the minimum of the surface tension coefficient σ. This procedure allows us to derive both the surface tension and the corresponding curvature correction (Tolman length) correctly for the curved and diffuse interface. We point out that the curvature correction depends significantly on the finite diffuse interface. We show that Tolman's length ξ is negative for a nuclear Fermi-liquid drop. The value of the Tolman length is only slightly sensitive to the Skyrme force parametrization and equals ξ=-0.36 fm.

  7. Sintering of viscous droplets under surface tension

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W.; Schauroth, Jenny; Dobson, Katherine J.; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    We conduct experiments to investigate the sintering of high-viscosity liquid droplets. Free-standing cylinders of spherical glass beads are heated above their glass transition temperature, causing them to densify under surface tension. We determine the evolving volume of the bead pack at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use these data to test a range of existing models. We extend the models to account for the time-dependent droplet viscosity that results from non-isothermal conditions, and to account for non-zero final porosity. We also present a method to account for the initial distribution of radii of the pores interstitial to the liquid spheres, which allows the models to be used with no fitting parameters. We find a good agreement between the models and the data for times less than the capillary relaxation timescale. For longer times, we find an increasing discrepancy between the data and the model as the Darcy outgassing time-scale approaches the sintering timescale. We conclude that the decreasing permeability of the sintering system inhibits late-stage densification. Finally, we determine the residual, trapped gas volume fraction at equilibrium using X-ray computed tomography and compare this with theoretical values for the critical gas volume fraction in systems of overlapping spheres. PMID:27274687

  8. Ice Accretion with Varying Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, Alan J.; Anderson, David N.

    1995-01-01

    During an icing encounter of an aircraft in flight, super-cooled water droplets impinging on an airfoil may splash before freezing. This paper reports tests performed to determine if this effect is significant and uses the results to develop an improved scaling method for use in icing test facilities. Simple laboratory tests showed that drops splash on impact at the Reynolds and Weber numbers typical of icing encounters. Further confirmation of droplet splash came from icing tests performed in the NaSA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with a surfactant added to the spray water to reduce the surface tension. The resulting ice shapes were significantly different from those formed when no surfactant was added to the water. These results suggested that the droplet Weber number must be kept constant to properly scale icing test conditions. Finally, the paper presents a Weber-number-based scaling method and reports results from scaling tests in the IRT in which model size was reduced up to a factor of 3. Scale and reference ice shapes are shown which confirm the effectiveness of this new scaling method.

  9. Pendant-Drop Surface-Tension Measurement On Molten Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Thiessen, David

    1996-01-01

    Method of measuring surface tension of molten metal based on pendant-drop method implemented in quasi-containerless manner and augmented with digital processing of image data. Electrons bombard lower end of sample rod in vacuum, generating hanging drop of molten metal. Surface tension of drop computed from its shape. Technique minimizes effects of contamination.

  10. The Cartesian Diver, Surface Tension and the Cheerios Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Tung; Lee, Wen-Tang; Kao, Sung-Kai

    2014-01-01

    A Cartesian diver can be used to measure the surface tension of a liquid to a certain extent. The surface tension measurement is related to the two critical pressures at which the diver is about to sink and about to emerge. After sinking because of increasing pressure, the diver is repulsed to the centre of the vessel. After the pressure is…

  11. Experimental Values of the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1951-01-01

    The results of surface-tension measurements for supercooled water are presented. A total of 702 individual measurements of surface tension of triple-distilled water were made in the temperature range, 27 to -22.2 C, with 404 of these measurements at temperatures below 0 C. The increase in magnitude of surface tension with decreasing temperature, as indicated by measurements above 0 C, continues to -22.2 C. The inflection point in the surface-tension - temperature relation in the vicinity of 0 C, as indicated by the International Critical Table values for temperatures down to -8 C, is substantiated by the measurements in the temperature range, 0 to -22.2 C. The surface tension increases at approximately a linear rate from a value of 76.96+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -8 C to 79.67+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -22.2 C.

  12. OH-Radical Oxidation of Surface-Active cis-Pinonic Acid at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Yosuke

    2016-05-26

    Gaseous biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are immediately oxidized by gaseous oxidants to form BVOC-acids that rapidly condense onto aqueous aerosol phase and thus contribute to the growth of atmospheric particles. Because BVOC-acids are highly hydrophobic and hence surface-active in nature, it seems critical to study the oxidation by gaseous hydroxyl radical (·OH(g)) at the air-water interface. Here we report on the fast (≤10 μs) oxidation of aqueous cis-pinonic acid (C10H16O3, CPA, cis-pinonate anion's m/z = 183), a representative BVOC-acid, by ·OH(g) at the air-water interface for the first time. We find that cis-pinonate anion is more enriched at the air-water interface by ∼4 and ∼14 times than n-octanoate anion at 10 and 100 μM, respectively, as revealed by an interface-specific mass spectrometry of the equimolar mixture of microjets. Exposure of aqueous CPA microjets to ·OH(g) pulses from the 266 nm laser photolysis of O3(g)/O2(g)/H2O(g)/N2(g) mixtures yields pinonic peroxyl radicals (m/z = 214) that lead to the functionalization products carbonyls (m/z = 197), alcohols (m/z = 199), and pinonic hydroperoxides (m/z = 215) in addition to smaller-mass products including carbonyls (m/z = 155 and 157). We confirmed the formation of the corresponding alcohols, aldehydes, and hydroperoxides in experiments performed in D2O solvent. The analysis of total mass balance implies a significant amount (>70%) of products would be emitted into the gas-phase during the heterogeneous ·OH-oxidations. Our results suggest ·OH-oxidations of amphiphilic BVOC-acids at the air-water interface may play a far more significant role in photochemical aging process of aqueous aerosols than previously assumed. PMID:27098046

  13. On the coefficients of small eddy and surface divergence models for the air-water gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binbin; Liao, Qian; Fillingham, Joseph H.; Bootsma, Harvey A.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggested that under low to moderate wind conditions without bubble entraining wave breaking, the air-water gas transfer velocity k+ can be mechanistically parameterized by the near-surface turbulence, following the small eddy model (SEM). Field measurements have supported this model in a variety of environmental forcing systems. Alternatively, surface divergence model (SDM) has also been shown to predict the gas transfer velocity across the air-water interface in laboratory settings. However, the empirically determined model coefficients (α in SEM and c1 in SDM) scattered over a wide range. Here we present the first field measurement of the near-surface turbulence with a novel floating PIV system on Lake Michigan, which allows us to evaluate the SEM and SDM in situ in the natural environment. k+ was derived from the CO2 flux that was measured simultaneously with a floating gas chamber. Measured results indicate that α and c1 are not universal constants. Regression analysis showed that α˜log>(ɛ>) while the near-surface turbulence dissipation rate ɛ is approximately greater than 10-6 m2 s-3 according to data measured for this study as well as from other published results measured in similar environments or in laboratory settings. It also showed that α scales linearly with the turbulent Reynolds number. Similarly, coefficient c1 in the SDM was found to linearly scale with the Reynolds number. These findings suggest that larger eddies are also important parameters, and the dissipation rate in the SEM or the surface divergence β' in the SDM alone may not be adequate to determine k+ completely.

  14. Surface tension of Nanofluid-type fuels containing suspended nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The surface tension of ethanol and n-decane based nanofluid fuels containing suspended aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), and boron (B) nanoparticles as well as dispersible multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were measured using the pendant drop method by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The effects of nanoparticle concentration, size and the presence of a dispersing agent (surfactant) on surface tension were determined. The results show that surface tension increases both with particle concentration (above a critical concentration) and particle size for all cases. This is because the Van der Waals force between particles at the liquid/gas interface increases surface free energy and thus increases surface tension. At low particle concentrations, however, addition of particles has little influence on surface tension because of the large distance between particles. An exception is when a surfactant was used or when (MWCNTs) was involved. For such cases, the surface tension decreases compared to the pure base fluid. The hypothesis is the polymer groups attached to (MWCNTs) and the surfactant layer between a particle and the surround fluid increases the electrostatic force between particles and thus reduce surface energy and surface tension. PMID:22513039

  15. The effects of ambient impurities on the surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Torres, A.; Vega, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    A liquid bridge is a liquid column held captive between two coaxial and parallel solid disks. It is an excellent test bench where measuring the surface tension. In this paper, we used this fluid configuration to examine experimentally the effects of ambient impurities on the surface tension over time. For this purpose, the liquid bridge equilibrium shape was analyzed when the liquid bridge was surrounded by three environments: the uncontrolled ambient, and both air and argon encapsulated in a small glass cover. Ambient contamination produced a sharp decrease of the surface tension of ultra-pure water. The presence of an anionic surfactant in the free surface of an aqueous solution did not inhibit the action of impurities coming from the ambient. Impurities can influence the dynamical behavior of the free surface in flows dominated by the surface tension. Therefore, a careful control of that influence can be crucial in many applications of fluid mechanics.

  16. Interaction of poly(ethylene-glycols) with air-water interfaces and lipid monolayers: investigations on surface pressure and surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Winterhalter, M; Bürner, H; Marzinka, S; Benz, R; Kasianowicz, J J

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the surface activity of different-sized poly(ethylene-glycols) (PEG; M(r) 200-100,000 Da) in the presence or absence of lipid monolayers and over a wide range of bulk PEG concentrations (10(-8)-10% w/v). Measurements of the surface potential and surface pressure demonstrate that PEGs interact with the air-water and lipid-water interfaces. Without lipid, PEG added either to the subphase or to the air-water interface forms relatively stable monolayers. Except for very low molecular weight polymers (PEGs < 1000 Da), low concentrations of PEG in the subphase (between 10(-5) and 10(-4)% w/v) increase the surface potential from zero (with respect to the potential of a pure air-water interface) to a plateau value of approximately 440 mV. At much higher polymer concentrations, > 10(-1)% (w/v), depending on the molecular weight of the PEG and corresponding to the concentration at which the polymers in solution are likely to overlap, the surface potential decreases. High concentrations of PEG in the subphase cause a similar decrease in the surface potential of densely packed lipid monolayers spread from either diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), or dioleoyl phosphatidylserine (DOPS). Adding PEG as a monolayer at the air-water interface also affects the surface activity of DPhPC or DPPC monolayers. At low lipid concentration, the surface pressure and potential are determined by the polymer. For intermediate lipid concentrations, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms show that the effects due to lipid and PEG are not always additive and that the polymer's effect is distinct for the two lipids. When PEG-lipid-mixed monolayers are compressed to surface pressures greater than the collapse pressure for a PEG monolayer, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms approach that of the lipid alone, suggesting that for this experimental condition PEG is expelled from the

  17. Surface Tension Gradients Induced by Temperature: The Thermal Marangoni Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugliotti, Marcos; Baptisto, Mauricio S.; Politi, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    Surface tensions gradients were generated in a thin liquid film because of the local increase in temperature, for demonstration purposes. This is performed using a simple experiment and allows different alternatives for heat generation to be used.

  18. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum sensing response that leads to heightened production of surfactin, which then weakens water surface tension to allow colony expansion. When the barrier formed by water surface tension is breached at a specific location, a stream of bacteria swarms out of the colony to form a tendril. If a B. subtilis strain produces surfactin at levels that can substantially weaken the overall water surface tension of the colony, water floods the agar surface in a thin layer, within which bacteria swarm and migrate rapidly. This study sheds light on the role of water surface tension in regulating B. subtilis swarming, and provides insight into the mechanisms underlying swarming initiation and tendril formation. PMID:26557106

  19. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum sensing response that leads to heightened production of surfactin, which then weakens water surface tension to allow colony expansion. When the barrier formed by water surface tension is breached at a specific location, a stream of bacteria swarms out of the colony to form a tendril. If a B. subtilis strain produces surfactin at levels that can substantially weaken the overall water surface tension of the colony, water floods the agar surface in a thin layer, within which bacteria swarm and migrate rapidly. This study sheds light on the role of water surface tension in regulating B. subtilis swarming, and provides insight into the mechanisms underlying swarming initiation and tendril formation. PMID:26557106

  20. Surface Pressure Study of Lipid Aggregates at the Air Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Woody; Ploplis Andrews, Anna

    1996-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the growth of fatty acid aggregates on a water/air interface were made by analyzing surface pressure measurements taken with a Langmuir Balance. High concentrations of palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, and also phosphatidylethanolamine in solution with chloroform were applied with a syringe to the surface of the Langmuir Balance and surface pressure was monitored as aggregates assembled spontaneously. The aggregation process for palmitic acid was determined to consist of three distinct parts. Exponential curves were fit to the individual regions of the data and growth and decay constants were determined. Surface pressure varied in very complex ways for lauric acid, myristic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine yet kinetic measurements yield qualitative information about assembly of those aggregates. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-93-22301.

  1. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  2. Pulmonary surfactant surface tension influences alveolar capillary shape and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Machiko; Weaver, Timothy E; Grant, Shawn N; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    Alveolar capillaries are located in close proximity to the alveolar epithelium and beneath the surfactant film. We hypothesized that the shape of alveolar capillaries and accompanying oxygenation are influenced by surfactant surface tension in the alveolus. To prove our hypothesis, surfactant surface tension was regulated by conditional expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B in Sftpb(-/-) mice, thereby inhibiting surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in vivo within 24 hours after depletion of Sftpb. Minimum surface tension of isolated surfactant was increased and oxygen saturation was significantly reduced after 2 days of SP-B deficiency in association with deformation of alveolar capillaries. Intravascularly injected 3.2-mum-diameter microbeads through jugular vein were retained within narrowed pulmonary capillaries after reduction of SP-B. Ultrastructure studies demonstrated that the capillary protrusion typical of the normal alveolar-capillary unit was reduced in size, consistent with altered pulmonary blood flow. Pulmonary hypertension and intrapulmonary shunting are commonly associated with surfactant deficiency and dysfunction in neonates and adults with respiratory distress syndromes. Increased surfactant surface tension caused by reduction in SP-B induced narrowing of alveolar capillaries and oxygen desaturation, demonstrating an important role of surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in the regulation of pulmonary vascular perfusion. PMID:19202005

  3. Surface Tensions and Their Variations with Temperature and Impurities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.; Fine, J.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tensions in this work were determined using the sessile drop technique. This method is based on a comparison of the profile of a liquid drop with the profile calculated by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The comparison can be made in several ways; the traditional Bashforth-Adams procedure was used in conjunction with recently calculated drop shape tables which virtually eliminate interpolation errors. Although previous study has found little difference in measurements with pure and oxygen doped silicon, there is other evidence suggesting that oxygen in dilute concentrations severely depresses the surface tension of silicon. The surface tension of liquid silicon in purified argon atmospheres was measured. A temperature coefficient near -0.28 mJ/square meters K was found. The experiments show a high sensitivity of the surface tension to what is believed are low concentrations of oxygen. Thus one cannot rule out some effect of low levels of oxygen in the results. However, the highest surface tension values obtained in conditions which minimized the residual oxygen pressure are in good agreement with a previous measurement in pure hydrogen. Therefore, depression of the surface tension by oxygen is insignificant in these measurements.

  4. Air, water, and surface bacterial contamination in a university-hospital autopsy room.

    PubMed

    Maujean, Géraldine; Malicier, Daniel; Fanton, Laurent

    2012-03-01

    Today, little is known about the bacteriological environment of the autopsy room and its potential interest for medico-legal practices. Seven hundred fifty microbiological samples were taken from surface (n = 660), air (n = 48), and water (n = 42) to evaluate it in a French University Forensic Department. Median bacterial counts were compared before and during autopsy for air samples, and before and after autopsy for surface samples, using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test. Bacterial identification relied on traditional phenotypic methods. Bacterial counts in the air were low before autopsy, increased significantly during procedure, and seemed more linked to the number of people in the room than to an important production of aerosol-containing bacteria. Despite cleaning, human fecal flora was omnipresent on surfaces, which revealed insufficient disinfection. Bacteriological sampling is an easy way to monitor cleaning practices in postmortem rooms, but chiefly a way to improve the reliability of medico-legal proofs of infectious deaths. PMID:22309163

  5. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface. PMID:27131706

  6. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  7. Strong evidence of surface tension reduction in microscopic aqueous droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, C. R.; Chuang, P. Y.; Nenes, A.; Cappa, C. D.; Kolesar, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    The ability of airborne particles to take up water may be enhanced by surface-active components, but the importance of this effect is controversial because direct measurement of the surface tension of microscopic droplets has not been possible. Here we infer droplet surface tension from water uptake measurements of mixed organic-inorganic particles at relative humidities just below saturation (99.3-99.9%). The surface tension of droplets formed on particles composed of NaCl and α-pinene ozonolysis products was reduced by 50-75%, but only when enough organic material was present to form a film on the droplet surface at least 0.8 nm thick. This study suggests that if atmospheric particles are predominantly (≳80%) composed of surface-active material, their influence on cloud properties and thus climate could be enhanced, and their atmospheric lifetimes could be reduced.

  8. Multiscale surface roughening of commercial purity titanium during uniaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina Kozelskaya, Anna Sinyakova, Elena; Lider, Andrey Sklyarova, Elena

    2015-10-27

    The mechanisms of the surface roughening of the titanium specimens during uniaxial tension were demonstrated. By means of optical profilometry and electron backscattered diffraction it was shown that the formation of surface roughening is a multilevel process. The correlation between the density of slip in some grains, and grain rotation, and their displacement towards the free surface was investigated.

  9. Surface tensions of solutions containing dicarboxylic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Young; Hildemann, Lynn M.

    2014-06-01

    Organic solutes tend to lower the surface tension of cloud condensation nuclei, allowing them to more readily activate. The surface tension of various dicarboxylic acid aerosol mixtures was measured at 20 °C using the Wilhelmy plate method. At lower concentrations, the surface tension of a solution with equi-molar mixtures of dicarboxylic acids closely followed that of a solution with the most surface-active organic component alone. Measurements of surface tension for these mixtures were lower than predictions using Henning's model and the modified Szyszkowski equation, by ˜1-2%. The calculated maximum surface excess (Γmax) and inverse Langmuir adsorption coefficient (β) from the modified Szyszkowski equation were both larger than measured values for 6 of the 7 mixtures tested. Accounting for the reduction in surface tension in the Köhler equation reduced the critical saturation ratio for these multi-component mixtures - changes were negligible for dry diameters of 0.1 and 0.5 μm, but a reduction from 1.0068 to 1.0063 was seen for the 4-dicarboxylic acid mixture with a dry diameter of 0.05 μm.

  10. Surface-tension-driven flow in a glass melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, Thomas J.; Cole, Robert; Shankar Subramanian, R.

    1985-01-01

    Motion driven by surface tension gradients was observed in a vertical capillary liquid bridge geometry in a sodium borate melt. The surface tension gradients were introduced by maintaining a temperature gradient on the free melt surface. The flow velocities at the free surface of the melt, which were measured using a tracer technique, were found to be proportional to the applied temperature difference and inversely proportional to the melt viscosity. The experimentally observed velocities were in reasonable accord with predictions from a theoretical model of the system.

  11. Surface tension regularizes the crack singularity of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; van Wijngaarden, Leen; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-05-11

    The elastic and adhesive properties of a solid surface can be quantified by indenting it with a rigid sphere. Indentation tests are classically described by the JKR-law when the solid is very stiff, while recent work highlights the importance of surface tension for exceedingly soft materials. Here we show that surface tension plays a crucial role even in stiff solids: Young's wetting angle emerges as a boundary condition and this regularizes the crack-like singularity at the edge of adhesive contacts. We find that the edge region exhibits a universal, self-similar structure that emerges from the balance of surface tension and elasticity. The similarity theory is solved analytically and provides a complete description of adhesive contacts, by which we reconcile global adhesion laws and local contact mechanics. PMID:27087459

  12. Dynamic surface tension of natural surfactant extract under superimposed oscillations.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Prasika I; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Bold, Geoff T

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant dysfunction plays a major role in respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This research seeks to determine whether the use of natural surfactant, Curosurf™ (Cheisi Farmaceutici, Parma, Italy), accompanied with pressure oscillations at the level of the alveoli can reduce the surface tension in the lung, thereby making it easier for infants with RDS to maintain the required level of functional residual capacity (FRC) without collapse. To simulate the alveolar environment, dynamic surface tension measurements were performed on a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer (PBS) type device and showed that introducing superimposed oscillations about the tidal volume excursion between 10 and 70 Hz in a surfactant bubble lowers interfacial surface tension below values observed using tidal volume excursion alone. The specific mechanisms responsible for this improvement are yet to be established; however it is believed that one mechanism may be the rapid transient changes in the interfacial area increase the number of interfacial binding sites for surfactant molecules, increasing adsorption and diffusion to the interface, thereby decreasing interfacial surface tension. Existing mathematical models in the literature reproduce trends noticed in experiments in the range of breathing frequencies only. Thus, a modification is introduced to an existing model to both incorporate superimposed pressure oscillations and demonstrate that these may improve the dynamic surface tension in the alveoli. PMID:20883997

  13. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  14. Charge and pressure-tuned surface patterning of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalate complexes at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Li, Haolong; Zhang, Liying; Wang, Yizhan; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Jianming; Wu, Lixin

    2012-10-16

    In this paper, four organic-inorganic hybrid complexes were prepared using a cationic surfactant dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DODA) to replace the counter cations of four Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM) clusters with gradually increased negative charges, PW(12)O(40)(3-), SiW(12)O(40)(4-), BW(12)O(40)(5-), and CoW(12)O(40)(6-). The formed surfactant-encapsulated POM (SEP) complexes showed typical amphiphilic properties and can be spread onto the air-water interface to form Langmuir monolayers. The interfacial behavior of the SEP monolayer films was systemically studied by multiple in situ and ex situ characterization methods including Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), reflection-absorption infrared (RAIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the increasing alkyl chain density of SEPs leads to an enhanced stability and a higher collapse pressure of SEP Langmuir monolayers. Moreover, a second layer evolved as patterns from the initial monolayers of all the SEPs, when the surface pressures approached the collapse values. The rational combination of alkyl chain density and surface pressure can precisely control the size and the morphology of SEP patterns transforming from disk-like to leaf-like structures on a micrometer scale. The pattern formation was demonstrated to be driven by the self-optimized surface energy of SEP monolayers. This finding can direct a new strategy for the fabrication of POM-hybrid films with controllable patterns, which should be instructive for designing POM-based thin film devices. PMID:22991980

  15. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  16. Theoretical Studies of the Surface Tension of Liquid Metal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, D. G.; Shih, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to understand the surface tension and other thermophysical properties of liquid metals and alloys from a fundamental viewpoint. The approach is to calculate these quantities by a first principles technique which combines the statistical-mechanical theory of the liquid state with an electronic pseudopotential theory of electrons in metals. The inhomogeneity of the surface is treated using an ionic-density-functional formalism developed with the support of NASA. Of particular interest are the variation of surface tension with temperature and impurity concentration: such variations strongly influence the types of convection which make take place in a low-gravity environment. Some progress has already been achieved in computing the reduction of surface tension due to the presence of low-surface-tension impurities, and the corresponding surface segregation of such impurities. In the coming year, it is planned to concentrate on the surface properties of materials of particular interest to the MSA program: Si, Ga and GaSn alloys. An additional goal is to gain some theoretical understanding of the high temperature thermophysical properties of liquid metals, particularly high melting point materials which have not been studied extensively from a theoretical viewpoint.

  17. Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air-water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization.

    PubMed

    Junginger, Mathias; Bleek, Katrin; Kita-Tokarczyk, Katarzyna; Reiche, Jürgen; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Schacher, Felix; Müller, Axel H E; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    The self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymer poly(butadiene)-block-poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] at the air-water interface and the mineralization of the monolayers with calcium phosphate was investigated at different pH values. As expected for polyelectrolytes, the subphase pH strongly affects the monolayer properties. The focus of the current study, however, is on the effect of an oscillating (instead of a static) polymer monolayer on calcium phosphate mineralization. Monitoring of the surface pressure vs. mineralization time shows that the monolayer is quite stable if the mineralization is performed at pH 8. In contrast, the monolayer at pH 5 shows a measurable decrease of the surface pressure already after ca. 2 h of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that mineralization at low pH under constant oscillation leads to small particles, which are arranged in circular features and larger entities with holes of ca. 200 nm. The larger features with the holes disappear as the mineralization is continued in favor of the smaller particles. These grow with time and form necklace-like architectures of spherical particles with a uniform diameter. In contrast, mineralization at pH 8 leads to very uniform particle morphologies already after 2 h. The mineralization products consist of a circular feature with a dark dot in the center. The increasing contrast of the precipitates in the electron micrographs with mineralization time indicates an increasing degree of mineralization vs. reaction time. The study therefore shows that mechanical effects on mineralization at interfaces are quite complex. PMID:20835481

  18. Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air-water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, Mathias; Bleek, Katrin; Kita-Tokarczyk, Katarzyna; Reiche, Jürgen; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Schacher, Felix; Müller, Axel H. E.; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    The self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymer poly(butadiene)-block-poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] at the air-water interface and the mineralization of the monolayers with calcium phosphate was investigated at different pH values. As expected for polyelectrolytes, the subphase pH strongly affects the monolayer properties. The focus of the current study, however, is on the effect of an oscillating (instead of a static) polymer monolayer on calcium phosphate mineralization. Monitoring of the surface pressure vs. mineralization time shows that the monolayer is quite stable if the mineralization is performed at pH 8. In contrast, the monolayer at pH 5 shows a measurable decrease of the surface pressure already after ca. 2 h of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that mineralization at low pH under constant oscillation leads to small particles, which are arranged in circular features and larger entities with holes of ca. 200 nm. The larger features with the holes disappear as the mineralization is continued in favor of the smaller particles. These grow with time and form necklace-like architectures of spherical particles with a uniform diameter. In contrast, mineralization at pH 8 leads to very uniform particle morphologies already after 2 h. The mineralization products consist of a circular feature with a dark dot in the center. The increasing contrast of the precipitates in the electron micrographs with mineralization time indicates an increasing degree of mineralization vs. reaction time. The study therefore shows that mechanical effects on mineralization at interfaces are quite complex.

  19. The wavelength of supercritical surface tension driven Benard convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschmieder, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The size or the wavelength of moderately supercritical surface tension driven Benard convection has been investigated experimentally in a thin fluid layer of large aspect ratio. It has been found that the number of the hexagonal convection cells increases with increased temperature differences, up to 1.3 times the critical temperature difference. That means that the wavelength of surface tension driven convection decreases after onset of the instability for moderately nonlinear conditions. This result is in striking contrast to the well-known increase of the wavelength of buoyancy driven Rayleigh-Benard convection.

  20. Surface tension mediated conversion of light to work

    DOEpatents

    Okawa, David; Pastine, Stefan J; Zettl, Alexander K; Frechet, Jean M. J

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for converting light energy to mechanical energy by modification of surface tension on a supporting fluid. The apparatus comprises an object which may be formed as a composite object comprising a support matrix and a highly light absorptive material. The support matrix may comprise a silicon polymer. The highly light absorptive material may comprise vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VANTs) embedded in the support matrix. The composite object is supported on a fluid. By exposing the highly light absorptive material to light, heat is generated, which changes the surface tension of the composite object, causing it to move physically within the fluid.

  1. Surface-tension-induced convection experiment MA-041

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    In the absence of gravity, stirring in a liquid is suppressed because of density differences caused by thermal or compositional gradients. However, other mechanisms resulting in natural convection in a microgravity environment exist. One of the most important mechanisms for liquid metals is surface tension driven convection, which becomes predominant in the low gravity environment. In this case, surface tension differences caused by compositional or temperature gradients have been demonstrated to cause stirring in liquids during experiments performed onboard Skylab. Compositional gradients were created by adding a soap solution to a large water globule, which caused vigorous fluid motion for some moments after the addition.

  2. Rupture of a biomembrane under dynamic surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicout, D. J.; Kats, E.

    2012-03-01

    How long will a fluid membrane vesicle stressed with a steady ramp of micropipette last before rupture? Or conversely, how high should the surface tension be to rupture such a membrane? To answer these challenging questions we developed a theoretical framework that allows for the description and reproduction of dynamic tension spectroscopy (DTS) observations. The kinetics of the membrane rupture under ramps of surface tension is described as a succession of an initial pore formation followed by the Brownian process of the pore radius crossing the time-dependent energy barrier. We present the formalism and a derive (formal) analytical expression of the survival probability describing the fate of the membrane under DTS conditions. Using numerical simulations for the membrane prepared in an initial state with a given distribution of times for pore nucleation, we study the membrane lifetime (or inverse of rupture rate) and distribution of membrane surface tension at rupture as a function of membrane characteristics like pore nucleation rate, the energy barrier to failure, and tension loading rate. It is found that simulations reproduce the main features of DTS experiments, particularly the pore nucleation and pore-size diffusion-controlled limits of membrane rupture dynamics. This approach can be adapted and applied to processes of permeation and pore opening in membranes (electroporation, membrane disruption by antimicrobial peptides, vesicle fusion).

  3. Surface activity and molecular organization of metallacarboranes at the air-water interface revealed by nonlinear optics.

    PubMed

    Gassin, Pierre-Marie; Girard, Luc; Martin-Gassin, Gaelle; Brusselle, Damien; Jonchère, Alban; Diat, Olivier; Viñas, Clara; Teixidor, Francesc; Bauduin, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Because of their amphiphilic structure, surfactants adsorb at the water-air interface with their hydrophobic tails pointing out of the water and their polar heads plunging into the liquid phase. Unlike classical surfactants, metallabisdicarbollides (MCs) do not have a well-defined amphiphilic structure. They are nanometer-sized inorganic anions with an ellipsoidal shape composed of two carborane semicages sandwiching a metal ion. However, MCs have been shown to share many properties with surfactants, such as self-assembly in water (formation of micelles and vesicles), formation of lamellar lyotropic phases, and surface activity. By combining second harmonic generation and surface tension measurement, we show here that cobaltabis(dicarbollide) anion {[(C2B9H11)2Co](-) also named [COSAN](-)} with H(+) as a counterion, the most representative metallacarborane, adsorbs vertically at the water surface with its long axis normal to the surface. This vertical molecular orientation facilitates the formation of intermolecular and nonconventional dihydrogen bonds such as the B-H(δ-)···(δ+)H-C bond that has recently been proven to be at the origin of the self-assembly of MCs in water. Therefore, it appears here that lateral dihydrogen bonds are also involved in the surface activity of MCs. PMID:25644035

  4. Drops, Sieves, and Paintbrushes: Teaching About Surface Tension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George B.

    1978-01-01

    Surface tension, a characteristic of liquids, is discussed in this article. Several activities appropriate to the elementary grades are described and explained. Each activity uses common materials to explore this tendancy of water to act as if it were surrounded by a membrane. (MA)

  5. A Modified Jaeger's Method for Measuring Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntibi, J. Effiom-Edem

    1991-01-01

    A static method of measuring the surface tension of a liquid is presented. Jaeger's method is modified by replacing the pressure source with a variable pressure head. By using this method, stationary air bubbles are obtained thus resulting in controllable external parameters. (Author/KR)

  6. A micro surface tension alveolus (MISTA) in a glass microchip.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing Yue Larry; Wu, Lan-Qin; Zhang, Na; Hu, Li-Dan; Li, You; Li, Wen-Juan; Li, Dong-Hui; Huang, Ping; Zhou, Yong-Liang

    2009-11-21

    We have designed a non-membrane micro surface tension alveolus (MISTA) in a glass microchip for direct gas exchange and micro gradient control. Hemoglobin (Hb) in the liquid phase indicates the rapid gas gradient changes of O2 and CO2 shifted by the difference in pressure between the liquid and the gas. PMID:19865732

  7. Surface Tension Triggered Wetting and Point of Care Sensor Design.

    PubMed

    Falde, Eric J; Yohe, Stefan T; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-08-01

    Rapid, simple, and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) medical tests are of significant need around the world. The transition between nonwetting and wetted states is used to create instrument-free surface tension sensors for POC diagnosis, using a layered electrospun mesh with incorporated dye to change color upon wetting. PMID:26097150

  8. Surface tension and viscosity of nuclei in liquid drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokonov, A. Kh

    2015-11-01

    An analytical solution for the capillary oscillations of the charged drop in dielectric medium obtained with taking into account the damping due to viscosity. The model has been applied for the estimation of even-even spherical nuclei surface tension and nuclei viscosity. Attenuation factor to nuclear capillary oscillation frequency ratio has been found.

  9. Surface Tension Measurements on Oleochemicals Derived from Soybean Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the surface tension measurements, at a variety of temperatures, for a variety of alkyl esters; in olefinic, epoxy, and branched ester forms. Because these compounds are potential fuel or lubricant additives, this physical data is valuable, and currently unreported in the literature. For ...

  10. Dynamics of surface tension in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Leslie, F. W.; Hong, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    Time-dependent evolutions of the profile of free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, in low and microgravity environments, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out (1) linear time-dependent functions of spin-up and spin-down in low and microgravity environments, (2) linear time-dependent functions of increasing and decreasing gravity environment at high and low rotating cylinder speeds, (3) time-dependent step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low-gravity environment, and (4) sinusoidal function oscillation of the gravity environment at high and low rotating cylinder speeds.

  11. Computation of surface tensions using expanded ensemble simulations.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Enrique

    2008-04-17

    A method for the direct simulation of the surface tension is examined. The technique is based on the thermodynamic route to the interfacial tension and makes use of the expanded ensemble simulation method for the calculation of the free energy difference between two inhomogeneous systems with the same number of particles, temperature, and volume, but different interfacial area. The method is completely general and suitable for systems with either continuous or discontinuous interactions. The adequacy of the expanded ensemble method is assessed by computing the interfacial tension of the planar vapor-liquid interface of Lennard-Jones, Lennard-Jones dimers, Gay-Berne, and square-well model fluids; in the latter, the interactions are discontinuous and the present method does not exhibit the asymmetry of other related methods, such as the test area. The expanded ensemble simulation results are compared with simulation data obtained from other techniques (mechanical and test area) with overall good agreement. PMID:18358023

  12. Molecular Arrangement and Surface Tension of Alcohol Solutions.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chi M; Nguyen, Cuong V; Pham, Thuy T T

    2016-04-28

    This study investigated the relationship between molecular arrangement and surface tension of water mixtures with methanol and ethanol. It has been found that the molecular structure of interfacial zone was deterministically correlated to alcohol concentration. From the water dipole moment, an interfacial boundary was defined. The boundary then was used to calculate the water and alcohols in the interfacial zone, which was then used to calculate the surface tension. The prediction from simulated data closely followed the experimental data. The analysis revives the relevance of the molecular arrangement, which had been the main focus in the early 20th century, in quantification of surface energy. The results can supplement the current thermodynamic analysis to correctly predict the surface adsorption. PMID:27054524

  13. Influence of surface tension on fractal contact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J. M.; Wang, G. F.; Feng, X. Q.; Yu, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    Almost all solid surfaces have roughness on different length scales, from macro, micro to nano. In the conventional fractal contact model, the macroscopic Hertzian contact theory is employed to predict the contact load-area relation for all sizes of contact spots. However, when the contact radius of an asperity shrinks to nanometers, surface tension may greatly alter the contact behavior. In the present paper, we address surface effects on the contact between a rigid sphere and an elastic half space, and we demonstrate that the contact load-area relation is size-dependent, especially for nanosized asperities. Then, the refined contact relation is incorporated into the Majumdar-Bhushan fractal contact model. It is found that the presence of surface tension requires higher load than the conventional fractal contact model to generate the same real contact area.

  14. Correlation of Dynamic Surface Tension with Sedimentation of PTFE Particles and Water Penetration in Powders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vidhi; Bharatiya, Bhavesh; Shah, Dinesh O; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2015-12-29

    The dynamic surface tension of aqueous poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) [(PEO-PPO-PEO)]-type polymeric surfactant (P103, P105, F108, P123, and F127) solutions were correlated with water penetration in packed Teflon powders, the sedimentation of Teflon suspensions in these solutions, foamability, and contact angle measurements on a Teflon surface. The DST trend with bubble lifetime indicated that the overall slowdown in the diffusion process in aqueous solutions is a function of a higher poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) molecular weight for a given series of block copolymers containing equal PPO molecular weights, favoring slower diffusion kinetics to the air-water interface caused by preferential partitioning in bulk water. The wettability of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) powder illustrates better water penetration for polymers with low molecular weight and lower HLB values. The wettability of F127 solutions decreases with corresponding increases in concentration resulting from higher viscosity, which restrains the diffusion kinetics at the PTFE-water interface. The foamability decreases drastically with higher PEO molecular weight as attributed by slower diffusion kinetics, leading to a decrease in the effective concentration of molecules at the foam interface. The contact angle on glass and the PTFE surface are in good agreement with assumptions made by other analytical techniques showing a lower value of the contact angle with a lower HLB of the Pluronic, which relates to the higher adsorption of molecules at the interface. It is concluded that the adsorption of molecules at the PTFE-water interface decreases in aqueous Pluronic solutions with corresponding increases in the hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB), which is consistent with foaming, water penetration in a packed powder of PTFE, the rate of sedimentation, and DST data. A PTFE dispersion containing P123 showed the maximum wettability and lowest sedimentation among the series

  15. Surface tension propulsion of fungal spores by use of microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yang, Sylvia; Dumais, Jacques

    2010-11-01

    Most basidiomycete fungi (such as edible mushrooms) actively eject their spores. The process begins with the condensation of a water droplet at the base of the spore. The fusion of the droplet onto the spore creates a momentum that propels the spore forward. The use of surface tension for spore ejection offers a new paradigm to perform work at small length scales. However, this mechanism of force generation remains poorly understood. To elucidate how fungal spores make effective use of surface tension, we performed high-speed video imaging of spore ejection in Auricularia auricula and Sporobolomyces yeast, along with a detailed mechanical analysis of the spore ejection. We developed an explicit relation for the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy during the coalescence process. The relation was validated with a simple artificial system.

  16. Surface tension dominates insect flight on fluid interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Bardon, Thibaut C.; Kim, Dong Hyun; Prakash, Manu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flight on the 2D air–water interface, with body weight supported by surface tension, is a unique locomotion strategy well adapted for the environmental niche on the surface of water. Although previously described in aquatic insects like stoneflies, the biomechanics of interfacial flight has never been analysed. Here, we report interfacial flight as an adapted behaviour in waterlily beetles (Galerucella nymphaeae) which are also dexterous airborne fliers. We present the first quantitative biomechanical model of interfacial flight in insects, uncovering an intricate interplay of capillary, aerodynamic and neuromuscular forces. We show that waterlily beetles use their tarsal claws to attach themselves to the interface, via a fluid contact line pinned at the claw. We investigate the kinematics of interfacial flight trajectories using high-speed imaging and construct a mathematical model describing the flight dynamics. Our results show that non-linear surface tension forces make interfacial flight energetically expensive compared with airborne flight at the relatively high speeds characteristic of waterlily beetles, and cause chaotic dynamics to arise naturally in these regimes. We identify the crucial roles of capillary–gravity wave drag and oscillatory surface tension forces which dominate interfacial flight, showing that the air–water interface presents a radically modified force landscape for flapping wing flight compared with air. PMID:26936640

  17. The formation of surface multilayers at the air-water interface from sodium polyethylene glycol monoalkyl ether sulfate/AlCl(3) solutions: the role of the size of the polyethylene oxide group.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Penfold, Jeff; Thomas, Robert K; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John P R

    2013-09-17

    Neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, have been used to study the surface adsorption properties at the air-water interface of the anionic surfactant sodium polyethylene glycol monododecyl ether sulfate (sodium lauryl ether sulfate, SLES) in the presence of Al(3+) multivalent counterions, by the addition of AlCl3. In the absence of AlCl3 and at low AlCl3 concentrations monolayer adsorption is observed. With increasing AlCl3 concentration, surface multilayer formation is observed, driven by SLES/Al(3+) complex formation. The onset of multilayer formation occurs initially as a single bilayer or a multilayer structure with a limited number of bilayers, N, ≤3, and ultimately at higher AlCl3 concentrations N is large, >20. The evolution in the surface structure is determined by the surfactant and AlCl3 concentrations, and the size of the polyethylene oxide group in the different SLES surfactants studied. From the NR data, approximate surface phase diagrams are constructed, and the evolution of the surface structure with surfactant and electrolyte concentration is shown to be dependent on the size of the polyethylene oxide group. As the polyethylene oxide group increases in size the multilayer formation requires increasingly higher surfactant and AlCl3 concentrations to promote the formation. This is attributed to the increased steric hindrance of the polyethylene oxide group disrupting SLES/Al(3+) complex formation. PMID:23968161

  18. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  19. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-07-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  20. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further. PMID:26037272

  1. Study Of Bubble-Count Measurement Of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Gary M.; Berg, James I.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents study of bubble-count method of measurement of surface or interfacial tension of liquids. In method, gas or liquid pumped at known rate along capillary tube. One end of tube open and immersed in liquid that wets tube. Pumped gas or liquid forms bubbles, detaching themselves from immersed open end of tube, and one measures average period, Pi, for formation and detachment of bubbles.

  2. Surface tension: Floater clustering in a standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovich, G.; Weinberg, A.; Denissenko, P.; Lukaschuk, S.

    2005-06-01

    How do waves affect the distribution of small particles that float on water? Here we show that drifting small particles concentrate in either the nodes or antinodes of a standing wave, depending on whether they are hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as a result of a surface-tension effect that violates Archimedes' law of buoyancy. This clustering on waves may find practical application in particle separation and provides insight into the patchy distribution on water of, for example, plastic litter or oil slicks.

  3. Onset of hexagons in surface-tension-driven Benard convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.; Vanhook, Stephen J.; Swift, John B.; Mccormick, William D.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution laboratory experiments with large aspect ratio are being conducted for thin fluid layers heated from below and bounded from above by a free surface. The fluid depths are chosen sufficiently small (less than 0.06 cm) so that surface tension is the dominant driving mechanisms; the Rayleigh number is less than 5 for the results reported here. Shadowgraph visualization reveals that the primary instability leading to hexagons is slightly hysteretic (approximately 1 percent). Preliminary measurements of the convection amplitude using infrared imaging are also presented.

  4. Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques

    DOEpatents

    Rye,Robert R. , Yost,Frederick G.

    1998-01-01

    An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

  5. Investigation of surface tension phenomena using the KC-135 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    The microgravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft was utilized in three experiments designed to determine the following: (1) the feasibility of measuring critical wetting temperatures; (2) the effectiveness of surface tension as a means of keeping the cushioning heat transfer liquid in the furnace during ampoule translation; and (3) whether a non-wetting fluid would separate from the ampoule wall under low gravity conditions. This trio of investigations concerning surface phenomena demonstrates the effectiveness of the KC-135 as a microgravity research environment for small-scale, hand-held experiments.

  6. A Lagrangian Model to Predict the Modification of Near-Surface Scalar Mixing Ratios and Air-Water Exchange Fluxes in Offshore Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Mark D.; Perlinger, Judith A.; Fairall, Christopher W.

    2011-07-01

    A model was developed to predict the modification with fetch in offshore flow of mixing ratio, air-water exchange flux, and near-surface vertical gradients in mixing ratio of a scalar due to air-water exchange. The model was developed for planning and interpretation of air-water exchange flux measurements in the coastal zone. The Lagrangian model applies a mass balance over the internal boundary layer (IBL) using the integral depth scale approach, previously applied to development of the nocturnal boundary layer overland. Surface fluxes and vertical profiles in the surface layer were calculated using the NOAA COARE bulk algorithm and gas transfer model (e.g., Blomquist et al. 2006, Geophys Res Lett 33:1-4). IBL height was assumed proportional to the square root of fetch, and estimates of the IBL growth rate coefficient, α, were obtained by three methods: (1) calibration of the model to a large dataset of air temperature and humidity modification over Lake Ontario in 1973, (2) atmospheric soundings from the 2004 New England Air Quality Study and (3) solution of a simplified diffusion equation and an estimate of eddy diffusivity from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST). Reasonable agreement was obtained between the calibrated and MOST values of α for stable, neutral, and unstable conditions, and estimates of α agreed with previously published parametrizations that were valid for the stable IBL only. The parametrization of α provides estimates of IBL height, and the model estimates modification of scalar mixing ratio, fluxes, and near-surface gradients, under conditions of coastal offshore flow (0-50 km) over a wide range in stability.

  7. A method for using surface tension to determine the size of holes in hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    To check the size of small holes in injectors, flow control orifices, filters, and similar hardware, a surface tension technique is used. The liquid surface tension causes it to act as a membrane when pressure is applied. This bubble pressure is a function of hole diameter and surface tension.

  8. Line Tension and Wettability of Nanodrops on Curved Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Shantanu; van der Hoef, Martin; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-12

    In this work we study the formation of nanodrops on curved surfaces (both convex and concave) by means of molecular dynamics simulations, where the particles interact via a Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the contact angle is not affected by the curvature of the substrate, in agreement with previous experimental findings. This means that the change in curvature of the drop in response to the change in curvature of the substrate can be predicted from simple geometrical considerations, under the assumption that the drop's shape is a spherical cap, and that the volume remains unchanged through the curvature. The resulting prediction is in perfect agreement with the simulation results, for both convex and concave substrates. In addition, we calculate the line tension, namely, by fitting the contact angle for different size drops to the modified Young equation. We find that the line tension for concave surfaces is larger than for convex surfaces, while for zero curvature it has a clear maximum. This feature is found to be correlated with the number of particles in the first layer of the liquid on the surface. PMID:26654333

  9. Effects of varying interfacial surface tension on macroscopic polymer lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Charlotte; White, Mason; Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    We investigate macroscopic polymer lenses (0.5- to 2.5-cm diameter) fabricated by dropping hydrophobic photocurable resin onto the surface of various hydrophilic liquid surfaces. Due to the intermolecular forces along the interface between the two liquids, a lens shape is formed. We find that we can vary the lens geometry by changing the region over which the resin is allowed to spread and the surface tension of the substrate to produce lenses with theoretically determined focal lengths ranging from 5 to 25 mm. These effects are varied by changing the container width, substrate composition, and substrate temperature. We present data for five different variants, demonstrating that we can control the lens dimensions for polymer lens applications that require high surface quality.

  10. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment-2 (STDCE-2. )

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1996-01-01

    The surface tension driven convection experiment-2 (STDCE-2) was conducted onboard the U.S. Microgravity Laboratory (USML)-2 Spacelab which was launched on October 20, 1995. The main objectives of the experiment was to study oscillatory thermocapillary flows in microgravity. Thermocapillary flows were generated in cylindrical test chambers filled with 2 centistokes silicone oil. Six modules were used to study three different chamber diameters and two different heating modes. Tests with both flat and curved free surfaces were conducted. The flow field was studied by flow visualization and an infrared imaging system recorded the oil free-surface temperature. An optical (Ronchi) system was used to measure the oil free-surface deformation and motions. A total of 55 tests were conducted and oscillations were found in most of them. The data are being analyzed.

  11. Development of surface tension tanks for transfer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netter, G.; Renner, U.; Eckhardt, K.

    A surface tension tank was designed and airplane flight tested. The tank is part of a propulsion subsystem and feeds the boost motor and attitude and orbit control thrusters. It stores nitrogen tetroxide or monomethyl hydrazine plus pressurant for a long mission. An upper section, containing boost firing propellant, is emptied during unidirectional firing. The lower compartment (1/4 total tank capacity) has a propellant managing device for microgravity and zero gravity accelerations. The expulsion device is a sump which samples propellant about to enter propellant thruster feed lines.

  12. Surface Tension Mediated Conversion of Light to Work

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, David; Pastine, Stefan J.; Zettl, Alex; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2009-01-01

    As energy demands increase, new, more direct, energy collection and utilization processes must be explored. We present a system that intrinsically combines the absorption of sunlight with the production of useful work in the form of locomotion of objects on liquids. Focused sunlight is locally absorbed by a nanostructured composite, creating a thermal surface tension gradient and, subsequently, motion. Controlled linear motion and rotational motion are demonstrated. The system is scale independent, with remotely powered and controlled motion shown for objects in the milligram to tens of grams range. PMID:20560635

  13. Surface tension, hydrophobicity, and black holes: The entropic connection

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The geometric entropy arising from partitioning space in a fluid {open_quote}{open_quote}field theory{close_quote}{close_quote} is shown to be linearly proportional to the area of an excluded region. The coefficient of proportionality is related to surface tension by a thermodynamic argument. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained for a number of fluids. The calculation employs a density-matrix formalism developed previously for studying the origin of black hole entropy. This approach may lead to a practical technique for the evaluation of thermodynamic quantities with important entropic components. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Tension in Microgravity Modeled Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, jets must be contained by surface tension forces. Recent NASA experiments in microgravity (Tank Pressure Control Experiment, TPCE, and Vented Tank Pressure Experiment, VTRE) resulted in a wealth of data about jet behavior in microgravity. VTRE was surprising in that, although it contained a complex geometry of baffles and vanes, the limit on liquid inflow was the emergence of a liquid jet from the top of the vane structure. Clearly understanding the restraint of liquid jets by surface tension is key to managing fluids in low gravity. To model this phenomenon, we need a numerical method that can track the fluid motion and the surface tension forces. The fluid motion is modeled with the Navier-Stokes equation formulated for low-speed incompressible flows. The quantities of velocity and pressure are placed on a staggered grid, with velocity being tracked at cell faces and pressure at cell centers. The free surface is tracked via the introduction of a color function that tracks liquid as 1/2 and gas as -1/2. A phase model developed by Jacqmin is used. This model converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly. Previous attempts at this formulation have been criticized for smearing the interface. However, by sharpening the phase

  15. Surface Tension, Pressure Difference and Laplace Formula for Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koibuchi, Hiroshi; Shobukhov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    The surface tension γ and the pressure difference Δp for spherical membranes are calculated using Monte Carlo simulation technique. We study the so-called tethered and uid surface discrete models that are defined on the fixed-connectivity (tethered) and dynamically triangulated (uid) lattices respectively. Hamiltonians of the models include a self-avoiding potential, which makes the enclosed volume well defined. We find that there is reasonable accuracy in the technique for the calculation of γ using the real area A if the bending rigidity κ or A/N is sufficiently large. We also find that γ becomes constant in the limit of A/N → ∞ both in the tethered and uid surfaces. The property limA/N→∞ γ = const corresponds to certain experimental results in cell biology.

  16. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  17. Effect of surface tension anisotropy on cellular morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional weakly nonlinear analysis for conditions near the onset of instability at the crystal-melt interface was carried out to second order, taking into account the effects of latent heat generation and surface-tension anisotropy of the crystal-melt interface; particular consideration was given to the growth of a cubic crystal in the 001-, 011-, and 111-line directions. Numerical calculations by McFadden et al. (1987), performed for an aluminum-chromium alloy with the assumption of a linear temperature field and an isotropic surface tension, showed that only hexagonal nodes (and not hexagonal cells) occurred near the onset of instability. The results of the present analysis indicate that the nonlinear temperature field (which occurs when thermal conductivities of the crystal and the melt are different and/or the latent heat effects are not negligible) can modify this result and, for certain alloys and processing conditions, can cause the occurrence of hexagonal cells near the onset of instability.

  18. Measurements of the Surface Tension for CFC Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Yukihiro; Ikeda, Tadamitsu; Kuwana, Takeaki; Okada, Masaaki

    Measurements of the surface tension for two kinds of CFC alternatives, i.e., HCFC-123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane), and HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane), have been made by the differential capillary rise method (DCRM) and the vertical plate method (VPM). For HCFC-123, 15 data have been obtained by DCRM in the temperature range between 273 and 333 K within the uncertainty of ±0.1mN/m, and 21 data have been obtained by VPM in the temperature range between 273 and 290 K within the uncertainty of ±0.2mN/m. For HFC-134a, 17 data have been obtained by DCRM in the temperature range between 276 and 329 K within the uncertainty of ±0.1mN/m. The uncertainty of temperature measurement by DCRM is estimated within ±20mK, whereas that by VPM within ±30mK. New correlations of the surface tension for HCFC-123 and HFC-134a have been also proposed.

  19. The Compressible Viscous Surface-Internal Wave Problem: Stability and Vanishing Surface Tension Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Juhi; Tice, Ian; Wang, Yanjin

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the dynamics of two layers of compressible, barotropic, viscous fluid lying atop one another. The lower fluid is bounded below by a rigid bottom, and the upper fluid is bounded above by a trivial fluid of constant pressure. This is a free boundary problem: the interfaces between the fluids and above the upper fluid are free to move. The fluids are acted on by gravity in the bulk, and at the free interfaces we consider both the case of surface tension and the case of no surface forces. We establish a sharp nonlinear global-in-time stability criterion and give the explicit decay rates to the equilibrium. When the upper fluid is heavier than the lower fluid along the equilibrium interface, we characterize the set of surface tension values in which the equilibrium is nonlinearly stable. Remarkably, this set is non-empty, i.e., sufficiently large surface tension can prevent the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. When the lower fluid is heavier than the upper fluid, we show that the equilibrium is stable for all non-negative surface tensions and we establish the zero surface tension limit.

  20. From viscosity and surface tension to marangoni flow in melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shouyi; Zhang, Ling; Jahanshahi, Sharif

    2003-10-01

    This article covers some of our recent work on slag viscosity, the surface tension of liquid Cu-O alloys, and the relative role of Marangoni and bulk flow on refractory wear in iron-silicate slags. A viscosity model developed for slags containing SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, MnO, FeO, PbO, NiO, Cu2O, ZnO, CoO, and TiO2 is capable of representing the effects of temperature, silica, and network-modifier cations within a wide range of temperatures and compositions. It forms a useful part of a computational package for multiphase-equilibrium (MPE) calculations and for predicting slag viscosities. The models are well applicable to a range of industrial slags (blast furnace, new iron making, base-metal and Platinum Group Metals (PGM) smelting, and coal-ash slags). The package has also some capability of predicting the viscosity of slags containing suspended solids. The surface tension of liquid copper-oxygen alloys has also been analyzed. The adsorption behavior of oxygen in liquid copper is well represented by the combined Langmuir-Gibbs isotherm. According to the rate data for silica-rod dissolution in liquid iron-silicate slags at 1573 K, the preferential attack at the slag line diminishes as the linear velocity of flow at the surface of the rotating silica rod reaches 9 to 16 cm/s. A tentative analysis gives the critical condition, that relates the critical Reynolds (Re) and Marangoni (Ma) number by the equation Re*2=0.13 Ma*.

  1. A Method to Manipulate Surface Tension of a Liquid Metal via Surface Oxidation and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Collin B; Khan, M Rashed; Dickey, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Controlling interfacial tension is an effective method for manipulating the shape, position, and flow of fluids at sub-millimeter length scales, where interfacial tension is a dominant force. A variety of methods exist for controlling the interfacial tension of aqueous and organic liquids on this scale; however, these techniques have limited utility for liquid metals due to their large interfacial tension. Liquid metals can form soft, stretchable, and shape-reconfigurable components in electronic and electromagnetic devices. Although it is possible to manipulate these fluids via mechanical methods (e.g., pumping), electrical methods are easier to miniaturize, control, and implement. However, most electrical techniques have their own constraints: electrowetting-on-dielectric requires large (kV) potentials for modest actuation, electrocapillarity can affect relatively small changes in the interfacial tension, and continuous electrowetting is limited to plugs of the liquid metal in capillaries. Here, we present a method for actuating gallium and gallium-based liquid metal alloys via an electrochemical surface reaction. Controlling the electrochemical potential on the surface of the liquid metal in electrolyte rapidly and reversibly changes the interfacial tension by over two orders of magnitude ( ̴500 mN/m to near zero). Furthermore, this method requires only a very modest potential (< 1 V) applied relative to a counter electrode. The resulting change in tension is due primarily to the electrochemical deposition of a surface oxide layer, which acts as a surfactant; removal of the oxide increases the interfacial tension, and vice versa. This technique can be applied in a wide variety of electrolytes and is independent of the substrate on which it rests. PMID:26863045

  2. Convection and surface tension profiles for aqueous droplet under microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Yushin; Asada, Masahiro; Asakuma, Yusuke; Honda, Itsuro; Phan, Chi; Parmar, Harisinh; Pareek, Vishnu; Evans, Geoffrey

    2014-08-01

    Application of microwave irradiation for chemical processes, such as emulsification and polymerization, has been reported [1,2]. Surfactant free emulsion can be produced with the help of microwave irradiation. Surface tension is an important property for the industrial process such as foaming/defoaming, wetting/dewetting and flotation. Similarly, the interfacial tension plays crucial role in separation and mixing process of two immiscible liquids, which are important unit operations of the fundamental chemical engineering. In practice, surface and interfacial tensions are often altered by introducing surfactants. In our previous research [3,4], specific property for surface tension of water droplet with salt under microwave radiation was found. For example, lower surface tension after the radiation was measured. The formation of nano-bubble will explain this behavior. Normally, the surface tension of aqueous solution increases with the salt concentration because cation and anion collect water molecule more strongly as a solvation. However, the exact mechanism of surface tension reduction by microwave radiation is not clear. We tried not only measurement of surface tension but also convection in the droplet during microwave radiation. This study investigates the influence of microwave on surface tension of aqueous solution. Moreover, relation between the concentration, temperature and droplet shape, which are related with surface tension.

  3. The wavenumbers of supercritical surface-tension-driven Benard convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschmieder, E. L.; Switzer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The cell size or the wavenumbers of supercritical hexagonal convection cells in primarily surface-tension-driven convection on a uniformly heated plate has been studied experimentally in thermal equilibrium in thin layers of silicone oil of large aspect ratio. It has been found that the cell size decreases with increased temperature difference in the slightly supercritical range, and that the cell size is unique within the experimental error. It has also been observed that the cell size reaches a minimum and begins to increase at larger temperature differences. This reversal of the rate of change of the wavenumber with temperature difference is attributed to influences of buoyancy on the fluid motion. The consequences of buoyancy have been tested with three fluid layers of different depth.

  4. Surface tension models for particle laden thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jeffrey; Wang, Li; Bertozzi, Andrea

    We study viscous slurries on an incline, for which particles migrate in a fluid due to a combination of gravity-induced settling and shear-induced migration. The lubrication model for the bulk of the fluid is a hyperbolic system of conservation laws for the film height and particle concentration which exhibits in interesting behavior, including singular shock solutions corresponding to accumulation of particles at the front. The addition of surface tension to the model produces a a capillary ridge that is affected by the particle accumulation and in two dimensions leads to fingering instabilities. We compare this model to experimental results. This work is supported by NSF Grants DMS-1312543 and DMS-1045536.

  5. The wave numbers of supercritical surface tension driven Benard convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschmieder, E. L.; Switzer, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    The cell size or the wave numbers of supercritical hexagonal convection cells in primarily surface tension driven convection on a uniformly heated plate was studied experimentally in thermal equilibrium in thin layers of silicone oil of large aspect ratio. It was found that the cell size decreases with increased temperature difference in the slightly supercritical range, and that the cell size is unique within the experimental error. It was also observed that the cell size reaches a minimum and begins to increase at larger temperature differences. This reversal of the rate of change of the wave number with temperature difference is attributed to influences of buoyancy on the fluid motion. The consequences of buoyancy were tested with three fluid layers of different depth.

  6. Experiment 6: Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment-2 (STDCE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Pline, Alexander D.

    1998-01-01

    Results are reported from the Second Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE-2) performed aboard the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2), which flew as Space Shuttle mission STS-73 and launched on October 20, 1995. Oscillatory thermocapillary flows were investigated in open cylindrical containers filled with 2 centistokes kinematic viscosity (Pr=27 at 25 C) silicone oil. Two different heating modes were investigated in detail. The main objectives of the experiments were to determine the onset of oscillatory thermocapillary flow under highly reduced buoyancy and gravity conditions and to study the important features of the oscillatory flow. The onset conditions were determined in three different size containers (1.2-, 2-, and 3-cm diameter) and for various free surface shapes (flat and curved). Numerical and scaling analyses were also performed to understand the basic steady flows. The analysis shows that the main flow is viscous-dominated near the onset of oscillations. The onset conditions determined in the present experiments together with our earlier ground-based data show that one could not describe the oscillation phenomenon if the fluid free surface is assumed to be rigid. Therefore, a parameter representing free surface deformation was derived, and the data are shown to be correlated well by that parameter. The oscillation patterns and frequencies are also presented.

  7. Surface interactions, thermodynamics and topography of binary monolayers of Insulin with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Grasso, E J; Oliveira, R G; Maggio, B

    2016-02-15

    The molecular packing, thermodynamics and surface topography of binary Langmuir monolayers of Insulin and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) or POCP (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) at the air/water interface on Zn(2+) containing solutions were studied. Miscibility and interactions were ascertained by the variation of surface pressure-mean molecular area isotherms, surface compressional modulus and surface (dipole) potential with the film composition. Brewster Angle Microscopy was used to visualize the surface topography of the monolayers. Below 20mN/m Insulin forms stable homogenous films with DPPC and POPC at all mole fractions studied (except for films with XINS=0.05 at 10mN/m where domain coexistence was observed). Above 20mN/m, a segregation process between mixed phases occurred in all monolayers without squeezing out of individual components. Under compression the films exhibit formation of a viscoelastic or kinetically trapped organization leading to considerable composition-dependent hysteresis under expansion that occurs with entropic-enthalpic compensation. The spontaneously unfavorable interactions of Insulin with DPPC are driven by favorable enthalpy that is overcome by unfavorable entropic ordering; in films with POPC both the enthalpic and entropic effects are unfavorable. The surface topography reveals domain coexistence at relatively high pressure showing a striped appearance. The interactions of Insulin with two major membrane phospholipids induces composition-dependent and long-range changes of the surface organization that ought to be considered in the context of the information-transducing capabilities of the hormone for cell functioning. PMID:26624532

  8. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment-2 (STDCE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masud, J.; Kamotani, Y.; Ostrach, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thermocapillary flows are known to become oscillatory (time-periodic), but how and when they become oscillatory in containers of unit-order aspect ratio are not yet fully understood. The present work is a part of our continuous effort to obtain a better understanding of the phenomenon. Thermocapillary flow experiments in normal gravity are limited to a narrow parametric range in order to minimize gravity and buoyancy effects, which is an important reason for our lack of full understanding of the oscillation phenomenon. One important unanswered question is what role, if any, free surface deformation plays in the oscillation mechanism. For that reason we performed thermocapillary flow experiments, called the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment-2 (STDCE-2), aboard the USML-2 Spacelab in 1995. The main objectives of the experiments were to investigate oscillatory thermocapillary flows in microgravity and to clarify the importance of free surface deformation in such flows. Steady and oscillatory thermocapillary flows were generated in cylindrical containers by employing two heating modes. A CO2 laser with adjustable power and beam diameter was used in the Constant Flux (CF) configuration to heat the free surface. The other configuration investigated in STDCE-2 was the Constant Temperature (CT) configuration in which a submerged cylindrical cartridge heater placed at the symmetry (axial) axis of the test container heated the fluid. Both heating modes cause non-uniform temperature distributions on the free surface, which generates thermocapillary flow. The flow field was investigated by flow visualization, and the temperature field was measured by thermistors and an infrared imager. The free surface shape and motion were measured by a Ronchi system. The hardware performed well and we were able to conduct more tests than originally planned. From the successful experiments a large amount of data was acquired. The analysis of the data is now nearly complete. Some

  9. Droplet Breakup and Other Problems Involving Surface Tension Driven Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael P.

    We explore several problems involving fluid flows driven by surface tension. The first part of the thesis concerns droplet breakup. The major focus is on the formation of singularities occurring when a mass of fluid breaks into two pieces. We explore this phenomena in many different physical situations, including droplet breakup in a Hele Shaw cell, rupturing of thin films on a solid surface, the breaking of Plateau borders in soap froths, and fluid dripping from a cylindrical nozzle. In most of the above examples the singularities are characterized by self similar solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations. For the dripping faucet, the similarity solution is unstable to finite (but small) amplitude perturbations; the consequence of this is that in practice the breakup of a three dimensional droplet is a nonsteady process, with new structures continually generated as the interface breaks. Through asymptotic analysis, we show that the amount of noise necessary to destabilize the similarity solution decreases rapidly as the singularity is approached. For fluids of moderate viscosity fluctuations in the interfacial shape of atomic size are sufficient to destabilize the interface when the thickness is less than one micron. The second part of the thesis addresses problems in wetting. We present an analysis of a droplet spreading on a solid surface, which results in an understanding of the experimentally observed spreading laws. Finally, we present an explanation of the mechanism for the instability that occurs when a contact line is driven by a constant force. The explanation is consistent with recent experimental data.

  10. Surface tension in human pathophysiology and its application as a medical diagnostic tool

    PubMed Central

    Fathi-Azarbayjani, Anahita; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pathological features of disease appear to be quite different. Despite this diversity, the common feature of various disorders underlies physicochemical and biochemical factors such as surface tension. Human biological fluids comprise various proteins and phospholipids which are capable of adsorption at fluid interfaces and play a vital role in the physiological function of human organs. Surface tension of body fluids correlates directly to the development of pathological states. Methods: In this review, the variety of human diseases mediated by the surface tension changes of biological phenomena and the failure of biological fluids to remain in their native state are discussed. Results: Dynamic surface tension measurements of human biological fluids depend on various parameters such as sex, age and changes during pregnancy or certain disease. It is expected that studies of surface tension behavior of human biological fluids will provide additional information and might become useful in medical practice. Theoretical background on surface tension measurement and surface tension values of reference fluids obtained from healthy and sick patients are depicted. Conclusion: It is well accepted that no single biomarker will be effective in clinical diagnosis. The surface tension measurement combined with routine lab tests may be a novel non-invasive method which can not only facilitate the discovery of diagnostic models for various diseases and its severity, but also be a useful tool for monitoring treatment efficacy. We therefore expect that studies of surface tension behavior of human biological fluids will provide additional useful information in medical practice. PMID:25901295

  11. Surface Tension Gradients on Mixing Processes after Coalescence of Binary Equal-Sized Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Guo, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2013-07-01

    Numerical simulations on coalescence of binary equal-sized droplets with surface tension gradients are carried out by using the front tracking method. Mixing process of the fluid from each droplet is investigated. The tangential flow caused by the Marangoni effect and the interface replacement by the fluid with small surface tension coefficient are simulated successfully. Asymmetry caused by the surface tension gradients can generate some extent of mixing within the coalesced droplet. The effects of the surface tension gradients and viscosity on the tangential velocity, replacement time of interface and mixing are investigated.

  12. Surface tension of water-alcohol mixtures from Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Malfreyt, P

    2011-01-28

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported to predict the dependence of the surface tension of water-alcohol mixtures on the alcohol concentration. Alcohols are modeled using the anisotropic united atom model recently extended to alcohol molecules. The molecular simulations show a good agreement between the experimental and calculated surface tensions for the water-methanol and water-propanol mixtures. This good agreement with experiments is also established through the comparison of the excess surface tensions. A molecular description of the mixture in terms of density profiles and hydrogen bond profiles is used to interpret the decrease of the surface tension with the alcohol concentration and alcohol chain length. PMID:21280787

  13. Surface cell differentiation controls tissue surface tension and tissue positioning during zebrafish gastrulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krens, S. F. G.

    2011-03-01

    Differences in tissue surface tension (TST) between different tissue types are thought to guide tissue organization and cell sorting in development. Measurements of TST have been useful to predict the outcome of in vitro cell sorting and envelopment experiments. However, the outcome of cell sorting experiments in vitro often substantially differs from tissue positioning in vivo, raising questions as to the actual contribution of TST to tissue positioning within the developing embryo. Here, we show that surface tension of germ layer tissues during zebrafish gastrulation critically relies on the differentiation of their surface cells. We also show that surface differentiation of the different germ layer tissues varies and is considerably different between the situation in vitro and in vivo, explaining the apparent dissimilar outcome of cell segregation between these two situations. To analyze germ layer TST as a function of surface cell differentiation, we interfere with surface cell properties of germ layer aggregates by misexpressing genes involved in surface cell differentiation specifically within surface cells using the GAL4-UAS system, and measure tissue surface tension using both parallel plate compression and micropipette aspiration techniques. Our data provides evidence in favor of a critical function of surface cell differentiation in modulating TST and subsequently tissue positioning within the developing embryo.

  14. Collision between immiscible drops with large surface tension difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios; Sussman, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Immiscible drop collision, as occurring in fuel-oxidizer sprays or in the release of certain fire-extinguishing agents, tends to exhibit a much richer behavior with respect to miscible drops collision thanks to the formation of a liquid-liquid interface during impact. For instance, in near-head-on diesel-water drop collisions, ``overlaying'' may occur in which the diesel oil flows from the collision point around the water drop to gather at the opposite location of the drop. To simulate this class of multi-material flows, the combined volume-of-fluid / level set methodology that sharply captures a single liquid-gas interface (Sussman et al, J. of Comp. Phys., 2007) needs to be duplicated for a second, independent interface. In this presentation, we will show that simulation results are not affected by the reconstruction order of the interfaces, as in other surface capturing methods. We will also propose different numerical solutions to treat surface tension in the triple point computational cells, and examine the characteristics of the flow developing at the contact line between the two liquids and air in overlaying head-on collisions.

  15. A new method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of complex-mixture liquid drops

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.

    1994-06-29

    A simple and accurate technique has been developed for measuring dynamic surface tension. The new technique is based on growing a drop at the end of a fine capillary into another immiscible fluid and can follow the changes in tension at a freshly formed interface during its entire period of evolution. When the relative importance of the surface tension force is large compared to gravitational and viscous forces, shapes of growing drops are sections of spheres and the difference in pressure between the interior and the exterior of the drop {triangle}p is related to the surface tension {sigma} and the radius of curvature R by the static Young-Laplace formula {triangle}p = 2{sigma}/R. In contrast to related work, the new technique can determine the surface tension of an interface with a surface age of a few to tens of milliseconds by measuring transient drop shapes and pressures in 1/6 to 1 millisecond. The capabilities of the new method are demonstrated by performing tension measurements on liquid systems that do not exhibit dynamic surface tension as well as ones that exhibit significant dynamic tension effects. Tension measurements made with surfactant-laden solutions show that variation of surface tension is nonmonotonic in time. In such systems, the dynamic behavior of surface tension is shown to depend upon both the rate of interfacial dilatation and that of surfactant transport. A maximum in the surface tension is attained when the lowering of the surfactant concentration on the drop interface due to its dilatation is balanced by the addition of fresh surfactant to the interface by convection and diffusion.

  16. The behavior of NaOH at the air-water interface, a computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations with a polarizable multi-state empirical valence bond model were carried out to investigate NaOH dissociation and pairing in water bulk and at the air-water interface. It was found that NaOH readily dissociates in the bulk, and the effect of the air-water interface on NaOH dissociation is fairly minor. Also, NaOH complexes were found to be strongly repelled from the air-water interface, which is consistent with surface tension measurements. At the same time, a very strong preference for the hydroxide anion to be oriented towards the air was found that persisted a few angstroms towards the liquid from the Gibbs dividing surface of the air-water interface. This was due to a preference for the hydroxide anion to have its hydrogen pointing towards the air, and the fact that the sodium ion was more likely to be found near the hydroxide oxygen than hydrogen. As a consequence, the simulation results show that surfaces of NaOH solutions should be negatively charged, in agreement with experimental observations, but also that the hydroxide has little surface affinity. This provides the possibility that the surface of water can be devoid of hydroxide anions, but still have a strong negative charge. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  17. Adsorption energies of poly(ethylene oxide)-based surfactants and nanoparticles on an air-water surface.

    PubMed

    Zell, Zachary A; Isa, Lucio; Ilg, Patrick; Leal, L Gary; Squires, Todd M

    2014-01-14

    The self-assembly of polymer-based surfactants and nanoparticles on fluid-fluid interfaces is central to many applications, including dispersion stabilization, creation of novel 2D materials, and surface patterning. Very often these processes involve compressing interfacial monolayers of particles or polymers to obtain a desired material microstructure. At high surface pressures, however, even highly interfacially active objects can desorb from the interface. Methods of directly measuring the energy which keeps the polymer or particles bound to the interface (adsorption/desorption energies) are therefore of high interest for these processes. Moreover, though a geometric description linking adsorption energy and wetting properties through the definition of a contact angle can be established for rigid nano- or microparticles, such a description breaks down for deformable or aggregating objects. Here, we demonstrate a technique to quantify desorption energies directly, by comparing surface pressure-density compression measurements using a Wilhelmy plate and a custom-microfabricated deflection tensiometer. We focus on poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymers and nanoparticles. For PEO-based homo- and copolymers, the adsorption energy of PEO chains scales linearly with molecular weight and can be tuned by changing the subphase composition. Moreover, the desorption surface pressure of PEO-stabilized nanoparticles corresponds to the saturation surface pressure for spontaneously adsorbed monolayers, yielding trapping energies of ∼10(3) k(B)T. PMID:24328531

  18. Thomas Young's Surface Tension Diagram: Its History, Legacy, and Irreconcilabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Robert; McCuan, John; Wente, Henry C.

    2012-09-01

    The Young diagram for determining the contact angle at a triple interface formed by two fluids with a solid, although based on speculative reasoning, found on its publication in 1805 a universal acceptance, without reservation. Later expository articles pointed out consequences that had initially been overlooked, but which were consistent in the specific configurations considered. More recently, reasoning disputing the construction has appeared, and examples—the most recent of them by the present initial author—were introduced, putting the underlying concept into serious doubt. Nevertheless, the construction remains firmly embedded in the curricula of major universities and institutes throughout the world; it continues to be used in engineering design, and two articles emphatically defending it have appeared recently in major journals. In the present note we outline past literature and provide a more precise statement of the Young criterion than is customary. We present explicit examples displaying contradictions arising from it, and corresponding erroneous reasoning in one of the articles defending the criterion (the other having already been refuted in an earlier publication). Finally, we call attention to a direct conflict between the Young construction as interpreted in that article and the classical Wilhelmy method for measuring surface tension at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  19. Surface Tension of Alcohols. Data Selection and Recommended Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulero, A.; Cachadiña, I.; Sanjuán, E. L.

    2015-09-01

    In previous papers, we have proposed specific correlations to reproduce the surface tension values for several sets of fluids and for wide ranges of temperatures. In this paper, we focus our attention on alcohols and consider the available data for 152 fluids grouped into five families. We use the most recent versions of the DIPPR and DETHERM databases and also Wohlfarth and Wohlfarth's (1997) book as our main sources of data. In some cases we have also considered new data. All the data have been carefully filtered in order to discard those that are in clear disagreement with most of the available data for the same fluid. In some cases, two or more different data sets versus temperature trends were observed, and where possible we considered only one of these trends. To fit the finally selected data, we used the model currently implemented in National Institute of Standards and Technology's refprop program, calculating two, four, or six adjustable coefficients for each fluid. As a result, we proposed recommended correlations for 147 alcohols, providing mean average percentage deviations below 1.7% for each fluid, with only two exceptions: 1,2-butanediol (2.77%) and benzyl alcohol (3.20%).

  20. Microgravity experiment study on the vane type surface tension tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Qi; Duan, Li; Rui, Wei

    Having advantages of low cost, convenience and high level of microgravity, the drop tower has become a significant microgravity experiment facility. National Microgravity Laboratory/CAS(NMLC) drop tower has 3.5s effective microgravity time, meanwhile the level of microgravity can reach 10 (-5) g. And the impact acceleration is less than 15g in the recovery period. The microgravity experiments have been conducted on the scaling model of vane type surface tension tank in NMLC’s drop tower. The efficiency of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs) was studied, which focus on the effects of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs), numbers of PMDs, contact angle, and liquid viscosity on the flow rate. The experimental results shown that the numbers of PMDs have little or no effect on the flow rate while the liquid is sufficient. The experiments about the influence of different charging ratio have been carried out while tank is placed positively and reversely, and we find the charging ratio has less effect on the capillary flow rate when the charging ratio is greater than 2%.

  1. Criticality and surface tension in rotating horizon thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Devin; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2016-08-01

    We study a modified horizon thermodynamics and the associated criticality for rotating black hole spacetimes. Namely, we show that under a virtual displacement of the black hole horizon accompanied by an independent variation of the rotation parameter, the radial Einstein equation takes a form of a ‘cohomogeneity two’ horizon first law, δ E=Tδ S+{{Ω }}δ J-σ δ A, where E and J are the horizon energy (an analogue of the Misner–Sharp mass) and the horizon angular momentum, Ω is the horizon angular velocity, A is the horizon area, and σ is the surface tension induced by the matter fields. For fixed angular momentum, the above equation simplifies and the more familiar (cohomogeneity one) horizon first law δ E=Tδ S-Pδ V is obtained, where P is the pressure of matter fields and V is the horizon volume. A universal equation of state is obtained in each case and the corresponding critical behavior is studied.

  2. Solid surface tension measured by a liquid drop under a solid film.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2013-06-25

    We show that a drop of liquid a few hundred microns in diameter placed under a solid, elastic, thin film (∼10 μm thick) causes it to bulge by tens of microns. The deformed shape is governed by equilibrium of tensions exerted by the various interfaces and the solid film, a form of Neumann's triangle. Unlike Young's equation, which specifies the contact angles at the junction of two fluids and a (rigid) solid, and is fundamentally underdetermined, both tensions in the solid film can be determined here if the liquid-vapor surface tension is known independently. Tensions in the solid film have a contribution from elastic stretch and a constant residual component. The residual component, extracted by extrapolation to films of vanishing thickness and supported by analysis of the elastic deformation, is interpreted as the solid-fluid surface tension, demonstrating that compliant thin-film structures can be used to measure solid surface tensions. PMID:23754440

  3. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  4. The Turbulent Boundary Layer Near the Air-Water Interface on a Surface-Piercing Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuta, Nathan; Masnadi, Naeem; Duncan, James H.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in the vicinity of the water free surface along a flat, vertically oriented surface-piercing plate are studied experimentally using a laboratory-scale experiment. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. This belt device is mounted inside a large water tank with the water level set just below the top edge of the belt. The belt, rollers, and supporting frame are contained within a sheet metal box to keep the device dry except for one 6-meter-long straight test section between rollers. The belt is launched from rest with a 3- g acceleration in order to quickly reach steady state velocity. This creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along a flat-sided ship moving at the same velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region since the belt motion began. Cinematic Stereo PIV measurements are performed in planes parallel to the free surface by imaging the flow from underneath the tank in order to study the modification of the boundary layer flow field due to the effects of the water free surface. The support of the Office of Naval Research under grant N000141110029 is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Internal Flow in a Free Drop (IFFD) Bubble Surface Tension Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This digital QuickTime movie is of the Internal Flow in a Free Drop (IFFD) Bubble Surface Tension Experiment taking place in the Microgravity laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The Bubble provides scientists with information about fluid surface tensions in a low-gravity environment.

  6. Mapping surface tension induced menisci with application to tensiometry and refractometry.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Avanish; Kulkarni, Varun; Khor, Jian-Wei; Wereley, Steve

    2015-07-28

    In this work, we discuss an optical method for measuring surface tension induced menisci. The principle of measurement is based upon the change in the background pattern produced by the curvature of the meniscus acting as a lens. We measure the meniscus profile over an inclined glass plate and utilize the measured meniscus for estimation of surface tension and refractive index. PMID:26106879

  7. Surface Tension Studies of Alkyl Esters and Epoxidized Alkyl Esters Relevant to Oleochemically Based Fuel Additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the surface tension of several epoxidized oleochemicals and their comparable fatty esters at temperatures between 25 and 60 deg C. Surface tensions of the olefins measured at 40 deg C range from 25.9 mN m-1, for isobutyl oleate, to 28.4 mN m-1 for methyl linoleate. The epoxy versions of ...

  8. Surface tension in situ in flooded alveolus unaltered by albumin.

    PubMed

    Kharge, Angana Banerjee; Wu, You; Perlman, Carrie E

    2014-09-01

    In the acute respiratory distress syndrome, plasma proteins in alveolar edema liquid are thought to inactivate lung surfactant and raise surface tension, T. However, plasma protein-surfactant interaction has been assessed only in vitro, during unphysiologically large surface area compression (%ΔA). Here, we investigate whether plasma proteins raise T in situ in the isolated rat lung under physiologic conditions. We flood alveoli with liquid that omits/includes plasma proteins. We ventilate the lung between transpulmonary pressures of 5 and 15 cmH2O to apply a near-maximal physiologic %ΔA, comparable to that of severe mechanical ventilation, or between 1 and 30 cmH2O, to apply a supraphysiologic %ΔA. We pause ventilation for 20 min and determine T at the meniscus that is present at the flooded alveolar mouth. We determine alveolar air pressure at the trachea, alveolar liquid phase pressure by servo-nulling pressure measurement, and meniscus radius by confocal microscopy, and we calculate T according to the Laplace relation. Over 60 ventilation cycles, application of maximal physiologic %ΔA to alveoli flooded with 4.6% albumin solution does not alter T; supraphysiologic %ΔA raise T, transiently, by 51 ± 4%. In separate experiments, we find that addition of exogenous surfactant to the alveolar liquid can, with two cycles of maximal physiologic %ΔA, reduce T by 29 ± 11% despite the presence of albumin. We interpret that supraphysiologic %ΔA likely collapses the interfacial surfactant monolayer, allowing albumin to raise T. With maximal physiologic %ΔA, the monolayer likely remains intact such that albumin, blocked from the interface, cannot interfere with native or exogenous surfactant activity. PMID:24970853

  9. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  10. Surface tension comparison of four common root canal irrigants and two new irrigants containing antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Giardino, Luciano; Ambu, Emanuele; Becce, Carlo; Rimondini, Lia; Morra, Marco

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the surface tension of four common endodontic irrigants: Moltendo EDTA 17%, Cetrexidin, Smear Clear, Sodium hypochlorite 5.25%, with the surface tension of MTAD and Tetraclean. Freshly produced MilliQ water was used as a reference. All measurements were performed following the Wilhelmy plate technique, using a Cahn DCA-322 Dynamic Contact Angle Analyzer at the temperature of 22 degrees C. MilliQ water, sodium hypochlorite 5.25%, and EDTA 17% had the highest surface tension, whereas those of Cetrexedin and Tetraclean has shown the lowest surface tension value. Both new irrigants, MTAD and Tetraclean, are capable of removing the smear layer. Thanks to their low surface tension, increasing the intimate contact of irrigant solutions with the dentinal walls, they may permit deeper penetration. PMID:17055914

  11. Do polysaccharides such as dextran and their monomers really increase the surface tension of water?

    PubMed

    Hoorfar, Mina; Kurz, Michael A; Policova, Zdenka; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    It has been reported in the literature that sugars such as dextrose and sucrose increase the surface tension of water. The effect was interpreted as a depletion of the solute molecules from the water-air interface. This paper presents accurate measurements of the surface tension of different concentrations of dextrose solution as well as its polymer (i.e., dextran). An automated drop shape technique called axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) was used for the surface tension determination. The surface tension measurement is presented as a function of a shape parameter, P(s), which has been used to quantify the range of the applicability of ADSA. The results of the above study show that dextrose solutions decrease the surface tension of water in contradiction to the results obtained from the weight drop method in the literature. The surface tension decreases continuously with increasing concentration. A similar effect was observed for the dextran solutions. To verify that the setup and the methodology are capable of accurately measuring increases in surface tension, a similar experiment was conducted with a sodium chloride solution with a concentration of 1 M. It is well-known that electrolyte solutions, e.g., sodium chloride, increase the surface tension of water. The results obtained from ADSA verify that the sodium chloride increases the surface tension of water by 1.6 mJ/m(2). It is concluded that dextrose and dextran decrease the surface tension of water. Thus, there is no evidence of depletion. To identify the sources of discrepancy between the results of ADSA and those reported in the literature, the experiments were repeated for different concentrations and the rate of drop formation using the drop weight method. It was found that the rate of drop formation is most likely the source of error in the results reported in the literature. PMID:16378399

  12. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Their Applications for Surface Tension Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    Shapes and stability of rotating molten metal drops carrying net surface electric charges are experimentally investigated, and the feasibility of measureing surface tension based on drop rotation is examined.

  13. Sedimentary structures formed in sand by surface tension on melting hailstones.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, D.M.; Hunter, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    When a hailstone melts, wet but unsaturated sand within the crater is attracted to the hailstone surface by surface tension. Shrinkage of the melting hailstone then produces one or more rings of sand within the impact crater.-from Authors

  14. Critical Surface Tension, Critical Surface Energy and Parachor of MnSO3 Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariper, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the critical surface energy of manganese sulfite (MnSO3) crystalline thin film, produced via chemical bath deposition (CBD) on substrates. In addition, parachor, which is an important parameter of chemical physics, and its relationship with grain size, film thickness, etc., has been investigated for thin films. For this purpose, MnSO3 thin films were deposited at room temperature using different deposition times. Structural properties of the films, such as film thickness and average grain size, were examined using X-ray diffraction; film thickness and surface properties were measured by and atomic force microscope; and critical surface tension of MnSO3 thin films was measured with Optical Tensiometer and calculated using Zisman method. The results showed that critical surface tension and parachor of the films have varied with average grain size and film thickness. Critical surface tension was calculated as 32.97, 24.55, 21.03 and 12.76mN/m for 14.66, 30.84, 37.07 and 44.56nm grain sizes, respectively. Film thickness and average grain size have been increased with the deposition time and they were found to be negatively correlated with surface tension and parachor. The relationship between film thickness and parachor was found as P=‑0.1856t+183.45; whereas the relationship between average grain size and parachor was found as P=‑0.8911D+150.52. We also showed the relationships between parachor and some thin films parameters.

  15. Surface tension and related thermodynamic parameters of alcohols using the Traube stalagmometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmohamud, B. A.; Seeneevassen, J.; Rughooputh, S. D. D. V.; Ramasami, P.

    2005-11-01

    An apparatus was devised using the Traube Stalagmometer for the determination of the surface tension of the alcohols methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol. Measurements were made under atmospheric pressure at temperatures between 288.15 K and 313.15 K. The surface tension values were correlated with temperature and surface thermodynamic parameters, namely surface entropy and surface enthalpy, were also calculated. The results obtained are in agreement with the literature and they are promising for the use of this low cost arrangement for accurate measurement of surface tension. Surface tension values were obtained with a maximum error of 0.5 mN m-1 and a maximum standard deviation of 0.8 mN m-1. We recommend this arrangement for students in advanced university courses and it can also be used for research work.

  16. Almost Exponential Decay of Periodic Viscous Surface Waves without Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yan; Tice, Ian

    2013-02-01

    We consider a viscous fluid of finite depth below the air, occupying a three-dimensional domain bounded below by a fixed solid boundary and above by a free moving boundary. The fluid dynamics are governed by the gravity-driven incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and the effect of surface tension is neglected on the free surface. The long time behavior of solutions near equilibrium has been an intriguing question since the work of Beale (Commun Pure Appl Math 34(3):359-392, 1981). This paper is the third in a series of three (Guo in Local well-posedness of the viscous surface wave problem without surface tension, Anal PDE 2012, to appear; in Decay of viscous surface waves without surface tension in horizontally infinite domains, Preprint, 2011) that answers this question. Here we consider the case in which the free interface is horizontally periodic; we prove that the problem is globally well-posed and that solutions decay to equilibrium at an almost exponential rate. In particular, the free interface decays to a flat surface. Our framework contains several novel techniques, which include: (1) a priori estimates that utilize a "geometric" reformulation of the equations; (2) a two-tier energy method that couples the boundedness of high-order energy to the decay of low-order energy, the latter of which is necessary to balance out the growth of the highest derivatives of the free interface; (3) a localization procedure that is compatible with the energy method and allows for curved lower surface geometry. Our decay estimates lead to the construction of global-in-time solutions to the surface wave problem.

  17. Amine Chemistry at Aqueous Interfaces: The Study of Organic Amines in Neutralizing Acidic Gases at an Air/Water Surface Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, L.; Wren, S. N.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Small organic bases have been measured in atmospheric samples, with their sources ranging from industrial processing to animal husbandry. These small organic amines are often highly soluble, being found in atmospheric condensed phases such as fogwater and rainwater. Additionally, they display acid-neutralization ability often greater than ammonia, yet little is known regarding their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. This presentation will describe the molecular level details of a model amine system at the vapor/liquid interface in the presence of acidic gas. We find that this amine system shows very unique properties in terms of its bonding, structure, and orientation at aqueous surfaces. The results of our studies using a combination of computation, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, and surface tension will report the properties inherent to these atmospherically relevant species at aqueous surfaces.

  18. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  19. Density-functional calculations of the surface tension of liquid Al and Na

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, D.; Grimson, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the surface tensions of liquid Al and Na are described using the full ionic density functional formalism of Wood and Stroud (1983). Surface tensions are in good agreement with experiment in both cases, with results substantially better for Al than those found previously in the gradient approximation. Preliminary minimization with respect to surface profile leads to an oscillatory profile superimposed on a nearly steplike ionic density disribution; the oscillations have a wavellength of about a hardsphere diameter.

  20. Simulation of surface tension in 2D and 3D with smoothed particle hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingyu

    2010-09-01

    The methods for simulating surface tension with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in two dimensions and three dimensions are developed. In 2D surface tension model, the SPH particle on the boundary in 2D is detected dynamically according to the algorithm developed by Dilts [G.A. Dilts, Moving least-squares particle hydrodynamics II: conservation and boundaries, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 48 (2000) 1503-1524]. The boundary curve in 2D is reconstructed locally with Lagrangian interpolation polynomial. In 3D surface tension model, the SPH particle on the boundary in 3D is detected dynamically according to the algorithm developed by Haque and Dilts [A. Haque, G.A. Dilts, Three-dimensional boundary detection for particle methods, Journal of Computational Physics 226 (2007) 1710-1730]. The boundary surface in 3D is reconstructed locally with moving least squares (MLS) method. By transforming the coordinate system, it is guaranteed that the interface function is one-valued in the local coordinate system. The normal vector and curvature of the boundary surface are calculated according to the reconstructed boundary surface and then surface tension force can be calculated. Surface tension force acts only on the boundary particle. Density correction is applied to the boundary particle in order to remove the boundary inconsistency. The surface tension models in 2D and 3D have been applied to benchmark tests for surface tension. The ability of the current method applying to the simulation of surface tension in 2D and 3D is proved.

  1. The Equilibrium Spreading Tension of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Maayan P; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-12-01

    Monomolecular films at an air/water interface coexist at the equilibrium spreading tension (γ(e)) with the bulk phase from which they form. For individual phospholipids, γ(e) is single-valued, and separates conditions at which hydrated vesicles adsorb from tensions at which overcompressed monolayers collapse. With pulmonary surfactant, isotherms show that monolayers compressed on the surface of bubbles coexist with the three-dimensional collapsed phase over a range of surface tensions. γ(e) therefore represents a range rather than a single value of surface tension. Between the upper and lower ends of this range, rates of collapse for spread and adsorbed films decrease substantially. Changes during adsorption across this narrow region of coexistence between the two- and three-dimensional structures at least partially explain how alveolar films of pulmonary surfactant become resistant to collapse. PMID:26583569

  2. Surface Tension of Organic Liquids Using the OPLS/AA Force Field.

    PubMed

    Zubillaga, Rafael A; Labastida, Ariana; Cruz, Bibiana; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, Enrique; Alejandre, José

    2013-03-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the surface tension of 61 organic liquids using the OPLS/AA (all-atom optimized potential for liquid simulations). The force field parameters are the same as those recently used (Caleman et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2012, 8, 61) to determine several thermodynamic properties of 146 organic liquids. The correct evaluation of surface tension using slab simulations of liquids requires one to properly take into account the long-range interactions (Trukhymchuk and Alejandre J. Chem. Phys.1999, 111, 8510). In addition, the liquid density from slab simulations has to be the same as that obtained in liquid simulations at constant temperature and pressure. The new results of surface tensions from this work improve those reported by Caleman et al. The OPLS/AA force field gives good surface tensions compared with experimental data for most of the systems studied in this work, although it was developed to simulate liquids. PMID:26587622

  3. New generalized corresponding states correlation for surface tension of normal saturated liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Huili; Tian, Jianxiang

    2015-08-01

    A new simple correlation based on the principle of corresponding state is proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent surface tension of normal saturated liquids. The new correlation contains three coefficients obtained by fitting 17,051 surface tension data of 38 saturated normal liquids. These 38 liquids contain refrigerants, hydrocarbons and some other inorganic liquids. The new correlation requires only the triple point temperature, triple point surface tension and critical point temperature as input and is able to well represent the experimental surface tension data for each of the 38 saturated normal liquids from the triple temperature up to the point near the critical point. The new correlation gives absolute average deviations (AAD) values below 3% for all of these 38 liquids with the only exception being octane with AAD=4.30%. Thus, the new correlation gives better overall results in comparison with other correlations for these 38 normal saturated liquids.

  4. Measurement of Temperature Dependence of Surface Tension of Alcohol Aqueous Solutions by Maximum Bubble Pressure Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Naoki; Kaneko, Takahiro; Nishiguchi, Shotaro; Shoji, Masahiro

    The surface tension of some high-carbon alcohol aqueous solutions increases as the temperature rises above a certain temperature. There have been attempts to use such special solutions in thermal devices to promote heat transfer. In this study, the authors analyzed the temperature dependence of surface tension of these solutions to investigate this peculiar characteristic in detail. The test fluids were butanol and pentanol aqueous solutions as peculiar solutions, while pure water and ethanol aqueous solution were normal fluids. First, the authors adopted Wilhelmy's method to measure the surface tension during heating, but found that the influence of evaporation of the solution could not be completely eliminated. In this study, the maximum bubble pressure method was employed, which made it possible to isolate the measured solution from ambient air and eliminate the influence of evaporation of the solution. The authors succeeded in measuring the temperature dependence of surface tension, and obtained more reasonable data.

  5. Prediction of surface tension of binary mixtures with the parachor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    The parachor method for the estimation of the surface tension of binary mixtures is modified by considering temperature-dependent values of the parachor parameters. The temperature dependence is calculated by a least-squares fit of pure-solvent surface tension data to the binary parachor equation utilizing the Peng-Robinson equation of state for the calculation of equilibrium densities. A very good agreement between experimental binary surface tension data and the predictions of the modified parachor method are found for the case of the mixtures of carbon dioxide and butane, benzene, and cyclohexane, respectively. The surface tension is also predicted for three refrigerant mixtures, i.e. propane, isobutane, and chlorodifluoromethane, with carbon dioxide.

  6. Measurement of Surface Tension of Solid Cu by Improved Multiphase Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Masashi; Liukkonen, Matti; Friman, Michael; Heikinheimo, Erkki; Hämäläinen, Marko; Holappa, Lauri

    2008-08-01

    The surface tension of solid Cu was measured with the multiphase equilibrium (MPE) method in a Pb-Cu system at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C. A special focus was on the measurement of angles involved in MPE. First, the effect of reading error in each angle measurement on the final result of surface tension of solid was simulated. It was found that the two groove measurements under atmosphere conditions are the primary sources of error in the surface tension of solid in the present system. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to these angle measurements as a new method with high accuracy. The obtained surface-tension values of solid Cu in the present work were 1587, 1610, and 1521 mN/m at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C, respectively, representing reasonable temperature dependence.

  7. Practical significance and calculation of surface tension of glass, enamels and glazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzel, A.

    1987-01-01

    Surface tension is important in the formation of streaks in the whole procedure of enameling and glazing., in the action of TiO2 as opacifier, in the addition of borax to enamels, or metals to glasses, and in the corrosion of refractories by molten charges. By the use of known methods for measuring surface tension additive constants are found which give correct results within 1% with no discrepancy due to B2O3.

  8. Critical-point analysis of the liquid-vapor interfacial surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvino, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial surface tension of the liquid-vapor system is analyzed near the critical point in a manner similar to bulk thermodynamic critical-point analyses. This is accomplished by a critical-point analysis of the single-phase hard-wall surface tension. Both a Landau expansion and a scaling theory equation of state are investigated. Some general exponent relations are derived and, in addition, some thermodynamically defined correlation lengths are discussed.

  9. Dynamic surface tension and adsorption kinetics of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianlong; Qu, Wenshan; Li, Zhe

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant was measured by using the maximum bubble pressure method. By using the classical Ward and Tordai equation, the diffusion coefficient for each bulk surfactant concentration was calculated. The results show that at the initial adsorption stage and at the end of the adsorption process, the dynamic surface tension data were all consistent with this diffusion-controlled mechanism. Their diffusion coefficient was slightly lower than that for conventional hydrocarbon surfactants.

  10. A simple experiment for measuring the surface tension of soap solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, F. L.; Faro, J.; Velasco, S.

    2001-08-01

    A simple experimental method for measuring the surface tension of a soap solution is proposed. In the experiment, a soap solution bubble is inflated by a syringe that is also connected to a precision manometer. By measuring the pressure change inside the bubble the surface tension can be calculated using the Young-Laplace equation. Experimental results for both toilet and dishwasher soap solutions are obtained.

  11. Surface tension and scaling of critical nuclei in diatomic and triatomic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napari, Ismo; Laaksonen, Ari

    2007-04-01

    Density functional theory has been used to investigate surface tension and scaling of critical clusters in fluids consisting of diatomic and rigid triatomic molecules. The atomic sites are hard spheres with attractive interactions obtained from the tail part of the Lennard-Jones potential. Asymmetry in attractive interactions between the atomic sites has been introduced to cause molecular orientation and oscillatory density profiles at liquid-vapor interfaces. The radial dependence of cluster surface tension in fluids showing modest orientation in unimolecular layer at the interface or no orientation at all resembles the surface tension behavior of clusters in simple monoatomic fluids, although the surface tension maximum becomes more pronounced with increasing chain length of the molecule. Surface tension of clusters having multiple oscillatory layers at the interface shows a prominent maximum at small cluster sizes; however, the surface tension of large clusters is lower than the planar value. The scaling relation for the number of molecules in the critical cluster and the nucleation barrier height developed by McGraw and Laaksonen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2754 (1996)] are well obeyed for fluids with little structure at liquid-vapor interface. However, fluids having enhanced interfacial structure show some deviation from the particle number scaling, and the barrier height scaling breaks up seriously.

  12. Surface Tension Characteristics of Aqueous Lithium Bromide Solution with Alcoholic Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Naoe; Ogawa, Kiyoshi

    At present, the combination of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr) solution as an absorbent and water as a refrigerant have widely been used as the working fluid for absorption refrigerating machines. In order to obtain absorption enhancement of water vapor into the LiBr solution by Marangoni convection, an alcoholic surfactant is being added in the LiBr solution. In that case, the surface tension of the LiBr solution with the surfactant plays an important role for the vapor absorption. In this study, the surface tensions of the LiBr solution with several alcoholic surfactants such as 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, 2-ethyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-pentanol, 1-heptanol, 1-octanol and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were measured by Wilhelmy plate method. As a result, the surface tensions of 50 wt% LiBr solution with several surfactants were obtained over the LiBr solution temperature range from 298 K to 318 K and the surfactant concentration range from 0 to 104 ppm by mass. The measured surface tension has decreased with the increasing number of carbons included in the surfactant at constant concentration, and the surface tension has increased with the increasing temperature of 50 wt% LiBr solution. The surface tension increase of 1-octanol became greater than any other surfactant used in this work. The effective carbon number of the surfactant for the absorption enhancement was in the range from 7 to 8.

  13. In-flight surface tension and viscosity measurements of inkjet printed droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staat, Hendrik; van der Bos, Arjan; van den Berg, Marc; Reinten, Hans; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    In modern drop-on-demand inkjet printing, the jetted liquid is a mixture of solvents, pigments and surfactants. In order to predict the droplet formation process, it is of importance to know the liquid properties. Surface tension is not constant at the timescale of droplet formation for a liquid that contains surfactants, making it non-trivial to determine the surface tension of the ink directly. Therefore we developed a technique to measure the surface tension of liquids during inkjet printing. We use high speed imaging to record the shape oscillation of a microdroplet within the first few hundred microseconds after droplet pinch-off. The frequency of oscillation depends on the surface tension, so by determining this frequency, we can measure the surface tension. The decay of oscillation amplitude is set by the viscosity, so we can also determine the viscosity with this technique. We use this technique to study the effect of surfactants on the surface tension of ink during the inkjet printing process.

  14. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements. PMID:23957441

  15. Effect of Low-Surface-Tension Liquid on Pattern Collapse Analyzed by Observing Dynamical Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Akira; Suzuki, Kenta

    2006-06-01

    It has been recognized that the decrease in surface tension of rinse water prevents resist pattern collapse during the pattern development process. We have already reported that the resist pattern collapse occurs as induced by stress concentration at the resist pattern bottom due to an air tunnel, that is formed between parallel patterns. To clarify the effect of low-surface-tension liquid visibly, a transparent organic film is used as a monitoring pattern in this study, that is, direct observation through the transparent film (DOT) method. Two types of liquid; namely, (i) low-surface-tension liquid (ethyl alcohol γL=22.5 mJ/m2) and (ii) high-surface-tension liquid [deionized (DI) water γL=72.9 mJ/m2], are used. As a consequence, the air tunnel is not formed using the low surface tension liquid but is formed using DI water. The balance between Laplace and elastic forces of the pattern is estimated to determine pattern collapse and deformation. As a consequence, it is effective to employ low-surface-tension liquid as rinse liquid to prevent air tunnel formation.

  16. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface. PMID:26697736

  17. Quantification of surface tension and internal pressure generated by single mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank; Müller, Daniel J; Helenius, Jonne

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis, adherent cells round up, by increasing the tension of the contractile actomyosin cortex while increasing the internal hydrostatic pressure. In the simple scenario of a liquid cell interior, the surface tension is related to the local curvature and the hydrostatic pressure difference by Laplace's law. However, verification of this scenario for cells requires accurate measurements of cell shape. Here, we use wedged micro-cantilevers to uniaxially confine single cells and determine confinement forces while concurrently determining cell shape using confocal microscopy. We fit experimentally measured confined cell shapes to shapes obeying Laplace's law with uniform surface tension and find quantitative agreement. Geometrical parameters derived from fitting the cell shape, and the measured force were used to calculate hydrostatic pressure excess and surface tension of cells. We find that HeLa cells increase their internal hydrostatic pressure excess and surface tension from ≈ 40 Pa and 0.2 mNm(-1) during interphase to ≈ 400 Pa and 1.6 mNm(-1) during metaphase. The method introduced provides a means to determine internal pressure excess and surface tension of rounded cells accurately and with minimal cellular perturbation, and should be applicable to characterize the mechanical properties of various cellular systems. PMID:25169063

  18. Quantification of surface tension and internal pressure generated by single mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank; Müller, Daniel J.; Helenius, Jonne

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis, adherent cells round up, by increasing the tension of the contractile actomyosin cortex while increasing the internal hydrostatic pressure. In the simple scenario of a liquid cell interior, the surface tension is related to the local curvature and the hydrostatic pressure difference by Laplace's law. However, verification of this scenario for cells requires accurate measurements of cell shape. Here, we use wedged micro-cantilevers to uniaxially confine single cells and determine confinement forces while concurrently determining cell shape using confocal microscopy. We fit experimentally measured confined cell shapes to shapes obeying Laplace's law with uniform surface tension and find quantitative agreement. Geometrical parameters derived from fitting the cell shape, and the measured force were used to calculate hydrostatic pressure excess and surface tension of cells. We find that HeLa cells increase their internal hydrostatic pressure excess and surface tension from ≈ 40 Pa and 0.2 mNm−1 during interphase to ≈ 400 Pa and 1.6 mNm−1 during metaphase. The method introduced provides a means to determine internal pressure excess and surface tension of rounded cells accurately and with minimal cellular perturbation, and should be applicable to characterize the mechanical properties of various cellular systems. PMID:25169063

  19. Quantification of surface tension and internal pressure generated by single mitotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank; Müller, Daniel J.; Helenius, Jonne

    2014-08-01

    During mitosis, adherent cells round up, by increasing the tension of the contractile actomyosin cortex while increasing the internal hydrostatic pressure. In the simple scenario of a liquid cell interior, the surface tension is related to the local curvature and the hydrostatic pressure difference by Laplace's law. However, verification of this scenario for cells requires accurate measurements of cell shape. Here, we use wedged micro-cantilevers to uniaxially confine single cells and determine confinement forces while concurrently determining cell shape using confocal microscopy. We fit experimentally measured confined cell shapes to shapes obeying Laplace's law with uniform surface tension and find quantitative agreement. Geometrical parameters derived from fitting the cell shape, and the measured force were used to calculate hydrostatic pressure excess and surface tension of cells. We find that HeLa cells increase their internal hydrostatic pressure excess and surface tension from ~ 40 Pa and 0.2 mNm-1 during interphase to ~ 400 Pa and 1.6 mNm-1 during metaphase. The method introduced provides a means to determine internal pressure excess and surface tension of rounded cells accurately and with minimal cellular perturbation, and should be applicable to characterize the mechanical properties of various cellular systems.

  20. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF SPRAY RETENTION BY A 3D BARLEY PLANT: EFFECT OF FORMULATION SURFACE TENSION.

    PubMed

    Massinon, M; De Cock, N; Salah, S Ouled Taleb; Lebeau, F

    2015-01-01

    A spray retention model was used in this study to explore theoretically the effect of a range of mixture surface tension on the spray retention and the variability of deposits. The spray retention model was based on an algorithm that tested whether droplets from a virtual nozzle intercepted a 3D plant model. If so, the algorithm determined the contribution of the droplet to the overall retention depending on the droplet impact behaviour on the leaf; adhesion, rebound or splashing. The impact outcome probabilities, function of droplet impact energy, were measured using high-speed imaging on an excised indoor grown barley leaf (BBCH12) both for pure water (surface tension of 0.072 N/m) and a non-ionic super spreader (static surface tension of 0.021 N/m) depending on the surface orientation. The modification of spray mixture properties in the simulations was performed by gradually changing the spray the droplet impact probabilities between pure water and a solution with non-ionic surfactant exhibiting super spreading properties. The plant architecture was measured using a structured light scanner. The final retention was expressed as the volume of liquid retained by the whole plant relative to the projected leaf surface area in the main spray direction. One hundred simulations were performed at different volumes per hectare and flat-fan nozzles for each formulation surface tension. The coefficient of variation was used as indicator of variability of deposits. The model was able to discriminate between mixture surface tension. The spray retention increased as the mixture surface tension decreased. The variability of deposits also decreased as the surface tension decreased. The proposed modelling approach provides a suited tool for sensitivity analysis: nozzle kind, pressure, volume per hectare applied, spray mixture physicochemical properties, plant species, growth stage could be screened to determine the best spraying characteristics maximizing the retention. The

  1. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A.; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-02-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface.The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes

  2. Surface tension and contact angles: Molecular origins and associated microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. T.

    1982-01-01

    Gradient theory converts the molecular theory of inhomogeneous fluid into nonlinear boundary value problems for density and stress distributions in fluid interfaces, contact line regions, nuclei and microdroplets, and other fluid microstructures. The relationship between the basic patterns of fluid phase behavior and the occurrence and stability of fluid microstructures was clearly established by the theory. All the inputs of the theory have molecular expressions which are computable from simple models. On another level, the theory becomes a phenomenological framework in which the equation of state of homogeneous fluid and sets of influence parameters of inhomogeneous fluids are the inputs and the structures, stress tensions and contact angles of menisci are the outputs. These outputs, which find applications in the science and technology of drops and bubbles, are discussed.

  3. Effect of an alcohol-based caries detector on the surface tension of sodium hypochlorite preparations.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero; Guastalli, Andrea R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an alcohol-based caries detector (Kurakay) on the surface tension of a conventional sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) preparation, and a product containing a surface-active agent (Chlor-XTRA). The surface tensions of the following solutions were tested: NaOCl, a mixture of NaOCl and Kurakay 9:1 w/w, Chlor-XTRA, a mixture of Chlor-XTRA and Kurakay 9:1 w/w. Ten measurements per test solution were made at 20°C, using an optical method called the "Pendant drop method", with a commercially available apparatus. The addition of Kurakay reduced the surface tension for NaOCl (p<0.05) whilst no significant difference was detected for Chlor-XTRA (p>0.05). Statistically significant differences between the NaOCl and Chlor-XTRA groups were found (p<0.05). The addition of an alcohol-based caries detector resulted in a reduction of the original surface tension values for NaOCl only. Taking into account the fact that mixtures of NaOCl and Kurakay have been used to assess the penetration of root canal irrigants in vitro, the related changes in surface tension are a possible source of bias. PMID:25672387

  4. Application of the UNIFAC model for prediction of surface tension and thickness of the surface layer in the binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rafati, A A; Bagheri, A; Khanchi, A R; Ghasemian, E; Najafi, Mojgan

    2011-03-01

    Surface properties of binary mixtures of (alkanol with acetonitrile) have been measured by surface tension method at T=298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The UNIFAC method is used for calculation activity coefficients of surface and bulk phases. Also, the surface tension has been predicted based on the Suarez method. This method combines a model for the description of surface tension of liquid mixtures with a UNIFAC group contribution method for the calculation of activity coefficient. Two techniques for calculation of molar surface areas, based on Paquette areas and Rasmussen areas are tested. On comparing the computed values of surface tension by the present approaches with experimental data, satisfactory results have been observed. In addition, the relative Gibbs adsorption and the surface mole fraction have been evaluated using this model. It is possible to calculate the thickness of liquid-vapor interfaces starting from surface tension data. A novel procedure is developed to obtain the thickness of liquid-vapor interfaces as a function of composition in binary systems. PMID:21190694

  5. Surface Tensions of Ionic Liquids: Non-Regular Trend Along the Number of Cyano Groups

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Hugo F. D.; Carvalho, Pedro J.; Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) with cyano-functionalized anions are a set of fluids that are still poorly characterized despite their remarkably low viscosities and potential applications. Aiming at providing a comprehensive study on the influence of the number of –CN groups through the surface tension and surface organization of ILs, the surface tensions of imidazolium-based ILs with cyano-functionalized anions were determined at atmospheric pressure and in the (298.15 to 343.15) K temperature range. The ILs investigated are based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (alkyl = ethyl, butyl and hexyl) combined with the [SCN]-, [N(CN)2]−, [C(CN)3]− and [B(CN)4]-anions. Although the well-known trend regarding the surface tension decrease with the increase of the size of the aliphatic moiety at the cation was observed, the order obtained for the anions is more intricate. For a common cation and at a given temperature, the surface tension decreases according to: [N(CN)2]- > [SCN]- > [C(CN)3]- > [B(CN)4]-. Therefore, the surface tension of this homologous series does not decrease with the increase of the number of –CN groups at the anion as has been previously shown by studies performed with a more limited matrix of ILs. A maximum in the surface tension and critical temperature was observed for [N(CN)2]-based ILs. Furthermore, a minimum in the surface entropy, indicative of a highly structured surface, was found for the same class of ILs. All these evidences seem to be a result of stronger hydrogen-bonding interactions occurring in [N(CN)2]-based ILs, when compared with the remaining CN-based counterparts, and as sustained by cation-anion interaction energies derived from the Conductor Like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS).

  6. Surface tension of water and acid gases from Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoufi, A.; Goujon, F.; Lachet, V.; Malfreyt, P.

    2008-04-01

    We report direct Monte Carlo (MC) simulations on the liquid-vapor interfaces of pure water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. In the case of water, the recent TIP4P/2005 potential model used with the MC method is shown to reproduce the experimental surface tension and to accurately describe the coexistence curves. The agreement with experiments is also excellent for CO2 and H2S with standard nonpolarizable models. The surface tensions are calculated by using the mechanical and the thermodynamic definitions via profiles along the direction normal to the surface. We also discuss the different contributions to the surface tension due to the repulsion-dispersion and electrostatic interactions. The different profiles of these contributions are proposed in the case of water.

  7. A dynamic technique for measuring surface tension at high temperatures in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miiller, A. P.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a dynamic technique for measuring surface tension of liquid metals at high temperatures in a microgravity environment was demonstrated. The basic method involves heating a tubular specimen resistively from ambient temperature through its melting point in about 1 sec by passing an electrical current pulse through it, while simultaneously recording the pertinent experimental quantities. Static equilibrium for the molten specimen is achieved in a microgravity environment by splitting the current after it passes through the specimen tube and returning a fraction along the tube axis, and the remaining fraction outside the specimen. Adjustments to the current split enable a balance between the magnetic and surface tension forces acting on the specimen. Values for surface tension are determined from measurements of the equilibrium dimensions of the molten specimen tube, and the magnitudes of the currents. Rapid melting experiments, performed during microgravity simulations with the NASA KC-135 aircraft, yield a value for the surface tension of copper at its melting point which is in agreement with literature data. Measurements of surface tension of a refractory metal (tantalum) are underway.

  8. Surface tension prediction for hydrocarbons and its application to level swell modelling.

    PubMed

    Cumber, Peter

    2002-01-28

    In this article, methods for estimating surface tension are considered where the specific gravity and normal boiling point are known such as when the composition is expressed using petroleum fractions. This is of interest as surface tension is an important parameter in the calculation of outflow conditions from a two-phase vessel undergoing level swell. A new improved correlation for the parachor is presented and the improved accuracy of the surface tension and bubble rise velocity compared to when the original parachor correlation is used is assessed. Finally the sensitivity of outflow predictions to changes in the surface tension is presented for a depressurising vessel containing pentane. For the vessel depressurisation simulation where the original parachor correlation is used, two-phase venting is maintained for two-three times as long compared to when the actual parachor or improved parachor correlation is used to estimate the surface tension. This has an impact on the error in predicting the mass flow rate as a source condition for other consequence models and also in vent sizing calculations. PMID:11744200

  9. Modeling the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Viglione, G. A.; Li, Z.; McNeill, V. Faye

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can contain thousands of organic compounds which impact aerosol surface tension, affecting aerosol properties such as heterogeneous reactivity, ice nucleation, and cloud droplet formation. We present new experimental data for the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic aqueous mixtures mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Each solution contained 2-6 organic compounds, including methylglyoxal, glyoxal, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, oxalic acid, succinic acid, leucine, alanine, glycine, and serine, with and without ammonium sulfate. We test two semi-empirical surface tension models and find that most reactive, complex, aqueous organic mixtures which do not contain salt are well described by a weighted Szyszkowski-Langmuir (S-L) model which was first presented by Henning et al. (2005). Two approaches for modeling the effects of salt were tested: (1) the Tuckermann approach (an extension of the Henning model with an additional explicit salt term), and (2) a new implicit method proposed here which employs experimental surface tension data obtained for each organic species in the presence of salt used with the Henning model. We recommend the use of method (2) for surface tension modeling of aerosol systems because the Henning model (using data obtained from organic-inorganic systems) and Tuckermann approach provide similar modeling results and goodness-of-fit (χ2) values, yet the Henning model is a simpler and more physical approach to modeling the effects of salt, requiring less empirically determined parameters.

  10. Modeling the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Viglione, G. A.; Li, Z.; McNeill, V. F.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can contain thousands of organic compounds which impact aerosol surface tension, affecting aerosol properties such as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) ability. We present new experimental data for the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic aqueous mixtures mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Each solution contained 2-6 organic compounds, including methylglyoxal, glyoxal, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, oxalic acid, succinic acid, leucine, alanine, glycine, and serine, with and without ammonium sulfate. We test two surface tension models and find that most reactive, complex, aqueous organic mixtures which do not contain salt are well-described by a weighted Szyszkowski-Langmuir (S-L) model which was first presented by Henning et al. (2005). Two approaches for modeling the effects of salt were tested: (1) the Tuckermann approach (an extension of the Henning model with an additional explicit salt term), and (2) a new implicit method proposed here which employs experimental surface tension data obtained for each organic species in the presence of salt used with the Henning model. We recommend the use of method (2) for surface tension modeling because the Henning model (using data obtained from organic-inorganic systems) and Tuckermann approach provide similar modeling fits and goodness of fit (χ2) values, yet the Henning model is a simpler and more physical approach to modeling the effects of salt, requiring less empirically determined parameters.

  11. Statistical Thermodynamic Model for Surface Tension of Aqueous Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Hallie C; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-30

    With statistical mechanics, an isotherm-based surface tension model for single solute aqueous solutions was derived previously (Wexler et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013) for the entire concentration range, from infinite dilution to pure liquid solute, as a function of solute activity. In recent work (Boyer et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015), empirical model parameters were reduced through physicochemical interpretations of both electrolyte and organic solutes, enabling surface tension predictions for systems where there is little or no data. The prior binary model is extended in the current work for the first time to treat multicomponent systems to predict surface tensions of partially dissociating organic acids (acetic, butyric, citric, formic, glutaric, maleic, malic, malonic, oxalic, propionic, and succinic acids). These organic acids are especially applicable to the study of atmospheric aqueous aerosols, due to their abundance in the atmosphere. In the model developed here, surface tension depends explicitly on activities of both the neutral organic and deprotonated components of the acid. The relative concentrations of the nondissociated and dissociated mole fractions are found using known dissociation constants. Model parameters strongly depend on molecular size, number of functional groups, O:C ratio, and number of carbons. For all organic acids in this study, fully predictive modeling of surface tensions is demonstrated. PMID:27219322

  12. Design of an experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinš, V.; Hrubý, J.; Hykl, J.; Blaha, J.; Šmíd, B.

    2013-04-01

    A unique experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of aqueous mixtures has been designed, manufactured, and tested in our laboratory. The novelty of the setup is that it allows measurement of surface tension by two different methods: a modified capillary elevation method in a long vertical capillary tube and a method inspired by the approach of Hacker (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Technical Note 2510, 1-20, 1951), i.e. in a short horizontal capillary tube. Functionality of all main components of the apparatus, e.g., glass chamber with the capillary tube, temperature control unit consisting of two thermostatic baths with special valves for rapid temperature jumps, helium distribution setup allowing pressure variation above the liquid meniscus inside the capillary tube, has been successfully tested. Preliminary results for the surface tension of the stable and metastable supercooled water measured by the capillary elevation method at atmospheric pressure are provided. The surface tension of water measured at temperatures between +26 °C and -11 °C is in good agreement with the extrapolated IAPWS correlation (IAPWS Release on Surface Tension of Ordinary Water Substance, September 1994); however it disagrees with data by Hacker.

  13. Exposure of the hydrophobic components of porcine lung surfactant to oxidant stress alters surface tension properties.

    PubMed Central

    Gilliard, N; Heldt, G P; Loredo, J; Gasser, H; Redl, H; Merritt, T A; Spragg, R G

    1994-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that oxidation of lung surfactant results in loss of surface tension lowering function. Porcine lung surfactant was exposed to conditions known to cause lipid peroxidation (0.2 mM FeCl2 + 0.1 mM H2O2 or 5 microM CuCl2). Lipid peroxidation was verified by detection of conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, fluorescent products, hydroxy alkenals, and loss of unsaturated fatty acids. Exposed samples had significantly diminished surface tension lowering ability in vitro as measured in a bubble surfactometer. Samples exposed to FeCl2 + H2O2 had significantly diminished surface tension lowering ability in vivo as indicated by their reduced ability to improve lung compliance of surfactant-deficient fetal rabbits. Oxidation of phospholipid mixtures with surface tension lowering activity and containing unsaturated acyl groups resulted in partial loss of activity as determined in vitro. These results suggest that the effect of oxidants on lung surfactant function is due, in part, to effects on the phospholipid components and that acute pulmonary inflammation accompanied by oxygen radical production may result in surfactant lipid peroxidation and loss of surface tension lowering function. PMID:8200999

  14. Determination of surface tension from the measurement of internal pressure of mini soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, F.; Behroozi, P. S.

    2011-11-01

    We review the elementary theory that gives the internal pressure of a soap bubble in terms of its radius and surface tension. The theory is generalized to relate the pressure difference across any element of a soap film to its local curvature. This result is used to introduce the concept of the mean curvature of a surface element and is applied to a double soap bubble to obtain the relation between the three radii that characterize its geometry. We also describe a simple setup, suitable for the undergraduate laboratory, to produce mini bubbles and to obtain the surface tension of the soap solution by measuring the radius and internal pressure of the bubbles.

  15. Ternary free-energy lattice Boltzmann model with tunable surface tensions and contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprebon, Ciro; Krüger, Timm; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-03-01

    We present a ternary free-energy lattice Boltzmann model. The distinguishing feature of our model is that we are able to analytically derive and independently vary all fluid-fluid surface tensions and the solid surface contact angles. We carry out a number of benchmark tests: (i) double emulsions and liquid lenses to validate the surface tensions, (ii) ternary fluids in contact with a square well to compare the contact angles against analytical predictions, and (iii) ternary phase separation to verify that the multicomponent fluid dynamics is accurately captured. Additionally we also describe how the model presented here can be extended to include an arbitrary number of fluid components.

  16. A Method to Calculate the Surface Tension of a Cylindrical Droplet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiaosong; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2010-01-01

    The history of Laplace's equations for spherical and cylindrical droplets and the concept of dividing surface in Gibbs' thermodynamic theory of capillary phenomena are briefly reviewed. The existing theories of surface tensions of cylindrical droplets are briefly reviewed too. For cylindrical droplets, a new method to calculate the radius and the…

  17. A Quasi-Containerless Pendant Drop Method for Surface Tension Measurements of Molten Metals and Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1994-01-01

    A quasi-containerless pendant drop method for measuring the surface tension of molten metals and alloys is being developed. The technique involves melting the end of a high-purity metal rod by bombardment with an electron beam to form a pendant drop under ultra-high vacuum conditions to minimize surface contamination.

  18. Convergence and accuracy of kernel-based continuum surface tension models

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.W.; Kothe, D.B.; Puckett, E.G.

    1998-12-01

    Numerical models for flows of immiscible fluids bounded by topologically complex interfaces possessing surface tension inevitably start with an Eulerian formulation. Here the interface is represented as a color function that abruptly varies from one constant value to another through the interface. This transition region, where the color function varies, is a thin O(h) band along the interface where surface tension forces are applied in continuum surface tension models. Although these models have been widely used since the introduction of the popular CSF method [BKZ92], properties such as absolute accuracy and uniform convergence are often not exhibited in interfacial flow simulations. These properties are necessary if surface tension-driven flows are to be reliably modeled, especially in three dimensions. Accuracy and convergence remain elusive because of difficulties in estimating first and second order spatial derivatives of color functions with abrupt transition regions. These derivatives are needed to approximate interface topology such as the unit normal and mean curvature. Modeling challenges are also presented when formulating the actual surface tension force and its local variation using numerical delta functions. In the following they introduce and incorporate kernels and convolution theory into continuum surface tension models. Here they convolve the discontinuous color function into a mollified function that can support accurate first and second order spatial derivatives. Design requirements for the convolution kernel and a new hybrid mix of convolution and discretization are discussed. The resulting improved estimates for interface topology, numerical delta functions, and surface force distribution are evidenced in an equilibrium static drop simulation where numerically-induced artificial parasitic currents are greatly mitigated.

  19. Estimation of solid–liquid interfacial tension using curved surface of a soft solid

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Subrata; Phukan, Monmee; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2015-01-01

    Unlike liquids, for crystalline solids the surface tension is known to be different from the surface energy. However, the same cannot be said conclusively for amorphous materials like soft cross-linked elastomers. To resolve this issue we have introduced here a direct method for measuring solid–liquid interfacial tension by using the curved surface of a solid. In essence, we have used the inner surface of tiny cylindrical channels embedded inside a soft elastomeric film for sensing the effect of the interfacial tension. When a liquid is inserted into the channel, because of wetting-induced alteration in interfacial tension, its thin wall deflects considerably; the deflection is measured with an optical profilometer and analyzed using the Föppl–von Kármán equation. We have used several liquids and cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) as the solid to show that the estimated values of the solid–liquid interfacial tension matches with the corresponding solid–liquid interfacial energy reasonably well. PMID:26420871

  20. Effect of surface tension on the onset of convection in a double-diffusive layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.; Su, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of surface tension on the stability of a double-diffusive layer is considered using linear stability analysis. The surface tension is assumed to vary linearly with temperature and solute concentration. The eigenvalue problem is solved by the Galerkin method. Results show that the predicted stability boundary based on Marangoni effects alone is completely altered in the presence of buoyancy effects induced by low gravity levels (about 10 exp -5 g). At reduced gravity levels, salt-finger instability may onset in the overstable mode due to the stabilizing effect of surface tension. Fluid properties in terms of the Prandtl and the Lewis numbers have a profound effect on the stability conditions; opposite stability characteristics are found in salt solutions and in molten metals.

  1. Effects of additives on volume change on melting, surface tension, and viscosity of liquid aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. L.; Rasmussen, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of various oxide additives on the volume change on melting, the surface tension, and the viscosity of liquid Al2O3 were studied. Additives of Sm2O3, MgO, and Y2O3 which form solid solutions, compounds, and multiphase solids with Al2O3 were studied. A review of the property data for Al2O3 and Al2O3 containing oxide additives is presented. Oxide additives to Al2O3 reduce the volume change on melting and with the exception of SiO2 lower the viscosity; surface tensions change with oxide additives, but changes vary with different container material. Viscosity and volume change on melting appeared to be significantly more important for studying the properties of liquid oxides than surface tension. Supercooling of 270 K of yttrium aluminum garnet was observed.

  2. On simulating lipid bilayers with an applied surface tension: periodic boundary conditions and undulations.

    PubMed Central

    Feller, S E; Pastor, R W

    1996-01-01

    As sketched in Fig. 1, a current molecular dynamics computer simulation of a lipid bilayer fails to capture significant features of the macroscopic system, including long wavelength undulations. Such fluctuations are intrinsically connected to the value of the macroscopic (or thermodynamic) surface tension (cf. Eqs. 1 and 9; for a related treatment, see Brochard et al., 1975, 1976). Consequently, the surface tension that might be evaluated in an MD simulation should not be expected to equal the surface tension obtained from macroscopic measurements. Put another way, the largest of the three simulations presented here contained over 16,000 atoms and required substantial computer time to complete, but modeled a system of only 36 lipids per side. From this perspective it is not surprising that the system is not at the thermodynamic limit. An important practical consequence of this effect is that simulations with fluctuating area should be carried out with a nonzero applied surface tension (gamma 0 of Fig. 2) even when the macroscopic tension is zero, or close to zero. Computer simulations at fixed surface area, which can explicitly determine pressure anisotropy at the molecular level, should ultimately lend insight into the value of gamma 0, including its dependence on lipid composition and other membrane components. As we have noted and will describe further in separate publications (Feller et al., 1996; Feller et al., manuscript in preparation), surface tensions obtained from simulations can be distorted by inadequate initial conditions and convergence, and are sensitive to potential energy functions, force truncation methods, and system size; it is not difficult, in fact, to tune terms in the potential energy function so as to yield surface tensions close to zero. This is why parameters should be tested extensively on simpler systems, for example, monolayers. The estimates of gamma 0 that we have presented here should be regarded as qualitative, and primarily

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the surface tension and structure of salt solutions and clusters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Li, Xin; Hede, Thomas; Tu, Yaoquan; Leck, Caroline; Ågren, Hans

    2012-03-15

    Sodium halides, which are abundant in sea salt aerosols, affect the optical properties of aerosols and are active in heterogeneous reactions that cause ozone depletion and acid rain problems. Interfacial properties, including surface tension and halide anion distributions, are crucial issues in the study of the aerosols. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations of water solutions and clusters containing sodium halides with the interatomic interactions described by a conventional force field. The simulations reproduce experimental observations that sodium halides increase the surface tension with respect to pure water and that iodide anions reach the outermost layer of water clusters or solutions. It is found that the van der Waals interactions have an impact on the distribution of the halide anions and that a conventional force field with optimized parameters can model the surface tension of the salt solutions with reasonable accuracy. PMID:22352372

  4. A new curvature technique calculation for surface tension contribution in PLIC-VOF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.-M.; Chesneau, X.; Zeghmati, B.

    2006-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) methods have been used for numerous numerical simulations. Among these techniques used to define the moving interface, the piecewise linear interface reconstruction (PLIC-VOF) is one of the most accurate. A study of the superficial tension impact on two-phase flow with free surface is presented. A new method based on direct staggered grid is developped to include surface tension in PLIC-VOF. The new numerical curvature calculation method doesn't need smoothed colour function and leads to less “spurious current”. This technique is applied to the calculus of surface tension force in the case of the rise of air bubble in viscous liquid and the fall of liquid drop in the same liquid on free surface. Droplets, thin layer and capillarity waves are observed after the free surface rupture for different Bond number. The influence of surface tension calculus is then obvioused and when the drop hit the free surface, wavelets propagate toward the virtual boundaries imposed.

  5. Surface tensions, viscosities, and diffusion constants in mixed component single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, Bryan; Marshall, Frances; Song, Young-Chul; Haddrell, Allen; Reid, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Surface tension and viscosity are important aerosol properties but are challenging to measure on individual particles owing to their small size and mass. Aerosol viscosity impacts semivolatile partitioning from the aerosol phase, molecular diffusion in the bulk of the particle, and reaction kinetics. Aerosol surface tension impacts how particles activate to serve as cloud condensation nuclei. Knowledge of these properties and how they change under different conditions hinders accurate modelling of aerosol physical state and atmospheric impacts. We present measurements made using holographic optical tweezers to directly determine the viscosity and surface tension of optically trapped droplets containing ~1-4 picolitres of material (corresponding to radii of ~5-10 micrometres). Two droplets are captured in the experimental setup, equilibrated to a relative humidity, and coalesced through manipulation of the relative trap positions. The moment of coalescence is captured using camera imaging as well as from elastically backscattered light connected to an oscilloscope. For lower viscosity droplets, the relaxation in droplet shape to a sphere follows the form of a damped oscillator and gives the surface tension and viscosity. For high viscosity droplets, the relaxation results in a slow merging of the two droplets to form a sphere and the timescale of that process permits determination of viscosity. We show that droplet viscosity and surface tension can be quantitatively determined to within <10% of the expected value for low viscosity droplets and to better than 1 order of magnitude for high viscosity droplets. Examples illustrating how properties such as surface tension can change in response to environmental conditions will be discussed. Finally, a study of the relationship between viscosity, diffusion constants, vapour pressures, and reactive uptake coefficients for a mixed component aerosol undergoing oxidation and volatilisation will be discussed.

  6. Accuracy of surface tension measurement from drop shapes: the role of image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalantarian, Ali; Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-11-01

    Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA) has been extensively used for surface tension measurement. In essence, ADSA works by matching a theoretical profile of the drop to the extracted experimental profile, taking surface tension as an adjustable parameter. Of the three main building blocks of ADSA, i.e. edge detection, the numerical integration of the Laplace equation for generating theoretical curves and the optimization procedure, only edge detection (that extracts the drop profile line from the drop image) needs extensive study. For the purpose of this article, the numerical integration of the Laplace equation for generating theoretical curves and the optimization procedure will only require a minor effort. It is the aim of this paper to investigate how far the surface tension accuracy of drop shape techniques can be pushed by fine tuning and optimizing edge detection strategies for a given drop image. Two different aspects of edge detection are pursued here: sub-pixel resolution and pixel resolution. The effect of two sub-pixel resolution strategies, i.e. spline and sigmoid, on the accuracy of surface tension measurement is investigated. It is found that the number of pixel points in the fitting procedure of the sub-pixel resolution techniques is crucial, and its value should be determined based on the contrast of the image, i.e. the gray level difference between the drop and the background. On the pixel resolution side, two suitable and reliable edge detectors, i.e. Canny and SUSAN, are explored, and the effect of user-specified parameters of the edge detector on the accuracy of surface tension measurement is scrutinized. Based on the contrast of the image, an optimum value of the user-specified parameter of the edge detector, SUSAN, is suggested. Overall, an accuracy of 0.01mJ/m(2) is achievable for the surface tension determination by careful fine tuning of edge detection algorithms. PMID:24018120

  7. Effects of Oxygen Partial Pressure on the Surface Tension of Liquid Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Gowda, Vijaya Kumar Malahalli Shankare; Rodriguez, Justin; Matson, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has been recently upgraded with an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, theoretically in the range from 10-36 to 100 bar. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte, which is yttria-stabilized zirconia. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, PID-based current loop, and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects of oxygen partial pressure on the surface tension of undercooled liquid nickel will be analyzed, and the results will be presented. The surface tension will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension will be measured using the oscillating drop method. While undercooled, each sample will be oscillated several times consecutively to investigate how the surface tension behaves with time while at a particular oxygen partial pressure.

  8. Experimental investigation of surface tension in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids with optical diffractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargham, Mehrnaz; Moradi, Ali-Reza; Najafi, Ali

    2013-11-01

    In this paper using an optical method based on diffraction phenomenon, we studied surface tension of fluids. Diffraction patterns of a laser beam diffracted from surface waves, induced by an external acoustic wave generator, provides information of the surface of fluids. This information, in turn, enables calculating an experimental dispersion relation and surface tension of fluids. Spherical and cylindrical surface waves on fluids are generated by sticking a long thin needle and a thin metal plate, respectively, to a loudspeaker. Turning on the generator, the needle (or metal plate) causes waves on the surface, which act as a diffraction grating to the incident laser beam. The experiment and analysis were performed for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Distilled water was used as a Newtonian sample fluid, and polyacrylamide solution was used as a non-Newtonian one. Our results predict considerable differences between Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids behavior in terms of their surface wave dispersion.

  9. Design of a surface deformation measuring instrument for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    1993-01-01

    This final technical report covers the work accomplished (under NAG3-1300) from 1 October 1991 to 1 October 1993. The grant is a direct result of Dr. H. Philip Stahl's (of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology) participation in the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored by Case Western Reserve University and the Ohio Aerospace Institute. The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a fundamental fluid physics experiment designed to provide quantitative data on the thermocapillary flow of fluid under the influence of an increased localized surface temperature. STDCE flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia in the First United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) in June 1992. The second flight of this experiment (STDCE-2) is scheduled for 1995. The specific science objectives of STDCE-2 are to determine the extent and nature of thermocapillary flows, the effect of heating mode and level, the effect of the liquid free-surface shape, and the onset conditions for and nature of oscillatory flows. In order to satisfy one of these objectives, an instrument for measuring the shape of an air/oil free surface must be developed.

  10. Surface tension and viscosity from damped free oscillations of viscous droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryanarayana, P. V. R.; Bayazitoglu, Yildiz

    1990-01-01

    Damped oscillations of a viscous droplet in vacuum or in an inert gas of negligible density are considered. The dependence of the complex decay factor on the properties of the liquid is investigated for the first time, and numerical results are compared with earlier studies for special cases. A new method is developed to determine both surface tension and viscosity from a single experiment in which the damping rate and frequency of oscillations are measured. The procedure to determine surface tension and viscosity from oscillating levitated liquids is outlined, and results presented for various modes of shape oscillations.

  11. Stability analysis of surface tension effects on a double-diffusive layer. [in reduced gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.; Su, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The linear stability characteristics of a fluid layer with simultaneous temperature and concentration gradients in a reduced gravity field are examined. The surface tension of the fluid is assumed to be a linear function of temperature and concentration. It is concluded that a small amount of gravity may damp out oscillatory instability or may alter its dynamics so that instability appears as steady convection. The onset of salt-finger instability may be in the overstable mode due to the surface tension method. The Lewis and Prandtl numbers of the material have a strong influence on the stability boundaries and onset characteristics of the system.

  12. Surface tension measurements of aqueous ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S. A.; Mccay, M. H.; Mccay, T. D.; Gray, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Aqueous NH4Cl's solidification is often used to model metal alloy solidification processes. The present determinations of the magnitude of the variation of aqueous NH4Cl's surface tension as a function of both temperature and solutal concentration were conducted at 3, 24, and 40 C over the 72-100 wt pct water solutal range. In general, the surface tension increases 0.31 dyn/cm per percent decrease in wt pct of water, and decreases 0.13 dyn/cm for each increase in deg C. Attention is given to the experimental apparatus employed.

  13. Surface Tension and Viscosity of Quasicrystal-Forming Ti-Zr-Ni Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, R. W.; Bradshaw, R. C.; Rogers, J. R.; Rathz, T. J.; Lee, G. W.; Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    The surface tension and viscosity of quasicrystal-forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys were measured over a range of temperature, including both stable and undercooled liquids by an Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) technique. ESL is a containerless technique which allows processing of samples without contact, greatly reducing contamination and increasing access to the metastable undercooled liquid. The measured viscosity is typical of glass-forming alloys of similar composition to the quasicrystal-forming alloys studied here, while the surface tension shows an anomaly at deep undercoolings.

  14. Interrelation of surface tension, optical turbidity, and color of operational transformer oils

    SciTech Connect

    L'vov, S. Yu.; Lyut'ko, E. O.; Lankau, Ya. V.; Komarov, V. B.; Seliverstov, A. F.; Bondareva, V. N.; L'vov, Yu. N.; L'vov, M. Yu.; Ershov, B. G.

    2011-09-15

    Measurements of the acidity, optical turbidity, surface tension, and color of transformer oil from 54 power transformers, autotransformers, and shunt reactors are reported. Changes in surface tension, optical turbidity, and color are found to obey adequate linear correlations, while the acidity has no correlation with any of these properties. Numerical criteria for the maximum permissible state (quality) of the oil with respect to optical turbidity and color are obtained. Recommendations to operating staff are provided for cases in which the criteria for optical turbidity and color are exceeded.

  15. A simple laboratory experiment to measure the surface tension of a liquid in contact with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, Jordi-Roger; Esteban, Bernat

    2014-09-01

    A simple and accurate laboratory experiment to measure the surface tension of liquids has been developed, which is well suited to teach the behaviour of liquids to first- or second-year students of physics, engineering or chemistry. The experimental setup requires relatively inexpensive equipment usually found in physics and chemistry laboratories, since it consists of a used or recycled burette, an analytical balance and a stereoscopic microscope or a micrometer. Experimental data and error analysis show that the surface tension of distilled water, 1-butanol and glycerol can be determined with accuracy better than 1.4%.

  16. Flow analysis in a vane-type surface tension propellant tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, A.; Ji, B.; Zhuang, B. T.; Hu, Q.; Luo, X. W.; Y Xu, H.

    2013-12-01

    Vane-type surface tension tanks are widely used as the propellant management devices in spacecrafts. This paper treats the two-phase flow inside a vane-type surface tension tank. The study indicates that the present numerical methods such as time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations, VOF model can reasonably predict the flow inside a propellant tank. It is clear that the vane geometry has important effects on transmission performance of the liquid. for a vane type propellant tank, the vane having larger width, folding angle, height of folded side and clearance is preferable if possible.

  17. Vapor-liquid surface tension of strong short-range Yukawa fluid.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, G; Bárcenas, M; Orea, P

    2011-04-21

    The thermodynamic properties of strong short-range attractive Yukawa fluids, κ = 10, 9, 8, and 7, are determined by combining the slab technique with the standard and the replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) methods. A good agreement was found among the coexistence curves of these systems calculated by REMC and those previously reported in the literature. However, REMC allows exploring the coexistence at lower temperatures, where dynamics turns glassy. To obtain the surface tension we employed, for both methods, a procedure that yields the pressure tensor components for discontinuous potentials. The surface tension results obtained by the standard MC and REMC techniques are in good agreement. PMID:21513403

  18. Surface tension and the mechanics of liquid inclusions in compliant solids.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Wettlaufer, John S; Dufresne, Eric R

    2015-01-28

    Eshelby's theory of inclusions has wide-reaching implications across the mechanics of materials and structures including the theories of composites, fracture, and plasticity. However, it does not include the effects of surface stress, which has recently been shown to control many processes in soft materials such as gels, elastomers and biological tissue. To extend Eshelby's theory of inclusions to soft materials, we consider liquid inclusions within an isotropic, compressible, linear-elastic solid. We solve for the displacement and stress fields around individual stretched inclusions, accounting for the bulk elasticity of the solid and the surface tension (i.e. isotropic strain-independent surface stress) of the solid-liquid interface. Surface tension significantly alters the inclusion's shape and stiffness as well as its near- and far-field stress fields. These phenomena depend strongly on the ratio of the inclusion radius, R, to an elastocapillary length, L. Surface tension is significant whenever inclusions are smaller than 100L. While Eshelby theory predicts that liquid inclusions generically reduce the stiffness of an elastic solid, our results show that liquid inclusions can actually stiffen a solid when R<3L/2. Intriguingly, surface tension cloaks the far-field signature of liquid inclusions when R=3L/2. These results are have far-reaching applications from measuring local stresses in biological tissue, to determining the failure strength of soft composites. PMID:25503573

  19. Controlling the Motion of Ferrofluid Droplets Using Surface Tension Gradients and Magnetoviscous Pinning.

    PubMed

    Ody, T; Panth, M; Sommers, A D; Eid, K F

    2016-07-12

    This work demonstrates the controlled motion and stopping of individual ferrofluid droplets due to a surface tension gradient and a uniform magnetic field. The surface tension gradients are created by patterning hydrophilic aluminum regions, shaped as wedges, on a hydrophobic copper surface. This pattern facilitates the spontaneous motion of water-based ferrofluid droplets down the length of the wedge toward the more hydrophilic aluminum end due to a net capillarity force created by the underlying surface wettability gradient. We observed that applying a magnetic field parallel to the surface tension gradient direction has little or no effect on the droplet's motion, while a moderate perpendicular magnetic field can stop the motion altogether effectively "pinning" the droplet. In the absence of the surface tension gradient, droplets elongate in the presence of a parallel field but do not travel. This control of the motion of individual droplets might lend itself to some biomedical and lab-on-a-chip applications. The directional dependence of the magnetoviscosity observed in this work is believed to be the consequence of the formation of nanoparticle chains in the fluid due to the existence of a minority of relatively larger magnetic particles. PMID:27269182

  20. Stability and evolution of low-surface-tension metal catalyzed growth of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Linwei; Fortuna, Franck; O'Donnell, Benedict; Patriache, Gilles; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2011-03-01

    Low-surface-tension metals were predicted to be insufficient to catalyze the growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) in vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mode while counter examples do exist, for example, in the tin- or indium-catalyzed SiNWs. This puzzle remains largely unresolved. We first examine the local tension-force-balance in a tin-catalyzed SiNW by using a cross-section analysis. We found that the existence of an ultrathin sidewall-spreading catalyst layer helps to stabilize the catalyst drop during growth. The predicted contact-angle evolution, by an energetic balance model, is also supported by the experimental data. These results bring critical understanding on the low-surface-tension catalyzed VLS process.

  1. Crack-mouth displacements for semielliptical surface cracks subjected to remote tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Atluri, Satya N.

    1992-01-01

    The exact analytical solution for an embedded elliptical crack in an infinite body subjected to arbitrary loading was used in conjunction with the finite element alternating method to obtain crack-mouth-opening displacements (CMOD) for surface cracks in finite plates subjected to remote tension. Identical surface-crack configurations were also analyzed with the finite element method using 20-noded element for plates subjected to both remote tension and bending. The CMODs from these two methods generally agreed within a few percent of each other. Comparisons made with experimental results obtained from surface cracks in welded aluminum alloy specimens subjected to tension also showed good agreement. Empirical equations were developed for CMOD for a wide range of surface-crack shapes and sizes subjected to tension and bending loads. These equations were obtained by modifying the Green-Sneddon exact solution for an elliptical crack in an infinite body to account for finite boundary effects. These equations should be useful in monitoring surface-crack growth in tests and in developing complete crack-face-displacement equations for use in three-dimensional weight-function methods.

  2. Bidirectional Control of Flow in Thin Polymer Films by Photochemically Manipulating Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chae Bin; Janes, Dustin; Zhou, Sunshine; Dulaney, Austin; Ellison, Christopher

    The Marangoni effect causes transport of liquids in response to surface tension gradients. In a thin polymer film, such flow results in formation of topographic features that could be exploited as a practically useful route to manufacture patterned surfaces. An especially versatile material for this application should be able to be spatially programmed to possess regions of higher or lower relative surface tension so that the direction of flow into or out of those regions can be directed with precision. To this end, we describe here a photopolymer whose melt-state surface tension can be selectively raised or lowered in light exposed regions depending on the wavelength and dose of applied light. The direction of Marangoni flow into or out of irradiated regions agrees with expected surface tension changes associated with each photochemical transformation. We believe this patterning methodology will be potentially useful for high throughput fabrication environments such as roll-to-roll processing that can exploit contact-free and solvent-free topography development.

  3. Size-dependent surface tension of a cylindrical nanobubble in liquid Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Zhu, Ru-Zeng; Wei, Jiu-An

    2012-08-01

    In view of the continued disputes on the fundamental question of whether the surface tension of a vapour bubble in liquid argon increases, or decreases, or remains unchanged with the increase of curvature radius, a cylindrical vapour bubble of argon is studied by molecular dynamics simulation in this paper instead of spherical vapour bubble so as to reduce the statistical error. So far, the surface tension of the cylindrical vapour bubble has not been studied by molecular dynamics simulation in the literature. Our results show that the surface tension decreases with radius increasing. By fitting the Tolman equation with our data, the Tolman length δ = -0.6225 sigma is given under cut-off radius 2.5σ, where σ = 0.3405 nm is the diameter of an argon atom. The Tolman length of Ar being negative is affirmed and the Tolman length of Ar being approximately zero given in the literature is negated, and it is pointed out that this error is attributed to the application of the inapplicable empirical equation of state and the neglect of the difference between surface tension and an equimolar surface.

  4. Constrained sessile drop as a new configuration to measure low surface tension in lung surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Laura M Y; Lu, James J; Chan, Yawen W; Ng, Amy; Zhang, Ling; Hoorfar, Mina; Policova, Zdenka; Grundke, Karina; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2004-08-01

    Existing methodology for surface tension measurements based on drop shapes suffers from the shortcoming that it is not capable to function at very low surface tension if the liquid dispersion is opaque, such as therapeutic lung surfactants at clinically relevant concentrations. The novel configuration proposed here removes the two big restrictions, i.e., the film leakage problem that is encountered with such methods as the pulsating bubble surfactometer as well as the pendant drop arrangement, and the problem of the opaqueness of the liquid, as in the original captive bubble arrangement. A sharp knife edge is the key design feature in the constrained sessile drop that avoids film leakage at low surface tension. The use of the constrained sessile drop configuration in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure surface tension allows complete automation of the setup. Dynamic studies with lung surfactant can be performed readily by changing the volume of a sessile drop, and thus the surface area, by means of a motor-driven syringe. To illustrate the validity of using this configuration, experiments were performed using an exogenous lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) at 5.0 mg/ml. A comparison of results obtained for BLES at low concentration between the constrained sessile drop and captive bubble arrangement shows excellent agreement between the two approaches. When the surface area of the BLES film (0.5 mg/ml) was compressed by about the same amount in both systems, the minimum surface tensions attained were identical within the 95% confidence limits. PMID:15064296

  5. Effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi Y; Gitiafroz, Roya; Acosta, Edgar; Policova, Zdenka; Cox, Peter N; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2005-11-01

    The in vitro adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces is affected by both the composition of the surfactant preparations and the conditions under which the assessment is conducted. Relevant experimental conditions are surfactant concentration, temperature, subphase pH, electrolyte concentration, humidity, and gas composition of the atmosphere exposed to the interface. The effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of a therapeutic lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), was studied by measuring the dynamic surface tension (DST). Axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) was used in conjunction with three different experimental methodologies, i.e., captive bubble (CB), pendant drop (PD), and constrained sessile drop (CSD), to measure the DST. The experimental results obtained from these three methodologies show that for 100% relative humidity (RH) at 37 degrees C the rate of adsorption of BLES at an air-water interface is substantially slower than for low humidity. It is also found that there is a difference in the rate of surface tension decrease measured from the PD and CB/CSD methods. These experimental results agree well with an adsorption model that considers the combined effects of entropic force, electrostatic interaction, and gravity. These findings have implications for the development and evaluation of new formulations for surfactant replacement therapy. PMID:16262325

  6. In situ measurement of contact angles and surface tensions of interfacial nanobubbles in ethanol aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binyu; Wang, Xingya; Wang, Shuo; Tai, Renzhong; Zhang, Lijuan; Hu, Jun

    2016-04-14

    The astonishing long lifetime and large contact angles of interfacial nanobubbles are still in hot debate despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies. One hypothesis to reconcile the two abnormalities of interfacial nanobubbles is that they have low surface tensions. However, few studies have been reported to measure the surface tensions of nanobubbles due to the lack of effective measurements. Herein, we investigate the in situ contact angles and surface tensions of individual interfacial nanobubbles immersed in different ethanol aqueous solutions using quantitative nanomechanical atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the contact angles of nanobubbles in the studied ethanol solutions were also much larger than the corresponding macroscopic counterparts on the same substrate, and they decreased with increasing ethanol concentrations. More significantly, the surface tensions calculated were much lower than those of the gas-liquid interfaces of the solutions at the macroscopic scale but have similar tendencies with increasing ethanol concentrations. Those results are expected to be helpful in further understanding the stability of interfacial nanobubbles in complex solutions. PMID:26954468

  7. Evolution of melt-vapor surface tension in silicic volcanic systems: Experiments with hydrous melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.; Sisson, T.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the melt-vapor surface tension (??) of natural, water-saturated dacite melt at 200 MPa, 950-1055??C, and 4.8-5.7 wt % H2O. We experimentally determine the critical supersaturation pressure for bubble nucleation as a function of dissolved water and then solve for ?? at those conditions using classical nucleation theory. The solutions obtained give dacite melt-vapor surface tensions that vary inversely with dissolved water from 0.042 (??0.003) J m-2 at 5.7 wt% H2O to 0.060 (??0.007) J m-2 at 5.2 wt% H2O to 0.073 (??0.003) J m-2 at 4.8 wt% H2O. Combining our dacite results with data from published hydrous haplogranite and high-silica rhyolite experiments reveals that melt-vapor surface tension also varies inversely with the concentration of mafic melt components (e.g., CaO, FeOtotal, MgO). We develop a thermodynamic context for these observations in which melt-vapor surface tension is represented by a balance of work terms controlled by melt structure. Overall, our results suggest that cooling, crystallization, and vapor exsolution cause systematic changes in ?? that should be considered in dynamic modeling of magmatic processes.

  8. Existence and uniqueness of analytic solution for unsteady crystals with zero surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xuming

    2007-03-01

    We study the initial value problem for two-dimensional dendritic crystal growth with zero surface tension. If the initial data is analytic and close to Ivantsov steady solution, it is proved that unique analytic solution exists locally in time. The analysis is based on a Nirenberg Theorem on abstract Cauchy-Kovalevsky problem in properly chosen Banach spaces.

  9. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  10. In situ droplet surface tension and viscosity measurements in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, B.; Siewert, E.; Schein, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptation of a drop oscillation technique that enables in situ measurements of thermophysical properties of an industrial pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. Surface tension, viscosity, density and temperature were derived expanding the portfolio of existing methods and previously published measurements of surface tension in pulsed GMAW. Natural oscillations of pure liquid iron droplets are recorded during the material transfer with a high-speed camera. Frame rates up to 30 000 fps were utilized to visualize iron droplet oscillations which were in the low kHz range. Image processing algorithms were employed for edge contour extraction of the droplets and to derive parameters such as oscillation frequencies and damping rates along different dimensions of the droplet. Accurate surface tension measurements were achieved incorporating the effect of temperature on density. These are compared with a second method that has been developed to accurately determine the mass of droplets produced during the GMAW process which enables precise surface tension measurements with accuracies up to 1% and permits the study of thermophysical properties also for metals whose density highly depends on temperature. Thermophysical properties of pure liquid iron droplets formed by a wire with 1.2 mm diameter were investigated in a pulsed GMAW process with a base current of 100 A and a pulse current of 600 A. Surface tension and viscosity of a sample droplet were 1.83 ± 0.02 N m-1 and 2.9 ± 0.3 mPa s, respectively. The corresponding droplet temperature and density are 2040 ± 50 K and 6830 ± 50 kg m-3, respectively.

  11. Design of a vapor-liquid-equilibrium, surface tension, and density apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C.D.; Outcalt, S.L.

    1997-12-31

    The design and performance of a unique vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) apparatus with density and surface tension capabilities is presented. The apparatus operates at temperatures ranging from 218 to 423 K, at pressures to 17 MPa, at densities to 1100 kg/m{sup 3}, and at surface tensions ranging from 0.1 to 75 mN/m. Temperatures are measured with a precision of {+-}0.02 K, pressures with a precision of {+-}0.1% of full scale, densities with a precision of {+-}0.5 kg/m{sup 3}, surface tensions with a precision of {+-}0.2 mN/m, and compositions with a precision of {+-}0.005 mole fraction. The apparatus is designed to be both accurate and versatile. Capabilities include: (1) the ability to operate the apparatus as a bubble point pressure or an isothermal pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) apparatus, (2) the ability to measure densities and surface tensions of the coexisting phases, and (3) the ability for either trapped or capillary sampling. We can validate our VLE and density data by measuring PVT or bubble point pressures in the apparatus. The use of the apparatus for measurements of VLE, densities, and surface tensions over wide ranges of temperature and pressure is important in equation of state and transport property model development. The use of different sampling procedures allows measurement of a wider variety of fluid mixtures. VLE measurements on the alternative refrigerant system R32/134a are presented and compared to literature results to verify the performance of the apparatus.

  12. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-11-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2) dyn cm-1 in pure water (a 10% surface tension reduction from that of pure water) and 62(±1) dyn cm-1 in AS solutions (a 20.6% reduction from that of a 3.1 M AS solution). Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9% reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  13. Computer modelling of the surface tension of the gas-liquid and liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2016-03-01

    This review presents the state of the art in molecular simulations of interfacial systems and of the calculation of the surface tension from the underlying intermolecular potential. We provide a short account of different methodological factors (size-effects, truncation procedures, long-range corrections and potential models) that can affect the results of the simulations. Accurate calculations are presented for the calculation of the surface tension as a function of the temperature, pressure and composition by considering the planar gas-liquid interface of a range of molecular fluids. In particular, we consider the challenging problems of reproducing the interfacial tension of salt solutions as a function of the salt molality; the simulations of spherical interfaces including the calculation of the sign and size of the Tolman length for a spherical droplet; the use of coarse-grained models in the calculation of the interfacial tension of liquid-liquid surfaces and the mesoscopic simulations of oil-water-surfactant interfacial systems. PMID:26744846

  14. Surface tension of liquid ternary Fe-Cu-Mo alloys measured by electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. P.; Luo, B. C.; Qin, T.; Chang, J.; Wei, B.

    2008-09-01

    For the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary system, the surface tensions of three selected alloys, i.e., three typical monotectic alloys, were measured by the electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method over a broad temperature range, including both superheated and undercooled states. The maximum undercooling attained is up to 173 K. The experimental results show a good linear correlation between the surface tension and the temperature. By applying on the Butler equation, the surface tensions were also calculated and they are in good agreement with the measured ones, except that in the undercooled state, the calculated value is slightly larger than the measured results. Interestingly, both the measured and calculated results indicate that the enriched element on the droplet surface is much more conspicuous than other elements in influencing the surface tension. Besides, the viscosity and the density of the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary alloys are also derived on the grounds of the experimentally measured surface tensions.

  15. Surface tension of liquid ternary Fe-Cu-Mo alloys measured by electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method.

    PubMed

    Wang, H P; Luo, B C; Qin, T; Chang, J; Wei, B

    2008-09-28

    For the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary system, the surface tensions of three selected alloys, i.e., three typical monotectic alloys, were measured by the electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method over a broad temperature range, including both superheated and undercooled states. The maximum undercooling attained is up to 173 K. The experimental results show a good linear correlation between the surface tension and the temperature. By applying on the Butler equation, the surface tensions were also calculated and they are in good agreement with the measured ones, except that in the undercooled state, the calculated value is slightly larger than the measured results. Interestingly, both the measured and calculated results indicate that the enriched element on the droplet surface is much more conspicuous than other elements in influencing the surface tension. Besides, the viscosity and the density of the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary alloys are also derived on the grounds of the experimentally measured surface tensions. PMID:19045047

  16. Determination of the Surface Tension of Liquid Fe77.5Cu13Mo9.5 Ternary Monotectic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-Peng; Chang, Jian; Luo, Bing-Chi; Wei, Bing-Bo

    2007-02-01

    Thermophysical properties of undercooled liquid monotectic alloys are usually difficult to be determined because of the great difficulty in achieving large undercoolings. We measure the surface tension of liquid Fe77.5Cu13Mo9.5 monotectic alloy by an electromagnetic oscillating drop method over a wide temperature range from 1577 to 1784 K, including both superheated and undercooled states. A good linear relationship exists between the surface tension and temperature. The surface tension value is 1.588 N/m at the monotectic temperature of 1703 K, and its temperature coefficient is -3.7×10-4 Nm-1K-1. Based on the Butler equation, the surface tension is also calculated theoretically. The experimental and calculated results indicate that the effect of the enriched element on droplet surface is much more conspicuous than the other elements to decrease the surface tension.

  17. The effect of surface tension reduction on the clinical performance of sodium hypochlorite in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Fedele, G; Prichard, J W; Steier, L; de Figueiredo, J A P

    2013-06-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is recommended as an endodontic irrigant in view of its broad antimicrobial and tissue dissolution capacities. To enhance its penetration into inaccessible areas of root canals and to improve its overall effect, the addition of surface-active agents has been suggested. The aim of this investigation was to review the effect of the reduction of the surface tension on the performance of NaOCl in endodontics. A search was performed in the Medline electronic database (articles published up to 28 July 2012, in English) with the search terms and combinations as follows: 'sodium hypochlorite AND surface tension or interfacial force or interfacial tension or surface-active agent or amphiphilic agent or surface active agent or surfactant or tenside or detergent'. The purpose of this search was to identify publications that compared NaOCl alone and NaOCl modified with the addition of a surface-active agent in endodontics. A hand search of articles published online ('in-press' and 'early view'), and appearing in the reference list of the articles included, was further performed, using the same search criteria as the electronic search. The search identified 302 publications, of which 11 fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria of the review. The evidence available suggests that surface-active agents improve the penetration of NaOCl in the main canal and have no effect on its pulp tissue dissolution ability. There are, however, insufficient data to enable a sound conclusion to be drawn regarding the effect of modifying NaOCl's surface tension on lubrication, antimicrobial and smear layer or debris removal abilities. PMID:23186034

  18. Halide anion dependence of ionic surfactant adsorption in air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doseok; Wang, Wenjie; Sung, Woongmo; Ao, Mingqi; Vaknin, David

    2014-03-01

    It was recently proposed that there is surface excess of halide anions at the air/water interface, and more surface excess of I- than Br- or Cl-, which cannot be explained by Debye-Huckel theory. In case of charged surfaces such as Gibbs monolayer consisting of cationic surfactant molecules, surface excess of anions can also be expected. In this study, by using surface-sensitive grazing angle X-ray fluorescence in conjunction with surface tension measurement, we investigated adsorption behavior of [C12mim]Cl, [C12mim]Br, [C12mim]I aqueous solutions, in which the surface is first covered by [C12mim]+ cations at low concentrations, and the adsorption of the halide anions to this charged interface would follow with the increase in the concentration of solutes. From the surface tension measurements, it was observed that critical micelle concentration of [C12mim]I solution was 4.6 mM, much smaller than that of [C12mim]Cl (16.7 mM) indicating surface activity of surfactant increases with size of halide anions. From X-ray fluorescence, surface excess of halide anion was measured quantitatively from the interface of these solutions. By putting NaCl and NaI in [C12mim]I and [C12mim]Cl solutions, respectively, competition between Cl- and I- adsorption was investigated, to find that I- has stronger adsorption on the charged surface than Cl-.

  19. Effects of water hardness and existence of adsorbent on toxic surface tension of surfactants for aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Oya, Masaru; Orito, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Yusuke; Iizuka, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the effectiveness of surface tension on surfactants risk assessment. gamma(tox) was defined as surface tension at a point where acute aquatic toxicity of a surfactant emerges. Oryzias latipes, Daphnia magna, and Podocopida were used for acute aquatic toxicity test of 7 surfactants and 3 detergents. Gamma(tox)values were plotted on surface tension curves, and the effect of water hardness on toxicity and surface tension were examined. Results showed that gamma(tox) varies greatly by kind of surfactant or detergent. Therefore, aquatic toxicity cannot only be explained by surface tension. The change of aquatic toxicity with varying water hardness, however, could be explained by the change of surface tension. Aquatic toxicity of LAS (Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonate) increased and aquatic toxicity of SOAP decreased with an increase of water hardness, but both gamma(tox), values were constant. Aquatic toxicity was decreased by an addition of mud soil as adsorbent into surfactant solution. The toxicity change can be explained by the surface tension since gamma(tox) value of solution with and without mud soil were equal. These results showed that the change of aquatic toxicity of a surfactant caused by water property, such as water hardness, could be explained by the change of surface tension. PMID:17898487

  20. Surface Tension Estimates for Droplet Formation in Slurries with Low Concentrations of Hydrophobic Particles, Polymer Flocculants or Surface-Active Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Bamberger, Judith A.

    2011-06-10

    In support of the K-Basin project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested to evaluate the appropriate surface tension value to use in models predicting the formation of droplets from spray leaks of K-Basin slurries. The specific issue was whether it was more appropriate to use the surface tension of pure water in model predictions for all plausible spray leaks or to use a lower value. The surface tension of K-Basin slurries is potentially affected not only by particles but by low concentrations of nonionic polyacrylamide flocculant and perhaps by contaminants with surfactant properties, which could decrease the surface tension below that of water. A lower surface tension value typically results in smaller droplets being formed with a larger fraction of droplets in the respirable size range, so using the higher surface tension value of pure water is not conservative and thus needs a strong technical basis.

  1. Surface tension driven processes densify and retain permeability in magma and lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ben M.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Ian Schipper, C.; Mark Jellinek, A.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kelly Russell, J.; Lavallée, Yan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    We offer new insights into how an explosive eruption can transition into an effusive eruption. Magma containing >0.2 wt% dissolved water has the potential to vesiculate to a porosity in excess of 80 vol.% at atmospheric pressure. Thus all magmas contain volatiles at depth sufficient to form foams and explosively fragment. Yet gas is often lost passively and effusive eruptions ensue. Magmatic foams are permeable and understanding permeability in magma is crucial for models that predict eruptive style. Permeability also governs magma compaction models. Those models generally imply that a reduction in magma porosity and permeability generates an increased propensity for explosivity. Here, our experimental results show that surface tension stresses drive densification without creating an impermeable 'plug', offering an additional explanation of why dense magmas can avoid explosive eruption. In both an open furnace and a closed autoclave, we subject pumice samples with initial porosity of ∼70 vol.% to a range of isostatic pressures (0.1-11 MPa) and temperatures (350-950 °C) relevant to shallow volcanic environments. Our experimental data and models constrain the viscosity, permeability, timescales, and length scales over which densification by pore-scale surface tension stresses competes with density-driven compaction. Where surface tension dominates the dynamics, densification halts at a plateau connected porosity of ∼25 vol.% for our samples. SEM, pycnometry and micro-tomography show that in this process (1) microporous networks are destroyed, (2) the relative pore network surface area decreases, and (3) a remaining crystal framework enhances the longevity of macro-pore connectivity and permeability critical for sustained outgassing. We propose that these observations are a consequence of a surface tension-driven retraction of viscous pore walls at areas of high bubble curvature (micro-vesicular network terminations), and that this process drives bulk

  2. Density and surface tension of melts of zirconium and hafnium fluorides with lithium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Katyshev, S.F.; Artemov, V.V.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the temperature dependence of the density and surface tension of melts of LiF-ZrF/sub 4/ and LiF-HfF/sub 4/. Density and surface tension were determined by the method of maximum pressure in an argon bubble. On the basis of experimental data over the entire concentration range the molar volumes and their relative deviations from the additive molar volumes were calculated for 1100/sup 0/K. The positive deviations of the molar volumes from additivity in the LiF-HfF/sub 4/ system (22.45%) were greater than in the LiF-ZrF/sub 4/ system (15.75%). This indicated that the reaction with lithium fluoride is intensified with the switch to the hafnium fluoride. Results also demonstrated that the fluorides are surface-active components in the molten mixtures.

  3. Density and surface tension of a concentrated lead melt in nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of a lead impurity on the properties of metallic melts in the composition range that obeys Henry's law is studied. The formation of the structural and physicochemical properties of real concentrated melts can be traced from changes in the temperature and concentration dependences of structure-sensitive properties, namely, density and surface tension. The surface properties of a solution depend on its volume properties and differ from them in enhancement effect. The lead saturation of the nickel melt is found to be accompanied by a compression effect (decrease in the melt volume), which is enhanced to a certain lead concentration. As this concentration is exceeded, the compression effect weakens because of volume separation and the appearance of an excess lead phase. As the lead content in a nickel base increases, the surface tension decreases, a second phase forms, and the melt undergoes separation.

  4. Wetting Angle and Surface Tension of Germanium Melts on Different Substrate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, N.; Croell, A.; Szofran, F. R.; Benz, K. W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The sessile drop technique has been used to measure the wetting angle and the surface tension of molten germanium (Ge) on various substrate materials. Sapphire, fused silica, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AlN, Si3N4, and CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effects of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. The highest wetting angles with values around 170 deg. were found for pBN substrates under active vacuum or with a slight overpressure of 5N Argon or forming gas (2% Hydrogen in 5N Argon). The measurement of the surface tension and its temperature dependence for Ge under a forming gas atmosphere resulted in gamma(T) = 591 - 0.077 (T-T(sub m).

  5. Influence of Nanosegregation on the Surface Tension of Fluorinated Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Luís, Andreia; Shimizu, Karina; Araújo, João M M; Carvalho, Pedro J; Lopes-da-Silva, José A; Canongia Lopes, José N; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G; Pereiro, Ana B

    2016-06-21

    We have investigated, both theoretically and experimentally, the balance between the presence of alkyl and perfluoroalkyl side chains on the surface organization and surface tension of fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs). A series of ionic liquids (ILs) composed of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations ([CnC1im] with n = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12) combined with the perfluorobutanesulfonate anion was used. The surface tensions of the investigated liquid salts are considerably lower than those reported for non-fluorinated ionic liquids. The most surprising and striking feature is the identification, for the first time, of a minimum at n = 8 in the surface tension versus the length of the IL cation alkyl side chain. Supported by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, it was found that this trend is a result of the competition between the two nonpolar domains (perfluorinated and aliphatic) pointing toward the gas-liquid interface, a phenomenon which occurs in ILs with perfluorinated anions. Furthermore, these ILs present the lowest surface entropy reported to date. PMID:27218210

  6. Contact angle and surface tension measurements of a five-ring polyphenyl ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Contact angle measurements were performed for a five-ring polyphenyl ether isomeric mixture on M-50 steel in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Two different techniques were used: (1) a tilting plate apparatus, and (2) a sessile drop apparatus. Measurements were made for the temperature range 25 to 190 C. Surface tension was measured by a differential maximum bubble pressure technique over the range 23 to 220C in room air. The critical surface energy of spreading (gamma (sub c)) was determined for the polyphenyl ether by plotting the cosine of the contact angle (theta) versus the surface tension (gamma (sub LV)). The straight line intercept at cosine theta = 1 is defined as gamma (sub c). Gamma (sub c) was found to be 30.1 dyn/cm for the tilting plate technique and 31.3 dyn/cm for the sessile drop technique. These results indicate that the polyphenyl ether is inherently autophobic (i.e., it will not spread on its own surface film until its surface tension is less than gamma (sub c). This phenomenon is discussed in light of the wettability and wear problems encountered with this fluid.

  7. Onset of Convection Due to Surface Tension Variations in Multicomponent and Binary Fluid Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    2000-01-01

    Under certain conditions, such as in thin liquid films or microgravity, surface tension variations along a free surface can induce convection. Convection onset due to surface tension variation is important to many terrestrial technological processes in addition to microgravity materials processing applications. Examples include coating, drying crystallization, solidification, liquid surface contamination, and containerless processing. In double-diffusive and multicomponent systems, the spatial variations of surface tension are associated with two or more stratifying agencies, respectively. For example, both temperature and species (concentration) gradients are associated with convection in the solidification of binary alloys or salt ponds. The direction of the two (or more) gradients has a profound effect on the nature of the flow at or slightly beyond the onset of convection. Our recent work at the NASA Lewis Research Center focused on characterizing surface-tension-induced onset of convection, often referred to as Marangoni-Benard convection. Exact solutions for the stationary neutral stability of multicomponent fluid layers with interfacial deformation were derived. These solutions also permit the computation of a boundary curve that separates the long and finite wavelength instabilities. Computing points along this boundary using the exact solution (when possible) is more efficient than the typical numerical approaches, such as finite difference or spectral methods. Above the curve, a long wavelength instability was predicted, suggesting that convection would occur principally through one large flow cell in the layer, whereas below the curve, finite wavelength instabilities occur which suggest multiple finite-sized circulation cells. For many common liquids with layer depths greater than 100 mm, finite wave instability is predicted under terrestrial conditions; however, with little exception, long wavelength instability is predicted in microgravity for the

  8. Surface tension/thermal mismatch in a self-assembly process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, R. M.; Hsu, C. C.; Chu, F. I.

    2008-11-01

    Surface tension is increasingly used for the self-assembly of 3D microstructures. This paper studies the use of a benzocyclobutene (BCB) photo-resist material for the out-of-plane rotation via self-assembly behavior of a silicon micro-part. The literature discusses both surface-tension self-assembly and thermal-mismatch self-assembly, but these two topics are treated separately. Due to its relatively large thermal expansion coefficient, the BCB photo-resist material exhibits both surface-tension and thermal-mismatch effects during self-assembly. Therefore, the residual stresses induced by the self-assembly process on the interface between the melting pad and the microstructure are an issue that needs clarification. In order to quantify the shear stress on the interface, a micro-cantilever test specimen is designed and fabricated by a two-mask self-assembly process using a BSOI wafer and DRIE etching. Two cantilever designs are compared, one having a single section of photo-resist coverage and the other having two sections of photo-resist coverage. The MSC/NASTRAN finite-element method with an interfacial shear-lag model is used to estimate the deflection of the cantilever beam due to residual stresses from surface tension and thermal shrinkage. A clamped-edge-body-rotation model is proposed in order to calibrate measurement results by confocal optical microscopy with numerical results. The interfacial shear between the BCB photo-resist and the silicon structure is found to range from 0.4 to 1.0 MPa due to thermal shrinkage (after soft bake and structure release). The residual stress from surface tension (after material reflow and self-assembly) depends on the thickness of the PR layer and in some cases is twice the residual stress from material mismatch. Finally, a micro-mirror design employing BCB melting pads is presented to verify a self-assembly process powered by both surface tension and thermal mismatch.

  9. An extended pressure finite element space for two-phase incompressible flows with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Sven; Reusken, Arnold

    2007-05-01

    We consider a standard model for incompressible two-phase flows in which a localized force at the interface describes the effect of surface tension. If a level set (or VOF) method is applied then the interface, which is implicitly given by the zero level of the level set function, is in general not aligned with the triangulation that is used in the discretization of the flow problem. This non-alignment causes severe difficulties w.r.t. the discretization of the localized surface tension force and the discretization of the flow variables. In cases with large surface tension forces the pressure has a large jump across the interface. In standard finite element spaces, due to the non-alignment, the functions are continuous across the interface and thus not appropriate for the approximation of the discontinuous pressure. In many simulations these effects cause large oscillations of the velocity close to the interface, so-called spurious velocities. In this paper, for a simplified model problem, we give an analysis that explains why known (standard) methods for discretization of the localized force term and for discretization of the pressure variable often yield large spurious velocities. In the paper [S. Groß, A. Reusken, Finite element discretization error analysis of a surface tension force in two-phase incompressible flows, Preprint 262, IGPM, RWTH Aachen, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (accepted for publication)], we introduce a new and accurate method for approximation of the surface tension force. In the present paper, we use the extended finite element space (XFEM), presented in [N. Moes, J. Dolbow, T. Belytschko, A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 46 (1999) 131-150; T. Belytschko, N. Moes, S. Usui, C. Parimi, Arbitrary discontinuities in finite elements, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 50 (2001) 993-1013], for the discretization of the pressure. We show that the size of spurious velocities is reduced substantially, provided we

  10. Formation, disruption and mechanical properties of a rigid hydrophobin film at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lynn; Kirby, Stephanie; Anna, Shelley; CMU Team

    Hydrophobins are small, globular proteins with distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions that make them extremely surface active. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential industrial applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams and emulsions, and as dispersants. Practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, both individually and in the presence of surfactants. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been shown to strongly stabilize air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. In this work, we characterize the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to strongly, irreversibly adsorb at air/water interfaces; the magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure, until the CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the addition of SDS, a strong surfactant, to the bulk. SDS is found to co-adsorb to interfaces pre-coated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU. These results lend insight into the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. Funding from GoMRI.

  11. Surface Tension and Viscosity Measurements in Microgravity: Some Results and Fluid Flow Observations during MSL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Robert W.; Trapaga, G.; Flemings, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The viscosity of a liquid metal was successfully measured for the first time by a containerless method, the oscillating drop technique. This method also provides a means to obtain a precise, non-contact measurement of the surface tension of the droplet. This technique involves exciting the surface of the molten sample and then measuring the resulting oscillations; the natural frequency of the oscillating sample is determined by its surface tension, and the damping of the oscillations by the viscosity. These measurements were performed in TEMPUS, a microgravity electromagnetic levitator (EML), on the Space Shuttle as a part of the First Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1), which flew in April and July 1997 (STS-83 and STS-94). Some results of the surface tension and viscosity measurements are presented for Pd82Si18. Some observations of the fluid dynamic characteristics (dominant flow patterns, turbulent transition, cavitation, etc.) of levitated droplets are presented and discussed together with magnetohydrodynamic calculations, which were performed to justify these findings.

  12. Possible Evidence for a New Form of Liquid Buried in the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water.

    PubMed

    Rogers, T Ryan; Leong, Kai-Yang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to the historical data, several recent experiments indicate that the surface tension of supercooled water follows a smooth extrapolation of the IAPWS equation in the supercooled regime. It can be seen, however, that a small deviation from the IAPWS equation is present in the recent experimental measurements. It is shown with simulations using the WAIL water potential that the small deviation in the experimental data is consistent with the tail of an exponential growth in surface tension as temperature decreases. The emergence temperature, Te, of a substantial deviation from the IAPWS equation is shown to be 227 K for the WAIL water and 235 K for real water. Since the 227 K Te is close to the Widom line in WAIL water, we argue that real water at 235 K approaches a similar crossover line at one atmospheric pressure. PMID:27615518

  13. Modeling surface tension using a ghost fluid technique within a volume of fluid formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, M. M.; Kothe, D. B.; Cummins, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    Ghost fluid methods (GFM) are a viable approach for imposing sharp boundary conditions on interfaces that are arbitrarily embedded within the computational mesh. All GFM to date are formulated with an interface distance function that resides within a level-set (LS) framework. Recently we proposed a technique for reconstructing distance functions from volume fractions. This technique enables the exploitation of GFM within a volume of fluid formulation for modeling an interfacial phenomenon like surface tension. Combining GFM with a volume of fluid (VOF) formulation is attractive because of the VOF method's superior mass conservation and because of the ability of GFM to maintain sharp jump conditions. The continuum surface tension force (CSF) method, however, has the propensity to produce smooth jump. In the following, the combined VOF-GFM and more classical VOF-CSF formulations are compared and contrasted. Static and dynamic numerical results are used to illustrate our findings and support our claims.

  14. Development of a space qualified Surface Tension Confined Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    The Surface Tension Confined Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), a new type of cryogenic cooler which is being developed by the NASA-GSFC for spaceflight payloads, is described. The STCLCC will be capable of maintaining instrumentation within the temperature range of 10-120 K and will allow liquid cryogens to be flown in space without the risk of liquid being entrained in the vent gas. A low-density open-cell material in the STCLCC acts as a 'sponge', with the surface tension trapping the liquid cryogen within its pores and keeping the liquid away from the cooler's vent during launch, zero-g operations, and landing. It is emphasized that the STCLCC concept is amenable to a wide variety of applications, whenever a passive low-cost cooler is required or when the on-orbit service of a cooler would increase a mission's lifetime.

  15. Pressure, Surface Tension, and Dripping of Self-Trapped Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, David; Michinel, Humberto; Tommasini, Daniele

    2009-07-10

    We show that a laser beam which propagates through an optical medium with Kerr (focusing) and higher order (defocusing) nonlinearities displays pressure and surface-tension properties yielding capillarity and dripping effects totally analogous to usual liquid droplets. The system is reinterpreted in terms of a thermodynamic grand potential, allowing for the computation of the pressure and surface tension beyond the usual hydrodynamical approach based on Madelung transformation and the analogy with the Euler equation. We then show both analytically and numerically that the stationary soliton states of such a light system satisfy the Young-Laplace equation and that the dynamical evolution through a capillary is described by the same law that governs the growth of droplets in an ordinary liquid system.

  16. A pumpless microfluidic device driven by surface tension for pancreatic islet analysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yuan; Nourmohammadzadeh, Mohammad; Elias, Joshua E Mendoza; Chan, Manwai; Chen, Zequn; McGarrigle, James J; Oberholzer, José; Wang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel pumpless microfluidic array driven by surface tension for studying the physiology of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Efficient fluid flow in the array is achieved by surface tension-generated pressure as a result of inlet and outlet size differences. Flow properties are characterized in numerical simulation and further confirmed by experimental measurements. Using this device, we perform a set of biological assays, which include real-time fluorescent imaging and insulin secretion kinetics for both mouse and human islets. Our results demonstrate that this system not only drastically simplifies previously published experimental protocols for islet study by eliminating the need for external pumps/tubing and reducing the volume of solution consumption, but it also achieves a higher analytical spatiotemporal resolution due to efficient flow exchanges and the extremely small volume of solutions required. Overall, the microfluidic platform presented can be used as a potential powerful tool for understanding islet physiology, antidiabetic drug development, and islet transplantation. PMID:27534648

  17. Digital image processing of sectorial oscillations for acoustically levitated drops and surface tension measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Changle; Xie, Wenjun; Wei, Bingbo

    2010-12-01

    A type of non-axisymmetric oscillations of acoustically levitated drops is excited by modulating the ultrasound field at proper frequencies. These oscillations are recorded by a high speed camera and analyzed with a digital image processing method. They are demonstrated to be the third mode sectorial oscillations, and their frequencies are found to decrease with the increase of equatorial radius of the drops, which can be described by a modified Rayleigh equation. These oscillations decay exponentially after the cessation of ultrasound field modulation. The decaying rates agree reasonably with Lamb's prediction. The rotating rate of the drops accompanying the shape oscillations is found to be less than 1.5 rounds per second. The surface tension of aqueous ethanol has been measured according to the modified Rayleigh equation. The results agree well with previous reports, which demonstrates the possible application of this kind of sectorial oscillations in noncontact measurement of liquid surface tension.

  18. Liquid Phase Exfoliation of Two-Dimensional Materials by Directly Probing and Matching Surface Tension Components.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianfeng; He, Yongmin; Wu, Jingjie; Gao, Caitian; Keyshar, Kunttal; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Yingchao; Ye, Mingxin; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2015-08-12

    Exfoliation of two-dimensional (2D) materials into mono- or few layers is of significance for both fundamental studies and potential applications. In this report, for the first time surface tension components were directly probed and matched to predict solvents with effective liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) capability for 2D materials such as graphene, h-BN, WS2, MoS2, MoSe2, Bi2Se3, TaS2, and SnS2. Exfoliation efficiency is enhanced when the ratios of the surface tension components of the applied solvent is close to that of the 2D material in question. We enlarged the library of low-toxic and common solvents for LPE. Our study provides distinctive insight into LPE and has pioneered a rational strategy for LPE of 2D materials with high yield. PMID:26200657

  19. Experimental study of surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity of liquid and solid titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K.; Wang, H. P.; Chang, J.; Wei, B.

    2015-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid and solid titanium such as the surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity have been investigated over a wide temperature range. By using electromagnetic levitation and oscillating drop method, the surface tension of liquid titanium was measured in the temperature range of 1802-2188 K. The viscosity and density of undercooled liquid titanium were calculated by some well-known models using the measured data as input. In addition, the specific heat of liquid titanium was determined over the experimental range using electromagnetic levitation and drop calorimetry obtaining the value of 33.64 J mol-1 K-1. In addition, the thermal diffusivity of solid titanium was measured by laser flash method in the temperature range of 171-1080 K.

  20. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-07-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2) dyn cm-1 in pure water and 62(±1) dyn cm-1 in AS solutions. Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9 % reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  1. Superficial composition in binary solid solutions A(B): Drastic effect of pure element surface tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, A.; Aufray, B.

    1985-10-01

    This paper deals with a comparative study of surface segragation of Pb and Ni respectively from Ag(Pb)(111) and Ag(Ni)(111) solid solutions. A high level of segregation of the solute is observed for both systems characterized by very low solute solubility. However, the superficial composition strongly depends on the relative surface tensions of the pure elements: the solute atoms are strictly on superficial sites when γ solute is smaller than γ solvent; in contrast uppermost layer consists purely of solvent when γ solute is greater than γ solvent. Two schematic distributions in close proximity to the surface are proposed in the last case.

  2. Comparison of neck tension palpation rating systems with surface electromyographic and acoustic measures in vocal hyperfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Cara E.; Heaton, James T.; Braden, Maia N.; Jetté, Marie E.; Stadelman-Cohen, Tara K.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to evaluate current neck tension palpation rating systems to determine inter-rater reliability and possible correlation with neck surface electromyography (sEMG, collected from three electrode recording locations) and measures of the third formant for /a/ during various vocal behaviors. Study Design This prospective study examined the neck muscle tension of 16 participants before and after a single session of voice therapy. Methods Inter-rater reliability and relationships between palpation ratings and objective measures of sEMG (anterior neck) and the third formant for /a/ were assessed using Pearson’s correlations (r). Results Inter-rater reliability was relatively low as measured by Pearson’s correlations, although Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test results were similar as those in a previous study. Correlations between palpation ratings and sEMG, and between ratings of laryngeal height and the third formant for /a/ were generally low. Correlations increased between anterior neck sEMG and ratings of suprahyoid muscle tension when examined in a reduced set of individuals with higher inter-rater reliability. Conclusions Palpation rating scales do not reliably capture changes that may occur in neck muscle tension of typical voice therapy patients over one session. Consequently, little can be concluded from correlations between sEMG and palpation ratings. PMID:20347260

  3. Surface Tension and Negative Pressure Interior of a Non-Singular ``Black Hole''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottola, Emil; Mazur, Pawel

    2015-04-01

    The interior Schwarzschild solution for a static, spherically symmetric collapsed star has a pressure divergence that is integrable, and induces a non-isotropic transverse stress with a finite surface energy and surface tension. When compressed to the Schwarzschild radius, the surface is at the same radius and the interior solution has constant negative pressure, thereby describing a gravitational condensate star, a fully collapsed state already inherent in and predicted by classical General Relativity. The redshifted surface tension of the condensate star surface is given by is the difference of surface gravities between the exterior and interior Schwarzschild solutions. The First Law, dM = dEv + τdA is a purely mechanical classical relation at zero temperature and zero entropy, describing the volume energy and surface energy respectively. Since there is no event horizon, the Schwarzschild time of such a non-singular gravitational condensate star is a global time, which is consistent with unitary time evolution in quantum theory. The interior acts as a defocusing lens for light passing through the condensate, leading to imaging characteristics distinguishable from a black hole. The discrete surface modes of oscillation which should be detectable by their GWave signatures

  4. Slow viscous gravity-driven interaction between a bubble and a free surface with unequal surface tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guémas, Marine; Sellier, Antoine; Pigeonneau, Franck

    2015-04-01

    The axisymmetric gravity-driven dynamics of a bubble rising toward a free surface is addressed for gas-liquid interfaces having unequal surface tensions. The liquid flow is governed by the Stokes equations which are here solved using a boundary element method in axisymmetric configuration. Within this framework, two dimensionless numbers arise: the Bond number Bo1 based on the surface tension of the bubble interface and the surface tension ratio γ ˆ comparing the free surface and bubble surface tensions. Under a careful and discussed selection of the code key settings (number of boundary elements, initial bubble location, and distance beyond which the free surface is truncated), it has been possible to numerically and accurately track in time the bubble and free surface shapes for several values of ( Bo 1 , γ ˆ ) . The long-time shapes are found to deeply depend upon both Bo1 and γ ˆ and also to compare well with the shapes predicted in Princen and Mason ["Shape of a fluid drop at a fluid-liquid interface. II. Theory for three-phase systems," J. Colloid. Sci. 20, 246-266 (1965)] using a hydrostatic model in which both surfaces are touching. Similarly, the drainage dynamics of the liquid film thickness between the bubble and the free surface depends on ( Bo 1 , γ ˆ ) . The long-time film thickness exponentially decays in time and a so-called thinning rate α for which the numerical behaviors and a simple model reveal two basic behaviors: (i) at small Bond number, α behaves as 1/Bo1 and (ii) at large Bond number, α is nearly constant. In addition, it is found that in the entire range of the quantity χ = ( 1 + γ ˆ ) Bo 1 / ( 2 γ ˆ ) , the thinning rate α is well approximated by the function 1/(18χ) + α∞ with α∞ ≈ 0.158. Such a result also permits one to estimate the typical drainage time versus the initial bubble radius a, the liquid density ρ and viscosity μ, the gravity and the free surface, and bubble surface tensions.

  5. Influence of surface tension effects on solidification of alloys in space and on ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. M.; Zhuang, Y. X.; Zhu, L. H.; Liu, Q. Q.; Yang, H. C.; Tang, Z. M.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification experiments of AlAl3Ni and AlBi alloys were carried out in space on board a Chinese recoverable satellite. An obvious double vortical radiant structure of AlAl3Ni eutectic and a homogeneous microstructure of AlBi monotectic were obtained. Combined fluid physics and metallography, the effect of surface tension gradient driven convection on the formation of radiant eutectic structure and the Marangoni migration of second-phase droplets in the molten alloy were analyzed.

  6. Effective Darcy-Scale Contact Angles in Porous Media Imbibing Solutions of Various Surface Tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, Noam; McGinnis, Thomas; Rockhold, Mark L.; Niemet, Mike; Selker, John S.

    2009-10-17

    Surface tensions of high-salinity solutions are significantly different from those of pure water. Our objective was to develop and test a methodology to determine whether these surface-tension effects predictably alter imbibition into dry and moist porous media. Static and dynamic experiments were performed using four grades of quartz sand to determine the effects of solution salinity on imbibition. Results were quantified as apparent contact angles between the sand and three solutions (pure water, 5 molal NaNO3, n-hexane). Contact angles determined using a static method in initially air-dried sand ranged from 23° to 31°, with the same values found for both water and the NaNO3 solution. Effective contact angles determined for the air-dried sand using a dynamic method based on a modified version of the Green and Ampt model were about twice those found using the static method, averaging 45° and 62° for water and the NaNO3 solution, respectively. In pre-wetted sands, the dynamic imbibition data yielded apparent contact angles of 2° and 21° for water and the NaNO3 solution, respectively, with the latter value comparing well to a predicted value of 25° for the NaNO3 solution based solely on surface-tension contrast. The results of this study indicate that on the Darcy-scale, saline solutions appear to follow the relationship of non-zero contact angles with other miscible fluids of different surface tensions used to pre-wet the sand grains, in agreement with the macro-scale infiltration results of Weisbrod et al. [2004].

  7. The in vitro Effect of Irrigants with Low Surface Tension on Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, Luciano; Estrela, Carlos; Generali, Luigi; Mohammadi, Zahed; Asgary, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Due to the complex anatomy of the root canal system and high surface tension of common root canal irrigants (RCI), conducting an investigation on RCIs containing surfactants is a priority. The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the antibacterial potential of RCI with low surface tension in root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were prepared and inoculated with E. faecalis for 60 days. After root canal preparation, the teeth were randomly divided to one positive and one negative control groups and 5 experimental groups: Hypoclean/Tetraclean NA, Hypoclean, Tetraclean, NaOCl/Tetraclean and NaOCl. Bacterial growth was observed by turbidity of culture medium and then measured using a UV spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed in three time intervals (pre-instrumentation and, 20 min and 72 h after canal preparation) using the ANOVA and post hoc Tukey’s tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results indicated the presence of E. faecalis in all post-irrigation samples irrespective of the RCI. However, the optical densities in both post-irrigation periods showed bacterial reduction and significant differences between groups. Conclusion: RCI with low surface tension showed antibacterial potential in E. faecalis infected roots. PMID:26229541

  8. A surface tension based method for measuring oil dispersant concentration in seawater.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengqing; Gong, Yanyan; Liu, Wen; Fu, Jie; O'Reilly, S E; Hao, Xiaodi; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-08-15

    This work developed a new method to determine concentration of Corexit EC9500A, and likely other oil dispersants, in seawater. Based on the principle that oil dispersants decrease surface tension, a linear correlation was established between the dispersant concentration and surface tension. Thus, the dispersant concentration can be determined by measuring surface tension. The method can accurately analyze Corexit EC9500A in the concentration range of 0.5-23.5mg/L. Minor changes in solution salinity (<0.3%), pH (7.9-9.0), and dissolved organic matter (<2.0mg/L as TOC) had negligible effects on the measurements. Moreover, effects of extracts from marine sediments were negligible, and thus, the method may be directly applied to seawater-sediment systems. The method accuracy was confirmed by comparing with direct TOC analysis. This simple, fast, economical method offers a convenient analytical tool for quantifying complex oil dispersants in water/seawater, which has been desired by the oil spill research community and industries. PMID:27321800

  9. Analysis of surface cracks in finite plates under tension or bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1979-01-01

    Stress-intensity factors calculated with a three-dimensional, finite-element analysis for shallow and deep semielliptical surface cracks in finite elastic isotropic plates subjected to tension or bending loads are presented. A wide range of configuration parameters was investigated. The ratio of crack depth to plate thickness ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 and the ratio of crack depth to crack length ranged from 0.2 to 2.0. The effects of plate width on stress-intensity variations along the crack front was also investigated. A wide-range equation for stress-intensity factors along the crack front as a function of crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and plate width was developed for tension and bending loads. The equation was used to predict patterns of surface-crack growth under tension or bending fatigue loads. A modified form of the equation was also used to correlate surface-crack fracture data for a brittle epoxy material within + or - 10 percent for a wide range of crack shapes and crack sizes.

  10. Ductile-to-brittle transition characterization using surface crack specimens loaded in combined tension and bending

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    Surface cracked tension specimens of ASTM A515, Grade B steel plate were tested to failure in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. Two different specimen configurations were used: one configuration was loaded in tension except for the natural bending resulting from the presence of the surface crack, the second configuration had an offset test section and was pin-loaded to provide a strong bending component in addition to the tension load. For each configuration, at least seven repeat tests were conducted at each of two temperatures. All specimens failed by cleavage and the critical J-integral, J{sub c}, was obtained using three-dimensional finite element analysis of the specimen. The FEM analysis was validated by comparison with experimental strain gage and displacement measurements taken during the tests. The results were compared with previous fracture toughness measurements on the same plate using 2T SE(B) specimens and surface cracked bend SC(B) specimens. The present results exhibited the expected elevation in fracture toughness and downward shift in the transition temperature compared to the highly constrained, deeply cracked SE(B) specimens. The master curve approach was used to characterize the transition curves for each specimen geometry and the shift in the transition temperature was characterized by the associated reference temperature.

  11. Computational analysis of microbubble flows in bifurcating airways: role of gravity, inertia, and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zielinski, Rachel; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2014-10-01

    Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy for patients with severe lung disorders, the microbubble flows generated during ventilation generate hydrodynamic stresses, including pressure and shear stress gradients, which damage the pulmonary epithelium. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics to investigate how gravity, inertia, and surface tension influence both microbubble flow patterns in bifurcating airways and the magnitude/distribution of hydrodynamic stresses on the airway wall. Direct interface tracking and finite element techniques were used to simulate bubble propagation in a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled bifurcating airway. Computational solutions of the full incompressible Navier-Stokes equation were used to investigate how inertia, gravity, and surface tension forces as characterized by the Reynolds (Re), Bond (Bo), and Capillary (Ca) numbers influence pressure and shear stress gradients at the airway wall. Gravity had a significant impact on flow patterns and hydrodynamic stress magnitudes where Bo > 1 led to dramatic changes in bubble shape and increased pressure and shear stress gradients in the upper daughter airway. Interestingly, increased pressure gradients near the bifurcation point (i.e., carina) were only elevated during asymmetric bubble splitting. Although changes in pressure gradient magnitudes were generally more sensitive to Ca, under large Re conditions, both Re and Ca significantly altered the pressure gradient magnitude. We conclude that inertia, gravity, and surface tension can all have a significant impact on microbubble flow patterns and hydrodynamic stresses in bifurcating airways. PMID:25068642

  12. SS/RCS surface tension propellant acquisition/expulsion tankage technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of published propellant physical property data together with bubble point tests of fine-mesh screen in propellants, was conducted. The effort consisted of: (1) the collection and evaluation of pertinent physical property data for hydrazine (N2H4), monomethylhydrazine (MMH), and nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4); (2) testing to determine the effect of dissolved pressurant gas, temperature, purity, and system cleanliness or contamination on system bubble point, and (3) the compilation and publishing of both the literature and test results. The space shuttle reaction control system (SS/RCS) is a bipropellant system using N2O4 and MMH, while the auxiliary power system (SS/APU) employs monopropellant N2H4. Since both the RCS and the APU use a surface tension device for propellant acquisition, the propellant properties of interest are those which impact the design and operation of surface tension systems. Information on propellant density, viscosity, surface tension, and contact angle was collected, compiled, and evaluated.

  13. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  14. Surface tension effects on the phase transition of a DPPC bilayer with and without protein: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xian; Qin, Shanshan; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2014-05-14

    While the surface tension of a cell membrane, or a plasma membrane, regulates cell functions, little is known about its effect on the conformational changes of the lipid bilayer and hence the resulting changes in the cell membrane. To obtain some insights into the phase transition of the lipid bilayer as a function of surface tension, we used a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer as a model lipid bilayer and aquaporin (AqpZ), a transmembrane channel protein for water, as a model embedded protein. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation was applied to illustrate the phase transition behavior of the pure DPPC bilayer and aquaporin-embedded DPPC bilayer under different surface tensions. It was shown that an increased surface tension reduced the phase transition temperature of the DPPC bilayer. As for the DPPC bilayer in gel form, no significant changes occurred in the structure of the bilayer in response to the surface tension. Once in a liquid crystal state, both the structure and properties of the DPPC bilayer, such as area per lipid, lipid order parameters, bilayer thickness and lateral diffusion coefficients, were responsive to the magnitude of surface tension in a linear way. The presence of aquaporin attenuated the compact alignment of the lipid bilayer, hindered the parallel movement, and thus made the DPPC bilayer less sensitive to the surface tension. PMID:24668218

  15. A thermodynamical model for the surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colucci, Simone; Battaglia, Maurizio; Trigila, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension plays an important role in the nucleation of H2O gas bubbles in magmatic melts and in the time-dependent rheology of bubble-bearing magmas. Despite several experimental studies, a physics based model of the surface tension of magmatic melts in contact with H2O is lacking. This paper employs gradient theory to develop a thermodynamical model of equilibrium surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas at low to moderate pressures. In the last decades, this approach has been successfully applied in studies of industrial mixtures but never to magmatic systems. We calibrate and verify the model against literature experimental data, obtained by the pendant drop method, and by inverting bubble nucleation experiments using the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). Our model reproduces the systematic decrease in surface tension with increased H2O pressure observed in the experiments. On the other hand, the effect of temperature is confirmed by the experiments only at high pressure. At atmospheric pressure, the model shows a decrease of surface tension with temperature. This is in contrast with a number of experimental observations and could be related to microstructural effects that cannot be reproduced by our model. Finally, our analysis indicates that the surface tension measured inverting the CNT may be lower than the value measured by the pendant drop method, most likely because of changes in surface tension controlled by the supersaturation.

  16. Surface tension depression by low-solubility organic material in aqueous aerosol mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, Allison; Mitroo, Dhruv; McNeill, V. Faye

    2012-07-01

    Surface-active material, including long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), comprises a significant fraction of organic aerosol mass. Surface-active species are thought to form a film at the gas-aerosol interface, with implications for aerosol heterogeneous chemistry and cloud formation. However, LCFA phase behavior and surface-bulk partitioning has not been characterized under most conditions typical of tropospheric aerosol water (i.e. acidic, high ionic content), making it challenging to predict surface film formation in aerosols. In this study, we present measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions containing the slightly soluble LCFAs oleic and stearic acid. The effect of varying pH, organic concentration, and inorganic salt content was tested for each system. We observe surface tension depression compared to water of up to ˜30 and 45% for aqueous solutions containing stearic or oleic acid at pH 0-8 and high inorganic salt concentrations (NaCl and (NH4)2SO4). This suggests that surface film formation is favorable for these species in atmospheric aerosols.

  17. Surface tensions of linear and branched alkanes from Monte Carlo simulations using the anisotropic united atom model.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Goujon, F; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic united atoms (AUA4) model has been used for linear and branched alkanes to predict the surface tension as a function of temperature by Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations are carried out for n-alkanes ( n-C5, n-C6, n-C7, and n-C10) and for two branched C7 isomers (2,3-dimethylpentane and 2,4-dimethylpentane). Different operational expressions of the surface tension using both the thermodynamic and the mechanical definitions have been applied. The simulated surface tensions with the AUA4 model are found to be consistent within both definitions and in good agreement with experiments. PMID:18847235

  18. Dissolution of microbubbles generated in seawater obtained offshore: Behavior and surface tension measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Monica M.; Talu, Esra; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2007-12-01

    Ocean water samples were collected from Saint Andrew Bay and the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida, on board the R/V Athena. Optical microscopy observations of the dissolution of microbubbles generated in these water samples showed that the microbubbles remained spherical and their surfaces remained smooth during dissolution. Comparatively, these bubbles behaved like bubbles coated with expanded phase surfactants, as we show by directly observing the dissolution of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) bubbles and citing our previous work involving dissolution of short-chain lipid-coated microbubbles. We apply Epstein and Plesset's model for the dissolution of a 15 to 25 μm radius microbubble to determine surface tension, appropriate for a dissolving bubble coated with expanded phase surfactant. Average surface tensions of dissolving bubbles obtained in multiple locations and from two depths (from the sea-air surface and 10 feet (1 foot = 0.3048 m) below the sea-air surface) range between 21 and 37 dyn/cm with a resulting dissolution time of at least 2 times that of a clean microbubble at an initial radius of 15 μm. We never observed a remnant particle upon completion of dissolution, consistent with the observed smooth dissolution. These visual observations are in contrast to several studies involving visual observations of dissolution of seawater microbubbles. Reasons for these differences are postulated. Generally, our results are consistent with microbubbles coated primarily with short-chain and unsaturated fatty acids or lipids, but with a minority fraction of a long-chain component, all remaining in an expanded phase. Similarities in occasional dimpled morphology and surface tension with SDS/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-coated bubbles are used to come to this conclusion.

  19. Compressibility, the measurement of surface tension, and particle size in molecular or nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Dixmier, Marc

    2006-02-15

    It is shown that the interface shrinkage resulting from the capillary pressure difference between both sides of a curved interface is the product of a "standard shrinkage"kappagamma (kappa is the isothermal compressibility, gamma the interfacial tension) by a dimensionless factor that depends only on the shape of the sample of matter under study. The behaviour of the standard shrinkage in the critical domain shows that it cannot be a measure of the thickness of the liquid-vapour interface in that domain. The standard shrinkage of classical liquids somewhat above triple point is usually near to 0.048 v(c)(1/3) (v(c) is the critical molecular volume); exceptions to this rule are discussed. The variation of the standard shrinkage along the liquid-vapour coexistence curves of water and argon is presented; the effect of the interface shrinkage on the measured surface tension of liquids can become important within about 15% of the critical temperature. The standard shrinkage of solids is less than that of the corresponding liquids, and is of no consequence when measuring the surface tension of solids. The standard shrinkage of the nuclear fluid is 0.23 fm=0.09 v(c)(1/3). The saturation density of infinite nuclear matter is about 9% less than its value in atomic nuclei, and a term proportional to A(1/3) (A is the mass number) must be added to the nuclear binding energy formula. PMID:16266717

  20. Nanoscale fluctuations and surface tension measurements in droplets using phase-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru; Kim, Taewoo; Mir, Mustafa; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    A common-path interferometer was designed with rapidly tunable broadband swept laser source, which provides quantitative phase measurements of nanometer scale motions with very high sensitivity. With this setup, we are able to detect the thermal fluctuations in liquid droplets hanging at the end of an optical fiber. The measured nanoscale displacement fluctuations of various droplet surfaces were used to extract the surface tension. This newly developed technique proved the feasibility of noninvasive, fast, phase-resolved dynamic light scattering measurement of fluid mechanical properties. PMID:23292390

  1. Surface Tension of Super-Cooled Fe-O Liquid Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Gyeol; Choe, Joongkil; Inoue, Takashi; Ozawa, Shumpei; Lee, Joonho

    2016-08-01

    The surface tension of liquid Fe-O alloys was measured at temperatures ranging from 1621 K to 2006 K (1348 °C to 1733 °C) under a He-Ar atmosphere by using the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation facility. The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones based on the ideal adsorption model and the two-step adsorption model. Since the calculation results based on the two-step adsorption model showed better agreements with the experimental data, it was concluded that there is interactions between the adsorbed oxygen on the surface of liquid iron.

  2. Surface Tension of Super-Cooled Fe-O Liquid Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Gyeol; Choe, Joongkil; Inoue, Takashi; Ozawa, Shumpei; Lee, Joonho

    2016-06-01

    The surface tension of liquid Fe-O alloys was measured at temperatures ranging from 1621 K to 2006 K (1348 °C to 1733 °C) under a He-Ar atmosphere by using the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation facility. The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones based on the ideal adsorption model and the two-step adsorption model. Since the calculation results based on the two-step adsorption model showed better agreements with the experimental data, it was concluded that there is interactions between the adsorbed oxygen on the surface of liquid iron.

  3. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  4. Specific ion adsorption at the air/water interface: The role of hydrophobic solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinek, Dominik; Herz, Alexander; Vrbka, Lubos; Sedlmeier, Felix; Mamatkulov, Shavkat I.; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-09-01

    Classical force fields for molecular simulations of aqueous electrolytes are still controversial. We study alkali and halide ions at the air/water interface using novel non-polarizable force fields that were optimized based on bulk thermodynamics. In qualitative agreement with polarizable force-field simulations, ion repulsion from the interface decreases with increasing ion size. Iodide is even enhanced at the interface, which is rationalized by hydrophobic solvation at the interface, but exhibits a smaller surface propensity than in previous polarizable simulations. Surprisingly, lithium is less repelled than other cations because of its tightly bound hydration shell. A generalized Poisson-Boltzmann approach that includes ionic potentials of mean force from simulation almost quantitatively matches experimental interfacial tension increments for 1 molar sodium halides and alkali chlorides. We conclude that properly optimized non-polarizable force fields are transferable to interfacial environments and hold the potential for unravelling ion-specific effects even in biological situations involving peptidic surfaces.

  5. Design criteria for developing low-resource magnetic bead assays using surface tension valves.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nicholas M; Creecy, Amy E; Majors, Catherine E; Wariso, Bathsheba A; Short, Philip A; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2013-01-01

    Many assays for biological sample processing and diagnostics are not suitable for use in settings that lack laboratory resources. We have recently described a simple, self-contained format based on magnetic beads for extracting infectious disease biomarkers from complex biological samples, which significantly reduces the time, expertise, and infrastructure required. This self-contained format has the potential to facilitate the application of other laboratory-based sample processing assays in low-resource settings. The technology is enabled by immiscible fluid barriers, or surface tension valves, which stably separate adjacent processing solutions within millimeter-diameter tubing and simultaneously permit the transit of magnetic beads across the interfaces. In this report, we identify the physical parameters of the materials that maximize fluid stability and bead transport and minimize solution carryover. We found that fluid stability is maximized with ≤0.8 mm i.d. tubing, valve fluids of similar density to the adjacent solutions, and tubing with ≤20 dyn/cm surface energy. Maximizing bead transport was achieved using ≥2.4 mm i.d. tubing, mineral oil valve fluid, and a mass of 1-3 mg beads. The amount of solution carryover across a surface tension valve was minimized using ≤0.2 mg of beads, tubing with ≤20 dyn/cm surface energy, and air separators. The most favorable parameter space for valve stability and bead transport was identified by combining our experimental results into a single plot using two dimensionless numbers. A strategy is presented for developing additional self-contained assays based on magnetic beads and surface tension valves for low-resource diagnostic applications. PMID:24403996

  6. Parameter Interpretation and Reduction for a Unified Statistical Mechanical Surface Tension Model.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Hallie; Wexler, Anthony; Dutcher, Cari S

    2015-09-01

    Surface properties of aqueous solutions are important for environments as diverse as atmospheric aerosols and biocellular membranes. Previously, we developed a surface tension model for both electrolyte and nonelectrolyte aqueous solutions across the entire solute concentration range (Wexler and Dutcher, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 1723-1726). The model differentiated between adsorption of solute molecules in the bulk and surface of solution using the statistical mechanics of multilayer sorption solution model of Dutcher et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 3198-3213). The parameters in the model had physicochemical interpretations, but remained largely empirical. In the current work, these parameters are related to solute molecular properties in aqueous solutions. For nonelectrolytes, sorption tendencies suggest a strong relation with molecular size and functional group spacing. For electrolytes, surface adsorption of ions follows ion surface-bulk partitioning calculations by Pegram and Record (J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 5411-5417). PMID:26275040

  7. Influence of Turbulence on the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity. After the code was implemented in axisymmetric form and verified by several test cases at the NASA Glenn Research Center, the drop tower runs of Aydelott were modeled. Work last year with a laminar model was found to overpredict Aydelott's results, except at the lowest Reynolds number conditions of 400. This year, a simple turbulence model was implemented by adding a turbulent viscosity based on the mixing-length hypothesis and empirical measurements of previous works. Predictions made after this change was implemented have been much closer to experimentally observed flow patterns and geyser heights. Two model runs is shown. The first, without any turbulence correction

  8. Free impinging jet microreactors: controlling reactive flows via surface tension and fluid viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Erni, Philipp; Elabbadi, Amal

    2013-06-25

    We investigate the use of impinging free liquid jets as wall-free continuous microreactors. The collision of two reactant jets forming a free-standing thin liquid sheet allows us to perform rapid precipitation reactions to form colloidal particles, enhance micromixing, and master challenging reactions with very fast kinetics. To control the shape, size, and hydrodynamics of the impingement zone between the two liquid streams, it is crucial to understand the interplay among surface tension, fluid viscoelasticity, and reaction kinetics. Here, we study these aspects using model fluids, each illustrating a different physical effect of surface and bulk fluid properties. First, solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate below, near, and above the critical micelle concentration are used to assess the role of static and dynamic surface tension. Second, we demonstrate how dilute solutions of high-molecular-weight polymers can be used to control the morphology of the free surface flow. If properly controlled, these effects can enhance the micromixing time scales to the extent that very rapid reactions can be performed with outstanding selectivity. We quantitatively assess the interplay between the free surface flow and reaction kinetics using parallel-competitive reactions and demonstrate how these results can be used to control the particle size in precipitation processes. PMID:23755870

  9. Volume tracking of interfaces having surface tension in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.B.; Rider, W.J.; Mosso, S.J.; Brock, J.S.; Hochstein, J.I.

    1996-03-01

    Solution algorithms are presented for tracking interfaces with piecewise linear (PLIC) volume-of-fluid (VOF) methods on fixed (Eulerian) two-dimensional (2-D) structured and three-dimensional (3-D) structured and unstructured grids. We review the theory of volume tracking methods, derive appropriate volume evolution equations, identify and present solutions to the basic geometric functions needed for interface reconstruction and volume fluxing, and provide detailed algorithm templates for modern 2-D and 3-D PLIC VOF interface tracking methods. We discuss some key outstanding issues for PLIC VOF methods, namely the method used for time integration of fluid volumes (operator splitting, unsplit, Runge-Kutta, etc.) and the estimation of interface normals. We also present our latest developments in the continuum surface force (CSF) model for surface tension, namely extension to 3-D and variable surface tension effects. We identify and focus on key outstanding CSF model issues that become especially critical on fine meshes with high density ratio interfacial flows, namely the surface delta function approximation, the estimation of interfacial curvature, and the continuum surface force scaling and/or smoothing model. Numerical results in two and three dimensions are used to illustrate the properties of these methods.

  10. Effect of surface modification on interfacial nanobubble morphology and contact line tension.

    PubMed

    Rangharajan, Kaushik K; Kwak, Kwang J; Conlisk, A T; Wu, Yan; Prakash, Shaurya

    2015-07-14

    Past research has confirmed the existence of surface nanobubbles on various hydrophobic substrates (static contact angle >90°) when imaged in air-equilibrated water. Additionally, the use of solvent exchange techniques (based on the difference in saturation levels of air in various solvents) also introduced surface nanobubbles on hydrophilic substrates (static contact angle <90°). In this work, tapping mode atomic force microscopy was used to image interfacial nanobubbles formed on bulk polycarbonate (static contact angle of 81.1°), bromo-terminated silica (BTS; static contact angle of 85.5°), and fluoro-terminated silica (FTS; static contact angle of 105.3°) surfaces when immersed in air-equilibrated water without solvent exchange. Nanobubbles formed on the above three substrates were characterized on the basis of Laplace pressure, bubble density, and contact line tension. Results reported here show that (1) the Laplace pressures of all nanobubbles formed on both BTS and polycarbonate were an order of magnitude higher than those of FTS, (2) the nanobubble number density per unit area decreased with an increase in substrate contact angle, and (3) the contact line tension of the nanobubbles was calculated to be positive for both BTS and polycarbonate (lateral radius, Rs < 50 nm for all nanobubbles), and negative for FTS (Rs > 50 nm for all nanobubbles). The nanobubble morphology and distribution before and after using the solvent exchange method (ethanol-water), on the bulk polycarbonate substrate was also characterized. Analysis for these polycarbonate surface nanobubbles showed that both the Laplace pressure and nanobubble density reduced by ≈98% after ethanol-water exchange, accompanied by a flip in the magnitude of contact line tension from positive (0.19 nN) to negative (-0.11 nN). PMID:26041331

  11. Relationships between plasma lipids, proteins, surface tension and post-dive bubbles.

    PubMed

    Schellart, Nico A M; Rozložník, Miroslav; Balestra, Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) in divers is caused by bubbles of inert gas. When DCS occurs, most bubbles can be found in the venous circulation: venous gas emboli (VGE). Bubbles are thought to be stabilized by low molecular weight surfactant reducing the plasma-air surface tension (γ). Proteins may play a role as well. We studied the interrelations between these substances, γ and VGE, measured before and after a dry dive simulation. VGE of 63 dive simulations (21-msw/40-minute profile) of 52 divers was examined 40, 80, 120 and 160 minutes after surfacing (precordial Doppler method) and albumin, total protein, triglycerides, total cholesterol and free fatty acids were determined pre- and post-exposure. To manipulate blood plasma composition, half of the subjects obtained a fat-rich breakfast, while the other half got a fat-poor breakfast pre-dive. Eleven subjects obtained both. VGE scores measured with the precordial Doppler method were transformed to the logarithm of Kisman Integrated Severity Scores. With statistical analysis, including (partial) correlations, it could not be established whether γ as well as VGE scores are related to albumin, total protein or total cholesterol. With triglycerides and fatty acids correlations were also lacking, despite the fact that these compounds varied substantially. The same holds true for the paired differences between the two exposures of the 11 subjects. Moreover, no correlation between surface tension and VGE could be shown. From these findings and some theoretical considerations it seems likely that proteins lower surface tension rather than lipids. Since the findings are not in concordance with the classical surfactant hypothesis, reconsideration seems necessary. PMID:26094288

  12. Surface tension and negative pressure interior of a non-singular ‘black hole’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2015-11-01

    The constant density interior Schwarzschild solution for a static, spherically symmetric collapsed star has a divergent pressure when its radius R≤slant \\frac{9}{8}{R}s=\\frac{9}{4}{GM}. We show that this divergence is integrable, and induces a non-isotropic transverse stress with a finite redshifted surface tension on a spherical surface of radius {R}0=3R\\sqrt{1-\\frac{8}{9}\\frac{R }{{R}s}}. For r\\lt {R}0 the interior Schwarzschild solution exhibits negative pressure. When R={R}s, the surface is localized at the Schwarzschild radius itself, {R}0={R}s, and the solution has constant negative pressure p=-\\bar{ρ } everywhere in the interior r\\lt {R}s, thereby describing a gravitational condensate star, a fully collapsed non-singular state already inherent in and predicted by classical general relativity. The redshifted surface tension of the condensate star surface is given by {τ }s={{Δ }}κ /8π G, where {{Δ }}κ ={κ }+-{κ }-=2{κ }+=1/{R}s is the difference of equal and opposite surface gravities between the exterior and interior Schwarzschild solutions. The First Law, {{d}}M={{d}}{E}V+{τ }s {{d}}A is recognized as a purely mechanical classical relation at zero temperature and zero entropy, describing the volume energy and surface energy change respectively. The Schwarzschild time t of such a non-singular gravitational condensate star is a global time, fully consistent with unitary time evolution in quantum theory. A clear observational test of gravitational condensate stars with a physical surface versus black holes is the discrete surface modes of oscillation which should be detectable by their gravitational wave signatures.

  13. Two-dimensional percolation at the free water surface and its relation with the surface tension anomaly of water.

    PubMed

    Sega, Marcello; Horvai, George; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2014-08-01

    The percolation temperature of the lateral hydrogen bonding network of the molecules at the free water surface is determined by means of molecular dynamics computer simulation and identification of the truly interfacial molecules analysis for six different water models, including three, four, and five site ones. The results reveal that the lateral percolation temperature coincides with the point where the temperature derivative of the surface tension has a minimum. Hence, the anomalous temperature dependence of the water surface tension is explained by this percolation transition. It is also found that the hydrogen bonding structure of the water surface is largely model-independent at the percolation threshold; the molecules have, on average, 1.90 ± 0.07 hydrogen bonded surface neighbors. The distribution of the molecules according to the number of their hydrogen bonded neighbors at the percolation threshold also agrees very well for all the water models considered. Hydrogen bonding at the water surface can be well described in terms of the random bond percolation model, namely, by the assumptions that (i) every surface water molecule can form up to 3 hydrogen bonds with its lateral neighbors and (ii) the formation of these hydrogen bonds occurs independently from each other. PMID:25106600

  14. The cohesive energy density and the isothermal compressibility: Their relationships with the surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqra, Fathi

    2014-08-01

    Models for predicting the cohesive energy density (CeD), the isothermal compressibility (kT), the compressibility and surface tension product (kT.γ), the ratio of surface tension to cohesive energy density (γ/CeD) and the isothermal compressibility and cohesive energy density product (kT.CeD) are described. The temperature T at which the numerical constants are valid is the melting temperature. The studies are being restricted to alkali halides. The calculated (kT.γ) values (21.3-40.9 pm), pertained to the sizes of voids between the ions, are of a smaller range than in the earlier treatments and agree very well with the experimental published data (21.9-47.6 pm). The determined (γ/CeD) values (4.3-8.2 pm), attributed to the contraction of the internuclear distance of the top-layer atoms in the surface, are comparable with the experimental data (3.9-11 pm). It is found that the ratio of the internuclear distance at the surface to that of the bulk is 97-98%.

  15. Mass spectrometry analysis of surface tension reducing substances produced by a pah-degrading Pseudomonas citronellolis strain

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Rodrigo J. S.; Santos, Eder C.; Haddad, Renato; Catharino, Rodrigo R.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Bento, Fátima M.; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we investigated the structure of the iron-stimulated surface tension reducing substances produced by P. citronellolis 222A isolated from a 17-years old landfarming used for sludge treatment in petrochemical industries and oil refinery. Its mass spectrum differs from P. aeruginosa spectrum, indicating that the surface tension reducing substances produced by P. citronellolis can be a new kind of biosurfactant. PMID:24031229

  16. Dynamic film and interfacial tensions in emulsion and foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Koczo, K.; Wasan, D.T.

    1997-03-01

    In concentrated fluid dispersions the liquid films are under dynamic conditions during film rupture or drainage. Aqueous foam films stabilized with sodium decylsulfonate and aqueous emulsion films stabilized with the nonionic Brij 58 surfactant were formed at the tip of a capillary and the film tension was measured under static and dynamic conditions. In the stress relaxation experiments the response of the film tension to a sudden film area expansion was studied. These experiments also allowed the direct measurement of the Gibbs film elasticity. In the dynamic film tension experiments, the film area was continuously increased by a constant rate and the dynamic film tension was monitored. The measured film tensions were compared with the interfacial tensions of the respective single air/water and oil/water interfaces, which were measured using the same radius of curvature, relative expansion, and expansion rate as in the film studies. It was found that under dynamic conditions the film tension is higher than twice the single interfacial tension (IFT) and a mechanism was suggested to explain the difference. When the film, initially at equilibrium, is expanded and the interfacial area increases, a substantial surfactant depletion occurs inside the film. As a result, the surfactant can be supplied only from the adjoining meniscus (Plateau border) by surface diffusion, and the film tension is controlled by the diffusion and adsorption of surfactant in the meniscus. The results have important implications for the stability and rheology of foams and emulsions with high dispersed phase ratios (polyhedral structure).

  17. Acoustic containerless experiment system: A non-contact surface tension measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.; Barmatz, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Acoustic Containerless Experiment System (ACES) was flown on STS 41-B in February 1984 and was scheduled to be reflown in 1986. The primary experiment that was to be conducted with the ACES module was the containerless melting and processing of a fluoride glass sample. A second experiment that was to be conducted was the verification of a non-contact surface tension measurement technique using the molten glass sample. The ACES module consisted of a three-axis acoustic positioning module that was inside an electric furnace capable of heating the system above the melting temperature of the sample. The acoustic module is able to hold the sample with acoustic forces in the center of the chamber and, in addition, has the capability of applying a modulating force on the sample along one axis of the chamber so that the molten sample or liquid drop could be driven into one of its normal oscillation modes. The acoustic module could also be adjusted so that it could place a torque on the molten drop and cause the drop to rotate. In the ACES, a modulating frequency was applied to the drop and swept through a range of frequencies that would include the n = 2 mode. A maximum amplitude of the drop oscillation would indicate when resonance was reached and from that data the surface tension could be calculated. For large viscosity samples, a second technique for measuring surface tension was developed. The results of the ACES experiment and some of the problems encountered during the actual flight of the experiment will be discussed.

  18. Effects of Added Salts on Surface Tension and Aggregation of Crown Ether Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Maki; Fujio, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Two crown ether surfactants, dodecanoyloxymethyl- (C11Φ6) and octanoyloxymethyl-18-crown-6 (C7Φ6), were synthesized and the surface tension dependence on surfactant concentration of their aqueous solutions was measured both in the absence and presence of alkali chlorides to confirm the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is highest for the added cation that have an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of the crown ether ring and that several break points on the surface tension vs. concentration curves occur for these crown ether surfactants. For C11Φ6 and C7Φ6, in the absence of salt, the surface tension vs. concentration curves had two break points. Using the solubilization of a water-insoluble dye as an indicator, we found that the break point at the higher concentration (m0) for C7Φ6 was due to micelle formation. Two break points were also observed for the aqueous solution of C11Φ6 in the presence of NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl salts at concentrations of 0.22 mol kg(-1) and for C7Φ6 with 0.22 mol kg(-1) KCl added. The CMC (m0) was found to be the highest for solutions containing K(+) salts because K(+) has an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of 18-crown-6 ring. Furthermore, the CMC decreased as the ionic diameters of the added cations deviated from the hole size. The molecular areas at two break points, estimated by the Gibbs adsorption isotherm, except for that at the break point at mI of C7Φ6, were very small for an adsorbed monolayer. Further investigation is required to elucidate the reason for the break point at mI. PMID:26666275

  19. Effect of increased surface tension and assisted ventilation on /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferies, A.L.; Kawano, T.; Mori, S.; Burger, R.

    1988-02-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) and high-frequency oscillation (HFO) on the clearance of technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) from lungs with altered surface tension properties. A submicronic aerosol of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was insufflated into the lungs of anesthetized, tracheotomized rabbits before and 1 h after the administration of the aerosolized detergent dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (OT). Rabbits were ventilated by one of four methods: 1) spontaneous breathing; 2) CMV at 12 cmH2O mean airway pressure (MAP); 3) HFO at 12 cmH2O MAP; 4) HFO at 16 cmH2O MAP. Administration of OT resulted in decreased arterial PO2 (PaO2), increased lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and abnormal lung pressure-volume relationships, compatible with increased surface tension. /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance was accelerated after OT in all groups. The post-OT rate of clearance (k) was significantly faster (P less than 0.05) in the CMV at 12 cmH2O MAP (k = 7.57 +/- 0.71%/min (SE)) and HFO at 16 cmH2O MAP (k = 6.92 +/- 0.61%/min) groups than in the spontaneously breathing (k = 4.32 +/- 0.55%/min) and HFO at 12 cmH2O MAP (4.68 +/- 0.63%/min) groups. The clearance curves were biexponential in the former two groups. We conclude that pulmonary clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA is accelerated in high surface tension pulmonary edema, and this effect is enhanced by both conventional ventilation and HFO at high mean airway pressure.

  20. Investigations of surface-tension effects due to small-scale complex boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiansheng

    In this Ph.D. dissertation, we have investigated some important surface-tension phenomena including capillarity, wetting, and wicking. We mainly focus on the geometric aspects of these problems, and to learn about how structures affect properties. . In the first project (Chapter 2), we used numerical simulations and experiments to study the meniscus of a fluid confined in capillaries with complicated cross-sectional geometries. In the simulations, we computed the three-dimensional shapes of the menisci formed in polygonal and star-shaped capillaries with sharp or rounded corners. Height variations across the menisci were used to quantify the effect of surface tension. Analytical solutions were derived for all the cases where the cross-sectional geometry was a regular polygon or a regular star-shape. Power indices that characterize the effects of corner rounding were extracted from simulation results. These findings can serve as guide for fabrications of unconventional three-dimensional structures in Capillary Force Lithography experiments. Experimental demonstrations of the working principle was also performed. Although quantitative matching between simulation and experimental results was not achieved due to the limitation of material properties, clear qualitative trends were observed and interesting three-dimensional nano-structures were produced. A second project (Chapter 3) focused on developing techniques to produce three-dimensional hierarchically structured superhydrophobic surfaces with high aspect ratios. We experimented with two different high-throughput electron-beam-lithography processes featuring single and dual electron-beam exposures. After a surface modification procedure with a hydrophobic silane, the structured surfaces exhibited two distinct superhydrophobic behaviors---high and low adhesion. While both types of superhydrophobic surfaces exhibited very high (approximately 160° water advancing contact angles, the water receding contact angles on

  1. Surface-tension-driven Stokes flow: A numerical method based on conformal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchak, Peter; Crowdy, Darren G.

    2016-07-01

    A novel numerical scheme is presented for solving the problem of two dimensional Stokes flows with free boundaries whose evolution is driven by surface tension. The formulation is based on a complex variable formulation of Stokes flow and use of conformal mapping to track the free boundaries. The method is motivated by applications to modelling the fabrication process for microstructured optical fibres (MOFs), also known as "holey fibres", and is therefore tailored for the computation of multiple interacting free boundaries. We give evidence of the efficacy of the method and discuss its performance.

  2. Surface tension effects on the motion of a free-falling liquid sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Gennaro; De Rosa, Fortunato; de Luca, Luigi

    2013-06-01

    The stationary motion of a liquid curtain falling under the effects of inertia, gravity, and surface tension is analyzed. An original equation governing the streamwise distribution of thickness and velocity is derived by means of a Taylor expansion in the lateral distance from the mean line of the sheet. Approximate solutions are obtained by means of perturbation approaches involving the two parameters governing the problem, namely, the slenderness ratio ɛ and the Weber number We. The numerical procedure employed in order to integrate the non-linear equation is discussed and a parametric study is presented, together with a comparison with the approximate asymptotic solutions valid for small ɛ and We.

  3. Surface tension of aqueous solutions of diethanolamine and triethanolamine from 25 C to 50 C

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.; Alvarez, E.; Rendo, R.; Romero, E.; Navaza, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    Aqueous solutions of alkanolamines such as monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) are good solvents for the removal of acid gases such CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from the gas streams of many processes in the natural gas, ammonia synthesis, and some chemical industries. The surface tension of aqueous solutions of diethanolamine and triethanolamine was measured over the entire concentration range at temperatures of 25 C to 50 C. The experimental values were correlated with temperature and with mole fraction. The maximum deviation was in both cases always less than 0.5%.

  4. Discussion on the measurement of the surface tension coefficient by the pull-off method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei; Liu, Guan-nan; Qian, Jun; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Chun-ling

    2016-03-01

    A simple experiment for measuring the surface tension coefficient is proposed, which is well suited for teaching and learning the behavior of liquids in typical student laboratories. It is based on the pull-off method and the dynamometer used is the Jolly balance. The experiment requires inexpensive equipment but the methods allow for serious analysis of possible systematic errors, such as the impact of the state of the spring and wire on the experimental results, and the unusual movement of the engraved line on the mirror when pulling up the water film.

  5. Selection of a surface tension propellant management system for the Viking 75 Orbiter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Debrock, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the propellant management system requirements derived for the Viking 75 mission, and review of a series of surface tension propellant management system design concepts. The chosen concept is identified and its mission operation described. The ullage bubble and bulk liquid positioning characteristics are presented, along with propellant dynamic considerations entailed by thrust initiation/termination. Pressurization design considerations, required to assure minimum disturbance to the bulk propellant, are introduced as well as those of the tank ullage vent. Design provisions to assure liquid communication between tank ends are discussed. Results of a preliminary design study are presented, including mechanical testing requirements to assure structural integrity, propellant compatibility, and proper installation.

  6. Combined device for measuring of osmotic pressure, conductance, surface tension, and viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.

    2010-12-01

    Micro and multipurpose analytical tools are in high demand for procuring physicochemical data. Thereby conductance and specific conductance (κ), surface tension (γ) and viscosity (η) of 0.066 to 0.333 mol/kg urea and methylurea, the osmotic pressure (π) for 0.1 to 1.0 mol/kg sucrose with 0.01 mmol/kg aqueous KCl solutions simultaneously were studied with oscosurvismeter. The solutions of different compositions were taken in cells, partitioned by nitrocellulose semipermeable membrane (SPM) for osmotic pressure. Survismeter, osmometer, electrodes, metallic clamp, SPM and high potential metallic springs are key parts of the oscosurvismeter. The conductance data were in close agreement with those of Horiba Conductivity Meter DS-8 M, surface tension data with that of face automatic surface tensiometer, CBVP-Z, Kyowa Interface Science Co. Ltd., viscosity data with survismeter, Spectro Analytical Pvt Ltd. The conductance and viscosities for methylurea are higher than those of the urea with comparatively stronger hydrophobic interaction of the -CH3 group of the methylurea. Statistical analysis of cost involved with oscosurvismeter was 99% less as compared with individual methods.

  7. Method and apparatus for monitoring and measuring the surface tension of a fluid using fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Bohanon, T.M.; Mikrut, J.M.

    1994-04-12

    A non-contact method and apparatus are described for measuring and monitoring the surface of a fluid using fiber optics and interferometric detection to permit measurement of mechanical characteristics of fluid surfaces. The apparatus employs an alternating electric field gradient for generating a capillary wave on the surface of the fluid. A fiber optic coupler and optical fiber directs a portion of a laser beam onto the surface of the fluid, another portion of the laser beam onto the photo sensor, and directs light reflected from the surface of the fluid onto the photo sensor. The output of the photo sensor is processed and coupled to a phase sensitive detector to permit measurement of phase shift between the drive signal creating the capillary wave and the detected signal. This phase shift information is then used to determine mechanical properties of the fluid surface such as surface tension, surface elasticity, and surface inhomogeneity. The resulting test structure is easily made compact, portable, and easy to align and use. 4 figures.

  8. Method and apparatus for monitoring and measuring the surface tension of a fluid using fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Bernard M.; Ketterson, John B.; Bohanon, Thomas M.; Mikrut, John M.

    1994-01-01

    A non-contact method and apparatus for measuring and monitoring the surface of a fluid using fiber optics and interferometric detection to permit measurement mechanical characteristics' fluid surfaces. The apparatus employs an alternating electric field gradient for generating a capillary wave on the surface of the fluid. A fiber optic coupler and optical fiber directs a portion of a laser beam onto the surface of the fluid, another portion of the laser beam onto the photo sensor, and directs light reflected from the surface of the fluid onto the photo sensor. The output of the photo sensor is processed and coupled to a phase sensitive detector to permit measurement of phase shift between the drive signal creating the capillary wave and the detected signal. This phase shift information is then used to determine mechanical properties of the fluid surface such as surface tension, surface elasticity, and surface inhomogeneity. The resulting test structure is easily made compact, portable, and easy to align and use.

  9. Factors influencing the density and surface tension of soda lime silica melts containing multi-valent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Douglas Richard

    2003-10-01

    The density and surface tension of (mol %) 15 Na2O 11 CaO 74 SiO2 glass melts containing additions of iron, iron and sulfur (amber glass), and vanadium were measured using the sessile and pendant drop techniques at temperatures between 1200 and 1400°C. The density of the iron-containing melts increased with increasing iron content and decreasing melt temperature. It was determined that melts with high concentrations of Fe3+ are most susceptible to changes in the atmosphere, since Fe3+ can have either tetrahedral or octahedral coordination. Molar volume measurements suggest that the iron is entering the structure as a network modifier at low concentrations and as a network former at high concentrations (>1.0 mol% addition). Multiple correlation analysis was used to develop a model for predicting the surface tension of melts as a function of melt temperature, melt atmosphere and iron oxide addition. For the reducing environment, the model predicted a minimum in melt surface tension near 1360°C with an addition of 1.25 mol% iron oxide. The surface tension of the amber glass melts decreased with increasing temperature. Melt atmosphere had little effect on the surface tension of the sulfur containing melts, suggesting that sulfur decomposition is resulting in a sulfur-rich local environment at the melt surface. The surface tension of the melts was found to increase with increasing SO3 content up to 0.13 to 0.31 wt%, after which it levels off or decreases. The density of the vanadium-containing melts increased with increasing vanadium content and decreasing melt temperature. The surface tension of these melts was found to increase between 10 to 30 mN/m at low additions of vanadia (0.1 to 0.2 mol%), above which the surface tension decreases. This behavior can be explained using the transitional structure theory. The surface tension of vanadium-containing soda lime silica melts was found to be highest in a reducing environment. The surface tension of the vanadia

  10. Hardware development for the surface tension driven convection experiment aboard the USML-1 spacelab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, A. D.; Jacobson, T. P.; Wanhainen, J. S.; Petrarca, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for March 1992. Hardware is under development to establish the experimental conditions and perform the specified measurements, for both ground based research and the flight experiment in a Spacelab single rack. Major development areas include an infrared thermal imaging system for surface temperature measurement, a CO2 laser and control system for surface heating, and for flow visualization, a He-Ne laser and optical system in conjunction with an intensified video camera. For ground based work the components of each system were purchased or designed, and tested individually. The three systems will be interfaced with the balance of the experimental hardware and will constitute a working engineering model. A description of the three systems and examples of the component performance is given along with the plans for the development of flight hardware.

  11. Development of an infrared imaging system for the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.

    1989-01-01

    An infrared imaging system is used to quantify the imposed surface temperature distribution along a liquid/gas free surface in support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, a planned Space Transportation System flight experiment. For ground-based work a commercially available instrument was used to determine the feasibility of using this type of imaging system for this experiment. The ground-based work was used as a baseline for compiling specifications for a flight qualified imager to be designed, fabricated, tested and qualified for flight. The requirements and the specifications for the flight model are given along with the reasons for departures from the ground-based equipment. The flight qualification requirements discussed are a representative sample of the necessary procedures which must be followed to flight qualify diagnostic equipment for use aboard the STS. The potential problems and concerns associated with operating an imaging system on orbit are also discussed.

  12. Hardware development for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, A. D.; Jacobson, T. P.; Wanhainen, J. S.; Petrarca, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for March 1992. Hardware is under development to establish the experimental conditions and perform the specified measurements, for both ground based research and the flight experiment in a Spacelab single rack. Major development areas include an infrared thermal imaging system for surface temperature measurement, a CO2 laser and control system for surface heating, and for flow visualization, a He-Ne laser and optical system in conjunction with an intensified video camera. For ground based work the components of each system were purchased or designed, and tested individually. The three systems will be interfaced with the balance of the experimental hardware and will constitute a working engineering model. A description of the three systems and examples of the component performance is given along with the plans for the development of flight hardware.

  13. Development of an infrared imaging system for the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.

    1989-01-01

    An infrared imaging system is used to quantify the imposed surface temperature distribution along a liquid/gas free surface in support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, a planned Space Transportation System flight experiment. For ground-based work a commercially available instrument was used to determine the feasibility of using the type of imaging system for this experiment. The ground-based work was used as a baseline for compiling specifications for a flight qualified imager to be designed, fabricated, tested and qualified for flight. The requirements and specifications for the flight model are given along with the reasons for departures from the ground-based equipment. The flight qualification requirements discussed are a representative sample of the necessary procedures which must be followed to flight qualify diagnostic equipment for use aboard the STS. The potential problems and concerns associated with operating an imaging system in orbit are also discussed.

  14. Modeling the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Jacqmim, David A.

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric phase field model is developed and used to model surface tension forces on liquid jets in microgravity. The previous work in this area is reviewed and a baseline drop tower experiment selected 'for model comparison. A mathematical model is developed which includes a free surface. a symmetric centerline and wall boundaries with given contact angles. The model is solved numerically with a compact fourth order stencil on a equally spaced axisymmetric grid. After grid convergence studies, a grid is selected and all drop tower tests modeled. Agreement was assessed by comparing predicted and measured free surface rise. Trend wise agreement is good but agreement in magnitude is only fair. Suspected sources of disagreement are suspected to be lack of a turbulence model and the existence of slosh baffles in the experiment which were not included in the model.

  15. Surface tension effects on the onset of double-diffusive convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the critical thermal Rayleigh number for onset of convection in a horizontal layer of density-stratified fluid with a free surface when heated from below. Three different aqueous solutions were used: salt, glycerol, and acetic acid. The rates of change in surface tension with concentration for these three solutions are positive, nearly zero, and negative, respectively. Compared to the rigid-rigid boundaries, the critical thermal Rayleigh number was found to be larger by 11.2 percent for the salt solution and smaller by 10.0 percent for the glycerol solution. With the acetic acid solution, however, the effect of the free surface was found to be negligible.

  16. Brewster Angle Microscopy Study of Model Stratum Corneum Lipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Ellen; Champagne, Alex; William, Joseph; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    As the first and last barrier in the body, the stratum corneum (SC) is essential to life. Understanding the interactions and organization of lipids within the SC provides insight into essential physiological processes, including water loss prevention and the adsorption of substances from the environment. Langmuir monolayers have long been used to study complex systems, such as biological membranes and marine aerosols, due to their ability to shed light on intermolecular interactions. In this study, lipid mixtures with varying cholesterol and cerebroside ratios were investigated at the air/water interface. Surface tension measurements along with Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images were used to examine the lipid phase transitions. Results indicate that cholesterol and cerebrosides form miscible monolayers, exhibiting ideal behavior. BAM images of a singular, uniform collapse phase also suggest formation of a miscible monolayer.

  17. Influence of phosphorus addition on the surface tension of liquid iron and segregation of phosphorus on the surface of Fe-P alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, X.M.; Jiang, H.G.; Ding, B.Z.; Hu, Z.Q.; Sui, Z.T.

    1996-02-01

    This article presents a study of the surface tension and phosphorus surface segregation in Fe-P alloys. The surface tension was measured by the sessile drop technique. The result of the dynamic surface tension for the low phosphorus content alloys shows that the alloy surface vaporization has a clear effect on the surface tension and causes a positive surface tension temperature coefficient. However, from this article, it is evident that phosphorus in liquid iron acts as a surface active element similar to arsenic. The surface segregation was determined using Auger electron spectroscopy. The result on the surface analysis of as-solidified sample indicates that the adsorption of impurity elements, such as oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, can conceal phosphorus segregation on the free surface. Phosphorus segregation was also examined in the samples as-cleaned by Ar{sup +} and then treated 30 minutes at 650 C. Phosphorus was found to segregate extensively on the surface of the alloys. On the basis of the analysis of the published data, the surface active intensity sequence of some nonmetallic elements was arrayed, and the surface active intensity of fluorine and boron in liquid iron was estimated.

  18. Quantum Magnetic Oscillations of the Surface Tension at a Metal-Insulator Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskii, L. B.

    2016-03-01

    Any metal-insulator transition (MI transition) in a crystalline material must be a transition from a situation in which electronic bands overlap to a situation when they do not (Mott, Metal-insulator, 2nd edn. Taylor@Francis, London, 1990). For this case the self-consistent equations for the two-band conductor are formulated (cf. Dubovskii, JETP Lett. 99(1):22-26, 2014). The description of the MI phase transition is based on two order parameters. The first one is the material density distribution at the MI boundary ρ ({vec {r}}). The second one is a four-component complex vector in spin space Upsilon ({vec {r}}). The value Upsilon ({vec {r}}) determines the electron density in the metallic or semimetallic phase in the presence of an external magnetic field. Two different components of the vector describe possible spin states of electrons and holes inserted in the external magnetic field. The solution gives a singular behavior of the surface tension at the MI interface in the vicinity of the MI phase transition. At low temperature quantum oscillations of the surface tension in the magnetic field take place.

  19. [Effects of disinfectants on erythrocytes and isolated hepatocytes from rats and surface tension].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Tsuji, M; Nakayama, S; Oguchi, K

    1993-05-01

    The effects of formaldehyde (F), m-cresol (C), guaiacol (G), ethanol (E) and their mixture (FC, FCE, FG, FGE) on erythrocytes and isolated hepatocytes from rats and surface tension in water were examined. Hypotonic hemolysis of erythrocytes was inhibited by m-cresol, while guaiacol, formaldehyde and ethanol accelerated the hemolysis. Lower concentrations of the mixture inhibited hypotonic hemolysis, but higher concentrations accelerated hemolysis. Formaldehyde caused a decrease of transaminase (GOT, GPT) in the medium and hepatocytes. GOT and GPT in the medium were increased by m-cresol, but those in the hepatocyte were decreased by this agent. FC and FCE at 10 mM increased GOT in the medium, but FG and FGE decreased GOT. All mixtures decreased GOT and GPT in hepatocytes and GPT in the medium. All mixtures and formaldehyde inhibited GOT and GPT activity. Formaldehyde and m-cresol decreased hepatocyte viability. In the all mixtures-added hepatocytes, the viability was markedly lowered. Formaldehyde, m-cresol, guaiacol and ethanol caused a depression of surface tension, but the depressive effects of FG and FGE were weaker than that of guaiacol. These results suggest that the observed effects of the drug mixtures on erythrocytes and hepatocytes were the additive effects of the component drugs. PMID:8330803

  20. Effects of tension-compression asymmetry on the surface wrinkling of film-substrate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao; Li, Bo; Hong, Wei; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2016-09-01

    Many soft materials and biological tissues are featured with the tension-compression asymmetry of constitutive relations. The surface wrinkling of a stiff thin film lying on a compliant substrate is investigated through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. It is found that the tension-compression asymmetry of the soft substrate not only affects the critical strain of buckling but, more importantly, may also influence the wrinkling pattern that occurs in the film-substrate system under specified loading conditions. Due to this mechanism, the thin film subjected to equi-biaxial compression may first buckle into a hexagonal array of dimples or bulges, instead of the checkerboard pattern, and consequently evolve into labyrinths with further loading. Under non-equi-biaxial compression, the system may buckle either into a parallel bead-chain pattern or a stripe pattern, depending on the substrate nonlinearity and the loading biaxiality. Phase diagrams are established for the wrinkling patterns in a wide range of geometric and mechanical parameters, which facilitate the design of surface patterns with desired properties and functions.

  1. Short-Time Structural Stability of Compressible Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Ben

    2016-06-01

    Assume we start with an initial vortex-sheet configuration which consists of two inviscid fluids with density bounded below flowing smoothly past each other, where a strictly positive fixed coefficient of surface tension produces a surface tension force across the common interface, balanced by the pressure jump. We model the fluids by the compressible Euler equations in three space dimensions with a very general equation of state relating the pressure, entropy and density such that the sound speed is positive. We prove that, for a short time, there exists a unique solution of the equations with the same structure. The mathematical approach consists of introducing a carefully chosen artificial viscosity-type regularisation which allows one to linearise the system so as to obtain a collection of transport equations for the entropy, pressure and curl together with a parabolic-type equation for the velocity which becomes fairly standard after rotating the velocity according to the interface normal. We prove a high order energy estimate for the non-linear equations that is independent of the artificial viscosity parameter which allows us to send it to zero. This approach loosely follows that introduced by Shkoller et al. in the setting of a compressible liquid-vacuum interface.

  2. Surface Tension Components Based Selection of Cosolvents for Efficient Liquid Phase Exfoliation of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianfeng; Wu, Jingjie; Wang, Man; Dong, Pei; Xu, Jingxuan; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Junhua; Wang, Xifan; Ye, Mingxin; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-05-01

    A proper design of direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) for 2D materials as graphene, MoS2 , WS2 , h-BN, Bi2 Se3 , MoSe2 , SnS2 , and TaS2 with common cosolvents is carried out based on considering the polar and dispersive components of surface tensions of various cosolvents and 2D materials. It has been found that the exfoliation efficiency is enhanced by matching the ratio of surface tension components of cosolvents to that of the targeted 2D materials, based on which common cosolvents composed of IPA/water, THF/water, and acetone/water can be designed for sufficient LPE process. In this context, the library of low-toxic and low-cost solvents with low boiling points for LPE is infinitely enlarged when extending to common cosolvents. Polymer-based composites reinforced with a series of different 2D materials are compared with each other. It is demonstrated that the incorporation of cosolvents-exfoliated 2D materials can substantially improve the mechanical and thermal properties of polymer matrices. Typically, with the addition of 0.5 wt% of such 2D material as MoS2 nanosheets, the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased up to 74.85% and 136.97%, respectively. The different enhancement effect of 2D materials is corresponded to the intrinsic properties and LPE capacity of 2D materials. PMID:27059403

  3. Nano bubble—Size dependence of surface tension and inside pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Kotaro

    2008-07-01

    The Young-Laplace (Y-L) equation describes the difference between inside pressure and outside pressure of a spherical bubble due to surface tension. The Y-L equation is simply deduced from mechanical stability of a bubble, but it is still controversial whether the Y-L equation can be used for tiny bubbles, such as a "nano bubble", because the pressure difference divergently increases as the bubble radius R decreases. We investigated a spherical vapor bubble in Lennard-Jones liquid with molecular dynamics simulation, mainly looking into its mechanical stabilities. We generated a tiny bubble of various sizes ( R≃1.7-5nm in argon unit) under equilibrium conditions by changing the simulation cell size and the number of molecules. The liquid pressure was evaluated with the virial expression, which was negative in general and was found to be strongly dependent on R. The vapor pressure was estimated from the vapor density via an empirical equation of state. The vapor pressure was found to be independent of R and very close to the vapor pressure at bulk liquid-vapor equilibrium. Then we assumed the Y-L equation to calculate the surface tension of the bubble, which turned out to be also independent of R. Thus we confirm that the Y-L equation is valid even for nano-scale bubbles.

  4. Elastic modulus and surface tension of a polyurethane rubber in nanometer thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Meiyu; McKenna, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Estane is a kind of polyurethane with thermodynamically incompatible hard and soft segments. In this study the macro and micro properties of Estane have been characterized and compared. The viscoelastic properties of this material in bulk scale have been determined using dynamic rheometry. Time-temperature superposition was found to be applicable for this material, and a master curve was successfully constructed from the dynamic shear responses of G'(ω) and G''(ω) . Also a novel nano bubble inflation method was used to obtain the creep compliance of the Estane ultrathin films and the results show stiffening in the rubbery region for the Estane over thicknesses ranging from 110nm to 22nm. The dependence of the rubbery stiffening on film thickness is studied and the relative influences of nano confinement and surface tension effect are analyzed using both a direct stress strain analysis and an energy balance method for the membrane. The contributions of surface tension and nano confinement are considered separately. Office of Naval Research under project No.N00014-11-1-0424.

  5. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Related Phenomena: A New Approach to the Surface Tension Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ishikawa, Takehiko

    2000-01-01

    Molten aluminum and tin drops were levitated in a high vacuum by controlled electric fields, and they were systematically rotated by applying by a rotating magnetic field. When the evolution of the drop shape was measured as a function of rotation frequency, it agreed quantitatively well with the Brown and Scriven's theoretical prediction. The normalized rotation frequencies at the bifurcation point agreed with the predicted value 0.559, within 2%. An anomalous phenomenon which totally deviated from the prediction was observed in rotating molten tin drops when they were kept in a high rotation rate for several hours. No anomaly was observed in aluminum drops when they underwent similar condition. It was speculated that under the strong centrifugal force in the drop the tin isotopes must be separating. Since Al-27 is essentially the only naturally abundant isotope in the aluminum drops, the same anomaly is not expected. Based on the shape deformation of a rotating drop, an alternate approach to the surface tension measurement was verified. This new surface tension measurement technique was applied to a glassforming alloy, Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) in its highly viscous states. Also demonstrated in the paper was a use of a molten aluminum drop to verify the Busse's prediction of the influence of the drop rotation on the drop oscillation frequency.

  6. Evaluation of surface tension and ion occupancy effects on gramicidin A channel lifetime.

    PubMed Central

    Ring, A.; Sandblom, J.

    1988-01-01

    The surface tension of glycerylmonooleate-hexadecane lipid bilayer membranes and the lifetime of gramicidin A channels were measured at various concentrations of the surrounding solutions. For HCl the surface tension is essentially constant at approximately 5 mN/m up to approximately 1 M, whereas the average lifetime increases approximately 40-fold. At higher concentrations the surface tension decreases markedly. For CsCl the surface tension is constant up to about 1 M then increases with salt level. The average lifetime in this case increases about sixfold. In both cases the lifetime levels off and even decreases at higher salt levels. The increase in lifetime observed with ion activity is therefore qualitatively different from, and not explained by, the established dependence of lifetime on membrane properties (Elliot, J.R., D. Needham, J.P. Dilger, and D.A. Haydon. 1983. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 735:95-103). We have previously proposed that ion occupancy is a determinant of channel stability, and to test this hypothesis the voltage dependence of channel lifetime was measured in asymmetrical solutions. For the case of a potassium chloride solution on one side of the membrane and a hydrogen chloride solution, on the other, the voltage dependence of the lifetime is asymmetrical. The asymmetry is such that when the electrical field is applied in the direction of the chemical gradient for each of the ions, the channel lifetime approaches, at increasing field strengths, that of a symmetrical solution of the respective ion. The voltage dependence of the surface tension, on the other hand, is negligible for the range of voltages used. These results, and the earlier findings that the order of the lifetimes for the alkali cations generally agree with the order of the permeability selectivity of the gramicidin A channel, support the hypothesis that ion occupancy is a major factor determining the lifetime of gramicidin A channels. The effects of multivalent blockers and

  7. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  8. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  9. Tension crack characteristics of surface ruptures of 2 strong earthquakes recently occurred along reverse faults in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingjun; Dai, Aopeng; Zhang, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Field investigations show that there are some tension cracks in the surface ruptures of 2 strong earthquakes recently occurred along reverse faults with strike-slip component in China. Yushu Ms7.1 earthquake occurred on April 14, 2010 in Qinghai, China produced a ~65 km long co-seismic surface rupture with a strike of 310°, which is distributed along Ganzi-Yushu fault that is a reverse fault with strike-slip component in the Qinghai—Tibetan Plateau. The surface rupture of Yushu Ms7.1 earthqake consists of shear, transtensional cracks, transpressional cracks, tension cracks and mole tracks. Some tension cracks occur on the top of small uplifts and the cracking course is from surface to undergound for some tension cracks are shallow. The small uplifts are actually anticlines produced by a regional and deep compressional stress field, but there is a local tensional stress field on the top of the anticlines. Lushan Ms7.0 earthquake on 20 April 20, 2013 in Sichuan, China occurred on the southern segment of the Longmenshan fault zone with a NE strike which is also a reverse fault zone with strike-slip component, but only a co-seismic surface rupture 80m long with a NW strike was found without any NE-striking surface rupture found. The surface rupture shows the form of tension cracks on a top of a small uplift. There are two sets of fresh striation on the surface rupture plane, the striation with larger plunge angles usually only remains above the range 10-20cm below the ground surface, which is covered by the striation with smaller plunging angles. The comprehensive analysis shows that the surface rupture during the Ms7.0 Lushan earthquake at first experienced thrusting, then sinistral strike-slip, and tension cracking at last. In general, some tension cracks of the surface ruptures from Yushu Ms7.1 earthquake on April 14, 2010 and Lushan Ms7.0 earthquake on 20 April 2013 may be produced by the local tensional stress field, but they also reflect the regional and deep

  10. Propensity of Hydrated Excess Protons and Hydroxide Anions for the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Chen, Chen; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Kumar, Revati; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Significant effort has been undertaken to better understand the molecular details governing the propensity of ions for the air-water interface. Facilitated by computationally efficient reactive molecular dynamics simulations, new and statistically conclusive molecular-scale results on the affinity of the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide anion for the air-water interface are presented. These simulations capture the dynamic bond breaking and formation processes (charge defect delocalization) that are important for correctly describing the solvation and transport of these complex species. The excess proton is found to be attracted to the interface, which is correlated with a favorable enthalpic contribution and consistent with reducing the disruption in the hydrogen bond network caused by the ion complex. However, a recent refinement of the underlying reactive potential energy function for the hydrated excess proton shows the interfacial attraction to be weaker, albeit nonzero, a result that is consistent with the experimental surface tension measurements. The influence of a weak hydrogen bond donated from water to the protonated oxygen, recently found to play an important role in excess hydrated proton transport in bulk water, is seen to also be important for this study. In contrast, the hydroxide ion is found to be repelled from the air-water interface. This repulsion is characterized by a reduction of the energetically favorable ion-water interactions, which creates an enthalpic penalty as the ion approaches the interface. Finally, we find that the fluctuation in the coordination number around water sheds new light on the observed entropic trends for both ions. PMID:26366480

  11. Reduction of Water/Oil Interfacial Tension by Model Asphaltenes: The Governing Role of Surface Concentration.

    PubMed

    Jian, Cuiying; Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Liu, Qingxia; Zerpa, Nestor; Zeng, Hongbo; Tang, Tian

    2016-06-30

    In this work, pendant drop techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the effect of asphaltene concentrations on the interfacial tension (IFT) of the oil/water interface. Here, oil and asphaltene were represented by, respectively, common organic solvents and Violanthrone-79, and two types of concentration, i.e., bulk concentration and surface concentration, were examined. Correlations between the IFTs from experiments and MD simulations revealed that surface concentration, rather than the commonly used bulk concentration, determines the reduction of oil/water IFTs. Through analyzing the hydrogen bonding, the underlying mechanism for the IFT reduction was proposed. Our discussions here not only enable the direct comparison between experiments and MD simulations on the IFTs but also help with future interfacial studies using combined experimental and simulation approaches. The methodologies used in this work can be extended to many other oil/water interfaces in the presence of interfacially active compounds. PMID:27268710

  12. Vibration of structures containing compressible liquids with surface tension and sloshing effects. Reduced-order model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohayon, R.; Soize, C.

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of the linear vibration of a general viscoelastic structure, with a local wall acoustic impedance, containing an inviscid compressible liquid (but with an additional volume dissipative term), with surface tension (capillarity) and sloshing effects, and neglecting the effects of internal gravity waves and the elastogravity operator. The sloshing problems of incompressible liquids with capillarity effects in elastic structures exhibit a major difficulty induced by the boundary contact conditions on the triple line because the capillarity forces are forces per unit length while the elastic forces are forces per unit surface. The proposed framework has the following novel features: (i) introducing a new appropriate boundary condition for the contact angle condition compatible with a deformable structure considered here as viscoelastic, (ii) considering a compressible liquid while incompressibility hypothesis is generally used for FSI problems including capillarity phenomena, and (iii) constructing a reduced-order model for the computational coupled problem.

  13. BIOMECHANICS. Jumping on water: Surface tension-dominated jumping of water striders and robotic insects.

    PubMed

    Koh, Je-Sung; Yang, Eunjin; Jung, Gwang-Pil; Jung, Sun-Pill; Son, Jae Hak; Lee, Sang-Im; Jablonski, Piotr G; Wood, Robert J; Kim, Ho-Young; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2015-07-31

    Jumping on water is a unique locomotion mode found in semi-aquatic arthropods, such as water striders. To reproduce this feat in a surface tension-dominant jumping robot, we elucidated the hydrodynamics involved and applied them to develop a bio-inspired impulsive mechanism that maximizes momentum transfer to water. We found that water striders rotate the curved tips of their legs inward at a relatively low descending velocity with a force just below that required to break the water surface (144 millinewtons/meter). We built a 68-milligram at-scale jumping robotic insect and verified that it jumps on water with maximum momentum transfer. The results suggest an understanding of the hydrodynamic phenomena used by semi-aquatic arthropods during water jumping and prescribe a method for reproducing these capabilities in artificial systems. PMID:26228144

  14. Surface tension measurement techniques of magnetic fluids at an interface between different fluids using perpendicular field instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. Shahrooz; Elborai, Shihab; Lee, Se-Hee; He, Xiaowei; Zahn, Markus

    2005-05-01

    Two measurement techniques to determine the surface tension of ferrofluids using the perpendicular field instability are described. Four ferrofluid layers were examined with magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the surface of (1) oil-based ferrofluid in air; (2) water-based ferrofluid in air, (3) oil-based ferrofluid, and (4) fluorocarbon-based ferrofluid, both below a blend of 50% n-Propyl alcohol and 50% deionized water (propanol). Surface tension was accurately calculated by utilizing the measured Taylor wavelength from measurements of incipient fluid instability peaks and the measured densities of fluids. For cases (1) and (2), the calculated surface tension values were in good agreement with a tensiometer measurement. No accurate tensiometer measurements were conducted for the superposed liquids (3) and (4) since accurate tensiometer measurements are difficult for a two fluid layer system. The second less accurate method used the ferrofluid's nonlinear Langevin magnetization characteristics to compute the surface tension from incipience of interfacial instability conditions. Discrepancies between the surface tensions measured by the two methods were probably due to the ferrofluid particle size distributions and the strong dependence of the ferrofluid magnetization on particle size.

  15. Surface tension and buoyancy-driven flow in a non-isothermal liquid bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Alexander, J. I. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations governing the transport of momentum, mass and heat in a nonisothermal liquid bridge with a temperature-dependent surface tension are solved using a vorticity-stream-function formulation together with a nonorthogonal coordinate transformation. The equations are discretized using a pseudo-unsteady semi-implicit finite difference scheme and are solved by the ADI method. A Picard-type iteration is adopted which consists of inner and outer iterative processes. The outer iteration is used to update the shape of the free surface. Two schemes have been used for the outer iteration; both use the force balance normal to the free surface as the distinguished boundary condition. The first scheme involves successive approximation by the direct solution of the distinguished boundary condition. The second scheme uses the artificial force imbalance between the fluid pressure, viscous and capillary forces at the free surface which arises when the boundary condition for force balance normal to the surface is not satisfied. This artificial imbalance is then used to change the surface shape until the distinguished boundary condition is satisfied. These schemes have been used to examine a variety of model liquid bridge situations including purely thermocapillary-driven flow situations and mixed thermocapillary- and bouyancy-driven flow.

  16. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L. A.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) University of Colorado light-emitting diode cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas-phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive dicarbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and < 1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples.

  17. High-precision instrument for measuring the surface tension, viscosity and surface viscoelasticity of liquids using ripplon surface laser-light scattering with tunable wavelength selection

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Yu; Hasegawa, Akinori; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2014-04-15

    Here we describe our new high-precision instrument that simultaneously measures the surface tension, viscosity, and surface viscoelasticity of liquids. The instrument works on the ripplon surface-laser light scattering principle and operates with an automatically tunable selection of ripplon wavelength from 4 to 1500 μm, which corresponds to the frequency range of observing surface phenomena from approximately 400 Hz to 3 MHz in the case of water. The heterodyne technique instrument uses a reference laser beam which intersects at an arbitrarily adjustable angle with a vertically directed probing beam. For the determination of the wavelength of selected ripplons we substituted with the interference fringe spacing, measured using a high-resolution beam profiler. To extract reliable surface tension and viscosity data from the experimentally obtained spectrum shape for a selected wavelength of ripplon, we developed an algorithm to calculate the exact solution of the dispersion equation. The uncertainties of surface tension and viscosity measurement were confirmed through the measurement of seven pure Newtonian liquids at 25 °C measured with the selected wavelength of ripplon from 40 μm to 467 μm. To verify the genuine capability of the tunable wavelength selection of ripplon, we measured the surface elasticity of soluble surface molecular layers spread on pentanoic acid solutions.

  18. Use of thermodynamic data to calculate surface tension and viscosity of Sn-based soldering alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Dong Nyung

    2001-09-01

    A thermodynamic database for the Pb-free soldering alloy systems, which include Sn, Ag, Cu, Bi, and In, has been made using the CALPHAD method. The resulting thermodynamic properties of the Sn-based binary alloy systems were used to determine the surface tensions and viscosities. The surface tensions were calculated using Butler’s monolayer model and the viscosities by Hirai’s and Seetharaman’s models. Butler’s model was also used to determine the surface active element. The results for binary systems were extended to the Sn-based ternary systems (Sn-Ag-Cu, Sn-Ag-Bi). The surface tensions of commercial eutectic Sn-Pb and Sn-Pb-Ag solder alloys were measured by the sessile drop method. The measured values and other researchers’ results were compared with the calculated data.

  19. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and light-emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive di-carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and <1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples. The potential impact of such chemistry on the atmosphere of the marine boundary layer is discussed.

  20. Effects of polar cortical cytoskeleton and unbalanced cortical surface tension on intercellular bridge thinning during cytokinesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; An, Mei-Wen; Li, Xiao-Na; Yang, Fang; Liu, Yang

    2011-12-01

    To probe the contributions of polar cortical cytoskeleton and the surface tension of daughter cells to intercellular bridge thinning dynamics during cytokinesis, we applied cytochalasin D (CD) or colchicine (COLC) in a highly localized manner to polar regions of dividing normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. We observed cellular morphological changes and analyzed the intercellular bridge thinning trajectories of dividing cells with different polar cortical characteristics. Global blebbistatin (BS) application was used to obtain cells losing active contractile force groups. Our results show that locally released CD or colchicine at the polar region caused inhibition of cytokinesis before ingression. Similar treatment at phases after ingression allowed completion of cytokinesis but dramatically influenced the trajectories of intercellular bridge thinning. Disturbing single polar cortical actin induced transformation of the intercellular bridge thinning process, and polar cortical tension controlled deformation time of intercellular bridges. Our study provides a feasible framework to induce and analyze the effects of local changes in mechanical properties of cellular components on single cellular cytokinesis.

  1. Effects of Environmental Oxygen Content and Dissolved Oxygen on the Surface Tension and Viscosity of Liquid Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SanSoucie, M. P.; Rogers, J. R.; Kumar, V.; Rodriguez, J.; Xiao, X.; Matson, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has recently added an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled in the range from approximately 10^{-28} {to} 10^{-9} bar, while in a vacuum atmosphere. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, has a PID-based current loop and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects on surface tension and viscosity by oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding environment and the melt dissolved oxygen content will be evaluated, and the results will be presented. The surface tension and viscosity will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension and viscosity will be measured using the oscillating droplet method.

  2. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability. PMID:23687391

  3. Computational Study of Surface Tension and Wall Adhesion Effects on an Oil Film Flow Underneath an Air Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celic, Alan; Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1998-01-01

    The fringe-imaging skin friction (FISF) technique, which was originally developed by D. J. Monson and G. G. Mateer at Ames Research Center and recently extended to 3-D flows, is the most accurate skin friction measurement technique currently available. The principle of this technique is that the skin friction at a point on an aerodynamic surface can be determined by measuring the time-rate-of-change of the thickness of an oil drop placed on the surface under the influence of the external air boundary layer. Lubrication theory is used to relate the oil-patch thickness variation to shear stress. The uncertainty of FISF measurements is estimated to be as low as 4 percent, yet little is known about the effects of surface tension and wall adhesion forces on the measured results. A modified version of the free-surface Navier-Stokes solver RIPPLE, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories, was used to compute the time development of an oil drop on a surface under a simulated air boundary layer. RIPPLE uses the volume of fluid method to track the surface and the continuum surface force approach to model surface tension and wall adhesion effects. The development of an oil drop, over a time period of approximately 4 seconds, was studied. Under the influence of shear imposed by an air boundary layer, the computed profile of the drop rapidly changes from its initial circular-arc shape to a wedge-like shape. Comparison of the time-varying oil-thickness distributions computed using RIPPLE and also computed using a greatly simplified numerical model of an oil drop equation which does not include surface tension and wall adhesion effects) was used to evaluate the effects of surface tension on FISF measurement results. The effects of surface tension were found to be small but not necessarily negligible in some cases.

  4. The effects of g-jitter and surface tension induced convection on float zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Winter, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of g-jitter on nonencapsulated and encapsulated liquid bridges were investigated numerically, using fluid characteristics and parameters from three fluid systems: a silicone oil bridge, a methanol bridge, and a silicon melt. Results showed that complex flow patterns can arise in g-jitter environment which significantly modify the heat-transfer characteristics of the system. It was found that the nonencapsulated liquid bridges and float zone melts were dominated by surface-tension driven convection, with very little impact on the flows by residual and g-jitter accelerations. Zone encapsulation resulted in a sizeable drop in the maximum fluid velocities. The g-jitter computations on the encapsulated float zones resulted in significant augmentation of the maximum velocities and heat transfer, with the silicon melt being the least sensitive to g-jitter acceleration.

  5. The surface crack problem in an orthotropic plate under bending and tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Bing-Hua; Erdogan, F.

    1987-01-01

    The elasticity problem for an infinite orthotropic flat plate containing a series of through and part through cracks and subjected to bending and tension loads is considered. The problem is formulated by using Reissner's plate bending theory and considering three-dimensional material orthotropy. The Line-spring model developed by Rice and Levy is used to formulate the surface crack problem in which a total of nine material constants were used. The effects of material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors was determined, the interaction between two asymmetrically arranged collinear cracks was investigated, and extensive numerical results regarding the stress intensity factors are provided. The problem is reduced to a system of singular integral equations which is solved by using the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulas. The calculated results show that the material orthotropy does have a significant effect on the stress intensity factor.

  6. Dynamic Nucleation of Supercooled Melts and Measurement of the Surface Tension and Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Ohsaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of acoustic pressure-induced nucleation by using a novel approach involving the large amplitude resonant radial oscillations and collapse of a single bubble intentionally injected into a supercooled liquid. Using a combination of previously developed and proven techniques, the bubble is suspended in a fluid host by an ultrasonic field which supplies both the levitation capability as well as the forcing of the radial oscillations. We observe the effects of an increase in pressure (due to bubble collapse) in a region no larger than 100 microns within the supercooled melt to rigorously probe the hypothesis of pressure-induced nucleation of the solid phase. The use of single bubbles operating in narrow temporal and spatial scales will allow the direct and unambiguous correlation between the origin and location of the generation of the disturbance and the location and timing of the nucleation event. In a companion research effort, we are developing novel techniques for the non-contact measurements of the surface tension and viscosity of highly viscous supercooled liquids. Currently used non-invasive methods of surface tension measurement for the case of undercooled liquids generally rely of the quantitative determination of the resonance frequencies of drop shape oscillations, of the dynamics of surface capillary waves, or of the velocity of streaming flows. These methods become quickly ineffective when the liquid viscosity rises to a significant value. An alternate and accurate method which would be applicable to liquids of significant viscosity is therefore needed. We plan to develop such a capability by measuring the equilibrium shape of levitated undercooled melt droplets as they undergo solid-body rotation. The experimental measurement of the characteristic point of transition (bifurcation point) between axisymmetric and two-lobed shapes will be used to calculate the surface tension of the liquid. Such an approach has already been

  7. Passive micromixer using by convection and surface tension effects with air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jongil; Warrick, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a passive micromixer that utilizes an air-liquid interface and surface tension effects to enhance fluid mixing via convection and Marangoni effects. Performance of the microfluidic component is tested within a passive-pumping-based device that consists of three microchannels connected in succession using passive micro-mixers. Mixing was quantified at 5 key points along the length of the device using microscope images of patterned streams of Alexa 488 fluorescent-dyed water and pure DI water flowing through the device. The passive micro-mixer mixed fluid 15–20 times more effectively than diffusion between laminar flow streams alone and is a novel micro-mixer embodiment that provides an additional strategy for removing external components from microscale devices for simpler, autonomous operation. PMID:25104979

  8. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the model's accuracy under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, we use the Pf-SPH model to simulate three phase flow in a porous medium.

  9. Detail design of the surface tension propellant management device for the Intelsat VII communication satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacalone, Philip L.

    1993-06-01

    The design of the Intelsat VII surface tension propellant management device (PMD) (an all-welded assembly consisting of about 100 individual components) was developed using a modular design approach that allowed the complex PMD assembly to be divided into smaller modules. The modular approach reduces manufacturing-related technical and schedule risks and allows many components and assemblies to be processed in parallel, while also facilitating the incorporation of quality assurance tests at all critical PMD subassembly levels. The baseline PMD assembly is made from titanium and stainless steel materials. In order to obtain a 100 percent titanium PMD, a new, state-of-the-art fine mesh titanium screen material was developed, tested, and qualified for use as an alternaltive to the stainless steel screen material. The Ti based screen material demonstrated a high level of bubble point performance. It was integrated into a PMD assembly and was successfully qualification tested at the tank assembly level.

  10. Burst behavior at a capillary tip: Effect of low and high surface tension.

    PubMed

    Agonafer, Damena D; Lopez, Ken; Palko, James W; Won, Yoonjin; Santiago, Juan G; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-10-01

    Liquid retention in micron and millimeter scale devices is important for maintaining stable interfaces in various processes including bimolecular separation, phase change heat transfer, and water desalination. There have been several studies of re-entrant geometries, and very few studies on retaining low surface tension liquids such as fluorocarbon-based dielectric liquids. Here, we study retention of a liquid with very low contact angles using borosilicate glass capillary tips. We analyzed capillary tips with outer diameters ranging from 250 to 840 μm and measured Laplace pressures up to 2.9 kPa. Experimental results agree well with a numerical model that predicts burst pressure (the maximum Laplace pressure for liquid retention), which is a function of the outer diameter (D) and capillary exit edge radius of curvature (r). PMID:26046980

  11. Effects of polymer stiffness on surface tension and pressure in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchev, Andrey

    2015-08-01

    We study the effect of chain rigidity on the behavior of semiflexible polymers in the vicinity of flat walls in a slit, and of surfactants at the liquid-liquid interface between immiscible liquids. Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is demonstrated that the impact of bending angle forces is particularly strong within the depletion layer at the phase boundary whereas at distance Re away from the interface, where Re is the mean distance between the ends of a semiflexible chain, the contribution of these non-local triplet interactions to pressure tensor virtually disappears. The present study also demonstrates that growing stiffness of the macromolecules leads to an increase in surface tension and total pressure.

  12. The surface crack problem in an orthotropic plate under bending and tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, B. H.; Erdogan, F.

    1986-01-01

    The elasticity problem for an infinite orthotropic flat plate containing a series of through and part-through cracks and subjected to bending and tension loads is considered. The problem is formulated by using Reissner's plate bending theory and considering three dimensional materials orthotropy. The Line-spring model developed by Rice and Levy is used to formulate the surface crack problem in which a total of nine material constants has been used. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors, to investigate the interaction between two asymmetrically arranged collinear cracks, and to provide extensive numerical results regarding the stress intensity factors. The problem is reduced to a system of singular integral equations which is solved by using the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulas. The calculated results show that the material orthotropy does have a significant effect on the stress intensity factor.

  13. "Effective" negative surface tension: a property of coated nanoaerosols relevant to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Purnendu; Zachariah, Michael R

    2007-06-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a very important role in atmospheric processes and have a major influence on the global climate. In this paper, we report results of a molecular dynamics study on the unique properties of organic-coated water droplets. In particular, we find that, for particles preferring an inverted micelle structure, the lower chain-chain interaction, with increasing radial distance from the water-organic interface, results in a negative internal radial pressure profile for the organic layer. As a result, a coated particle behaves as though the surface tension is "negative" and implies that such a particle will inherently have an inverse Kelvin vapor pressure effect, resulting in increased water condensation. PMID:17539611

  14. A discontinuous Galerkin front tracking method for two-phase flows with surface tension

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, V.-T.; Peraire, J.; Cheong, K.B.; Persson, P.-O.

    2008-12-28

    A Discontinuous Galerkin method for solving hyperbolic systems of conservation laws involving interfaces is presented. The interfaces are represented by a collection of element boundaries and their position is updated using an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. The motion of the interfaces and the numerical fluxes are obtained by solving a Riemann problem. As the interface is propagated, a simple and effective remeshing technique based on distance functions regenerates the grid to preserve its quality. Compared to other interface capturing techniques, the proposed approach avoids smearing of the jumps across the interface which leads to an improvement in accuracy. Numerical results are presented for several typical two-dimensional interface problems, including flows with surface tension.

  15. Influence of an external field on the surface tension of free-standing smectic films.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, A V; Vakunenko, A A

    2012-09-01

    We have carried out a theoretical study of the effect of the electric field E on the thermodynamical properties and surface tension γ of free-standing smectic films. Calculations, based upon the extended McMillan approach with anisotropic forces, show a stepwise reduction and increase of the values of the Helmholtz free energy f and γ, respectively, per partially fluorinated 5-n-alkyl-2-[4-n-(perfluoroalkyl-metheleneoxy)phenyl] (H10F5MOPP) molecule, as the temperature is raised above that for the bulk smectic-A-isotropic transition. Calculations show that E may not only affect the layer-thinning transition sequence, but also change the first multilayer jump in the thickness and increase the value of γ per H10F5MOPP molecule. Reasonable agreement between the theoretically predicted and the experimentally obtained data on γ of the partially fluorinated H10F5MOPP film has been obtained. PMID:23030927

  16. Influence of an external field on the surface tension of free-standing smectic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. V.; Vakunenko, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    We have carried out a theoretical study of the effect of the electric field E on the thermodynamical properties and surface tension γ of free-standing smectic films. Calculations, based upon the extended McMillan approach with anisotropic forces, show a stepwise reduction and increase of the values of the Helmholtz free energy f and γ, respectively, per partially fluorinated 5-n-alkyl-2-[4-n-(perfluoroalkyl-metheleneoxy)phenyl] (H10F5MOPP) molecule, as the temperature is raised above that for the bulk smectic-A-isotropic transition. Calculations show that E may not only affect the layer-thinning transition sequence, but also change the first multilayer jump in the thickness and increase the value of γ per H10F5MOPP molecule. Reasonable agreement between the theoretically predicted and the experimentally obtained data on γ of the partially fluorinated H10F5MOPP film has been obtained.

  17. High-Temperature Liquid Metal Infusion Considering Surface Tension-Viscosity Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Harris, Christopher K.; Bronson, Arturo; Shantha-Kumar, Sanjay; Medina, Arturo

    2016-02-01

    In considering the significant effect of the surface tension-viscosity dissipation driving the fluid flow within a capillary, high-temperature liquid metal infusion was analyzed for titanium, yttrium, hafnium, and zirconium penetrating into a packed bed. A model of the dissipation considers the momentum balance within the capillary to determine the rate of infusion, which is compared with the Semlak-Rhines model developed for liquid metal penetration into a packed bed assumed as a bundle of tubes mimicking the porosity of a packed bed. For liquid Ti, the penetration rate was calculated from 0.2 µs to 1 ms and rose to a maximum of 7 m/s at approximately 1 µs; after which, the rate decreased to 0.7 m/s at 1 ms. Beyond 10 µs, the decreasing trend of the rate of penetration determined by the model of dissipation compared favorably with the Semlak-Rhines equation.

  18. Investigation of surface tension driven convection as a feasibility study for a micro-gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschmieder, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    The work performed for the feasibility study of a microgravity surface tension driven convection experiment was reviewed. An experimental investigation of the onset of convection in shallow fluid layers heated uniformly from below and cooled from above by an air layer was made. Results are discussed in relation to the formation of Benard cells. The onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection in thin fluid layers heated uniformly from below were studied experimentally. It was found that in thin fluid layers the onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection is preceded by subcritical convective motions. Secondly, it was found that the onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection in non-Boussinesq fluid layers takes place in the form of hexagonal cells at Rayleigh numbers larger than the critical Rayleigh number R sub C = 1708 which determines the onset of convection in Boussinesq fluid layers.

  19. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact. PMID:22717083

  20. Surface Tension and Critical Supersaturations for Mixed Aerosol Particles Composed of Inorganic and Organic Compounds of Atmospheric Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, I. R.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between water vapor and aerosol particles in the atmosphere has implications on important processes. Among these are cloud droplet formation and growth, which impact cloud properties and therefore have an indirect effect on climate. A significant fraction of the dry submicron mass of atmospheric aerosols is composed of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Although the WSOC fraction contains a large amount of compounds, most yet unidentified, it can be partitioned into three main categories in order to use a set of model substances to reproduce its behavior. In this study, we chose levoglucosan, succinic acid and Nordic Reference fulvic acid (NRFA) to represent the WSOC categories of neutral compounds, mono-/di-carboxylic acids, and polycarboxylic acids, respectively. We measured the surface tension of aqueous pure NRFA and of five of its mixtures at 298 K using the Wilhemy plate method. Langmuir adsorption parameters for the organic mixtures were extracted by fitting the surface tension measurements and corresponding solute concentrations to the Szyszkowski-Langmuir equation. The measured surface tension as a function of aqueous NRFA concentration was identical to that of Suwannee River (SR) and Waskish Peat fulvic acids below 0.02 g/L but up to 12% and 15% higher, respectively, at higher concentrations. Similar to previous findings by Aumann et al. (2010) with SRFA, the surface tension of a NRFA/inorganic salt solution was mainly controlled by the organic compound even when the salt comprised 75% of the added solute mass. This effect was observed for mixtures of NRFA with both sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate salts up to 5 g/L of NRFA. From 5 g/L to about 50 g/L of NRFA, the surface tension for both NRFA/salt mixtures stopped decreasing, remained constant at 52-53 mN/m and then started slowly increasing indicating that the salt component might start dominating at higher concentrations. For a solution of 25% NRFA / 75% levoglucosan, the surface

  1. Non-Newtonian Fluids Spreading with Surface Tension Effect: 3D Numerical Analysis Using FEM and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah

    2010-11-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow down an incline is studied for optimal design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. We develop a 3D FEM model using non-Newtonian mechanics to model the flow of gels in response to gravity, surface tension and shear-thinning. Constant volume setup is applied within the lubrication approximation scope. The lengthwise profiles of the 3D model agree with our previous 2D finite difference model, while the transverse contact line patterns of the 3D model are compared to the experiments. With incorporation of surface tension, capillary ridges are observed at the leading front in both 2D and 3D models. Previously published studies show that capillary ridge can amplify the fingering instabilities in transverse direction. Sensitivity studies (2D & 3D) and experiments are carried out to describe the influence of surface tension and shear-thinning on capillary ridge and fingering instabilities.

  2. Surface tension of liquid mercury: a comparison of density-dependent and density-independent force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Anton; Bedrov, Dmitry; Müller, Marcus

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by growing interest in interfacial properties of liquid mercury we investigate by atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulation the ability of density-independent, empiric density-dependent, and recently proposed embedded-atom force fields to predict the surface tension and coexistence density of liquid mercury at room temperature, 293 K. The effect of the density dependence of the studied models on the liquid-vapor coexistence and surface tension is discussed in detail and our results are corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations and semi-analytic liquid-state theory. The latter approach is particularly useful to identify and rationalize artifacts that arise from an ad-hoc generalization of density-independent potentials by introducing density-dependent coefficients. In view of computational efficiency and thermodynamic robustness of density-independent model we optimize its functional form to obtain higher surface tension values in order to improve agreement with experiment.

  3. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, S M; Kojic, M; Tsuda, A

    2010-10-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17-32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  4. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  5. Surface Tension of the System NaF -AlF3-Al2O3 and Surface Adsorption of Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharík, Marián; Vasiljev, Roman

    2006-08-01

    Part of the molten system NaF-AlF3-Al2O3 was studied by surface tension measurements, which were performed at cryolite ratios (CR) between 1.5 and 3 [CR = n(NaF)/n(AlF3)]. The maximal bubble pressure method was applied. The surface adsorption of alumina (Al2O3) was also calculated. The obtained results were discussed in terms of the anionic composition of the melt. The addition of AlF3 to melt with CR= 3 decreases the surface tension, as AlF3 is surface-active in molten Na3AlF6. The concentration dependence of the surface tension and the surface adsorption of alumina in the title system are influenced by the formation of surface-active oxofluoroaluminates. An increase of the difference between the surface tension of NaF-AlF3 mixtures and the surface tension of pure alumina was observed with decreasing cryolite ratio.

  6. Design of peptidyl compounds that affect beta-amyloid aggregation: importance of surface tension and context.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Todd J; Murphy, Regina M

    2005-06-21

    Self-association of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide into cross-beta-sheet fibrils induces cellular toxicity in vitro and is linked with progression of Alzheimer's disease. Previously, we demonstrated that hybrid peptides, containing a recognition domain that binds to Abeta and a disrupting domain consisting of a chain of charged amino acids, inhibited Abeta-associated toxicity in vitro and increased the rate of Abeta aggregation. In this work we examine the design parameter space of the disrupting domain. Using KLVFFKKKKKK as a base case, we tested hybrid compounds with a branched rather than linear lysine oligomer, with l-lysine replaced by d-lysine, and with lysine replaced by diaminopropionic acid. We synthesized a compound with a novel anionic disrupting domain that contained cysteine thiols oxidized to sulfates, as well as other compounds in which alkyl or ether chains were appended to KLVFF. In all cases, the hybrid compound's ability to increase solvent surface tension was the strongest predictor of its effect on Abeta aggregation kinetics. Finally, we investigated the effects of arginine on Abeta aggregation. Arginine is a well-known chaotrope but increases surface tension of water. Arginine modestly decreased Abeta aggregation. In contrast, RRRRRR slightly, and KLVFFRRRRRR greatly, increased Abeta aggregation. Thus, the influence of arginine on Abeta aggregation depends strongly on the context in which it is presented. The effect of arginine, RRRRRR, and KLVFFRRRRRR on Abeta aggregation was examined in detail using laser light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thioflavin T fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:15952797

  7. Surface tension of liquid Al-Cu and wetting at the Cu/Sapphire solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, J.; Brillo, J.; Egry, I.

    2014-02-01

    For the study of the interaction of a liquid alloy with differently oriented single crystalline sapphire surfaces precise surface tension data of the liquid are fundamental. We measured the surface tension of liquid Al-Cu contactlessly on electromagnetically levitated samples using the oscillating drop technique. Data were obtained for samples covering the entire range of composition and in a broad temperature range. The surface tensions can be described as linear functions of temperature with negative slopes. Moreover, they decrease monotonically with an increase of aluminium concentration. The observed behaviour with respect to both temperature and concentration is in agreement with a thermodynamic model calculation using the regular solution approximation. Surface tensions were used to calculate interfacial energies from the contact angles of liquid Cu droplets, deposited on the C(0001), A(11-20), R(1-102) surfaces of an α-Al2O3 substrate. The contact angles were measured by means of the sessile drop method at 1380 K. In the Cu/α-Al2O3 system, no anisotropy is evident neither for the contact angles nor for the interfacial energies of different surfaces. The work of adhesion of this system is isotropic, too.

  8. The polarized interface between quadrupolar insulators: Maxwell stress tensor, surface tension, and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavchov, Radomir I.; Dimitrova, Iglika M.; Ivanov, Tzanko

    2015-10-01

    The quadrupolar Maxwell electrostatic equations predict several qualitatively different results compared to Poisson's classical equation in their description of the properties of a dielectric interface. All interfaces between dielectrics possess surface dipole moment which results in a measurable surface potential jump. The surface dipole moment is conjugated to the bulk quadrupole moment density (the quadrupolarization) similarly to Gauss's relation between surface charge and bulk polarization. However, the classical macroscopic Maxwell equations completely neglect the quadrupolarization of the medium. Therefore, the electrostatic potential distribution near an interface of intrinsic dipole moment can be correctly described only within the quadrupolar macroscopic equations of electrostatics. They predict that near the polarized interface a diffuse dipole layer exists, which bears many similarities to the diffuse charge layer near a charged surface, in agreement with existing molecular dynamics simulation data. It turns out that when the quadrupole terms are kept in the multipole expansion of the laws of electrostatics, the solutions for the potential and the electric field are continuous functions at the surface. A well-defined surface electric field exists, interacting with the adsorbed dipoles. This allows for a macroscopic description of the surface dipole-surface dipole and the surface dipole-bulk quadrupole interactions. They are shown to have considerable contribution to the interfacial tension—of the order of tens of mN/m! To evaluate it, the Maxwell stress tensor in quadrupolar medium is deduced, including the electric field gradient action on the quadrupoles, as well as quadrupolar image force and quadrupolar electrostriction. The dependence of the interfacial tension on the external normal electric field (the dielectrocapillary curve) is predicted and the dielectric susceptibility of the dipolar double layer is related to the quadrupolarizabilities of

  9. Disjoining pressure and the film-height-dependent surface tension of thin liquid films: new insight from capillary wave fluctuations.

    PubMed

    MacDowell, Luis G; Benet, Jorge; Katcho, Nebil A; Palanco, Jose M G

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we review simulation and experimental studies of thermal capillary wave fluctuations as an ideal means for probing the underlying disjoining pressure and surface tensions, and more generally, fine details of the Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We discuss recent simulation results that reveal a film-height-dependent surface tension not accounted for in the classical Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We show how this observation may be explained bottom-up from sound principles of statistical thermodynamics and discuss some of its implications. PMID:24351859

  10. Fine Tuning of Tissues' Viscosity and Surface Tension through Contractility Suggests a New Role for α-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Stirbat, Tomita Vasilica; Mgharbel, Abbas; Bodennec, Selena; Ferri, Karine; Mertani, Hichem C.; Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    What governs tissue organization and movement? If molecular and genetic approaches are able to give some answers on these issues, more and more works are now giving a real importance to mechanics as a key component eventually triggering further signaling events. We chose embryonic cell aggregates as model systems for tissue organization and movement in order to investigate the origin of some mechanical constraints arising from cells organization. Steinberg et al. proposed a long time ago an analogy between liquids and tissues and showed that indeed tissues possess a measurable tissue surface tension and viscosity. We question here the molecular origin of these parameters and give a quantitative measurement of adhesion versus contractility in the framework of the differential interfacial tension hypothesis. Accompanying surface tension measurements by angle measurements (at vertexes of cell-cell contacts) at the cell/medium interface, we are able to extract the full parameters of this model: cortical tensions and adhesion energy. We show that a tunable surface tension and viscosity can be achieved easily through the control of cell-cell contractility compared to cell-medium one. Moreover we show that -catenin is crucial for this regulation to occur: these molecules appear as a catalyser for the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton underneath cell-cell contact, enabling a differential contractility between the cell-medium and cell-cell interface to take place. PMID:23390488

  11. A numerical study of three-dimensional surface tension driven convection with fre surface deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1992-01-01

    The steady three-dimensional thermocapillary motion with a deformable free surface is studied numerically in both normal and zero gravity environments. Flow configurations consist of a square cavity heated from the side. In the analysis, the free surface is allowed to deform and the grid distribution is adapted to the surface deformation. The divergence-free condition is satisfied by using a dual time-stepping approach in the numerical scheme. Convective flux derivatives are evaluated using a third-order accurate upwind-biased flux-split differencing technique. The numerical solutions at the midplane of the square cavity are compared with the results from two-dimensional calculations. In addition, numerial results for cases under zero and normal gravity conditions are compared. Significantly different flow structures and surface deformation have been observed. The comparison of calculated results will be compared with experimental data in the updated version of this paper.

  12. Effects of chemical structure on the dynamic and static surface tensions of short-chain, multi-arm nonionic fluorosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Thomas; Krumpfer, Joseph W; Schellenberger, Steffen; Friedrich, Reiner; Klapper, Markus; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-08-15

    Fluorinated surfactants with short perfluoroalkyl chains (R(F)) as potential substitutes for the environmentally questionable, long R(F) systems are presented. Three types of nonionic hydrophilic-fluorophilic amphiphiles are synthesized and evaluated based on surface activity in equilibrated (static) and non-equilibrated (dynamic) states. Furthermore, several mono- and disaccharide-based fluorosurfactants are also examined as potential non-bioaccumulative alternatives. A correlation between the chemical structure and resulting surface properties is made by comparing R(F) length, number and size, alkyl-spacer, and hydrophilic moieties. Based on dynamic and static surface tension experiments, the effects of surfactant structure are summarized to provide a basis for the future design of fluorosurfactants. We have found that surfactants with more perfluorinated chains tend to have a higher surface tension reduction, but typically result in slower dynamic behaviors. Using the presented structural characteristics, surfactants with R(F)<4 can be prepared with static surface tensions as low as 18.1 mN/m or reduce surface tension within milliseconds. PMID:24910063

  13. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, P. A.; Wells, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  14. Formation of a Rigid Hydrophobin Film and Disruption by an Anionic Surfactant at an Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Zhang, Xujun; Russo, Paul S; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2016-06-01

    Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins produced by fungi. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been associated with Dutch elm disease. Like other hydrophobins, CU stabilizes air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams, and emulsions and as dispersants. The practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, alone and in the presence of added surfactants. In this study, the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces is characterized by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to adsorb irreversibly at air/water interfaces. The magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure until CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the sequential addition of strong surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the bulk liquid adjacent to the interface. SDS is found to coadsorb to interfaces precoated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU by SDS. Sequential adsorption results in mixed layers with properties not observed in interfaces generated from complexes formed in the bulk. These results lend insight to the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. PMID:27164189

  15. Surfactant-Induced Flow in Unsaturated Porous Media: Implications for Air-Water Interfacial Area Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, M. S.; Zheng, Z.; Estabrook, B.; Henry, E. J.; Littlefield, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Air-water interfacial area (AI) in porous media is an important factor governing equilibrium contaminant retention, as well as the kinetics of interphase mass transfer. Interfacial-partitioning tracer (IPT) tests are a common technique for measuring AI at a given moisture saturation (SW), where AI is calculated based on the ratio of arrival times of a surfactant and a non-reactive tracer. At surfactant concentrations often used, the aqueous surface tension of the interfacial tracer solution is ~30% lower than that of the resident porewater in the system, creating transient surface tension gradients during the IPT measurement. Because surface tension gradients create capillary pressure gradients, surfactant-induced unsaturated flow may occur during IPT tests, a process that would violate fundamental assumptions of constant SW, of steady-state flow, and of nonreactive and surfactant tracers experiencing the same transport conditions. To examine the occurrence and magnitude of surfactant-induced flow, we conducted IPT tests for unsaturated systems at ~84% initial SW using surfactant input concentrations that bracket concentrations commonly used. Despite constant boundary conditions (constant inlet flux and outlet pressure), the introduction of the surfactant solution induced considerable transience in column effluent flowrate and SW. Real-time system mass measurements revealed drainage of 20-40% SW, with the amount of drainage and the maximum rate of drainage proportional to the influent surfactant concentration, as would be expected. Because AI is inversely related to SW, the use of higher surfactant concentrations should yield larger AI estimates. Measured AI values, however, showed no clear relationship to surfactant concentration or the time-averaged SW of the system. These findings cast doubt on the reliability of IPT for AI determination.

  16. Spread Films of Human Serum Albumin at the Air-Water Interface: Optimization, Morphology, and Durability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard A; Ang, Joo Chuan; Sebastiani, Federica; Tummino, Andrea; White, John W

    2015-12-22

    It has been known for almost one hundred years that a lower surface tension can be achieved at the air-water interface by spreading protein from a concentrated solution than by adsorption from an equivalent total bulk concentration. Nevertheless, the factors that control this nonequilibrium process have not been fully understood. In the present work, we apply ellipsometry, neutron reflectometry, X-ray reflectometry, and Brewster angle microscopy to elaborate the surface loading of human serum albumin in terms of both the macroscopic film morphology and the spreading dynamics. We show that the dominant contribution to the surface loading mechanism is the Marangoni spreading of protein from the bulk of the droplets rather than the direct transfer of their surface films. The films can be spread on a dilute subphase if the concentration of the spreading solution is sufficient; if not, dissolution of the protein occurs, and only a textured adsorbed layer slowly forms. The morphology of the spread protein films comprises an extended network with regions of less textured material or gaps. Further, mechanical cycling of the surface area of the spread films anneals the network into a membrane that approach constant compressibility and has increased durability. Our work provides a new perspective on an old problem in colloid and interface science. The scope for optimization of the surface loading mechanism in a range of systems leading to its exploitation in deposition-based technologies in the future is discussed. PMID:26607026

  17. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Werner, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  18. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Wernet, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  19. Convective Instability of a Gravity Modulated Fluid Layer with Surface Tension Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    1998-01-01

    Gravity modulation of an unbounded fluid layer with surface tension variations along its free surface is investigated. In parameter space of (wavenumber, Marangoni number) modulation has a destabilizing effect on the unmodulated neutral stability curve for large Prandtl number, Pr, and small modulation frequency, Omega, while a stabilizing effect is observed for small Pr and large Omega. As Omega yields infinity, the modulated neutral stability curves approach the unmodulated neutral stability curve. At certain values of Pr and L2 multiple minima are observed and the neutral stability curves become highly distorted. Closed regions of subharmonic instability are also observed. Alternating regions of synchronous and subharmonic instability separated by very thin stable regions are observed in (1/Omega,g(sub 1)) space for the singly diffusive cases. Quasiperiodic behavior in addition to the synchronous and subharmonic responses, are observed for the case of a double diffusive fluid layer. Minimum acceleration amplitudes were observed to closely correspond with a subharmonic response, Lambda(sub im) = Omega/2 .

  20. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  1. A self-consistent field study of a hydrocarbon droplet at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Emilia; Leermakers, Frans A M; Vermeer, Arnoldus W P

    2012-04-14

    A molecularly detailed self-consistent field (SCF) approach is applied to describe a sessile hydrocarbon droplet placed at the air-water interface. Predictions of the contact angle for macroscopic droplets follow from using Neumann's equation, wherein the macroscopic interfacial tensions are computed from one-gradient calculations for flat interfaces. A two-gradient cylindrical coordinate system with mirror-like boundary conditions is used to analyse the three dimensional shape of the nano-scale oil droplet at the air-water interface. These small droplets have a finite value of the Laplace pressure and concomitant line tension. It has been calculated that the oil-water and oil-vapour interfacial tensions are curvature dependent and increase slightly with increasing interfacial curvature. In contrast, the line tension tends to decrease with curvature. In all cases there is only a weak influence of the line tension on the droplet shape. We therefore argue that the nano-scale droplets, which are described in the SCF approach, are representative for macroscopic droplets and that the method can be used to efficiently generate accurate information on the spreading of oil droplets at the air-water interface in molecularly more complex situations. As an example, non-ionic surfactants have been included in the system to illustrate how a molecularly more complex situation will change the wetting properties of the sessile drop. This short forecast is aimed to outline and to stress the potential of the method. PMID:22395192

  2. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  3. Effect of pH on dynamic and equilibrium surface tension of dissolve organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, Gilboa; Trifonov, Pavel; Ilani, Talli

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the terrestrial environment may originate from the decomposition of soil organic matter accumulated from the degradation of vegetative residues, the release of root exudates, the lysis of microorganisms and addition of organic wastes, such as livestock manure, biosolids, and different composted organic residues, or from irrigation with wastewater. The structure of DOM macromolecules is known to vary with the following aqueous solution properties: ionic strength, the nature of the inorganic ions, pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. In aqueous solution, the DOM molecules are amphiphilic, that is, it possesses both hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups in the same molecule. This simultaneous presence, gave rise to the conceptual surfactant like model for DOM which has been studies in conjunction with the equilibrium surface tension at the liquid-air interface (STeq, mN/m). Measurements of STeq of DOM solution were reported in a relatively small number of studies for the conditions of the aqueous solution (e.g., temperature, pH, ionic strength, the valence of the metal ions, and DOC concentration). All studies demonstrate the decrease in STeq with increase aqueous concentration of the DOC. The effect of pH, however, exhibit contradictory results. Specifically, for a given DOC concentration, the patterns reported for STeq versus pH were different. With increasing pH values, STeq has been reported to decrease, increase or exhibit a minimum. These contradictory results have been attributed to the different DOC concentration examined in each of the studies. In current study we hypothesized that the inconsistent results of STeq vs. pH may also stem from the adsorption kinetics of the DOM amphiphilic molecules at the liquid air interface, which can be evaluated form dynamic surface tension measurements (STt). The STt is approaching STeq values and commonly exhibiting an exponential decay pattern. If for different p

  4. The Equilibria of Diosgenin-Phosphatidylcholine and Diosgenin-Cholesterol in Monolayers at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Janicka, Katarzyna; Jastrzebska, Izabella; Petelska, Aneta Dorota

    2016-08-01

    Diosgenin (Dio) has shown many treatment properties, but the most important property is cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated monolayers of Dio, cholesterol (Ch), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the air/water interface. The measurements were carried with a Langmuir Teflon trough and a Nima 9000 tensiometer program. The surface tension values of pure and mixed monolayers were used to calculate π-A isotherms and determine molecular surface areas. We were able to demonstrate the formation of complexes between Dio and PC and Dio and Ch molecules also. We considered the equilibrium between individual components and the formed complexes. In addition, we established that diosgenin and the lipids formed highly stable 1:1 complexes. PMID:27350149

  5. Negative entropy, energy, and heat capacity in connection with surface tension: artifact of a model or real

    SciTech Connect

    Lubkin, E.

    1987-05-01

    It is only by neglecting self-adsorption (a treatment referred to as pure-energy, PE) that one gets textbook thermodynamics of a surface, based upon the tension L as a function of temperature T, and one finds negative specific heat for hot water. Any lower critical point and PE provides the other exciting negatives: nicotine-and-water is an example. In order to include adsorption, T must be known in terms of T and chemical potentials as independent variables; this forces measurement of the tension of curved menisci. Will the minus signs remain.

  6. Classical nucleation theory with a radius-dependent surface tension: A two-dimensional lattice-gas automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Joseph; L'Heureux, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    The constant surface tension assumption of the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) is known to be flawed. In order to probe beyond this limitation, we consider a microscopic, two-dimensional Lattice-Gas Automata (LGA) model of nucleation in a supersaturated system, with model input parameters Ess (solid particle-to-solid particle bonding energy), Esw (solid particle-to-water bonding energy), η (next-to-nearest-neighbor bonding coefficient in solid phase), and Cin (initial solute concentration). The LGA method has the advantages of easy implementation, low memory requirements, and fast computation speed. Analytical results for the system's concentration and the crystal radius as functions of time are derived and the former is fit to the simulation data in order to determine the equilibrium concentration. The “Mean First-Passage Time” technique is used to obtain the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size from the simulation data. The nucleation rate and supersaturation data are evaluated using a modification to the CNT that incorporates a two-dimensional radius-dependent surface tension term. The Tolman parameter, δ, which controls the radius dependence of the surface tension, decreases (increases) as a function of the magnitude of Ess (Esw), at fixed values of η and Esw (Ess). On the other hand, δ increases as η increases while Ess and Esw are held constant. The constant surface tension term of the CNT, Σ0, increases (decreases) with increasing magnitudes of Ess (Esw) at fixed values of Esw (Ess) and increases as η is increased. Σ0 increases linearly as a function of the change in energy during an attachment or detachment reaction, |ΔE|, however, with a slope less than that predicted for a crystal that is uniformly packed at maximum density. These results indicate an increase in the radius-dependent surface tension, Σ, with respect to increasing magnitude of the difference between Ess and Esw.

  7. The influence of chemical composition of the slags on the surface tension used in the continuous casting of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Csaba Attila; Ardelean, Erika; Heput, Teodor

    2016-06-01

    An important factor that can influence the surface quality of the continuous cast is the lubrication slag used in the crystallizer. The paper introduces the multiple 2nd degree correlations between the slags surface tension (dependent parameter) and its major oxides (independent parameters). The graphic correlations allow the determination of the variation limits for the independent parameters so as to range the values of the dependent parameters within a given domain.

  8. A study of surface tension driven segregation in monotectic alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Andrews, Rosalia N.; Gowens, Terrell F.

    1988-01-01

    The compatibilities of various monotectic alloy systems with several different crucible materials were evaluated. The study was carried out using small candidate alloy samples of compositions that produced fifty volume percent of each liquid phase at the monotectic temperature. Compatibility was based on the evaluation of the wetting tendency of the two immiscible phases with the crucible material in a one-g solidified sample. Three types of wetting phenomena were observed during the evaluation. Type 1 indicates an alloy-crucible combination where the L2 phase preferentially wets the crucible material. Since L2 is usually the minority phase in desirable alloys, this material combination would be difficult to process and is therefore considered incompatible. Type 2 behavior indicates an alloy-crucible combination where the L1 phase preferentially wets the crucible material. This type of combination is considered compatible since surface tension effects should aid in processing the alloy to a useful form. Type 3 indicates any combination that leads to major reactions between the alloy and crucible material, gas entrapment, or separation of the metal from the crucible wall. Additional compatibility evaluations would have to be carried out on combinations of this category. The five alloy systems studied included aluminum-bismuth, copper-lead, aluminum-indium, aluminum-lead and cadmium-gallium. The systems were combined with crucibles of alumina, boron nitride, mullite, quartz, silicon carbide and zirconia.

  9. Theory of melt polyelectrolyte blends and block copolymers: Phase behavior, surface tension, and microphase periodicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sing, Charles E.; Zwanikken, Jos W.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-01-21

    Polymer mixtures such as blends or block copolymers are of great interest in energy applications and functional materials, and often, one or more of these species contain charges. The traditional fashion in which such materials are studied uses Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) methods that incorporate electrostatics using Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. We adapt a new and rigorous approach that does not rely on the mean-field assumptions inherent in the PB theory and instead uses Liquid State (LS) integral equation theory to articulate charge correlations that are completely neglected in PB. We use this theory to calculate phase diagrams for both blends and block copolyelectrolytes using SCFT-LS and demonstrate how their phase behavior is highly dependent on chain length, charge fraction, charge size, and the strength of Coulombic interactions. Beyond providing phase behavior of blends and block copolyelectrolytes, we can use this theory to investigate the interfacial properties such as surface tension and block copolyelectrolyte lamellar spacing. Lamellar spacing provides a way to directly compare the SCFT-LS theory to the results of experiments. SCFT-LS will provide conceptual and mathematical clarification of the role of charge correlations in these systems and aid in the design of materials based on charge polymers.

  10. Particle image velocimetry for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment using a particle displacement tracking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Pline, Alexander D.

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electronic, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry technique called particle displacement tracking (PDT) which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. The PDT system is successful in producing velocity vector fields from the raw video data. Application of the PDT technique to a sample data set yielded 1606 vectors in 30 seconds of processing time. A bottom viewing optical arrangement is used to image the illuminated plane, which causes keystone distortion in the final recorded image. A coordinate transformation was incorporated into the system software to correct this viewing angle distortion. PDT processing produced 1.8 percent false identifications, due to random particle locations. A highly successful routine for removing the false identifications was also incorporated, reducing the number of false identifications to 0.2 percent.

  11. Particle image velocimetry for the surface tension driven convection experiment using a particle displacement tracking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Pline, Alexander D.

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electronic, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry technique called particle displacement tracking (PDT) which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. The PDT system is successful in producing velocity vector fields from the raw video data. Application of the PDT technique to a sample data set yielded 1606 vectors in 30 seconds of processing time. A bottom viewing optical arrangement is used to image the illuminated plane, which causes keystone distortion in the final recorded image. A coordinate transformation was incorporated into the system software to correct this viewing angle distortion. PDT processing produced 1.8 percent false identifications, due to random particle locations. A highly successful routine for removing the false identifications was also incorporated, reducing the number of false identifications to 0.2 percent.

  12. A Dimension-Breaking Phenomenon for Water Waves with Weak Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, M. D.; Sun, S. M.; Wahlén, E.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

  13. Surface-tension-anisotropy measurements of succinonitrile and pivalic acid: Comparison with microscopic solvability theory

    SciTech Connect

    Muschol, M.; Liu, D.; Cummins, H.Z. )

    1992-07-15

    New determinations of the surface-tension-anisotropy parameter {var epsilon}{sub 4} of succinonitrile (SCN), pivalic acid (PVA), and a PVA--1%-ethanol mixture are reported. Effects of temperature gradients and crystal orientation are analyzed in detail. The experiments utilized numerical interpolation techniques previously employed by Dougherty and Gollub to enhance the digital image resolution. The values found for {var epsilon}{sub 4} in SCN, PVA, and PVA--1%-ethanol are 0.0055{plus minus}0.0015, 0.025{plus minus}0.002, and 0.026{plus minus}0.002, respectively. From these values, the selection parameter {sigma}{sub theor}{sup *} predicted by microscopic solvability theory for the three-dimensional axisymmetric case was computed and compared to the {sigma}{sub expt}{sup *} values determined directly from previous dendritic-growth experiments. We find that {sigma}{sub theor}{sup *}/{sigma}{sub expt}{sup *} is 0.56{plus minus}0.20 for SCN, and 2.14{plus minus}0.50 for PVA. Possible sources for these discrepancies are discussed.

  14. HIV Viral RNA Extraction in Wax Immiscible Filtration Assisted by Surface Tension (IFAST) Devices

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; LaVanway, Alex J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Guckenberger, David J.; Anderson, Meghan A.; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Beebe, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of viral load is critical for proper management of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive patients. Unfortunately, in the developing world, significant economic and geographical barriers exist, limiting access to this test. The complexity of current viral load assays makes them expensive and their access limited to advanced facilities. We attempted to address these limitations by replacing conventional RNA extraction, one of the essential processes in viral load quantitation, with a simplified technique known as immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST). Furthermore, these devices were produced via the embossing of wax, enabling local populations to produce and dispose of their own devices with minimal training or infrastructure, potentially reducing the total assay cost. In addition, IFAST can be used to reduce cold chain dependence during transportation. Viral RNA extracted from raw samples stored at 37°C for 1 week exhibited nearly complete degradation. However, IFAST-purified RNA could be stored at 37°C for 1 week without significant loss. These data suggest that RNA isolated at the point of care (eg, in a rural clinic) via IFAST could be shipped to a central laboratory for quantitative RT-PCR without a cold chain. Using this technology, we have demonstrated accurate and repeatable measurements of viral load on samples with as low as 50 copies per milliliter of sample. PMID:24613822

  15. Computation of symmetric, time-periodic solutions of the vortex sheet with surface tension

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, David M.; Wilkening, Jon

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method is introduced for the computation of time-periodic vortex sheets with surface tension separating two immiscible, irrotational, two-dimensional ideal fluids of equal density. The approach is based on minimizing a nonlinear functional of the initial conditions and supposed period that is positive unless the solution is periodic, in which case it is zero. An adjoint-based optimal control technique is used to efficiently compute the gradient of this functional. Special care is required to handle singular integrals in the adjoint formulation. Starting with a solution of the linearized problem about the flat rest state, a family of smooth, symmetric breathers is found that, at quarter-period time intervals, alternately pass through a flat state of maximal kinetic energy, and a rest state in which all the energy is stored as potential energy in the interface. In some cases, the interface overturns before returning to the initial, flat configuration. It is found that the bifurcation diagram describing these solutions contains several disjoint curves separated by near-bifurcation events. PMID:20133691

  16. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Chin, Emily N; Jackson, Shawn S; Strotman, Lindsay N; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E; Alexander, Caroline M; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R; Beebe, David J

    2014-02-15

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, which gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes compared to current wash-based protocols, which require reequilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible-phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of nonspecific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  17. The critical size of brittle solid materials and the measurement of their surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamboliadis, Elias

    2012-12-01

    The relationship of the energy required to break a particle or a particulate material vs. particle size has been studied by many researchers. On the one hand, mineral processing engineers, who are interested in the specific energy (in joules per cubic meter or joules per kilogram) required for grinding, almost agree that it is inversely proportional to the particle size, although they might disagree on the type of the relationship. On the other hand, building and structural engineers, who are mainly interested in the strength of materials (in newtons per square meter or pascals), they almost agree that at the size range of the elements used, their strength depends on the quality of the material rather than its size. The present article shows that both groups of engineers are right about the size range of the bodies used by each one. However, there is a critical size that determines the fracture behavior of a brittle material. The definition of the critical size can be used to understand the practical results obtained as well as to measure the surface tension of the tested materials.

  18. An electrofusion chip with a cell delivery system driven by surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jongil; Ko, Jung-Moon; Cha, Hyeon-Cheol; Park, Joong Yull; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated an electric cell fusion chip with an embedded cell delivery function driven by surface tension and evaluated its performance with several types of plant cells. The chip consists of a polydimethylsiloxane-based microchannel with a fusion chamber and gold-titanium (Au-Ti) electrodes. The velocity profiles of the microfluid in the channel and fusion chamber were calculated to predict cell movement, and the electric field distribution between the electrodes was also calculated in order to determine the appropriate electrode shape. The range of the fluid velocity in the fusion chamber is 20-50 µm s-1 and the measured speed of the cells is approximately 45 µm s-1, which is sufficiently slow for the motion of the cells in the fusion chamber to be monitored and controlled. We measured the variation of the pearl chain ratio with frequency for five kinds of plant cells, and determined that the optimal frequency for pearl chain formation is 1.5 MHz. The electrofusion of cells was successfully carried out under ac field (amplitude: 0.4-0.5 kV cm-1, frequency: 1.5 MHz) and dc pulse (amplitude: 1.0 kV cm-1, duration: 20 ms) conditions.

  19. The dynamic surface tension of atmospheric aerosol surfactants reveals new aspects of cloud activation

    PubMed Central

    Nozière, Barbara; Baduel, Christine; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The activation of aerosol particles into cloud droplets in the Earth’s atmosphere is both a key process for the climate budget and a main source of uncertainty. Its investigation is facing major experimental challenges, as no technique can measure the main driving parameters, the Raoult’s term and surface tension, σ, for sub-micron atmospheric particles. In addition, the surfactant fraction of atmospheric aerosols could not be isolated until recently. Here we present the first dynamic investigation of the total surfactant fraction of atmospheric aerosols, evidencing adsorption barriers that limit their gradient (partitioning) in particles and should enhance their cloud-forming efficiency compared with current models. The results also show that the equilibration time of surfactants in sub-micron atmospheric particles should be beyond the detection of most on-line instruments. Such instrumental and theoretical shortcomings would be consistent with atmospheric and laboratory observations and could have limited the understanding of cloud activation until now. PMID:24566451

  20. New procedure to measure simultaneously the surface tension and contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champmartin, S.; Ambari, A.; Le Pommelec, J. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new procedure to simultaneously measure the static contact angle and the surface tension of a liquid using a spherical geometry. Unlike the other existing methods, the knowledge of one of both previous parameters and the displacement of the sphere are not mandatory. The technique is based on the measurement of two simple physical quantities: the height of the meniscus formed on a sphere at the very contact with a liquid bath and the resulting vertical force exerted on this object at equilibrium. The meniscus height, whose exact value requires the numerical resolution of the Laplace equation, is often estimated with an approximate 2D model, valid only for very large spheres compared to the capillary length. We develop instead another simplified solution of the Young-Laplace equation based on the work of Ferguson for the meniscus on a cylinder and adapted for the spherical shape. This alternative model, which is less restrictive in terms of the sphere size, is successfully compared to numerical solutions of the complete Young-Laplace equation. It appears to be accurate for sphere radii larger than only two capillary lengths. Finally the feasibility of the method is experimentally tested and validated for three common liquids and two "small" steel spheres.

  1. New procedure to measure simultaneously the surface tension and contact angle.

    PubMed

    Champmartin, S; Ambari, A; Le Pommelec, J Y

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new procedure to simultaneously measure the static contact angle and the surface tension of a liquid using a spherical geometry. Unlike the other existing methods, the knowledge of one of both previous parameters and the displacement of the sphere are not mandatory. The technique is based on the measurement of two simple physical quantities: the height of the meniscus formed on a sphere at the very contact with a liquid bath and the resulting vertical force exerted on this object at equilibrium. The meniscus height, whose exact value requires the numerical resolution of the Laplace equation, is often estimated with an approximate 2D model, valid only for very large spheres compared to the capillary length. We develop instead another simplified solution of the Young-Laplace equation based on the work of Ferguson for the meniscus on a cylinder and adapted for the spherical shape. This alternative model, which is less restrictive in terms of the sphere size, is successfully compared to numerical solutions of the complete Young-Laplace equation. It appears to be accurate for sphere radii larger than only two capillary lengths. Finally the feasibility of the method is experimentally tested and validated for three common liquids and two "small" steel spheres. PMID:27250468

  2. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; Chin, Emily N.; Jackson, Shawn S.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, that gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes as compared to current wash-based protocols, which require re-equilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of non-specific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody (PR-mAb) to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein-binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  3. Domains of surfactant protein A that affect protein oligomerization, lipid structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, N; Ikegami, M; Korfhagen, T; Whitsett, J; McCormack, F X

    2001-05-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an abundant protein found in pulmonary surfactant which has been reported to have multiple functions. In this review, we focus on the structural importance of each domain of SP-A in the functions of protein oligomerization, the structural organization of lipids and the surface-active properties of surfactant, with an emphasis on ultrastructural analyses. The N-terminal domain of SP-A is required for disulfide-dependent protein oligomerization, and for binding and aggregation of phospholipids, but there is no evidence that this domain directly interacts with lipid membranes. The collagen-like domain is important for the stability and oligomerization of SP-A. It also contributes shape and dimension to the molecule, and appears to determine membrane spacing in lipid aggregates such as common myelin and tubular myelin. The neck domain of SP-A is primarily involved in protein trimerization, which is critical for many protein functions, but it does not appear to be directly involved in lipid interactions. The globular C-terminal domain of SP-A clearly plays a central role in lipid binding, and in more complex functions such as the formation and/or stabilization of curved membranes. In recent work, we have determined that the maintenance of low surface tension of surfactant in the presence of serum protein inhibitors requires cooperative interactions between the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of the molecule. This effect of SP-A requires a high degree of oligomeric assembly of the protein, and may be mediated by the activity of the protein to alter the form or physical state of surfactant lipid aggregates. PMID:11369537

  4. Lung ventilation injures areas with discrete alveolar flooding, in a surface tension-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Wu, You; Kharge, Angana Banerjee; Perlman, Carrie E

    2014-10-01

    With proteinaceous-liquid flooding of discrete alveoli, a model of the edema pattern in the acute respiratory distress syndrome, lung inflation over expands aerated alveoli adjacent to flooded alveoli. Theoretical considerations suggest that the overexpansion may be proportional to surface tension, T. Yet recent evidence indicates proteinaceous edema liquid may not elevate T. Thus whether the overexpansion is injurious is not known. Here, working in the isolated, perfused rat lung, we quantify fluorescence movement from the vasculature to the alveolar liquid phase as a measure of overdistension injury to the alveolar-capillary barrier. We label the perfusate with fluorescence; micropuncture a surface alveolus and instill a controlled volume of nonfluorescent liquid to obtain a micropunctured-but-aerated region (control group) or a region with discrete alveolar flooding; image the region at a constant transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O; apply five ventilation cycles with a positive end-expiratory pressure of 0-20 cmH2O and tidal volume of 6 or 12 ml/kg; return the lung to a constant transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O; and image for an additional 10 min. In aerated areas, ventilation is not injurious. With discrete alveolar flooding, all ventilation protocols cause sustained injury. Greater positive end-expiratory pressure or tidal volume increases injury. Furthermore, we determine T and find injury increases with T. Inclusion of either plasma proteins or Survanta in the flooding liquid does not alter T or injury. Inclusion of 2.7-10% albumin and 1% Survanta together, however, lowers T and injury. Contrary to expectation, albumin inclusion in our model facilitates exogenous surfactant activity. PMID:25080924

  5. Lung ventilation injures areas with discrete alveolar flooding, in a surface tension-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Wu (吴右), You; Kharge, Angana Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    With proteinaceous-liquid flooding of discrete alveoli, a model of the edema pattern in the acute respiratory distress syndrome, lung inflation over expands aerated alveoli adjacent to flooded alveoli. Theoretical considerations suggest that the overexpansion may be proportional to surface tension, T. Yet recent evidence indicates proteinaceous edema liquid may not elevate T. Thus whether the overexpansion is injurious is not known. Here, working in the isolated, perfused rat lung, we quantify fluorescence movement from the vasculature to the alveolar liquid phase as a measure of overdistension injury to the alveolar-capillary barrier. We label the perfusate with fluorescence; micropuncture a surface alveolus and instill a controlled volume of nonfluorescent liquid to obtain a micropunctured-but-aerated region (control group) or a region with discrete alveolar flooding; image the region at a constant transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O; apply five ventilation cycles with a positive end-expiratory pressure of 0–20 cmH2O and tidal volume of 6 or 12 ml/kg; return the lung to a constant transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O; and image for an additional 10 min. In aerated areas, ventilation is not injurious. With discrete alveolar flooding, all ventilation protocols cause sustained injury. Greater positive end-expiratory pressure or tidal volume increases injury. Furthermore, we determine T and find injury increases with T. Inclusion of either plasma proteins or Survanta in the flooding liquid does not alter T or injury. Inclusion of 2.7–10% albumin and 1% Survanta together, however, lowers T and injury. Contrary to expectation, albumin inclusion in our model facilitates exogenous surfactant activity. PMID:25080924

  6. Experimental study of homogeneous nucleation from the bismuth supersaturated vapor: evaluation of the surface tension of critical nucleus.

    PubMed

    Onischuk, A A; Vosel, S V; Borovkova, O V; Baklanov, A M; Karasev, V V; di Stasio, S

    2012-06-14

    The homogeneous nucleation of bismuth supersaturated vapor is studied in a laminar flow quartz tube nucleation chamber. The concentration, size, and morphology of outcoming aerosol particles are analyzed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an automatic diffusion battery (ADB). The wall deposit morphology is studied by scanning electron microscopy. The rate of wall deposition is measured by the light absorption technique and direct weighting of the wall deposits. The confines of the nucleation region are determined in the "supersaturation cut-off" measurements inserting a metal grid into the nucleation zone and monitoring the outlet aerosol concentration response. Using the above experimental techniques, the nucleation rate, supersaturation, and nucleation temperature are measured. The surface tension of the critical nucleus and the radius of the surface of tension are determined from the measured nucleation parameters. To this aim an analytical formula for the nucleation rate is used, derived from author's previous papers based on the Gibbs formula for the work of formation of critical nucleus and the translation-rotation correction. A more accurate approach is also applied to determine the surface tension of critical drop from the experimentally measured bismuth mass flow, temperature profiles, ADB, and TEM data solving an inverse problem by numerical simulation. The simulation of the vapor to particles conversion is carried out in the framework of the explicit finite difference scheme accounting the nucleation, vapor to particles and vapor to wall deposition, and particle to wall deposition, coagulation. The nucleation rate is determined from simulations to be in the range of 10(9)-10(11) cm(-3) s(-1) for the supersaturation of Bi(2) dimers being 10(17)-10(7) and the nucleation temperature 330-570 K, respectively. The surface tension σ(S) of the bismuth critical nucleus is found to be in the range of 455-487 mN/m for the radius of the surface of

  7. A miniature surface tension-driven robot using spatially elliptical moving legs to mimic a water strider's locomotion.

    PubMed

    Yan, J H; Zhang, X B; Zhao, J; Liu, G F; Cai, H G; Pan, Q M

    2015-08-01

    The highly agile and efficient water-surface locomotion of the water strider has stimulated substantial interest in biomimetic research. In this paper, we propose a new miniature surface tension-driven robot inspired by the water strider. A key feature of this robot is that its actuating leg possesses an ellipse-like spatial trajectory similar to that of a water strider by using a cam-link mechanism. Simplified models are presented to discuss the leg-water interactions as well as critical conditions for a leg penetrating the water surface, and simulations are performed on the robot's dynamic properties. The final fabricated robot weighs about 3.9 g, and can freely and stably walk on water at different gaits. The maximum forward and turning speeds of the robot are measured as 16 cm s(-1) and 23°/s, respectively. Furthermore, a similarity analysis with Bond number and Weber number demonstrates that the locomotion of this robot is quite analogous to that of a real water strider: the surface tension force dominates the lifting force and plays a major role in the propulsion force. This miniature surface tension-driven robot might have potential applications in many areas such as water quality monitoring and aquatic search and rescue. PMID:26241519

  8. Surface Tension Gradient Driven Spreading on Aqueous Mucin Solutions: A Possible Route to Enhanced Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Kevin; Dew, Beautia; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Przybycien, Todd M.; Tilton, Robert D.; Garoff, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension gradient driven, or “Marangoni,” flow can be used to move exogenous fluid, either surfactant dispersions or drug carrying formulations, through the lung. In this paper, we investigate the spreading of aqueous solutions of water-soluble surfactants over entangled, aqueous mucin solutions that mimic the airway surface liquid of the lung. We measure the movement of the formulation by incorporating dyes into the formulation while we measure surface flows of the mucin solution subphase using tracer particles. Surface tension forces and/or Marangoni stresses initiate a convective spreading flow over this rheologically complex subphase. As expected, when the concentration of surfactant is reduced until its surface tension is above that of the mucin solution, the convective spreading does not occur. The convective spreading front moves ahead of the drop containing the formulation. Convective spreading ends with the solution confined to a well-defined static area which must be governed by a surface tension balance. Further motion of the spread solution progresses by much slower diffusive processes. Spreading behaviors are qualitatively similar for formulations based on anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactants, containing either hydrophilic or hydrophobic dyes, on mucin as well as on other entangled aqueous polymer solution subphases. This independence of qualitative spreading behaviors from the chemistry of the surfactant and subphase indicates that there is little chemical interaction between the formulation and the subphase during the spreading process. The spreading and final solution distributions are controlled by capillary and hydrodynamic phenomena and not by specific chemical interactions among the components of the system. It is suggested that capillary forces and Marangoni flows driven by soluble surfactants may thereby enhance the uniformity of drug delivery to diseased lungs. PMID:21250745

  9. Topography-based surface tension gradients to facilitate water droplet movement on laser-etched copper substrates.

    PubMed

    Sommers, A D; Brest, T J; Eid, K F

    2013-09-24

    This paper describes a method for creating a topography-based gradient on a metallic surface to help mitigate problems associated with condensate retention. The gradient was designed to promote water droplet migration toward a specified region on the surface which would serve as the primary conduit for drainage using only the roughness of the surface to facilitate the movement of the droplets. In this work, parallel microchannels having a fixed land width but variable spacing were etched into copper substrates to create a surface tension gradient along the surface of the copper. The surfaces were fabricated using a 355 nm Nd:YVO4 laser system and then characterized using spray testing techniques and water droplet (2-10 μL) injection via microsyringe. The distances that individual droplets traveled on the gradient surface were also measured using a goniometer and CCD camera and were found to be between 0.5 and 1.5 mm for surfaces in a horizontal orientation. Droplet movement was spontaneous and did not require the use of chemical coatings. The theoretical design and construction of surface tension gradients were also explored in this work by calculating the minimum gradient needed for droplet movement on a horizontal surface using Wenzel's model of wetting. The results of this study suggest that microstructural patterning could be used to help reduce condensate retention on metallic fins such as those used in heat exchangers in heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) applications. PMID:23971937

  10. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  11. Influence of surface tension on cavitation noise spectra and particle removal efficiency in high frequency ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerotto, Elisabeth; Brems, Steven; Hauptmann, Marc; Pacco, Antoine; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul W.; De Gendt, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Physical cleaning methods are applied in the semiconductor industry and have become increasingly challenging due to the continued scaling of semiconductors device elements. Cavitation and acoustic phenomena are known to play a fundamental role in megasonic cleaning. Hence, a better understanding of cavitation phenomena in multi-bubble systems is crucial. Here, a study on the effects of lower bulk surface tension and different O2 concentrations on the bubble activity in the megahertz range is presented. A lower bulk surface tension (45 mN/m) with respect to ultra pure water (72 mN/m) is obtained by adding a non-ionic surface-active agent (Triton X-100). After a thorough surfactant characterization, a Triton X-100-containing cleaning solution is investigated under pulsed and continuous acoustic fields, for different acoustic amplitudes and gas concentrations. It is demonstrated that cavitation activity, measured by means of ultraharmonic cavitation noise, is enhanced in presence of a lower surface tension, under continuous acoustic fields. In addition, cavitation measurements performed under pulsed fields reveal the existence of optimal pulse-off times, for which a maximum of activity is observed. These optimal pulse-off time values are linked to the bubble dissolution theoretical times and experimentally verified. To end, cavitation noise measurements are correlated to cleaning performance in megasonic fields by means of particle removal and damage tests on patterned wafers. A clear increase in particle removal efficiency of 78 nm SiO2 particles is obtained when Triton X-100 is employed, at the optimized process conditions. In addition, the number of defects due to cavitation bubbles is significantly reduced for lower surface tension, at particle removal efficiencies <60%. The results here reported constitute a different approach towards more efficient megasonic cleaning processes.

  12. Effect of surface tension of mucosal lining liquid on upper airway mechanics in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Eastwood, Peter R; Szollosi, Irene; Platt, Peter R; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C; Hillman, David R

    2003-07-01

    Upper airway (UA) patency may be influenced by surface tension (gamma) operating within the (UAL). We examined the role of gamma of UAL in the maintenance of UA patency in eight isoflurane-anesthetized supine human subjects breathing via a nasal mask connected to a pneumotachograph attached to a pressure delivery system. We evaluated 1). mask pressure at which the UA closed (Pcrit), 2). UA resistance upstream from the site of UA collapse (RUS), and 3). mask pressure at which the UA reopened (Po). A multiple pressure-transducer catheter was used to identify the site of airway closure (velopharyngeal in all subjects). UAL samples (0.2 microl) were collected, and the gamma of UAL was determined by using the "pull-off force" technique. Studies were performed before and after the intrapharyngeal instillation of 5 ml of exogenous surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline). The gamma of UAL decreased from 61.9 +/- 4.1 (control) to 50.3 +/- 5.0 mN/m (surfactant; P < 0.02). Changes in Po, RUS, and Po - Pcrit (change = control - surfactant) were positively correlated with changes in gamma (r2 > 0.6; P < 0.02) but not with changes in Pcrit (r2 = 0.4; P > 0.9). In addition, mean peak inspiratory airflow (no flow limitation) significantly increased (P < 0.04) from 0.31 +/- 0.06 (control) to 0.36 +/- 0.06 l/s (surfactant). These findings suggest that gamma of UAL exerts a force on the UA wall that hinders airway opening. Instillation of exogenous surfactant into the UA lowers the gamma of UAL, thus increasing UA patency and augmenting reopening of the collapsed airway. PMID:12626492

  13. Wetting Angles and Surface Tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) Melts on Different Substrate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Szofran, F. R.; Cobb, S. D.; Volz, M. P.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The wetting angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) melts (0.02 less than x less than 0.13) have been measured on various substrate materials using the sessile drop technique. Fused quartz, sapphire, SiC, glassy carbon, pBN, AIN, and Si3N4 have been used as substrates. The highest and most stable wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with 164 +/- 8 deg., either under forming gas with an additional carbon getter in the system or under active vacuum. The surface tension measurements resulted in a value of +2.2 x 10(exp -3) N/m.at%Si for the concentration dependence delta(gamma)/(delta)C. For the composition range measured, the temperature dependence (delt)gamma/(delta)T showed values similar to those of pure Ge, on average -0.07 x 10(exp -3) N/mK.

  14. Multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann front tracking method for two-phase flow with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hai-Qiong; Zeng, Zhong; Zhang, Liang-Qi; Liang, Gong-You; Hiroshi, Mizuseki; Yoshiyuki, Kawazoe

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, an improved incompressible multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann-front tracking approach is proposed to simulate two-phase flow with a sharp interface, where the surface tension is implemented. The lattice Boltzmann method is used to simulate the incompressible flow with a stationary Eulerian grid, an additional moving Lagrangian grid is adopted to track explicitly the motion of the interface, and an indicator function is introduced to update the fluid properties accurately. The interface is represented by using a four-order Lagrange polynomial through fitting a set of discrete marker points, and then the surface tension is directly computed by using the normal vector and curvature of the interface. Two benchmark problems, including Laplace's law for a stationary bubble and the dispersion relation of the capillary wave between two fluids are conducted for validation. Excellent agreement is obtained between the numerical simulations and the theoretical results in the two cases.

  15. Surface tension of natural silicate melts from 1,200-1,500 C and implications for melt structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Mullins, O., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The surface tension between silicate liquid and gas is measured for four lava compositions (limburgite to andesite) from 1,200 to 1,500 C. It is noted that the magnitude of surface tension (gamma) is in the range 350-370 dynes/cm. Variations found in gamma as a function of liquid composition are small and have no obvious relation to liquid composition. Gamma is also found to vary little with furnace atmosphere - air, Ar, CO2, H2, CO and their mixtures. It is found that a relaxation time of hours to days, depending on temperature, is required before reproducible results can be obtained from originally crystalline starting material. The reproducible temperature dependence of gamma for complex silicate liquid solution is found to be small, positive, and a relatively simple function of liquid composition.

  16. Concentrations, atmospheric partitioning, and air-water/soil surface exchange of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran along the upper reaches of the Haihe River basin, North China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiqiang; Die, Qingqi; Yang, Yufei; Tang, Zhenwu; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qifei

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/PCDF) were overall measured and compared in ambient air, water, soils, and sediments along the upper reaches of the Haihe River of North China, so as to evaluate their concentrations, profiles, and to understand the processes of gas-particle partitioning and air-water/soil exchange. The following results were obtained: (1) The average concentrations (toxic equivalents, TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/PCDF in air, water, sediment, and soil samples were 4,855 fg/m(3), 9.5 pg/L, 99.2 pg/g dry weight (dw), and 56.4 pg/g (203 fg TEQ/m(3), 0.46 pg TEQ/L, 2.2 pg TEQ/g dw, and 1.3 pg TEQ/g, respectively), respectively. (2) Although OCDF, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF, OCDD, and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD were the dominant congeners among four environmental sinks, obvious discrepancies of these congener and homologue patterns of PCDD/PCDF were observed still. (3) Significant linear correlations for PCDD/PCDF were observed between the gas-particle partition coefficient (K p) and the subcooled liquid vapor pressure (P L (0)) and octanol-air partition coefficient (K oa). (4) Fugacity fraction values of air-water exchange indicated that most of PCDD/PCDF homologues were dominated by net volatilization from water into air. The low-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (tetra- to hexa-) presented a strong net volatilization from the soil into air, while high-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (hepta- to octa-) were mainly close to equilibrium for air-soil exchange. PMID:24643387

  17. Wetting and Interfacial Tension Dynamics of Oil-Nanofluids-Surface Minerals System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, L.; Li, C.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Korte, C.; Ladner, D.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Among the techniques used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR), chemical injection involves the injection of surfactants to increase the oil mobility and decrease the interfacial tension (IFT). With the nanotechnology revolution, the use of nanoparticles has shown unique opportunities in petroleum engineering due to their physico-chemical properties. Our research examines the potential application of nanoparticles as a means of EOR by studying the influence of silicon oxide nanoparticles on the wettability and IFT of oil-nanofluids-surface systems. Batch studies were conducted to assess the stability of the nanoparticle suspensions of different concentrations (0, 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 wt. %) in different reservoir conditions with and without the addition of surfactants (i.e. 5% brine, and Tween 20 at 0.5 and 2 cmc). Testing of oil-nanofluids and oil-nanofluids-minerals interactions was performed using crude oils from West Texas (light, API 40), Prudhoe Bay (medium, API 28), and Lloydminster (heavy, API 20). The dynamic behavior of IFT was measured using a pendant drop method. Results for 5% brine-nanoparticle systems indicated that 0.001 and 0.01 wt.% of nanoparticles contributed to a significant decrease of IFT for West Texas and Prudhoe Bay oils, while the highest decrease of IFT for Lloydminster was reported with 0.1 wt.% nanoparticles. IFT decrease was also enhanced by surfactant, and the addition of nanoparticles at 0.001 wt.% to surfactant resulted in significant decrease of IFT in most of the tested oil-nanofluid systems. The sessile drop method was used to measure the dynamic behavior of the contact angle of these oil droplets on minerals surface made of thin sections from Berea and Boise sandstone cores through a wetting test. Different nanofluid and surfactant concentrations were tested for the optimization of changes in wettability, which is a critical phase in assessing the behavior of nanofluids for optimal EOR with the selected crude oils.

  18. Improvements of the experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids using horizontal capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinš, Václav; Hošek, Jan; Hykl, Jiří; Hrubý, Jan

    2016-03-01

    An experimental apparatus with a horizontal capillary tube for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids, i.e. liquids in a metastable state below the equilibrium freezing point, was designed and tested in the previous study [V. Vinš et al., EPJ Web Conf. 92, 02108 (2015)]. In this work, recent modifications of both the experimental setup and the measurement analysis are described. The main aim is to improve the accuracy and the reproducibility of measured surface tension and to achieve higher degrees of supercooling. Temperature probes measuring the temperature of cooling medium near the horizontal capillary tube were calibrated in the relevant temperature range from - 31 °C to + 45 °C. An additional pressure transducer was installed in the helium distribution setup at the position close to the capillary tube. The optical setup observing the liquid meniscus at the open end of the horizontal capillary tube together with the video analysis were thoroughly revised. The red laser illuminating the liquid meniscus, used at the original apparatus, was replaced by a fiber optic light source, which significantly improved the quality of the meniscus image. The modified apparatus was used for the measurement of surface tension of supercooled water at temperatures down to - 11 °C. The new data have a lower scatter compared to the previous horizontal measurements and show a good agreement with the other data obtained with a different measurement technique based on the modified capillary rise method.

  19. Laplacian drop shapes and effect of random perturbations on accuracy of surface tension measurement for different drop constellations.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical drop shapes are calculated for three drop constellations: pendant drops, constrained sessile drops, and unconstrained sessile drops. Based on total Gaussian curvature, shape parameter and critical shape parameter are discussed as a function of different drop sizes and surface tensions. The shape parameter is linked to physical parameters for every drop constellation. The as yet unavailable detailed dimensional analysis for the unconstrained sessile drop is presented. Results show that the unconstrained sessile drop shape depends on a dimensionless volume term and the contact angle. Random perturbations are introduced and the accuracy of surface tension measurement is assessed for precise and perturbed profiles of the three drop constellations. It is concluded that pendant drops are the best method for accurate surface tension measurement, followed by constrained sessile drops. The unconstrained sessile drops come last because they tend to be more spherical at low and moderate contact angles. Of course, unconstrained sessile drops are the only option if contact angles are to be measured. PMID:25466689

  20. Verification and Validation of Numerical Models for Air/Water Flow on Coastal and Navigation Fluid-Structure Interaction Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M.; Dimakopoulos, A.; DeLataillade, T.

    2015-12-01

    Performance analysis and optimization of coastal and navigation structures is becoming feasible due to recent improvements in numerical methods for multiphase flows and the steady increase in capacity and availability of high performance computing resources. Now that the concept of fully three-dimensional air/water flow modelling for real world engineering analysis is achieving acceptance by the wider engineering community, it is critical to expand careful comparative studies on verification,validation, benchmarking, and uncertainty quantification for the variety of competing numerical methods that are continuing to evolve. Furthermore, uncertainty still remains about the relevance of secondary processes such as surface tension, air compressibility, air entrainment, and solid phase (structure) modelling so that questions about continuum mechanical theory and mathematical analysis of multiphase flow are still required. Two of the most popular and practical numerical approaches for large-scale engineering analysis are the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) and Level Set (LS) approaches. In this work we will present a publically available verification and validation test set for air-water-structure interaction problems as well as computational and physical model results including a hybrid VOF-LS method, traditional VOF methods, and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) results. The test set repository and test problem formats will also be presented in order to facilitate future comparative studies and reproduction of scientific results.

  1. Surface Tension and Viscosity of SCN and SCN-acetone Alloys at Melting Points and Higher Temperatures Using Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tin, Padetha; deGroh, Henry C., III.

    2003-01-01

    Succinonitrile has been and is being used extensively in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Fluid Physics programs and as well as in several ground-based and microgravity studies including the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE). Succinonitrile (SCN) is useful as a model for the study of metal solidification, although it is an organic material, it has a BCC crystal structure and solidifies dendriticly like a metal. It is also transparent and has a low melting point (58.08 C). Previous measurements of succinonitrile (SCN) and alloys of succinonitrile and acetone surface tensions are extremely limited. Using the Surface Light Scattering technique we have determined non invasively, the surface tension and viscosity of SCN and SCN-Acetone Alloys at different temperatures. This relatively new and unique technique has several advantages over the classical methods such as, it is non invasive, has good accuracy and measures the surface tension and viscosity simultaneously. The accuracy of interfacial energy values obtained from this technique is better than 2% and viscosity about 10 %. Succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys are well-established model materials with several essential physical properties accurately known - except the liquid/vapor surface tension at different elevated temperatures. We will be presenting the experimentally determined liquid/vapor surface energy and liquid viscosity of succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys in the temperature range from their melting point to around 100 C using this non-invasive technique. We will also discuss about the measurement technique and new developments of the Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer.

  2. Interfacial tension and surface adsorption in i-heptanol/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chavepeyer, G.; Platten, J.K.; Smet, P.; Salajan, M.

    1995-09-01

    Two-phase i-heptanol/water systems are studied for the isomers i = 1 to 4. Interfacial tension data, measured mainly by the spinning-drop method, are reported as a function of the temperature together with density differences between the two mutually saturated phases. The solubilities are measured for each system at 20 C, a temperature at which the Gibbs adsorptions are also determined. It is shown that the three sets of data are consistent with each other.

  3. Calculation of the surface tension of cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons from Monte Carlo simulations using an anisotropic united atom model (AUA).

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-01

    We report the calculation of the surface tension of cycloalkanes and aromatics by direct two-phase MC simulations using an anisotropic united atom model (AUA). In the case of aromatics, the polar version of the AUA-4 (AUA 9-sites) model is used. A comparison with the nonpolar models is carried out on the surface tension of benzene. The surface tension is calculated from different routes: the mechanical route using the Irving and Kirkwood (IK) and Kirkwood-Buff (KB) expressions; the thermodynamic route by using the test-area (TA) method. The different operational expressions of these definitions are presented with those of their long range corrections. The AUA potential allows to reproduce very well the dependence of the surface tension with respect to the temperature for cyclopentane, cyclohexane, benzene and toluene. PMID:19606323

  4. Link between the Semi-empirical Andrade and Schytil Equations and the Statistical-Mechanical Born-Green Equation for Viscosity and Surface Tension of Pure Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptay, G.

    2008-04-01

    The semi-empirical Andrade and Schytil equations are revisited for the melting point dynamic viscosity and surface tension of pure liquid metals. Both equations are derived in modified forms, with easy-to-use, dimensionless semi-empirical parameters. The modified equations are used to reproduce the theoretical equation of Born-Green on the ratio of surface tension and viscosity of pure liquid metals.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid surface of the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide: structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín Pensado, Alfonso; Malfreyt, Patrice; Pádua, Agílio A H

    2009-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid-vacuum interface of the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide were performed with an all-atom force field. Structural properties of the interface, such as orientational ordering and density profiles, were calculated. The hexyl side chain of the cation is likely to protrude outward from the surface layer. There is a region with enhanced density from that of the bulk where the cation preferably slants with the imidazolium ring tending to be perpendicular to the interface. The surface tensions are calculated using mechanical and thermodynamic definitions via profiles along the direction normal to the interface. We also discuss the different contributions to the surface tension due to the repulsion-dispersion and electrostatic interactions. The use of local pressure profiles provides an explanation to the systematic problems encountered by several researchers to obtain accurate values of the surface tension at low temperature. Even when macroscopically the system looks in equilibrium, locally this is not accomplished. PMID:19863141

  6. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  7. Butler-Sugimoto monomolecular bilayer interface model: the effect of oxygen on the surface tension of a liquid metal and its wetting of a ceramic.

    PubMed

    Yen, Pei-Shan; Datta, Ravindra

    2014-07-15

    The influence of oxygen on liquid-gas surface tension of molten metals has been well-investigated experimentally and modeled theoretically via the Szyszkowski equation, derivable from the Butler molecular monolayer interface model. However, there is no corresponding model describing the experimentally observed profound effect of oxygen partial pressure on solid-liquid surface tension as well as on contact angle of molten metals on ceramic substrates. Here, we utilize the Butler-Sugimoto thermodynamic approach based on a monomolecular bilayer interface model to investigate the effect of oxygen partial pressure on liquid-gas as well as solid-liquid surface tension of molten Cu/Al2O3 and molten Ag/Al2O3 systems. It is shown that both liquid-gas and solid-liquid surface tension are a strong function of oxygen activity in the melt, which, in turn, depends on gas-phase oxygen partial pressure, in conformity with experiments. The change in solid-liquid surface tension and wetting is also greatly affected by the change in liquid-gas surface tension. This improved understanding is of practical significance in many applications. PMID:24863799

  8. Prediction of the temperature dependence of the surface tension of SO2, N2, O2, and Ar by Monte Carlo molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Neyt, Jean-Claude; Wender, Aurélie; Lachet, Véronique; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-08-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of the liquid-vapor interface of SO(2), O(2), N(2), and Ar to reproduce the dependence of the surface tension with the temperature. Whereas the coexisting densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure are very well reproduced by the two-phase simulations showing the same accuracy as the calculations performed using the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo technique (GEMC), the performance of the prediction of the variation of the surface tension with the temperature depends on the magnitude of the electrostatic and repulsive-dispersive interactions. The surface tension of SO(2) is very well reproduced, whereas the prediction of this property is less satisfactory for O(2) and N(2), for which the average intermolecular electrostatic interactions are several orders smaller than the dispersion interactions. For argon, we observe significant deviations from experiments. The representation of the surface tension of argon in reduced units shows that our calculations are in line with the existing surface tensions of the Lennard-Jones fluid in the literature. This underlines the difficulty of reproducing the temperature dependence of the surface tension of argon with interactions only modeled by the Lennard-Jones pair potential. PMID:21711018

  9. Droplet relaxation in Hele-Shaw geometry: Application to the measurement of the nematic-isotropic surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Patrick; Poy, Guilhem

    2015-12-01

    Shape measurements after the coalescence of isotropic droplets embedded in a thin sample of a homeotropic nematic phase provides a tool to measure the nematic-isotropic surface tension. In addition, this experiment allows us to check the scaling laws recently given by Brun et al. [P.-T. Brun, M. Nagel, and F. Gallaire, Phys. Rev. E 88, 043009 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.043009] to explain the relaxation of ellipsoidal droplets in a Hele-Shaw cell.

  10. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics - Part 1: Surface tension depression and light-absorbing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The light-absorbing products form on the order of minutes, and solution composition continues to change over several days. The results suggest an aldol condensation pathway involving the participation of the ammonium ion. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit surface tension depression. Methylglyoxal uptake could potentially change the optical properties, climate effects, and heterogeneous chemistry of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  11. The wetting characteristics and surface tension of some ni-based alloys on yttria, hafnia, alumina, and zirconia substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanetkar, C. S.; Kacar, A. S.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1988-07-01

    Sessile drop experiments were carried out in order to measure surface tensions and to investigate wetting characteristics of some Ni-based alloys on various ceramic substrates. The liquid-vapor surface tension (γLV) was found to be 1.764 N/m for pure Ni, 1.45 ± 0.11 N/m for Ni-20 pct Cr, 1.29 ± 0.06 N/m for Ni-20 pct Cr-1 pct Al, and 1.31 ± 0.09 N/m for Ni-20 pct Cr-4 pct Al. The commercial alloys UD520, UD718, UD720, and WASPALOY* showed non-wetting behavior on zirconia but wetting tendency on alumina substrates. Ni-20 pct Cr-1 pct Al showed non-wetting behavior on alumina, hafnia, and yttria substrates whereas Ni-20 pct Cr and Ni-20 pct Cr-4 pct Al were observed to be non-wetting on hafnia but wetting on yttria and alumina substrates. All the systems that exhibited wetting behavior were found to be non-wetting in the beginning; however, wet-ting improved with time. The wetting characteristics were apparently related to impurification of droplets during measurements, which is reflected in the solidification structure, rather than to the presence of oxides on the surface.

  12. An apparatus with a horizontal capillary tube intended for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinš, Václav; Hošek, Jan; Hykl, Jiří; Hrubý, Jan

    2015-05-01

    New experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of liquids under the metastable supercooled state has been designed and assembled in the study. The measuring technique is similar to the method employed by P.T. Hacker [NACA TN 2510] in 1951. A short liquid thread of the liquid sample was sucked inside a horizontal capillary tube partly placed in a temperature-controlled glass chamber. One end of the capillary tube was connected to a setup with inert gas which allowed for precise tuning of the gas overpressure in order of hundreds of Pa. The open end of the capillary tube was precisely grinded and polished before the measurement in order to assure planarity and perpendicularity of the outer surface. The liquid meniscus at the open end was illuminated by a laser beam and observed by a digital camera. Application of an increasing overpressure of the inert gas at the inner meniscus of the liquid thread caused variation of the outer meniscus such that it gradually changed from concave to flat and subsequently convex shape. The surface tension at the temperature of the inner meniscus could be evaluated from the overpressure corresponding to exactly planar outer meniscus. Detailed description of the new setup together with results of the preliminary tests is provided in the study.

  13. Sucrose dependence of solute retention on human serum albumin stationary phase: hydrophobic effect and surface tension considerations.

    PubMed

    Peyrin, E; Guillaume, Y C; Morin, N; Guinchard, C

    1998-07-15

    In a chromatographic system using human serum albumin (HSA) as a stationary phase, D,L dansyl amino acids as solutes, and sucrose as a mobile-phase modifier, a study on the surface tension effect of sugar on compound retention was carried out by varying the salting-out agent concentration c and the column temperature T. The thermodynamic parameters for solute transfer from the mobile to the stationary phase were determined from linear van't Hoff plots. An enthalpy-entropy compensation study revealed that the type of interaction between solute and HSA was independent of the molecular structure of the dansyl amino acids and the mobile-phase composition. An analysis of the experimental variations in the retention factor and the enantioselectivity values with c was performed using a theoretical model. It was shown that the decrease in solute retention accompanying the sucrose concentration increase was principally governed by a structural rearrangement of the binding cavity due to the increased surface tension effects. The cavity apolar residues were assumed to fold out of contact with the medium in order to reduce the surface area accessible to sucrose molecules, thus implying a restriction of the curvature radius of the cavity. Such behavior caused a decrease in the hydrophobic interaction for ligand binding on HSA explaining the observed thermodynamic parameter trends over the sucrose concentration range. PMID:9684542

  14. Combined effect of synthetic protein, Mini-B, and cholesterol on a model lung surfactant mixture at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Hui, Erica; Waring, Alan J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of this work is to study the combined effects of Mini-B, a 34 residue synthetic analog of the lung surfactant protein SP-B, and cholesterol, a neutral lipid, on a model binary lipid mixture containing dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), that is often used to mimic the primary phospholipid composition of lung surfactants. Using surface pressure vs. mean molecular area isotherms, fluorescence imaging and analysis of lipid domain size distributions; we report on changes in the structure, function and stability of the model lipid-protein films in the presence and absence of varying composition of cholesterol. Our results indicate that at low cholesterol concentrations, Mini-B can prevent cholesterol's tendency to lower the line tension between lipid domain boundaries, while maintaining Mini-B's ability to cause reversible collapse resulting in the formation of surface associated reservoirs. Our results also show that lowering the line tension between domains can adversely impact monolayer folding mechanisms. We propose that small amounts of cholesterol and synthetic protein Mini-B can together achieve the seemingly opposing requirements of efficient LS: fluid enough to flow at the air-water interface, while being rigid enough to oppose irreversible collapse at ultra-low surface tensions. PMID:26775740

  15. Tangential stress beneath wind-driven air water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banner, Michael L.; Peirson, William L.

    1998-06-01

    The detailed structure of the aqueous surface sublayer flow immediately adjacent to the wind-driven air water interface is investigated in a laboratory wind-wave flume using particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. The goal is to investigate quantitatively the character of the flow in this crucial, very thin region which is often disrupted by microscale breaking events. In this study, we also examine critically the conclusions of Okuda, Kawai & Toba (1977), who argued that for very short, strongly forced wind-wave conditions, shear stress is the dominant mechanism for transmitting the atmospheric wind stress into the water motion waves and surface drift currents. In strong contrast, other authors have more recently observed very substantial normal stress contributions on the air side. The availability of PIV and associated image technology now permits a timely re-examination of the results of Okuda et al., which have been influential in shaping present perceptions of the physics of this dynamically important region. The PIV technique used in the present study overcomes many of the inherent shortcomings of the hydrogen bubble measurements, and allows reliable determination of the fluid velocity and shear within 200 [mu]m of the instantaneous wind-driven air water interface.

  16. Rheologic Profile, Specific Gravity, Surface Tension, and pH of Fifteen Over-the-Counter Preparations.

    PubMed

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Baghat, Tushar; Chukwubeze, Onah; Dembla, Ishwin

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the physical characteristics of commercially available over-the-counter preparations can aid the compounding pharmacist in preparing medication. In this study, 15 over-the-counter products were studied with regard to their specific gravity, surface tension, pH, and rheologic profile. The specific gravities of all the products were greater than 1, with the exceptions of Nivea Lotion and rubbing alcohol, which were less than 1. The majority of the products had an acidic pH. With the exception of two products, Citrucel and Chloraseptic, all products demonstrated a surface tension value less than that of water (72.8 dynes/cm). Chloraseptic had the lowest Newtonian viscosity (1.27 cPs), whereas Vicks DayQuil had the highest (098.86 cPs). Citrucel exhibited dilatant-type flow; Suave Shampoo, herbal shampoo, Tangerine Tickle Herbal Shampoo, and Metamucil pseudoplastic flow; the remaining non-Newtonian formulations, plastic flow profiles. PMID:23996027

  17. Conditions necessary for capillary hysteresis in porous media: Tests of grain-size and surface tension influences

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Olson, Keith R.; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-03-12

    Hysteresis in the relation between water saturation and matric potential is generally regarded as a basic aspect of unsaturated porous media. However, the nature of an upper length scale limit for saturation hysteresis has not been previously addressed. Since hysteresis depends on whether or not capillary rise occurs at the grain scale, this criterion was used to predict required combinations of grain size, surface tension, fluid-fluid density differences, and acceleration in monodisperse systems. The Haines number (Ha), composed of the aforementioned variables, is proposed as a dimensionless number useful for separating hysteretic (Ha < 15) versus nonhysteretic (Ha > 15) behavior. Vanishing of hysteresis was predicted to occur for grain sizes greater than 10.4 +- 0.5 mm, for water-air systems under the acceleration of ordinary gravity, based on Miller-Miller scaling and Haines' original model for hysteresis. Disappearance of hysteresis was tested through measurements of drainage and wetting curves of sands and gravels and occurs between grain sizes of 10 and 14 mm (standard conditions). The influence of surface tension was tested through measurements of moisture retention in 7 mm gravel, without and with a surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS)). The ordinary water system (Ha = 7) exhibited hysteresis, while the SDBS system (Ha = 18) did not. The experiments completed in this study indicate that hysteresis in moisture retention relations has an upper limit at Ha = 16 +- 2 and show that hysteresis is not a fundamental feature of unsaturated porous media.

  18. Buoyancy-driven detachment of a wall-bound pendant drop: Interface shape at pinchoff and nonequilibrium surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present numerical results from phase-field simulations of the buoyancy-driven detachment of an isolated, wall-bound pendant emulsion droplet acted upon by surface tension and wall-normal buoyancy forces alone. Our theoretical approach follows a diffuse-interface model for partially miscible binary mixtures which has been extended to include the influence of static contact angles other than 90∘, based on a Hermite interpolation formulation of the Cahn boundary condition as first proposed by Jacqmin [J. Fluid Mech. 402, 57 (2000), 10.1017/S0022112099006874]. In a previous work, this model has been successfully employed for simulating triphase contact line problems in stable emulsions with nearly immiscible components, and, in particular, applied to the determination of critical Bond numbers for buoyancy-driven detachment as a function of static contact angle. Herein, the shapes of interfaces at pinchoff are investigated as a function of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition. Furthermore, we show numerical results on the nonequilibrium surface tension that help to explain the discrepancy between our numerically determined static contact angle dependence of the critical Bond number and its sharp-interface counterpart based on a static stability analysis of equilibrium shapes after numerical integration of the Young-Laplace equation. Finally, we show the influence of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition on the temporal evolution of the minimum neck radius in the necking regime of drop detachment.

  19. Buoyancy-driven detachment of a wall-bound pendant drop: interface shape at pinchoff and nonequilibrium surface tension.

    PubMed

    Lamorgese, A; Mauri, R

    2015-09-01

    We present numerical results from phase-field simulations of the buoyancy-driven detachment of an isolated, wall-bound pendant emulsion droplet acted upon by surface tension and wall-normal buoyancy forces alone. Our theoretical approach follows a diffuse-interface model for partially miscible binary mixtures which has been extended to include the influence of static contact angles other than 90^{∘}, based on a Hermite interpolation formulation of the Cahn boundary condition as first proposed by Jacqmin [J. Fluid Mech. 402, 57 (2000)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S0022112099006874]. In a previous work, this model has been successfully employed for simulating triphase contact line problems in stable emulsions with nearly immiscible components, and, in particular, applied to the determination of critical Bond numbers for buoyancy-driven detachment as a function of static contact angle. Herein, the shapes of interfaces at pinchoff are investigated as a function of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition. Furthermore, we show numerical results on the nonequilibrium surface tension that help to explain the discrepancy between our numerically determined static contact angle dependence of the critical Bond number and its sharp-interface counterpart based on a static stability analysis of equilibrium shapes after numerical integration of the Young-Laplace equation. Finally, we show the influence of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition on the temporal evolution of the minimum neck radius in the necking regime of drop detachment. PMID:26465476

  20. A study of the adsorption of the amphiphilic penicillins cloxacillin and dicloxacillin onto human serum albumin using surface tension isotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Silvia; Leis, David; Taboada, Pablo; Attwood, David; Mosquera, Victor

    The interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with two structurally similar anionic amphiphilic penicillins, cloxacillin and dicloxacillin, at 25°C has been examined by surface tension measurements under conditions at which the HSA molecule was positively (pH 4.5) or negatively charged (pH 7.4). Measurements were at fixed HSA concentrations (0.0125 and 0.125% w/v) and at drug concentrations over a range including, where possible, the critical micelle concentration (cmc). Interaction between anionic drugs and positively charged HSA at pH 7.4 resulted in an increase of the cmc of each drug as a consequence of its removal from solution by adsorption. Limited data for cloxacillin at pH 4.5 indicated an apparent decrease of the cmc in the presence of HSA suggesting a facilitation of the aggregation by association with the protein. Changes in the surface tension-log (drug concentration) plots in the presence of HSA have been discussed in terms of the adsorption of drug at the air-solution and protein-solution interfaces. Standard free energy changes associated with the micellization of both drugs and their adsorption at the air-solution interface have been calculated and compared.

  1. Adsorption at air-water and oil-water interfaces and self-assembly in aqueous solution of ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun X; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John R P; Terry, Ann E

    2015-03-17

    The Tween nonionic surfactants are ethoxylated sorbitan esters, which have 20 ethylene oxide groups attached to the sorbitan headgroup and a single alkyl chain, lauryl, palmityl, stearyl, or oleyl. They are an important class of surfactants that are extensively used in emulsion and foam stabilization and in applications associated with foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. A range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants, with differing degrees of ethoxylation from 3 to 50 ethylene oxide groups, have been synthesized and characterized by neutron reflection, small-angle neutron scattering, and surface tension. In conjunction with different alkyl chain groups, this provides the opportunity to modify their surface properties, their self-assembly in solution, and their interaction with macromolecules, such as proteins. Adsorption at the air-water and oil-water interfaces and solution self-assembly of the range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants synthesized are presented and discussed. PMID:25697294

  2. The relationship between surface tension and the industrial performance of water-soluble polymers prepared from acid hydrolysis lignin, a saccharification by-product from woody materials.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Imai, Masanori; Iwatsuki, Ayuko; Fukushima, Kazuhiko

    2008-05-01

    In this study, water-soluble anionic and cationic polymers were prepared from sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), an acid hydrolysis lignin, and the relationship between the surface tension of these polymers and industrial performance was examined. The SAL was phenolized (P-SAL) to enhance its solubility and reactivity. Sulfonation and the Mannich reaction with aminocarboxylic acids produced water-soluble anionic polymers and high-dispersibility gypsum paste. The dispersing efficiency increased as the surface tension decreased, suggesting that the fluidity of the gypsum paste increased with the polymer adsorption on the gypsum particle surface. Water-soluble cationic polymers were prepared using the Mannich reaction with dimethylamine. The cationic polymers showed high sizing efficiency under neutral papermaking conditions; the sizing efficiency increased with the surface tension. This suggests that the polymer with high hydrophilicity spread in the water and readily adhered to the pulp surface and the rosin, showing good retention. PMID:17664066

  3. On Energy Inequality for the Problem on the Evolution of Two Fluids of Different Types Without Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Irina Vlad.

    2015-03-01

    The paper deals with the motion of two immiscible viscous fluids in a container, one of the fluids being compressible while another one being incompressible. The interface between the fluids is an unknown closed surface where surface tension is neglected. We assume the compressible fluid to be barotropic, the pressure being given by an arbitrary smooth increasing function. This problem is considered in anisotropic Sobolev-Slobodetskiǐ spaces. We show that the L 2-norms of the velocity and deviation of compressible fluid density from the mean value decay exponentially with respect to time. The proof is based on a local existence theorem (Denisova, Interfaces Free Bound 2:283-312, 2000) and on the idea of constructing a function of generalized energy, proposed by Padula (J Math Fluid Mech 1:62-77, 1999). In addition, we eliminate the restrictions for the viscosities which appeared in Denisova (Interfaces Free Bound 2:283-312, 2000).

  4. The effects of interface misfit strain and surface tension on magnetoelectric effects in layered magnetostrictive-piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Feng; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2013-07-01

    A nonlinear model is proposed to study low-frequency magnetoelectric (ME) effects in layered magnetostrictive-piezoelectric composites, taking into account the effects of interface misfit strain and surface stress. As a specific case, L-T mode of Terfenol-D/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) composites is investigated. The results show that flexural deformation can suppress the ME voltage coefficient, especially for elevated Terfenol-D volume fraction. Interface misfit strain demonstrates a notable impact on the ME voltage coefficient, and this strain-mediated ME effect is intensified with increasing interface misfit strain. Owing to residual surface tension, the ME voltage coefficient is found to be size-dependent when the thickness of Terfenol-D/PZT layered composite reduces to the nanoscale. In addition, substrate effect on ME voltage coefficients is evaluated.

  5. Surface tension and disjoining pressure of free-standing smectic films above the bulk smectic-A-isotropic transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. V.; Śliwa, Izabela

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out a numerical study of both the structural and thermodynamic properties of free-standing smectic films for the case of enhanced pair interaction in the bounding layers. Calculations, based upon the extended McMillan's mean-field theory with anisotropic forces, show that the layer-thinning transitions are characterized by abrupt drops to lower values, both for a disjoining pressure and a fluctuation-induced long-range interaction between the smectic film surfaces, and then continues to increase with a larger positive slope. Reasonable agreement between the theoretically predicted and the experimentally obtained data on the surface tension of the partially fluorinated 5-n-alkyl-2-(4-n-(perfluoroalkyl-metheleneoxy)phenyl) film has been obtained.

  6. Stress-intensity factors for circumferential surface cracks in pipes and rods under tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present stress-intensity factors for a wide range of nearly semi-elliptical surface cracks in pipes and rods. The configurations were subjected to either remote tension or bending loads. For pipes, the ratio of crack depth to crack length (a/c) ranged from 0.6 to 1; the ratio of crack depth to wall thickness (a/t) ranged from 0.2 to 0.8; and the ratio of internal radius to wall thickness (R/t) ranged from 1 to 10. For rods, the ratio of crack depth to crack length also ranged from 0.6 to 1; and the ratio of crack depth to rod diameter (a/D) ranged from 0.05 to 0.35. These particular crack configurations were chosen to cover the range of crack shapes (a/c) that have been observed in experiments conducted on pipes and rods under tension and bending fatigue loads. The stress-intensity factors were calculated by a three-dimensional finite-element method. The finite-element models employed singularity elements along the crack front and linear-strain elements elsewhere. The models had about 6500 degrees of freedom. The stress-intensity factors were evaluated using a nodal-force method.

  7. Method and apparatus for determining surface tension or if a surfactant will keep a narrow passageway open

    SciTech Connect

    Enhorning, G.

    1990-11-20

    A method for determining surface tension or if a surface will keep a narrow passageway open. It comprises: providing elongated passageway defining means, the passageway having first and second end portions and an intermediate necked-down portion including a relatively narrow center a tapered first and second sections to either side of the relatively narrow center, the first and second tapered sections being adjacent to the first and second end portions, respectively, and one of the first and second end portions being open to atmosphere, and the other end portion not being open to atmosphere; installing a small quantity of the fluid whose surface tension is to be determined within the necked-down portion to form a column fluid; treating and progressively increasing a pressure different between the gases in the first and second end portions by either slowly introducing additional gas under pressure into the other end portion or by slowly withdrawing gas from the other end portion to cause the column of fluid to be slowly forced along the necked-down portion until the first meniscus passes the relatively narrow center. The first meniscus rupturing after it passes the relatively narrow center to open up the column of fluid to permit the gas pressure within the first and second end portions to substantially instantaneously equalize; continuing to either slowly introduced additional gas under pressure into the other end portion or to slowly withdraw gas from the other end portion for a significant period of time after the first meniscus ruptures; and recording the pressure within the other end portion.

  8. Microscopic dynamics of nanoparticle monolayers at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R; Basu, J K

    2013-04-15

    We present results of surface mechanical and particle tracking measurements of nanoparticles trapped at the air-water interface as a function of their areal density. We monitor both the surface pressure (Π) and isothermal compression modulus (ϵ) as well as the dynamics of nanoparticle clusters, using fluorescence confocal microscopy while they are compressed to very high density near the two dimensional close packing density Φ∼0.82. We observe non-monotonic variation in both ϵ and the dynamic heterogeneity, characterized by the dynamical susceptibility χ4 with Φ, in such high density monolayers. We provide insight into the underlying nature of such transitions in close packed high density nanoparticle monolayers in terms of the morphology and flexibility of these soft colloidal particles. We discuss the significance our results in the context of related studies on two dimensional granular or colloidal systems. PMID:23411354

  9. Estuary Turbulence and Air-Water Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Philip Mark

    The mixing of constituents between estuarine bottom and surface waters or between estuarine surface waters and the atmosphere are two topics of growing interest, in part due to the potentially important role of estuaries in global carbon budgets. These two types of mixing are typically driven by turbulence, and a research project was developed to improve the scientific understanding of atmospheric and tidal controls on estuary turbulence and airwater exchange processes. Highlights of method development and field research on the Hudson River estuary include several deployments of bottom mounted current profilers to quantify the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget, and construction and deployment of an instrumented catamaran that makes autonomous measurements of air-water CO2 exchange (FCO2), water TKE dissipation at 50 cm depth (epsilon50), and other physical properties just above and below the air-water interface. On the Hudson, wind correlates strongly with epsilon50, but surface water speed and airwater heat flux also have moderate correlations with epsilon50. In partially mixed estuaries such as the Hudson, as well as salt wedge estuaries, baroclinic pressure forcing typically causes spring ebb tides to have much stronger upper water column shear than flood tides. The Hudson data are used to show that this shear leads to local shear instability and stronger near-surface turbulence on spring ebbs. Also, buoyancy budget terms are compared to demonstrate how water-to-air heat fluxes can influence stratification and indirectly influence epsilon50. Looking more closely at the role of wind forcing, it is demonstrated that inland propagation of the sea breeze on warm sunny days leads to arrival in phase with peak solar forcing at seaward stations, but several hours later at up-estuary stations. Passage of the sea breeze front raises the air-water CO2 flux by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and drives epsilon50 comparable to spring tide levels in the upper meter of the water

  10. Influence of Contact Angle, Growth Angle and Melt Surface Tension on Detached Solidification of InSb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yazhen; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2000-01-01

    We extended the previous analysis of detached solidification of InSb based on the moving meniscus model. We found that for steady detached solidification to occur in a sealed ampoule in zero gravity, it is necessary for the growth angle to exceed a critical value, the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall to exceed a critical value, and the melt-gas surface tension to be below a critical value. These critical values would depend on the material properties and the growth parameters. For the conditions examined here, the sum of the growth angle and the contact angle must exceed approximately 130, which is significantly less than required if both ends of the ampoule are open.

  11. A General Strategy for the Separation of Immiscible Organic Liquids by Manipulating the Surface Tensions of Nanofibrous Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhao, Yong; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2015-12-01

    Oil/water separation membranes with different wettability towards water are attractive for their economic efficiency and convenience. The key factor for the separation process is the roughness-enhanced wettability of membranes based on the intrinsic wetting threshold (IWT) of water, that is, the limitation of the wettability caused by hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity. However, the separation of organic liquids (OLs) remains a challenge. Herein, we manipulate the surface tensions of nanofibrous membranes to lie between the IWTs of the two OLs to be separated so that the nanofibrous membranes can be endowed with superlyophobicity and superlyophilicity for the two liquids, and thus lead to successful separation. Our investigations provide a general strategy to separate any immiscible liquids efficiently, and may lead to the development of membranes with a large capacity, high flux, and high selectivity for organic reactions or liquid extraction in chemical engineering. PMID:26492856

  12. The wetting characteristics and surface tension of some Ni-based alloys on yttria, hafnia, alumina, and zirconia substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanetkar, C. S.; Kacar, A. S.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The surface tension and wetting characteristics of four commercial Ni-based alloys (UD718, Waspaloy, UD720, and UD520), pure Ni, and three special alloys (Ni-20 percent Cr, Ni-20 percent Cr-1 percent Al, and Ni-20 percent Cr-4 percent Al) on various ceramic substrates (including alumina, zirconia, hafnia, and yttria) were investigated using sessile drop experiments. Most of the systems studied exhibited a nonwetting behavior. Wetting improved with holding time at a given temperature to the point that some systems, such as Ni-20Cr on alumina, Ni-20Cr-4Al on alumina and on yttria, became marginally wetting. Wetting characteristics were apparently related to constitutional undercooling, which in turn could be affected by the metal dissolving some of the substrate during measurements.

  13. Physical properties of cerebrospinal fluid of relevance to shunt function. 2: The effect of protein upon CSF surface tension and contact angle.

    PubMed

    Brydon, H L; Hayward, R; Harkness, W; Bayston, R

    1995-01-01

    CSF surface tension has received little study, and yet it will effect the pressure at which shunt valves operate, and by influencing the degree of hydrophobicity (contact angle) will alter the attraction between bacteria and neurosurgical prostheses. A study is therefore presented of the effect of protein content upon the surface tension of CSF and its contact angle to silicone rubber. Both of these quantities fell throughout the normal range of CSF protein, but above 1 g/l, additional protein had little effect, and the results obtained were similar to that reported for plasma. The effect of surface tension on the opening and closing pressures of hydrocephalus shunt valves and of contact angle in the adhesion of bacteria to neurosurgical implants is discussed. PMID:8561937

  14. Effects of the kinematic viscosity and surface tension on the bubble take-off period in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi; Iida, Yoshinori

    2009-06-01

    The effect of kinematic viscosity and surface tension of the solution was investigated by adding catalase, glucose oxidase, or glucose on the bubble movement in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system. The kinematic viscosity was measured using a Cannon-Fenske kinematic viscometer. The surface tension of the solution was measured by the Wilhelmy method using a self-made apparatus. The effects of the hole diameter/cell wall thickness, catalase concentration, glucose concentration, and glucose oxidase concentration on the kinematic viscosity, surface tension, and bubble take-off period were investigated. With our system, the effects of the changes in the solution materiality on the bubble take-off period were proven to be very small in comparison to the change in the oxygen-producing rate. PMID:19250805

  15. Sulforhodamine B interacts with albumin to lower surface tension and protect against ventilation injury of flooded alveoli.

    PubMed

    Kharge, Angana Banerjee; Wu, You; Perlman, Carrie E

    2015-02-01

    In the acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar flooding by proteinaceous edema liquid impairs gas exchange. Mechanical ventilation is used as a supportive therapy. In regions of the edematous lung, alveolar flooding is heterogeneous, and stress is concentrated in aerated alveoli. Ventilation exacerbates stress concentrations and injuriously overexpands aerated alveoli. Injury degree is proportional to surface tension, T. Lowering T directly lessens injury. Furthermore, as heterogeneous flooding causes the stress concentrations, promoting equitable liquid distribution between alveoli should, indirectly, lessen injury. We present a new theoretical analysis suggesting that liquid is trapped in discrete alveoli by a pressure barrier that is proportional to T. Experimentally, we identify two rhodamine dyes, sulforhodamine B and rhodamine WT, as surface active in albumin solution and investigate whether the dyes lessen ventilation injury. In the isolated rat lung, we micropuncture a surface alveolus, instill albumin solution, and obtain an area with heterogeneous alveolar flooding. We demonstrate that rhodamine dye addition lowers T, reduces ventilation-induced injury, and facilitates liquid escape from flooded alveoli. In vitro we show that rhodamine dye is directly surface active in albumin solution. We identify sulforhodamine B as a potential new therapeutic agent for the treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:25414246

  16. Sulforhodamine B interacts with albumin to lower surface tension and protect against ventilation injury of flooded alveoli

    PubMed Central

    Kharge, Angana Banerjee; Wu, You

    2014-01-01

    In the acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar flooding by proteinaceous edema liquid impairs gas exchange. Mechanical ventilation is used as a supportive therapy. In regions of the edematous lung, alveolar flooding is heterogeneous, and stress is concentrated in aerated alveoli. Ventilation exacerbates stress concentrations and injuriously overexpands aerated alveoli. Injury degree is proportional to surface tension, T. Lowering T directly lessens injury. Furthermore, as heterogeneous flooding causes the stress concentrations, promoting equitable liquid distribution between alveoli should, indirectly, lessen injury. We present a new theoretical analysis suggesting that liquid is trapped in discrete alveoli by a pressure barrier that is proportional to T. Experimentally, we identify two rhodamine dyes, sulforhodamine B and rhodamine WT, as surface active in albumin solution and investigate whether the dyes lessen ventilation injury. In the isolated rat lung, we micropuncture a surface alveolus, instill albumin solution, and obtain an area with heterogeneous alveolar flooding. We demonstrate that rhodamine dye addition lowers T, reduces ventilation-induced injury, and facilitates liquid escape from flooded alveoli. In vitro we show that rhodamine dye is directly surface active in albumin solution. We identify sulforhodamine B as a potential new therapeutic agent for the treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:25414246

  17. Simultaneous decay of contact-angle and surface-tension during the rehydration of air-dried root mucilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, Gilboa; Chen, Fengxian

    2016-04-01

    Plants can extract or exude water and solutes at their root surface. Among the root exudates, the mucilage exhibits a surfactant like properties - depressing the surface-tension (ST, mN/m) at the water-air interface. The amphipathic nature of some of the mucilage molecules (e.g. lipids) is thought to be the reason for its surfactant like behavior. As the rhizosphere dries out, re-orientation and/or re-configuration of amphipathic molecules at the solid-air interface, may impart hydrophobic nature to the rhizosphere. Our current knowledge on the ST of natural and/or model root mucilage is based on measurements of the equilibrium ST. However, adsorption of amphipathic molecules at the water-air interface is not reached instantaneously. The hydrophobic nature of the rhizosphere was deduced from the initial advancing CA, commonly calculated from the first few milliseconds up to few seconds (depending on the method employed). We hypothesized that during the rehydration of the root mucilage; both quantities are dynamic. Processes such as water absorbance and dissolution, may vary the interfacial tensions as a function of time. Consequently, simultaneous reduction of both CA and ST as a function of time can be expected. The main objective of this study was to characterize and quantify the extent, persistency and dynamic of the CA and ST during rehydration of air-dried root mucilage. The study was involved with measurements of dynamic and equilibrium ST using the pedant drop or Wilhelmy plate method, respectively. Glass slides were coated with naturally occurring or model root mucilage and the CA of a sessile drop was measured optically, as a function of time. The results were analyzed based on the Young-Dupré and Young-Laplace equations, from which the simultaneous decay of CA and ST was deduced. The implication for the wettability and water flow in the rhizosphere will be discussed.

  18. Pressure and surface tension of an active simple liquid: a comparison between kinetic, mechanical and free-energy based approaches.

    PubMed

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-06-29

    We discuss different definitions of pressure for a system of active spherical particles driven by a non-thermal coloured noise. We show that mechanical, kinetic and free-energy based approaches lead to the same result up to first order in the non-equilibrium expansion parameter. The first prescription is based on a generalisation of the kinetic mesoscopic virial equation and expresses the pressure exerted on the walls in terms of the average of the virial of the inter-particle forces. In the second approach, the pressure and the surface tension are identified with the volume and area derivatives, respectively, of the partition function associated with the known stationary non-equilibrium distribution of the model. The third method is a mechanical approach and is related to the work necessary to deform the system. The pressure is obtained by comparing the expression of the work in terms of local stress and strain with the corresponding expression in terms of microscopic distribution. This is determined from the force balance encoded in the Born-Green-Yvon equation. Such a method has the advantage of giving a formula for the local pressure tensor and the surface tension even in inhomogeneous situations. By direct inspection, we show that the three procedures lead to the same values of the pressure, and give support to the idea that the partition function, obtained via the unified coloured noise approximation, is more than a formal property of the system, but determines the stationary non-equilibrium thermodynamics of the model. PMID:27301440

  19. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  20. Precipitation and surface adsorption of metal complexes during electropolishing. Theory and characterization with X-ray nanotomography and surface tension isotherms.

    PubMed

    Nave, Maryana I; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Wang, Jun; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2015-09-21

    Electropolishing of metals often leads to supersaturation conditions resulting in precipitation of complex compounds. The solubility diagrams and Gibbs adsorption isotherms of the electropolishing products are thus very important to understand the thermodynamic mechanism of precipitation of reaction products. Electropolishing of tungsten wires in aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide is used as an example illustrating the different thermodynamic scenarios of electropolishing. Electropolishing products are able to form highly viscous films immiscible with the surrounding electrolyte or porous shells adhered to the wire surface. Using X-ray nanotomography, we discovered a gel-like phase formed at the tungsten surface during electropolishing. The results of these studies suggest that the electropolishing products can form a rich library of compounds. The surface tension of the electrolyte depends on the metal oxide ions and alkali-metal complexes. PMID:26279498

  1. Effect of surface tension and surface elasticity of a fluid-fluid interface on the motion of a particle immersed near the interface.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2006-10-14

    The motion of a particle immersed in a fluid near a fluid-fluid interface is studied on the basis of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The motion is influenced by surface tension, dilatational surface elasticity modulus, and surface shear modulus, as well as by gravity. The backflow at the location of the particle after a sudden impulse has some universal features that are the same as for a rigid wall with stick boundary conditions. At short times the flow depends only on the mass densities of the two fluids. The nature of the short-time flow is calculated from potential flow theory. At a somewhat later time the particle shows a pronounced rebound. The maximum value of the rebound and the time at which the maximum occurs depend on the elastic properties of the interface. PMID:17042642

  2. Curvature estimation from a volume-of-fluid indicator function for the simulation of surface tension and wetting with a free-surface lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Simon; Rüde, Ulrich; Harting, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The free surface lattice Boltzmann method (FSLBM) is a combination of the hydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann method with a volume-of-fluid (VOF) interface capturing technique for the simulation of incompressible free surface flows. Capillary effects are modeled by extracting the curvature of the interface from the VOF indicator function and imposing a pressure jump at the free boundary. However, obtaining accurate curvature estimates from a VOF description can introduce significant errors. This article reports numerical results for three different surface tension models in standard test cases and compares the according errors in the velocity field (spurious currents). Furthermore, the FSLBM is shown to be suited to simulate wetting effects at solid boundaries. To this end, a new method is developed to represent wetting boundary conditions in a least-squares curvature reconstruction technique. The main limitations of the current FSLBM are analyzed and are found to be caused by its simplified advection scheme. Possible improvements are suggested.

  3. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-12-29

    Air-water interfacial monolayers of poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure-area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air-water monolayers formed by a PLGA-PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA-PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA-PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the "n-cluster" effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the "n-cluster" effects. PMID:26633595

  4. Type the title of your paper here Effect of the focused light from the xenon arc lamp on the surface tension of the molten enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleutdinov, A. D.; Ghyngazov, S. A.; Mylnikova, T. S.; Aleutdinov, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of exposure to the focused light from the xenon arc lamp on the surface tension of molten enamels was studied with a designed light beam setup as compared to that observed in conventional heating in a resistance furnace. The objects under investigation were enamels No. 261, UES-200 and UES-300. The power density of the light beam was varied in the range of (30-80) W/cm2. When exposed to light, the surface tension is shown to be an order of magnitude lower than that obtained in conventional furnace heating.

  5. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  6. Microrheology Using Optical Tweezers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, Thomas; Levine, Alex; Dennin, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Microrheological techniques have been used successfully to determine mechanical properties of materials important in cellular structure. Also critical to cellular mechanical functions are biological membranes. Many aspects of biological membranes can be modeled using Langmuir monolayers, which are single layers surfactants at the air-water interface. The macroscopic mechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers have been extensively characterized. In contrast to macroscopic measurements, we report on experimental methods for studying the rheological properties of Langmuir monolayers on the micron scale. A water immersion optical tweezers system is used to trap ˜1 micron diameter beads in a monolayer. The passive motion of the trapped beads is recorded at high frequency and the complex shear modulus is calculated. Preliminary microrheological data of a fatty acid monolayer showing dependence on surface pressure will be presented. Experimental obstacles will also be discussed.

  7. Surface tension and bubble shapes in a partially filled rotating cylinder under low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Leslie, Fred W.; Hong, B. B.

    1988-01-01

    A computer algorithm is developed to simulate the profile of a free liquid surface for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry. The equilibrium shape of the free surface is governed by a balance of capillary, centrifugal, and gravity forces. The results can be used to determine the profile of a bubble at various rotating speeds under the gravity environments from low gravity, microgravity to zero-gravity. The present paper discusses the further extension of the study of the determination of bubble shape in a higher rotating speed container developed by Hung and Leslie.

  8. On the physically based modeling of surface tension and moving contact lines with dynamic contact angles on the continuum scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M.; Keller, F.; Säckel, W.; Hirschler, M.; Kunz, P.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Nieken, U.

    2016-04-01

    The description of wetting phenomena is a challenging problem on every considerable length-scale. The behavior of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale is caused by intermolecular interactions like the Van der Waals forces. Therefore, to describe surface tension and the resulting dynamics of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale, appropriate formulations must be developed. While the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model is well-engineered for the description of interfaces, there is still a lack of treatment of contact lines, which are defined by the intersection of an ending fluid interface and a solid boundary surface. In our approach we use a balance equation for the contact line and extend the Navier-Stokes equations in analogy to the extension of a two-phase interface in the CSF model. Since this model depicts a physically motivated approach on the continuum scale, no fitting parameters are introduced and the deterministic description leads to a dynamical evolution of the system. As verification of our theory, we show a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model and simulate the evolution of droplet shapes and their corresponding contact angles.

  9. Solid capillarity: when and how does surface tension deform soft solids?

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Bruno; Bäumchen, Oliver; Boulogne, François; Daniels, Karen E; Dufresne, Eric R; Perrin, Hugo; Salez, Thomas; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Style, Robert W

    2016-03-28

    Soft solids differ from stiff solids in an important way: their surface stresses can drive large deformations. Based on a topical workshop held in the Lorentz Center in Leiden, this Opinion highlights some recent advances in the growing field of solid capillarity and poses key questions for its advancement. PMID:26936296

  10. Interaction of Charged Colloidal Particles at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-07-01

    We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles. PMID:26551757

  11. Infrared surface temperature measurements for the surface tension driven convection experiment. M.S. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., Aug. 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.

    1989-01-01

    In support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE), a planned space transportation system (STS) flight experiment, a commercially available infrared thermal imaging system is used to quantify the imposed thermal signature along the free surface. The system was tested and calibrated for the STDCE with ground-based equivalents of the STDCE hardware. Before using the system, consideration was given to the radiation characteristics of the target (silicone oil). Absorption coefficients were calculated to understand the surface depth as seen by the imager and the penetration depth of the surface heater (CO2 laser). The performance and operational specifications for the imager and image processing system are described in detail to provide an understanding of the equipment. Measurements made with the system were compared to thermocouple measurements and a calculated surface temperature distribution. This comparison showed that in certain regions the IR imager measurements were within 5 percent of the overall temperature difference across the free surface. In other regions the measurements were within + or - 10 percent of the overall temperature gradient across the free surface. The effective emissivity of silicone oil for these experimental conditions was also determined. Measurement errors and their possible solutions are discussed.

  12. Surface cracks in a plate of finite width under tension or bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Boduroglu, H.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of a finite plate containing collinear surface cracks is considered and solved by using the line spring model with plane elasticity and Reissner's plate theory. The main focus is on the effect of interaction between two cracks or between cracks and stress-free plate boundaries on the stress intensity factors in an effort to provide extensive numerical results which may be useful in applications. Some sample results are obtained and are compared with the existing finite element results. Then the problem is solved for a single (internal) crack, two collinear cracks, and two corner cracks for wide range of relative dimensions. Particularly in corner cracks, the agreement with the finite element solution is surprisingly very good. The results are obtained for semi-elliptic and rectangular crack profiles which may, in practice, correspond to two limiting cases of the actual profile of a subcritically growing surface crack.

  13. Time-dependent dynamical behavior of surface tension on rotating fluids under microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Hong, B. B.; Leslie, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Time dependent evolutions of the profile of free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out with the following situations: (1) linear functions of spin-up and spin-down in low and microgravity environments, (2) step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low gravity environment, and (3) sinusoidal function oscillation of gravity environment in high and low rotating cylinder speeds.

  14. Computer modeling of the dynamics of surface tension on rotating fluids in low and microgravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Hong, B. B.; Leslie, Fred W.

    1989-01-01

    Time-dependent evolutions of the profile of the free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations have been carried out with the following situations: (1) linear functions of spin-up and spin-down in low- and microgravity environments, (2) linear functions of increasing and decreasing gravity environments at high- and low-rotating cylinder speeds, and (3) step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low-gravity environment.

  15. Exact Solution to Stationary Onset of Convection Due to Surface Tension Variation in a Multicomponent Fluid Layer With Interfacial Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee; McCaughan, Frances E.

    1998-01-01

    Stationary onset of convection due to surface tension variation in an unbounded multicomponent fluid layer is considered. Surface deformation is included and general flux boundary conditions are imposed on the stratifying agencies (temperature/composition) disturbance equations. Exact solutions are obtained to the general N-component problem for both finite and infinitesimal wavenumbers. Long wavelength instability may coexist with a finite wavelength instability for certain sets of parameter values, often referred to as frontier points. For an impermeable/insulated upper boundary and a permeable/conductive lower boundary, frontier boundaries are computed in the space of Bond number, Bo, versus Crispation number, Cr, over the range 5 x 10(exp -7) less than or equal to Bo less than or equal to 1. The loci of frontier points in (Bo, Cr) space for different values of N, diffusivity ratios, and, Marangoni numbers, collapsed to a single curve in (Bo, D(dimensional variable)Cr) space, where D(dimensional variable) is a Marangoni number weighted diffusivity ratio.

  16. A Multipurpose Apparatus to Measure Viscosity and Surface Tension of Solutions: The Measurement of the Molecular Cross-Sectional Area of N-Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xin Zhang; Shouxin Liu; Booxin Li; Na An; Fan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    A multipurpose apparatus that can be used to measure the viscosity of solution by the Ostwald method and the surface tension of solution by the drop-weight method or by the capillary-rise method is developed. The apparatus is convenient for in-situ preparation of solutions of different concentrations and avoids the error that frothing of the…

  17. Dynamical behavior of surface tension on rotating fluids in low and microgravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Hong, B. B.; Leslie, F. W.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the time-dependent evolutions of the free surface profile (bubble shapes) of a cylindrical container, partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry in low and microgravity environments. The dynamics of the bubble shapes are calculated for four cases: linear time-dependent functions of spin-up and spin-down in low and microgravity, linear time-dependent functions of increasing and decreasing gravity at high and low rotating cylinder speeds, time-dependent step functions of spin-up and spin-down in low gravity, and sinusoidal function oscillation of the gravity environment in high and low rotating cylinder speeds. It is shown that the computer algorithms developed by Hung et al. (1988) may be used to simulate the profile of time-dependent bubble shapes under variations of centrifugal, capillary, and gravity forces.

  18. Long-Wavelength Rupturing Instability in Surface-Tension-Driven Benard Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, J. B.; Hook, Stephen J. Van; Becerril, Ricardo; McCormick, W. D.; Swinney, H. L.; Schatz, Michael F.

    1999-01-01

    A liquid layer with a free upper surface and heated from below is subject to thermocapillary-induced convective instabilities. We use very thin liquid layers (0.01 cm) to significantly reduce buoyancy effects and simulate Marangoni convection in microgravity. We observe thermocapillary-driven convection in two qualitatively different modes, short-wavelength Benard hexagonal convection cells and a long-wavelength interfacial rupturing mode. We focus on the long-wavelength mode and present experimental observations and theoretical analyses of the long-wavelength instability. Depending on the depths and thermal conductivities of the liquid and the gas above it, the interface can rupture downwards and form a dry spot or rupture upwards and form a high spot. Linear stability theory gives good agreement to the experimental measurements of onset as long as sidewall effects are taken into account. Nonlinear theory correctly predicts the subcritical nature of the bifurcation and the selection between the dry spot and high spots.

  19. Consequences of Anisotropic Permeability and Surface Tension for Magmatic Segregation in Deforming Mantle Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-West, J.; Katz, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of partially molten regions of the mantle are not well understood--in part due to the inaccessibility of these regions to observation. However it is widely agreed that experiments performed on synthetic mantle rocks [e.g KZK10] act as a reasonable test of theoretical models of magma dynamics. One robust feature of experiments on partially molten mantle rocks deformed under strain is the emergence of high-porosity bands at an angle of between 15° and 20° to the shear plane. A number of theoretical approaches have been made to reproduce the formation of these low angle bands in models. The most recent approaches, for example by Takei and Katz [TK13], have involved the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity in diffusion creep arising from the grain-scale redistribution of melt as formulated in a theoretical model by Takei and Holtzman [TH09]. It is reasonable to assume that this melt-preferred orientation (MPO) that leads to anisotropy in viscosity may also lead to anisotropy in permeability. However, the effect of anisotropic permeability remains unexplored. We investigate its impact on the dynamics of partially molten rock, and specifically on its role in low-angle band formation in deformation under simple shear. We work with the continuum model of two-phase-flow as formulated by McKenzie [M84] with the addition of anisotropic permeability. There are some apparent inconsistencies in this model. Firstly, the model predicts continued segregation of melt into bands of 100% porosity, while experiments report maximum porosities in the region of 30%. Secondly, linear stability analyses find maximal growth-rates for porosity perturbations that vary on arbitrarily small length-scales. We study how the inclusion of surface forces into the model could regulate these effects. REFERENCES: KZK10 = King, Zimmerman, & Kohlstedt (2010), J Pet, 10.1093/petrology/egp062. TK13 = Takei & Katz (2013), JFM, 10.1017/jfm.2013.482. TH09 = Takei & Holtzman (2009a), JGR, 10

  20. Irreversible adsorption-driven assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces revealed by a dynamic surface tension probe.

    PubMed

    Bizmark, Navid; Ioannidis, Marios A; Henneke, Dale E

    2014-01-28

    Adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces is a promising bottom-up approach for the preparation of advanced functional materials and devices. Full realization of its potential requires quantitative understanding of the parameters controlling the self-assembly, the structure of nanoparticles at the interface, the barrier properties of the assembly, and the rate of particle attachment. We argue that models of dynamic surface or interfacial tension (DST) appropriate for molecular species break down when the adsorption energy greatly exceeds the mean energy of thermal fluctuations and validate alternative models extending the application of generalized random sequential adsorption theory to nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. Using a model colloidal system of hydrophobic, charge-stabilized ethyl cellulose nanoparticles at neutral pH, we demonstrate the potential of DST measurements to reveal information on the energy of adsorption, the adsorption rate constant, and the energy of particle-interface interaction at different degrees of nanoparticle coverage of the interface. These findings have significant implications for the quantitative description of nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. PMID:24397479