Science.gov

Sample records for air-water temperature difference

  1. Experimental study of the decrease in the temperature of an air/water-cooled turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, A. A.; Sereda, A. V.; Shaiakberov, V. F.; Iskakov, K. M.; Shatalov, Iu. S.

    Results of the full-scale testing of an air/water-cooled deflector-type turbine blade are reported. Data on the decrease in the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade are presented and compared with the calculated values. An analysis of the results indicates that the use of air/water cooling makes it possible to significantly reduce the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade with practically no increase in the engine weight and dimensions.

  2. Water temperature effect on upward air-water flow in a vertical pipe: Local measurements database using four-sensor conductivity probes and LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrós-Andreu, G.; Chiva, S.; Martínez-Cuenca, R.; Torró, S.; Juliá, J. E.; Hernández, L.; Mondragón, R.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental work was carried out to study the effects of temperature variation in bubbly, bubbly to slug transition. Experiments were carried out in an upward air-water flow configuration. Four sensor conductivity probes and LDA techniques was used together for the measurement of bubble parameters. The aim of this paper is to provide a bubble parameter experimental database using four-sensor conductivity probes and LDA technique for upward air-water flow at different temperatures and also show transition effect in different temperatures under the boiling point.

  3. Air - water temperature relationships in the trout streams of southeastern Minnesota’s carbonate - sandstone landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krider, Lori A.; Magner, Joseph A.; Perry, Jim; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate-sandstone geology in southeastern Minnesota creates a heterogeneous landscape of springs, seeps, and sinkholes that supply groundwater into streams. Air temperatures are effective predictors of water temperature in surface-water dominated streams. However, no published work investigates the relationship between air and water temperatures in groundwater-fed streams (GWFS) across watersheds. We used simple linear regressions to examine weekly air-water temperature relationships for 40 GWFS in southeastern Minnesota. A 40-stream, composite linear regression model has a slope of 0.38, an intercept of 6.63, and R2 of 0.83. The regression models for GWFS have lower slopes and higher intercepts in comparison to surface-water dominated streams. Regression models for streams with high R2 values offer promise for use as predictive tools for future climate conditions. Climate change is expected to alter the thermal regime of groundwater-fed systems, but will do so at a slower rate than surface-water dominated systems. A regression model of intercept vs. slope can be used to identify streams for which water temperatures are more meteorologically than groundwater controlled, and thus more vulnerable to climate change. Such relationships can be used to guide restoration vs. management strategies to protect trout streams.

  4. Amphiphilic siloxane phosphonate macromolecule monolayers at the air/water interface: effects of structure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Cabasso, Israel; Stesikova, Elvira

    2008-11-20

    A comprehensive study is reported of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films (spread at the air/water interface using the Langmuir balance technique) composed of surface active, nonionic, and OH-free amphiphilic siloxane phosphonate ester macromolecules. Analysis is made on three molecular structures in the form of linear polymer poly(diethylphosphono-benzyl-alphabeta-ethyl methylsiloxane) (PPEMS), cyclic oligomer methylphosphonobenzyl-alphabeta-ethyl cyclosiloxane (MPECS), and copolymer poly(PEMS-co-DMS). The surface pressure-surface area (pi -A) isotherms of homopolymer at 3-40 degrees C show a clear temperature-induced phase transition (plateaus at pit approximately 17-19 mN/m) below 10 degrees C. The magnitude of the transition substantially increases upon lowering the temperature (partial differential DeltaAt/ partial differential T approximately -0.1 nm2 unit(-1) deg(-1) and partial differential pi t / partial differential T approximately -0.25 mN m(-1) deg(-1)). The positive entropy and enthalpy gain infers that strong coupling with the subphase and excess hydration attributed to hydrogen bonding between the P=O bond and the subphase prevails at low temperatures. The cyclic oligomer MPECS forms a condensed monolayer at the air/water interface that does not display a similar transition in the experimental temperature range. The temperature sensitivity of MPECS film is observed only in the collapsed region. The nature of the interaction with the subphase is similar for MPECS and PPEMS, indicating that the size and thermal mobility are the controlling factors in these processes. The elasticity plot reveals two distinct states (above and below transition). This observation is supported by BAM images that show irregular spiral structures below 10 degrees C. The transition occurring in the copolymer at 20 degrees C is due to relaxation of the PDMS component. The two maxima shown in the elasticity plot indicate additive fractions of PPEMS and PDMS. The surface areas of these

  5. THE ROLE OF AQUEOUS THIN FILM EVAPORATIVE COOLING ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR-WATER EXCHANGE UNDER TEMPERATURE DISEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical conununity has only recently addressed the role of atmospheric temperature variations on rates of air-water vapor phase toxicant exchange. The technical literature has documented that: 1) day time rates of elemental mercury vapor phase air-water exchange can exceed ...

  6. Comparison of pulsating DC and DC power air-water plasma jet: A method to decrease plume temperature and increase ROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Hu, H.; Lei, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Most air-water plasma jets are rich in hydroxyl radicals (•OH), but the plasma has higher temperatures, compared to that of pure gas, especially when using air as working gas. In this paper, pulsating direct current (PDC) power was used to excite the air-water plasma jet to reduce plume temperature. In addition to the temperature, other differences between PDC and DC plasma jets are not yet clear. Thus, comparative studies of those plasmas are performed to evaluate characteristics, such as breakdown voltage, temperature, and reactive oxygen species. The results show that the plume temperature of PDC plasma is roughly 5-10 °C lower than that of DC plasma in the same conditions. The •OH content of PDC is lower than that of DC plasma, whereas the O content of PDC plasma is higher. The addition of water leads in an increase in the plume temperature and in the production of •OH with two types of power supplies. The production of O inversely shows a declining tendency with higher water ratio. The most important finding is that the PDC plasma with 100% water ratio achieves lower temperature and more abundant production of •OH and O, compared with DC plasma with 0% water ratio.

  7. Temperature-dependent interfacial properties of hydrophobically end-modified poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline)s assemblies at the air/water interface and on solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rodolphe; Park, Jin-Young; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Winnik, Françoise M

    2009-12-15

    We describe herein the properties at the air/water (A/W) interface of hydrophobically end-modified (HM) poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline)s (PiPrOx) bearing an n-octadecyl chain on both termini (telechelic HM-PiPrOx) or on one chain end (semitelechelic HM-PiPrOx) for different subphase temperatures and spreading solvents using the Langmuir film balance technique. The polymer interfacial properties revealed by the pi-A isotherms depend markedly on the architecture and molecular weight of the polymer. On cold water subphases (14 degrees C), diffusion of PiPrOx chains onto water takes place for all polymers in the intermediate compressibility region (5mNm(-1)). At higher subphase temperatures (36 and 48 degrees C), the HM-PiPrOx film exhibited remarkable stability with time. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) imaging of the A/W interface showed that the polymer assembly was not uniform and that large domains formed, either isolated grains or pearl necklaces, depending on the polymer structure, the concentration of the spreading solution and the subphase temperature. The Langmuir films were transferred onto hydrophilic substrates (silica) by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique and onto hydrophobic substrates (gold) by Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) film deposition, resulting in the formation of adsorbed particles ranging in size from 200 to 500nm, depending on the polymer architecture and the substrate temperature. The particles presented "Janus"-like hydrophilic/hydrophobic characteristics.

  8. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Daniel J.; O’Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Nislow, Keith H.; O’Donnell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade−1) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade−1). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network. PMID:26966662

  9. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags.

    PubMed

    Letcher, Benjamin H; Hocking, Daniel J; O'Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R; Nislow, Keith H; O'Donnell, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade(-1)) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade(-1)). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network.

  10. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, Benjamin; Hocking, Daniel; O'Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Nislow, Keith H.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade−1) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade−1). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network.

  11. Effect of temperature on the interfacial behavior of a polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) diblock copolymer at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsok; Cho, Chung Yeon; Hwangbo, Minyoung; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Hong, Soon Man

    2008-03-18

    Monolayers of a polystyrene-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) diblock copolymer at the air-water interface were studied by measuring the surface pressure-area isotherms at several temperatures. Langmuir film balance experiments and atomic force microscopy showed that the diblock copolymer molecules formed surface micelles. In the plot of the surface pressure versus surface area per repeating unit, the monolayer changed from the gas phase to the liquid expanded phase at lower surface pressure for systems at low temperature compared to those at high temperature. In addition, a plateau, corresponding to the transition from the liquid expanded to liquid condensed phase, appeared in that plot at lower surface pressure for systems with a higher subphase (water) temperature. Hysteresis was observed in the compression-expansion cycle process. Increasing the subphase temperature alleviated this hyteresis gap, especially at low surface pressures. The minimum in the plot of the surface pressure versus surface area per repeating unit in the expansion process (which arises from the transition) and the transition plateau appeared more vividly at higher water temperature. These dynamic experimental results show that PS-PMMA diblock copolymers, in which both blocks are insoluble in water, do not form complicated entanglements in two-dimensional space. Although higher water temperature provided more entropy to the chains, and thus more conformational freedom, it did not change the surface morphology of the condensed film because both blocks of PS-PMMA are insoluble in water.

  12. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  13. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  14. Energy from low temperature differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, B. K.

    1985-05-01

    A number of energy conservation and alternative energy approaches utilize a low temperature heat source. Applications in this category include: solar ponds, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), low temperature solar thermal, geothermal, and waste heat recovery and bottoming cycles. Low temperature power extraction techniques are presented and the differences between closed and open Rankine power cycles are discussed. Specific applications and technical areas of current research in OTEC along with a breakdown of plant operating conditions and a rough cost estimate illustrate how the use of low temperature power conversion technology can be cost effective.

  15. Effects of Temperature, Oxygen Level, Ionic Strength, and pH on the Reaction of Benzene with Hydroxyl Radicals at the Air-Water Interface in Comparison to the Bulk Aqueous Phase.

    PubMed

    Heath, Aubrey A; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2015-08-06

    Atmospheric aerosols (e.g., fog droplets) are complex, multiphase mediums. Depending on location, time of day, and/or air mass source, there can be considerable variability within these droplets, relating to temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Due to the droplets' inherently small size, the reactions that occur within these droplets are determined by bulk aqueous phase and air-water interfacial conditions. In this study, the reaction of benzene and hydroxyl radicals is examined kinetically in a thin-film flow-tube reactor. By varying the aqueous volume (e.g., film thickness) along the length of the reactor, both bulk and interfacial reaction rates are measured from a single system. Temperature, pH, and ionic strength are varied to model conditions typical of fog events. Oxygen-poor conditions are measured to study oxygen's overall effect on the reaction pathway. Initial rate activation energies and the bulk aqueous phase and interfacial contributions to the overall rate constant are also obtained.

  16. [Virus adsorption from batch experiments as influenced by air-water interface].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Bing-zi; Zhang, Jia-bao; Zhang, Cong-zhi; Wang, Qiu-ying; Chen, Ji

    2007-12-01

    The presence of air-water interface in batch sorption experiments may result in inaccurate estimation of virus adsorption onto various soils. A batch sorption experiment was conducted to compare the adsorption results of MS2 in different soils under presence/absence of air-water interface. Soils with sterilization/nonterilization treatment were used. Virus recovery efficiency in a blank experiment (no soil) was also evaluated as affected by different amount of air-water interface. The presence of air-water interface altered the results of virus adsorption in different soils with different extent, with Sandy fluvo-aquic soil being the most considerably affected, followed by Red loam soil, and the least being Red clay soil, probably because of different soil properties associated with virus adsorption/inactivation. Soil sterilization resulted in more significant difference of virus adsorption onto the Sandy fluvo-aquic soil between the presence and absence of air-water interface, while a reduced difference was observed in the Red loam soil. The presence of air-water interface significantly decreased virus recovery efficiency, with the values being decreased with increase in the amount of air-water interface. Soil particles likely prohibit viruses from reaching the air-water interface or alter the forces at the solid-water-air interface so that the results from the blank experiment did not truly represent results from control blank, which probably resulted in adsorption difference between presence and absence of the air-water interface.

  17. Coupling of phytoplankton uptake and air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Baker, J.E.; Ko, F.C.; Jeremiason, J.D.

    1999-10-15

    A dynamic model that couples air-water exchange and phytoplankton uptake of persistent organic pollutants has been developed and then applied to PCB data from a small experimental lake. A sensitivity analysis of the model, taking into account the influence of physical environmental conditions such as temperature, wind speed, and mixing depth as well as plankton-related parameters such as biomass and growth rate was carried out for a number of PCBs with different physical-chemical properties. The results indicate that air-water exchange dynamics are influenced not only by physical parameters but also by phytoplankton biomass and growth rate. New phytoplankton production results in substantially longer times to reach equilibrium. Phytoplankton uptake-induced depletion of the dissolved phase concentration maintains air and water phases out of equilibrium. Furthermore, PCBs in phytoplankton also take longer times to reach equilibrium with the dissolved water phase when the latter is supported by diffusive air-water exchange. However, both model analysis and model application to the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario (Canada) suggest that the gas phase supports the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs, in atmospherically driven aquatic environments.

  18. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air/water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Subroutine WETAIR calculates properties at nearly 1,500 K and 4,500 atmospheres. Necessary inputs are assigned values of combinations of density, pressure, temperature, and entropy. Interpolation of property tables obtains dry air and water (steam) properties, and simple mixing laws calculate properties of air/water mixture. WETAIR is used to test gas turbine engines and components operating in relatively humid air. Program is written in SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  19. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  20. Microclimatic Temperature Relationships over Different Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a study of temperature variations over different surfaces in an urban campus setting. Explains that researchers sampled temperatures over grass, bare soil, gravel, concrete, and blacktop. Reports that grassy areas registered the highest morning temperatures and lowest afternoon temperatures. (SG)

  1. Milk whey proteins and xanthan gum interactions in solution and at the air-water interface: a rheokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adrián A; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Patino, Juan M Rodríguez; Rubiolo, Amelia C; Santiago, Liliana G

    2010-11-01

    In this contribution, we present experimental information about the effect of xanthan gum (XG) on the adsorption behaviour of two milk whey protein samples (MWP), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and whey protein concentrate (WPC), at the air-water interface. The MWP concentration studied corresponded to the protein bulk concentration which is able to saturate the air-water interface (1.0 wt%). Temperature, pH and ionic strength of aqueous systems were kept constant at 20 degrees C, pH 7 and 0.05 M, respectively, while the XG bulk concentration varied in the range 0.00-0.25 wt%. Biopolymer interactions in solution were analyzed by extrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy using 1-anilino-8-naphtalene sulphonic acid (ANS) as a protein fluorescence probe. Interfacial biopolymer interactions were evaluated by dynamic tensiometry and surface dilatational rheology. Adsorption behaviour was discussed from a rheokinetic point of view in terms of molecular diffusion, penetration and conformational rearrangement of adsorbed protein residues at the air-water interface. Differences in the interaction magnitude, both in solution and at the interface vicinity, and in the adsorption rheokinetic parameters were observed in MWP/XG mixed systems depending on the protein type (beta-LG or WPC) and biopolymer relative concentration. beta-LG adsorption in XG presence could be promoted by mechanisms based on biopolymer segregative interactions and thermodynamic incompatibility in the interface vicinity, resulting in better surface and viscoelastic properties. The same mechanism could be responsible of WPC interfacial adsorption in the presence of XG. The interfacial functionality of WPC was improved by the synergistic interactions with XG, although WPC chemical complexity might complicate the elucidation of molecular events that govern adsorption dynamics of WPC/XG mixed systems at the air-water interface.

  2. Electron temperature differences and double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C.; Hershkowitz, N.; Lonngren, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Electron temperature differences across plasma double layers are studied experimentally. It is shown that the temperature differences across a double layer can be varied and are not a result of thermalization of the bump-on-tail distribution. The implications of these results for electron thermal energy transport in laser-pellet and tandem-mirror experiments are also discussed.

  3. Capillary forces between sediment particles and an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Lapin, Sergey; Flury, Markus

    2012-04-17

    In the vadose zone, air-water interfaces play an important role in particle fate and transport, as particles can attach to the air-water interfaces by action of capillary forces. This attachment can either retard or enhance the movement of particles, depending on whether the air-water interfaces are stationary or mobile. Here we use three standard PTFE particles (sphere, circular cylinder, and tent) and seven natural mineral particles (basalt, granite, hematite, magnetite, mica, milky quartz, and clear quartz) to quantify the capillary forces between an air-water interface and the different particles. Capillary forces were determined experimentally using tensiometry, and theoretically assuming volume-equivalent spherical, ellipsoidal, and circular cylinder shapes. We experimentally distinguished between the maximum capillary force and the snap-off force when the air-water interface detaches from the particle. Theoretical and experimental values of capillary forces were of similar order of magnitude. The sphere gave the smallest theoretical capillary force, and the circular cylinder had the largest force due to pinning of the air-water interface. Pinning was less pronounced for natural particles when compared to the circular cylinder. Ellipsoids gave the best agreement with measured forces, suggesting that this shape can provide a reasonable estimation of capillary forces for many natural particles.

  4. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  5. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  6. Cationic Gemini surfactant at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Qibin, Chen; Xiaodong, Liang; Shaolei, Wang; Shouhong, Xu; Honglai, Liu; Ying, Hu

    2007-10-15

    The surface properties and structures of a cationic Gemini surfactant with a rigid spacer, p-xylyl-bis(dimethyloctadecylammonium bromide) ([C(18)H(37)(CH(3))(2)N(+)CH(2)C(6)H(4)CH(2)N(+)(CH(3))(2)C(18)H(37)],2Br(-), abbreviated as 18-Ar-18,2Br(-1)), at the air/water interface were investigated. It is found that the surface pressure-molecular area isotherms observed at different temperatures do not exhibit a plateau region but display an unusual "kink" before collapse. The range of the corresponding minimum compressibility and maximum compressibility modulus indicates that the monolayer is in the liquid-expanded state. The monolayers were transferred onto mica and quartz plates by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The structures of monolayers at various surface pressures were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. AFM measurements show that at lower surface pressures, unlike the structures of complex or hybrid films formed by Gemini amphiphiles with DNA, dye, or inorganic materials or the Langmuir film formed by the nonionic Gemini surfactant, in this case network-like labyrinthine interconnected ridges are formed. The formation of the structures can be interpreted in terms of the spinodal decomposition mechanism. With the increase of the surface pressure up to 35 mN/m, surface micelles dispersed in the network-like ridges gradually appear which might be caused by both the spinodal decomposition and dewetting. The UV-vis adsorption shows that over the whole range of surface pressures, the molecules form a J-aggregate in LB films, which implies that the spacers construct a pi-pi aromatic stacking. This pi-pi interaction between spacers and the van der Waals interaction between hydrophobic chains lead to the formation of both networks and micelles. The labyrinthine interconnected ridges are formed first because of the rapid evaporation of solvent during the spreading processes; with increasing surface pressure, some of the

  7. Diffusive exchange of PAHs across the air-water interface of the Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Meng-Der; Lee, Chon-Lin; Jiang, Jheng-Jie; Ko, Fung-Chi; Baker, Joel E

    2012-11-15

    Instantaneous air-water polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exchange fluxes were calculated in 22 pairs of ambient air and water samples from Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, from December 2003 to January 2005. The highest net volatilization (3135 ng m(-2) day(-1)) and absorptive (-1150 ng m(-2) day(-1)) fluxes in the present study were obtained for the three-ring PAH phenanthrene on 7 April and 27 January 2004, respectively. All PAH diffusive fluxes for three-ring PAHs except phenanthrene were mainly volatilization exchange across the air-water interface. Phenanthrene and the four-ring PAHs were absorbed primarily from the atmosphere and deposited to the surface water, although some minor volatilization fluxes were also observed. Differences in flux magnitude and direction between the dry and wet seasons were also evident for PAHs. Strong absorptive/weaker volatilization PAH fluxes occurred in the dry season, but the opposite was found in the wet season. The mean daily PAH diffusive fluxes were an in flux of -635 ng m(-2) day(-1) in the dry season and an efflux of 686 ng m(-2) day(-1) in the wet season. The integrated absorbed and emitted fluxes of PAHs for harbor lagoon surface waters in the dry and wet seasons were 3.1 kg and 3.4 kg, respectively. Different from water bodies located in temperate zone, phenanthrene diffusive fluxes in Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon was favored in volatilization from surface waters during the wet season (April to September) because of scavenging by precipitation and dilution by prevailing southwesterly winds. In addition, this study used both of salinity and temperature to improve estimation of Henry's law constants (H) of PAHs in a tropical coastal area and show that correction for salinity produced 13-15% of differences in H values.

  8. Effect of particle shape on capillary forces acting on particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Flury, Markus

    2013-06-25

    The capillary forces exerted by moving air-water interfaces can dislodge particles from stationary surfaces. The magnitude of the capillary forces depends on particle shape, orientation, and surface properties, such as contact angle and roughness. The objective was to quantify, both experimentally and theoretically, capillary force variations as an air-water interface moves over the particles. We measured capillary forces as a function of position, i.e., force-position curves, on particles of different shape by using force tensiometry. The particles (5 mm nominal size) were made of polyacrylate and were fabricated using a 3D printer. Experimental measurements were compared with theoretical calculations. We found that force-position curves could be classified into in three categories according to particle shapes: (1) curves for particles with round cross sections, such as spheroidal particles, (2) curves for particles with fixed cross sections, such cylindrical or cubical particles, and (3) curves for particles with tapering cross sections, such as prismatic or tetrahedral particles. Spheroidal particles showed a continuously varying capillary force. Cylindrical or cubical particles showed pronounced pinning of the air-water interface line at edges. The pinning led to an increased capillary force, which was relaxed when the interface snapped off from the edges. Particles with tapering cross section did not show pinning and showed reduced capillary forces as the air-water interface line perimeter and displacement cross section continuously decrease when the air-water interface moved over the particles.

  9. WETAIR: A computer code for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of air-water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program subroutine, WETAIR, was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of air water mixtures. It determines the thermodynamic state from assigned values of temperature and density, pressure and density, temperature and pressure, pressure and entropy, or pressure and enthalpy. The WETAIR calculates the properties of dry air and water (steam) by interpolating to obtain values from property tables. Then it uses simple mixing laws to calculate the properties of air water mixtures. Properties of mixtures with water contents below 40 percent (by mass) can be calculated at temperatures from 273.2 to 1497 K and pressures to 450 MN/sq m. Dry air properties can be calculated at temperatures as low as 150 K. Water properties can be calculated at temperatures to 1747 K and pressures to 100 MN/sq m. The WETAIR is available in both SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  10. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  11. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (<1.5%). Among the different colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  12. Surface behavior of malonic acid adsorption at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Blower, Patrick G; Shamay, Eric; Kringle, Loni; Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-03-28

    The presence of organic materials adsorbed to the surfaces of aerosol particles has been demonstrated to be a determining factor in relevant atmospheric processes. Malonic acid is a small, water-soluble organic acid that is common in aerosols and is surface-active. A comprehensive investigation of the adsorption of malonic acid to the air/water interface was accomplished using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) and surface tension measurements as functions of concentration and pH. Malonic acid was found to be weakly solvated at the air/water interface, and its orientation as a function of concentration was explored through different VSFS polarization schemes. pH-dependent experiments revealed that the surface-active species is the fully protonated species. Computational analyses were used to obtain depth-specific geometries of malonic acid at the air/water interface that confirm and enrich the experimental results.

  13. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  14. Powder wettability at a static air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Julien; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2015-06-15

    The reconstitution of a beverage from a dehydrated powder involves several physical mechanisms that determine the practical difficulty to obtain a homogeneous drink in a convenient way and within an acceptable time for the preparation of a beverage. When pouring powder onto static water, the first hurdle to overcome is the air-water interface. We propose a model to predict the percentage of powder crossing the interface in 45 s, namely the duration relevant for this application. We highlight theoretically the determinant role of the contact angle and of the particle size distribution. We validate experimentally the model for single spheres and use it to predict the wettability performance of commercial food powders for different contact angles and particles sizes. A good agreement is obtained when comparing the predictions and the wettability of the tested powders.

  15. Morphological variation of stimuli-responsive polypeptide at air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sungchul; Ahn, Sungmin; Cheng, Jie; Chang, Hyejin; Jung, Dae-Hong; Hyun, Jinho

    2016-12-01

    The morphological variation of stimuli-responsive polypeptide molecules at the air-water interface as a function of temperature and compression was described. The surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms of an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) monolayer were obtained under variable external conditions, and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers were deposited onto a mica substrate for characterization. As the compression of the ELP monolayer increased, the surface pressure increased gradually, indicating that the ELP monolayer could be prepared with high stability at the air-water interface. The temperature in the subphase of the ELP monolayer was critical in the preparation of LB monolayers. The change in temperature induced a shift in the π-A isotherms as well as a change in ELP secondary structures. Surprisingly, the compression of the ELP monolayer influenced the ELP secondary structure due to the reduction in the phase transition temperature with decreasing temperature. The change in the ELP secondary structure formed at the air-water interface was investigated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Moreover, the morphology of the ELP monolayer was subsequently imaged using atomic force microscopy. The temperature responsive behavior resulted in changes in surface morphology from relatively flat structures to rugged labyrinth structures, which suggested conformational changes in the ELP monolayers.

  16. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  17. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-12-31

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B{sub sn}, versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35{Angstrom} and 3.85{Angstrom}. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased.

  18. Air-water gas exchange of toxaphene in Lake Superior.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F

    2003-06-01

    Parallel air and water samples were collected in Lake Superior during August 1996 and May 1997, to determine the levels and air-water exchange direction of toxaphene. Concentration of toxaphene in water did not vary across Lake Superior or between seasons (averaging 918 +/- 218 pg/L) but atmospheric levels were lower in May (12 +/- 4.6 pg/m3) than in August (28 +/- 10 pg/m3). Two recalcitrant congeners, Parlar 26 and 50, also were determined. These congeners were enriched in the air samples, compared to a standard of technical toxaphene, but not in the water. Water-air fugacity ratios varied from 1.4 to 2.6 in August and 1.3 to 4.7 in May, implying volatilization of toxaphene from the lake. Estimated net fluxes ranged from 5.4 to 13 and 1.8 to 6.4 nm/m2d, respectively. The temperature dependence of toxaphene partial pressure (P) in air was log P/Pa = -3.291/T(a) + 1.67, where T(a) is air temperature. By using this relationship, the atmospheric levels of toxaphene, fugacity ratios, and net fluxes were estimated for the entire year. Fugacity ratios were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer; thus toxaphene was predicted to undergo net volatilization from the lake during all months. A net removal of approximately 220 kg/year by gas exchange was estimated.

  19. Meaning of temperature in different thermostatistical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Peter; Hilbert, Stefan; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-03-28

    Depending on the exact experimental conditions, the thermodynamic properties of physical systems can be related to one or more thermostatistical ensembles. Here, we survey the notion of thermodynamic temperature in different statistical ensembles, focusing in particular on subtleties that arise when ensembles become non-equivalent. The 'mother' of all ensembles, the microcanonical ensemble, uses entropy and internal energy (the most fundamental, dynamically conserved quantity) to derive temperature as a secondary thermodynamic variable. Over the past century, some confusion has been caused by the fact that several competing microcanonical entropy definitions are used in the literature, most commonly the volume and surface entropies introduced by Gibbs. It can be proved, however, that only the volume entropy satisfies exactly the traditional form of the laws of thermodynamics for a broad class of physical systems, including all standard classical Hamiltonian systems, regardless of their size. This mathematically rigorous fact implies that negative 'absolute' temperatures and Carnot efficiencies more than 1 are not achievable within a standard thermodynamical framework. As an important offspring of microcanonical thermostatistics, we shall briefly consider the canonical ensemble and comment on the validity of the Boltzmann weight factor. We conclude by addressing open mathematical problems that arise for systems with discrete energy spectra.

  20. The existence of longitudinal vortices in the flow of air above an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, J.; Saylor, J. R.

    2009-11-01

    Many researchers have observed the formation of longitudinal vortices in boundary layers developing over heated solid surfaces. In the present work, such vortices were observed in an air boundary layer developing over a heated water surface. The existence of these vortices was documented via infrared imaging of the water surface, which showed a consistent pattern of hot and cold streaks, coinciding with the vortex position. These vortices were also visualized through smoke injected into the air-side flow. The onset position Xc and lateral vortex spacing λ were investigated for a range of wind speeds (0.1 - 1 m/s) and air/water temperature differences (26 - 42 ^oC). Plots of Xc/λ versus the Reynolds number exhibit power-law behavior similar to that of prior work on boundary layers over heated solid surfaces. However, plots of Xc/λ versus the Grashof number show significant differences from the power-law behavior observed for heated solid plates. A theory explaining the similarity and difference between the present results and those for heated solid plates is discussed which is based on differences in the thermal boundary conditions.

  1. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-07

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements.

  2. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  3. Air-water interface equilibrium partitioning coefficients of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Chu, Fu-Sui; Liou, Jia-Jiunn

    The single equilibration technique was used to determine the equilibrium partitioning coefficients ( pc) of an air-water interface for target aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene. The tested liquid concentrations ( CL) of VOC ranged from 0.5 to 20 mg/l, and the temperatures ( Tw) of the solutions were 300, 305, 310 and 315 K, respectively. The pc values were calculated using the gaseous concentrations ( Cg*) of aromatic hydrocarbons in equilibrium with the aqueous phase and the formula pc=( Cg*/ CL). The heats of VOC of liquid and gaseous phase transfer (Δ Htr) in pure water, and the highly linear regression relationship (with squared correlation coefficients, R2, from 0.900 to 0.999) between ( ln C g*) and (1/ Tw) are also evaluated. Experimental results indicated that the pc values of the target VOC components increase with Tw but, in contrast, are not significantly affected by CL in pure water. However, pc of more soluble compounds, like iso-propanol and methyl ethyl ketone, have been evaluated to be significant with CL in the earlier investigation. Finally, the co-solute effect on pc is also evaluated in this work, as determining pc of the aromatic hydrocarbons by using aqueous ethanol (in a volume ration of 1-15%) as solutes.

  4. Air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated soils: Evaluation of interfacial domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2002-10-01

    A gas-phase miscible-displacement method, using decane as an interfacial tracer, was used to measure air-water interfacial areas for a sand with water contents ranging from ˜2% to 20%. The expected trend of decreasing interfacial areas with increasing water contents was observed. The maximum estimated interfacial area of 19,500 cm-1 appears reasonable given it is smaller than the measured surface area of the porous medium (60,888 cm-1). Comparison of the experimental data presented herein with literature data provided further insight into the characterization of the air-water interface in unsaturated porous media. Specifically, comparison of interfacial areas measured using gas-phase versus aqueous-phase methods indicates that the gas-phase method generally yields larger interfacial areas than the aqueous-phase methods, even when accounting for differences in water content and physical properties of the porous media. The observations are consistent with proposed differences in interfacial accessibility of the aqueous- and gas-phase tracers. Evaluation of the data in light of functional interfacial domains, described herein, yields the hypothesis that aqueous interfacial tracers measure primarily air-water interfaces formed by "capillary water," while gas-phase tracers measure air-water interfaces formed by both capillary and surface-adsorbed (film) water. The gas- and aqueous-phase methods may each provide interfacial area information that is more relevant to specific problems of interest. For example, gas-phase interfacial area measurements may be most relevant to contaminant transport in unsaturated systems, where retention at the air-water interface may be significant. Conversely, the aqueous-phase methods may yield information with direct bearing on multiphase flow processes that are dominated by capillary-phase behavior.

  5. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  6. Impact of artificial monolayer application on stored water quality at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pittaway, P; Martínez-Alvarez, V; Hancock, N; Gallego-Elvira, B

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation mitigation has the potential to significantly improve water use efficiency, with repeat applications of artificial monolayer formulations the most cost-effective strategy for large water storages. Field investigations of the impact of artificial monolayers on water quality have been limited by wind and wave turbulence, and beaching. Two suspended covers differing in permeability to wind and light were used to attenuate wind turbulence, to favour the maintenance of a condensed monolayer at the air/water interface of a 10 m diameter tank. An octadecanol formulation was applied twice-weekly to one of two covered tanks, while a third clean water tank remained uncovered for the 14-week duration of the trial. Microlayer and subsurface water samples were extracted once a week to distinguish impacts associated with the installation of covers, from the impact of prolonged monolayer application. The monolayer was selectively toxic to some phytoplankton, but the toxicity of hydrocarbons leaching from a replacement liner had a greater impact. Monolayer application did not increase water temperature, humified dissolved organic matter, or the biochemical oxygen demand, and did not reduce dissolved oxygen. The impact of an octadecanol monolayer on water quality and the microlayer may not be as detrimental as previously considered.

  7. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  8. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  9. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  10. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.

  11. Propagation of density disturbances in air-water flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassos, G. P.

    1969-01-01

    Study investigated the behavior of density waves propagating vertically in an atmospheric pressure air-water system using a technique based on the correlation between density change and electric resistivity. This information is of interest to industries working with heat transfer systems and fluid power and control systems.

  12. Rheology and microrheology of materials at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Robert Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The study of materials at the air-water interface is an important area of research in soft condensed matter physics. Films at the air-water interface have been a system of interest to physics, chemistry and biology for the last 20 years. The unique properties of these surface films provide ideal models for 2-d films, surface chemistry and provide a platform for creating 2 dimensional analogue materials to cellular membranes. Measurements of the surface rheology of cross-linked F-actin networks associated with a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface of a Langmuir monolayer have been performed. The rheological measurements are made using a Couette cell. These data demonstrate that the network has a finite elastic modulus that grows as a function of the cross-linking concentration. We also note that under steady-state flow the system behaves as a power law fluid in which the effective viscosity decreases with imposed shear. A Langmuir monolayer trough that is equipped for simultaneous microrheology and standard rheology measurements has been constructed. The central elements are the trough itself with a full range of optical tools accessing the air-water interface from below the trough and a portable knife-edge torsion pendulum that can access the interface from above. The ability to simultaneously measure the mechanical response of Langmuir monolayers on very different length scales is an important step for our understanding of the mechanical response of two-dimensional viscoelastic networks. The optical tweezer microrheometer is used to study the micromechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers. Microrheology measurements are made a variety of surface pressures that correspond to different ordered phases of the monolayer. The complex shear modulus shows an order of magnitude increase for the liquid condensed phase of DPPC compared to the liquid expanded phase.

  13. Radically Different Kinetics at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Ian

    2014-06-01

    The use of the CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme, or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique coupled with pulsed laser photochemical kinetics methods has shown that reactions involving radicals can be very rapid at temperatures down to 10 K or below. The results have had a major impact in astrochemistry and planetology, as well as proving an exacting test for theory. The technique has also been applied to the formation of transient complexes of interest both in atmospheric chemistry and combustion. Until now, all of the chemical reactions studied in this way have taken place on attractive potential energy surfaces with no overall barrier to reaction. The F + H2 {→} HF + H reaction does possess a substantial energetic barrier ({\\cong} 800 K), and might therefore be expected to slow to a negligible rate at very low temperatures. In fact, this H-atom abstraction reaction does take place efficiently at low temperatures due entirely to tunneling. I will report direct experimental measurements of the rate of this reaction down to a temperature of 11 K, in remarkable agreement with state-of-the-art quantum reactive scattering calculations by François Lique (Université du Havre) and Millard Alexander (University of Maryland). It is thought that long chain cyanopolyyne molecules H(C2)nCN may play an important role in the formation of the orange haze layer in Titan's atmosphere. The longest carbon chain molecule observed in interstellar space, HC11N, is also a member of this series. I will present new results, obtained in collaboration with Jean-Claude Guillemin (Ecole de Chimie de Rennes) and Stephen Klippenstein (Argonne National Labs), on reactions of C2H, CN and C3N radicals (using a new LIF scheme by Hoshina and Endo which contribute to the low temperature formation of (cyano)polyynes. H. Sabbah, L. Biennier, I. R. Sims, Y. Georgievskii, S. J. Klippenstein, I. W. M. Smith, Science 317, 102 (2007). S. D. Le Picard, M

  14. Kinetics of adsorption of whey proteins and hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose mixtures at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Oscar E; Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio; Pilosof, Ana M R; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this research is to quantify the competitive adsorption of a whey protein concentrate (WPC) and hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose (HPMC so called E4M, E50LV and F4M) at the air-water interface by means of dynamic surface tensiometry and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). These biopolymers are often used together in many food applications. The concentration of both protein and HPMC, and the WPC/HPMC ratio in the aqueous bulk phase were variables, while pH (7), the ionic strength (0.05 M) and temperature (20 degrees C) were kept constant. The differences observed between mixed systems were in accordance with the relative bulk concentration of these biopolymers (C(HPMC) and C(WPC)) and the molecular structure of HPMC. At short adsorption times, the results show that under conditions where both WPC and HPMC could saturate the air-water interface on their own or when C(HPMC) > or = C(WPC), the polysaccharide dominates the surface. At concentrations where none of the biopolymers was able to saturate the interface, a synergistic behavior was observed for HPMC with lower surface activity (E50LV and F4M), while a competitive adsorption was observed for E4M (the HPMC with the highest surface activity). At long-term adsorption the rate of penetration controls the adsorption of mixed components. The results reflect complex competitive/synergistic phenomena under conditions of thermodynamic compatibility or in the presence of a "depletion mechanism". Finally, the order in which the different components reach the interface will influence the surface composition and the film properties.

  15. Anisotropic orientational motion of molecular adsorbates at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zimdars, D.; Dadap, J.I.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Heinz, T.F.

    1999-04-29

    The ultrafast orientational motions of coumarin 314 (C314) adsorbed at the air/water interface were investigated by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TRSHG). The theory and method of using TRSHG to detect both out-of-plane and in-plane orientational motions are discussed. The interfacial solute motions were found to be anisotropic, with differing out-of-plane and in-plane reorientation time constants. This report presents the first direct observation of in-plane orientational motion of a molecule (C314) at the air/water interface using TRSHG. The in-plane reorientation time constant is 600 {+-} 40 ps. The out-of-plane reorientation time constant is 350 {+-} 20 ps. The out-of-plane orientational motion of C314 is similar to the previous results on rhodamine 6G at the air/water interface which indicated increased interfacial friction compared with bulk aqueous solution. The surface reorientation times are 2--3 times slower than the bulk isotropic orientational diffusion time.

  16. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  17. Air-water gas exchange of mercury in the Bay Saint François wetlands: Observation and model parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong H.; Poissant, Laurier; Xu, Xiaohong; Pilote, Martin; Beauvais, Conrad; Amyot, Marc; Garcia, Edenise; Laroulandie, Jerome

    2006-09-01

    Total gaseous mercury (TGM) air-water flux measurements were taken using a dynamic flux chamber (DFC) coupled with a gaseous mercury (Hg) analyzer at the Bay St. François (BSF) wetlands (Quebec, Canada) in summer 2003. The measured TGM fluxes over water exhibited a consistent diurnal pattern, with maximum emissions during daytime and minimum fluxes occurring at night. Pearson correlation analysis showed that solar radiation was the most influential environmental parameter in TGM air-water exchange. Significant correlations were also found between TGM fluxes and 1 hour time-lagged water temperature, indicating the enhancement of fluxes by bacterial activities or chemical reactions. The concentrations of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) in water were measured during the 2003 sampling period and indicated that DGM was always supersaturated, which implied that the water body acted primarily as a source of mercury to the atmosphere. Several empirical models of mercury air-water gas exchange were developed and evaluated. Compared to the published models, these proposed models were capable of producing good results, leading to a better agreement between the measured and modeled fluxes (improvements by 48-98%). Among these empirical models, the ones linking TGM fluxes with net radiation were superior because of their strong predictive capability. Two preferred models were selected for air-water TGM flux estimation from Lake St. Pierre's surrounding wetlands. These two models yield a mean emission of 0.19-0.24 kg mercury during May-September each year from 1999 to 2003.

  18. Anomalous Transmission of Infrasound Through Air-Water and Air-Ground Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, O. A.

    2009-05-01

    Speed of compressional waves in air is smaller than in water and in the ground, while mass density of air is much smaller than mass densities of water and the ground. This results in a very strong acoustic impedance contrast at air-water and air-ground interfaces. Sound transmission through a boundary with a strong impedance contrast is normally very weak. This paper reports theoretical studies of the power output of localized sound sources and acoustic power fluxes through plane gas-liquid and gas-solid interfaces in a layered medium. It is found that the transparency of the interfaces increases dramatically at low frequencies. For low-frequency sound, a phenomenon of anomalous transparency can occur where most of the acoustic power generated by a source in water is radiated into the atmosphere. Contrary to the conventional wisdom based on ray-theoretical predictions and observations at higher frequencies, infrasonic energy from localized waterborne sources can be effectively transmitted into air. The main physical mechanism responsible for the anomalous transparency of air-water interface is found to be an acoustic power transfer by inhomogeneous (evanescent) waves in the plane-wave decomposition of the acoustic field in water. The effects of ocean and atmosphere stratification and of guided sound propagation in water or in air on the anomalous transparency of the air-water interface are considered. In the case of air-ground interface, the increase of the acoustic power flux into atmosphere, when a compact source approaches the interface from below, proves to be even larger than for an underwater source. The physics behind the increase of the power flux into the atmosphere, when the source depth decreases, is shown to be rather different for the air-ground and air-water interfaces. Depending on attenuation of compressional and shear waves in the ground, a leaky interface wave supported by the air-ground interface can be responsible for the bulk of acoustic power

  19. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. 1274... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.926 Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative agreement or...

  20. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces.

  1. Influence of Gas Turbulence on the Instability of an Air-Water Mixing Layer.

    PubMed

    Matas, Jean-Philippe; Marty, Sylvain; Dem, Mohamed Seydou; Cartellier, Alain

    2015-08-14

    We present the first evidence of the direct influence of gas turbulence on the shear instability of a planar air-water mixing layer. We show with two different experiments that increasing the level of velocity fluctuations in the gas phase continuously increases the frequency of the instability, up to a doubling of frequency for the largest turbulence intensity investigated. A modified spatiotemporal stability analysis taking turbulence into account via a simple Reynolds stress closure provides the right trend and magnitude for this effect.

  2. Air-water ‘tornado’-type microwave plasmas applied for sugarcane biomass treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lino da Silva, M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Amorim, J.

    2014-02-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol from sugarcane biomass is an attractive alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Pretreatment is needed to separate the cellulosic material, which is packed with hemicellulose and lignin in cell wall of sugarcane biomass. A microwave ‘tornado’-type air-water plasma source operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been applied for this purpose. Samples of dry and wet biomass (˜2 g) have been exposed to the late afterglow plasma stream. The experiments demonstrate that the air-water highly reactive plasma environment provides a number of long-lived active species able to destroy the cellulosic wrapping. Scanning electron microscopy has been applied to analyse the morphological changes occurring due to plasma treatment. The effluent gas streams have been analysed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Optical emission spectroscopy and FT-IR have been applied to determine the gas temperature in the discharge and late afterglow plasma zones, respectively. The optimal range of the operational parameters is discussed along with the main active species involved in the treatment process. Synergistic effects can result from the action of singlet O2(a 1Δg) oxygen, NO2, nitrous acid HNO2 and OH hydroxyl radical.

  3. Aqueous solubility, Henry's law constants and air/water partition coefficients of n-octane and two halogenated octanes.

    PubMed

    Sarraute, S; Delepine, H; Costa Gomes, M F; Majer, V

    2004-12-01

    New data on the aqueous solubility of n-octane, 1-chlorooctane and 1-bromooctane are reported between 1 degree C and 45 degrees C. Henry's law constants, K(H), and air/water partition coefficients, K(AW), were calculated by associating the measured solubility values to vapor pressures taken from literature. The mole fraction aqueous solubility varies between (1.13-1.60)x10(-7) for n-octane with a minimum at approximately 23 degrees C, (3.99-5.07)x10(-7) for 1-chlorooctane increasing monotonically with temperature and (1.60-3.44)x10(-7) for 1-bromooctane with a minimum near 18 degrees C. The calculated air-water partition coefficients increase with temperature and are two orders of magnitude lower for the halogenated derivatives compared to octane. The precision of the results, taken as the average absolute deviations of the aqueous solubility, the Henry's law constants, or the air/water partition coefficients, from appropriate smoothing equations as a function of temperature is of 3% for n-octane and of 2% and 4% for 1-chlorooctane and 1-bromooctane, respectively. A new apparatus based on the dynamic saturation column method was used for the solubility measurements. Test measurements with n-octane indicated the capability of measuring solubilities between 10(-6) and 10(-10) in mole fraction, with an estimated accuracy better than +/-10%. A thorough thermodynamic analysis of converting measured data to air/water partition coefficients is presented.

  4. Polydopamine Films from the Forgotten Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Florian; Payamyar, Payam; Schneider, Anne; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bour, Jérôme; Addiego, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie-Pierre; Hemmerle, Joseph; Ball, Vincent

    2014-10-02

    The formation of polydopamine under mild oxidation conditions from dopamine solutions with mechanical agitation leads to the formation of films that can functionalize all kinds of materials. In the absence of stirring of the solution, we report the formation of polydopamine films at the air/water interface (PDA A/W) and suggest that it arises from an homogeneous nucleation process. These films grow two times faster than in solution and can be deposited on hydrophilic or hydrophobic substrates by the Langmuir-Schaeffer technique. Thanks to this new method, porous and hydrophobic materials like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes can be completely covered with a 35 nm thick PDA A/W film after only 3h of reaction. Finally the oxidation of a monomer followed by a polymerization in water is not exclusive to polydopamine since we also transferred polyaniline functional films from the air/water interface to solid substrates. These findings suggest that self-assembly from a solution containing hydrophilic monomers undergoing a chemical transformation (here oxidation and oligomerization) could be a general method to produce films at the liquid/air interface.

  5. Interfacial characterization of Pluronic PE9400 at biocompatible (air-water and limonene-water) interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis M; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Ramírez, Pablo; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Muñoz, José

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we provide an accurate characterization of non-ionic triblock copolymer Pluronic PE9400 at the air-water and limonene-water interfaces, comprising a systematic analysis of surface tension isotherms, dynamic curves, dilatational rheology and desorption profiles. The surface pressure isotherms display two different slopes of the Π-c plot suggesting the existence of two adsorption regimes for PE9400 at both interfaces. Application of a theoretical model, which assumes the coexistence of different adsorbed states characterized by their molar areas, allows quantification of the conformational changes occurring at the adsorbed layer, indentifying differences between the conformations adopted at the air-water and the limonene-water interface. The presence of two maxima in the dilatational modulus vs. interfacial pressure importantly corroborates this conformational change from a 2D flat conformation to 3D brush one. Moreover, the dilatational response provides mechanical diferences between the interfacial layers formed at the two interfaces analyzed. Dynamic surface pressure data were transformed into a dimensionless form and fitted to another model which considers the influence of the reorganization process on the adsorption dynamics. Finally, the desorption profiles reveal that Pluronic PE9400 is irreversibly adsorbed at both interfaces regardless of the interfacial conformation and nature of the interface. The systematic characterization presented in this work provides important new findings on the interfacial properties of pluronics which can be applied in the rational development of new products, such as biocompatible limonene-based emulsions and/or microemulsions.

  6. Surface properties and morphology of mixed POSS-DPPC monolayers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Monika; Skrzypiec, Marta; Prochaska, Krystyna

    2017-02-01

    From the point of view of the possible medical applications of POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes), it is crucial to analyse interactions occurring between POSS and model biological membrane at molecular level. Knowledge of the interaction between POSS and DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) allows prediction of the impact of POSS contained in biomaterials or cosmetics on a living organism. In the study presented, the surface properties and morphology of Langmuir monolayers formed by mixtures of POSS and the phospholipid (DPPC) at the air/water surface are examined. We selected two POSS derivatives, with completely different chemical structure of substituents attached to the corner of the silicon open cage, which allowed the analysis of the impact of the character of organic moieties (strongly hydrophobic or clearly hydrophilic) on the order of POSS molecules and their tendency to form self-aggregates at the air/water surface. POSS derivatives significantly changed the profile of the π-A isotherms obtained for DPPC but in different ways. On the basis of the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analysed in terms of compression modulus (Cs(-1)), excess Gibbs free energy (ΔGexc), activity coefficients (γ) and interaction parameter (ξ). The results obtained indicate the existence of two different interaction mechanisms between DPPC and POSS which depend on the chemical character of moieties present in POSS molecules.

  7. Ground surface temperature simulation for different land covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herb, William R.; Janke, Ben; Mohseni, Omid; Stefan, Heinz G.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryA model for predicting temperature time series for dry and wet land surfaces is described, as part of a larger project to assess the impact of urban development on the temperature of surface runoff and coldwater streams. Surface heat transfer processes on impervious and pervious land surfaces were investigated for both dry and wet weather periods. The surface heat transfer equations were combined with a numerical approximation of the 1-D unsteady heat diffusion equation to calculate pavement and soil temperature profiles to a depth of 10 m. Equations to predict the magnitude of the radiative, convective, conductive and evaporative heat fluxes at a dry or wet surface, using standard climate data as input, were developed. A model for the effect of plant canopies on surface heat transfer was included for vegetated land surfaces. Given suitable climate data, the model can simulate the land surface and sub-surface temperatures continuously throughout a six month time period or for a single rainfall event. Land surface temperatures have been successfully simulated for pavements, bare soil, short and tall grass, a forest, and two agricultural crops (corn and soybeans). The simulations were run for three different locations in US, and different years as imposed by the availability of measured soil temperature and climate data. To clarify the effect of land use on surface temperatures, the calibrated coefficients for each land use and the same soil coefficients were used to simulate surface temperatures for a six year climate data set from Albertville, MN. Asphalt and concrete give the highest surface temperatures, as expected, while vegetated surfaces gave the lowest. Bare soil gives surface temperatures that lie between those for pavements and plant-covered surfaces. The soil temperature model predicts hourly surface temperatures of bare soil and pavement with root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of 1-2 °C, and hourly surface temperatures of vegetation-covered surfaces

  8. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF HOT JUPITERS: DAYSIDE–NIGHTSIDE TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Showman, Adam P.

    2016-04-10

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here, we present a three-dimensional model that explains this relationship, in order to provide insight into the processes that control heat redistribution in tidally locked planetary atmospheres. This three-dimensional model combines predictive analytic theory for the atmospheric circulation and dayside–nightside temperature differences over a range of equilibrium temperatures, atmospheric compositions, and potential frictional drag strengths with numerical solutions of the circulation that verify this analytic theory. The theory shows that the longitudinal propagation of waves mediates dayside–nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres, analogous to the wave adjustment mechanism that regulates the thermal structure in Earth’s tropics. These waves can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either radiative cooling or potential frictional drag. This frictional drag would likely be caused by Lorentz forces in a partially ionized atmosphere threaded by a background magnetic field, and would increase in strength with increasing temperature. Additionally, the amplitude of radiative heating and cooling increases with increasing temperature, and hence both radiative heating/cooling and frictional drag damp waves more efficiently with increasing equilibrium temperature. Radiative heating and cooling play the largest role in controlling dayside–nightside temperature differences in both our analytic theory and numerical simulations, with frictional drag only being important if it is stronger than the Coriolis force. As a result, dayside–nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres increase with increasing stellar irradiation and decrease with increasing pressure.

  9. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside-Nightside Temperature Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Showman, Adam P.

    2016-04-01

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here, we present a three-dimensional model that explains this relationship, in order to provide insight into the processes that control heat redistribution in tidally locked planetary atmospheres. This three-dimensional model combines predictive analytic theory for the atmospheric circulation and dayside-nightside temperature differences over a range of equilibrium temperatures, atmospheric compositions, and potential frictional drag strengths with numerical solutions of the circulation that verify this analytic theory. The theory shows that the longitudinal propagation of waves mediates dayside-nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres, analogous to the wave adjustment mechanism that regulates the thermal structure in Earth’s tropics. These waves can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either radiative cooling or potential frictional drag. This frictional drag would likely be caused by Lorentz forces in a partially ionized atmosphere threaded by a background magnetic field, and would increase in strength with increasing temperature. Additionally, the amplitude of radiative heating and cooling increases with increasing temperature, and hence both radiative heating/cooling and frictional drag damp waves more efficiently with increasing equilibrium temperature. Radiative heating and cooling play the largest role in controlling dayside-nightside temperature differences in both our analytic theory and numerical simulations, with frictional drag only being important if it is stronger than the Coriolis force. As a result, dayside-nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres increase with increasing stellar irradiation and decrease with increasing pressure.

  10. Local temperature differences in relation to weather parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogren, J.; Gustavsson, T.; Postgård, U.

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to focus on the influence of clouds and wind on air and road surface temperature variations between different types of local climate environments. The study area covers 160×130 km2 and includes 35 field stations in the Swedish Road Weather Information System (RWIS) and two synoptic weather stations. By combining data from the two sources, the spatial and temporal variations in air and road surface temperature have been analysed. In the first part of this paper the theoretical influence of different weather parameters is determined. In the empirical part of the study, a validation of the theoretical result is assessed using temperature and weather data from the study area. The results show that it is possible to calculate the temperature variations in relation to topographical siting and different weather factors. During day-time conditions, the effect of screening from the sun has a significant influence on the road surface temperature, even with cloudiness amounting to 4-6 octas, provided that the solar elevation is high. During night-time, the potential for pooling of cold air is determined by cloud cover and wind speed. When cloudy situations prevail during night-time, neutral stability is dominant resulting in a decrease with increasing altitude for both air and surface temperatures. Road surface temperatures, however, have a lower correlation with altitude than air temperature. The variation in surface temperature decreases with altitude is also larger and has a more even distribution than the air temperature decrease with altitude. Wind speed was not an important factor for the variation in surface temperature decrease with altitude, but insolation from the sun during day-time is one parameter to consider.

  11. Temperature transport in Lysimeters – comparison of different setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Ulrich; Weber, Katja; Seyfarth, Manfred; Reth, Sascha

    2015-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are designed to mimick the undisturbed soil for the study of soil processes. Ecological and chemical processes are influenced by temperature and therefore it is mandatory that the temperature regime in the lysimeter follows closely the natural conditions. Unfortunately the lysimeter has a lower boundary that cuts off the natural dampening temperature flux. Also the walls of the vessel can transport temperature in a higher rate than the soil would do. And the exchange with the surrounding air at the installation facility may add a bias to the temperature regime in the lysimeter vessels. To test the influence of the wall and the lower boundary we have set up a lysimeter experiment with three different lysimeters. These are all 1m² surface by 2 m depth vessels, identically filled with a sandy loam. All three were instrumented with temperature sensors in 4 depths, and at each depth with 4 sensors, with a distance of 2,5 cm; 5 cm; 10 cm and 15 cm from the wall. In addition, temperature sensors in the surrounding soil and air temperature in the lysimeter containment are available. The three vessels differ in their setup and material. One vessel is a standard stainless steel vessel with seepage boundary, the second is stainless steel with isolation and a controlled lower boundary. This vessel has a tube system at the bottom that circulates water in the vessel and the surrounding soil at the same depth. The control ascertains that the bottom temperature of the lysimeter vessel is always the same as in the surrounding soil. The third vessel is made of PE, in order to minimize temperature transport in the wall material. The data so far shows little difference between the alternative setup. It seems that in a well closed lysimeter containment the temperature regime is sufficiently close to the natural soil. This is especially true for the top soil where most biological and chemical processes occur.

  12. Temperature Rise during Resin Composite Polymerization under Different Ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Yondem, Isa; Altintas, Subutay Han; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure temperature increase induced by various light polymerizing units during resin composite polymerization beneath one of three types of ceramic restorations. Methods: The resin composite (Variolink II) was polymerized between one of three different ceramic specimens (zirconium oxide, lithium disilicate, feldspathic) (diameter 5 mm, height 2 mm) and a dentin disc (diameter 5 mm, height 1 mm) with a conventional halogen light, a high intensity halogen light, or an LED unit. The temperature rise was measured under the dentin disc with a J-type thermocouple wire connected to a data logger. Ten measurements were carried out for each group. The difference between the initial and highest temperature readings was taken and the 10 calculated temperature changes were averaged to determine the mean value in temperature rise. Two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data (polymerizing unit, ceramic brand) for significant differences. The Tukey HSD test was used to perform multiple comparisons (α=.05). Results: Temperature rise did not vary significantly depending on the light polymerizing unit used (P=.16), however, the type of ceramic system showed a significant effect on temperature increases (P<.01). There were no statistically significant differences between lithium disilicate and feldspathic ceramic systems (P >.05); in comparison, the resin composite polymerized under the zirconium oxide ceramic system induced a significantly lower temperature increase than the other ceramic systems tested (P<.05) Conclusions: The resin composite polymerized beneath zirconium oxide ceramic system induced significantly smaller temperature changes. The maximal temperature increase detected in all groups in this study was not viewed as critical for pulpal health. PMID:21769272

  13. Dayside-Nightside Temperature Differences in Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-12-01

    The infrared phase curves of low-eccentricity transiting hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing flux amplitude, or increasing day-night temperature difference, with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here we utilize atmospheric circulation modeling and analytic theory to understand this trend, and the more general question: what processes control heat redistribution in tidally-locked giant planet atmospheres? We performed a wide range of 3D numerical simulations of the atmospheric circulation with simplified forcing, and constructed an analytic theory that explains the day-night temperature differences in these simulations over a wide parameter space. Our analytic theory shows that day-night temperature differences in tidally-locked planet atmospheres are mediated by wave propagation. If planetary-scale waves are free to propagate longitudinally, they will efficiently flatten isentropes and lessen day-night temperature differences. If these waves are damped, the day-night temperature differences will necessarily be larger. We expect that wave propagation in hot Jupiter atmospheres can be damped in two ways: by either radiative cooling or frictional drag. Both of these processes increase in efficacy with increasing equilibrium temperature, as radiative cooling is directly related to the cube of temperature and magnetically-induced (Lorentz) drag becomes stronger with increasing partial ionization and hence temperature. We find that radiative cooling plays the largest role in damping wave propagation and hence plays the biggest role in controlling day-night temperature differences. As a result, day-night temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres decrease with increasing pressure and increase with increasing stellar flux. One can apply this result to phase curve observations of individual hot Jupiters in multiple bandpasses, as varying flux amplitudes between wavelengths implies that different photospheric pressure levels are being probed. Namely, a larger

  14. Simulation of soil temperature dynamics with models using different concepts.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Renáta; Fodor, Nándor

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents two soil temperature models with empirical and mechanistic concepts. At the test site (calcaric arenosol), meteorological parameters as well as soil moisture content and temperature at 5 different depths were measured in an experiment with 8 parcels realizing the combinations of the fertilized, nonfertilized, irrigated, nonirrigated treatments in two replicates. Leaf area dynamics was also monitored. Soil temperature was calculated with the original and a modified version of CERES as well as with the HYDRUS-1D model. The simulated soil temperature values were compared to the observed ones. The vegetation reduced both the average soil temperature and its diurnal amplitude; therefore, considering the leaf area dynamics is important in modeling. The models underestimated the actual soil temperature and overestimated the temperature oscillation within the winter period. All models failed to account for the insulation effect of snow cover. The modified CERES provided explicitly more accurate soil temperature values than the original one. Though HYDRUS-1D provided more accurate soil temperature estimations, its superiority to CERES is not unequivocal as it requires more detailed inputs.

  15. Reacting chemistry at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morgan, Thomas; Huwel, Lutz; Graham, William

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interaction with gas-liquid interfaces is becoming increasingly important in biological applications, chemical analysis and medicine. It introduces electrons, new ionic species and reactive species and contributes to chemical and electrical self-organization at the interface. To provide insight into the associated physics and chemistry at work in the evolution of the plasma in the air-water interface (AWI), a time-dependent one-dimensional modelling has been developed. The numerical simulation is used to solve the kinetic equations and help identify the important reaction mechanisms and describe the phenomena associated with hundreds of reacting pathways in gas-phase and liquid-phase AWI chemistry. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K04998.

  16. Effect of Particulate Contaminants on the Development of Biofilms at Air/Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-03-22

    The development of biofilms at air/water or oil/water interfaces has important ramifications on several applications, but it has received less attention than biofilm formation on solid surfaces. A key difference between the growth of biofilms on solid surfaces versus liquid interfaces is the range of complicated boundary conditions the liquid interface can create that may affect bacteria, as they adsorb onto and grow on the interface. This situation is exacerbated by the existence of complex interfaces in which interfacially adsorbed components can even more greatly affect interfacial boundary conditions. In this work, we present evidence as to how particle-laden interfaces impact biofilm growth at an air/water interface. We find that particles can enhance the rate of growth and final strength of biofilms at liquid interfaces by providing sites of increased adhesive strength for bacteria. The increased adhesion stems from creating localized areas of hydrophobicity that protrude in the water phase and provide sites where bacteria preferentially adhere. This mechanism is found to be primarily controlled by particle composition, with particle size providing a secondary effect. This increased adhesion through interfacial conditions creates biofilms with properties similar to those observed when adhesion is increased through biological means. Because of the generally understood ubiquity of increased bacteria attachment to hydrophobic surfaces, this result has general applicability to pellicle formation for many pellicle-forming bacteria.

  17. Studies on behaviors of dipalmitoylposphatidylcholine and bilirubin in mixed monolayer at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuhua; Tang, Yufeng; Xie, Anjian; Zhu, Jinmiao; Li, Shikuo; Zhang, Yong

    2006-06-01

    Mixed monolayers of dipalmitoylposphatidylcholine (DPPC) and bilirubin (BR) were prepared on different subphases. The properties of DPPC/BR monolayer, such as collapse pressure ( πcoll), limiting area per molecule ( Alim), surface compressibility modulus, free energy (Δ Gmix) and excess free energy (Δ Gex), were investigated based on the analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms on pure water. The results showed that DPPC and BR were miscible and formed non-ideal mixed monolayers at the air/water interface. With the molar fraction of BR ( XBR) increasing, the LE-LC coexistence region of DPPC monolayer was eliminated gradually. The DPPC/BR complex (M D-B) of 1:2 stoichiometry formed as a result of the strong hydrogen bonds between the polar groups of DPPC and BR. The studies of effects of pH values and calcium ions in subphase on the DPPC/BR monolayers showed that the mixed monolayer became expanded on alkali aqueous solution and on 1 mmol/L CaCl 2 aqueous solution. The orientation of DPPC and BR at air/water interface was also discussed.

  18. A comparison of the temperature difference according to the placement of a nasopharyngeal temperature probe

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungsun; Kim, Boram; Kim, Dong-Chan; Lee, Sang-Kyi

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare temperatures measured at three different sites where a nasopharyngeal temperature probe is commonly placed. Methods Eighty elective abdominal surgical patients were enrolled. After anesthesia induction, four temperature probes were placed at the nasal cavity, upper portion of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, and the esophagus. The placement of the nasopharyngeal temperature probes was evaluated using a flexible nasendoscope, and the depth from the nares was measured. The four temperatures were simultaneously recorded at 10-minute intervals for 60 minutes. Results The average depths of the probes that were placed in the nasal cavity, upper nasopharynx, and the oropharynx were respectively 5.7 ± 0.9 cm, 9.9 ± 0.7 cm, and 13.6 ± 1.7 cm from the nares. In the baseline temperatures, the temperature differences were significantly greater in the nasal cavity 0.32 (95% CI; 0.27-0.37)℃ than in the nasopharynx 0.02 (0.01–0.04)℃, and oropharynx 0.02 (−0.01 to 0.05)℃ compared with the esophagus (P < 0.001). These differences were maintained for 60 minutes. Twenty patients showed a 0.5℃ or greater temperature difference between the nasal cavity and the esophagus, but no patient showed such a difference at the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Conclusions During general anesthesia, the temperatures measured at the upper nasopharynx and the oropharynx, but not the nasal cavity, reflected the core temperature. Therefore, the authors recommend that a probe should be placed at the nasopharynx (≈ 10 cm) or oropharynx (≈ 14 cm) with mucosal attachment for accurate core temperature measurement. PMID:27482312

  19. The temperature difference across the cool skin of the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, C. A.; Simpson, J. J.

    1981-11-01

    The temperature difference ΔT across the cool skin of the ocean was determined from radiometric measurements of surface brightness temperature and conventional measurements of temperature at a depth of 1 m. Eleven days of measurements were made from the R/P Flip in February 1974 about 800 miles north of Hawaii (35°N, 155°W). The surface brightness temperature was corrected for nonblackness of the surface to obtain an estimate of the true surface temperature. The constant λ in Saunders' (1967a) formula, ΔT = λvQ/kU* was found to be λ = 6.5±0.6, where v is kinematic viscosity, Q the upward heat flux just below, the interface, k the thermal conductivity, and U* the friction velocity. The constant is independent of wind speed for winds ranging from 3 to 11 m/s. The use of subsurface rather than surface temperature in the bulk aerodynamic formulas results in an increase in the sum of the sensible and latent heat fluxes equal to 4-5% of Q. However, the percentage change in sensible and latent heat fluxes may be much greater. Spectra of surface and subsurface sea temperature exhibit a peak at low frequencies and fall off approximately proportional to ƒ-3/2; with increasing frequency ƒ. The variability of sea surface temperature was caused about equally by the variability of subsurface temperature and the variability of ΔT. Caution should therefore be exercised in the interpretation of radiometric surface temperature measurements as representative of subsurface temperature.

  20. ISSUES IN SIMULATING ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE AND AQUEOUS MONOMETHYLMERCURY SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation focuses on two areas relevant to assessing the global fate and bioavailability of mercury: elemental mercury air/water exchange and aqueous environmental monomethylmercury speciation.

  1. Regional differences in temperature sensation and thermal comfort in humans.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoda, Tamae; Crawshaw, Larry I; Yasuhara, Saki; Saito, Yasuyo; Kasuga, Momoko; Nagashima, Kei; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    Sensations evoked by thermal stimulation (temperature-related sensations) can be divided into two categories, "temperature sensation" and "thermal comfort." Although several studies have investigated regional differences in temperature sensation, less is known about the sensitivity differences in thermal comfort for the various body regions. In the present study, we examined regional differences in temperature-related sensations with special attention to thermal comfort. Healthy male subjects sitting in an environment of mild heat or cold were locally cooled or warmed with water-perfused stimulators. Areas stimulated were the face, chest, abdomen, and thigh. Temperature sensation and thermal comfort of the stimulated areas were reported by the subjects, as was whole body thermal comfort. During mild heat exposure, facial cooling was most comfortable and facial warming was most uncomfortable. On the other hand, during mild cold exposure, neither warming nor cooling of the face had a major effect. The chest and abdomen had characteristics opposite to those of the face. Local warming of the chest and abdomen did produce a strong comfort sensation during whole body cold exposure. The thermal comfort seen in this study suggests that if given the chance, humans would preferentially cool the head in the heat, and they would maintain the warmth of the trunk areas in the cold. The qualitative differences seen in thermal comfort for the various areas cannot be explained solely by the density or properties of the peripheral thermal receptors and thus must reflect processing mechanisms in the central nervous system.

  2. Development of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Dermanyssidae) at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tucci, E C; Prado, A P; Araújo, R P

    2008-08-01

    The development, viability, and life cycle parameters of Dermanyssus gallinae at five different temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 degrees C), and at relative humidity 70-85% were evaluated. Life cycle duration was 690.75 h (28 days) at 15 degrees C, 263.12h (11 days) at 20 degrees C, 164.63 h (7 days) at 25 degrees C, 140.69 h (6 days) at 30 degrees C and 172.04 h (7 days) at 35 degrees C. The optimal development temperature for D. gallinae was 30 degrees C, with the greatest survival in all stages and the shortest development time. High mortality at 35 degrees C indicated that this temperature had adverse effects on development of D. gallinae, and that in field conditions D. gallinae populations may decrease or even disappear due to the negative impact of high temperature on development. There were no significant differences in the pre-oviposition period among the four temperatures 20-35 degrees C, indicating that temperature did not affect this part of the life cycle.

  3. Dayside-Nightside Temperature Differences in Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, T. D.; Showman, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    The full-phase light curves of individual close-in extrasolar giant planets, or "hot Jupiters," show a trend of increasing fractional amplitude with increasing planetary equilibrium temperature. The attached figure shows this trend for 7 transiting low-eccentricity hot Jupiters. For these planets, this trend can be realized as a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature, as these planets are expected to be tidally locked. Here we examine this trend, in order to shed insight on the physical processes that regulate heat redistribution in tidally-locked planet atmospheres. We utilize a combination of analytic theory to predict how heat is redistributed from day to night over a range of equilibrium temperature, atmospheric composition, and potential frictional drag strengths, and confirm the theory using numerical circulation modeling. Our theory identifies that the transition from low to high day-night temperature differences is mediated by wave adjustment, the same process that regulates heat redistribution in the tropics of Earth. Due to their low rotation rate and hence large Rossby deformation radius, tidally locked planets allow for wave propagation to occur over a much larger latitude range than on Earth. Hence, wave adjustment processes play a key role in the the global, not just equatorial, heat redistribution in hot Jupiter atmospheres. Wave propagation can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either radiative cooling to space or potential frictional drag. This frictional drag, if present, would likely be caused by Lorentz forces in a partially ionized atmosphere threaded by a planetary-scale magnetic field. The radiative cooling timescale is inversely related to the cube of temperature, and any Lorentz drag would increase with temperature due to the increasing ionization fraction of the atmosphere. Hence, both of these processes damp waves more effectively as equilibrium temperature increases

  4. Different annealing temperature suitable for different Mg doped P-GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. T.; Yang, J.; Zhao, D. G.; Jiang, D. S.; Liang, F.; Chen, P.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, Z. S.; Li, X.; Liu, W.; Zhang, L. Q.; Long, H.; Li, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, epitaxial GaN with different Mg doping concentration annealed at different temperature is investigated. Through Hall and PL spectra measurement we found that when Mg doping concentration is different, different annealing temperature is needed for obtaining the best p-type conduction of GaN, and this difference comes from the different influence of annealing on compensated donors. For ultra-heavily Mg doped sample, the process of Mg related donors transferring to non-radiative recombination centers is dominated, so the performance of P-GaN deteriorates with temperature increase. But for low Mg doped sample, the process of Mg related donors transfer to non-raditive recombination is weak compare to the Mg acceptor activation, so along the annealing temperature increase the performance GaN gets better.

  5. Foam fractionation as a tool to study the air-water interface structure-function relationship of wheat gluten hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Arno G B; Rombouts, Ine; Schoebrechts, Nele; Fierens, Ellen; Brijs, Kristof; Blecker, Christophe; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat gluten protein improves its solubility and produces hydrolysates with foaming properties which may find applications in food products. First, we here investigated whether foam-liquid fractionation can concentrate wheat gluten peptides with foaming properties. Foam and liquid fractions had high and very low foam stability (FS), respectively. In addition, foam fractions were able to decrease surface tension more pronouncedly than un-fractionated samples and liquid fractions, suggesting they are able to arrange themselves more efficiently at an interface. As a second objective, foam fractionation served as a tool to study the structural properties of the peptides, causing these differences in air-water interfacial behavior. Zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity measurements did not fully explain these differences but suggested that hydrophobic interactions at the air-water interface are more important than electrostatic interactions. RP-HPLC showed a large overlap between foam and liquid fractions. However, a small fraction of very hydrophobic peptides with relatively high average molecular mass was clearly enriched in the foam fraction. These peptides were also more concentrated in un-fractionated DH 2 hydrolysates, which had high FS, than in DH 6 hydrolysates, which had low FS. These peptides most likely play a key role in stabilizing the air-water interface.

  6. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  7. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  8. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  9. 14 CFR § 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Â...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  10. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to <10 °C after 30 min. Using an intravascular flush (Method B) improved cooling during the entire duration of procurement, but incorporating an intraductal infusion (Method C) rapidly reduced core temperature 15-20 °C within the first 2 min of cooling. Combining all methods (Method D) was the most effective at rapidly reducing temperature and providing sustained cooling throughout the duration of procurement, although the recorded WIT was not different between Methods (P = 0.36). Histological scores were different between the cooling Methods (P = 0.02) and the worst with Method A. There were differences in histological scores between Methods A and C (P = 0.02) and Methods A and D (P = 0.02), but not between Methods C and D (P = 0.95), which may highlight the importance of early cooling using an intraductal infusion. In conclusion, surface cooling alone cannot rapidly cool large (porcine or human) pancreata. Additional cooling with an intravascular flush and intraductal infusion results in improved core porcine pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and

  11. The Importance of Moving Air-Water Interfaces for Colloid Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the vadose zone, or in unsaturated porous media in general, transport of colloids is usually less pronounced than in groundwater. An important retention mechanism for colloids in unsaturated porous media is attachment to air-water interfaces. However, air-water interfaces can also lead to colloid mobilization and enhanced transport if air-water interfaces are moving, such as during infiltration, imbibition, and drainage. Colloid attachment to air-water interfaces is caused by surface tension forces, and these forces usually exceed other interactions forces; therefore, surface tension forces play a dominant role for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media. In this presentation, experimental and theoretical evidence of surface tension forces acting on colloids will be presented, and the role of moving air-water interfaces will be discussed.

  12. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  13. Nonlinear Acoustics at the Air-Water Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pree, Seth; Naranjo, Brian; Putterman, Seth

    2016-11-01

    According to linear acoustics, airborne sound incident on a water surface transmits only a tenth of a percent of its energy. This difficulty of transmitting energy across the water surface limits the feasibility of standoff ultrasound imaging. We propose to overcome this long standing problem by developing new methods of coupling into the medium at standoff. In particular, we believe that the acoustic nonlinearity of both the air and the medium may yield a range of effects in the vicinity of the surface permitting an efficient transmission of ultrasound from the air into the medium. The recent commercial availability of parametric speakers that deliver modulated 100kHz ultrasound at 135dB to nonlinearly generate music at 95dB provides an interesting platform with which to revisit the transmission of sound across acoustic impedance mismatches. We show results of experimental studies of the behavior of the air-water free surface when subjected to large amplitude acoustic pressures from the air. This work was supported by the ARO STIR program.

  14. Shear characteristics, miscibility, and topography of sodium caseinate-monoglyceride mixed films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution, we are concerned with the study of structure, topography, and surface rheological characteristics (under shear conditions) of mixed sodium caseinate and monoglycerides (monopalmitin and monoolein) at the air/water interface. Combined surface chemistry (surface film balance and surface shear rheometry) and microscopy (Brewster angle microscopy, BAM) techniques have been applied in this study to mixtures of insoluble lipids and sodium caseinate spread at the air-water interface. At a macroscopic level, sodium caseinate and monoglycerides form an heterogeneous and practically immiscible monolayer at the air-water interface. The images from BAM show segregated protein and monoglyceride domains that have different topography. At surface pressures higher than that for the sodium caseinate collapse, this protein is displaced from the interface by monoglycerides. These results and those derived from interfacial shear rheology (at a macroscopic level) appear to support the idea that immiscibility and heterogeneity of these emulsifiers at the interface have important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films, with the alternating flow of segregated monoglyceride domains (of low surface shear viscosity, etas) and protein domains (of high etas) across the canal.

  15. Vibrational Spectra and Adsorption of Trisiloxane Superspreading Surfactant at Air/Water Interface Studied with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun; Wu, Dan; Wen, Jia; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hong-fei

    2008-08-01

    The C-H stretch vibrational spectra of the trisiloxane superspreading surfactant Silwet L-77 ((CH3)3Si-O-Si(CH3)(C3H6)(OCH2CH2)7-8OCH3)-O-Si(CH3)3) at the air/water interface are measured with the surface Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (SFG-VS). The spectra are dominated with the features from the -Si-CH3 groups around 2905 cm-1 (symmetric stretch or SS mode) and 2957 cm-1 (mostly the asymmetric stretch or AS mode), and with the weak but apparent contribution from the -O-CH2- groups around 2880 cm-1 (symmetric stretch or SS mode). Comparison of the polarization dependent SFG spectra below and above the critical aggregate or micelle concentration (CAC) indicates that the molecular orientation of the C-H related molecular groups remained unchanged at different surface densities of the Silwet L-77 surfactant. The SFG-VS adsorption isotherm suggested that there was no sign of Silwet L-77 bilayer structure formation at the air/water interface. The Gibbs adsorption free energy of the Silwet surfactant to the air/water interface is -42.2±0.8kcal/mol, indicating the unusually strong adsorption ability of the Silwet L-77 superspreading surfactant.

  16. LED Curing Lights and Temperature Changes in Different Tooth Sites

    PubMed Central

    Armellin, E.; Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Pasquantonio, G.; Cerroni, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess thermal changes on tooth tissues during light exposure using two different LED curing units. The hypothesis was that no temperature increase could be detected within the dental pulp during polymerization irrespective of the use of a composite resin or a light-curing unit. Methods. Caries-free human first molars were selected, pulp residues were removed after root resection, and four calibrated type-J thermocouples were positioned. Two LED lamps were tested; temperature measurements were made on intact teeth and on the same tooth during curing of composite restorations. The data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson's χ2. After ANOVA, the Bonferroni multiple comparison test was performed. Results. Polymerization data analysis showed that in the pulp chamber temperature increase was higher than that without resin. Starlight PRO, in the same condition of Valo lamp, showed a lower temperature increase in pre- and intrapolymerization. A control group (without composite resin) was evaluated. Significance. Temperature increase during resin curing is a function of the rate of polymerization, due to the exothermic polymerization reaction, the energy from the light unit, and time of exposure. PMID:27195282

  17. Velocity and phase distribution measurements in vertical air-water annular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Annular flow topology for three air-water conditions in a vertical duct is investigated through the use of a traversing double-sensor hot-film anemometry probe and differential pressure measurements. Near wall measurements of mean and fluctuating velocities, as well as local void fraction, are taken in the liquid film, with the highest turbulent fluctuations occurring for the flow condition with the largest pressure drop. A modified law-of-the-wall formulation for wall shear is presented which, using near wall values of mean velocity and kinetic energy, agrees reasonably well with the average stress obtained from direct pressure drop measurements. The linear profile using wall coordinates in the logarithmic layer is preserved in annular flow; however, the slope and intercept of the profile differ from the single-phase values for the annular flow condition which has a thicker, more turbulent, liquid film.

  18. Denaturation resistance of beta-lactoglobulin in monomolecular films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Min; White, John W

    2009-10-29

    Using X-ray reflectometry we report strong differences in the denaturation response of beta-lactoglobulin adsorbed as a monomolecular film at the air-water interface from that observed in mixed denaturant/beta-lactoglobulin bulk solutions. Using the "flow trough" technique an isolated monomolecular film of the protein showed little change in structure when subjected to a 4.0 M guanidinium hydrochloride substrate. Unlike the bulk solution where a new protein layer structure appears, small changes in the protein packing and the roughness of the film are the only evidence of change. These parameters have been studied as a function of denaturant concentration and film quality. The strength of the response depends on the degree of perfection of the originally formed film; quickly formed films are more easily denatured. As the response is so subtle, possible interfering effects such as denaturant release of protein adsorbed on the trough have been quantified.

  19. Conformational changes of a calix[8]arene derivative at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Pedrosa, José M; Martín-Romero, María T; Muñoz, Eulogia; Richardson, Tim H; Camacho, Luis

    2005-03-10

    The particular behavior of a p-tert-butyl calix[8]arene derivative (C8A) has been studied at the air-water interface using surface pressure-area isotherms, surface potential-area isotherms, film relaxation measurements, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and infrared spectroscopy for Langmuir-Blodgett films. Thus, it is observed that the properties of the film, for example, isotherms, domain formation, and FTIR spectra, recorded during the first compression cycle differ appreciably from those during the second compression and following cycles. The results obtained are interpreted on the basis of the conformational changes of the C8A molecules by surface pressure, allowing us to inquire into the inter- and intramolecular interactions (hydrogen bonds) of those molecules. Thus, the compression induces changes in the kind of hydrogen bonds from intra- and intermolecular with other C8A molecules to hydrogen bonds with water molecules.

  20. Mechanical Stability of Polystyrene and Janus Particle Monolayers at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Lenis, Jessica; Razavi, Sepideh; Cao, Kathleen D; Lin, Binhua; Lee, Ka Yee C; Tu, Raymond S; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2015-12-16

    The compressional instability of particle-laden air/water interfaces is investigated with plain and surface-anisotropic (Janus) particles. We hypothesize that the amphiphilic nature of Janus particles leads to both anisotropic particle-particle and particle-interface interactions that can yield particle films with unique collapse mechanisms. Analysis of Langmuir isotherms and microstructural characterization of the homogeneous polystyrene particle films during compression reveal an interfacial buckling instability followed by folding, which is in good agreement with predictions from classical elasticity theory. In contrast, Janus particle films exhibit a different behavior during compression, where the collapse mode occurs through the subduction of the Janus particle film. Our results suggest that particle-laden films comprised of surface-anisotropic particles can be engineered to evolve new material properties.

  1. Dynamics of surfactant sorption at the air/water interface: continuous-flow tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Svitova, T F; Wetherbee, M J; Radke, C J

    2003-05-01

    Dynamic interfacial tensiometry, gauged by axisymmetric drop shape analysis of static drops or bubbles, provides useful information on surfactant adsorption kinetics. However, the traditional pendant-drop methodology is not readily amenable to the study of desorption kinetics. Thus, the question of sorption reversibility is difficult to assess by this technique. We extend classical pendant/sessile drop dynamic tensiometry by immersing a sessile bubble in a continuously mixed optical cell. Ideal-mixed conditions are established by stirring and by constant flow through the cell. Aqueous surface-active-agent solutions are either supplied to the cell (loading) or removed from the cell by flushing with water (washout), thereby allowing study of both adsorption and desorption kinetics. Well-mixed conditions and elimination of any mass transfer resistance permit direct identification of sorption kinetic barriers to and from the external aqueous phase with time constants longer than the optical-cell residence time. The monodisperse nonionic surfactant ethoxy dodecyl alcohol (C(12)E(5)), along with cationic cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) in the presence of added salt, adsorbs and desorbs instantaneously at the air/water interface. In these cases, the experimentally observed dynamic-tension curves follow the local-equilibrium model precisely for both loading and washout. Accordingly, these surfactants below their critical micelle concentrations (CMC) exhibit no detectable sorption-activation barriers on time scales of order a min. However, the sorption dynamics of dilute CTAB in the absence of electrolyte is markedly different from that in the presence of KBr. Here CTAB desorption occurs at local equilibrium, but the adsorption rate is kinetically limited, most likely due to an electrostatic barrier arising as the charged surfactant accumulates at the interface. The commercial, polydisperse nonionic surfactant ethoxy nonylphenol (NP9) loads in good agreement with

  2. Studies of silicon quantum dots prepared at different substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Agel, Faisal A.; Suleiman, Jamal; Khan, Shamshad A.

    2017-03-01

    In this research work, we have synthesized silicon quantum dots at different substrate temperatures 193, 153 and 123 K at a fixed working pressure 5 Torr. of Argon gas. The structural studies of these silicon quantum dots have been undertaken using X-ray diffraction, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The optical and electrical properties have been studied using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy and I-V measurement system. X-ray diffraction pattern of Si quantum dots prepared at different temperatures show the amorphous nature except for the quantum dots synthesized at 193 K which shows polycrystalline nature. FESEM images of samples suggest that the size of quantum dots varies from 2 to 8 nm. On the basis of UV-visible spectroscopy measurements, a direct band gap has been observed for Si quantum dots. FTIR spectra suggest that as-grown Si quantum dots are partially oxidized which is due exposure of as-prepared samples to air after taking out from the chamber. PL spectra of the synthesized silicon quantum dots show an intense peak at 444 nm, which may be attributed to the formation of Si quantum dots. Temperature dependence of dc conductivity suggests that the dc conductivity enhances exponentially by raising the temperature. On the basis above properties i.e. direct band gap, high absorption coefficient and high conductivity, these silicon quantum dots will be useful for the fabrication of solar cells.

  3. Predicting thermal inactivation in media of different pH of Salmonella grown at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Mañas, Pilar; Pagán, Rafael; Raso, Javier; Condón, Santiago

    2003-10-15

    The influence of the growth temperature and the pH of the heating medium on the heat resistance at different temperatures of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 13311 was studied and described mathematically. The shift of the growth temperature from 10 to 37 degrees C increased heat resistance of S. typhimurium fourfold. The pH of the heating medium at which heat resistance was maximum was pH 6 for cells grown at 37 degrees C, but changed with growth temperature. The alkalinization of the heating medium from pH 6 to pH 7.7 decreased the heat resistance of cells grown at 37 degrees C by a factor of 3. Neither the growth temperature nor the pH modified the z values significantly (4.9 degrees C). The decimal reduction times at different treatment temperatures, in buffers of different pH of cells of S. typhimurium grown at different temperatures, were accurately described by a mathematical equation (correlation coefficient of 0.97). This equation was also tested for Salmonella senftenberg 775W (ATCC 43845) and Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, strains in which the correlation coefficients between the observed and the theoretically calculated values were 0.91 and 0.98, respectively.

  4. [Temperature differences of air-rice plant under different irrigated water depths at spiking stage].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zheng, Jian-chu; Huang, Shan; Tian, Yun-lu; Peng, Lan; Bian, Xin-min; Zhang, Wei-jian

    2008-01-01

    With rice cultivars Yangdao 6, Yangjing 9538 and Wuxiangjing 14 as test materials, field experiment was conducted to study the effects of 3 irrigated water depths (0 cm, 2-4 cm, and > 10 cm) on the temperature of different parts of rice plant at spiking stage. The results showed that from 10:30 to 15:00 on sunny days, irrigated water depth on paddy field had significant effects on the temperature of field surface, middle part of rice plant, and rice spike. The higher the water depth on field surface, the lower the temperature of rice plant and rice spike. At the water level > 10 cm, the average temperature differences between air and the rice spike, middle part of rice plant and field surface of these three cultivars were 1.37, 2.98 and 4.12 degrees C higher than those at the water depth of 0 cm, and 0.67, 1.59 and 2.17 degrees C higher than those at the water depth of 2-4 cm, respectively. In addition, the temperature differences were 0.71, 1.39 and 1.95 degrees C higher at the water depth of 2-4 cm than those at the water depth of 0 cm, respectively. Obvious temperature differences of air-rice plant were also observed among the three rice varieties under different irrigated water depths. The analysis of the characteristics of temperature transfer among field surface, middle part of plant and rice spike indicated that the temperature transfer patterns under all test water management regimes accorded with the principles of energy transfer, suggesting that keeping proper water depth on the field surface at rice spiking stage contributed great to the decrease of rice spike temperature and the alleviation of rice heat injury.

  5. Refinement of thermal imager minimum resolvable temperature difference calculating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Mykytenko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Calculating methods, which accurately predict minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD), are of significant interest for many years. The article deals with improvement the accuracy of determining the thermal imaging system MRTD by elaboration the visual perception model. We suggest MRTD calculating algorithm, which is based on a reliable approximation of the human visual system modulation transfer function (MTF) proposed by N. Nill. There was obtained a new expression for the bandwidth evaluation, which is independent of angular size of the Foucault bar target.

  6. Performance of NiTi endodontic instrument under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jamleh, Ahmed; Yahata, Yoshio; Ebihara, Arata; Atmeh, Amre R; Bakhsh, Turki; Suda, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test nickel titanium (NiTi) instrument performance under different surrounding temperatures. Twenty-four superelastic NiTi instruments with a conical shape comprising a 0.30-mm-diameter tip and 0.06 taper were equally divided into 3 groups according to the temperature employed. Using a specially designed cyclic fatigue testing apparatus, each instrument was deflected to give a curvature 10 mm in radius and a 30° angle. This position was kept as the instrument was immersed in a continuous flow of water under a temperature of 10, 37, or 50 °C for 20 s to calculate the deflecting load (DL). In the same position, the instrument was then allowed to rotate at 300 rpm to fracture, and the working time was converted to the number of cycles to fracture (NCF). The statistical significance was set at p = 0.05. The mean DL (in N) and NCF (in cycles) of the groups at 10, 37, and 50 °C were 10.16 ± 1.36 and 135.50 ± 31.48, 13.50 ± 0.92 and 89.20 ± 16.44, and 14.70 ± 1.21 and 65.50 ± 15.90, respectively. The group at 10 °C had significantly the lowest DL that favorably resulted in the highest NCF. Within the limitations of this study, the surrounding temperature influences the cyclic fatigue resistance and DL of the superelastic NiTi instruments. Lower temperatures are found to favorably decrease the DL and extend the lifetime of the superelastic NiTi instrument. Further NiTi instrument failure studies should be performed under simulated body temperature.

  7. Piglets’ Surface Temperature Change at Different Weights at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Caldara, Fabiana Ribeiro; dos Santos, Luan Sousa; Machado, Sivanilza Teixeira; Moi, Marta; de Alencar Nääs, Irenilza; Foppa, Luciana; Garcia, Rodrigo Garófallo; de Kássia Silva dos Santos, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out in order to verify the effects of piglets’ weight at birth on their surface temperature change (ST) after birth, and its relationship with ingestion time of colostrum. Piglets from four different sows were weighed at birth and divided into a totally randomized design with three treatments according to birth weight (PBW): T1 - less than 1.00 kg, T2 - 1.00 to 1.39 kg, and T3 - higher than or equal to 1.40 kg. The time spent for the first colostrum ingestion was recorded (TFS). Images of piglets’ surface by thermal imaging camera were recorded at birth (STB) and 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min after birth. The air temperature and relative humidity were recorded every 30 min and the indexes of temperature and humidity (THI) were calculated. A ST drop after 15 min from birth was observed, increasing again after sixty minutes. Positive correlations were found between the PBW and the ST at 30 and 45 min after birth. The PBW was negatively correlated with the TFS. The THI showed high negative correlations (−0.824 and −0.815) with STB and after 15 min from birth. The piglet’s surface temperature at birth was positively correlated with temperature thereof to 15 min, influencing therefore the temperatures in the interval of 45 to 120 min. The birth weight contributes significantly to postnatal hypothermia and consequently to the time it takes for piglets ingest colostrum, requiring special attention to those of low birth weight. PMID:25049971

  8. Piglets' surface temperature change at different weights at birth.

    PubMed

    Caldara, Fabiana Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Luan Sousa; Machado, Sivanilza Teixeira; Moi, Marta; de Alencar Nääs, Irenilza; Foppa, Luciana; Garcia, Rodrigo Garófallo; de Kássia Silva Dos Santos, Rita

    2014-03-01

    The study was carried out in order to verify the effects of piglets' weight at birth on their surface temperature change (ST) after birth, and its relationship with ingestion time of colostrum. Piglets from four different sows were weighed at birth and divided into a totally randomized design with three treatments according to birth weight (PBW): T1 - less than 1.00 kg, T2 - 1.00 to 1.39 kg, and T3 - higher than or equal to 1.40 kg. The time spent for the first colostrum ingestion was recorded (TFS). Images of piglets' surface by thermal imaging camera were recorded at birth (STB) and 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min after birth. The air temperature and relative humidity were recorded every 30 min and the indexes of temperature and humidity (THI) were calculated. A ST drop after 15 min from birth was observed, increasing again after sixty minutes. Positive correlations were found between the PBW and the ST at 30 and 45 min after birth. The PBW was negatively correlated with the TFS. The THI showed high negative correlations (-0.824 and -0.815) with STB and after 15 min from birth. The piglet's surface temperature at birth was positively correlated with temperature thereof to 15 min, influencing therefore the temperatures in the interval of 45 to 120 min. The birth weight contributes significantly to postnatal hypothermia and consequently to the time it takes for piglets ingest colostrum, requiring special attention to those of low birth weight.

  9. Effect of different alkaline solutions on crystalline structure of cellulose at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Keshk, Sherif M A S

    2015-01-22

    Effect of alkaline solutions such as 10% NaOH, NaOH/urea and NaOH/ethylene glycol solutions on crystalline structure of different cellulosic fibers (cotton linter and filter paper) was investigated at room temperature and -4°C. The highest dissolution of cotton linter and filter paper was observed in NaOH/ethylene glycol at both temperatures. X-ray patterns of treated cotton linter with different alkaline solutions at low temperature showed only two diffractions at 2θ=12.5° and 21.0°, which belonged to the crystalline structure of cellulose II. CP/MAS (13)C NMR spectra showed the doublet peaks at 89.2 ppm and 88.3 ppm representing C4 resonance for cellulose I at room temperature, Whereas, at low temperature the doublet peaks were observed at 89.2 ppm and 87.8 ppm representing C4 resonance for cellulose II. Degree of polymerization of cellulose plays an important role in cellulose dissolution in different alkaline solutions and temperatures, where, a low temperature gives high dissolutions percentage with change in crystalline structure from cellulose I to cellulose II forms.

  10. The Effects of High Temperature on Gessoes with Different Admixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budu, Ana-Maria; Sandu, Ion; Cristache, Raluca Anamaria

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the effects of temperature on gessoes that have different substances added, usually used in painting or restoration to enhance the flexibility of the ground layer or to create a suitable gesso for the specific painting technique. Five samples of gesso were made and applied on Balsa wood (a dry, stable wood that is used in restoration for completing the missing elements of the panel). After the thermal treatment, the samples were analyzed optical, by microscopy and colorimetry. The results showed small differences in colour, but no cracks of the gessoes

  11. Stall cleanliness and stall temperature of two different freestall bases.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, B A; Stone, A E; Clark, J D; Ray, D L; Bewley, J M

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the differences in freestall cleanliness and stall temperature between a barn with Dual Chamber Cow Waterbeds (DCCW; Advanced Comfort Technology, Reedsburg, WI) and a barn with rubber-filled mattresses at the University of Kentucky Coldstream Dairy Research Farm from January 18, 2012, to May 3, 2013. Stall cleanliness was measured twice weekly (n=134) by the same 2 observers using a 0.91 m×0.91 m wire grid containing 128 equally sized rectangles (10.16 cm×5.08 cm). This grid was centered at the rear portion of the stall; a rectangle that was visibly wet or had any amount of feces present was defined as a dirty rectangle. Weekly stall temperature (n=66) was measured by the same observer during a.m. milkings in the same predetermined stalls. Feces and wet sawdust were removed from the stalls before stall temperatures were acquired. Temperatures were obtained using a handheld thermometer at 30.48 cm above the stall base as determined via dual laser measurements. Stall temperature was measured on the front, middle, and back of the stall first with clean sawdust and then with the sawdust removed from the stall and wiped clean with a towel. Daily temperature-humidity index (THI) was calculated using Kentucky climate data calculated through the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture via a data logger, located 5.63 km from the Coldstream Dairy Farm. Stall cleanliness was not different between the DCCW barn (26.09±0.89 rectangles) and the rubber-filled mattress barn (23.70±0.89 rectangles). Mean THI throughout the study was 64.39±0.82. Stall temperature was different among THI categories. Temperature-humidity index categories 1 (coldest), 2, 3, and 4 (warmest) had THI ranges of 22.94 to 50.77, 50.77 to 64.88, 64.88 to 78.75, and 78.75 to 101.59, respectively. Stall temperatures (°C; least squares means±SE) were 2.26±0.30, 8.86±0.30, 15.52±0.30, and 20.95±0.30 for THI categories 1 to 4, respectively. Stalls with

  12. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  13. Air-water CO2 exchange in five hypereutrophic lakes in Bangalore, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Ghosh, P.; Bala, G.; Bastviken, D.

    2014-12-01

    Inland water bodies play a significant role in terrestrial carbon cycling, rather than being just conduits for the transport of terrestrial carbon to the oceans. Recent syntheses estimate that freshwaters emit substantial amounts of CO2 (1.4 Pg C yr-1) (Tranvik et al. 2009) and CH4 (0.65 Pg C yr-1) (Bastviken et al. 2011), which are similar in magnitude to the global terrestrial carbon sink (2.5 ± 1.7 Pg C yr-1) (IPCC 2013). However, eutrophic waters, which constitute the majority of the global freshwater supply (ILEC/UNEP 1994, Liu et al. 2012, Carpenter et al. 1998), are vastly underrepresented in these estimates. These waters, due to high primary productivity leading to CO2 undersaturation, can act as sinks rather than sources of CO2, thus reversing the role of lakes in the carbon cycle (Balmer and Downing 2011, Pacheco et al. 2013). We are investigating the air-water CO2 exchange of five hypereutrophic lakes in urban Bangalore using a novel Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR)-based CO2 sensor installed in flux chambers that can be used to measure CO2 exchange in lakes in situ. This work is a part of a larger study called Bangalore Carbon Mapping Study that aims to track the spatial flows of carbon in an urban area of a developing country. Preliminary observations reveal that these lakes absorb CO2 during the photosynthetic hours, at an average rate of 3.4 mg C m-2 h-1. The ongoing study will characterize the complete diurnal cycle of CO2 exchange, its variation over different seasons, and its relationships with various limnological and catchment characteristics. The flux estimates thus produced will also be compared with those predicted by the current models for air-water gas exchange based on wind speed.

  14. Catechol oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Camm, Robert C; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2014-12-16

    Anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons promptly react with hydroxyl radicals undergoing oxidation to form phenols and polyphenols (e.g., catechol) typically identified in the complex mixture of humic-like substances (HULIS). Because further processing of polyphenols in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can continue mediated by a mechanism of ozonolysis at interfaces, a better understanding about how these reactions proceed at the air-water interface is needed. This work shows how catechol, a molecular probe of the oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in SOA, can contribute interfacial reactive species that enhance the production of HULIS under atmospheric conditions. Reactive semiquinone radicals are quickly produced upon the encounter of 40 ppbv-6.0 ppmv O3(g) with microdroplets containing [catechol] = 1-150 μM. While the previous pathway results in the instantaneous formation of mono- and polyhydroxylated aromatic rings (PHA) and chromophoric mono- and polyhydroxylated quinones (PHQ), a different channel produces oxo- and dicarboxylic acids of low molecular weight (LMW). The cleavage of catechol occurs at the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-water interface through the formation of (1) an ozonide intermediate, (2) a hydroperoxide, and (3) cis,cis-muconic acid. However, variable [catechol] and [O3(g)] can affect the ratio of the primary products (cis,cis-muconic acid and trihydroxybenzenes) and higher order products observed (PHA, PHQ, and LMW oxo- and dicarboxylic acids). Secondary processing is confirmed by mass spectrometry, showing the production of crotonic, maleinaldehydic, maleic, glyoxylic, and oxalic acids. The proposed pathway can contribute precursors to aqueous SOA (AqSOA) formation, converting aromatic hydrocarbons into polyfunctional species widely found in tropospheric aerosols with light-absorbing brown carbon.

  15. Flowability analysis of uranium dioxide powder at different temperatures containing different lubricants.

    PubMed

    Santana, H H S; Maier, G; Ródenas, J

    2011-08-01

    Powder flowability characteristics are often intentionally modified in order to improve their production process. The UO(2) pellet manufacturing process can consist of many steps, e.g. milling, granulation, homogenization, die filling for pressing, etc. By the addition of flow additives, lubricants or glidants the desired workability can be achieved. Temperature also influences the powder processability, leading to an easier or more complex powder flow. The work aims to determine some flowability characteristics for UO(2) powder at different temperatures.

  16. Micrometeorological Measurement of Fetch- and Atmospheric Stability-Dependent Air- Water Exchange of Legacy Semivolatile Organic Contaminants in Lake Superior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlinger, J. A.; Tobias, D. E.; Rowe, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    Coastal waters including the Laurentian Great Lakes are particularly susceptible to local, regional, and long- range transport and deposition of semivolatile organic contaminants (SOCs) as gases and/or associated with particles. Recently-marketed SOCs can be expected to undergo net deposition in surface waters, whereas legacy SOCs such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are likely to be at equilibrium with respect to air-water exchange, or, if atmospheric concentrations decrease through, e.g., policy implementation, to undergo net gas emission. SOC air-water exchange flux is usually estimated using the two-film model. This model describes molecular diffusion through the air and water films adjacent to the air-water interface. Air-water exchange flux is estimated as the product of SOC fugacity, typically based on on-shore gaseous concentration measurements, and a transfer coefficient, the latter which is estimated from SOC properties and environmental conditions. The transfer coefficient formulation commonly applied neglects resistance to exchange in the internal boundary layer under atmospherically stable conditions, and the use of on-shore gaseous concentration neglects fetch-dependent equilibration, both of which will tend to cause overestimation of flux magnitude. Thus, for legacy chemicals or in any highly contaminated surface water, the rate at which the water is cleansed through gas emission tends to be over-predicted using this approach. Micrometeorological measurement of air-water exchange rates of legacy SOCs was carried out on ships during four transect experiments during off-shore flow in Lake Superior using novel multicapillary collection devices and thermal extraction technology to measure parts-per-quadrillion SOC levels. Employing sensible heat in the modified Bowen ratio, fluxes at three over-water stations along the transects were measured, along with up-wind, onshore gaseous concentration and aqueous concentration. The atmosphere was unstable for

  17. Chlorella Virus Encoded Deoxyuridine triphosphatases Exhibit different Temperature Optima

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Moriyama, H.; Homma, K.; Van Etten, J.

    2005-01-01

    A putative deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) gene from chlorella virus PBCV-1 was cloned, and the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein has dUTPase activity and requires Mg{sup 2+} for optimal activity, while it retains some activity in the presence of other divalent cations. Kinetic studies of the enzyme revealed a K{sub m} of 11.7 {mu}M, a turnover k{sub cat} of 6.8 s{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.8 x 105 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. dUTPase genes were cloned and expressed from two other chlorella viruses IL-3A and SH-6A. The two dUTPases have similar properties to PBCV-1 dUTPase except that IL-3A dUTPase has a lower temperature optimum (37{sup o}C) than PBCV-1 dUTPase (50{sup o}C). The IL-3A dUTPase differs from the PBCV-1 enzyme by nine amino acids, including two amino acid substitutions, Glu81{yields}Ser81 and Thr84{yields}Arg84, in the highly conserved motif III of the proteins. To investigate the difference in temperature optima between the two enzymes, homology modeling and docking simulations were conducted. The results of the simulation and comparisons of amino acid sequence suggest that adjacent amino acids are important in the temperature optima. To confirm this suggestion, three site-directed amino acid substitutions were made in the IL-3A enzyme: Thr84{yields}Arg84, Glu81{yields}Ser81, and Glu81{yields}Ser81 plus Thr84{yields}Arg84. The single substitutions affected the optimal temperature for enzyme activity. The temperature optimum increased from 37 to 55{sup o}C for the enzyme containing the two amino acid substitutions. We postulate that the change in temperature optimum is due to reduction in charge and balkiness in the active cavity that allows more movement of the ligand and protein before the enzyme and substrate complex is formed.

  18. Interhemispheric temperature difference as a predictor of boreal winter ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Gutowska, Dorota

    2013-04-01

    We use statistical analysis to show statistically significant relationship between the boreal winter MEI index of ENSO and HadCRUT3 temperature difference between Northern and Southern hemispheres (NH - SH) during the preceding summer. Correlation values increase (in absolute terms) if the correlated time periods are increased from month to seasonal length. For example December and January (DJ) MEI values anticorrelate stronger with the preceding MJJA period than with any of the four months taken separately. We believe this is further evidence that the correlation is caused by a real physical process as increase of the averaging period tends to reduce statistical noise. The motivation for looking for such a relationship comes from review of literature on paleoclimatic ENSO behavior. We have noticed that in many cases relatively cold NH coincided with "strong ENSO" (frequent El Niños), for example the Ice Age periods and Little Ice Age. On the other hand periods of relatively warm NH (the Holocene climate optimum or Medieval Climate Anomaly) are coincident with frequent or even "permanent" La Niñas. This relationship suggest the influence of the position of Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) on the frequency of El Niños. The simplest physical mechanism of the relationship is that the positive (negative) NH-SH temperature difference causes a north (south) shift of ITCZ with a parallel shift of trade wind zones. The North-South orographic difference between the Panama Isthmus and the South America may cause stronger (weaker) trade winds in Eastern Tropical Pacific increasing (decreasing) the thermochemical tilt which, in turn, causes a more negative (positive) ENSO values. Of course this may be only a first approximation of the real mechanism of this "teleconnection". The correlations we have found are not strong even if statistically significant. For example, the MJJA NH-SH temperature vs. DJ MEI correlation has r = -0.28 implying it explains only 8% of boreal

  19. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE PARTNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evasion of elemental mercury from aquatic systems can significantly deplete net mercury accumulation resulting from atmospheric deposition, the current ability to model elemental mercury air/water exchange is limited by uncertainties in our understanding of all gaseous a...

  20. Numerical Modeling of Flow Dynamics in The Aluminum Smelting Process: Comparison Between Air-Water and CO2-Cryolite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhibin; Feng, Yuqing; Schwarz, M. Philip; Witt, Peter J.; Wang, Zhaowen; Cooksey, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Air-water models have been widely applied as substitutes for CO2-cryolite systems in the study of the complex bubble dynamics and bubble-driven flow that occurs in the molten electrolyte phase in the aluminum electrolytic process, but the detailed difference between the two systems has not been studied. This paper makes a numerical comparison between the bubble dynamics for the two systems. Simulations of both single bubble and continuous bubbling were conducted using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling approach with a volume of fluid (VOF) method to capture the phase interfaces. In the single bubble simulations, it was found that bubbles sliding under an anode in a CO2-cryolite system have a smaller bubble thickness and a higher sliding velocity than those in the air-water system for bubbles of the same volume. Dimensionless analysis and numerical simulation show that contact angle is the dominant factor producing these differences; the effects of kinematic viscosity, surface tension, and density are very small. In the continuous bubbling simulations, the continuous stream of air bubbles detaches from the anode sidewall after a period of climbing, just as it does in the single bubble simulation, but bubbles have less tendency to migrate away from the wall. Quasi-stable state flow characteristics, i.e., time-averaged bath flow pattern, turbulence kinetic energy, turbulence dissipation rate, and gas volume fraction, show a remarkable agreement between the two systems in terms of distribution and magnitude. From the current numerical comparisons, it is believed that the air-water model is a close substitutive model for studying bubble-driven bath flow in aluminum smelting processes. However, because of the difference in bubble morphologies between the two systems, and also the reactive generation and growth of bubbles in the real system, there will likely be some differences in bubble coverage of the anode in the anode-cathode gap.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Flow Dynamics in The Aluminum Smelting Process: Comparison Between Air-Water and CO2-Cryolite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhibin; Feng, Yuqing; Schwarz, M. Philip; Witt, Peter J.; Wang, Zhaowen; Cooksey, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Air-water models have been widely applied as substitutes for CO2-cryolite systems in the study of the complex bubble dynamics and bubble-driven flow that occurs in the molten electrolyte phase in the aluminum electrolytic process, but the detailed difference between the two systems has not been studied. This paper makes a numerical comparison between the bubble dynamics for the two systems. Simulations of both single bubble and continuous bubbling were conducted using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling approach with a volume of fluid (VOF) method to capture the phase interfaces. In the single bubble simulations, it was found that bubbles sliding under an anode in a CO2-cryolite system have a smaller bubble thickness and a higher sliding velocity than those in the air-water system for bubbles of the same volume. Dimensionless analysis and numerical simulation show that contact angle is the dominant factor producing these differences; the effects of kinematic viscosity, surface tension, and density are very small. In the continuous bubbling simulations, the continuous stream of air bubbles detaches from the anode sidewall after a period of climbing, just as it does in the single bubble simulation, but bubbles have less tendency to migrate away from the wall. Quasi-stable state flow characteristics, i.e., time-averaged bath flow pattern, turbulence kinetic energy, turbulence dissipation rate, and gas volume fraction, show a remarkable agreement between the two systems in terms of distribution and magnitude. From the current numerical comparisons, it is believed that the air-water model is a close substitutive model for studying bubble-driven bath flow in aluminum smelting processes. However, because of the difference in bubble morphologies between the two systems, and also the reactive generation and growth of bubbles in the real system, there will likely be some differences in bubble coverage of the anode in the anode-cathode gap.

  2. Mechanism of boron uptake by hydrocalumite calcined at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xinhong; Sasaki, Keiko; Takaki, Yu; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi; Ideta, Keiko; Miyawaki, Jin

    2015-04-28

    Hydrocalumite (Ca-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH)) was prepared and applied for the removal of borate. The properties of Ca-Al-LDH calcined at different temperatures were diverse, which affected the sorption density and mechanism of boron species. The sorption density increased with increase in calcined temperature and the sample calcined at 900°C (Ca-Al-LDH-900) showed the maximum sorption density in this work. The solid residues after sorption were characterized by (11)B NMR, (27)Al NMR, SEM, and XRD to investigate the sorption mechanism. Dissolution-reprecipitation was the main mechanism for sorption of borate in Ca-Al-LDH. For Ca-Al-LDH calcined at 300 and 500°C, regeneration occurred in a short time and the newly forming LDHs were decomposed to release Ca(2+) ions and formed ettringite with borate. Two stages occurred in the sorption of boron by Ca-Al-LDH calcined at 900°C. In the first stage, boron species adsorbed on the alumina gel resulting from the hydration of calcined products. In this stage, borate was included as an interlayer anion into the newly forming LDHs in the following stage, and then immobilized as HBO3(2-) into the interlayer, most the LDHs.

  3. Dielectric Behavior of Biomaterials at Different Frequencies on Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, B. D.; Barde, Ravindra; Mishra, A.; Phadke, S.

    2014-09-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in radiofrequency (RF) and microwave systems is described mathematically by Maxwell's equations with corresponding boundary conditions. Dielectric properties of lossless and lossy materials influence EM field distribution. For a better understanding of the physical processes associated with various RF and microwave devices, it is necessary to know the dielectric properties of media that interact with EM waves. For telecommunication and radar devices, variations of complex dielectric permittivity (referring to the dielectric property) over a wide frequency range are important. For RF and microwave applicators intended for thermal treatments of different materials at ISM (industrial, scientific, medical) frequencies, one needs to study temperature and moisture content dependencies of the Permittivity of the treated materials. Many techniques have been developed for the measurement of materials. In the present paper authors used Bones and scales of Fish taken from Narmada River (Rajghat Dist. Barwani) as biomaterials. Dielectric properties of Biomaterials with the frequency range from 1Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature with low water content were measured by in-situ performance dielectric kit. Analysis has been done by Alpha high performance impedance analyzer and LCR meters. The experimental work were carried out in Inter University Consortium UGC-DAE, CSR center Indore MP. Measured value indicates the dielectric constant (ɛ') dielectric loss (ɛ") decreases with increasing frequency while conductivity (σ) increases with frequency increased.

  4. Air-Water Gas Transfer in Coastal Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    water currents and turbulence, air and water temperatures , visible and infrared (IR) radiative fluxes, the visco-elastic properties of surface films, and...turbulence at the ocean interface. Measuring the spatiotemporal temperature distribution on top of the aqueous mass boundary layer, heat patterns can be...interface is obtained through quantitative analysis of infrared image sequences of the water surface temperature . Our main focus during the last year

  5. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76°C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68°C in the summer and 61°C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10°C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  6. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76 degrees C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68 degrees C in the summer and 61 degrees C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10 degrees C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  7. Floatable, Self-Cleaning, and Carbon-Black-Based Superhydrophobic Gauze for the Solar Evaporation Enhancement at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiming; Chen, Jingwei; Guo, Dawei; Cao, Moyuan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-06-24

    Efficient solar evaporation plays an indispensable role in nature as well as the industry process. However, the traditional evaporation process depends on the total temperature increase of bulk water. Recently, localized heating at the air-water interface has been demonstrated as a potential strategy for the improvement of solar evaporation. Here, we show that the carbon-black-based superhydrophobic gauze was able to float on the surface of water and selectively heat the surface water under irradiation, resulting in an enhanced evaporation rate. The fabrication process of the superhydrophobic black gauze was low-cost, scalable, and easy-to-prepare. Control experiments were conducted under different light intensities, and the results proved that the floating black gauze achieved an evaporation rate 2-3 times higher than that of the traditional process. A higher temperature of the surface water was observed in the floating gauze group, revealing a main reason for the evaporation enhancement. Furthermore, the self-cleaning ability of the superhydrophobic black gauze enabled a convenient recycling and reusing process toward practical application. The present material may open a new avenue for application of the superhydrophobic substrate and meet extensive requirements in the fields related to solar evaporation.

  8. Dipolar interactions between domains in lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rufeil-Fiori, Elena; Wilke, Natalia; Banchio, Adolfo J

    2016-05-25

    A great variety of biologically relevant monolayers present phase coexistence characterized by domains formed by lipids in an ordered phase state dispersed in a continuous, disordered phase. From the difference in surface densities between these phases, inter-domain dipolar interactions arise. These interactions are relevant for the determination of the spacial distribution of domains as well as their dynamics. In this work, we propose a novel way of estimating the dipolar repulsion using a passive method that involves the analysis of images of the monolayer with phase coexistence. This method is based on the comparison of the pair correlation function obtained from experiments with that obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations of a model system. As an example, we determined the difference in dipolar density of a binary monolayer of DSPC/DMPC at the air-water interface from the analysis of the radial distribution of domains, and the results are compared with those obtained by surface potential determinations. A systematic analysis for the experimentally relevant parameter range is given, which may be used as a working curve for obtaining the dipolar repulsion in different systems.

  9. Characterization of atmospheric nanosecond discharge under highly inhomogeneous and transient electric field in air/water mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaras, Karim; Tardiveau, Pierre; Magne, Lionel; Jeanney, Pascal; Bournonville, Blandine

    2016-09-01

    We report the studies of a centimeter range pin-to-plane nanosecond repetitively discharge (<30 ns and 10 Hz) in standard conditions of pressure and temperature under very high positive voltage pulses (20 to 100 kV). In these typical conditions, plasma exhibit unusual diffuse and large structure. This kind of discharge is not well understood and in first approach, it requires (i) a description of plasma dynamic and (ii) behavior under relevant context (environmental issues ...) using pertinent gas (humid air). Thus, we will first present sub-nanosecond imaging of the discharge obtained for typical conditions of stabilized plasma. Then we will focus on determination of rotational and vibrational temperature (OES) and preliminary results concerning the production and evolution of OH radical in temporal post-discharge in air/water mixture (PLIF). Theses spectroscopic measurements are undertaken as function of most influent parameters, i . e . voltage pulses features (amplitude, rise time and length) and water concentration.

  10. Surface activity coefficients of spread monolayers of behenic acid salts at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, D K; Halder, E; Das, K P; Mitra, A

    2006-11-16

    The pressure-area isotherms of ionized monolayers of behenic acid at air-water interface at pH 12.0 have been obtained from the Langmuir film balance experiments under various physico-chemical conditions. The value of the measured surface pressure at a given area per molecule is equal to the sum of the ideal pressure, cohesive pressure and electrical pressure. The electrical pressure term is regarded as the sum of the pressure originating from the Gouy-Chapman double layer including discrete ion effect, ion binding and monolayer hydration effect. At a given area, the deviation of the measured surface pressure from its ideal value has been calculated in terms of the apparent surface compressibility coefficients, surface fugacity coefficients for gaseous monolayer and surface activity coefficients of solute forming two-dimensional solutions in the monolayer phase respectively. Values of all these coefficients have been calculated for different compositions of the monolayer using non-ideal gas model and Raoult's and Henry's laws modified for two-dimensional non-ideal solutions respectively. Values of these coefficients may be higher or lower than unity depending upon ionic strengths and nature of inorganic salts present in the sub-phase. Using these values of surface activity coefficients, the standard free energies of formation, of spread monolayers of salts of behenic acid have been calculated at different standard states of reference.

  11. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  12. Considerations for modeling thin cirrus effects via brightness temperature differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E. O.; Arduini, R. F.; Wielicki, B. A.; Stone, R. S.; Tsay, S.-C.

    1995-01-01

    Brightness temperature difference (BTD) values are calculated for selected Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-6) channels (3.9, 12.7 micrometer) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer channels (3.7, 12.0 micrometer). Daytime and nighttime discrimination of particle size information is possible given the infrared cloud extinction optical depth and the BTD value. BTD values are presented and compared for cirrus clouds composed of equivalent ice spheres (volume, surface area) versus randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals. The effect of the hexagonal ice crystals is to increase the magnitude of the BTD values calculated relative to equivalent ice sphere (volume, surface area) BTDs. Equivalent spheres (volume or surface area) do not do a very good job of modeling hexagonal ice crystal effects on BTDs; however, the use of composite spheres improves the simulation and offers interesting prospects. Careful consideration of the number of Legendre polynomial coefficients used to fit the scattering phase functions is crucial to realistic modeling of cirrus BTDs. Surface and view-angle effects are incorporated to provide more realistic simulation.

  13. Intraday evaporation and heat fluxes variation at air-water interface of extremely shallow lakes in Chilean Andean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Jaime; de la Fuente, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Salars are landscapes formed by evapo-concentration of salts that usually have extremely shallow terminal lagoons (de la Fuente & Niño, 2010). They are located in the altiplanic region of the Andes Mountains of Chile, Argentina, Bolivia and Peru, and they sustain highly vulnerable and isolated ecosystems in the Andean Desert. These ecosystems are sustained by benthic primary production, which is directly linked to mass, heat and momentum transfer between the water column and the atmosphere (de la Fuente, 2014). Despite the importance of these transport processes across the air-water interface, there are few studies describing their intraday variation and how they are influenced by the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer in the altiplano. The main objective of this work is to analyze the intraday vertical transport variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum between the atmosphere and a shallow water body on Salar del Huasco located in northern Chile (20°19'40"S, 68°51'25"W). To achieve this goal, we measured atmospheric and water variables in a campaign realized on late October 2015, using high frequency meteorological instruments (a sonic anemometer with an incorporated infrared gas analyzer, and a standard meteorological station) and water sensors. From these data, we characterize the intraday variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum fluxes, we quantify the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer stability on them, and we estimate transfer coefficients associated to latent heat, sensible heat, hydrodynamic drag and vertical transport of water vapor. As first results, we found that latent and sensible heat fluxes are highly influenced by wind speed rather buoyancy, and we can identify four intraday intervals with different thermo-hydrodynamic features: (1) cooling under stable condition with wind speed near 0 from midnight until sunrise; (2) free convection with nearly no wind speed under unstable condition from sunrise until midday

  14. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    X. Sun; S. Kim; L. Cheng; M. Ishii; S.G. Beus

    2001-10-31

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in a cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 20-cm in width and 1-cm in gap. The miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions.

  15. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii; Beus, Stephen G.

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

  16. Reliable quantification of phthalates in environmental matrices (air, water, sludge, sediment and soil): a review.

    PubMed

    Net, Sopheak; Delmont, Anne; Sempéré, Richard; Paluselli, Andrea; Ouddane, Baghdad

    2015-05-15

    Because of their widespread application, phthalates or phthalic acid esters (PAEs) are ubiquitous in the environment. Their presence has attracted considerable attention due to their potential impacts on ecosystem functioning and on public health, so their quantification has become a necessity. Various extraction procedures as well as gas/liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection techniques are found as suitable for reliable detection of such compounds. However, PAEs are ubiquitous in the laboratory environment including ambient air, reagents, sampling equipment, and various analytical devices, that induces difficult analysis of real samples with a low PAE background. Therefore, accurate PAE analysis in environmental matrices is a challenging task. This paper reviews the extensive literature data on the techniques for PAE quantification in natural media. Sampling, sample extraction/pretreatment and detection for quantifying PAEs in different environmental matrices (air, water, sludge, sediment and soil) have been reviewed and compared. The concept of "green analytical chemistry" for PAE determination is also discussed. Moreover useful information about the material preparation and the procedures of quality control and quality assurance are presented to overcome the problem of sample contamination and these encountered due to matrix effects in order to avoid overestimating PAE concentrations in the environment.

  17. Interaction of the cationic peptide bactenecin with mixed phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    López-Oyama, Ana B; Taboada, Pablo; Burboa, María G; Rodríguez, Ezequiel; Mosquera, Víctor; Valdez, Miguel A

    2011-07-01

    The initial mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides target microbes occurs via electrostatic interactions; however, the mechanism is not well understood. We investigate the interaction of the antimicrobial peptide bactenecin with a 50:50 w:w% 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DMPG) phospholipid mixture at the air-water interface with different NaCl concentrations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 M) in the subphase. A larger shift of DPPC:DMPG isotherms was obtained for 0.1 M salt concentration at lower and higher pressures, demonstrating the influence of the negative charge of DMPG molecules and the screening of the electrostatic interaction by the salt concentration. Raman spectroscopy of monolayers demonstrated the presence of cysteine-cysteine bridges in bactenecin loops. The peptide adsorption in DPPC:DMPG monolayers observed by AFM images suggests a self-assembled aggregation process, starting with filament-like networks. Domains similar to carpets were formed and pore structures were obtained after a critical peptide concentration, according to the carpet model.

  18. Measuring interactions between polydimethylsiloxane and serum proteins at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhengzheng; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Baumgart, Tobias; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2013-07-30

    The interaction between synthetic polymers and proteins at interfaces is relevant to basic science as well as a wide range of applications in biotechnology and medicine. One particularly common and important interface is the air-water interface (AWI). Due to the special energetics and dynamics of molecules at the AWI, the interplay between synthetic polymer and protein can be very different from that in bulk solution. In this paper, we applied the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the compression state of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film at the AWI affects the subsequent adsorption of serum protein [e.g., human serum albumin (HSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG)] and the interaction between PDMS and protein. Of particular note is our observation of circular PDMS domains with micrometer diameters that form at the AWI in the highly compressed state of the surface film: proteins were shown to adsorb preferentially to the surface of these circular PDMS domains, accompanied by a greater than 4-fold increase in protein found in the interfacial film. The PDMS-only film and the PDMS-IgG composite film were transferred to cover glass, and platinum-carbon replicas of the transferred films were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We conclude that the structure of the PDMS film greatly affects the amount and distribution of protein at the interface.

  19. Study on different characteristics of doped tri calcium phosphate at different sintering temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Sujan Krishna; Chanda, Abhijit

    2016-04-01

    Pure β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), Zn-doped (3wt %) β-TCP and Mg- doped (3wt %) β-TCP samples were prepared by using a wet chemical precipitation synthesis technique, followed by calcination at 800 °C in air. The developed materials were subjected to sintering at different temperatures. Density and porosity were compared. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) spectrometer were used to examine the changes in crystalline phases and presence of functional groups of TCP ceramics. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the pore formation, pore size, grain size.

  20. Critical air/water blow-down in safety valves at low qualities.

    PubMed

    Moncalvo, D; Friedel, L

    2011-02-28

    Critical air/water blow-downs in safety valves for qualities from 0.01 to 0.113 and mass flow rates from 1.5 up to 4.3 kg/s have been observed in our test facility. These critical blow-downs are characterized by a large void fraction and by an intense mixing of the phases both in the valve body and in the outlet pipe. A qualitative estimation of the flow pattern in the outlet pipe using the map of Taitel and Dukler suggests that these air/water flows are intermittent flows--presumably slug flows--evolving to annular flows for qualities above 0.1. Intermittent flows are also predicted for critical air/water and air/glycerine flows taken from the literature for the same safety valve at slightly larger relieving pressures.

  1. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  2. N₂O accumulation from denitrification under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Poh, Leong Soon; Jiang, Xie; Zhang, Zhongbo; Liu, Yu; Ng, Wun Jern; Zhou, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The effects of temperature on nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during denitrification and denitritation were investigated. Batch experiments were performed to measure N2O accumulation at 25 and 35 °C. More N2O accumulation was observed during denitritation at the higher temperature as compared with full denitrification and low temperature tests. The highest nitrite concentration tested in this study (25 mg/L NO2 (-)N and pH 8.0) did not show inhibitory effect on N2O reduction. It was found that the major cause of more N2O accumulation during denitrification at higher temperature was due to higher N2O production rate and lower N2O solubility. Specific nitrate, nitrite, and N2O reduction rates increased 62, 61, and 41 %, respectively, when temperature rose from 25 to 35 °C. The decrease of N2O solubility in mixed liquor at 35 °C (when compared to 25 °C) resulted in faster diffusing rate of N2O from liquid to gas phase. It was also more difficult for gas phase N2O to be re-dissolved. The diffused N2O was then accumulated in the headspace, which was not available for denitrification by denitrifiers. The results of this study suggest higher temperature may worsen N2O emission from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs).

  3. Intraspecific variation in temperature dependence of gas exchange characteristics among Plantago asiatica ecotypes from different temperature regimes.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazumasa; Onoda, Yusuke; Hikosaka, Kouki

    2007-01-01

    There are large inter- and intraspecific differences in the temperature dependence of photosynthesis, but the physiological cause of the variation is poorly understood. Here, the temperature dependence of photosynthesis was examined in three ecotypes of Plantago asiatica transplanted from different latitudes, where the mean annual temperature varies between 7.5 and 16.8 degrees C. Plants were raised at 15 or 30 degrees C, and the CO(2) response of photosynthetic rates was determined at various temperatures. When plants were grown at 30 degrees C, no difference was found in the temperature dependence of photosynthesis among ecotypes. When plants were grown at 15 degrees C, ecotypes from a higher latitude maintained a relatively higher photosynthetic rate at low measurement temperatures. This difference was caused by a difference in the balance between the capacities of two processes, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration (J(max)) and carboxylation (V(cmax)), which altered the limiting step of photosynthesis at low temperatures. The organization of photosynthetic proteins also varied among ecotypes. The ecotype from the highest latitude increased the J(max) : V(cmax) ratio with decreasing growth temperature, while that from the lowest latitude did not. It is concluded that nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and its response to growth temperature were different among ecotypes, which caused an intraspecific variation in temperature dependence of photosynthesis.

  4. Collapsed bipolar glycolipids at the air/water interface: effect of the stereochemistry on the stretched/bent conformations.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Alicia; Terme, Nolwenn; Benvegnu, Thierry; Vié, Véronique; Lemiègre, Loïc

    2013-12-15

    This article describes a comparative study of several bipolar lipids derived from tetraether structures. The sole structural difference between the main two glycolipids is a unique stereochemical variation on a cyclopentyl ring placed in the middle of the lipids. We discuss the comparative results obtained at the air/water interface on the basis of tensiometry and ellipsometry. Langmuir-Blodgett depositions during lipid film compressions and decompressions were also analyzed by AFM. The lactosylated tetraether (bipolar) lipid structures involved the formation of highly stable multilayers, which are still present at 10 mN m(-1) during decompression. This study suggests also that the stereochemistry of a central cyclopentyl ring dramatically drives the conformation of the corresponding bipolar lipids. Both isomers (trans and cis) adopt a U-shaped (bent) conformation at the air/water interface but the trans cyclopentyl ring induces a much more frustration within this type of conformation. Consequently, this bipolar lipid (trans-tetraether) undergoes a flip of one polar head-group (lactosyl) leading to a stretched conformation during collapse.

  5. Interpreting Vibrational Sum-frequency Spectra of Sulfur Dioxide at the Air/Water Interface: A Comprehensive Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Chang, Tsun-Mei; Tao, Fu-Ming; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the solvation and spectroscopic properties of SO2 at the air/water interface using molecular simulation techniques. Molecular interactions from both Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) and classical polarizable models were utilized to understand the properties of SO2:(H2O)x complexes in the vicinity of the air/water interface. The KS-DFT was included to allow comparisons with sum-frequency generation spectroscopy through the identification of surface SO2:(H2O)x complexes. Using our simulation results, we were able to develop a much more detailed picture for the surface structure of SO2 that is consistent with the spectroscopic data obtained Richmond and coworkers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 16806 (2005)). We also found many similarities and differences between to the two interaction potentials, including a noticeable weakness of the classical potential model in reproducing the asymmetric hydrogen bonding of water with SO2 due to its inability to account for SO2 resonance structures. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and oxygenated PAH (OPAH) air-water exchange during the deepwater horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Lane G; Allan, Sarah E; O'Connell, Steven G; Hobbie, Kevin A; Smith, Brian W; Anderson, Kim A

    2015-01-06

    Passive sampling devices were used to measure air vapor and water dissolved phase concentrations of 33 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 22 oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) at four Gulf of Mexico coastal sites prior to, during, and after shoreline oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWH). Measurements were taken at each site over a 13 month period, and flux across the water-air boundary was determined. This is the first report of vapor phase and flux of both PAHs and OPAHs during the DWH. Vapor phase sum PAH and OPAH concentrations ranged between 1 and 24 ng/m(3) and 0.3 and 27 ng/m(3), respectively. PAH and OPAH concentrations in air exhibited different spatial and temporal trends than in water, and air-water flux of 13 individual PAHs were strongly associated with the DWH incident. The largest PAH volatilizations occurred at the sites in Alabama and Mississippi in the summer, each nominally 10,000 ng/m(2)/day. Acenaphthene was the PAH with the highest observed volatilization rate of 6800 ng/m(2)/day in September 2010. This work represents additional evidence of the DWH incident contributing to air contamination, and provides one of the first quantitative air-water chemical flux determinations with passive sampling technology.

  7. Electrochemical Surface Potential due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Stern, Abraham C.; Levin, Yan; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-06-07

    Herein, we present research that suggests that the underlying physics that drive simple empirical models of anions (e.g. point charge, no polarization) to the air-water interface, with water described by SPC/E, or related partial charge models is different than when both ions and water are modeled with quantum mechanical based interactions. Specifically, we will show that the driving force of ions to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and the negative electrochemical surface potential. We will demonstrate that we can fully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory (DCT). Our research suggests that a significant part of the electrochemical surface potential in empirical models appears to be an artifact of the failure of point charge models in the vicinity of a broken symmetry. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle.

  8. Comparison of different measuring methods for body temperature in lactating cows under different climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ammer, Stefanie; Lambertz, Christian; Gauly, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the research described here was to compare different methods of body temperature (BT) measurements in dairy cows. It was hypothesised that reticular temperature (RET) values reflect the physiological status of the animals in an equivalent way to rectal (RT) and vaginal (VT) measurements. RT, VT and RET temperatures of twelve lactating Holstein-Friesian cows were measured over five consecutive days in June and October 2013. While RT and VT were manually measured three times a day, RET was automatically recorded at 10 min intervals using a bolus in the reticulum. For comparison with RT and VT, different RET values were used: single values at the respective recording times (RET-SIN), and mean (RET-MEAN) and median (RET-MED) values of 2 h prior to RT and VT measurements. Overall, body temperatures averaged 38·1 ± 0·6, 38·2 ± 0·4, 38·7 ± 0·9, 38·5 ± 0·7 and 38·7 ± 0·5 °C for RT, VT, RET-SIN, RET-MEAN and RET-MED, respectively. RT and VT were lower than all RET measurements, while RET-SIN and RET-MED were higher than RET-MEAN (P < 0·001). RET-MEAN and RET-MED values were higher in the morning, whereas RT and VT were greatest in the evening (P < 0·001). Overall, records of RT and VT were strongly correlated (r = 0·75; P < 0·001). In contrast to RET-SIN and RET-MEAN, RET-MED was higher correlated to RT and VT. In June, coefficients were higher between all methods than in October. Relation of barn T to RT and VT was stronger when compared to RET measurements. RET-SIN was higher correlated to barn T than RET-MEAN or RET-MED. Correlation between VT and barn T was strongest (r = 0·48; P < 0·001). In summary, RET-MED showed highest correlation with VT and RT. However, single RET measurements (influenced by water or feed intake) can lead to extreme variations and differences to single VT and RT values.

  9. Femtosecond-laser-induced shockwaves in water generated at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Strycker, B D; Springer, M M; Traverso, A J; Kolomenskii, A A; Kattawar, G W; Sokolov, A V

    2013-10-07

    We report generation of femtosecond-laser-induced shockwaves at an air-water interface by millijoule femtosecond laser pulses. We document and discuss the main processes accompanying this phenomenon, including light emission, development of the ablation plume in the air, formation of an ablation cavity, and, subsequently, a bubble developing in water. We also discuss the possibility of remotely controlling the characteristics of laser-induced sound waves in water through linear acoustic superposition of sound waves that results from millijoule femtosecond laser-pulse interaction with an air-water interface, thus opening up the possibility of remote acoustic applications in oceanic and riverine environments.

  10. Interaction of Charged Colloidal Particles at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-07-07

    We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles.

  11. Turbulence and wave breaking effects on air-water gas exchange

    PubMed

    Boettcher; Fineberg; Lathrop

    2000-08-28

    We present an experimental characterization of the effects of turbulence and breaking gravity waves on air-water gas exchange in standing waves. We identify two regimes that govern aeration rates: turbulent transport when no wave breaking occurs and bubble dominated transport when wave breaking occurs. In both regimes, we correlate the qualitative changes in the aeration rate with corresponding changes in the wave dynamics. In the latter regime, the strongly enhanced aeration rate is correlated with measured acoustic emissions, indicating that bubble creation and dynamics dominate air-water exchange.

  12. The interaction of eugenol with cell membrane models at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid monolayer composition.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Giulia E G; de Souza, Fernanda S; Lago, João Henrique G; Caseli, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    Eugenol, a natural phenylpropanoid derivative with possible action in biological surfaces as microbicide, anesthetic and antioxidant, was incorporated in lipid monolayers of selected lipids at the air-water interface, representing cell membrane models. Interaction of eugenol with the lipids dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) could be inferred by means of surface pressure-area isotherms and Polarization-Modulation Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy. The interaction showed different effects on the different lipids. A higher monolayer expansion was observed for DPPS and DODAB, while more significant effects on the polar groups of the lipids were observed for DPPS and DPPC. These results pointed to the fact that the interaction of eugenol with lipid monolayers at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid composition, which may be important to comprehend at the molecular level the interaction of this drug with biological surfaces.

  13. [Fluoride emission from different soil minerals at high temperatures].

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xie, Z; Xu, J; Liu, C

    2001-03-01

    The emission characteristics of fluoride pollutants from montmorillonite, kaolinite, vermiculite, geothite and allophane were studied to elucidate the mechanism of fluoride-releasing from soils during brick and tile making at high temperatures from 300 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The rate of fluoride emission varied with temperature, mineral type, heating time, specific surface area and cations added to minerals. The escape of crystalline water resulting from crystal lattice collapse at a certain high temperature was found to affect the rate of fluoride emission. Calcium compounds could decrease fluoride emission rate from montmorillonite. At 800 degrees C, the rate of fluoride emission from Ca-treated montmorillonite decreased by 59.6% compared to untreated montmorillonite. The order for fluoride-fixing capacity of the 5 calcium compounds at 800 degrees C was as follows: CaCO3 > CaO > Ca3(PO4)2 > Ca(OH)2 > CaSO4.

  14. Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ankur; SenGupta, Sumana; Kumar, Awadhesh; Choudhury, Sipra; Naik, Prakash D.

    2016-08-01

    The structure and orientation of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate [PF3(C2F5)3], commonly known as [bmim][fap], have been investigated at the air-[bmim][fap] and air-water interfaces, employing vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. The VSFG spectra in the CH stretch region suggest presence of the [bmim] cation at the interfaces. Studies reveal that the butyl chain protrudes out into air, and the imidazolium ring lies almost planar to the interface. The CH stretch intensities get enhanced at the air-water interface, mainly because of polar orientation of imidazolium cation induced by interfacial water molecules. The OH stretch intensities are also enhanced at the air-water interface due to polar orientation of interfacial water molecules induced by [bmim][fap]. The Brewster angle microscopy suggests self aggregation of [bmim][fap] in the presence of water, and the aggregation becomes extensive showing dense surface domains with time. However, the surface pressure is almost unaffected due to aggregation.

  15. Equilibrium free-energy differences at different temperatures from a single set of nonequilibrium transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-10-01

    Crook's fluctuation theorem (CFT) and Jarzynski equality (JE) are effective tools for obtaining free-energy difference Δ F (λA→λB,T0) through a set of finite-time protocol driven nonequilibrium transitions between two equilibrium states A and B [parametrized by the time-varying protocol λ (t ) ] at the same temperature T0. Using the generalized dimensionless work function Δ WG , we extend CFT to transitions between two nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs) created by a thermal gradient. We show that it is possible, provided the period over which the transitions occur is sufficiently long, to obtain Δ F (λA→λB,T0) for different values of T0, using the same set of finite-time transitions between these two NESSs. Our approach thus completely eliminates the need to make new samples for each new T0. The generalized form of JE arises naturally as the average of the exponentiated Δ WG . The results are demonstrated on two test cases: (i) a single particle quartic oscillator having a known closed form Δ F , and (ii) a one-dimensional ϕ4 chain. Each system is sampled from the canonical distribution at an arbitrary T' with λ =λA , then subjected to a temperature gradient between its ends, and after steady state is reached, the protocol change λA→λB is effected in time τ , following which Δ WG is computed. The reverse path likewise initiates in equilibrium at T' with λ =λB and the protocol is time reversed leading to λ =λA and the reverse Δ WG . Our method is found to be more efficient than either JE or CFT when free-energy differences at multiple T0's are required for the same system.

  16. Longevity of crapemyrtle pollen stored at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperatures for storage of crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia app.) pollen over time were studied using clones of two interspecific hybrids (L. 'Cheyenne' and L. 'Wichita') and five species (L. indica 'Catawba', L. subcostata (NA 40181), L. limii, L. speciosa, and L. fauriei 'Kiowa'). Pollen samples were s...

  17. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design.

  18. Two-dimensional crystallization of proteins on lipid monolayers at the air water interface and transfer to an electron microscopy grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisson, Alain; Bergsma-Schutter, Wilma; Oling, Frank; Lambert, Olivier; Reviakine, Ilya

    1999-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) crystallization of proteins on lipid monolayers at the air-water interface is a well established method for crystallizing soluble proteins. The transfer of 2-D crystals from the air-water interface to an electron microscopy (EM) grid constitutes a critical and ill-controlled step in the whole procedure, which is likely to be responsible for the high variability of results obtained with this method. In this paper, we address the following questions: (1) does the material observed on EM grids constitute a true representation of the material present at the air-water interface? (2) is there an optimal method of transfer to obtain well-ordered protein 2-D crystals? To answer these questions, we combine data obtained on three different protein systems, annexin V, streptavidin and cholera toxin, using two types of EM grids, coated with either holey carbon films or continuous carbon films. These combined observations help us draw a coherent picture of the state of the interfacial films at the air-water surface and provide new insight into the perturbing influence of the transfer step. The main conclusions are: (1) both annexin V and streptavidin form crystalline monolayers at the air-water interface, which are well preserved when transfer is performed by means of holey carbon films; (2) a major reorganization of the material present at the water surface accompanies transfer with continuous carbon films; the basal monolayer is extensively damaged, transforming into domains and vesicular structures, which do not pre-exist at the water surface; with the three protein systems studied here, these domains are often crystalline; (3) the most striking structural reorganization induced by transfer with continuous carbon films is observed with annexin V, for which the native p6 crystalline assembly is transformed into another crystal form more ordered, with p3 symmetry. It is most probable that these conclusions also apply to other protein 2-D crystals

  19. Differences between true mean temperatures and means calculated with four different approaches: a case study from three Croatian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Ognjen; Željković, Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Different countries use varied methods for daily mean temperature calculation. None of them assesses precisely the true daily mean temperature, which is defined as the integral of continuous temperature measurements in a day. Of special scientific as well as practical importance is to find out how temperatures calculated by different methods and approaches deviate from the true daily mean temperature. Five mean daily temperatures were calculated (T0, T1, T2, T3, T4) using five different equations. The mean of 24-h temperature observations during the calendar day is accepted to represent the true, daily mean T0. The differences Δi between T0 and four other mean daily temperatures T1, T2, T3, and T4 were calculated and analysed. In the paper, analyses were done with hourly data measured in a period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2014 (149,016 h, 192 months and 16 years) at three Croatian meteorological stations. The stations are situated in distinct climatological areas: Zagreb Grič in a mild climate, Zavižan in the cold mountain region and Dubrovnik in the hot Mediterranean. Influence of fog on the temperature is analysed. Special attention is given to analyses of extreme (maximum and minimum) daily differences occurred at three analysed stations. Selection of the fixed local hours, which is in use for calculation of mean daily temperature, plays a crucial role in diminishing of bias from the true daily temperature.

  20. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. W.; Bian, X. L.; Wu, S. W.; Hussain, I.; Jia, Y. D.; Yi, J.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10−6 s−1 to 10−2 s−1 are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  1. Mechanism of vibrational energy dissipation of free OH groups at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R Kramer; Okuno, Masanari; Backus, Ellen H G; Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa

    2013-11-19

    Interfaces of liquid water play a critical role in a wide variety of processes that occur in biology, a variety of technologies, and the environment. Many macroscopic observations clarify that the properties of liquid water interfaces significantly differ from those of the bulk liquid. In addition to interfacial molecular structure, knowledge of the rates and mechanisms of the relaxation of excess vibrational energy is indispensable to fully understand physical and chemical processes of water and aqueous solutions, such as chemical reaction rates and pathways, proton transfer, and hydrogen bond dynamics. Here we elucidate the rate and mechanism of vibrational energy dissipation of water molecules at the air-water interface using femtosecond two-color IR-pump/vibrational sum-frequency probe spectroscopy. Vibrational relaxation of nonhydrogen-bonded OH groups occurs at a subpicosecond timescale in a manner fundamentally different from hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk, through two competing mechanisms: intramolecular energy transfer and ultrafast reorientational motion that leads to free OH groups becoming hydrogen bonded. Both pathways effectively lead to the transfer of the excited vibrational modes from free to hydrogen-bonded OH groups, from which relaxation readily occurs. Of the overall relaxation rate of interfacial free OH groups at the air-H2O interface, two-thirds are accounted for by intramolecular energy transfer, whereas the remaining one-third is dominated by the reorientational motion. These findings not only shed light on vibrational energy dynamics of interfacial water, but also contribute to our understanding of the impact of structural and vibrational dynamics on the vibrational sum-frequency line shapes of aqueous interfaces.

  2. Liquid Temperature Measurements Using Two Different Tunable Hollow Prisms

    PubMed Central

    Calixto, Sergio; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha; Torres-Gomez, Ismael

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of two hollow prisms. One is a prism with a grating glued to its hypotenuse. This ensemble, prism + grating, is called a grism. It can be applied as an on-axis tunable spectrometer. The other hollow prism is a constant deviation one called a Pellin-Broca. It can be used as a tunable dispersive element in a spectrometer with no moving parts. The application of prisms as temperature sensors is shown. PMID:28146068

  3. Liquid Temperature Measurements Using Two Different Tunable Hollow Prisms.

    PubMed

    Calixto, Sergio; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha; Torres-Gomez, Ismael

    2017-01-29

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of two hollow prisms. One is a prism with a grating glued to its hypotenuse. This ensemble, prism + grating, is called a grism. It can be applied as an on-axis tunable spectrometer. The other hollow prism is a constant deviation one called a Pellin-Broca. It can be used as a tunable dispersive element in a spectrometer with no moving parts. The application of prisms as temperature sensors is shown.

  4. It's Alive!: Students Observe Air-Water Interface Samples Rich with Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an experiment, designed by Cindy Henk, manager of the Socolofsky Microscopy Center at Louisiana State University (LSU), that involved collecting and viewing microorganisms in the air-water interface. The experiment was participated by Leesville High School microbiology students. The students found that the air-water…

  5. Oil lenses on the air-water surface and the validity of Neumann's rule.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2016-05-10

    Many studies have focused on the mechanisms of oil spreading over the air-water surface, oil lens formation, and lens dynamics: Franklin et al.(1774), Rayleigh (1890), Neumann and Wangerin (1894), Hardy (1912), Lyons (1930), Langmuir (1933), Miller (1941), Zisman (1941), Pujado and Scriven (1972), Seeto et al. (1983), and Takamura et al. (2012). Despite all of these studies, the phenomenon of the oil lens's air-water surface equilibrium is still under discussion. Here, we highlight an accurate method to study the oil lens's three-phase-contact angle by reflected light interferometry, using both common (CRLI) and differential reflected light interferometry (DRLI) to verify Neumann's rule (the vectorial sum of the three tensions is zero). For non-spreading oils, the validity of Neumann's rule is confirmed for small lenses when the role of the oil film tension around the lens's meniscus is taken into consideration. Neumann's rule was also validated when the monolayer surface pressure isotherm was taken into consideration for oil spreading on the air-water surface. The periodic monolayer surface pressure oscillation of the oil phase monolayer created by the air-evaporating biphilic oil was monitored with time. The monolayer's surface pressure periodic oscillation was attributed to the instability of the aqueous film covering the oil drop phase. The knowledge gained from this study will benefit the fundamental understanding of the oil lens's air-water surface equilibrium and oil spill mechanisms, thereby promoting better methods for the prevention and clean-up of oil spills.

  6. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants.

  7. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA laboratory in Athens, Georgia i spursuing the goal of developing a model for describing toxicant vapor phase air/water exchange under all relevant environmental conditions. To date, the two-layer exchange model (suitable for low wind speed conditions) has been modif...

  8. Non-linear surface dilatational rheology as a tool for understanding microstructures of air/water interfaces stabilized by oligofructose fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Silvia E H J; Schols, Henk A; van der Linden, Erik; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2013-10-28

    In this paper, the rheological response of air/water interfaces, stabilized by various oligofructose fatty acid esters, to oscillatory dilatational deformations was studied and compared to the response of interfaces stabilized by sucrose esters. We have followed a traditional approach to surface rheology, where the development of the modulus as a function of time is studied as well as the frequency dependence of the modulus. We also adopted a different approach where we investigate in detail the amplitude dependence of the modulus. Finally, we studied the temperature dependence. We show that for an accurate characterization of the dilatational rheology of fluid–fluid interfaces with a complex microstructure, a protocol should be used that not only involves variations of surface pressure, frequency, and temperature, but also establishes amplitude dependence. We show that Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation can be useful tools to help interpret surface dilatational behavior in terms of interfacial microstructure. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by oligofructose esters differed significantly from the response of those stabilized by sucrose esters. Sucrose esters behaved like typical low molecular weight surfactants, and gave interfaces with relatively low moduli, a frequency scaling of the dilatational modulus with an exponent close to 0.5, and displayed no asymmetries in Lissajous plots. In contrast, the oligofructose esters gave, depending on the fatty acid tail, relatively high moduli, almost independent of frequency. Significant asymmetries were observed in the Lissajous plots, with strain hardening during compression and strain softening during extension. Our results suggest that the unusual rheological properties of interfaces stabilized by oligofructose esters may be the result of the formation of a two-dimensional soft glass phase by the oligofructose part of the ester.

  9. Charge dependent condensation of macro-ions at air-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Mrinal; Antonio, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Ordering of ions at and near air-water interfaces is a century old problem for researchers and has implications on a host of physical, chemical and biological processes. The dynamic nature of water surface and the surface fluctuations created by thermally excited capillary waves have always limited measurement of near surface ionic-distributions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome by using macro-ions of sizes larger than the capillary wave roughness ~3Å. Our attempts to measure distributions of inorganic macro-ions in the form of Keggin heteropolyanions (HPAs) of sizes ~10Å have unraveled novel charge-dependent condensation of macro-ions beneath air-water interfaces. Our results demonstrate that HPAs with -3 charges condense readily beneath air-water interfaces. This is in contrast to the absence of surface preference for HPAs with -4 charges. The similarity of HPA-HPA separations near air-water interfaces and in bulk crystal structures suggests the presence of the planar Zundel ions (H5O2+), which interact with HPAs and the water surface to facilitate the charge dependent condensation beneath the air-water interfaces.This work and the use of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, is based upon work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences, under contract No DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  10. Detachment of colloids from a solid surface by a moving air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Flury, Markus; Zhou, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Colloid attachment to liquid-gas interfaces is an important process used in industrial applications to separate suspended colloids from the fluid phase. Moving gas bubbles can also be used to remove colloidal dust from surfaces. Similarly, moving liquid-gas interfaces lead to colloid mobilization in the natural subsurface environment, such as in soils and sediments. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of moving air-water interfaces on the detachment of colloids deposited on an air-dried glass surface, as a function of colloidal properties and interface velocity. We selected four types of polystyrene colloids (positive and negative surface charge, hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The colloids were deposited on clean microscope glass slides using a flow-through deposition chamber. Air-water interfaces were passed over the colloid-deposited glass slides, and we varied the number of passages and the interface velocity. The amounts of colloids deposited on the glass slides were visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Our results showed that colloids attached under unfavorable conditions were removed in significantly greater amounts than those attached under favorable conditions. Hydrophobic colloids were detached more than hydrophilic colloids. The effect of the air-water interface on colloid removal was most pronounced for the first two passages of the air-water interface. Subsequent passages of air-water interfaces over the colloid-deposited glass slides did not cause significant additional colloid removal. Increasing interface velocity led to decreased colloid removal. The force balances, calculated from theory, supported the experimental findings, and highlight the dominance of detachment forces (surface tension forces) over the attachment forces (DLVO forces).

  11. Benchmark analysis of forecasted seasonal temperature over different climatic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, G.; Salerno, R.; Ceppi, A.; Ercolani, G.; Mancini, M.

    2015-12-01

    From a long-term perspective, an improvement of seasonal forecasting, which is often exclusively based on climatology, could provide a new capability for the management of energy resources in a time scale of just a few months. This paper regards a benchmark analysis in relation to long-term temperature forecasts over Italy in the year 2010, comparing the eni-kassandra meteo forecast (e-kmf®) model, the Climate Forecast System-National Centers for Environmental Prediction (CFS-NCEP) model, and the climatological reference (based on 25-year data) with observations. Statistical indexes are used to understand the reliability of the prediction of 2-m monthly air temperatures with a perspective of 12 weeks ahead. The results show how the best performance is achieved by the e-kmf® system which improves the reliability for long-term forecasts compared to climatology and the CFS-NCEP model. By using the reliable high-performance forecast system, it is possible to optimize the natural gas portfolio and management operations, thereby obtaining a competitive advantage in the European energy market.

  12. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals.

  13. Luminescence characteristics of nanoporous anodic alumina annealed at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, D. O.; Vokhmintsev, A. S.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with 100 µm thickness were synthesized in oxalic acid solution under constant current density. Grown samples were annealed in 500-1250 °C range for 5 h in air. Average pore diameter was evaluated using quantitative analysis of SEM images and appeared to be within 78-86 nm diapason. It was found there was a broad emission band in the 350-620 nm region of photoluminescence (PL) spectra in amorphous membranes which is attributed to F-type oxygen deficient centers or oxalic ions. It was shown that intensive red emission caused by Cr3+ (696 nm) and Mn4+ (680 nm) impurities dominates in PL of AAO samples with crystalline α- and δ-phases after annealing at 1100-1250 °C temperatures.

  14. The configuration of water on rough natural surfaces: Implications for understanding air-water interfacial area, film thickness, and imaging resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibbey, Tohren C. G.

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies of air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated porous media have often distinguished between interfacial area corresponding to water held by capillary forces between grains and area corresponding to water associated with solid surfaces. The focus of this work was on developing a better understanding of the nature of interfacial area associated with solid surfaces following drainage of porous media. Stereoscopic scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface elevation maps for eight different surfaces of varying roughness. An algorithm was developed to calculate the true configuration of an air-water interface in contact with the solid surface as a function of capillary pressure. The algorithm was used to calculate surface-associated water configurations for capillary pressures ranging from 10 to 100 cm water. The results of the work show that, following drainage, the configuration of surface-associated water is dominated by bridging of macroscopic surface roughness features over the range of capillary pressures studied, and nearly all of the surface-associated water is capillary held. As such, the thicknesses of surface-associated water were found to be orders-of-magnitude greater than might be expected at the same capillary pressures based on calculations of adsorbed film thickness. The fact that capillary forces in air-water interfaces dominate surface-associated water configuration means that interface shapes are largely unaffected by microscopic surface roughness, and interfaces are considerably smoother than the underlying solid. As such, calculations suggest that microscopic surface roughness likely has minimal impact on the accuracy of surface-associated air-water interfacial areas determined by limited-resolution imaging methods such as computed microtomography.

  15. Temperature-induced plasticity in membrane and storage lipid composition: thermal reaction norms across five different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Van Dooremalen, Coby; Koekkoek, Jacco; Ellers, Jacintha

    2011-02-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor inducing phenotypic plasticity in a wide range of behavioral, morphological, and life history traits in ectotherms. The strength of temperature-induced responses in fitness-related traits may be determined by plasticity of the underlying physiological or biochemical traits. Lipid composition may be an important trait underlying fitness response to temperature, because it affects membrane fluidity as well as availability of stored energy reserves. Here, we investigate the effect of temperature on lipid composition of the springtail Orchesella cincta by measuring thermal reaction norms across five different temperatures after four weeks of cold or warm acclimation. Fatty acid composition in storage and membrane lipids showed a highly plastic response to temperature, but the responses of single fatty acids revealed deviations from the expectations based on HVA theory. We found an accumulation of C(18:2n6) and C(18:3n3) at higher temperatures and the preservation of C(20:4n6) across temperatures, which is contrary to the expectation of decreased unsaturation at higher temperatures. The thermal response of these fatty acids in O. cincta differed from the findings in other species, and therefore shows there is interspecific variation in how single fatty acids contribute to HVA. Future research should determine the consequences of such variation in terms of costs and benefits for the thermal performance of species.

  16. Shock Initiation of Energetic Materials at Different Initial Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Tarver, C M

    2005-01-14

    Shock initiation is one of the most important properties of energetic materials, which must transition to detonation exactly as intended when intentionally shocked and not detonate when accidentally shocked. The development of manganin pressure gauges that are placed inside the explosive charge and record the buildup of pressure upon shock impact has greatly increased the knowledge of these reactive flows. This experimental data, together with similar data from electromagnetic particle velocity gauges, has allowed us to formulate the Ignition and Growth model of shock initiation and detonation in hydrodynamic computer codes for predictions of shock initiation scenarios that cannot be tested experimentally. An important problem in shock initiation of solid explosives is the change in sensitivity that occurs upon heating (or cooling). Experimental manganin pressure gauge records and the corresponding Ignition and Growth model calculations are presented for two solid explosives, LX-17 (92.5 % triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) with 7.5 % Kel-F binder) and LX-04 (85 % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX) with 15 % Viton binder) at several initial temperatures.

  17. Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-09-17

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

  18. Evolution of Nanoflowers and Nanospheres of Zinc Bisporphyrinate Tweezers at the Air/water Interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fan; Zhuo, Congcong; Hu, Chuanjiang; Liu, Ming Hua

    2017-03-22

    While the sophisticated Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett technique facilitates the fabrication of uniform ultrathin monolayer and films, it is also revealed as a powerful tool for the bottom-up constructions of the nanostructures through the air/water interface. In this paper, unique nanoflowers or nanospheres were constructed based on the synthesized m-phthalic diamide-linked Zinc bis-porphyrinate tweezers using the Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. It was found that both the two tweezer type Zinc bisporphyrinates could form stable two-dimensional spreading films at the air/water interface, which could be subsequently transferred onto solid substrates by the vertical lifting method. The atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that at the initial spreading stage the compound formed flat disk-like domains and then hierarchically evolved into nanoflowers or nanospheres upon compressing the floating film. Such nanostructures have not been reported before and cannot be fabricated using the other self-assembly methods.

  19. Structure of phospholipid monolayers containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipids at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, J.; Smith, G.S.; Kuhl, T.L.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-04-17

    The density distribution of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface mixed with varying amounts of lipid with poly(ethylene glycol)polymer headgroups (polymer-lipid or PEG-lipid) was measured using neutron reflectometry. The structure of the monolayer at the interface was greatly perturbed by the presence of the bulky polymer-lipid headgroups resulting in a large increase in the thickness of the headgroup region normal to the interface and a systematic roughening of the interface with increasing polymer-lipid content. These results show how bulky hydrophilic moieties cause significant deformations and out-of-place protrusions of phospholipid monolayers and presumably bilayers, vesicles and biological membranes. In terms of polymer physics, very short polymer chains tethered to the air-water interface follow scaling behavior with a mushroom to brush transition with increasing polymer grafting density. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Behavior of pH-sensitive core shell particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mark D'Souza; Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Cayre, Olivier J; Biggs, Simon

    2012-03-20

    In this article, the adsorption of latex core-responsive polymer-shell nanoparticles at the air-water interface is investigated using a Langmuir trough. Phase transition isotherms are used to explore their responsive behavior at the interface as a function of changes in the pH of the subphase. By adjusting the pH of the water prior to particle deposition, we probe the effect of the stabilizing polymer wetting by the water subphase on the stability of these particles at the air-water interface. In addition, by initially compressing a stable film of adsorbed particles and then subsequently changing the pH of the subphase we study desorption of these particles into the water phase.

  1. Effect of surfactants on bubble collisions with an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyan; Guo, Tianqi; Dabiri, Sadegh; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2016-11-01

    Collisions of bubbles on an air-water interface are frequently observed in natural environments and industrial applications. We study the coefficient of restitution of a bubble colliding on an air-water interface in the presence of surfactants through a combination of experimental and numerical approaches. In a high concentration surfactant solution, bubbles experience perfectly inelastic collisions, and bubbles are arrested by the interface after the collision. As the surfactant concentration decreases, collisions are altered to partially inelastic, and eventually, elastic collisions occur in the pure water. In a high concentration surfactant solution, the reduced bouncing is attributed to the Marangoni stress. We identify the Langmuir number, the ratio between absorption and desorption rates, as the fundamental parameter to quantify the Marangoni effect on collision processes in surfactant solutions. The effect of Marangoni stress on the bubble's coefficient of restitution is non-monotonic, where the coefficient of restitution first decreases with Langmuir number, and then increases.

  2. Surface pressure affects B-hordein network formation at the air-water interface in relation to gastric digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingqi; Huang, Jun; Zeng, Hongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    Protein interfacial network formation under mechanical pressure and its influence on degradation was investigated at molecular level using Langmuir-Blodgett B-hordein monolayer as a 2D model. Surface properties, such as surface pressure, dilatational and shear rheology and the surface pressure--area (π-A) isotherm, of B-hordein at air-water interface were analyzed by tensiometer, rheometer and a Langmuir-Blodgett trough respectively. B-Hordein conformation and orientation under different surface pressures were determined by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The interfacial network morphology was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). B-Hordein could reduce the air-water surface tension rapidly to ∼ 45 mN/m and form a solid-like network with high rheological elasticity and compressibility at interface, which could be a result of interactions developed by intermolecular β-sheets. The results also revealed that B-hordein interfacial network switched from an expanded liquid phase to a solid-like film with increasing compression pressure. The orientation of B-hordein was parallel to the surface when in expended liquid phase, whereas upon compression, the hydrophobic repetitive region tilted away from water phase. When compressed to 30 mN/m, a strong elastic network was formed at the interface, and it was resistant to a harsh gastric-like environment of low pH and pepsin. This work generated fundamental knowledge, which suggested the potential to design B-hordein stabilized emulsions and encapsulations with controllable digestibility for small intestine targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.

  3. New Mechanistic Pathways for Criegee-Water Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kumar, Manoj; Zhong, Jie; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-07

    Understanding Criegee chemistry has become one of central topics in atmospheric research recently. The reaction of Criegee intermediates with gas-phase water clusters has been widely viewed as a key Criegee reaction in the troposphere. However, the effect of aerosols or clouds on Criegee chemistry has received little attention. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, and water clusters in the gas phase, as well as at the air/water surface using ab initio quantum chemical calculations and adaptive buffered force quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that the typical time scale for the reaction of CH2OO with water at the air/water interface is on the order of a few picoseconds, 2-3 orders of magnitude shorter than that in the gas phase. Importantly, the adbf-QM/MM dynamics simulations suggest several reaction pathways for the CH2OO + water reaction at the air/water interface, including the loop-structure-mediated mechanism and the stepwise mechanism. Contrary to the conventional gas-phase CH2OO reaction, the loop-structure is not a prerequisite for the stepwise mechanism. For the latter, a water molecule and the CH2OO at the air/water interface, upon their interaction, can result in the formation of (H3O)(+) and (OH)CH2(OO)(-). Thereafter, a hydrogen bond can be formed between (H3O)(+) and the terminal oxygen atom of (OH)CH2(OO)(-), leading to direct proton transfer and the formation of α-hydroxy methylperoxide, HOCH2OOH. The mechanistic insights obtained from this simulation study should motivate future experimental studies of the effect of water clouds on Criegee chemistry.

  4. Adsorption, folding, and packing of an amphiphilic peptide at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Engin, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet

    2012-02-23

    Peptide oligomers play an essential role as model compounds for identifying key motifs in protein structure formation and protein aggregation. Here, we present our results, based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations, on adsorption, folding, and packing within a surface monolayer of an amphiphilic peptide at the air/water interface. Experimental results suggest that these molecules spontaneously form ordered monolayers at the interface, adopting a β-hairpin-like structure within the surface layer. Our results reveal that the β-hairpin structure can be observed both in bulk and at the air/water interface. However, the presence of an interface leads to ideal partitioning of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues, and therefore reduces the conformational space for the molecule and increases the stability of the hairpin structure. We obtained the adsorption free energy of a single β-hairpin at the air/water interface, and analyzed the enthalpic and entropic contributions. The adsorption process is favored by two main factors: (1) Free-energy reduction due to desolvation of the hydrophobic side chains of the peptide and release of the water molecules which form a cage around these hydrophobic groups in bulk water. (2) Reduction of the total air/water contact area at the interface upon adsorption of the peptide amphiphile. By performing mutations on the original molecule, we demonstrated the relative role of key design features of the peptide. Finally, by analyzing the potential of mean force among two peptides at the interface, we investigated possible packing mechanisms for these molecules within the surface monolayer.

  5. Foam and cluster structure formation by latex particles at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Garcia, Jaime; Gámez-Corrales, Rogelio; Ivlev, Boris I.

    1997-02-01

    We report the formation of two-dimensional foam and cluster structures by spherical polystyrene particles trapped at the air/water interface. The colloidal foam is a transient structure that evolves to the formation of clusters, but clusters can also be formed after deposition of the sample. We also observed the formation of small aggregates, whose formation along with the cluster stabilization can be explained in terms of a balance between electrostatic repulsive and van der Waals attractive interactions.

  6. Bio-inspired evaporation through plasmonic film of nanoparticles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenhui; Liu, Yanming; Tao, Peng; Shen, Qingchen; Yi, Nan; Zhang, Fangyu; Liu, Quanlong; Song, Chengyi; Zhang, Di; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-08-27

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles self-assembled at the air-water interface to produce an evaporative surface with local control inspired by skins and plant leaves. Fast and efficient evaporation is realized due to the instant and localized plasmonic heating at the evaporative surface. The bio-inspired evaporation process provides an alternative promising approach for evaporation, and has potential applications in sterilization, distillation, and heat transfer.

  7. Biodegradability of dispersed crude oil at two different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Venosa, A D; Holder, E L

    2007-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were initiated to study the biodegradability of oil after dispersants were applied. Two experiments were conducted, one at 20 degrees C and the other at 5 degrees C. In both experiments, only the dispersed oil fraction was investigated. Each experiment required treatment flasks containing 3.5% artificial seawater and crude oil previously dispersed by either Corexit 9500 or JD2000 at a dispersant-to-oil ratio of 1:25. Two different concentrations of dispersed oil were prepared, the dispersed oil then transferred to shake flasks, which were inoculated with a bacterial culture and shaken on a rotary shaker at 200 rpm for several weeks. Periodically, triplicate flasks were removed and sacrificed to determine the residual oil concentration remaining at that time. Oil compositional analysis was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to quantify the biodegradability. Dispersed oil biodegraded rapidly at 20 degrees C and less rapidly at 5 degrees C, in line with the hypothesis that the ultimate fate of dispersed oil in the sea is rapid loss by biodegradation.

  8. Differences between near-surface equivalent temperature and temperature trends for the Eastern United States. Equivalent temperature as an alternative measure of heat content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davey, C.A.; Pielke, R.A.; Gallo, K.P.

    2006-01-01

    There is currently much attention being given to the observed increase in near-surface air temperatures during the last century. The proper investigation of heating trends, however, requires that we include surface heat content to monitor this aspect of the climate system. Changes in heat content of the Earth's climate are not fully described by temperature alone. Moist enthalpy or, alternatively, equivalent temperature, is more sensitive to surface vegetation properties than is air temperature and therefore more accurately depicts surface heating trends. The microclimates evident at many surface observation sites highlight the influence of land surface characteristics on local surface heating trends. Temperature and equivalent temperature trend differences from 1982-1997 are examined for surface sites in the Eastern U.S. Overall trend differences at the surface indicate equivalent temperature trends are relatively warmer than temperature trends in the Eastern U.S. Seasonally, equivalent temperature trends are relatively warmer than temperature trends in winter and are relatively cooler in the fall. These patterns, however, vary widely from site to site, so local microclimate is very important. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimum dose variation caused by post exposure bake temperature difference inside photoresist over different sublayers and thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young-Min; An, Ilsin; Kim, Do Wan; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2008-03-01

    In principle, the dose should not be changed to make the same linewidth if a perfect anti-reflection coating (ARC) is used for all the sublayers underneath the resist. However, the optimum dose for different sublayers and thicknesses are different even though perfect ARC is used. The post exposure bake (PEB) process of a chemically amplified resist is one of the key processes to make very small features of semiconductor device. The photo-generated acid makes the deprotection of protected polymer, and this deprotection highly depends on the PEB temperature and time. The diffusion length of acid is also strongly dependent on PEB temperature and time. As the linewidth of the device decreases, smaller diffusion length is required to reduce the roughness of the line edge and width. One of the key factors to determine the deprotection and acid diffusion is the initial temperature rising and the final real temperature inside the resist. The unpredictable temperature rising to the pre-set temperature mainly causes the variation of linewidth and the optimum dose. In order to predict the accurate PEB temperature and time dependency of the linewidth and dose, the heat transfer from the hot plate to the resist on the top of the multiply stacked sublayers over the silicon wafer has to be known since the reaction and diffusion occur inside the resist, not on the top of the bare silicon wafer. We studied heat transfer from the hot plate to the top of the resist including conductivity and thickness of each sublayer. For this purpose, a novel numerical approach incorporated with analytic method was proposed to solve the heat conduction problem. The unknowns for temperature are located only at the interfaces between layers, so that it is fast and efficient. We calculated the time that is consumed for the resist to attain the prescribed PEB temperature for the different multi stacks and thicknesses. Calculation shows that the temperature rising is different and final temperature on

  10. Interaction between graphene oxide and Pluronic F127 at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanghao; Guo, Jingru; Patel, Ravi A; Dadlani, Anup L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2013-05-14

    Triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 (PF127) has previously been demonstrated to disperse graphene oxide (GO) in electrolyte solution and block the hydrophobic interaction between GO and l-tryptophan and l-tyrosine. However, the nature of this interaction between PF127 and GO remains to be characterized and elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to characterize and understand the interaction between GO and PF127 using a 2-dimensional Langmuir monolayer methodology at the air-water interface by surface pressure-area isotherm measurement, stability, adsorption, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. Based on the observation of surface pressure-area isotherms, adsorption, and stability of PF127 and PF127/GO mixture at the air-water interface, GO is suggested to change the conformation of PF127 at the air-water interface and also drag PF127 from the interface to the bulk subphase. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) image supports this assumption, as GO and PF127 can be observed by spreading the subphase solution outside the compressing barriers, as shown in the TOC graphic.

  11. Studies of Athabasca asphaltene Langmuir films at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Yan; Lawrence, Steven; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2003-08-01

    Asphaltenes are present in heavy oils and bitumen. They are a mixture of hydrocarbons having complex structures of polyaromatic rings and short side chains. In general, the high-molecular-weight asphaltene is the most aromatic fraction with the highest number of side chains and the low-molecular-weight asphaltene contains the lowest number of side chains, while the number of side chains of the whole asphaltene fraction lies in between. In this study, asphaltenes were extracted and/or fractionated from Athabasca oil sand bitumen. Subfractions of high and low molecular weight and the whole asphaltenes were characterized using a Langmuir trough and complementary techniques such as VPO, FTIR, AFM, and contact angle measurements. At an air-water interface, amphiphilic asphaltene molecules can form a monolayer. Various fractions (high, low, and whole) of the asphaltene molecules behave similarly at the air-water interface, characterized by close resemblance of their surface pressure-area, hysteresis, and relaxation isotherms. The high-molecular-weight asphaltene is the most expanded fraction, while the low-molecular-weight asphaltene fraction is the most condensed, with the whole asphaltene lying in between. At the air-water interface a monolayer of the low-molecular-weight asphaltene relaxes at a faster rate than one of the high-molecular-weight asphaltene.

  12. Properties of amphiphilic oligonucleotide films at the air/water interface and after film transfer.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Kwak, M; de Vries, J W; Sawaryn, C; Wang, J; Anaya, M; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Herrmann, A; Berger, R

    2013-11-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic hybrid materials containing an oligonucleotide sequence at the air/water interface was investigated by means of pressure-molecular area (Π-A) isotherms. In addition, films were transferred onto solid substrates and imaged using scanning force microscopy. We used oligonucleotide molecules with lipid tails, which consisted of a single stranded oligonucleotide 11 mer containing two hydrophobically modified 5-(dodec-1-ynyl)uracil nucleobases (dU11) at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The air/water interface was used as confinement for the self-assembling process of dU11. Scanning force microscopy of films transferred via Langmuir-Blodgett technique revealed mono-, bi- (Π ≥ 2 mN/m) and multilayer formation (Π ≥ 30 mN/m). The first layer was 1.6 ± 0.1 nm thick. It was oriented with the hydrophilic oligonucleotide moiety facing the hydrophilic substrate while the hydrophobic alkyl chains faced air. In the second layer the oligonucleotide moiety was found to face the air. The second layer was found to cover up to 95% of the sample area. Our measurements indicated that the rearrangement of the molecules into bi- and multiple bilayers happened already at the air/water interface. Similar results were obtained with a second type of oligonucleotide amphiphile, an oligonucleotide block copolymer, which was composed of an oligonucleotide 11 mer covalently attached at the terminus to polypropyleneoxide (PPO).

  13. Hydrodynamics of a fixed camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhiraj; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Ravi; Mandre, Shreyas; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when introduced at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and the camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface. This radial spreading of camphor is due to Marangoni forces setup by the camphor concentration gradient. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of this process for a camphor tablet held fixed at the air-water interface. During the initial transient, the time-dependent spread radius R (t) of camphor scales algebraically with time t (R (t) ~t 1 / 2) in agreement with empirical scalings reported for spreading of volatile oils on water surface. But unlike surfactants, the camphor stops spreading when the influx of camphor from the tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the outflux of camphor due to evaporation, and a steady-state condition is reached. The spreading camphor however, shears the underlying fluid and sets up bulk convective flow. We explain the coupled steady-state dynamics between the interfacial camphor spreading and bulk convective flow with a boundary layer approximation, supported by experimental evidence. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  14. Comparison of models with different and identical vibrational temperatures of the molecular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbak, V. G.

    1993-02-01

    Calculation results based on models with averaged and different vibrational temperatures of the molecular components are compared for flow near the critical line of the Buran spacecraft during its descent in the atmosphere. It is shown that the difference between the vibrational temperatures of molecular components may be substantial. When models with different vibrational temperatures are used, the effect of nonequilibrium excitation of vibrational degrees of freedom on the flow characteristics at the thermally stressed section of a gliding reentry trajectory is greater than in the case of a model with a single averaged vibrational temperature. The difference between the heat flows of the models can be as high as 20 percent.

  15. Influence of temperature difference on surface figure controlling during continuous polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Meijuan; Xu, Xueke; Dun, Aihuan; Yang, Minghong; Gao, Wenlan; Wei, Chaoyang; Liu, Shijie; Shao, Jianda; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    During continuous polishing, temperature is a significant source of processing uncertainty. Three work pieces of different kind material (K9, Nd:glass and ULE) were polished on 2.4m continuous polisher. It turns out that temperature difference has different influence on different material work pieces. It also indicates that temperature difference aggravates the processing uncertainy. The deformation caused by temperature difference is simulated using ANSYS. It shows that, with top-bottom temperature difference of 0.1°C, the deformation of Nd:glass, K9 and ULE are 0.444E-6 m (about 0.7025λ), 0.249E-6 m (about 0.3925λ ), and 0.105E-8 m (about 0.00166λ), respectively. With radial temperature difference of 0.1°C, the deformation of Nd:glass, K9 and ULE are 0.831E-7 m (about 0.1313λ), 0.465E-7 m (about 0.07348λ) and 0.196E-9 m (about 3.0973E-4λ), respectively. To explore the top-bottom temperature difference and radial temperature difference along the polishing surface, a small aperture Nd:glass and a large aperture Nd:glass in polishing have been measured using thermal infrared imager. The results showed that for Ø 260 mm × 26 mm Nd: glass, the radial temperature difference is about 0.1°C, while the top-bottom temperature difference is about 0.1°C ~ 0.21°C. Contrastively, for 810 mm×460 mm×40 mm Nd:glass, the radial temperature difference have reached 0.4°C, while top - bottom temperature difference ranges between 0.1°C ~ 0.27°C. When element gets larger, it will suffer greater temperature difference. These temperature differences are great enough to cause deformation far beyond the polishing accuracy required. Finally, methods are proposed to diminish the effect of temperature difference.

  16. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  17. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.; Emery, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. During this one year grant, design and construction of an improved infrared radiometer was completed and testing was initiated. In addition, development of an improved parametric model for the bulk-skin temperature difference was completed using data from the previous version of the radiometer. This model will comprise a key component of an improved procedure for estimating the bulk SST from satellites. The results comprised a significant portion of the Ph.D. thesis completed by one graduate student and they are currently being converted into a journal publication.

  18. Universal behavior of the viscosity of supercooled fragile and polymeric glassformers in different temperature regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraca, Adriana; Goldstein, Patricia; del Castillo, Luis Felipe

    2016-11-01

    The behavior of the viscosity of supercooled liquids with temperature has been extensively studied in different regimes. We present a universal behavior for the Logarithmic Shift Factor for fragile and polymeric glassformers in two temperature regions, above and below the crossover temperature Tc, respectively. We find two different equations, one for each region, that may be represented as master plots which show universal behaviors for both cases.

  19. Effects of Different Environment Temperatures on Some Motor Characteristics and Muscle Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakir, Ergün; Yüksek, Selami; Asma, Bülent; Arslanoglu, Erkal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was determine the effects of different environment temperatures on motor characteristics and muscle strength. 15 athletes participated to study. Flexibility, vertical jump, hand grip-leg strength, 30m sprint, 20-meter shuttle run and coordination-agility tests were measured in five different environment temperatures. (22°C,…

  20. Effects of Cylindrical Chopper Geometry on Calculating Power Coupling Efficiency and Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    in Teff = 180 K. Instead of observing an effective temperature difference of 218 K between the chopper and cold scene, a 115 K temperature...difference (295 K – Teff ) results for the cylindrical chopper. Depending on the specifics of the setup, including the location of the detector array (L0

  1. Influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Hoff, R.M.

    2000-03-15

    The influence of eutrophication on the biogeochemical cycles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is largely unknown. In this paper, the application of a dynamic air-water-phytoplankton exchange model to Lake Ontario is used as a framework to study the influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of POPs. The results of these simulations demonstrate that air-water exchange controls phytoplankton concentrations in remote aquatic environments with little influence from land-based sources of pollutants and supports levels in even historically contaminated systems. Furthermore, eutrophication or high biomass leads to a disequilibrium between the gas and dissolved phase, enhanced air-water exchange, and vertical sinking fluxes of PCBs. Increasing biomass also depletes the water concentrations leading to lower than equilibrium PCB concentrations in phytoplankton. Implications to future trends in PCB pollution in Lake Ontario are also discussed.

  2. Interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, socio-demographic and built environment) on preterm birth.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposures are often measured individually, though many occur in tandem. To address aggregate exposures, a county-level Environmental Quality Index (EQI) representing five environmental domains (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic) was constructed. Recent st...

  3. Measurement of air distribution and void fraction of an upwards air-water flow using electrical resistance tomography and a wire-mesh sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olerni, Claudio; Jia, Jiabin; Wang, Mi

    2013-03-01

    Measurements on an upwards air-water flow are reported that were obtained simultaneously with a dual-plane electrical resistance tomograph (ERT) and a wire-mesh sensor (WMS). The ultimate measurement target of both ERT and WMS is the same, the electrical conductivity of the medium. The ERT is a non-intrusive device whereas the WMS requires a net of wires that physically crosses the flow. This paper presents comparisons between the results obtained simultaneously from the ERT and the WMS for evaluation and calibration of the ERT. The length of the vertical testing pipeline section is 3 m with an internal diameter of 50 mm. Two distinct sets of air-water flow rate scenarios, bubble and slug regimes, were produced in the experiments. The fast impedance camera ERT recorded the data at an approximate time resolution of 896 frames per second (fps) per plane in contrast with the 1024 fps of the wire-mesh sensor WMS200. The set-up of the experiment was based on well established knowledge of air-water upwards flow, particularly the specific flow regimes and wall peak effects. The local air void fraction profiles and the overall air void fraction were produced from two systems to establish consistency for comparison of the data accuracy. Conventional bulk flow measurements in air mass and electromagnetic flow metering, as well as pressure and temperature, were employed, which brought the necessary calibration to the flow measurements. The results show that the profiles generated from the two systems have a certain level of inconsistency, particularly in a wall peak and a core peak from the ERT and WMS respectively, whereas the two tomography instruments achieve good agreement on the overall air void fraction for bubble flow. For slug flow, when the void fraction is over 30%, the ERT underestimates the void fraction, but a linear relation between ERT and WMS is still observed.

  4. Thermoregulation responses of broiler chickens to humidity at different ambient temperatures. I. One week of age.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Zhang, H F; Jiao, H C; Zhao, T; Sui, S J; Gu, X H; Zhang, Z Y; Buyse, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-08-01

    Three trials were conducted to investigate the effect of RH (35, 60, and 85%) on thermoregulation of 1-wk-old broiler chickens at different temperatures (35, 30, and 25 degrees C). The response to humidity in rectal temperature and plumage temperature at the back and breast within 24 h after exposure were recorded at 5 time points (1,4,8,16, and 24 h). Humidity affected the thermoregulation of 1-wk-old broiler chickens by redistributing heat within the body at high, low, and thermoneutral temperatures. The redistribution of heat resulted in decreased rectal temperature and increased peripheral temperature, which were, respectively, beneficial and unfavorable at high and low temperatures. These results suggested that feedback effects of surface temperature on core temperature also exist in poultry, as already observed in mammals, and could be induced not only by changed ambient temperature but also by the changes in humidity at high temperature. The disturbance of thermal equilibrium could not be established solely by changes in RT, but rather core and surface temperatures had to be considered. The daily rhythms in rectal and surface temperatures were affected by humidity.

  5. Fugacity gradients of hydrophobic organics across the air-water interface measured with a novel passive sampler.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chou; Yao, Yao; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wu, Feng-Chang; Wong, Charles S; Tao, Shu; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-11-01

    Mass transfer of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) across the air-water interface is an important geochemical process controlling the fate and transport of HOCs at the regional and global scales. However, few studies have characterized concentration or fugacity profiles of HOCs near both sides of the air-water interface, which is the driving force for the inter-compartmental mass transfer of HOCs. Herein, we introduce a novel passive sampling device which is capable of measuring concentration (and therefore fugacity) gradients of HOCs across the air-water interface. Laboratory studies indicated that the escaping fugacity values of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water to air were negatively correlated to their volatilization half-lives. Results for field deployment were consistent between the passive sampler and an active method, i.e., a combination of grab sampling and liquid-liquid extraction. In general, the fugacity profiles of detected PAHs were indicative of an accumulation mechanism in the surface microlayer of the study regions (Haizhu Lake and Hailing Bay of Guangdong Province, China), while p,p'-DDD tended to volatilize from water to the atmosphere in Hailing Bay. Furthermore, the fugacity profiles of the target analytes increased towards the air-water interface, reflecting the complexity of environmental behavior of the target analytes near the air-water interface. Overall, the passive sampling device provides a novel means to better characterize the air-water diffusive transfer of HOCs, facilitating the understanding of the global cycling of HOCs.

  6. Differences induced by incubation temperature, versus androgen manipulation, in male leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius).

    PubMed

    Huang, Victoria; Crews, David

    2012-08-20

    A fundamental tenet of sexual selection is that in sexually dimorphic traits, there is variation within a sex. In leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination, embryonic temperature contributes both to sex determination and polymorphisms within each sex. In this study we report that males from different incubation temperatures, one hitherto untested, exhibit significant differences in behavior even when castrated. Further, treatment with dihydrotestosterone increases scent marking, a territorial behavior. This supports previous results indicating that temperature has a direct organizing action on brain and sociosexual behavior independent of gonadal hormones.

  7. Temperature differences in the air layer close to a road surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogren, Jörgen; Gustavsson, Torbjörn; Karlsson, Maria

    2001-12-01

    In this study, profiles of temperature and humidity (<250 cm above the road and 5 m into the surroundings) have been used to examine the development of temperature differences in the air layer close to the road. Temperature, humidity and wind profiles were measured, together with net radiation and observations of road surface state, at a test site at Road 45, Surte, Sweden. Measured temperature differences were compared with present weather, preceding weather, surface status, wind direction and other parameters thought to be important for the development of temperature differences. The results showed that large temperature differences (1-3 °C between 250 cm and 10 cm above the road) occurred when there was a high risk of slipperiness caused by hoarfrost, snow or ice on the road. The temperature differences between different levels were associated with the exchange of humidity and temperature between the air layer and the road surface. The 10 cm level reflected the surface processes well. Higher levels were influenced by the surroundings because of turbulence and advection. This study emphasises the need for measurements to be taken at a height and place that reflects the processes at the road surface.

  8. Attachment of composite porous supra-particles to air-water and oil-water interfaces: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Paunov, Vesselin N; Al-Shehri, Hamza; Horozov, Tommy S

    2016-09-29

    experimental data for the attachment of porous supra particles to the air-water interface from both air and water also agree with the theoretical model. This study gives important insights about how porous particles and particle aggregates attach to the oil-water interface in Pickering emulsions and the air-water surface in particle-stabilised aqueous foams relevant in ore flotation and a range of cosmetic, pharmaceutical, food, home and personal care formulations.

  9. Atmospheric partitioning and the air-water exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a large shallow Chinese lake (Lake Chaohu).

    PubMed

    Qin, Ning; He, Wei; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Xiu; He, Qi-Shuang; Yang, Bin; Ouyang, Hui-Ling; Wang, Qing-Mei; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2013-11-01

    The residual levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere and in dissolved phase from Lake Chaohu were measured by (GC-MS). The composition and seasonal variation were investigated. The diffusive air-water exchange flux was estimated by a two-film model, and the uncertainty in the flux calculations and the sensitivity of the parameters were evaluated. The following results were obtained: (1) the average residual levels of all PAHs (PAH16) in the atmosphere from Lake Chaohu were 60.85±46.17 ng m(-3) in the gaseous phase and 14.32±23.82 ng m(-3) in the particulate phase. The dissolved PAH16 level was 173.46±132.89 ng L(-1). (2) The seasonal variation of average PAH16 contents ranged from 43.09±33.20 ng m(-3) (summer) to 137.47±41.69 ng m(-3) (winter) in gaseous phase, from 6.62±2.72 ng m(-3) (summer) to 56.13±22.99 ng m(-3) (winter) in particulate phase, and 142.68±74.68 ng L(-1) (winter) to 360.00±176.60 ng L(-1) (summer) in water samples. Obvious seasonal trends of PAH16 concentrations were found in the atmosphere and water. The values of PAH16 for both the atmosphere and the water were significantly correlated with temperature. (3) The monthly diffusive air-water exchange flux of total PAH16 ranged from -1.77×10(4) ng m(-2) d(-1) to 1.11×10(5) ng m(-2) d(-1), with an average value of 3.45×10(4) ng m(-2) d(-1). (4) The results of a Monte Carlo simulation showed that the monthly average PAH fluxes ranged from -3.4×10(3) ng m(-2) d(-1) to 1.6×10(4) ng m(-2) d(-1) throughout the year, and the uncertainties for individual PAHs were compared. (5) According to the sensitivity analysis, the concentrations of dissolved and gaseous phase PAHs were the two most important factors affecting the results of the flux calculations.

  10. Clinical review: Brain-body temperature differences in adults with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine; Lunn, Kueh Wern

    2013-04-22

    Surrogate or 'proxy' measures of brain temperature are used in the routine management of patients with brain damage. The prevailing view is that the brain is 'hotter' than the body. The polarity and magnitude of temperature differences between brain and body, however, remains unclear after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The focus of this systematic review is on the adult patient admitted to intensive/neurocritical care with a diagnosis of severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 8). The review considered studies that measured brain temperature and core body temperature. Articles published in English from the years 1980 to 2012 were searched in databases, CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid SP, Mednar and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database. For the review, publications of randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, before and after studies, cohort studies, case-control studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion. Of 2,391 records identified via the search strategies, 37 were retrieved for detailed examination (including two via hand searching). Fifteen were reviewed and assessed for methodological quality. Eleven studies were included in the systematic review providing 15 brain-core body temperature comparisons. The direction of mean brain-body temperature differences was positive (brain higher than body temperature) and negative (brain lower than body temperature). Hypothermia is associated with large brain-body temperature differences. Brain temperature cannot be predicted reliably from core body temperature. Concurrent monitoring of brain and body temperature is recommended in patients where risk of temperature-related neuronal damage is a cause for clinical concern and when deliberate induction of below-normal body temperature is instituted.

  11. Comparison of positional surfactant isomers for displacement of rubisco protein from the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    He, Lizhong; Onaizi, Sagheer A; Dimitrijev-Dwyer, Mirjana; Malcolm, Andrew S; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Dong, Chuchuan; Holt, Stephen A; Thomas, Robert K; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2011-08-15

    Protein-surfactant interaction, which is a function of the protein and surfactant characteristics, is a common phenomenon in a wide range of industrial applications. In this work, we used rubisco, the most abundant protein in nature, as a model protein and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDOBS), one of the most widely used commercial surfactants, with two positional isomers (SDOBS-2 and SDOBS-6), as a model surfactant. We first examined the surface tension and the mechanical properties of interfacial mixed rubisco-SDOBS films adsorbed at the air-water interface. The concentration of rubisco in solution was fixed at 0.1 mg mL(-1) while the SDOBS concentration varied from 0 to 150 μM. Both the surface tension and the mechanical strength of the interfacial film decreased with increasing SDOBS concentration. Overall, the surface tension of a rubisco-SDOBS-6 mixture is lower than that of rubisco-SDOBS-2, while the mechanical strength of both systems is similar. Neutron reflection data suggest that rubisco protein is likely denatured at the interface. The populations of rubisco and SDOBS of the mixed systems at the interface were determined by combining non-deuterated and deuterated SDOBS to provide contrast variation. At a low surfactant concentration, SDOBS-6 has a stronger ability to displace rubisco from the air-water interface than SDOBS-2. However, when surfactant concentration reaches 50 μM, SDOBS-2 has a higher population than SDOBS-6, with more rubisco displaced from the interface. The results presented in this work suggest that the extent of protein displacement from the air-water interface, and hence the nature of the protein-surfactant interactions at the interface, are strongly affected by the position of surfactant isomerisation, which might allow the design of formulations for efficient removal of protein stains.

  12. Monolayer film behavior of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas; Schooling, Sarah R; Beveridge, Terry J; Katsaras, John

    2008-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential biomacromolecule making up approximately 50% of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. LPS chemistry facilitates cellular barrier and permeability functions and mediates interactions between the cell and its environment. To better understand the local interactions within LPS membranes, the monolayer film behavior of LPS extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen of medical importance, was investigated by Langmuir film balance. LPS formed stable monolayers at the air-water interface and the measured lateral stresses and modulus (rigidity) of the LPS film in the compressed monolayer region were found to be appreciable. Scaling theories for two-dimensional (2D) polymer chain conformations were used to describe the pi-A profile, in particular, the high lateral stress region suggested that the polysaccharide segments reside at the 2D air-water interface. Although the addition of monovalent and divalent salts caused LPS molecules to adopt a compact conformation at the air-water interface, they did not appear to have any influence on the modulus (rigidity) of the LPS monolayer film under biologically relevant stressed conditions. With increasing divalent salt (CaCl2) content in the subphase, however, there is a progressive reduction of the LPS monolayer's collapse pressure, signifying that, at high concentrations, divalent salts weaken the ability of the membrane to withstand elevated stress. Finally, based on the measured viscoelastic response of the LPS films, we hypothesize that this property of LPS-rich outer membranes of bacteria permits the deformation of the membrane and may consequently protect bacteria from catastrophic structural failure when under mechanical-stress.

  13. Effects of outlet blade angle of centrifugal pump on the pump performance under air-water two-phase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Minemura, Kiyoshi; Kinoshita, Katsuhiko; Ihara, Masaru; Furukawa, Hironori; Egashira, Kazuyuki

    1995-12-31

    To establish the optimum design parameters of offshore oil well centrifugal pumps, which should deliver crude oil containing a large amount of gas, various shapes of pump impeller with different outlet blade angles, locations of leading-edge and numbers of impeller blades as the design parameters were tested with various rotating speeds and suction pressures under air-water two-phase flow conditions. The greater the outlet blade angle, the less the degradation of the pump performance becomes, showing the optimum blade angle approximately equals to 90{degree}.

  14. An analysis of the differences between monitored indoor temperatures and reported thermostat settings

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.; Barnes, B.K.

    1988-03-01

    We examined differences in reported winter thermostat settings and monitored temperatures, and contrasted those households with little difference, and those with a substantial difference. This analysis was conducted on households participating in Bonneville Power Administration's Residential Standards Demonstration Program (RSDP) in the Pacific Northwest. The reported thermostat settings were obtained from a survey of RSDP participants, and indoor temperatures were read from special recorders inside the house. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Ecosystem Metabolism and Air-Water Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in High Arctic Wetland Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnherr, I.; Venkiteswaran, J.; St. Louis, V. L.; Emmerton, C.; Schiff, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Freshwater lakes and wetlands can be very productive systems on the Arctic landscape compared to terrestrial tundra ecosystems and provide valuable resources to many organisms, including waterfowl, fish and humans. Rates of ecosystem productivity dictate how much energy flows through food webs, impacting the abundance of higher-level organisms (e.g., fish), as well as the net carbon balance, which determines whether a particular ecosystem is a source or sink of carbon. Climate change is predicted to result in warmer temperatures, increased precipitation and permafrost melting in the Arctic and is already altering northern ecosystems at unprecedented rates; however, it is not known how freshwater systems are responding to these changes. To predict how freshwater systems will respond to complex environmental changes, it is necessary to understand the key processes, such as primary production and ecosystem respiration, that are driving these systems. We sampled wetland ponds (n=8) and lakes (n=2) on northern Ellesmere Island (81° N, Nunavut, Canada) during the open water season for a suite of biogeochemical parameters, including concentrations of dissolved gases (O2, CO2, CH4, N2O) as well as stable-isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC), dissolved oxygen (δ18O-DO), and water (δ18O-H2O). We will present rates of primary production and ecosystem respiration, modeled from the concentration and stable isotope ratios of DIC and DO, as well as air-water gas exchange of greenhouse gases in these high Arctic ponds and lakes. Preliminary results demonstrate that ecosystem metabolism in these ponds was high enough to result in significant deviations in the isotope ratios of DIC and DO from atmospheric equilibrium conditions. In other words ecosystem rates of primary production and respiration were faster than gas exchange even in these small, shallow, well-mixed ponds. Furthermore, primary production was elevated enough at all sites except Lake Hazen, a

  16. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  17. Air-Water Exchange of Legacy and Emerging Organic Pollutants across the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, R.; Ruge, Z.; Khairy, M.; Muir, D.; Helm, P.

    2014-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are transported to great water bodies via long-range atmospheric transport and released from the surface water as air concentrations continue to diminish. As the largest fresh water bodies in North America, the Great Lakes have both the potential to accumulate and serve as a secondary source of persistent bioaccumulative toxins. OCP and PCB concentrations were sampled at 30+ sites across Lake Superior, Ontario and Erie in the summer of 2011. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine air-water gaseous exchange of OCPs and PCBs. In Lake Superior, surface water and atmospheric concentrations were dominated by α-HCH (average 250 pg/L and 4.2 pg/m3, respectively), followed by HCB (average 17 pg/L and 89 pg/m3, respectively). Air-water exchange varied greatly between sites and individual OCPs, however α-endosulfan was consistently deposited into the surface water (average 19 pg/m2/day). PCBs in the air and water were characterized by penta- and hexachlorobiphenyls with distribution along the coast correlated with proximity to developed areas. Air-water exchange gradients generally yielded net volatilization of PCBs out of Lake Superior. Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin and chlordanes were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at Lake Erie than Lake Ontario. A multiple linear regression that incorporated meteorological, landuse and population data was used to explain variability in the atmospheric concentrations. Results indicated that landuse (urban and/or cropland) greatly explained the variability in the data. Freely dissolved concentrations of OCPs (

  18. Rediscovering the Schulze-Hardy Rule in Competitive Adsorption to an Air-Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Patrick C.; Isbell, Stephen G.; Hillaire, Debra St.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    The ratio of divalent to monovalent ion concentration necessary to displace the surface-active protein, albumin, by lung surfactant monolayers and multilayers at an air-water interface scales as 2−6, the same concentration dependence as the critical flocculation concentration (CFC) for colloids with a high surface potential. Confirming this analogy between competitive adsorption and colloid stability, polymer-induced depletion attraction and electrostatic potentials are additive in their effects; the range of the depletion attraction, twice the polymer radius of gyration, must be greater than the Debye length to have an effect on adsorption. PMID:19705897

  19. Measurement of surface temperature and emissivity of different materials by two-colour pyrometry.

    PubMed

    Raj, Vinay C; Prabhu, S V

    2013-12-01

    An experimental investigation is performed to substantiate the capability of a charge coupled device camera to measure local temperature and emissivity of different materials heated to temperatures above 500 °C by two-colour pyrometric technique using colorimetric method. Materials investigated are Inconel 718 with pyromark (high temperature paint), Inconel 718, stainless steel SS 304 and SS 316. Centerline temperature and emissivity distribution is obtained for target plates maintained at constant temperature by AC heating while complete temperature and emissivity distribution is provided for plates heated by flame impingement. The obtained results are compared with a calibrated infrared camera and thermocouples and the temperature distribution is found to be in close agreement. These results pertain to partially oxidized metal alloys covered in this study. Deviation in the measurement of emissivity can be attributed to its dependence on wavelength range, oxidation, and sensitivity of the image detector.

  20. Prediction of air temperature in the aircraft cabin under different operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volavý, F.; Fišer, J.; Nöske, I.

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of the air temperature in the aircraft cabin by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. The simulations are performed on the CFD model which is based on geometry and cabin interior arrangement of the Flight Test Facility (FTF) located at Fraunhofer IBP, Germany. The experimental test flights under three different cabin temperatures were done in FTF and the various data were gathered during these flights. Air temperature in the cabin was measured on probes located near feet, torso and head of each passenger and also surface temperature and air temperature distributed from inlets were measured. The data were firstly analysed in order to obtain boundary conditions for cabin surfaces and inlets. Then the results of air temperature from the simulations were compared with measured data. The suitability and accuracy of the CFD approach for temperature prediction is discussed.

  1. Measurement of surface temperature and emissivity of different materials by two-colour pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Vinay C.; Prabhu, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    An experimental investigation is performed to substantiate the capability of a charge coupled device camera to measure local temperature and emissivity of different materials heated to temperatures above 500 °C by two-colour pyrometric technique using colorimetric method. Materials investigated are Inconel 718 with pyromark (high temperature paint), Inconel 718, stainless steel SS 304 and SS 316. Centerline temperature and emissivity distribution is obtained for target plates maintained at constant temperature by AC heating while complete temperature and emissivity distribution is provided for plates heated by flame impingement. The obtained results are compared with a calibrated infrared camera and thermocouples and the temperature distribution is found to be in close agreement. These results pertain to partially oxidized metal alloys covered in this study. Deviation in the measurement of emissivity can be attributed to its dependence on wavelength range, oxidation, and sensitivity of the image detector.

  2. Acclimation and acute temperature effects on population differences in oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Baris, Tara Z; Crawford, Douglas L; Oleksiak, Marjorie F

    2016-01-15

    Temperature changes affect metabolism on acute, acclamatory, and evolutionary time scales. To better understand temperature's affect on metabolism at these different time scales, we quantified cardiac oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in three Fundulus taxa acclimated to 12 and 28°C and measured at three acute temperatures (12, 20, and 28°C). The Fundulus taxa (northern Maine and southern Georgia F. heteroclitus, and a sister taxa, F. grandis) were used to identify evolved changes in OxPhos. Cardiac OxPhos metabolism was quantified by measuring six traits: state 3 (ADP and substrate-dependent mitochondrial respiration); E state (uncoupled mitochondrial activity); complex I, II, and IV activities; and LEAK ratio. Acute temperature affected all OxPhos traits. Acclimation only significantly affected state 3 and LEAK ratio. Populations were significantly different for state 3. In addition to direct effects, there were significant interactions between acclimation and population for complex I and between population and acute temperature for state 3. Further analyses suggest that acclimation alters the acute temperature response for state 3, E state, and complexes I and II: at the low acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at low assay temperatures, and at the high acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at high assay temperatures. Closer examination of the data also suggests that differences in state 3 respiration and complex I activity between populations were greatest between fish acclimated to low temperatures when assayed at high temperatures, suggesting that differences between the populations become more apparent at the edges of their thermal range.

  3. Acclimation and acute temperature effects on population differences in oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Baris, Tara Z.; Oleksiak, Marjorie F.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature changes affect metabolism on acute, acclamatory, and evolutionary time scales. To better understand temperature's affect on metabolism at these different time scales, we quantified cardiac oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in three Fundulus taxa acclimated to 12 and 28°C and measured at three acute temperatures (12, 20, and 28°C). The Fundulus taxa (northern Maine and southern Georgia F. heteroclitus, and a sister taxa, F. grandis) were used to identify evolved changes in OxPhos. Cardiac OxPhos metabolism was quantified by measuring six traits: state 3 (ADP and substrate-dependent mitochondrial respiration); E state (uncoupled mitochondrial activity); complex I, II, and IV activities; and LEAK ratio. Acute temperature affected all OxPhos traits. Acclimation only significantly affected state 3 and LEAK ratio. Populations were significantly different for state 3. In addition to direct effects, there were significant interactions between acclimation and population for complex I and between population and acute temperature for state 3. Further analyses suggest that acclimation alters the acute temperature response for state 3, E state, and complexes I and II: at the low acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at low assay temperatures, and at the high acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at high assay temperatures. Closer examination of the data also suggests that differences in state 3 respiration and complex I activity between populations were greatest between fish acclimated to low temperatures when assayed at high temperatures, suggesting that differences between the populations become more apparent at the edges of their thermal range. PMID:26582639

  4. "study of Physical Properties of Carbon-Tetrachloride Mixture at Different Temperatures and Concentra Tions"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, A. R.; Sah, C. S.; Bhattarai, P.

    2001-04-01

    The physical properties like ultrasonic velocity, density and refractive index has been measured for the binary mixture of Carbon Tetrachloride and Toluene at different temperatures (20°C-50°C). Parameters like isentropic compressibility (Ks), acoustic impedance (Z) and Rao-number (R) are also computed. It was observed that all parameters vary linearly with temperature within the range of concentration and temperature.

  5. Effect of diurnal temperature difference on lipid accumulation and development in Calanus sinicus (Copepoda: Calanoida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Konglin; Sun, Song

    2016-08-01

    Calanus sinicus, the dominant copepod in the Yellow Sea, develops a large oil sac in late spring to prepare for over-summering in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). The lipid accumulation mechanism for the initiation of over-summering is unknown. Here, we cultured C3 copepodites at four constant temperatures (10, 13, 16, and 19°C) and at three temperature regimes that mimicked the temperature variations experienced during diurnal vertical migration (10-13°C, 10-16°C, and 10-19°C) for 18 days to explore the effects of temperature differences on copepod development and lipid accumulation. C. sinicus stored more lipid at low than at high temperatures. A diurnal temperature difference (10-16°C and 10-19°C) promoted greater lipid accumulation (1.9-2.1 times) than a constant temperature of either 16°C or 19°C, by reducing the energy cost at colder temperatures and lengthening copepodite development. Thereafter, the lipid reserve supported gonad development after final molting. Only one male developed in these experiments. This highly female-skewed sex ratio may have been the result of the monotonous microalgae diet fed to the copepodites. This study provides the first evidence that diurnal temperature differences may promote lipid accumulation in C. sinicus, and provides a foundation for future investigations into the mechanisms involved in over-summering in the YSCWM.

  6. Different mechanisms at different temperatures for the ring-opening polymerization of lactide catalyzed by binuclear magnesium and zinc alkoxides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Cui, Yaqin; Xiong, Jiao; Dai, Zhongran; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2015-10-07

    Two binuclear magnesium and zinc alkoxides supported by a bis-salalen type dinucleating heptadentate Schiff base ligand were synthesized and fully characterized. The two complexes are efficient initiators for the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide, affording polymers with narrow polydispersities and desirable molecular weights. Interestingly, the mechanisms for the ROP of lactide are different at different temperatures. At a high temperature of 130 °C, a coordination-insertion mechanism is reasonable for the bulk melt polymerization of lactide. At a low temperature, the alkoxide cannot initiate the ROP reaction; however, upon the addition of external benzyl alcohol into the system, the ROP of lactide can smoothly proceed via an "activated monomer" mechanism. In addition, these complexes display slight stereo-selectivity for the ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide, affording partially isotactic polylactide in toluene with a Pm value of 0.59.

  7. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside–Nightside Temperature Differences. II. Comparison with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Showman, Adam P.; Tan, Xianyu

    2017-02-01

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing fractional dayside–nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing incident stellar flux, both averaged across the infrared and in each individual wavelength band. The analytic theory of Komacek & Showman shows that this trend is due to the decreasing ability with increasing incident stellar flux of waves to propagate from day to night and erase temperature differences. Here, we compare the predictions of this theory with observations, showing that it explains well the shape of the trend of increasing dayside–nightside temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Applied to individual planets, the theory matches well with observations at high equilibrium temperatures but, for a fixed photosphere pressure of 100 {mbar}, systematically underpredicts the dayside–nightside brightness temperature differences at equilibrium temperatures less than 2000 {{K}}. We interpret this as being due to the effects of a process that moves the infrared photospheres of these cooler hot Jupiters to lower pressures. We also utilize general circulation modeling with double-gray radiative transfer to explore how the circulation changes with equilibrium temperature and drag strengths. As expected from our theory, the dayside–nightside temperature differences from our numerical simulations increase with increasing incident stellar flux and drag strengths. We calculate model phase curves using our general circulation models, from which we compare the broadband infrared offset from the substellar point and dayside–nightside brightness temperature differences against observations, finding that strong drag or additional effects (e.g., clouds and/or supersolar metallicities) are necessary to explain many observed phase curves.

  8. Effect of ultrasonic treatment of brown rice at different temperatures on cooking properties and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research aimed at developing quick cooking brown rice by investigating the effect of ultrasonic treatment at different temperatures on cooking time and quality. The medium grain brown rice was ultrasonically treated in water at temperatures of 25°C, 40°C and 55°C for 30 min and then dried by ai...

  9. Heat Resistance of Native and Demineralized Spores of Bacillus subtilis Sporulated at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Palop, Alfredo; Sala, Francisco J.; Condón, Santiago

    1999-01-01

    Demineralization reduced heat resistance of B. subtilis spores, but the pattern and magnitude of the reduction depended on sporulation temperature and on heating menstruum pH. The differences in heat resistance of native spores caused by sporulation temperature almost disappeared after demineralization. Demineralized spores were still susceptible to the heat-sensitizing effect of acidic pH. PMID:10049900

  10. Effects of different temperature regimens on the development of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Azad; Chadee, Dave D

    2011-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of increased water temperatures on the development of Aedes aegypti immatures under laboratory conditions in Trinidad, West Indies using temperature regulated water baths to cover a range of temperatures from 24-25°C to 34-35°C at a relative humidity of 80%. Two experiments were designed: (1) at constant temperature regimens and (2) under diurnal temperature regimens ranging from 24-25°C to 34-35°C. At 24-25°C egg hatching success was 98% at 48 h, however at 34-35°C egg hatching rates declined to 1.6% after 48 h. Ae. aegypti larvae reared under constant temperature regimens showed pupation on day 4 with highest pupation occurring at 30°C (78.4%) However, under diurnal temperature regimens, pupation began on day 4 but only at the higher temperatures of 30-35°C. Under diurnal temperature regimens ranging from 24°C to 35°C significantly more females emerged at higher temperatures, than males. In contrast, at constant temperatures of 24-35°C no significant difference in M/F ratios were observed. The body size of Ae. aegypti reared at constant temperature regimens was significantly larger than males and females larvae reared under diurnal temperature regimens of 25-30°C. The results of this study are discussed in the context of changing or increasing water temperatures, seasonal changes in vector populations and vector competence. Using these key factors control strategies are recommended to manage vector populations as expected increases in temperatures impact the Caribbean region.

  11. Each to their own: skeletal muscles of different function use different biochemical strategies during aestivation at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Young, Karen M; Cramp, Rebecca L; Franklin, Craig E

    2013-03-15

    Preservation of muscle morphology depends on a continuing regulatory balance between molecules that protect and molecules that damage muscle structural integrity. Excessive disruption of the biochemical balance that favours reactive oxygen species (ROS) in disused muscles may lead to oxidative stress, which in turn is associated with increased atrophic or apoptotic signalling and/or oxidative damage to the muscle and thus muscle disuse atrophy. Increases in the rate of oxygen consumption likely increase the overall generation of ROS in vivo. Temperature-induced increases in oxygen consumption rate occur in some muscles of ectotherms undergoing prolonged muscular disuse during aestivation. In the green-striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata, both large jumping and small non-jumping muscles undergo atrophy seemingly commensurate with their rate of oxygen consumption during aestivation. However, because the extent of atrophy in these muscles is not enhanced at higher temperatures, despite a temperature-sensitive rate of oxygen consumption in the jumping muscle, we proposed that muscles are protected by biochemical means that, when mobilised at higher temperatures, inhibit atrophy. We proposed that the biochemical response to temperature would be muscle-specific. We examined the effect of temperature on the antioxidant and heat shock protein systems and determined the extent of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in two functionally different skeletal muscles, the gastrocnemius (jumping muscle) and the iliofibularis (non-jumping muscle), by aestivating frogs at 24 and 30°C for 6 months. We assayed small molecule antioxidant capacity, mitochondrial and cytosolic superoxide dismutase activities and Hsp70 concentrations to show that protective mechanisms in disused muscles are differentially regulated with respect to both temperature and aestivation. High aestivation temperature results in an antioxidant response in the metabolically temperature

  12. Phase transitions in films of lung surfactant at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Perez-Gil, J; Ruano, M L; Worthman, L A; Stewart, J; Casals, C; Keough, K M

    1998-01-01

    45 mN/m. It also induced formation of large amounts of novel, nearly circular domains containing probe above pi of 50 mN/m, these domains being different in appearance than any seen at lower pressures with calcium or higher pressures in the absence of calcium. Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) adsorbed from the subphase onto solvent-spread LSE films, and aggregated condensed domains in presence of calcium. This study indicates that spread or adsorbed lung surfactant films can undergo expanded to condensed, and possibly other, phase transitions at the air-water interface as lateral packing density increases. These phase transitions are affected by divalent cations and SP-A in the subphase, and possibly by loss of material from the surface upon cyclic compression and expansion. PMID:9635752

  13. Shear turbulence, Langmuir circulation and scalar transfer at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, Amine; Tejada-Martinez, Andres; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-11-01

    DNS of an initially quiescent coupled air-water interface driven by an air-flow with free stream speed of 5 m/s generates gravity-capillary waves and small-scale (centimeter-scale) Langmuir circulation (LC) beneath the interface. In addition to LC, the waterside turbulence is characterized by shear turbulence with structures similar to classical "wall streaks" in wall-bounded flow. These streaks, denoted here as "shear streaks", consist of downwind-elongated vortices alternating in sign in the crosswind direction. The presence of interfacial waves causes interaction between these vortices giving rise to bigger vortices, namely LC. LES with momentum equation augmented with the Craik-Leibovich (C-L) vortex force is used to understand the roles of the shear streaks (i.e. the shear turbulence) and the LC in determining scalar flux from the airside to the waterside and vertical scalar transport beneath. The C-L force consists of the cross product between the Stokes drift velocity (induced by the interface waves) and the flow vorticity. It is observed that Stokes drift shear intensifies the shear streaks (with respect to flow without wave effects) leading to enhanced scalar flux at the air-water interface. LC leads to increased vertical scalar transport at depths below the interface.

  14. Air-water two-phase flow in a 3-mm horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ing Youn; Chang, Yu-Juei; Wang, Chi-Chung

    2000-01-01

    Two-phase flow pattern and friction characteristics for air-water flow in a 3.17 mm smooth tube are reported in this study. The range of air-water mass flux is between 50 to 700 kg/m2.s and gas quality is between 0.0001 to 0.9. The pressure drop data are analyzed using the concept of the two-phase frictional multipliers and the Martinelli parameter. Experimental data show that the two-phase friction multipliers are strongly related to the flow pattern. Taitel & Dukler flow regime map fails to predict the stratified flow pattern data. Their transition lines between annular-wavy and annular-intermittent give fair agreement with data. A modified correlation from Klimenko and Fyodoros criterion is able to distinguish the annular and stratified data. For two-phase flow in small tubes, the effect of surface tension force should be significantly present as compared to gravitational force. The tested empirical frictional correlations couldn't predict the pressure drop in small tubes for various working fluids. It is suggested to correlate a reliable frictional multiplier for small horizontal tubes from a large database of various working fluids, and to develop the flow pattern dependent models for the prediction of two-phase pressure drop in small tubes. .

  15. Air-water gas exchange of organochlorine compounds in Lake Baikal, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, L.L.; Kucklick, J.R.; Bidleman, T.F.; Ivanov, G.P.; Chernyak, S.M.

    1996-10-01

    Air and surface water samples were collected at Lake Baikal, Russia, during June 1991 to determine concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. These data were combined with Henry`s law constants to estimate the gas flux rate across the air-water interface of each compound class. Air samples were collected at Lake Baikal and from nearby Irkutsk. Water samples were collected from three mid-lake stations and at the mouth of two major tributaries. Average air concentrations of chlorinated bornanes (14 pg m{sup -3}), chlordanes (4.9 pg m{sup -3}), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) (194 pg m{sup -3}) were similar to global backgound of Arctic levels. However, air concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), DDTs, and PCBs were closer to those observed in the Great Lakes region. Significantly higher levels of these three compound classes in air over Irkutsk suggests that regional atmospheric transport and deposition may be an important source of these persistent compounds to Lake Baikal. Air-water gas exchange calculations resulted in net depositional flux values for {alpha}-HCH, {gamma}-HCH, DDTs, and chlorinated bornanes at 112, 23, 3.6, and 2.4 ng m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. The total net flux of 22 PCB congeners, chlordanes, and HCB was from water to air (volatilization) at 47, 1.8, and 32 ng m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. 50 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. NOVEL METHODS FOR MEASURING AIR-WATER INTERFACIAL AREA IN UNSATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Ouni, Asma El; Araujo, Juliana B.; Zhong, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  17. The cis-bis(decanoate)tin phthalocyanine/DPPC film at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Salvador; Garza, Cristina; Beltran, Hiram I; Campos-Terán, José; Arenas-Alatorre, Jesús; Castillo, Rolando

    2012-03-01

    Films made of cis-bis-decanoate-tin(IV) phthalocyanine (PcSn10) and racemic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) are studied with compression isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) at the air/water interface. Films enriched in PcSn10 present phase separation elliptical-shaped domains. These domains present optical anisotropy and molecular order. They are enriched in PcSn10, and the film outside these domains is enriched in DPPC, as shown in by high-angle annular dark-field transmission electron microscopy on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) transferred films. Film collapse area and atomic force microscopy images of LB transferred films on mica indicate that the films are actually multilayers. A computational survey was performed to determine how the PcSn10 molecules prefer to self-assemble, in films basically made of PcSn10. The relative energetic stability for several dimeric assemblies was obtained, and a crystal model of the film was developed through packing and repeating the PcSn10 molecules, along the crystallographic directions of the unit cell. Our results contribute to understanding the strong interaction between PcSn10 and DPPC at the air/water interface, where even small quantities of DPPC (~1-2%) can modify the film in an important way.

  18. Molecular Adsorption Steers Bacterial Swimming at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Maxey, Martin R.; Tang, Jay X.

    2013-01-01

    Microbes inhabiting Earth have adapted to diverse environments of water, air, soil, and often at the interfaces of multiple media. In this study, we focus on the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the air/water interface. Forward swimming C. crescentus swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at the surface when swimming in nutrient-rich growth medium but not in minimal salt motility medium. Trapped cells move in tight, clockwise circles when viewed from the air with slightly reduced speed. Trace amounts of Triton X100, a nonionic surfactant, release the trapped cells from these circular trajectories. We show, by tracing the motion of positively charged colloidal beads near the interface that organic molecules in the growth medium adsorb at the interface, creating a high viscosity film. Consequently, the air/water interface no longer acts as a free surface and forward swimming cells become hydrodynamically trapped. Added surfactants efficiently partition to the surface, replacing the viscous layer of molecules and reestablishing free surface behavior. These findings help explain recent similar studies on Escherichia coli, showing trajectories of variable handedness depending on media chemistry. The consistent behavior of these two distinct microbial species provides insights on how microbes have evolved to cope with challenging interfacial environments. PMID:23823220

  19. An investigation of channel flow with a smooth air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madad, Reza; Elsnab, John; Chin, Cheng; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation are used to investigate fully developed laminar and turbulent channel flow with an air-water interface as the lower boundary condition. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements of streamwise and wall-normal velocity components are made over a range of Reynolds number based upon channel height and bulk velocity from 1100 to 4300, which encompasses the laminar, transitional and low Reynolds numbers turbulent regimes. The results show that the airflow statistics near the stationary wall are not significantly altered by the air-water moving interface and reflect those found in channel flows. The mean statistics on the water interface side largely exhibit results similar to simulated Poiseuille-Couette flow (PCF) with a solid moving wall. For second-order statistics, however, the simulation and experimental results show some discrepancies near the moving water surface, suggesting that a full two-phase simulation is required. A momentum and energy transport tubes analysis is investigated for laminar and turbulent PCFs. This analysis builds upon the classical notion of a streamtube and indicates that part of the energy from the pressure gradient is transported towards the stationary wall and is dissipated as heat inside the energy tubes, while the remainder is transmitted to the moving wall. For the experiments, the airflow energy is transmitted towards the water to overcome the drag force and drive the water forward; therefore, the amount of energy transferred to the water is higher than the energy transferred to a solid moving wall.

  20. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  1. Research on measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution based on an air-water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Xu, Hua-bin; Cheng, Kang

    2016-11-01

    A measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) method with an air-water channel is researched. In this method, the underwater vehicle and satellite are the legitimate parties, and the third party is at the airwater interface in order to simplify the unilateral quantum channel to water or air. Considering the condition that both unilateral transmission distance and transmission loss coefficient are unequal, a perfect model of the asymmetric channel is built. The influence of asymmetric channel on system loss tolerance and secure transmission distance is analyzed. The simulation results show that with the increase of the channel's asymmetric degree, the system loss tolerance will descend, one transmission distance will be reduced while the other will be increased. When the asymmetric coefficient of channel is between 0.068 and 0.171, MDI-QKD can satisfy the demand of QKD with an air-water channel, namely the underwater transmission distance and atmospheric transmission distance are not less than 60 m and 12 km, respectively.

  2. Dipole Moment of a Charged Particle Trapped at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Bohinc, Klemen; Brown, Matthew A; May, Sylvio

    2016-07-07

    The interaction between two charged particles (such as nanoparticles or colloids) trapped at the air-water interface becomes dipolar at large separations. The corresponding dipole moment can be modeled by considering a single point charge located exactly at the interface, but this model fails to correctly predict the dipole moment's dependence on the salt concentration in the aqueous medium. We extend the single point charge model to two point charges that are separated by a fixed distance and are located at the air-water interface, with one charge being immersed in air and the other in the solvent. The two point charges represent the surface charges at the air-exposed and water-exposed regions of an interface-trapped particle. The two point charges also account for the spatial extension of the particle. On the basis of the Debye-Hückel model, we derive mathematical expressions for the interaction between two pairs of charges and discuss the salt concentration dependence of the dipolar moment at large separations. Our results reveal a residual dipole moment in the limit of large salt content that originates from the charge attached to the air-exposed region of the particle. We discuss nonlinear screening effects and compare the predicted dipolar moments with recent experimental results.

  3. Amphiphilic derivatives of dextran: adsorption at air/water and oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rotureau, E; Leonard, M; Dellacherie, E; Durand, A

    2004-11-01

    Ionic amphiphilic dextran derivatives were synthesized by the attachment of sodium sulfopropyl and phenoxy groups on the native polysaccharide. A family of dextran derivatives was thus obtained with varying hydrophobic content and charge density in the polymer chains. The surface-active properties of polymers were studied at the air-water and dodecane-water interfaces using dynamic surface/interfacial tension measurements. The adsorption was shown to begin in a diffusion-limited regime at low polymer concentrations, that is to say, with the diffusion of macromolecules in the bulk solution. In contrast, at long times the interfacial adsorption is limited by interfacial phenomena: adsorption kinetics or transfer into the adsorbed layer. A semiempirical equation developed by Filippov was shown to correctly fit the experimental curves over the whole time range. The presence of ionic groups in the chains strongly lowers the adsorption kinetics. This effect can be interpreted by electrostatic interactions between the free molecules and the already adsorbed ones. The adsorption kinetics at air-water and oil-water interfaces are compared.

  4. Separating Octadecyltrimethoxysilane Hydrolysis and Condensation at the Air/Water Interface through Addition of Methyl Stearate

    PubMed Central

    Britt, David W.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis and condensation of octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) at the air/water interface were monitored through molecular area changes at a constant surface pressure of 10 mN/m. The onset of condensation was delayed through the addition of methyl stearate (SME) acting as an inert filler molecule. In the absence of SME, complete gelation of OTMS required 30 h, during which time OTMS condensation occurred concomitantly with hydrolysis. In the presence of SME, the OTMS monolayer gelation rate increased in proportion to the amount of SME present. A 1:6 OTMS:SME molar ratio resulted in monolayer gelation within 30 min, suggesting completion of monomer hydrolysis prior to condensation. These findings indicate that lability of OTMS to hydrolysis at the air/water interface is governed by steric and conformational constraints at the silicon atom site, with monomeric OTMS being much more reactive than oligomeric OTMS. Fluorescence microscope images demonstrated that the OTMS condensed domain size also decreased with increasing SME concentrations, further implicating SME’s role as an inert filler. PMID:25132807

  5. Mechanisms of Polyelectrolyte Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption at the Air-Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Patrick C.; Palazoglu, Omer A.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally occurring cationic polyelectrolyte, restores the adsorption of the clinical lung surfactant Survanta to the air-water interface in the presence of albumin at much lower concentrations than uncharged polymers such as polyethylene glycol. This is consistent with the positively charged chitosan forming ion pairs with negative charges on the albumin and lung surfactant particles, reducing the net charge in the double-layer, and decreasing the electrostatic energy barrier to adsorption to the air-water interface. However, chitosan, like other polyelectrolytes, cannot perfectly match the charge distribution on the surfactant, which leads to patches of positive and negative charge at net neutrality. Increasing the chitosan concentration further leads to a reduction in the rate of surfactant adsorption consistent with an over-compensation of the negative charge on the surfactant and albumin surfaces, which creates a new repulsive electrostatic potential between the now cationic surfaces. This charge neutralization followed by charge inversion explains the window of polyelectrolyte concentration that enhances surfactant adsorption; the same physical mechanism is observed in flocculation and re-stabilization of anionic colloids by chitosan and in alternate layer deposition of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on charged colloids. PMID:19366599

  6. Molecular adsorption steers bacterial swimming at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Maxey, Martin R; Tang, Jay X

    2013-07-02

    Microbes inhabiting Earth have adapted to diverse environments of water, air, soil, and often at the interfaces of multiple media. In this study, we focus on the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the air/water interface. Forward swimming C. crescentus swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at the surface when swimming in nutrient-rich growth medium but not in minimal salt motility medium. Trapped cells move in tight, clockwise circles when viewed from the air with slightly reduced speed. Trace amounts of Triton X100, a nonionic surfactant, release the trapped cells from these circular trajectories. We show, by tracing the motion of positively charged colloidal beads near the interface that organic molecules in the growth medium adsorb at the interface, creating a high viscosity film. Consequently, the air/water interface no longer acts as a free surface and forward swimming cells become hydrodynamically trapped. Added surfactants efficiently partition to the surface, replacing the viscous layer of molecules and reestablishing free surface behavior. These findings help explain recent similar studies on Escherichia coli, showing trajectories of variable handedness depending on media chemistry. The consistent behavior of these two distinct microbial species provides insights on how microbes have evolved to cope with challenging interfacial environments.

  7. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h-1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m-2 d-1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  8. Evaporative assembly of MEH-PPV rings using mixed solvents at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kung-Po; Biswal, Sibani L

    2014-04-22

    Controlling the morphology of conjugated polymers has recently attracted considerable attention because of their applications in photovoltaic (PV) devices and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, we describe the self-assembly of a common conjugated polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), into ringlike structures via solvent evaporation on an air/water interface. The films are monitored using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and transferred onto a solid substrate by either the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) or the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) method and further characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The morphology of the MEH-PPV thin film at the air/water interface can be controlled by the spreading solvent. By mixing solvents of varying spreading coefficients and evaporation rates, such as chloroform and chlorobenzene, MEH-PPV can be assembled into micrometer-sized ring structures. The optical properties of these MEH-PPV ring structures are also characterized. Lastly, MEH-PPV can be used as a soft template to organize microscale structures of nanoparticles.

  9. Bovine insulin-phosphatidylcholine mixed Langmuir monolayers: behavior at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, S; Blanco-Vila, N M; Vila-Romeu, N

    2011-08-04

    The behavior of the binary mixed Langmuir monolayers of bovine insulin (INS) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) spread at the air-water interface was investigated under various subphase conditions. Pure and mixed monolayers were spread on water, on NaOH and phosphate-buffered solutions of pH 7.4, and on Zn(2+)-containing solutions. Miscibility and interactions between the components were studied on the basis of the analysis of the surface pressure (π)-mean molecular area (A) isotherms, surface compression modulus (C(s)(-1))-π curves, and plots of A versus mole fraction of INS (X(INS)). Our results indicate that intermolecular interactions between INS and PC depend on both the monolayer state and the structural characteristics of INS at the interface, which are strongly influenced by the subphase pH and salt content. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) was applied to investigate the peptide aggregation pattern at the air-water interface in the presence of the studied lipid under any experimental condition investigated. The influence of the lipid on the INS behavior at the interface strongly depends on the subphase conditions.

  10. An air-water interfacial area based variable tortuosity model for unsaturated sands

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Raziuddin; Saripalli, Prasad

    2006-05-01

    Based on Kozeny-Carman equation for saturated media permeability, a new model is developed for the prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, K as a function of moisture content, ?. The K(???) estimates are obtained using laboratory measurements of moisture retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and a saturation-dependent tortuosity based on the immiscible fluid (air-water) interfacial area. Tortuosity (?a) for unsaturated media is defined as aaw/aaw,o (ratio of the specific air-water interfacial area of a real and the corresponding idealized porous medium). A correspondence between the real and idealized media is established by using the laboratory-measured soil moisture retention curve to calculate the interfacial area. The general trend in prediction of ?a as a function water saturation is in agreement with similar recent predictions based on diffusion theory. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities measured for a number of coarse-textured, repacked Hanford sediments agree well with predictions based on the modified Kozeny-Carman relation. Because of the use of saturated hydraulic conductivity, a slight bias is apparent in measured and predicted K at low ?. While the modified Kozeny-Carman relation was found to be reasonably accurate in predicting K(??) for the repacked, sandy soils considered in this study, a further testing of the new model for undisturbed sediments and other soil textures would be useful.

  11. Systematical electrochemical study on the parasitic shuttle-effect in lithium-sulfur-cells at different temperatures and different rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busche, Martin Rolf; Adelhelm, Philipp; Sommer, Heino; Schneider, Holger; Leitner, Klaus; Janek, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    The influence of cycling rate and temperature on the performance of lithium sulfur batteries is systematically studied by evaluating data of hundred identical cells. Differences in the discharge and charge capacities and the voltage profiles during the first and subsequent cycles are evaluated quantitatively in detail. Special attention is paid to the parasitic shuttle effect and its magnitude as function of C-rate and temperature. Mathematical models by Kumaresan et al. and Mikhaylik et al. are used to discuss the correlation between discharge/charge capacities, cycling efficiency and cycling rate at different temperatures. Mathematical error analysis further provides information on typical deviations between identical samples that can be expected when characterizing Li/S cells. This error can become significant especially when reaching higher cycle numbers. When changing the cycling parameters we find that the different regions of the voltage profile are affected differently. Therefore, we conducted first galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) measurements on the Li/S cell system to study the kinetics during cell cycling and evaluated the relaxation behavior between the different states of discharge/charge and OCV conditions. Significant differences in relaxation kinetics are found for the lower and higher plateaus of the discharge- and charge voltage profiles.

  12. Temperature dependence of properties of Mn-doped nanocrystals with different binding symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Boping; Zhao, Qing; Zhang, Jiayu

    2016-02-01

    We report the temperature dependence of photoluminescent properties of Mn-doped nanocrystals (NCs) with different binding symmetry. The photoluminescence peaks of Mn2+ ions shift to shorter wavelength with increasing temperatures, resulting from the reduction of crystal field. Further evidence for temperature-dependent crystal field variety is demonstrated by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra. Additionally, the inflexion temperature of the excited state lifetimes increases from 170 K (Sample I) to 220 K (Sample IV), which is speculated to be resulted from the easily affected wave function overlap due to thermal lattice expansion in more symmetrical binding Mn-doped NCs.

  13. Self-assembly and lipid interactions of diacylglycerol lactone derivatives studied at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Philosof-Mazor, Liron; Volinsky, Roman; Comin, Maria J; Lewin, Nancy E; Kedei, Noemi; Blumberg, Peter M; Marquez, Victor E; Jelinek, Raz

    2008-10-07

    Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) have been shown to be effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways. The biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules depends in part upon their lipid interactions within the cellular plasma membrane. This study explores the thermodynamic and structural features of DAG-lactone derivatives and their lipid interactions at the air/water interface. Surface-pressure/area isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy revealed the significance of specific side-groups attached to the terminus of a very rigid 4-(2-phenylethynyl)benzoyl chain of the DAG-lactones, which affected both the self-assembly of the molecules and their interactions with phospholipids. The experimental data highlight the formation of different phases within mixed DAG-lactone/phospholipid monolayers and underscore the relationship between the two components in binary mixtures of different mole ratios. Importantly, the results suggest that DAG-lactones are predominantly incorporated within fluid phospholipid phases rather than in the condensed phases that form, for example, by cholesterol. Moreover, the size and charge of the phospholipid headgroups do not seem to affect DAG-lactone interactions with lipids.

  14. Porphyrin assemblies through the air/water interface: effect of hydrogen bond, thermal annealing, and amplification of supramolecular chirality.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yunlong; Chen, Penglei; Wang, Dongjun; Liu, Minghua

    2012-04-17

    Molecular assemblies of two achiral porphyrins with different substituents, 5-(4-methoxycarbonylphenyl)-10,15,20-triphenyl-21H,23H-porphine (TPPCOOMe) and 5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-triphenyl-21H,23H-porphine (TPPCOOH), have been fabricated by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. It is disclosed that although only slight differences exist in the molecular skeleton of these two compounds, their interfacial assemblies display distinct chiroptical properties. It is found that weak circular dichroism (CD) signals are observed from the TPPCOOH assemblies, while in the case of the TPPCOOMe assemblies, only negligible CD signals could be detected. Interestingly, after the assemblies are subjected to a thermal annealing treatment, TPPCOOH assemblies show a distinct amplification of CD signals, while those of TPPCOOMe do not. An explanation in terms of the effect of substituents on the spreading properties of the compounds and the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonds on the cooperative stacking of the building blocks is proposed to explain these new findings. The investigation suggests that in the present porphyrin systems, besides a nice spreading property, the cooperative interaction of various noncovalent interactions, including hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking, and hydrophobic interactions, is essentially required for the occurrence of symmetry breaking at the air/water interface.

  15. Thermal equilibrium and temperature differences among body regions in European plethodontid salamanders.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Enrico; Manenti, Raoul; Canciani, Giancarlo; Scarì, Giorgio; Pennati, Roberta; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Information on species thermal physiology is extremely important to understand species responses to environmental heterogeneity and changes. Thermography is an emerging technology that allows high resolution and accurate measurement of body temperature, but until now it has not been used to study thermal physiology of amphibians in the wild. Hydromantes terrestrial salamanders are strongly depending on ambient temperature for their activity and gas exchanges, but information on their body temperature is extremely limited. In this study we tested if Hydromantes salamanders are thermoconform, we assessed whether there are temperature differences among body regions, and evaluated the time required to reach the thermal equilibrium. During summers of 2014 and 2015 we analysed 56 salamanders (Hydromantes ambrosii and Hydromantes italicus) using infrared thermocamera. We photographed salamanders at the moment in which we found them and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 15min after having kept them in the hands. Body temperature was equal to air temperature; salamanders attained the equilibrium with air temperature in about 8min, the time required to reach equilibrium was longer in individuals with large body size. We detected small temperature differences between body parts, the head being slightly warmer than the body and the tail (mean difference: 0.05°C). These salamanders quickly reach the equilibrium with the environment, thus microhabitat measurement allows obtaining accurate information on their tolerance limits.

  16. MOVPE growth of laser structures for high-power applications at different ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, F.; Crump, P.; Frevert, C.; Knigge, S.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Weyers, M.

    2016-10-01

    Laser structures for different operating temperatures were developed. Higher temperatures need an increase in barrier height to reduce carrier leakage. Best results for an emission wavelength of ≈800 nm were obtained using an asymmetric structure containing an n-InGaP and a p-Al0.5Ga0.5As waveguide. Such structures show 10 W output power for a single laser diode and >100 W for a laser bar at 50 °C ambient temperature and also a good aging behavior. Lower operating temperatures permit lower barrier heights which results in a lower series resistance and therefore higher conversion efficiency at high power. Carrier concentration and mobility for different AlxGa1-xAs compositions were estimated in dependence on temperature. An optimized structure reached 20 W for a single laser diode and 2 kW for a laser bar in QCW mode at -70 °C.

  17. Organization of T-shaped facial amphiphiles at the air/water interface studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Christian; Chen, Bin; Tschierske, Carsten; Kressler, Jörg; Blume, Alfred

    2012-10-11

    We studied the behavior of monolayers at the air/water interface of T-shaped facial amphiphiles which show liquid-crystalline mesophases in the bulk. The compounds are composed of a rigid p-terphenyl core (TP) with two terminal hydrophobic ether linked alkyl chains of equal length and one facial hydrophilic tri(ethylene oxide) chain with a carboxylic acid end group. Due to their amphiphilic nature they form stable Langmuir films at the air/water interface. Depending on the alkyl chain length they show markedly different compression isotherms. We used infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) to study the changes in molecular organization of the TP films upon compression. We could retrieve information on layer thickness, alkyl chain crystallization, and the orientation of the TP cores within the films. Films of TPs with long (16 carbon atoms: TP 16/3) and short (10 carbon atoms: TP 10/3) alkyl chains were compared. Compression of TP 16/3 leads to crystallization of the terminal alkyl chains, whereas the alkyl chains of TP 10/3 stay fluid over the complete compression range. TP 10/3 shows an extended plateau in the compression isotherm which is due to a layering transition. The mechanism of this layering transition is discussed. Special attention was paid to the question of whether a so-called roll-over collapse occurs during compression. From the beginning to the end of the plateau, the layer thickness is increased from 15 to 38 Å and the orientation of the TP cores changes from parallel to the water surface to isotropic. We conclude that the plateau in the compression isotherm reflects the transition of a TP monolayer to a TP multilayer. The monolayer consists of a sublayer of well-organized TP cores underneath a sublayer of fluid alkyl chains whereas the multilayer consists of a well oriented bottom layer and a disordered top layer. Our findings do not support the model of a roll-over collapse. This study demonstrates how the IRRA band intensity of OH

  18. Intricacies of using temperature of different niches for assessing impact on malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Poonam; Yadav, Yogesh; Saraswat, Shweta; Dhiman, Ramesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The influence of temperature on the life cycle of mosquitoes as well as on development of malaria parasite in mosquitoes is well studied. Most of the studies use outdoor temperature for understanding the transmission dynamics and providing projections of malaria. As the mosquitoes breed in water and rest usually indoors, it is logical to relate the transmission dynamics with temperature of micro-niche. The present study was, therefore, undertaken to understand the influence of different formats of temperature of different micro-niches on transmission of malaria for providing more realistic projections. Methods: The study was conducted in one village each of Assam and Uttarakhand States of India. Temperatures recorded from outdoor (air) as well as indoor habitats (resting place of mosquito) were averaged into daily, fortnightly and monthly and were used for determination of transmission windows (TWs) for Plasmodium vivax (Pv) and P. falciparum (Pf) based on minimum temperature threshold required for transmission. Results: The daily temperature was found more useful for calculation of sporogony than fortnightly and monthly temperatures. Monthly TWs were further refined using fortnightly temperature, keeping in view the completion of more than one life cycle of malaria vectors and sporogony of malaria parasite in a month. A linear regression equation was generated to find out the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures and R2 to predict the percentage of variation in indoor temperature as a function of outdoor temperature at both localities. Interpretation & conclusions: The study revealed that the indoor temperature was more than outdoors in stable malarious area (Assam) but fluctuating in low endemic area like Uttarakhand. Transmission windows of malaria should be determined by transforming outdoor data to indoor and preferably at fortnightly interval. With daily recorded temperature, sporogonic and gonotrophic cycles can also

  19. Interaction of poly(ethylene-glycols) with air-water interfaces and lipid monolayers: investigations on surface pressure and surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Winterhalter, M; Bürner, H; Marzinka, S; Benz, R; Kasianowicz, J J

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the surface activity of different-sized poly(ethylene-glycols) (PEG; M(r) 200-100,000 Da) in the presence or absence of lipid monolayers and over a wide range of bulk PEG concentrations (10(-8)-10% w/v). Measurements of the surface potential and surface pressure demonstrate that PEGs interact with the air-water and lipid-water interfaces. Without lipid, PEG added either to the subphase or to the air-water interface forms relatively stable monolayers. Except for very low molecular weight polymers (PEGs < 1000 Da), low concentrations of PEG in the subphase (between 10(-5) and 10(-4)% w/v) increase the surface potential from zero (with respect to the potential of a pure air-water interface) to a plateau value of approximately 440 mV. At much higher polymer concentrations, > 10(-1)% (w/v), depending on the molecular weight of the PEG and corresponding to the concentration at which the polymers in solution are likely to overlap, the surface potential decreases. High concentrations of PEG in the subphase cause a similar decrease in the surface potential of densely packed lipid monolayers spread from either diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), or dioleoyl phosphatidylserine (DOPS). Adding PEG as a monolayer at the air-water interface also affects the surface activity of DPhPC or DPPC monolayers. At low lipid concentration, the surface pressure and potential are determined by the polymer. For intermediate lipid concentrations, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms show that the effects due to lipid and PEG are not always additive and that the polymer's effect is distinct for the two lipids. When PEG-lipid-mixed monolayers are compressed to surface pressures greater than the collapse pressure for a PEG monolayer, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms approach that of the lipid alone, suggesting that for this experimental condition PEG is expelled from the

  20. Interaction of poly(ethylene-glycols) with air-water interfaces and lipid monolayers: investigations on surface pressure and surface potential.

    PubMed

    Winterhalter, M; Bürner, H; Marzinka, S; Benz, R; Kasianowicz, J J

    1995-10-01

    We have characterized the surface activity of different-sized poly(ethylene-glycols) (PEG; M(r) 200-100,000 Da) in the presence or absence of lipid monolayers and over a wide range of bulk PEG concentrations (10(-8)-10% w/v). Measurements of the surface potential and surface pressure demonstrate that PEGs interact with the air-water and lipid-water interfaces. Without lipid, PEG added either to the subphase or to the air-water interface forms relatively stable monolayers. Except for very low molecular weight polymers (PEGs < 1000 Da), low concentrations of PEG in the subphase (between 10(-5) and 10(-4)% w/v) increase the surface potential from zero (with respect to the potential of a pure air-water interface) to a plateau value of approximately 440 mV. At much higher polymer concentrations, > 10(-1)% (w/v), depending on the molecular weight of the PEG and corresponding to the concentration at which the polymers in solution are likely to overlap, the surface potential decreases. High concentrations of PEG in the subphase cause a similar decrease in the surface potential of densely packed lipid monolayers spread from either diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), or dioleoyl phosphatidylserine (DOPS). Adding PEG as a monolayer at the air-water interface also affects the surface activity of DPhPC or DPPC monolayers. At low lipid concentration, the surface pressure and potential are determined by the polymer. For intermediate lipid concentrations, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms show that the effects due to lipid and PEG are not always additive and that the polymer's effect is distinct for the two lipids. When PEG-lipid-mixed monolayers are compressed to surface pressures greater than the collapse pressure for a PEG monolayer, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms approach that of the lipid alone, suggesting that for this experimental condition PEG is expelled from the

  1. Photosynthesis of young apple trees in response to low sink demand under different air temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pei G; Li, Lian S; Duan, Wei; Li, Wei D; Li, Shao H

    2010-03-01

    Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic end products and related enzymes in source leaves in response to low sink demand after girdling to remove the root sink were assessed in young apple trees (Malus pumila) grown in two greenhouses with different air temperatures for 5 days. Compared with the non-girdled control in the low-temperature greenhouse (diurnal maximum air temperature <32 degrees C), low sink demand resulted in lower net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and transpiration rate (E) but higher leaf temperature on Day 5, while in the high-temperature greenhouse (diurnal maximum air temperature >36 degrees C), P(n), g(s) and E declined from Day 3 onwards. Moreover, gas exchange responded more to low sink demand in the high-temperature greenhouse than in the low-temperature greenhouse. Decreased P(n) at low sink demand was accompanied by lower intercellular CO(2) concentrations in the low-temperature greenhouse. However, decreased maximal photochemical efficiency, potential activity, efficiency of excitation capture, actual efficiency and photochemical quenching, with increased minimal fluorescence and non-photochemical quenching of photosystem II (PSII), were observed in low sink demand leaves only in the high-temperature greenhouse. In addition, low sink demand increased leaf starch and soluble carbohydrate content in both greenhouses but did not result in lower activity of enzymes involved in metabolism. Thus, decreased P(n) under low sink demand was independent of a direct effect of end-product feedback but rather depended on a high temperature threshold. The lower P(n) was likely due to stomatal limitation in the low-temperature greenhouse, but mainly due to non-stomatal limitation in the high-temperature greenhouse.

  2. Tailoring biochars from different feedstock and produced at different temperature and time of pyrolysis for their use as soil amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raul; Moreno, Fabian; Acosta, Jose A.; Gomez Lopez, Maria Dolores; Faz, Angel

    2015-04-01

    Biochar used as a soil amendment to improve soil quality and fertility and increase soil carbon sequestration has been the focus of much research in the recent past. Unlike most conventional soil organic materials, which are readily decomposed, the recalcitrant nature of biochar increases its potential value as a soil amending material for the longer term. However, many biochars can be hydrophobic, and added to soil can aggravate water availability in areas where water scarcity is a major limiting factor for agriculture or forestry. It has been shown that biochar characteristics are influenced by production variables, especially feedstock, pyrolysis temperature and time of pyrolysis. Although there have been different studies characterizing biochars prepared from different sources, there are few studies comparing different types of biochar produced from domestic residues, manures or crop residues pyrolysis; there are, in addition, fewer studies dealing with the hydrophobic properties of the biochars. The different feedstock can have different properties which would result into different biochars even produced at the same operational factors. The main objective of this experiment was to study the influence of feedstock properties and pyrolysis temperature and time on nutrient contents, heavy metals, recalcitrance, thermal stability and hydrophobicity of biochars from cotton crop residues (CR), pig manure (PM) and domestic waste (DW). Biochars were obtained by pyrolysis under oxygen-limited conditions in a muffle furnace. The temperature was increased at 5°C min-1 to 300°C, 400°C, 500°C and 700°C and then maintained for 1h, 2h, 4 and 5 h at this temperature. All biochar properties were strongly influenced by feedstock source except for pH, the recalcitrance index and hydrophobicity. Nutrient contents were normally higher in the PM biochar, except for Cu and Ca which were higher in the DW biochar and B in the CR biochar. Heavy metal contents were significantly

  3. Protein resistance of (ethylene oxide)n monolayers at the air/water interface: effects of packing density and chain length.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangming; Chen, Yijian; Zhang, Guangzhao; Yang, Shihe

    2007-12-14

    Protein adsorption on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and oligo(ethylene oxide) (OEO) monolayers is studied at different packing densities using the Langmuir technique. In the case of a PEO monolayer, a protein adsorption minimum is revealed at sigma(-1) = 10 nm(2) for both lysozyme and fibrinogen. Manifested are two packing density regimes of steric repulsion and compressive attraction between PEO and a protein on top of the overall attraction of the protein to the air/water interface. The observed protein adsorption minimum coincides with the maximum of the surface segment density at sigma(-1) = 10 nm(2). However, OEO monolayer presents a different scenario, namely that the amount of protein adsorbed decreases monotonically with increasing packing density, indicating that the OEO chains merely act as a steric barrier to protein adsorption onto the air/water interface. Besides, in the adsorption of fibrinogen, three distinct kinetic regimes controlled by diffusion, penetration and rearrangement are recognized, whereas only the latter two were made out in the adsorption of lysozyme.

  4. Toward a unified picture of the water self-ions at the air-water interface: a density functional theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Baer, Marcel D; Kuo, I-Feng W; Tobias, Douglas J; Mundy, Christopher J

    2014-07-17

    The propensities of the water self-ions, H3O(+) and OH(-), for the air-water interface have implications for interfacial acid-base chemistry. Despite numerous experimental and computational studies, no consensus has been reached on the question of whether or not H3O(+) and/or OH(-) prefer to be at the water surface or in the bulk. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study of the bulk vs interfacial behavior of H3O(+) and OH(-) that employs forces derived from density functional theory with a generalized gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional (specifically, BLYP) and empirical dispersion corrections. We computed the potential of mean force (PMF) for H3O(+) as a function of the position of the ion in the vicinity of an air-water interface. The PMF suggests that H3O(+) has equal propensity for the interface and the bulk. We compare the PMF for H3O(+) to our previously computed PMF for OH(-) adsorption, which contains a shallow minimum at the interface, and we explore how differences in solvation of each ion at the interface vs in the bulk are connected with interfacial propensity. We find that the solvation shell of H3O(+) is only slightly dependent on its position in the water slab, while OH(-) partially desolvates as it approaches the interface, and we examine how this difference in solvation behavior is manifested in the electronic structure and chemistry of the two ions.

  5. Phase diagram, design of monolayer binary colloidal crystals, and their fabrication based on ethanol-assisted self-assembly at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhengfei; Li, Yue; Duan, Guotao; Jia, Lichao; Cai, Weiping

    2012-08-28

    Flexible structural design and accurate controlled fabrication with structural tunability according to need for binary or multicomponent colloidal crystals have been expected. However, it is still a challenge. In this work, the phase diagram of monolayer binary colloidal crystals (bCCs) is established on the assumption that both large and small polystyrene (PS) colloidal spheres can stay at the air/water interface, and the range diagram for the size ratio and number ratio of small to large colloidal spheres is presented. From this phase diagram, combining the range diagram, we can design and relatively accurately control fabrication of the bCCs with specific structures (or patterns) according to need, including single or mixed patterns with the given relative content. Further, a simple and facile approach is presented to fabricate large-area (more than 10 cm(2)) monolayer bCCs without any surfactants, using differently sized PS spheres, based on ethanol-assisted self-assembly at the air/water interface. bCCs with different patterns and stoichiometries are thus designed from the established phase diagram and then successfully fabricated based on the volume ratios (V(S/L)) of the small to large PS suspensions using the presented colloidal self-assembling method. Interestingly, these monolayer bCCs can be transferred to any desired substrates using water as the medium. This study allows us to design desired patterns of monolayer bCCs and to more accurately control their structures with the used V(S/L).

  6. Mechanical properties of protein adsorption layers at the air/water and oil/water interface: a comparison in light of the thermodynamical stability of proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Varvara; Mütze, Annekathrin; Fischer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decades numerous studies on the interfacial rheological response of protein adsorption layers have been published. The comparison of these studies and the retrieval of a common parameter to compare protein interfacial activity are hampered by the fact that different boundary conditions (e.g. physico-chemical, instrumental, interfacial) were used. In the present work we review previous studies and attempt a unifying approach for the comparison between bulk protein properties and their adsorption films. Among many common food grade proteins we chose bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme for their difference in thermodynamic stability and studied their adsorption at the air/water and limonene/water interface. In order to achieve this we have i) systematically analyzed protein adsorption kinetics in terms of surface pressure rise using a drop profile analysis tensiometer and ii) we addressed the interfacial layer properties under shear stress using an interfacial shear rheometer under the same experimental conditions. We could show that thermodynamically less stable proteins adsorb generally faster and yield films with higher shear rheological properties at air/water interface. The same proteins showed an analog behavior when adsorbing at the limonene/water interface but at slower rates.

  7. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Gary A.; Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work was performed in two different major areas. The first centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. The second involved a modeling and data analysis effort whereby modeled near-surface temperature profiles were integrated into the retrieval of bulk SST estimates from existing satellite data. Under the first work area, two different seagoing infrared radiometers were designed and fabricated and the first of these was deployed on research ships during two major experiments. Analyses of these data contributed significantly to the Ph.D. thesis of one graduate student and these results are currently being converted into a journal publication. The results of the second portion of work demonstrated that, with presently available models and heat flux estimates, accuracy improvements in SST retrievals associated with better physical treatment of the near-surface layer were partially balanced by uncertainties in the models and extra required input data. While no significant accuracy improvement was observed in this experiment, the results are very encouraging for future applications where improved models and coincident environmental data will be available. These results are included in a manuscript undergoing final review with the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology.

  8. The large volcanic eruptions at different latitude bands and patterns of winter temperature changes over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhixin; Sun, Di

    2016-04-01

    Based on the chronology of 29 large volcanic eruptions events (Volcanic Explosivity Index≥4) since 1951 and gridded temperature dataset from China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System, we identified the patterns of winter temperature changes over China after the large volcanic eruptions, comparing with the mean temperature within the five years before, then we analyzed the related dynamic mechanisms of different patterns by NCEP reanalysis data and model output data from Community Earth System Model (CESM). The results showed that the winter temperature decreased more than 1°C in East China after volcanic eruptions on middle-lower latitudes and equatorial bands. After volcanic eruptions on different latitudes, the temperature spatial patterns were summarized as two types, which included that temperature was cooling centered on Northeast and warming in Tibets, and its opposite pattern. The first pattern was usually detected after tropical volcanic eruptions in spring/summer and it also appeared after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes in spring/autumn. After middle-lower latitude volcanic eruptions, the variation of geopotential height on 500hPa showed that the positive anomaly was existed at the East of Ural mountain, which caused the temperature decreased in Northwest , Central East and Southeast when east asian trough was intensified. After high latitudes volcanic eruptions, the zonal circulation was more obvious at middle latitudes, the cold air was not easy to transport,therefore winter temperature increased in China except for the Yangtze River Basin. The result of full forcing experiments by CESM showed that temperature decreased at most regions after large volcanic eruptions on equatorial /high bands, and troughs and wedges were developed on 500 hPa. The variation of geopotential height was nearly reversed after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes, only the temperature of Tibetan Plateau decreased. But how the variation of geopotential height

  9. The large volcanic eruptions at different latitude bands and patterns of winter temperature changes over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Hao, Z.; Zheng, J.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the chronology of 29 large volcanic eruptions events (Volcanic Explosivity Index≥4) since 1951 and gridded temperature dataset from China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System, we identified the patterns of winter temperature changes over China after the large volcanic eruptions, comparing with the mean temperature within the five years before, then we analyzed the related dynamic mechanisms of different patterns by NCEP reanalysis data and model output data from Community Earth System Model (CESM). The results showed that the winter temperature decreased more than 1°C in East China after volcanic eruptions on middle-lower latitudes and equatorial bands. After volcanic eruptions on different latitudes, the temperature spatial patterns were summarized as two types, which included that temperature was cooling centered on Northeast and warming in Tibets, and its opposite pattern. The first pattern was usually detected after equatorial volcanic eruptions in spring/summer and it also appeared after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes in spring/autumn. After middle-lower latitude volcanic eruptions, the variation of geopotential height on 500hPa showed that the positive anomaly was existed at the East of Ural mountain, which caused the temperature decreased in Northwest , Central East and Southeast when east asian trough was intensified. After high latitudes volcanic eruptions, the zonal circulation was more obvious at middle latitudes, the cold air was not easy to transport therefore winter temperature increased in China except for the Yangtze River Basin. The result of full forcing experiments by CESM showed that temperature decreased at most regions after large volcanic eruptions on equatorial /high bands, and troughs and wedges were developed on 500 hPa. The variation of geopotential height was nearly reversed after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes, only the temperature of Tibetan Plateau decreased. But how the variation of geopotential height

  10. Cloacal and surface temperatures of tom turkeys exposed to different rearing temperature regimes during the first 12 weeks of growth.

    PubMed

    Mayes, S L; Strawford, M L; Noble, S D; Classen, H L; Crowe, T G

    2015-06-01

    Years of genetic selection have caused an increase in growth rate and market body mass in agricultural poultry species compared to earlier genetic strains, potentially altering their physiological requirements. The objective of this study was to expose Hybrid Converter tom turkeys on a weekly basis to the recommended rearing temperature regime (TCON: control) or 4°C below the recommended standard (TTRT: treatment) to determine their thermal responses. Once per week for 12 weeks, 12 turkeys were individually exposed to either TCON or TTRT for a 2-h period. Surface temperatures of the breast (TBREAST), wing (TWING), drumstick (TDRUM), head (THEAD), and shank (TSHANK) were measured at 20-min intervals using an infrared camera, while a thermal data logger measured the skin surface temperature under the wing (TLOGGER) at 30-s intervals. The cloacal temperature (TCORE) was measured using a medical thermometer at the start and end of the exposure period. Regardless of exposure temperature, the TBREAST (TCON: P<0.001 and TTRT: P<0.001), TWING (TCON: P<0.001 and TTRT: P<0.001), and TDRUM (TCON: P<0.001 and TTRT: P<0.001) decreased from weeks 4 to 6 and remained constant from weeks 1 to 3 and 8 to 12. THEAD was elevated in week 2 (TCON: P<0.001) or week 3 (TTRT: P<0.001), TSHANK increased slightly during week 3 for both TCON (P<0.001) and TTRT (P<0.001), and TLOGGER (TCON: P<0.001 and TTRT: P=0.001) and TCORE (TCON: P<0.001 and TTRT: P<0.001) were lower during the first week. Thereafter, THEAD, TSHANK, TLOGGER, and TCORE remained constant. Exposure to TTRT resulted in lower TBREAST, TWING, and TDRUM compared to TCON. Generally, THEAD, TSHANK, TLOGGER, and TCORE were not affected by the different exposure temperatures. The data demonstrated that the degree of thermal response expressed is dependent on the location of measurement, age, and exposure temperature.

  11. Alteration of protein patterns in black rock inhabiting fungi as a response to different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Tesei, Donatella; Marzban, Gorji; Zakharova, Kristina; Isola, Daniela; Selbmann, Laura; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Rock inhabiting fungi are among the most stress tolerant organisms on Earth. They are able to cope with different stressors determined by the typical conditions of bare rocks in hot and cold extreme environments. In this study first results of a system biological approach based on two-dimensional protein profiles are presented. Protein patterns of extremotolerant black fungi – Coniosporium perforans, Exophiala jeanselmei – and of the extremophilic fungus – Friedmanniomyces endolithicus – were compared with the cosmopolitan and mesophilic hyphomycete Penicillium chrysogenum in order to follow and determine changes in the expression pattern under different temperatures. The 2D protein gels indicated a temperature dependent qualitative change in all the tested strains. Whereas the reference strain P. chrysogenum expressed the highest number of proteins at 40 °C, thus exhibiting real signs of temperature induced reaction, black fungi, when exposed to temperatures far above their growth optimum, decreased the number of proteins indicating a down-regulation of their metabolism. Temperature of 1 °C led to an increased number of proteins in all of the analysed strains, with the exception of P. chrysogenum. These first results on temperature dependent reactions in rock inhabiting black fungi indicate a rather different strategy to cope with non-optimal temperature than in the mesophilic hyphomycete P. chrysogenum. PMID:22862921

  12. Temperature change and hardness with different resin composites and photo-activation methods.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Luis Felipe Jochims; Consani, Simonides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Sobrinho, Lourenço Correr; Milan, Fábio Machado

    2005-01-01

    This study verifies whether there is any temperature change during photoactivation of two resin composites (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow) with three different light curing methods (conventional halogen light curing unit, light emitting diodes curing unit and xenon plasma arc curing unit) and the relationship of temperature change with resin composite hardness. A type-K thermocouple registered the temperature rise peak in an elastomer mold during photoactivation. After photoactivation, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test performed by an indenter (HMV-2000) under a load of 50g for 15 seconds. Both the temperature change data and results of the Knoop hardness test were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test at the 5% significance level. No statistical differences in temperature rise were recorded for the different composites following processing by light curing unit (p>0.05). The conventional halogen source produced statistically higher temperatures (p<0.05) than the other units. The plasma arc source promoted statistically lower (p<0.05) Knoop hardness values and temperature changes than the other light curing units.

  13. Alteration of protein patterns in black rock inhabiting fungi as a response to different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tesei, Donatella; Marzban, Gorji; Zakharova, Kristina; Isola, Daniela; Selbmann, Laura; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-08-01

    Rock inhabiting fungi are among the most stress tolerant organisms on Earth. They are able to cope with different stressors determined by the typical conditions of bare rocks in hot and cold extreme environments. In this study first results of a system biological approach based on two-dimensional protein profiles are presented. Protein patterns of extremotolerant black fungi -Coniosporium perforans, Exophiala jeanselmei - and of the extremophilic fungus -Friedmanniomyces endolithicus - were compared with the cosmopolitan and mesophilic hyphomycete Penicillium chrysogenum in order to follow and determine changes in the expression pattern under different temperatures. The 2D protein gels indicated a temperature dependent qualitative change in all the tested strains. Whereas the reference strain P. chrysogenum expressed the highest number of proteins at 40 °C, thus exhibiting real signs of temperature induced reaction, black fungi, when exposed to temperatures far above their growth optimum, decreased the number of proteins indicating a down-regulation of their metabolism. Temperature of 1 °C led to an increased number of proteins in all of the analysed strains, with the exception of P. chrysogenum. These first results on temperature dependent reactions in rock inhabiting black fungi indicate a rather different strategy to cope with non-optimal temperature than in the mesophilic hyphomycete P. chrysogenum.

  14. Impact of biogenic amine molecular weight and structure on surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-02-01

    The oligoamines, such as ethylenediamine to pentaethylenetetramine, and the aliphatic biogenic amines, such as putrescine, spermidine and spermine, strongly interact with anionic surfactants, such as sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS. It has been shown that this results in pronounced surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface and the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption which depends upon solution pH and oligoamine structure. In the neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, results presented here the role of the oligoamine structure on the adsorption of SDS is investigated more fully using a range of different biogenic amines. The effect of the extent of the intra-molecular spacing between amine groups on the adsorption has been extended by comparing results for cadavarine with putrescine and ethylenediamine. The impact of more complex biogenic amine structures on the adsorption has been investigated with the aromatic phenethylamine, and the heterocyclic amines histamine and melamine. The results provide an important insight into how surfactant adsorption at interfaces can be manipulated by the addition of biogenic amines, and into the role of solution pH and oligoamine structure in modifying the interaction between the surfactant and oligoamine. The results impact greatly upon potential applications and in understanding some of the important biological functions of biogenic amines.

  15. Foaming and adsorption behavior of bovine and camel proteins mixed layers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Lajnaf, Roua; Picart-Palmade, Laetitia; Attia, Hamadi; Marchesseau, Sylvie; Ayadi, M A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to examine foaming and interfacial behavior of three milk protein mixtures, bovine α-lactalbumin-β-casein (M1), camel α-lactalbumin-β-casein (M2) and β-lactoglobulin-β-casein (M3), alone and in binary mixtures, at the air/water interface in order to better understand the foaming properties of bovine and camel milks. Different mixture ratios (100:0; 75:25; 50:50; 25:75; 0:100) were used during foaming tests and interfacial protein interactions were studied with a pendant drop tensiometer. Experimental results evidenced that the greatest foam was obtained with a higher β-casein amount in all camel and bovine mixtures. Good correlation was observed with the adsorption and the interfacial rheological properties of camel and bovine protein mixtures. The proteins adsorbed layers are mainly affected by the presence of β-casein molecules, which are probably the most abundant protein at interface and the most efficient in reducing the interfacial properties. In contrast of, the globular proteins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin that are involved in the protein layer composition, but could not compact well at the interface to ensure foams creation and stabilization because of their rigid molecular structure.

  16. Effect of perfluoroalkyl chain length on monolayer behavior of partially fluorinated oleic acid molecules at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Baba, Teruhiko; Takai, Katsuki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    A series of oleic acid (OA) analogs containing terminal perfluoroalkyl groups (CF3, C2F5, n-C3F7, n-C4F9 or n-C8F17) was synthesized to clarify how the fluorinated chain length affects the stability and molecular packing of liquid-expanded OA monolayers at the air-water interface. Although the substitution of terminal CF3 group for CH3 in OA had no effect on monolayer stability, further fluorination led to a gradual increase in monolayer stability at 25 °C. Surface pressure-area isotherm revealed that partially fluorinated OA analogs form more expanded monolayers than OA at low surface pressures, and that the monolayer behavior of OA analogs with the even-carbon numbered fluorinated chain is almost the same as that of OA upon monolayer compression, whereas the behavior of OA analogs with the odd-carbon numbered fluorinated chain significantly differs from that of OA. These results indicate: (i) the terminal short part (at least C2 residue) in OA predominantly determines the liquid-expanded monolayer stability; (ii) the molecular packing state of OA may be perturbed by the substitution of a short odd-carbon numbered fluorinated chain; (iii) hence, OA analogs with even-carbon numbered chain are considered to be preferable as hydrophobic building blocks for the synthesis of fluorinated phospholipids.

  17. Flow-induced molecular segregation in beta-casein-monoglyceride mixed films spread at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2004-07-20

    In this work, we have used different and complementary interfacial techniques (surface film balance, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear rheology) to analyze the static (structure, topography, reflectivity, miscibility, and interactions) and flow characteristics (surface shear characteristics) of beta-casein and monoglyceride (monopalmitin and monoolein) mixed films spread on the air-water interface. The structural, topographical, and shear characteristics of the mixed films depend on the surface pressure and on the composition of the mixed film. The surface shear viscosity (etas) varies greatly with the surface pressure. In general, the greater the surface pressure, the greater the values of etas. At higher surface pressures, collapsed beta-casein residues may be displaced from the interface by monoglyceride molecules with important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films. A shear-induced change in the topography of monoglyceride and beta-casein domains, on one hand, and a segregation between domains of the film-forming components, on the other hand, were also observed. The displacement of the beta-casein by the monoglycerides is facilitated under shear conditions, especially for beta-casein-monoolein mixed films.

  18. Effects of chain unsaturation on the equation of state for lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, S S; MacDonald, R C

    1995-01-01

    An equation of state for lipid monolayers at the air-water interface is presented, which takes into account the effects of the conformation and the number and position of double bonds of the hydrocarbon chains. The total Hamiltonian of the monolayer is assumed to consist of three terms. Two of them are calculated exactly within the limitations of the formulation. These are the two-dimensional entropy of mixing of the lipid and water molecules at the surface and the conformational entropy of the chains using a model available from the literature. These two terms give rise to positive surface pressure. The third term, which includes all energies that are not amenable to calculation, was obtained as the difference between the sum of the two calculated terms and experimental data and is found to represent an approximately area-independent tension. The effects of chain unsaturation on the equation of state were modeled in the present theory in two ways; the chain bend caused by cis double bonds increases the minimal molecular area, and the double bond linkage on a chain decreases the degrees of freedom of the chain. Calculations revealed that the former is highly significant whereas the latter is negligible. The deduced equation of state reproduces experimental data with appropriate values for three parameters, which represent the collapse area, the overlap of adjacent chains, and the combined effects of the intra- and intermolecular interactions other than the surface mixing entropy and the chain conformational energy. PMID:8527660

  19. Exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjun; Lin, Tian; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Tian, Chongguo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, air and surface seawater samples collected from the Bohai (BS) and Yellow Seas (YS) in May 2012 were determined exchange of PAHs, especially of low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs (three- and four-ring PAHs) at the air-water interface. Net volatilization fluxes of LMW PAHs were 266-1454 ng/m2/d and decreased with distance from the coast, indicating that these PAHs transported from coastal runoff were potential contributors to the atmosphere in the BS and YS. Moreover, LMW PAHs were enriched in the dissolved phase compared with those in the particulate phase in the water column, possibly suggesting that the volatilized LMW PAHs were directly derived from wastewater discharge or petroleum pollution rather than released from contaminated sediments. The air-sea exchange fluxes of the three-ring PAHs were 2- to 20-fold higher than their atmospheric deposition fluxes in the BS and YS. The input to and output from the water reached equilibrium for four-ring PAHs. Differently, five- and six-ring PAHs were introduced into the marine environment primarily through dry and wet deposition, indicating that the water column was still a sink of these PAHs from the surrounding atmosphere.

  20. Electron temperature difference between the o-point and x-point of a magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jinhong; Zhu Sizheng; Yu Qingquan; Zhuang, G.

    2009-09-15

    The electron temperature difference between the o-point and the x-point of a magnetic island is studied numerically by solving the two-dimensional energy transport equation. It is found that, even without a localized radio-frequency heating at the island's o-point, there is usually a temperature difference between these two points. This difference depends on the radial profile of the heating power deposition, the ratio between the parallel and the perpendicular heat conductivity and the island width, and it takes a minimum when the island width is about twice the local heat diffusion layer width. The effect of the temperature difference on the island growth is further studied, and the peaked heating power density profile at magnetic axis is found be destabilizing.

  1. The shift of thermoneutral zone in striped hamster acclimated to different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chi, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Quan-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Liu, Jin-Song; Wang, De-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Temperature affects all biological functions and will therefore modulate ecologically significant interactions between animals and their environment. Here, we examined the effect of ambient temperature (Ta) on the thermal biology and energy budget in striped hamsters acclimated to cold (5°C), warm (21°C) and hot temperatures (31°C). Thermoneutral zone (TNZ) was 22.5-32.5°C, 25-32.5°C and 30-32.5°C in the cold-, warm- and hot-acclimated hamsters, respectively. The cold acclimation decreased the lower critical temperature and made the TNZ wider, and hot exposure elevated the lower critical temperature, resulting in a narrow TNZ. Within the TNZ, cold-acclimated hamsters showed a significantly higher rate of metabolism and thermogenesis than those acclimated to hot temperature. Digestive enzymes activities, including intestinal sucrase, maltase, L-alanine aminopeptidase-N and leucine aminopeptidase were higher in the cold than in the hot. The changes in metabolic rate and thermogenesis at different temperatures were in parallel with cytochrome c oxidase activity and uncoupling protein 1 gene expression of brown adipose tissue. This suggests that the shift of the lower critical temperature of TNZ is possibly associated with the rate of metabolism and thermogenesis, as well as with the digestive capacity of the gastrointestinal tract at different Ta. The upper critical temperature of TNZ may be independent of the changes in Ta. The changes of lower critical temperature of TNZ are an important strategy in adaption to variations of Ta.

  2. Temperature Profiles Along the Root with Gutta-percha Warmed through Different Heat Sources

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Michele; Santis, Roberto De; Ametrano, Gianluca; Prisco, Davide; Borrelli, Marino; Paduano, Sergio; Riccitiello, Francesco; Spagnuolo, Gianrico

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate temperature profiles developing in the root during warm compaction of gutta-percha with the heat sources System B and System MB Obtura (Analityc Technology, Redmond, WA, USA). Thirty extracted human incisor teeth were used. Root canals were cleaned and shaped by means of Protaper rotary files (Dentsply-Maillefer, Belgium), and imaging was performed by micro-CT (Skyscan 1072, Aartselaar, Belgium). Methods: Teeth were instrumented with K-type thermocouples, and the roots were filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha. Vertical compaction was achieved through the heat sources System B and System MB, and temperature profiles were detect-ed by means of NI Dac Interface controlled by the LabView System. With both heat sources, higher temperature levels were recorded in the region of the root far from the apex. When the warm plugger tip was positioned at a distance of 3 mm from the root apex, temperature levels of about 180°C were used to soften gutta-percha, and no statistically significant differences were observed between peak temperatures developed by the two heating sources at the root apex. However, a temperature level higher than 40°C was maintained for a longer time with System MB. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in peak temperature levels recorded far from the root apex. Thus, with a temperature of about 180°C and the warm plugger positioned at 3 mm from the root apex, both heating sources led to a temperature slightly higher than 40°C at the apex of the root, suggesting that the gutta-percha was properly softened. Significance: A temperature level higher than 40°C was maintained for a longer time with System MB, thus providing an ad-equate time for warm compaction of the gutta-percha. PMID:25614768

  3. The Shift of Thermoneutral Zone in Striped Hamster Acclimated to Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chi, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Quan-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Liu, Jin-Song; Wang, De-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Temperature affects all biological functions and will therefore modulate ecologically significant interactions between animals and their environment. Here, we examined the effect of ambient temperature (Ta) on the thermal biology and energy budget in striped hamsters acclimated to cold (5°C), warm (21°C) and hot temperatures (31°C). Thermoneutral zone (TNZ) was 22.5–32.5°C, 25–32.5°C and 30–32.5°C in the cold-, warm- and hot-acclimated hamsters, respectively. The cold acclimation decreased the lower critical temperature and made the TNZ wider, and hot exposure elevated the lower critical temperature, resulting in a narrow TNZ. Within the TNZ, cold-acclimated hamsters showed a significantly higher rate of metabolism and thermogenesis than those acclimated to hot temperature. Digestive enzymes activities, including intestinal sucrase, maltase, L-alanine aminopeptidase-N and leucine aminopeptidase were higher in the cold than in the hot. The changes in metabolic rate and thermogenesis at different temperatures were in parallel with cytochrome c oxidase activity and uncoupling protein 1 gene expression of brown adipose tissue. This suggests that the shift of the lower critical temperature of TNZ is possibly associated with the rate of metabolism and thermogenesis, as well as with the digestive capacity of the gastrointestinal tract at different Ta. The upper critical temperature of TNZ may be independent of the changes in Ta. The changes of lower critical temperature of TNZ are an important strategy in adaption to variations of Ta. PMID:24400087

  4. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals.

  5. Non-Newtonian Characteristics of Gochujang and Chogochujang at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Eun; Lee, Jun Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the rheological properties of gochujang and chogochujang at different temperatures (25, 35, and 45°C). Rheological properties of the samples were determined using a rotational rheometer at a shear range of 1 to 40 s−1. Gochujang and chogochujang were found to be non-Newtonian fluids according to the Herschel-Bulkley model. Yield stress and consistency coefficient of gochujang at different temperatures were higher than those of chogochujang, whereas the opposite was observed for flow behavior index. Moreover, all rheological properties of gochujang and chogochujang decreased with increasing temperature. The consistency coefficient was related to temperature using an Arrhenius-type relationship. Gochujang (14.48 kJ/mol) had slightly higher activation energy than chogochujang (14.03 kJ/mol).

  6. Ionic Nature of a Gemini Surfactant at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chi M; Nguyen, Cuong V; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu; Nguyen, Thanh V

    2016-12-06

    The ionic state of an adsorbed gemini surfactant at the air/water interface was investigated using a combination of surface potential and surface tension data. The combined model was developed and successfully described the experimental data. The results verified the existence of three ionic states of the gemini surfactant in the interfacial zone. Furthermore, the model can quantify the adsorbed concentrations of these species. At low concentrations, the fully dissociated state dominates the adsorption. At high concentrations, the fully associated state dominates, accounting for up to 80% of the total adsorption. In the middle range, the adsorption is dominated by the partially associated state, which has a maximum percentage of 80% at a critical micelle concentration of 0.5. The variation in the ionic state is a unique characteristic of gemini surfactants, which can be the underlying mechanism for their advantages over conventional surfactants.

  7. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate. PMID:25687953

  8. A model for sound velocity in a two-phase air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, N.M.; Lin, W.K.; Pei, B.S.; Hsu, Y.Y. )

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, wave propagation in a homogeneous, low void fraction, two-phase air-water bubbly flow is analyzed through the compressibility of a single bubble to derive a P({rho}) relation; the dispersion relation is then derived by a homogeneous model. The phase velocity and attenuation calculated from the model are compared with existing data and are in good agreement. The momentum transfer effect is considered through the virtual mass term and is significant at a higher void fraction. The interfacial heat transfer between phases is significant at low frequency, while bubble scattering effects are important at high frequency (near resonance). Bubble behavior at both low and high frequency is derived based on the isothermal and the adiabatic cases, respectively. The phase velocity occurs at the limiting condition in both cases. Furthermore, resonance is present in the model, and the resonant frequency is determined.

  9. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  10. Novel Behavior in Self-Assembled Superparamagnetic Nanoparticle Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Jacob; Boucheron, Leandra; Dai, Yeling; Lin, Binhua; Meron, Mati; Shpyrko, Oleg

    2013-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, coated with an oleic acid ligand, have been found to form self-assembled monolayers when deposited at the air-water interface. Even for low particle densities these particles aggregate into hexagonally close-packed islands which merge into a uniform layer at higher densities. Using Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (GISAXS) we were able to measure the first through fifth order diffraction peaks. By analyzing the positions and shapes of these peaks we investigated the in-plane structure of these monolayers and characterized how the structure changes as a function of compression in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Since iron oxide nanoparticles are known to be super-paramagnetic, we sought to investigate the role magnetic effects may have on the interparticle interactions and ordering within the film. We performed Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) measurements on the film while varying an external magnetic field. We will discuss the results of our findings.

  11. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  12. Robust Gold Nanoparticle Sheets by Ligand Cross-Linking at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kosif, Irem; Kratz, Katrina; You, Siheng Sean; Bera, Mrinal K; Kim, Kyungil; Leahy, Brian; Emrick, Todd; Lee, Ka Yee C; Lin, Binhua

    2017-02-28

    We report the results of cross-linking of two-dimensional gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) assemblies at the air-water interface in situ. We introduce an aqueous soluble ruthenium benzylidene catalyst into the water subphase to generate a robust, elastic two-dimensional network of nanoparticles containing cyclic olefins in their ligand framework. The most striking feature of the cross-linked Au-NP assemblies is that the extended connectivity of the nanoparticles enables the film to preserve much of its integrity under compression and expansion, features that are absent in its non-cross-linked counterparts. The cross-linking process appears to "stitch" the nanoparticle crystalline domains together, allowing the cross-linked monolayers to behave like a piece of fabric under lateral compression.

  13. Structure of hydroxylated galactocerebrosides from myelin at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Karlheinz; Baltes, Hubert; Ahrens, Heiko; Helm, Christiane A; Husted, Cynthia A

    2002-01-01

    Hydroxy-galactocerebrosides (mixed chain length, constituent of myelin membranes) from bovine brain are investigated as monolayers at the air-water interface with isotherms, fluorescence microscopy, x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction. With grazing incidence diffraction a monoclinic tilted chain lattice is found in the condensed phase. According to x-ray reflectivity, the longest chains protrude above the chain lattice and roughen the lipid/air interface. On compressing the chain lattice, the correlation length increases by approximately 65%; obviously, the sugar headgroups are flexible enough to allow for lattice deformation. With fluorescence experiments, small coexisting fluid and ordered domains are observed, and there is lipid dissolution into the subphase as well. The dissolved hydroxy-galactocerebroside molecules reenter on monolayer expansion. The electron density profiles derived from x-ray reflectometry (coherent superposition) show that the chain-ordering transition causes the molecules to grow into the subphase. PMID:11806931

  14. Two-dimensional crystallization of phthalocyanine pigments at the air/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, B.W.; Vaknin, D.; Gray, J.D.; Cotton, T.M.; Struve, W.S. |; Ocko, B.M.

    1999-01-21

    Two-dimensional crystallization of highly planar phthalocyanine (Pc) pigments underneath the headgroups of a lipid Langmuir monolayer was observed and characterized by synchrotron X-ray diffraction at grazing angles of incidence (GID). The crystallization was achieved through spontaneous adsorption of positively charged, water-soluble Pc`s to a spread dihexadecyl phosphate (DHDP) monolayer at the air/water interface. Analysis of the GID and rod profiles show that the lipid, pigment, and counterions form a complex in which the pigment plane is tilted with respect to the liquid surface; this is consistent with previous independent X-ray reflectivity investigations. In addition, the two-dimensional crystalline order of DHDP monolayers on pure H{sub 2}O has been determined and an analysis of its structure both before and after complexation is presented.

  15. Turbulent heat and mass transfers across a thermally stratified air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of heat and mass transfer across an air-water interface were measured in a wind-wave research facility, under various wind and thermal stability conditions (unless otherwise noted, mass refers to water vapor). Heat fluxes were obtained from both the eddy correlation and the profile method, under unstable, neutral, and stable conditions. Mass fluxes were obtained only under unstable stratification from the profile and global method. Under unstable conditions the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers remain fairly constant and equal to 0.74, whereas the rate of mass transfer varies linearly with bulk Richardson number. Under stable conditions the turbulent Prandtl number rises steadily to a value of 1.4 for a bulk Richardson number of about 0.016. Results of heat and mass transfer, expressed in the form of bulk aerodynamic coefficients with friction velocity as a parameter, are also compared with field data.

  16. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  17. Measuring Air-water Interfacial Area for Soils Using the Mass Balance Surfactant-tracer Method

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Juliana B.; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. PMID:25950136

  18. The effect of bubbles on air-water oxygen transfer in the breaker zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuno, Shohachi; Moog, Douglas B.; Tatekawa, Tetsuya; Takemura, Kenji; Yamagishi, Tatsuya

    The effect of bubbles entrained in the breaker zone on air-water oxygen transfer is examined. First, the area of bubbles entrained by breakers generated on a sloping bottom in a wave tank is analyzed using a color image sensor which can count the pixel number of a specific color in a frame. It was found that the time-averaged pixel number over a wave period has a strong relationship to the energy dissipation rate per unit mass of the breaker. The time-averaged pixel number is then incorporated with some modification into an equation proposed by Eckenfelder for the calculation of the mass transfer coefficient from bubble surfaces in an aeration tank. The coefficient resulting from the modified equation shows a strong relationship between the mass transfer coefficient and the dissipation rate.

  19. Partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds to the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, James F.

    Partition coefficients ( Kia, m 3m -2) for sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes at the air/water interface were estimated by extrapolating quartz/gas sorption data to relative humidity (RH) values of 100%. For each compound class, the log Kia values were found to be well correlated with log pLo where pLo (Torr) is the vapor pressure of the pure subcooled liquid. For the PAHs, correlation equation is log Kia = -1.20 log pLo - 5.82 ( R2 = 0.98). For the n-alkanes, the correlation equation is log Kia = -0.93 log pLo - 4.42 ( R2 = 0.95).

  20. Crystalline self-assembly into monolayers of folded oligomers at the air-water interface

    PubMed

    Lederer; Godt; Howes; Kjaer; Als-Nielsen; Lahav; Wegner; Leiserowitz; Weissbuch

    2000-06-16

    Insertion of the 1,3-bis(ethynylene)benzene unit as a rigid spacer into a linear alkyl chain, thus separating the two resulting stems by 9 A. induces chain folding at the air-water interface. These folded molecules self-assemble into crystalline monolayers at this interface, with the plane of the folding unit almost perpendicular to the water surface, as determined by synchrotron grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. Three distinct molecular shapes, of the types U, inverted U, and M, were obtained in the two-dimensional crystalline state, depending upon the number of spacer units, and the number and position of the hydrophilic groups in the molecule. The molecules form ribbons with a higher crystal coherence in the direction of stacking between the molecular ribbons, and a lower coherence along the ribbon direction. A similar molecule, but with a spacer unit that imposes a 5 A separation between alkyl chains, yields the conventional herringbone arrangement.

  1. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of a lipid Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mangeney, C; Dupres, V; Roche, Y; Felidj, N; Levi, G; Aubard, J; Bernard, S

    Surface enhanced Raman spectra were recorded from a phospholipid monolayer directly at the air-water interface. We used an organized monolayer of negatively charged tetramyristoyl cardiolipins as a template for the electrochemical generation of silver deposits. This two-dimensional electrodeposition of silver under potentiostatic control was the substrate for enhancement of Raman spectra. We report the optimized conditions for the Raman enhancement, the microscopic observations of the deposits, and their characterization by atomic force microscopy. Laser excitation at 514.5 nm leads to intense and reproducible surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra recorded in situ from one monolayer of cardiolipin, using 0.5 mol % of 10N nonyl acridine orange or 5 mol % of acridine in the film, and demonstrates the possibility of estimating the pH at the metal/phospholipidic film interface.

  2. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid-coated air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D. James; George, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids-covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation.

  3. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  4. Protonation, Hydrolysis, and Condensation of Mono- and Trifunctional Silanes at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Britt, David W.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The protonation, hydrolysis, and condensation kinetics of octadecyldimethylmethoxysilane (OMMS) and octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) at the air/water interface were investigated using a monolayer trough. OTMS chemical condensation within physically condensed phases was observed in transferred monolayers using fluorescence microscopy. Molecular area increases and decreases attributed to protonation and hydrolysis, respectively, of silane methoxy groups were measured by a surface balance. These area changes at constant surface pressure suggested a stepwise protonation and hydrolysis of the three OTMS methoxy groups. In contrast, only a single protonation and hydrolysis event was observed for monofunctional OMMS. The influences of monolayer spreading time, silane packing density, and subphase pH on the reaction kinetics are presented. PMID:25147424

  5. Air/water two-phase flow test tunnel for airfoil studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.

    1990-02-01

    A test tunnel for the study of airfoil performances under air/water two-phase flow condition has been designed and constructed. This facility will serve for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and characteristics of hydraulic machinery under gas/ liquid two-phase flow operating conditions. At the test section of the tunnel, a two-dimensional isolated airfoil or a cascade of airfoils is installed in a two-phase inlet flow with a uniform velocity (up to 10 m/s) and void fraction (up to 12%) distribution. The details of the tunnel structure and the measuring systems are described and the basic characteristics of the constructed tunnel are also given. As an example of the test results, void fraction distribution around a test airfoil is shown.

  6. Air/water two-phase flow test tunnel for airfoil studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.

    1994-01-01

    A test tunnel for the study of airfoil performances under air/water two-phase flow condition has been designed and constructed. This facility will serve for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and characteristics of hydraulic machinery under gas/ liquid two-phase flow operating conditions. At the test section of the tunnel, a two-dimensional isolated airfoil or a cascade of airfoils is installed in a two-phase inlet flow with a uniform velocity (up to 10 m/s) and void fraction (up to 12%) distribution. The details of the tunnel structure and the measuring systems are described and the basic characteristics of the constructed tunnel are also given. As an example of the test results, void fraction distribution around a test airfoil is shown.

  7. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; ...

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initialmore » monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.« less

  8. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.

  9. Thermodynamics of iodide adsorption at the instantaneous air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2013-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations using both polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study the adsorption of iodide to the air-water interface. A novel aspect of our analysis is that the progress of ion adsorption is measured as the distance from the instantaneous interface, which is defined by a coarse-graining scheme proposed recently by Willard and Chandler ["Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010), 10.1021/jp909219k]. Referring structural and thermodynamic quantities to the instantaneous interface unmasks molecular-scale details that are obscured by thermal fluctuations when the same quantities are referred to an average measure of the position of the interface, such as the Gibbs dividing surface. Our results suggest that an ion adsorbed at the interface resides primarily in the topmost water layer, and the interfacial location of the ion is favored by enthalpy and opposed by entropy.

  10. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system

    PubMed Central

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications. PMID:24204419

  11. Temperature of denture base resin under different protocols of microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Newton; Gil, Carlos; Kolikauskas, William Antunes; Silva, Rafael Andrade; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the temperature of dentures after different microwave irradiation protocols. Two complete dentures (one maxillary and one mandibular denture) were irradiated separately 4 times for each of the following 5 protocols: dentures immersed in water (G1- 6 min, G2- 3 min); dentures kept dry (G3- 6 min); dentures placed in the steam sterilizer (G4- 6 min, G5- 3 min). The final temperature of the dentures was gauged in a thin and in a thick area of each denture with an infrared thermometer. All groups presented an increase in the resin base temperature. The thin areas of the dentures underwent greater heating than the thick areas. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the final mean temperatures of dentures immersed in water for 6 (G1) and 3 min (G2). However, the final mean temperatures recorded in G1 and G2 exceeded 71°C and were significantly higher (<0.001) than the final mean temperatures recorded in the other groups. It may be concluded that denture base resins subjected to microwave irradiation immersed in water may be exposed to deleterious temperatures.

  12. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system.

    PubMed

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns; Larhed, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications.

  13. Momentum and mass fluxes in a gas confined between periodically structured surfaces at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, Alexander A.; Tiwari, Sudarshan; Liang, Tengfei; Hardt, Steffen; Klar, Axel; Ye, Wenjing

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that in a gas-filled duct or channel along which a temperature gradient is applied, a thermal creep flow is created. Here we show that a mass and momentum flux can also be induced in a gas confined between two parallel structured surfaces at different temperatures, i.e., orthogonal to the temperature gradient. We use both analytical and numerical methods to compute the resulting fluxes. The momentum flux assumes its maximum value in the free-molecular flow regime, the (normalized) mass flux in the transition flow regime. The discovered phenomena could find applications in methods for energy-conversion and thermal pumping of gases.

  14. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-07

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  15. Combined surface pressure-interfacial shear rheology studies of the interaction of proteins with spread phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Simon A; Kellaway, Ian W; Taylor, Kevin M G; Warburton, Brian; Peters, Kevin

    2005-08-26

    The adsorption of two model proteins, catalase and lysozyme, to phospholipid monolayers spread at the air-water interface has been studied using a combined surface pressure-interfacial shear rheology technique. Monolayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG) and DPPC:DPPG (7:3) were spread on a phosphate buffer air-water interface at pH 7.4. Protein solutions were introduced to the subphase and the resultant changes in surface pressure and interfacial storage and loss moduli were recorded with time. The results show that catalase readily adsorbs to all the phospholipid monolayers investigated, inducing a transition from liquid-like to gel-like rheological behaviour in the process. The changes in surface rheology as a result of the adsorption of catalase increase in the order DPPCdifferences when injected beneath DPPC or the DPPC:DPPG (7:3) mixed monolayer. It is proposed that DPPG monolayers are more susceptible to penetration by adsorbing protein molecules. The interaction between DPPG and lysozyme is further enhanced due to electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged DPPG and the positively charged lysozyme.

  16. In situ study by polarization modulated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the structure and orientation of lipids and amphipathic peptides at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Cornut, I; Desbat, B; Turlet, J M; Dufourcq, J

    1996-01-01

    Free amphipathic peptides and peptides bound to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) were studied directly at the air/water interface using polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PMIRRAS). Such differential reflectivity measurements proved to be a sensitive and efficient technique to investigate in situ the respective conformations and orientations of lipid and peptide molecules in pure and mixed films. Data obtained for melittin, a natural hemolytic peptide, are compared to those of L15K7, an ideally amphipathic synthetic peptide constituted by only apolar Leu and polar Lys residues. For pure peptidic films, the intensity, shape, and position of the amide I and II bands indicate that the L15K7 peptide adopts a totally alpha-helical structure, whereas the structure of melittin is mainly alpha-helical and presents some unordered domains. The L15K7 alpha-helix axis is oriented essentially parallel to the air-water interface plane; it differs for melittin. When injected into the subphase, L15K7 and melittin insert into preformed expanded DMPC monolayers and can be detected by PMIRRAS, even at low peptide content (> 50 DMPC molecules per peptide). In such conditions, peptides have the same secondary structure and orientation as in pure peptidic films. PMID:8770206

  17. DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces: Their relative impact on bacteria deposition mechanisms in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were performed to investigate bacteria deposition behavior in unsaturated porous media. The coupled effect of different forces, acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces and their relative importance on bacteria deposition mechanisms was explored by calculating Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces. Negatively charged non-motile bacteria and quartz sands were used in packed column experiments. The breakthrough curves and retention profiles of bacteria were simulated using the modified Mobile-IMmobile (MIM) model, to identify physico-chemical attachment or physical straining mechanisms involved in bacteria retention. These results indicated that both mechanisms might occur in both sand. However, the attachment was found to be a reversible process, because attachment coefficients were similar to those of detachment. DLVO calculations supported these results: the primary minimum did not exist, suggesting no permanent retention of bacteria to solid-water and air-water interfaces. Calculated hydrodynamic and resisting torques predicted that bacteria detachment in the secondary minimum might occur. The capillary potential energy was greater than DLVO, hydrophobic and hydrodynamic potential energies, suggesting that film straining by capillary forces might largely govern bacteria deposition under unsaturated conditions.

  18. Temperature Characterization of Different Urban Microhabitats of Aedes albopictus (Diptera Culicidae) in Central-Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Vallorani, Roberto; Angelini, Paola; Bellini, Romeo; Carrieri, Marco; Crisci, Alfonso; Mascali Zeo, Silvia; Messeri, Gianni; Venturelli, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) is an invasive mosquito species that has spread to many countries in temperate regions bordering the Mediterranean basin, where it is becoming a major public health concern. A good knowledge of the thermal features of the most productive breeding sites for Ae. albopictus is crucial for a better estimation of the mosquitoes' life cycle and developmental rates. In this article, we address the problem of predicting air temperature in three microhabitats common in urban and suburban areas and the air and water temperature inside an ordinary catch basin, which is considered the most productive breeding site for Ae. albopictus in Italy. Temperature differences were statistically proven between the three microhabitats and between the catch basin external and internal temperature. The impacts on the developmental rates for each life stage of Ae. albopictus were tested through a parametric function of the temperature, and the aquatic stages resulted as being the most affected using the specific temperature inside a typical catch basin instead of a generic air temperature. The impact of snow cover on the catch basin internal temperature, and consequently on the mortality of diapausing eggs, was also evaluated. These data can be useful to improve epidemiological models for a better prediction of Ae. albopictus seasonal and population dynamics in central-northern Italian urban areas.

  19. Nonlinear optical parameters of nanocrystalline AZO thin film measured at different substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Asim; Abdel-wahab, M. Sh; Al-ghamdi, Attieh A.; Dahlan, Ammar sadik; Yahia, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The 2.2 wt% of aluminum (Al)-doped zinc oxide (AZO) transparent and preferential c-axis oriented thin films were prepared by using radio frequency (DC/RF) magnetron sputtering at different substrate temperature ranging from room temperature to 200 °C. For structural analysis, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Electron Microscope (AFM) was used for morphological studies. The optical parameters such as, optical energy gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient, dielectric loss, tangent loss, first and third order nonlinear optical properties of transparent films were investigated. High transmittance above 90% and highly homogeneous surface were observed in all samples. The substrate temperature plays an important role to get the best transparent conductive oxide thin films. The substrate temperature at 150 °C showed the growth of highly transparent AZO thin film. Energy gap increased with the increased in substrate temperature of Al doped thin films. Dielectric constant and loss were found to be photon energy dependent with substrate temperature. The change in substrate temperature of Al doped thin films also affect the non-liner optical properties of thin films. The value of χ(3) was found to be changed with the grain size of the thin films that directly affected by the substrate temperature of the pure and Al doped ZnO thin films.

  20. Compensatory growth of juvenile brown flounder Paralichthys olivaceus following low temperature treatment for different periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yinhui; Liu, Xiujia; Huang, Guoqiang; Wei, Liuzhi; Zhang, Xiumei

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the effects of low temperature (8.5°C) on the growth and feeding rates and feed conversion efficiency of juvenile P. olivaceus with an average initial weight of 3.87 ± 0.06 g (mean ± SE). Fish were exposed to 8.5°C for 0 (control), 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks, and then to 20°C for 10, 9, 8, 7 and 6 weeks, respectively. Low temperature clearly led to growth depression. The weight of fish exposed to low temperature for 1 week was restored to that of control, while that of fish exposed to low temperature longer was significantly decreased ( P < 0.05). During the entire low-temperature period, specific growth rate, feeding rate and feed conversion efficiency of the fish were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) than those of control, while in the whole recovery period, specific growth and average feeding rate were markedly higher ( P < 0.05) than those of control. At the end of experiment, only the feeding rate of the fish exposed to low temperature for 1 week was not significantly different from that of control ( P > 0.05). Feeding rate and feed conversion efficiency were reduced at low temperature in juvenile P. olivaceus. The compensatory growth of juvenile P. olivaceus may therefore be attributed to the improvement of feeding rate. Our results suggested that growth depression occurs when juvenile P. olivaceus are exposed to low temperature for more than one week.

  1. Feel the heat: activation, orientation and feeding responses of bed bugs to targets at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Zachary C; Mick, Russell; Schal, Coby

    2016-12-01

    Host location in bed bugs is poorly understood. Of the primary host-associated cues known to attract bed bugs - CO2, odors, heat - heat has received little attention as an independent stimulus. We evaluated the effects of target temperatures ranging from 23 to 48°C on bed bug activation, orientation and feeding. Activation and orientation responses were assessed using a heated target in a circular arena. All targets heated above ambient temperature activated bed bugs (initiated movement) and elicited oriented movement toward the target, with higher temperatures generally resulting in faster activation and orientation. The distance over which bed bugs could orient toward a heat source was measured using a 2-choice T-maze assay. Positive thermotaxis was limited to distances <3 cm. Bed bug feeding responses on an artificial feeding system increased with feeder temperature up to 38 and 43°C, and declined precipitously at 48°C. In addition, bed bugs responded to the relative difference between ambient and feeder temperatures. These results highlight the wide range of temperatures that elicit activation, orientation and feeding responses in bed bugs. In contrast, the ability of bed bugs to correctly orient towards a heated target, independently of other cues, is limited to very short distances (<3 cm). Finally, bed bug feeding is shown to be relative to ambient temperature, not an absolute response to feeder blood temperature.

  2. Spatially resolved air-water emissions tradeoffs improve regulatory impact analyses for electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Sun, Xiaodi; Behrer, A Patrick; Azevedo, Inês L; Mauter, Meagan S

    2017-02-21

    Coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) generate air, water, and solids emissions that impose substantial human health, environmental, and climate change (HEC) damages. This work demonstrates the importance of accounting for cross-media emissions tradeoffs, plant and regional emissions factors, and spatially variation in the marginal damages of air emissions when performing regulatory impact analyses for electric power generation. As a case study, we assess the benefits and costs of treating wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater at US CFPPs using the two best available treatment technology options specified in the 2015 Effluent Limitation Guidelines (ELGs). We perform a life-cycle inventory of electricity and chemical inputs to FGD wastewater treatment processes and quantify the marginal HEC damages of associated air emissions. We combine these spatially resolved damage estimates with Environmental Protection Agency estimates of water quality benefits, fuel-switching benefits, and regulatory compliance costs. We estimate that the ELGs will impose average net costs of $3.01 per cubic meter for chemical precipitation and biological wastewater treatment and $11.26 per cubic meter for zero-liquid discharge wastewater treatment (expected cost-benefit ratios of 1.8 and 1.7, respectively), with damages concentrated in regions containing a high fraction of coal generation or a large chemical manufacturing industry. Findings of net cost for FGD wastewater treatment are robust to uncertainty in auxiliary power source, location of chemical manufacturing, and binding air emissions limits in noncompliant regions, among other variables. Future regulatory design will minimize compliance costs and HEC tradeoffs by regulating air, water, and solids emissions simultaneously and performing regulatory assessments that account for spatial variation in emissions impacts.

  3. Precision cleaning verification of fluid components by air/water impingement and total carbon analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 sq m. Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging/diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg/sq ft of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVRs impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 sq m.

  4. Precision Cleaning Verification of Fluid Components by Air/Water Impingement and Total Carbon Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1995-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 m(exp 2). Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging-diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC-113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg-ft(exp 2) of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVR's impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 m(exp 2).

  5. Temperature influences on water permeability and chlorpyrifos uptake in aquatic insects with differing respiratory strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Jenkins, J.J.; Curtis, L.R.

    2003-01-01

    Aquatic insects have evolved diverse respiratory strategies that range from breathing atmospheric air to breathing dissolved oxygen. These strategies result in vast morphological differences among taxa in terms of exchange epithelial surface areas that are in direct contact with the surrounding water that, in turn, affect physiological processes. This paper examines the effects of acute temperature shifts on water permeability and chlorpyrifos uptake in aquatic insects with different respiratory strategies. While considerable differences existed in water permeability among the species tested, acute temperature shifts raised water influx rates similarly in air-breathing and gill-bearing taxa. This contrasts significantly with temperature-shift effects on chlorpyrifos uptake. Temperature shifts of 4.5??C increased 14C-chlorpyrifos accumulation rates in the gill-bearing mayfly Cinygma sp. and in the air-breathing hemipteran Sigara washingtonensis. However, the temperature-induced increase in 14C-chlorpyrifos uptake after 8 h of exposure was 2.75-fold higher in Cinygma than in Sigara. Uptake of 14C-chlorpyrifos was uniformly higher in Cinygma than in Sigara in all experiments. These findings suggest that organisms with relatively large exchange epithelial surface areas are potentially more vulnerable to both osmoregulatory distress as well as contaminant accumulation. Temperature increases appear more likely to impact organisms that have relatively large exchange epithelial surface areas, both as an individual stressor and in combination with additional stressors such as contaminants.

  6. Viscoelasticity and texture of spreadable cheeses with different fat contents at refrigeration and room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, S; Carbonell, I; Costell, E

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the 2 common consumption temperatures, refrigeration temperature (10°C) and room temperature (22°C), on the viscoelasticity, mechanical properties, and perceived texture of commercial cream cheeses was studied. Two samples with different fat contents, regular and low fat, from each of 4 selected commercial brands were analyzed. The selection criteria were based on identification of brands with different percentages of fat content reduction between the regular- and low-fat samples (35, 50, 84, and 98.5%). The fat content of regular-fat samples ranged from 19.8 to 26.0% (wt/wt), and that of low-fat samples ranged from 0.3 to 13.0% (wt/wt). Viscoelasticity was measured in a controlled-stress rheometer using parallel-plate geometry, and the mechanical characteristics of samples were measured using the spreadability test. Differences in the intensity of thickness, creaminess, and roughness between the regular- and low-fat samples of each commercial brand were evaluated at each of the selected temperatures by using the paired comparisons test. At 10°C, all samples showed higher viscoelastic modulus values, firmness, and stickiness, and lower spreadability than when they were measured at 22°C. Differences in viscoelasticity and mechanical properties between each pair of samples of the same brand were greater at 10°C than at 22°C because of the influence not only of fat content but also of fat state. Ingestion temperature did not modify the sensory differences detected between each pair of samples in terms of creaminess and roughness, but it did modify the differences detected in thickness. The joint consideration of sample composition, fat state, and product behavior during oral processing could explain the differences detected in thickness perceived because of measurement temperatures.

  7. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  8. Rheological characterization of novel physically crosslinked terpolymeric hydrogels at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malana, Muhammad Aslam; Zohra, Rubab; Khan, Muhammad Saleem

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this research work is to reveal the detailed and extensive rheological characterization of terpolymeric hydrogel formulations using a variety of monomers having different concentrations of acrylic acid and applying a range of temperatures. The hydrogels with the different concentrations of acrylic acid were prepared in the absence of air using three different monomers, by free radical polymerization, gradually increasing the temperature up to polymerization point, using ethyl alcohol as solvent. Different shear measurements were performed to study rheological properties, temperature dependence, and yield strength of acrylic acid pharmaceutical hydrogels. Various models were applied to analyze the rheological behavior of the gels. The acrylic acid pharmaceutical gels having physical cross links in the gel networks, exhibit remarkable temperature dependence especially with relatively higher concentration of acrylic acid at greater shear rate. Flow curves plotted at various temperatures indicate that these gels exhibit a reasonable pseudoplastic behavior. All these hydrogels require appropriate yield strength to break their network structures. The gel samples exhibit the best fit to the Modified Bingham model, which can explain the overall flow behavior of these topical gels. The rheological analysis indicates that these gels may be used as topical gels for targeted and controlled drug delivery at a specific site.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Differences between Readily Releasable and Reserve Pool Vesicles in Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Christy L.; Siff, Lauren N.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Summary Statistical differences between amperometric traces recorded from chromaffin cells using K+ and Ba2+ secretagogues support the assertion that readily releasable pool (RRP) and reserve pool (RP) vesicles can be probed with pool-specific secretagogues. Release from the RRP was evoked by K+ while release from the RP was evoked by Ba2+. Similar temperature-dependent changes in spike area and half-width for both pools suggest that the content of RRP and RP vesicles is similar and packaged in the same way. Differences between the vesicle pools were revealed in the temperature dependence of spike frequency. While the burst spike frequency of the RRP, which is comprised of pre-docked and primed vesicles, increased 2.8% per °C, the RP spike frequency increased 12% per °C. This difference is attributed to a temperature dependent mobilization of the RP. Furthermore, the RP exhibited more foot events at room temperature than the RRP but this difference was not apparent at 37°C. This trend suggests that RP vesicle membranes have a compromised surface tension compared to RRP vesicles. Collectively, the changes of release characteristics with temperature reveal distinctions between the RRP and the RP. PMID:17467077

  10. SURVIVAL CAPACITY OF Arcobacter butzleri INOCULATED IN POULTRY MEAT AT TWO DIFFERENT REFRIGERATION TEMPERATURES.

    PubMed

    Badilla-Ramírez, Yanán; Fallas-Padilla, Karolina L; Fernández-Jaramillo, Heriberto; Arias-Echandi, María Laura

    2016-01-01

    Arcobacter spp. are emerging enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents that can be transmitted by food and water, being considered a public health risk. The high isolation rate of these bacteria from poultry products suggests that it may be a major source of human infections. One hallmark for differentiating the genus Arcobacter from Campylobacter includes their growing capacity at low temperatures (15-30 °C) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about the population density variation of these bacteria at different refrigeration temperatures. The aim of this study was to determine the survival behavior of two different Arcobacter butzleri concentrations (10(4) CFU/mL and 10(7) CFU/mL) inoculated on chicken legs and held at two different refrigeration temperatures (4 and 10 °C) throughout storage time. Results have shown that A. butzleri had growing capacity both at 4 and 10 °C. No statistical difference between the survival trends was found for both bacterial concentrations and temperatures tested. This study shows that A. butzleri is a robust species with regard to storage temperature, and represents a potential health risk for poultry meat consumers.

  11. Finite difference modelling of the temperature rise in non-linear medical ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Divall, S A; Humphrey, V F

    2000-03-01

    Non-linear propagation of ultrasound can lead to increased heat generation in medical diagnostic imaging due to the preferential absorption of harmonics of the original frequency. A numerical model has been developed and tested that is capable of predicting the temperature rise due to a high amplitude ultrasound field. The acoustic field is modelled using a numerical solution to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, known as the Bergen Code, which is implemented in cylindrical symmetric form. A finite difference representation of the thermal equations is used to calculate the resulting temperature rises. The model allows for the inclusion of a number of layers of tissue with different acoustic and thermal properties and accounts for the effects of non-linear propagation, direct heating by the transducer, thermal diffusion and perfusion in different tissues. The effect of temperature-dependent skin perfusion and variation in background temperature between the skin and deeper layers of the body are included. The model has been tested against analytic solutions for simple configurations and then used to estimate temperature rises in realistic obstetric situations. A pulsed 3 MHz transducer operating with an average acoustic power of 200 mW leads to a maximum steady state temperature rise inside the foetus of 1.25 degrees C compared with a 0.6 degree C rise for the same transmitted power under linear propagation conditions. The largest temperature rise occurs at the skin surface, with the temperature rise at the foetus limited to less than 2 degrees C for the range of conditions considered.

  12. Temperature and functional traits influence differences in nitrogen uptake capacity between native and invasive grasses.

    PubMed

    Leffler, A Joshua; James, Jeremy J; Monaco, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Performance differences between native and exotic invasive plants are often considered static, but invasive grasses may achieve growth advantages in western North America shrublands and steppe under only optimal growing conditions. We examine differences in N uptake and several morphological variables that influence uptake at temperatures between 5 and 25 °C. We contrast two native perennial grasses in western North America: Elymus elymoides and Pseudoroegneria spicata; two invasive annual grasses: Bromus tectorum and Taeniatherum caput-medusae; and one highly selected non-native perennial grass: Agropyron cristatum. The influence of temperature on N uptake is poorly characterized, yet these invasive annual grasses are known to germinate in warm soils in the autumn, and both experience cool soils during the short growing season following snowmelt in the spring. To further explore the influence of temperature on the correlation between morphological variables and N uptake, our data are applied to a previously published path model and one proposed here. Differences in N uptake between native and invasive grasses were small at the lowest temperature, but were large at the highest temperature. At lower temperatures, uptake of N by annuals and perennials was correlated with leaf N and mass. At higher temperatures, uptake by annuals was correlated only with these leaf traits, but uptake by perennials was correlated with these leaf traits as well as root N and mass. Consequently, our results imply that annual grasses face fewer morphological constraints on N uptake than perennial grasses, and annual grasses may gain further advantage in warmer temperature conditions or during more frequent warm periods.

  13. Genetically determined differences in ethanol sensitivity influenced by body temperature during intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Alkana, R.L.; Finn, D.A.; Bejanian, M.; Crabbe, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The present study investigated the importance of body temperature during intoxication in mediating differences between five inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J; BALB/cJ; DBA/2J; A/HeJ; 129/J) in their acute sensitivity to the hypnotic effects of ethanol. Mice exposed to 22/degrees/C after ethanol injection became hypothermic and exhibited statistically significant differences between strains in rectal temperatures at the return of the righting reflex (RORR), duration of loss of the righting reflex (LORR), and blood and brain ethanol concentrations at RORR. Exposure to 34/degrees/C after injection offset ethanol-hypothermia and markedly reduced strain-related differences in rectal temperatures and blood and brain ethanol concentrations at RORR. Brain ethanol concentrations at RORR were significantly lower in C57, BALB, DBA and A/He mice exposed to 34/degrees/C compared to mice exposed to 22/degrees/C during intoxication suggesting that offsetting hypothermia increased ethanol sensitivity in these strains. Taken with previous in vitro studies, these results suggest that genetically determined differences in acute sensitivity to the behavioral effects of ethanol reflect differences in body temperature during intoxication as well as differences in sensitivity to the initial actions of ethanol at the cellular level.

  14. Thermal fluctuations of haemoglobin from different species: adaptation to temperature via conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stadler, A M; Garvey, C J; Bocahut, A; Sacquin-Mora, S; Digel, I; Schneider, G J; Natali, F; Artmann, G M; Zaccai, G

    2012-11-07

    Thermodynamic stability, configurational motions and internal forces of haemoglobin (Hb) of three endotherms (platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus; domestic chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus and human, Homo sapiens) and an ectotherm (salt water crocodile, Crocodylus porosus) were investigated using circular dichroism, incoherent elastic neutron scattering and coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results from Hb solutions revealed a direct correlation between protein resilience, melting temperature and average body temperature of the different species on the 0.1 ns time scale. Molecular forces appeared to be adapted to permit conformational fluctuations with a root mean square displacement close to 1.2 Å at the corresponding average body temperature of the endotherms. Strong forces within crocodile Hb maintain the amplitudes of motion within a narrow limit over the entire temperature range in which the animal lives. In fully hydrated powder samples of human and chicken, Hb mean square displacements and effective force constants on the 1 ns time scale showed no differences over the whole temperature range from 10 to 300 K, in contrast to the solution case. A complementary result of the study, therefore, is that one hydration layer is not sufficient to activate all conformational fluctuations of Hb in the pico- to nanosecond time scale which might be relevant for biological function. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations permitted to explore residue-specific effects. They indicated that temperature sensing of human and chicken Hb occurs mainly at residues lining internal cavities in the β-subunits.

  15. Demographic comparison and population projection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) reared on sugarcane at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lu; Miao, Yunxin; Hou, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how temperature affects fitness is important for conservation and pest management, especially in the era of global climate change. Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Oliver) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a worldwide pest of many economically important crops. Although much is known about this pest’s life cycle, its adaptability to different temperatures is not fully understood. Here, we used age- and stage-specific life tables to investigate the effects of temperature on fitness-related traits and demographic parameters of R. ferrugineus under eight constant temperature regimens in the laboratory. The growth potential of these populations was also evaluated. The greatest longevity for males and females was 158.0 d at 24 °C and 144.5 d at 21 °C, respectively, but mean total fecundity was the highest at 27 °C. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), and net reproductive rate (R0) increased initially at low temperatures and then decreased. All metrics reached a maximum at 27 °C and a minimum at 36 °C. Mean generation times (T ) decreased across the temperature range with a minimum at 36 °C. Our results indicate that the optimum temperature for growth of R. ferrugineus was approximately 27 °C. Our work will be of value for developing strategies for control management of this pest species. PMID:27545594

  16. Coffee roasting and aroma formation: application of different time-temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Juerg; Poisson, Luigi; Kaegi, Ruth; Perren, Rainer; Escher, Felix

    2008-07-23

    The impact of time-temperature combinations of roasting processes on the kinetics of aroma formation in coffee was investigated. The development of 16 aroma compounds and the physical properties of coffee beans was followed in a commercial horizontal drum roasting process and in laboratory scale fluidizing-bed roasting processes at high temperature-short time and low temperature-long time conditions. All trials were run to an equal roast end point as defined by the lightness of coffee beans. In addition, the effect of excessive roasting on aroma composition was studied. Compared to low temperature-long time roasting, high temperature-short time roasting resulted in considerable differences in the physical properties and kinetics of aroma formation. Excessive roasting generally led to decreasing or stable amounts of volatile substances, except for hexanal, pyridine, and dimethyl trisulfide, whose concentrations continued to increase during over-roasting. When the drum roaster and the fluidizing bed roaster were operated in the so-called temperature profile mode, that is, along the identical development of coffee bean temperature over roasting time, the kinetics of aroma generation were similar in both processes.

  17. Temperature-difference-driven mass transfer through the vapor from a cold to a warm liquid.

    PubMed

    Struchtrup, Henning; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Irreversible thermodynamics provides interface conditions that yield temperature and chemical potential jumps at phase boundaries. The interfacial jumps allow unexpected transport phenomena, such as the inverted temperature profile [Pao, Phys. Fluids 14, 306 (1971)] and mass transfer from a cold to a warm liquid driven by a temperature difference across the vapor phase [Mills and Phillips, Chem. Phys. Lett. 372, 615 (2002)]. Careful evaluation of the thermodynamic laws has shown [Bedeaux et al., Physica A 169, 263 (1990)] that the inverted temperature profile is observed for processes with a high heat of vaporization. In this paper, we show that cold to warm mass transfer through the vapor from a cold to a warm liquid is only possible when the heat of evaporation is sufficiently small. A necessary criterium for the size of the mass transfer coefficient is given.

  18. Surface acoustic wave velocity of gold films deposited on silicon substrates at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, E.; Jimenez Rioboo, R. J.; Prieto, C.; Every, A. G.

    2011-07-15

    Au thin films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on Si (001) substrates at different substrate temperatures, ranging from 200 K to 450 K. With increasing temperature, the expected crystallinity and morphology of the Au thin film are clearly improved, as shown by x ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy experiments. Parallel to this, the surface acoustic wave propagation velocity shows a clear enhancement toward the ideal values obtained from numerical simulations of a Au thin film on Si (001) substrate. Moreover, a very thin and slightly rough interlayer between the Si (001) substrate and the Au thin film is developed for temperatures above 350 K. The composition and nature of this interlayer is not known. This interlayer may be responsible for the steep change in the structural and elastic properties of the Au thin films at the higher temperatures and possibly also for an improvement of the adhesion properties of the Au on the Si (001) substrate.

  19. Self-diffusion of lignite/water under different temperatures and pressure: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjian; Jin, Yu; Huang, Congliang; He, Jingfeng; Rao, Zhonghao; Zhao, Yuemin

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and pressure have direct and remarkable implications for drying and dewatering effect of low rank coals such as lignite. To understand the microenergy change mechanism of lignite, the molecular dynamics simulation method was performed to study the self-diffusion of lignite/water under different temperatures and pressure. The results showed that high temperature and high pressure can promote the diffusion of lignite/water system, which facilitates the drying and dewatering of lignite. The volume and density of lignite/water system will increase and decrease with temperature increasing, respectively. Though the pressure within simulation range can make lignite density increase, the increasing pressure showed a weak impact on variation of density.

  20. Effects of different sitting positions on skin temperature of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Seung; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Shim, JungMyo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of different sitting positions on the skin temperature of the lower extremity. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 23 healthy university students (8 males, 15 females). [Methods] Normal sitting (NS), upper leg cross (ULC) and ankle on knee (AOK) positions were conducted to measure the changes in skin temperature using digital infrared thermographic imaging (DITI). [Results] ULC upper ankle, NS upper shin, ULC upper shin and NS lower shin showed significant declines in temperature with time. [Conclusion] These finding suggest that the ULC and NS sitting positions cause decline of blood flow volume to the lower extremity resulting in decrease of temperature of the lower extremity. Especially, sitting with the legs crossed interferes with the circulation of blood flowing volume much more than just sitting in a chair.

  1. The forms of alkalis in the biochar produced from crop residues at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jin-Hua; Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhang, Hong

    2011-02-01

    The forms of alkalis of the biochars produced from the straws of canola, corn, soybean and peanut at different temperatures (300, 500 and 700°C) were studied by means of oxygen-limited pyrolysis. The alkalinity and pH of the biochars increased with increased pyrolysis temperature. The X-ray diffraction spectra and the content of carbonates of the biochars suggested that carbonates were the major alkaline components in the biochars generated at the high temperature; they were also responsible for the strong buffer plateau-regions on the acid-base titration curves at 500 and 700°C. The data of FTIR-PAS and zeta potentials indicated that the functional groups such as -COO(-) (-COOH) and -O(-) (-OH) contained by the biochars contributed greatly to the alkalinity of the biochar samples tested, especially for those generated at the lower temperature. These functional groups were also responsible for the negative charges of the biochars.

  2. Locomotor activity and body temperature in selected mouse lines differing greatly in feed intake.

    PubMed

    Sojka, P A; Griess, R S; Nielsen, M K

    2013-08-01

    Locomotor activity, body temperature, feed intake, and BW were measured on 382 mature male mice sampled from lines previously selected (25 generations) for either high (MH) or low (ML) heat loss and an unselected control (MC). Animals were from all 3 independent replicates of the 3 lines and across 4 generations (68 through 71). Locomotor activity and body temperatures were obtained using implanted transmitters with data collection over 4 d following a 3-d postsurgery recovery period. Data were collected every minute and then averaged into 30-min periods, thus providing 192 data points for each mouse. Least-squares means for feed intake adjusted for BW (Feed/BW, feed·BW(-1)·d(-1), g/g) were 0.1586, 0.1234, and 0.1125 (±0.0022) for MH, MC, and ML, respectively, with line being a highly significant source of variation (P < 0.0003). Line effects for locomotor activity counts, transformed to the 0.25 power for analysis, were significantly different, with MH mice being 2.1 times more active than ML mice (P < 0.003); MC mice were intermediate. Differences in body temperature were significant for both line (P < 0.03) and day effects (P < 0.001), with a 0.32°C difference between the MH and ML lines. Fourier series analysis used the combined significant periodicities of 24, 18, 12, 9, 6, and 3 h to describe circadian cycles for activity and body temperature. All 3 lines expressed daily peaks in body temperature and locomotor activity ∼3 h into darkness and ∼2 h after lights were turned on. There was a stronger relationship between locomotor activity and Feed/BW (P < 0.0001) than between body temperature and Feed/BW (P < 0.01); differences between lines in locomotor activity and body temperature explained 17% and 3%, respectively, of differences between lines in Feed/BW. Thus, line differences in locomotor activity contribute to line differences in maintenance, but approximately 80% of the differences between the MH and ML selection lines in Feed/BW remains

  3. Behavior, metabolism and swimming physiology in juvenile Spinibarbus sinensis exposed to PFOS under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ji-Gang; Nie, Li-Juan; Mi, Xia-Mei; Wang, Wei-Zhen; Ma, Yi-Jie; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2015-10-01

    The harmful effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are of growing international concern. This paper aimed to gain an integrated understanding of fitness-related ecological end points, such as behavior, metabolism and swimming physiology, in juvenile Spinibarbus sinensis in response to PFOS toxicity at different temperatures. The fish were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (0, 0.32, 0.8, 2 and 5 mg/L) at different temperatures (18 and 28 °C) for 30 days. The effects on fish behavior, metabolic characteristics and aerobic swimming performance caused by PFOS at different temperatures were investigated. Our results showed that both PFOS and temperature had important influences on spontaneous swimming behavior, social interactions, routine metabolic rate (RMR), net energetic cost of transport (COTnet) and critical swimming speed (U crit) in fish. The lowest observed effect concentration for both U crit and RMR was 5 and 0.8 mg/L at 18 and 28 °C, respectively. We found that PFOS affected various behavioral and social end points and also appeared to affect metabolic rates and reduced U crit, likely as a result of increased COTnet, and that many of these effects also changed with respect to temperature. Our results further the understanding of the metabolic and behavioral toxicity of PFOS to aquatic organisms.

  4. Metabolic flux and nodes control analysis of brewer's yeasts under different fermentation temperature during beer brewing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhimin; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhao, Mouming; Lei, Hongjie; Li, Huiping

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to further investigate the glycolysis performance of lager and ale brewer's yeasts under different fermentation temperature using a combined analysis of metabolic flux, glycolytic enzyme activities, and flux control. The results indicated that the fluxes through glycolytic pathway decreased with the change of the fermentation temperature from 15 °C to 10 °C, which resulted in the prolonged fermentation times. The maximum activities (V (max)) of hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and pyruvate kinase (PK) at key nodes of glycolytic pathway decreased with decreasing fermentation temperature, which was estimated to have different control extent (22-84 %) on the glycolytic fluxes in exponential or flocculent phase. Moreover, the decrease of V (max) of PFK or PK displayed the crucial role in down-regulation of flux in flocculent phase. In addition, the metabolic state of ale strain was more sensitive to the variation of temperature than that of lager strain. The results of the metabolic flux and nodes control analysis in brewer's yeasts under different fermentation temperature may provide an alternative approach to regulate glycolytic flux by changing V (max) and improve the production efficiency and beer quality.

  5. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Ozcan; Turel, Verda; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED) curing. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers’ instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU) was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. Results: There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05). Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05). The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH)2 specimens. Conclusion: Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing. PMID:26751112

  6. Analysis of temperature difference on the total of energy expenditure during static bicycle exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiono

    2016-04-01

    How to manage energy expenditure for cyclist is very crucial part to achieve a good performance. As the tropical situation, the differences of temperature level might be contributed in energy expenditure and durability. The aim of the paper is to estimate and to analysis the configuration of energy expenditure for static cycling activity based on heart rate value in room with air conditioning (AC)/no AC treatment. The research is started with study literatures of climate factors, temperature impact on human body, and definition of energy expenditure. The next step is design the experiment for 5 participants in 2 difference models for 26.80C - 74% relative humidity (room no AC) and 23,80C - 54.8% relative humidity (room with AC). The participants’ heart rate and blood pressure are measured in rest condition and in cycling condition to know the impact of difference temperature in energy expenditure profile. According to the experiment results, the reducing of the temperature has significantly impact on the decreasing of energy expenditure at average 0.3 Kcal/minute for all 5 performers. Finally, the research shows that climate condition (temperature and relative humidity) are very important factors to manage and to reach a higher performance of cycling sport.

  7. Hot in Baltimore: linking urban form to fine-scale temperature differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, A.; Waugh, D.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Guikema, S.

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding how urban morphology creates microclimates can help policymakers and planners mitigate the effects of heatwaves and other negative urban heat island effects. In Baltimore, where the observed downtown-rural temperature difference (as measured by NOAA stations) can reach 5°C, low-income neighborhoods are almost entirely covered by impervious surfaces like concrete but lack trees and parks. Their urban-rural temperature difference is then expected to exceed the reported one. However, that difference is not well quantified because these areas lack weather station coverage. Additionally, high resolution satellite imagery shows only land surface temperatures (inadequate for policy and health interventions) and may miss severe heat events. To remedy this, a low-cost monitoring network was installed in East Baltimore over summer 2015 aiming to characterize spatial and temporal variability and examine how heat excess varies during heat events. Results confirm that E. Baltimore exceeds downtown temperatures and show that a dense network of low cost sensors can help attribute temperature anomalies to local features such as land cover, building density and tree canopy.

  8. Antioxidant activity and free radical-scavenging capacity of Gynura divaricata leaf extracts at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunpeng; Yu, Yanying; Zhou, Shouran; Liu, Wei; Tian, Shuge; Cao, Shuwen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Extraction temperature influences the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) of medicinal plant extracts to a great extend. TPC and TFC are the principle activity constituents present in the plant. The effects of extraction temperature on TPC, TFC and free radical-scavenging capacity of Gynura divaricata leaf extracts are worth to study. Materials and Methods: Folin–Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride colorimetric assay were used to determine the TPC and TFC of Gynura divaricata leaf extracts at different temperatures. The antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activity were measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and phosphomolybdenum methods. Results: TPC and TFC were significantly elevated with increasing extraction temperature (from 40°C to 100°C). However, TPC and TFC were not significantly different (P > 0.05) at the extraction temperatures 90°C and 100°C. Also, the extracts obtained at a higher temperature exhibited a significant free radical-scavenging activity compared with extraction at lower temperatures (P < 0.05). The TPCs (13.95-36.68 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry material) were highly correlated with DPPH (R2 = 0.9229), ABTS (R2 = 0.9951) free radical-scavenging capacity, and total antioxidant activity (R2 = 0.9872) evaluated by phosphomolybdenum method. Conclusion: The TPC and TFC of G. divaricata leaf was significantly influenced by the extraction temperatures, which were the main antioxidant constituents present in the G. divaricata plant. PMID:21472078

  9. [The Influence of Different Ionic Concentration in Cell Physiological Solution on Temperature Measurement by Near Infrared].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Chen, Xiong; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Meng-jun; Wang, Jin-hai; Li, Gang; Cui, Jun

    2015-10-01

    It is important to real-timely monitor and control the temperature of cell physiological solution in patch clamp experiments, which can eliminate the uncertainty due to temperature and improve the measurement accuracy. This paper studies the influence of different ions at different concentrations in the physiological solution on precision of a temperature model by using near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics method. Firstly, we prepared twelve sample solutions respectively with the solutes of CaCl2, KCl and NaCl at four kinds of concentrations, and collected the spectra of different solutions at the setting temperature range 20-40 degrees C, the range of the spectra is 9 615-5 714 cm(-1). Then we divided the spectra of each solution at different temperatures into two parts (a training set and a prediction set) by three methods. Interval partial least squares method was used to select an effective wavelength range and develop calibration models between the spectra in the selected range and temperature velues. The experimental results show that RMSEP of CaCl2 solution with 0.25 g x mL(-1) is maximum, the result of the three tests are 0.386 3, 0.303 7 and 0.337 2 degrees C, RMSEP of NaCl with 0.005 g x mL(-1) solution is minimum, the result of the three tests are 0.220 8, 0.155 3 and 0.145 2 degrees C. The experimental results indicate that Ca2+ has the greatest influence on the accuracy of the temperature model of the cell physiological solution, then K+, and Na+ has the least influence. And with the ionic concentration increasing, the model accuracy decreases. Therefore; when we build the temperature model of cell physiological solution, it is necessary to change the proportion of the three kinds of main ions in cell physiological solution reasonably in order to correct the effects of different ionic concentrations in physiological solution and improve the accuracy of temperature measurements by near infrared spectroscopy.

  10. Systematic Pressure and Temperature Differences between Vaisala RS80 and RS92 Radiosonde-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecht, W.; Claude, H.; Schönenborn, F.

    2008-12-01

    National meteorological centers are replacing the widely used Vaisala RS80 radiosonde with the newer RS90 or RS92. Such change-overs often introduce erroneous steps into long-term atmospheric temperature records. We show that twin-flight campaigns with RS80 and RS92 sondes on the same balloon, and the transition from RS80 to RS92 in operational radio-soundings over Germany, consistently indicate higher temperature readings from RS92 sondes in the stratosphere. In our presentation we summarize these main differences between RS80 and RS92. Significant differences are found in the stratosphere, above the 100~hPa level. The accuracy of our temperature results is of the order of 0.1 to 0.5~K, and at this level we were not able to find significant differences in the troposphere, although there are indications for slightly higher daytime temperatures from RS92 sondes. During day-time and near 50~hPa, RS92s report +0.3 ± 0.2~K higher temperature than RS80s, increasing to +0.7 ± 0.4~K near 10~hPa (2σ uncertainties). At night, the difference is smaller, +0.1 ± 0.1~K near 50~hPa to +0.35 ± 0.2~K near 10~hPa. The mean day-to-night difference (12-00~UT) is also larger for RS92s, by 0.1± 0.06~K near 70~hPa, and by 0.76± 0.16~K near 10~hPa. The main contribution to this stratospheric day-time difference comes from an over-correction of the radiation error in the Vaisala RS80 data processing. The night-time difference at stratospheric levels (and part of the day-time difference) is due to a low bias of the RS80 pressure measurement, typically by -0.4~hPa near 10~hPa. This shifts temperature readings to lower pressure/ higher altitude. For stratospheric levels, it results in lower temperatures from RS80 sondes (due to the vertical temperature increase). Generally, RS92s give better temperature repeatabiliy, ±0.25~K (2σ) near 50~hPa, and much more precise pressure, ±0.2~hPa near 50~hPa, compared to RS80 systems, ±0.5~K, or ±1.5~hPa. Geopotential heights from RS92s are

  11. Compositional and mechanical properties of peanuts roasted to equivalent colors using different time/temperature combinations.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Kristin A; White, Brittany L; Dean, Lisa L; Sanders, Timothy H; Davis, Jack P

    2012-12-01

    Peanuts in North America and Europe are primarily consumed after dry roasting. Standard industry practice is to roast peanuts to a specific surface color (Hunter L-value) for a given application; however, equivalent surface colors can be attained using different roast temperature/time combinations, which could affect product quality. To investigate this potential, runner peanuts from a single lot were systematically roasted using 5 roast temperatures (147, 157, 167, 177, and 187 °C) and to Hunter L-values of 53 ± 1, 48.5 ± 1, and 43 ± 1, corresponding to light, medium, and dark roasts, respectively. Moisture contents (MC) ranged from 0.41% to 1.70% after roasting. At equivalent roast temperatures, MC decreased as peanuts became darker; however, for a given color, MC decreased with decreasing roast temperature due to longer roast times required for specified color formation. Initial total tocopherol contents of expressed oils ranged from 164 to 559 μg/g oil. Peanuts roasted at lower temperatures and darker colors had higher tocopherol contents. Glucose content was roast color and temperature dependent, while fructose was only temperature dependent. Soluble protein was lower at darker roast colors, and when averaged across temperatures, was highest when samples were roasted at 187 °C. Lysine content decreased with increasing roast color but was not dependent on temperature. MC strongly correlated with several components including tocopherols (R(2) = 0.67), soluble protein (R(2) = 0.80), and peak force upon compression (R(2) = 0.64). The variation in characteristics related to roast conditions is sufficient to suggest influences on final product shelf life and consumer acceptability.

  12. Influence of Different Temperature Sensors on Measuring Energy Efficiency and Heating-Up Time of Hobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beges, G.; Drnovsek, J.; Ogorevc, J.; Bojkovski, J.

    2015-03-01

    Measuring performance, mainly temperature dependence, for electric cooking ranges, hobs, ovens, and grills for household use is essential for producers as low power consumption of appliances represents a powerful selling point and also in terms of ecodesign requirements. It is also important from a consumer perspective, as these appliances are responsible for the significant share of households' electricity bills. The aim of the paper was to highlight and clearly define possible ambiguities and weaknesses of standardized procedures for measuring hob performance. Differences between measurement/test results of testing laboratories are possible due to lack of detailed information in the standard, and it is difficult to obtain technical accessories required in the standard. An energy consumption comparison of three different hobs is presented (standard iron electrical hob, radiant-glass ceramic, and induction hob). Various temperature sensors (different types of thermocouples and a platinum resistance thermometer) and technical accessories (e.g., different cookware) were used to research differences or influences on final result of hobs' energy efficiency. Results show that temperature measurements with different sensors have an influence on the time difference in critical points for determination of hob energy efficiency.

  13. Influence of the mode geometry on the strain and temperature sensitivity of different fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, M.; Holdynski, Z.; Szymanski, M.; Tenderenda, T.; Ostrowski, L.; Łukowski, A.; Krisch, H.; Napierała, M.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Nasilowski, T.

    2013-05-01

    Sensitivity of optical fibers to the temperature, longitudinal strain or pressure, is a very important feature in many applications, such as sensors or telecommunication. The most common way to modify (depending on application - either mitigate or strengthen,) this sensitivity is changing the fiber material properties by appropriate glass doping or by employing appropriate microstructure in the fiber. In some cases the precise adjustment of a doping level and sophisticated design of air-holes arrangement is needed to obtain required features of the fiber. In this paper, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we report the investigation of the mode area and geometry influence on the fiber temperature and mechanical sensitivities. To do so, we engaged a dedicated all-fiber interferometer which enables the measurement of the temperature and longitudinal strain sensitivities of different fiber types, including conventional and microstructured fibers with different core diameters.

  14. Effects of different temperatures and duration on germination of caper (Capparis ovata) seeds.

    PubMed

    Basbag, Mehmet; Toncer, Ozlem; Basbag, Sema

    2009-07-01

    Caperseed has poor germination because of the seed coat dormancy Germination of caperseeds are complex traits affected by a wide range of intemal and environmental influences. The effects of temperature preconditioning and period on germination of Capparis ovata were examined. Experiments were conducted in order to investigate germination behaviour of caperseeds subjected to different temperature and duration. The experiment revealed that the different temperature treatments were effective on mean germination percentage. The highest mean germination were obtained at 0 degree C 29.52% and 10 degrees C with 27.17% and the lowest mean germination were obtained at control seeds with 8.39%. Dry heat treatments effected germination rate, but it was not enough for removing germination obstacle of caper seed completely.

  15. Difference method for analysing infrared images in pigs with elevated body temperatures.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Carsten; Dänicke, Sven; Kersten, Susanne; Brosig, Bianca; Rohweder, Dirk; Beyerbach, Martin; Seifert, Hermann

    2014-03-01

    Infrared imaging proves to be a quick and simple method for measuring temperature distribution on the pig's head. The study showed that infrared imaging and analysis with a difference ROI (region of interest) method may be used for early detection of elevated body temperature in pigs (> 39.5°C). A high specificity of approx. 85% and a high sensitivity of 86% existed. The only prerequisite is that there are at least 2 anatomical regions which can be recognised as reproducible in the IR image. Noise suppression is guaranteed by averaging the temperature value within both of these ROI. The subsequent difference imaging extensively reduces the off-set error which varies in every thermal IR-image.

  16. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  17. Effects of wearing two different types of clothing on body temperatures during and after exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woon Seon; Tokura, Hiromi

    1989-06-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the human thermoregulatory responses during rest, exercise and recovery at T a 20°C and 60% R.H. under the conditions of wearing two different types of clothing. Six healthy men wore two types of clothing: one covering the whole body area except the head (Type A, weight 1656 g), and the other covering only the trunk, upper arms and thighs (Type B, weight 996 g). The level of rectal temperature was kept significantly higher in Type B than in Type A during rest and recovery. The increased and decreased rates of rectal temperature during exercise and recovery were significantly greater in Type A than in Type B, respectively. These findings are discussed from the viewpoint of the differences of skin temperatures of the extremities between Type A and Type B.

  18. Eccentric variation of corneal sensitivity to pneumatic stimulation at different temperatures and with CO2.

    PubMed

    Situ, P; Simpson, T L; Fonn, D

    2007-09-01

    The purpose was to measure corneal sensitivity at multiple corneal positions using pneumatic stimuli, at room temperature and at ocular surface temperature (with and without CO(2) added), in 15 healthy participants. Sensitivity of central, mid-peripheral, and peripheral cornea was measured using a computer-controlled modified Belmonte esthesiometer to deliver pneumatic cool (air at 20 degrees C), mechanical (air at 50 degrees C), and chemical stimuli (air at 50 degrees C with CO(2) added). The ascending method of limits and method of constant stimuli were adopted to determine the threshold to these stimuli at each location. Sensitivity across the cornea using pneumatic stimuli at different temperatures and chemical stimuli varied only slightly. These patterns of variation are different to what has been previously reported using Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometry.

  19. Frequency moments and elastic moduli of liquid rubidium at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.; Thakore, B. Y.; Jani, A. R.

    2013-06-01

    To shed light on structural and vibrational dynamics of liquid rubidium (Rb) at different temperatures; a treatment of pseudopotential theory has been performed. The temperature dependence of structure factor and pair correlation functions has been determined using Percus-Yevick approximation consistent to the model potential used. In the present study, a modified empty core potential is employed to explain an electron-ion interaction. It consists of the full electron-ion interaction and a delta function which represents the orthogonalisation effect due to the s-core states in such sp-bonded metals. The temperature dependence of pair potential is achieved by using the damping factor exp(-αkBTr/2kF) in the pair potential. Expressions for phonon dispersions are derived using different frequency moments. Results for longitudinal phonon frequencies and various elastic moduli are obtained.

  20. The study of the formation of monolayers of quantum dots at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Ilya A.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.; Brezesinski, Gerald; Gluhovskoy, Evgeny G.

    2016-04-01

    The process of formation of Langmuir monolayers of quantum dots at the different subphase temperatures was studied by means of compression isotherm, Brewster angle microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The increasing of the maximum surface pressure from 32 to 44 mN/m takes place with decreasing the temperature from 34 to 11°C. This is due to a decrease in the rate of dissolution of surfactant molecules in water. The increasing of a filling degree of monolayer by the quantum dots and increasing of it uniformity in thickness takes place in this temperature range. The area of bilayer and multilayer film of quantum dots decreasing and the area of quantum dots monolayer is increasing. This change explained by the difference in the phase condition of oleic acid molecules, which stabilized quantum dots.

  1. Influence of probe-sample temperature difference on thermal mapping contrast in scanning thermal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak-Bałata, Anna; Juszczyk, Justyna; Trefon-Radziejewska, Dominika; Bodzenta, Jerzy

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the influence of a temperature difference through a probe-sample contact on thermal contrast in Scanning Thermal Microscopy imaging. A variety of combinations of temperature differences in the probe-sample system were first analyzed based on an electro-thermal finite element model. The numerical analysis included cooling the sample, as well as heating the sample and the probe. Due to the simplicity in the implementation, experimental verification involved modifying the standard imaging technique by heating the sample. Experiments were carried out in the temperature range between 298 K and 328 K. Contrast in thermal mapping was improved for a low probe current with a heated sample.

  2. Drop Hammer Tests with Three Oleo Strut Models and Three Different Shock Strut Oils at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, M

    1954-01-01

    Drop hammer tests with different shock strut models and shock strut oils were performed at temperatures ranging to -40 C. The various shock strut models do not differ essentially regarding their springing and damping properties at low temperatures; however, the influence of the different shock strut oils on the springing properties at low temperatures varies greatly.

  3. Resistivity Variation due to CO2 Migration in Different Temperature and Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Y.; Onishi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Matsuoka, T.; Xue, Z.

    2007-12-01

    CO2 geological sequestration is one of the effective approaches solving the global warming problem. Captured CO2 is injected to the deep aquifers or depleted oil and gas fields. Injected CO2 migrates thorough the reservoir rock, however, the details behavior of injected CO2 under the ground at super critical phase is not yet fully understood. Migration of injected CO2 will change by the condition of the injected reservoir such as the temperature and pressure. Also density and permeability of the rock may be changed due to temperature or pressure variations. These changes control the migration behavior of injected CO2. In this study, experiments of resistivity measurements were conducted to detect the migration difference of CO2 in different temperature and pressure conditions by using sandstone core samples. Core sample was taken from Berea sandstone and processed to 5cm diameter and 12cm length. For the resistivity measurement, impression electrode was set on the both end and the measurement electrode of ring condition was set on the side of the rock sample. We stetted the core sample in the pressure vessel and recreated the condition of underground reservoir which is high pressure and high temperature. We injected supercritical CO2 in different pressure and temperature for each experiment. Pressure was changed in range of 8 to 11MPa and temperature was changed in range of 35° to 45°. This means that all the experiments were conducted in supercritical phase. From the measured resistivity variation, we verified the migration of CO2 and compared the migration behavior of CO2 in different conditions.

  4. Thermodynamics of the clusterization process of trans-isomers of unsaturated fatty acids at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2012-02-23

    In the frameworks of the quantum-chemical semiempirical PM3 method, the thermodynamic parameters of trans-isomers of unsaturated carboxylic acids at the air/water interface were studied. Systems with 18-26 carbon atoms in the alkyl chain and different positions of the double bond are considered. Using quantum-chemical semiempirical PM3 method enthalpy, Gibbs' energy of monomers' formation from the elementary compounds and absolute entropy of trans-unsaturated carboxylic acids are calculated. It has been shown that thermodynamic parameters mentioned above for isomers with the same number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon chain but different position of double bond are practically the same within the margin of error. For dimers, trimers, and tetramers of the four trans-unsaturated carboxylic acids, the thermodynamic parameters of clusterization were calculated. It is shown that the position of double bond does not significantly affect the values of thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization of carboxylic acids with equal alkyl chain lengths. The only exception is the case that the double bond is in the ω-position (extremely distanced from the carboxylic group). In this case, the number of intermolecular interactions between alkyl chains is changed. Spontaneous clusterization of trans- in the standard conditions is possible for molecules that possess more than 16-17 carbon atoms in the alkyl chain. These threshold values exceed the corresponding values that were calculated previously using the quantum-chemical PM3 method for saturated carboxylic acids (12-13 carbon atoms in the alkyl chain) and are a little bit smaller than the corresponding parameters for cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids (18-19 carbon atoms). These values agree with experimental parameters. Also, the calculated structural parameters of trans-unsaturated carboxylic acids' monolayer for the unit cell with a = 6.98 Å, b = 8.30 Å, and for the molecular tilt angle with 64.95° agree with

  5. Effect of temperature on the intrinsic viscosity and conformation of different pectins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of temperature on the intrinsic viscosity and on the conformation of different pectins obtained from citrus, apple and sunflower in a 0.17M NaCl solution were studied. The intrinsic viscosity and the flow activation energy of the polymer (Ea) derived from slope of d In [']/ d(l/T) as an ...

  6. The Effect of Storage at Three Different Temperatures on the Activity of Lipase Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Karen; Mathewman, David

    1984-01-01

    Presented are procedures used to assay the activity of lipase during storage at three different temperatures. Since lipase solutions can decay even when refrigerated, it is recommended that the enzyme be freshly prepared prior to laboratory sessions in which they are used. (JN)

  7. [Temperature compensation strategy and implementation for photoelectric modulation interferometer with large optical path difference].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Ji-Long; Chen, You-Hua

    2013-05-01

    For temperature drift in hypervelocity photoelectric modulation interferometer, a control model of temperature compensation is presented including voltage and phase compensation. First, according to the similar and modeling theory, an equivalent circuit model of mechanical properties of hypervelocity photoelectric modulation interferometer was established, the impact of temperature drift on its resonance frequency was analyzed, a mathematical model was set up, which contains drive voltage, frequency and resonance frequency, and the control method was determined for high optical path difference to get steady. Then, a digital method including voltage and phase compensation is given for optical path difference deviation control, which merges the DPLL and program of voltage and phase compensation. Finally, the control method was tested through experiment system. A test between drive control system including voltage and phase compensation and traditional drive control system was executed, using a laser doppler vibrometer to record the amount of change in optical path difference within 3 hours. Results show that the optical path difference deviation caused by temperature drift in long term is reduced by about 50%.

  8. Compositional and Mechanical Properties of Peanuts Roasted to Equivalent Colors using Different Time/Temperature Combinations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanuts in North America and Europe are primarily consumed after dry roasting. Standard industry practice is to roast peanuts to a specific surface color (Hunter L-value) for a given application; however, equivalent surface colors can be attained using different roast temperature/time combinations,...

  9. Effect of Different Time/Temperature Roast Combinations on Nutritional and Mechanical Properties of Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanuts in North America and Europe are primarily consumed after dry roasting. Standard industry practice is to roast peanuts to a specific surface color (Hunter L-value) for a given application; however, equivalent surface colors can be attained using different roast temperature/time combinations....

  10. Effects of foliage plants on human physiological and psychological responses at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumeno, Desto; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Escalation of task demands and time pressures tends to make a worker run into work stress, which leads to mental fatigue and depression. The mental fatigue can be reduced when attention capacity is restored. Nature can serve as a source of fascination which can restore the attention capacity. People bring plants indoors so they can experience nature in their workplace. The stress and fatigue are also affected by air temperatures. The increase or decrease of temperatures from the comfort zone may induce the stress and fatigue. The objective of this study is to investigate the intervention of using foliage plants placed inside a building at different air temperature levels. The effects of foliage plants on human stress and fatigue were measured by human physiological responses such as heart rate, amylase level, electroencephalography (EEG), and the secondary task-reaction time. Several different tasks, namely typing, math and logical sequences are included in the investigation of these studies. Fifteen subjects, with the age ranged from 22 to 38 years old have participated in the study using within subject design. From the study, it is revealed that the presence of foliage plants at several temperatures have different effects on meditation, secondary task reaction time and typing accuracy. This study also revealed that the presence of plants on several types of tasks has different effects of attention which are useful for increasing work performance.

  11. Physiological and antioxidant responses of two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana in different light and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Renata; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Gabruk, Michał; Glińska, Sława; Michlewska, Sylwia; Dłużewska, Jolanta; Sawicka, Anna; Kruk, Jerzy; Laitinen, Roosa

    2015-06-01

    During their lifetime, plants need to adapt to a changing environment, including light and temperature. To understand how these factors influence plant growth, we investigated the physiological and antioxidant responses of two Arabidopsis accessions, Shahdara (Sha) from the Shahdara valley (Tajikistan, Central Asia) in a mountainous area and Lovvik-5 (Lov-5) from northern Sweden to different light and temperature conditions. These accessions originate from different latitudes and have different life strategies, both of which are known to be influenced by light and temperature. We showed that both accessions grew better in high-light and at a lower temperature (16°C) than in low light and at 23°C. Interestingly, Sha had a lower chlorophyll content but more efficient non-photochemical quenching than Lov-5. Sha, also showed a higher expression of vitamin E biosynthetic genes. We did not observe any difference in the antioxidant prenyllipid level under these conditions. Our results suggest that the mechanisms that keep the plastoquinone (PQ)-pool in more oxidized state could play a role in the adaptation of these accessions to their local climatic conditions.

  12. Hemispheric Differences in the Temperature of the Summertime Stratosphere and Mesosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-22

    measurements of the mesopause by Huaman and Balsley [1999] also led them to conclude that the austral summer was warmer than the boreal summer at mesopause...1991. Huaman , M. M., and B. B. Balsley, Differences in near-mesopause summer winds, temperatures, and water vapor at northern and southern latitudes as

  13. Effects of different temperature treatments on biological ice nuclei in snow samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kazutaka; Maki, Teruya; Kakikawa, Makiko; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Matsuki, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The heat tolerance of biological ice nucleation activity (INA) depends on their types. Different temperature treatments may cause varying degrees of inactivation on biological ice nuclei (IN) in precipitation samples. In this study, we measured IN concentration and bacterial INA in snow samples using a drop freezing assay, and compared the results for unheated snow and snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C. At a measured temperature of -7 °C, the concentration of IN in untreated snow was 100-570 L-1, whereas the concentration in snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C was 31-270 L-1 and 2.5-14 L-1, respectively. In the present study, heat sensitive IN inactivated by heating at 40 °C were predominant, and ranged 23-78% of IN at -7 °C compared with untreated samples. Ice nucleation active Pseudomonas strains were also isolated from the snow samples, and heating at 40 °C and 90 °C inactivated these microorganisms. Consequently, different temperature treatments induced varying degrees of inactivation on IN in snow samples. Differences in the concentration of IN across a range of treatment temperatures might reflect the abundance of different heat sensitive biological IN components.

  14. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Responses during Aquatic Exercise in Water at Different Temperatures in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergamin, Marco; Ermolao, Andrea; Matten, Sonia; Sieverdes, John C.; Zaccaria, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological responses during upper-body aquatic exercises in older adults with different pool temperatures. Method: Eleven older men (aged 65 years and older) underwent 2 identical aquatic exercise sessions that consisted of 3 upper-body exercises using progressive intensities (30, 35, and 40…

  15. Pollution: A Selected Bibliography of U.S. Government Publications on Air, Water, and Land Pollution 1965-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiraldi, Louis, Comp.; Burk, Janet L., Comp.

    Materials on environmental pollution published by the various offices of the federal government are presented in this select bibliography. Limited in scope to publications on air, water, and land pollution, the document is designed to serve teachers and researchers working in the field of environmental problems who wish reference to public…

  16. Grazing Characteristics and Growth Efficiencies at Two Different Temperatures for Three Nanoflagellates Fed with Vibrio Bacteria at Three Different Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, T.; Sleigh, M.A.

    2001-04-01

    Small inocula of one of the flagellates Paraphysomonas imperforata, Pteridomonas danica, and Cafeteria roenbergensis were added to suspensions of the bacterium Vibrio natriegens at each of three concentrations between 107 and 108 cells ml-1 and incubated at each of the temperatures 10 degrees C and 25 degrees C. Samples were taken at intervals for counting the flagellates and bacteria to determine the timing of the maximum of flagellate numbers and the concentrations at that time. Measurements of the protein concentration of the suspensions during incubation were used to determine the gross growth efficiency (GGE) or yield of flagellate grazing in each experiment. The most effective grazer was Pteridomonas, followed by Paraphysomonas, with Cafeteria being least effective, as judged by the threshold bacterial concentrations at which flagellate multiplication ceased, which were about 2 x 105, 2 x 106, and 2 x 107, respectively, and by the finding that Pteridomonas consumed 99%, Paraphysomonas about 95%, and Cafeteria only 60-70% of the available bacteria in the experiments. Peak concentrations of flagellates were reached later at the lower temperature, but the numbers of flagellates produced and of bacteria eaten were of a similar order at the two temperatures and the GGE was only slightly higher at the lower temperature. The time taken to reach peak flagellate numbers changed little with a threefold increase in bacterial concentrations, but the GGE increased and the numbers of bacteria eaten to produce one flagellate decreased when the bacterial concentration was increased. The three flagellates show clear evidence of niche specialization in differences in thresholds of bacterial prey concentration.

  17. Physiological and biochemical responses of Ricinus communis seedlings to different temperatures: a metabolomics approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared with major crops, growth and development of Ricinus communis is still poorly understood. A better understanding of the biochemical and physiological aspects of germination and seedling growth is crucial for the breeding of high yielding varieties adapted to various growing environments. In this context, we analysed the effect of temperature on growth of young R. communis seedlings and we measured primary and secondary metabolites in roots and cotyledons. Three genotypes, recommended to small family farms as cash crop, were used in this study. Results Seedling biomass was strongly affected by the temperature, with the lowest total biomass observed at 20°C. The response in terms of biomass production for the genotype MPA11 was clearly different from the other two genotypes: genotype MPA11 produced heavier seedlings at all temperatures but the root biomass of this genotype decreased with increasing temperature, reaching the lowest value at 35°C. In contrast, root biomass of genotypes MPB01 and IAC80 was not affected by temperature, suggesting that the roots of these genotypes are less sensitive to changes in temperature. In addition, an increasing temperature decreased the root to shoot ratio, which suggests that biomass allocation between below- and above ground parts of the plants was strongly affected by the temperature. Carbohydrate contents were reduced in response to increasing temperature in both roots and cotyledons, whereas amino acids accumulated to higher contents. Our results show that a specific balance between amino acids, carbohydrates and organic acids in the cotyledons and roots seems to be an important trait for faster and more efficient growth of genotype MPA11. Conclusions An increase in temperature triggers the mobilization of carbohydrates to support the preferred growth of the aerial parts, at the expense of the roots. A shift in the carbon-nitrogen metabolism towards the accumulation of nitrogen-containing compounds seems

  18. Temperature Values Variability in Piezoelectric Implant Site Preparation: Differences between Cortical and Corticocancellous Bovine Bone

    PubMed Central

    Lamazza, Luca; Garreffa, Girolamo; Laurito, Domenica; Lollobrigida, Marco; Palmieri, Luigi; De Biase, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Various parameters can influence temperature rise and detection during implant site preparation. The aim of this study is to investigate local temperature values in cortical and corticocancellous bovine bone during early stages of piezoelectric implant site preparation. Materials and Methods. 20 osteotomies were performed using a diamond tip (IM1s, Mectron Medical Technology, Carasco, Italy) on two different types of bovine bone samples, cortical and corticocancellous, respectively. A standardized protocol was designed to provide constant working conditions. Temperatures were measured in real time at a fixed position by a fiber optic thermometer. Results. Significantly higher drilling time (154.90 sec versus 99.00 sec; p < 0.0001) and temperatures (39.26°C versus 34.73°C; p = 0.043) were observed in the cortical group compared to the corticocancellous group. A remarkable variability of results characterized the corticocancellous blocks as compared to the blocks of pure cortical bone. Conclusion. Bone samples can influence heat generation during in vitro implant site preparation. When compared to cortical bone, corticocancellous samples present more variability in temperature values. Even controlling most experimental factors, the impact of bone samples still remains one of the main causes of temperature variability. PMID:27110567

  19. Fitness costs associated with different frequencies and magnitudes of temperature change in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    PubMed

    Franke, Kristin; Heitmann, Nadja; Tobner, Anne; Fischer, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    Plastic responses to changes in environmental conditions are ubiquitous and typically highly effective, but are predicted to incur costs. We here investigate the effects of different frequencies and magnitudes of temperature change in the tropical butterfly Bicyclus anynana, considering developmental (Experiment 1) and adult stage plasticity (Experiment 2). We predicted negative effects of more frequent temperature changes on development, immune function and/or reproduction. Results from Experiment 1 showed that repeated temperature changes during development, if involving large amplitudes, negatively affect larval time, larval growth rate and pupal mass, while adult traits remained unaffected. However, results from treatment groups with smaller temperature amplitudes yielded no clear patterns. In Experiment 2 prolonged but not repeated exposure to 39°C increased heat tolerance, potentially reflecting costs of repeatedly activating emergency responses. At the same time fecundity was more strongly reduced in the group with prolonged heat stress, suggesting a trade-off between heat tolerance and reproduction. Clear effects were restricted to conditions involving large temperature amplitudes or high temperatures.

  20. Modeling Allometric Relationships in Leaves of Young Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Grown at Different Temperature Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Wu, Lingtong; Henke, Michael; Ali, Basharat; Zhou, Weijun; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Functional–structural plant modeling (FSPM) is a fast and dynamic method to predict plant growth under varying environmental conditions. Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. In the present study, we used three different temperature treatments (10/14°C, 18/22°C, and 26/30°C) to test the effect of temperature on growth and development of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) seedlings. Plants were sampled at regular intervals (every 3 days) to obtain growth data during the length of the experiment (1 month in total). Total leaf dry mass, leaf area, leaf mass per area (LMA), width-length ratio, and the ratio of petiole length to leaf blade length (PBR), were determined and statistically analyzed, and contributed to a morphometric database. LMA under high temperature was significantly smaller than LMA under medium and low temperature, while leaves at high temperature were significantly broader. An FSPM of rapeseed seedlings featuring a growth function used for leaf extension and biomass accumulation was implemented by combining measurement with literature data. The model delivered new insights into growth and development dynamics of winter oilseed rape seedlings. The present version of the model mainly focuses on the growth of plant leaves. However, future extensions of the model could be used in practice to better predict plant growth in spring and potential cold damage of the crop. PMID:28377775

  1. Nutrient transformation during aerobic composting of pig manure with biochar prepared at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronghua; Wang, Quan; Zhang, Zengqiang; Zhang, Guangjie; Li, Zhonghong; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the corn stalk charred biomass (CB) prepared at different pyrolysis temperatures as additives on nutrient transformation during aerobic composting of pig manure were investigated. The results showed that the addition of CB carbonized at different temperatures to pig manure compost significantly influenced the compost temperature, moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, organic matter degradation, total nitrogen, [Formula: see text] and NH3 variations during composting. Compared with control and adding CB charred at lower temperature treatments, the addition of CB prepared over 700°C resulted in higher pH (over 9.2) and NH3 emission and lower potherb mustard seed germination index value during the thermophilic phase. Peak temperatures of composts appeared at 7 days for control and 11 days for CB added treatments. During 90 days composting, the organic matter degradation could be increased over 14.8-29.6% after adding of CB in the compost mixture. The introduction of CB in pig manure could prolong the thermophilic phase, inhibit moisture reduce, facilitate the organic matter decomposition, reduce diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable Zn and Cu contents in pig manure composts and increase ryegrass growth. The study indicated that the corn stalk CB prepared around 500°C was a suitable additive in pig manure composting.

  2. Difference in ocular surface temperature by infrared thermography in phakic and pseudophakic patients

    PubMed Central

    Sniegowski, Matthew; Erlanger, Michael; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Olson, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the change in ocular surface temperature between healthy phakic and pseudophakic patients. Methods We included patients with no history of ocular disease other than cataract. Patients were divided into three groups: clear lens, cataract, and pseudophakic. All patients had two ocular surface digital thermal scans. An average of five surface points was used as the mean ocular surface temperature. Results were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance and a Tukey’s least significance difference test. The patients were further divided into phakic and pseudophakic groups. Correlation coefficients between several variables were done in order to assess dependencies. Results Fifty-six eyes (28 cataracts, 12 clear lenses, 16 pseudophakic) were enrolled. The mean ocular surface temperature in the cataract group was 34.14°C±1.51°C; clear lens: 34.43°C±2.27°C; and pseudophakic: 34.97°C±1.57°C. There were no statistical differences among the study groups (P=0.3). There was a nonsignificant negative correlation trend between age and surface temperature in the phakic group. The trend inverted in the pseudophakic group but without statistical significance. Conclusion Although cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation seem to induce a mild increase in ocular surface temperature, the effect is not clear and not significant. PMID:25834383

  3. Biological Strategies of Dermestes maculatus DeGeer (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) at Larval Stages in Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, N I; Visciarelli, E C; Centeno, N D

    2016-12-01

    The intraspecific variation in larval instars is a widely distributed phenomenon amongst holometabolous insects. Several factors can affect the number of instars, such as temperature, humidity, and density. Only a few references could be found in the literature because the invariability in the number of larval instars is considered normal, and the issue has raised little to no interest. Despite this, no study to date has intended to assess or focus on the larval development. Here, we analyzed the effect of different rearing temperature on the larval stage of Dermestes maculatus DeGeer (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). The results indicated that at all temperatures, L5 represented a decisive point for individuals as well as the other later larval instars, because the next step to follow was to pupate or molt to the next larval instar. Furthermore, there were mainly two populations, L5 and L6, although in different proportions according to temperature. We also found that at a greater number of instars, the larval development at all temperatures lasted longer. Moreover, the exponential model was the best adjustment in the developmental time of all populations as well as for the accumulated developmental time of L1-L4. Thus, we conclude that random factors such as genetics could probably cause interspecific variability in D. maculatus larval development.

  4. Developmental Biology of Zeugodacus cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Three Cucurbitaceous Hosts at Different Temperature Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Mkiga, A. M.; Mwatawala, M. W

    2015-01-01

    Fruit flies are key pests of cucurbits in many parts of the world, including Tanzania. Developmental biology of Zeugodacus cucurbitae (Coquillett) has been determined across temperature regimes in some cucurbitaceous hosts, in limited geographies. This study was conducted to determine duration and survival rates of immature stages of Z. cucurbitae in three cucurbitaceous hosts, at different temperature regimes. It was hypothesized that temperature and cucurbitaceous hosts influence duration and survival of immature stages of Z. cucurbitae. We conducted experiments in the environmental chamber set at 75 ± 10% RH and a photoperiod of 12:12 (L:D) h, at temperatures of 20, 25, and 30°. Our results showed that duration and survival of immature stages of Z. cucurbitae differed significantly among the temperature regimes but not among the hosts. Egg incubation period as well as larval and pupal stages were significantly longer (P < 0.0001) at low temperature in all three hosts Likewise, survival rate of all immature stages were significantly higher (P < 0.0001) at higher than lower temperatures. The three hosts, cucumber (Cucumis sativus), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai), and pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) did not significantly affect duration or survival rates of immature stages of Z. cucurbitae. The low developmental thresholds were estimated at 15.88, 13.44, and 12.62 for egg, larva and pupa, respectively. These results further confirm that Z. cucurbitae is well adapted to warm climate, which dominates many areas of Tanzania. PMID:26589874

  5. Effects of Urban Morphology on Intra-Urban Temperature Differences: Two Squares in Glasgow City Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, P. R. C.; Emmanuel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The perspective of climate change increases the necessity of tackling the urban over heating effects, by developing strategies to mitigate/adapt to changes. Analysing the influence of urban form on intra-urban temperature dynamics could be a helpful way of reducing its negative consequences. Also, it would help untangle the urban effect from the effect caused by atmospheric conditions. The present paper presents the effect of atmospheric conditions as exemplified by atmospheric stability (modified Pasquill-Gifford-Turner classification system) and urban morphology as measured by the Sky View Factor (SVF) on intra-urban variations in air temperature in a cold climate city, in and around the mature urban area of Glasgow, UK (55° 51' 57.294"N, 4° 15' 0.2628"W). The aim is to highlight their combined importance and to make preliminary investigations on the local warming effect of urban morphology under specific atmospheric stability classes. The present work indicates that the maximum intra-urban temperature differences (i.e. temperature difference between the coolest and the warmest spots in a given urban region) is strongly correlated with atmospheric stability. The spatial patterns in local temperature variations consistently show that water bodies and urban parks have lower temperature variations. Thus, greenery and urban materials could play an important role in influencing the local climate in cold cities. The knowledge of urban morphology's influence on local temperature variations could be an important tool for devising appropriate planning/design strategies to face urban overheating in the coming years as the background climate continues to warm.

  6. [Adsorption of Cd(II) varies with biochars derived at different pyrolysis temperatures].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Guo-Cheng; Monica, Xing; Li, Feng-Min; Zheng, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Ten biochars were prepared at different pyrolysis temperatures (300- 600 degrees C) using peanut shells and Chinese medicine material residue as raw materials, and were characterized. Adsorption behavior of Cd(II) on these biochars at different solution pHs, sorption times, and Cd(II) concentrations was investigated. The C content, surface area, and aromaticity of the biochars increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while the amount of oxygen-containing functional groups decreased. In addition, the content of inorganic minerals (e. g., Ca/Mg carbonate or phosphate) was enriched, but their solubility was reduced with increasing pyrolysis temperature. As the solution pHs increased from 2.0 to 6.0, the amount of Cd(II) adsorbed on the biochars gradually increased, and achieved the maximum at pH 6.0. Adsorption processes could be divided into two stages: fast and slow sorption. The rate of Cd(II) adsorption on these biochars was regulated by film and intraparticle diffusion, precipitation and ion exchange. With increasing temperature, the percentage of fast sorption to overall sorption of Cd(II) gradually decreased. Sharp decrease of oxygen-containing functional groups and formation of insoluble crystalline minerals reduced the rate of fast sorption on the high-temperature biochars (> 500 degrees C). For low-temperature biochars (≤ 400 degrees C), precipitation and ion exchange were the dominant sorption mechanisms. For high-temperature biochars (≥ 500 degrees C), more integrated π-conjugated aromatic structures enhanced the contribution of Cd-π interaction to the overall sorption, but the formation of phosphate and carbonate minerals probably weakened the sorption. These results will provide important information on screening biochars as engineered adsorbents to remove or immobilize Cd(II) in contaminated water and soil.

  7. Proteinase and phospholipase activities and development at different temperatures of yeasts isolated from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Melville, Priscilla A; Benites, Nilson R; Ruz-Peres, Monica; Yokoya, Eugenio

    2011-11-01

    The presence of yeasts in milk may cause physical and chemical changes limiting the durability and compromising the quality of the product. Moreover, milk and dairy products contaminated by yeasts may be a potential means of transmission of these microorganisms to man and animals causing several kinds of infections. This study aimed to determine whether different species of yeasts isolated from bovine raw milk had the ability to develop at 37°C and/or under refrigeration temperature. Proteinase and phospholipase activities resulting from these yeasts were also monitored at different temperatures. Five genera of yeasts (Aureobasidium sp., Candida spp., Geotrichum spp., Trichosporon spp. and Rhodotorula spp.) isolated from bovine raw milk samples were evaluated. All strains showed one or a combination of characteristics: growth at 37°C (99·09% of the strains), psychrotrophic behaviour (50·9%), proteinase production (16·81% of the strains at 37°C and 4·09% under refrigeration) and phospholipase production (36·36% of the isolates at 37°C and 10·9% under refrigeration), and all these factors may compromise the quality of the product. Proteinase production was similar for strains incubated at 37°C (16·81% of the isolates) and room temperature (17·27%) but there was less amount of phospholipase-producing strains at room temperature (15·45% of the isolates were positive) when compared with incubation at 37°C (36·36%). Enzymes production at 37°C by yeasts isolated from milk confirmed their pathogenic potential. The refrigeration temperature was found to be most efficient to inhibit enzymes production and consequently ensure better quality of milk. The viability of yeasts and the activity of their enzymes at different temperatures are worrying because this can compromise the quality of dairy products at all stages of production and/or storage, and represent a risk to the consumer.

  8. Influence of Air Temperature Difference on the Snow Melting Simulation of SWAT Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YAN, Y.; Onishi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The temperature-index models are commonly used to simulate the snowmelt process in mountain areas because of its good performance, low data requirements, and computational simplicity. Widely used distributed hydrological model: Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is also using a temperature-index module. However, the lack of monitoring air temperature data still involves uncertainties and errors in its simulation performance especially in data sparse area. Thus, to evaluate the different air temperature data influence on the snow melt of the SWAT model, five different air temperature data are applied in two different Russia basins (Birobidjan basin and Malinovka basin). The data include the monitoring air temperature data (TM), NCEP reanalysis data (TNCEP), the dataset created by inverse distance weighted interpolation (IDW) method (TIDW), the dataset created by improved IDW method considering the elevation influence (TIDWEle), and the dataset created by using linear regression and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data (TLST). Among these data, the TLST , the TIDW and TIDWEle data have the higher spatial density, while the TNCEP and TM DATA have the most valid monitoring value for daily scale. The daily simulation results during the snow melting seasons (March, April and May) showed reasonable results in both test basins for all air temperature data. While R2 and NSE in Birobidjan basin are around 0.6, these values in Malinovka basin are over 0.75. Two methods: Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) and Sequential Uncertainty Fitting, version. 2 (SUFI-2) were used for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. The evolution index is p-factor which means the percentage of measured data bracketed by the 95% Prediction Uncertainty (95PPU). The TLST dataset always obtained the best results in both basins compared with other datasets. On the other hand, the two IDW based method get the worst results among all the scenarios. Totally, the

  9. Effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding.

    PubMed

    Secilmis, Asli; Bulbul, Mehmet; Sari, Tugrul; Usumez, Aslihan

    2013-01-01

    The neodymium/yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd/YAG) laser has been suggested to repair broken prostheses in the mouth. This study investigated the effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding. Three intact human maxillary molars were prepared for full-veneer crown. For each tooth, dentin thicknesses in mesiobuccal cusp was 2, 3, or 4 mm. Twenty dies were duplicated from each of the prepared teeth. For metal copings with 0.5-mm thickness, wax patterns were prepared with dip wax technique directly onto each of dies. All patterns were sprued and invested. The castings were made using a nickel-chromium alloy (Nicromed Premium, Neodontics). A hole with 0.5-mm diameter was prepared on the mesiobuccal cusp of each crown. The Nd/YAG laser (9.85 W; 1 Hz repetition rate; fluence, 1.230 J/cm(2); Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona) was used for welding with or without air cooling (n = 10). The temperature rise was measured in pulpal chamber with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Differences between start and highest temperature reading were taken, and temperature rise values were compared using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference tests (α = .05). Pulpal temperature rise varied significantly depending on the dentin thickness and air cooling (p < 0.05). The non-air cooling group induced significantly the highest temperature increases. There were no significant differences between 2- and 3-mm dentin thicknesses groups (p > 0.05); however, pulpal temperature rise was the lowest for 4-mm dentin thickness group (p < 0.05). The highest values of thermal increase were found in the pulp chamber (6.8°C) when no air cooling was used in 2-mm dentin thickness group. Laser welding on base metal castings with Nd/YAG laser can be applied with air cooling to avoid temperature rises known to adversely affect pulpal health when dentin thickness is 2 or 3 mm.

  10. Shelf-life of almond pastry cookies with different types of packaging and levels of temperature.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F V; De Luca, S; Piscopo, A; Santisi, V; Poiana, M

    2010-06-01

    Almond pastries are typical cookies of the south of Italy. Introduction of new packaging for this kind of cookies requires shelf-life assessments. This study, related to different types of packaging under various storage conditions of time and temperature, identifies critical parameters, as color and texture, to track during storage studies and to extend the shelf-life. The cookies were packed in three different ways and stored at two different temperatures. The pastries were separately stored: (1) in polyvinylchloride film; (2) in aluminum foil (ALL); (3) with modified atmosphere (MAP) in plastic vessels sealed into a polyamide/ polyethylene film; and (4) in vessels without any polymeric film. The storage temperatures were 20 and 30 °C. Evolution of texture, water activity, dry matter and color was assessed. Texture was evaluated by a texture analyzer with a puncturing test. Indices for hardening were the area under the curve (N × mm) up to 10 mm of distance, and the maximum force (N) corresponding to the crust fracture. The best results were obtained with ALL packaging and MAP condition, and above all, in all the trials a temperature of 30 °C reduced the crust hardness.

  11. Plant Canopy Temperature and Heat Flux Profiles: What Difference Does an Isothermal Skin Make?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.; Qualls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature Ts plays a vital role in the determination of sensible (H) and latent heat flux, upwelling long-wave radiation, and ground heat flux. While it is widely recognized that there is a range of skin temperatures represented in even a homogeneous canopy, it is often necessary or convenient to treat the surface as isothermal. This study investigates, at the sub-canopy scale, the implications of assuming that a canopy is isothermal. The focus is on profiles within the canopy of air, foliage, and soil surface temperature, and of sensible and latent heat flux source strength. Data from a dense grassland at the Southern Great Plains experiment in 1997 (SGP97) were used to assess the ability of a multi-layer canopy model to match measured sensible and latent heat fluxes along with radiometric surface temperatures. In its standard mode, the model solves the energy balance for each canopy layer and uses Localized Near Field (LNF) theory to model the turbulent transport. The results suggest the model captures the most important features of canopy flux generation and transport, and support its use to investigate scalar profiles within canopies. For 112 data points at SGP97, the model produced realistic temperature and sensible heat flux source profiles. In addition, it was run in a mode that seeks the isothermal (soil and foliage) skin temperature (Ti) that provides the same Hproduced by the model in its standard mode. This produces profiles of air and foliage temperature and of sensible heat source strength that differ significantly from profiles from the standard mode. Based on these simulations, realistic canopies may have a mixture of positive and negative sensible heat flux sources at various heights, typically with large contributions from the soil surface. There is frequently a discontinuity between foliage temperatures near the soil and the actual soil surface temperature. For isothermal canopies, heat sources at all levels had the same sign and

  12. Co-doped sodium chloride crystals exposed to different irradiation temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Morales, A.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C.; Kitis, G.; Flores J, C.; Hernandez A, J.; Murrieta S, H.

    2013-07-03

    Monocrystals of NaCl:XCl{sub 2}:MnCl{sub 2}(X = Ca,Cd) at four different concentrations have been analyzed. The crystals were exposed to different irradiation temperature, such as at room temperature (RT), solid water (SW), dry ice (DI) and liquid nitrogen (LN). The samples were irradiated with photon from {sup 60}Co irradiators. The co-doped sodium chloride crystals show a complex structure of glow curves that can be related to different distribution of traps. The linearity response was analyzed with the F(D) index. The F(D) value was less than unity indicating a sub-linear response was obtained from the TL response on the function of the dose. The glow curves were deconvoluted by using the CGCD program based on the first, second and general order kinetics.

  13. A comparative assessment of different methods for detecting inhomogeneities in Turkish temperature data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayanç, Mete; Nüzhet Dalfes, H.; Karaca, Mehmet; Yenigün, Orhan

    1998-04-01

    A combination of different methods is described whereby climatological time series can be tested for inhomogeneities using relative homogeneity techniques. The method set includes graphical analysis, a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis homogeneity test and a Wald-Wolfowitz runs test application to the annual mean difference temperature series between highly correlated stations. A series of Monte Carlo simulation studies was carried out, which determined the inhomogeneity detection efficiencies of these tests. The procedure is statistically rigorous and provides estimates of the time and magnitude of change in the mean. Its application to annual mean temperature differences series for 82 Turkish climate stations indicates that the method set is a valuable tool for testing time series.

  14. Discriminating among different tea leaves using an operating temperature-modulated tin oxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastkhadiv, Ali; Jenabi, Amin; Souri, Asma

    2016-03-01

    We report distinguishing different types of tea leaves from each other based on their aroma using a thermal shock-induced generic tin oxide gas sensor. The sensor used in this work consists of a microheater and a tin oxide pellet, both connected to outside circuitry with noble metal contacts. The heater is powered with a series of narrow high magnitude voltage impulses of predetermined thermal impacts adjusted to produce step-like temperature rises of different magnitudes on the gas sensitive pellet. The sensor is exposed to aromas collected from various types of tea leaves at different concentrations. Within 4.5 s, nine 500 ms-wide voltage pulses, each as high as 9.3 V in magnitude, are applied to the microheater. Each pulse causes a step-like temperature jump on the pellet temperature. The transient responses recorded for different tea leaves look different even after amplitude normalization. The sensor profiles are recorded, digitized, and compared with the database of previous experiences. A heuristically defined high dimensional feature vector is automatically generated for each analyte. Classifications are graphically achieved in a 3-D feature space after applying principle component analysis for dimension reduction.

  15. Lower Stratospheric Temperature Differences In Meteorological Analyses and Their Impact On Polar Processing Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G.; Sabutis, J.; Pawson, S.; Santee, M.; Naujokat, B.; Swinbank, R.; Gelman, M.; Ebisuzaki, W.

    Models - chemical transport models (CTMs), trajectory and Eulerian transport mod- els, microphysical models - used in polar processing studies typically rely on winds and/or temperatures from one of several meteorological analyses to drive the transport and control processes such as polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and chemical reaction rates. Using different analyzed data sets to obtain temperatures and temper- ature histories can have significant consequences. A quantitative comparison of six meteorological analyses (UK Met Office, National Centers for Environmental Pre- diction/Climate Prediction Center (NCEP), NCEP/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis (REAN), Freie Universität Berlin, European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO)) is pre- sented for the cold 1999-2000 and 1995-1996 Arctic winters, showing substantial dif- ferences in diagnostics related to polar processing between the different analyses. Bi- ases between analyses vary from year to year. Temperature history case studies show substantial differences using Met Office, NCEP, REAN, ECMWF, and DAO analyses. Different meteorological conditions in the comparably cold winters of 1995-1996 and 1999-2000 had a large impact on both expectations for PSC formation and on the ef- fects of discrepancies between different meteorological analyses. Met Office, NCEP, REAN, ECMWF, and DAO analyses are commonly used in modeling polar processes; the choice of analysis can strongly influence the results of such studies.

  16. Differences in the H-mode pedestal width of temperature and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. A.; Wolfrum, E.; Groebner, R. J.; Osborne, T. H.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Dunne, M. G.; Ferron, J. R.; Günter, S.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Snyder, P. B.; Zohm, H.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the DIII-D Team; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2012-10-01

    A pedestal database was built using data from type-I ELMy H-modes of ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JET. ELM synchronized pedestal data were analysed with the two-line method. The two-line method is a bilinear fit which shows better reproducibility of pedestal parameters than a modified hyperbolic tangent fit. This was tested with simulated and experimental data. The influence of the equilibrium reconstruction on pedestal parameters was investigated with sophisticated reconstructions from CLISTE and EFIT including edge kinetic profiles. No systematic deviation between the codes could be observed. The flux coordinate system is influenced by machine size, poloidal field and plasma shape. This will change the representation of the width in different coordinates, in particular, the two normalized coordinates ΨN and r/a show a very different dependence on the plasma shape. The scalings derived for the pedestal width, Δ, of all machines suggest a different scaling for the electron temperature and the electron density. Both cases show similar dependence with machine size, poloidal magnetic field and pedestal electron temperature and density. The influence of ion temperature and toroidal magnetic field is different on each of \\Delta_{T_\\rme} and \\Delta_{n_\\rme} . In dimensionless form the density pedestal width in ΨN scales with \\rho^{0.6}_{i\\star} , the temperature pedestal width with \\beta_p,ped^{0.5} . Both widths also show a strong correlation with the plasma shape. The shape dependence originates from the coordinate transformation and is not visible in real space. The presented scalings predict that in ITER the temperature pedestal will be appreciably wider than the density pedestal.

  17. Particle monolayer formation with arrayed structure by PMMA-grafted polystyrene Latex at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Emiko; Terada, Motokazu; Koga, Ryosuke; Karakawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshinaga, Kohji

    2010-09-01

    The structure of the particle monolayer formed by the polymer-grafted latex particle at the air-water interface was estimated mainly by pi--A isotherm measurement and SEM observation to examine the effect of core particle characteristics and to generalize the key factors in determining the polymer-grafted particle monolayer structure. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) was polymerized from the polystyrene latex (PSL) surface by atom transfer radical polymerization to give a PMMA-grafted PSL (PSL-PMMA) with a relatively high graft density of about 0.2 nm-2. We obtained PSL-PMMA with PMMA of different molecular weights but almost the same graft density. The onset area of increasing surface pressure in pi-A isotherm was in agreement with the value of effective radius of PSL-PMMA with quite extended PMMA chains. The particle monolayer structure deposited on the substrate was strongly dependent on the molecular weight of the grafted PMMA. The aggregation size was reduced with increasing molecular weight and a lattice-like structure was observed for PSL-PMMA monolayer with a high molecular weight PMMA. The interparticle distance was decreased and structure becomes ordered with increasing surface pressure. The monolayer structure obtained here was consistent with that of the PMMA-grafted silica particle system. We also synthesized polystyrene (PS)-grafted PMMA latex (PML-PS) and compared the two systems. We confirmed that the lattice-like structure depended on the nature of the grafted PMMA chain, not the core particle characteristics.

  18. Comparison of the spores of Paenibacillus polymyxa prepared at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Huo, Zhenhua; Zhang, Nan; Raza, Waseem; Huang, Xinqi; Yong, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yunpeng; Wang, Dandan; Li, Shuqing; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2012-05-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa SQR-21, which is antagonistic against Fusarium oxysporum, is used as a biocontrol agent and, when mixed with organic substances for solid fermentation, produces a bioorganic fertilizer. The spores of P. polymyxa prepared at different temperatures were characterized with respect to the dipicolinic acid content, heat resistance, fatty acid composition and germination. Spores prepared at 37°C showed higher heat resistance than those prepared at 25 and 30°C. However, the germination rate was negatively correlated with the sporulation temperature. The maximum germination rate of the spores prepared at 25°C was 1.3-times higher than the spores prepared at 30°C. The sporulation temperature thus affects the resistance and germination properties of P. polymyxa spores. These results are useful for the production of improved bio-organic fertilizer.

  19. Temperature distribution of air source heat pump barn with different air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Li, J. C.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    There are two type of airflow form in tobacco barn, one is air rising, the other is air falling. They are different in the structure layout and working principle, which affect the tobacco barn in the distribution of temperature field and velocity distribution. In order to compare the temperature and air distribution of the two, thereby obtain a tobacco barn whose temperature field and velocity distribution are more uniform. Taking the air source heat pump tobacco barn as the investigated subject and establishing relevant mathematical model, the thermodynamics of the two type of curing barn was analysed and compared based on Fluent. Provide a reasonable evidence for chamber arrangement and selection of outlet for air source heat pump tobacco barn.

  20. Achieving nitritation in a continuous moving bed biofilm reactor at different temperatures through ratio control.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wei; Zhang, Shuyan; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Li, Wenjing; Kan, Ruizhe; Wang, Wenxiao; Zheng, Zhaoming; Li, Jun

    2017-02-01

    A ratio control strategy was implemented in a continuous moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to investigate the response to different temperatures. The control strategy was designed to maintain a constant ratio between dissolved oxygen (DO) and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrations. The results revealed that a stable nitritation in a biofilm reactor could be achieved via ratio control, which compensated the negative influence of low temperatures by stronger oxygen-limiting conditions. Even with a temperature as low as 6°C, stable nitritation could be achieved when the controlling ratio did not exceed 0.17. Oxygen-limiting conditions in the biofilm reactor were determined by the DO/TAN concentrations ratio, instead of the mere DO concentration. This ratio control strategy allowed the achievement of stable nitritation without complete wash-out of NOB from the reactor. Through the ratio control strategy full nitritation of sidestream wastewater was allowed; however, for mainstream wastewater, only partial nitritation was recommended.

  1. Treatment of bilateral idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia by radiofrequency thermocoagulation at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peng; Hong, Tao; Wang, Zhi-bin; Ma, Jia-ming; Zhu, Yong-qiang; Li, Hong-xi; Ding, Yuan-yuan; Jiang, Chang-lin; Pan, Shi-nong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFT) is an effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, but consensus regarding an optimal treatment temperature is lacking. While treatment temperatures ranging from 60°C to 95°C have been reported, RFT at too high a temperature is often followed by serious complications, and comparative evaluations of RFT at different temperatures in a single study are rare. This current prospective cohort study was to compare immediate and long-term outcomes of RFT at varying temperatures in patients with bilateral idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN) of maxillary division of trigeminal nerve (V2), mandibular division of trigeminal nerve (V3), and V2+V3, including pain relief, complications, recurrence rate, and patient satisfaction. From May 2011 to April 2016, 62 consecutive patients with bilateral ITN of V2, V3, and V2+V3 were enrolled in the study. These patients underwent bilateral RFT at 68°C and 75°C, respectively, using the same RF parameters. Side-to-side results, including pain relief, complications, and patient satisfaction, were compared during a 5-year follow-up period. Overall pain relief was satisfactory after RFT. The rate of pain relief after treatment at 75°C was slightly higher than at 68°C (P > 0.05). The pain-free rate was 95.1% at 75°C and 93.5% at 68°C at 1 year, 84.3% and 78.1% at 3 years, and 80.7% and 74.4% at 5 years. There were 10 and 13 cases of recurrence, respectively, and 6 cases of bilateral recurrence. The incidence and severity of complications were greater at 75°C (P < 0.05) than at 68°C, and therefore the patient satisfaction at the higher temperature was lower (P < 0.05). Patients with bilateral ITN who underwent RFT at different temperatures had consistent pain relief after RFT at both 75°C and 68°C, but there were fewer and less severe complications at 68°C, which was accompanied by greater patient satisfaction. This suggests that RFT at lower temperatures may be

  2. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste.

  3. Skin and bulk temperature difference at Lake Tahoe: A case study on lake skin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. Chris; Hook, Simon J.; Schneider, Philipp; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2013-09-01

    water, infrared radiometers on satellites measure radiation leaving from the surface skin layer and therefore the retrieved temperature is representative of the skin layer. This is slightly different from the bulk layer deeper in the water where various floating thermometers take temperature measurements to validate satellite measurements. The difference between the bulk and skin temperature (skin effect) must be understood to properly validate schemes that use surface skin temperature to infer bulk temperatures. Further skin temperatures retrieved over inland waters may show different patterns to those retrieved over oceans due to differences in conditions such as wind speed, aerosols, and elevation. We have analyzed the differences between the skin and bulk temperatures at four permanent monitoring stations (buoys) located on Lake Tahoe since 1999 and compared the results with similar studies over the ocean typically obtained from boat cruises. Skin effect distributions were found to be consistent across the buoys; however, the diurnal behavior of the skin effect was slightly different and shown to be related to wind speed measured at an individual buoy. When wind speed was less than 2 m s-1, the skin temperature osclillated and greatly increased the uncertainty in the skin effect reported over Lake Tahoe. When downwelling sky radiation was increased from clouds or high humidity, this led to nighttime skin temperatures that were warmer than bulk temperatures by as much as 0.5 K. The size of the warm skin effect is larger than other ocean studies that observed warm nighttime skin values around 0.1 K. The nighttime skin effect was seen to be more consistent with a smaller standard deviation compared to the daytime skin effect. The nighttime skin behavior had a mean and standard deviation that ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 K and between 0.3 and 0.4 K, respectively. In contrast, daytime skin effect was strongly influenced by direct solar illumination and typically had a

  4. Estimating human exposure through multiple pathways from air, water, and soil.

    PubMed

    McKone, T E; Daniels, J I

    1991-02-01

    This paper describes a set of multipathway, multimedia models for estimating potential human exposure to environmental contaminants. The models link concentrations of an environmental contaminant in air, water, and soil to human exposure through inhalation, ingestion, and dermal-contact routes. The relationship between concentration of a contaminant in an environmental medium and human exposure is determined with pathway exposure factors (PEFs). A PEF is an algebraic expression that incorporates information on human physiology and lifestyle together with models of environmental partitioning and translates a concentration (i.e., mg/m3 in air, mg/liter in water, or mg/kg in soil) into a lifetime-equivalent chronic daily intake (CDI) in mg/kg-day. Human, animal, and environmental data used in calculating PEFs are presented and discussed. Generalized PEFs are derived for air----inhalation, air----ingestion, water----inhalation, water----ingestion, water----dermal uptake, soil----inhalation, soil----ingestion, and soil----dermal uptake pathways. To illustrate the application of the PEF expressions, we apply them to soil-based contamination of multiple environmental media by arsenic, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  5. Impact of Salinity on the Air-Water Partition Coefficient of Gas Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Pope, Gary A.; Evans, John C.; Cameron, Richard J.

    2005-09-01

    The use of a gas partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) has been proposed as a standard approach to the measurement of field-scale vadose zone water saturation fractions. The accuracy of the saturation measurement is largely dependent on the determination of the air-water partitioning coefficient, K, of the tracers; however, in practice, K is also strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the water. In this study, column tests were conducted to investigate the impact of salinity on tracer partitioning coefficients for two promising gas phase candidate tracers, dibromomethane and dimethylether. Sodium thiosulfate was used as a salinity surrogate. The dynamic K values of the two partitioning tracers were measured for sodium thiosulfate concentrations between 0% and 36% by weight. Methane was used as the non-partitioning tracer for all experiments. K values were found to decrease significantly with increasing sodium thiosulfate concentration. Similar correlations between K values and sodium thiosulfate concentration were found for both of the partitioning tracers tested.

  6. Visualization of oxygen transfer across the air-water interface using a fluorescence oxygen visualization method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee

    2002-04-01

    Oxygen concentration fields in a water body were visualized by the fluorescence oxygen visualization (FOV) method. Pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used as a fluorescent indicator of oxygen, and an intensive charge coupled-device (ICCD) camera as an image detector. Sequential images (over 2000 images) of the oxygen concentration field around the surface water of the tank (1 x 1 x 0.75 m3) were produced during the 3 h experiment. From image processing, the accurate pathway of oxygen-rich, cold water at the water surface was also visualized. The amount of oxygen transferred through the air-water interface during the experiment was measured and the oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)) was determined as 0.22 m/d, which was much higher than that is expected in molecular diffusion. Results suggest that vertical penetration of cold water was the main pathway of oxygen in the water body in the tank. The average velocity of cold water penetrating downward in water body was also measured from consecutive images and the value was 0.3-0.6 mm/s. The FOV method used in this research should have wide application in experimental fluid mechanics and can also provide a phenomenological description of oxygen transfer under physically realizable natural conditions in lakes and reservoirs.

  7. On the stability of an accelerated coupled air-water flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Ierley, Glenn; Melville, W. Kendall

    2000-11-01

    We present the results of a study of the stability of the interface of an accelerated coupled air-water flow. We develop a general solution of the two-layer, laminar parallel flow driven by a pressure gradient in the air. The velocity profiles in both fluids are given by analytical functions for pressure gradients that can be represented as power series in time. The stability of the coupled flow is then examined by solving the two layer Orr-Sommerfeld equations allowing for linear displacements of the interface. In the simple case of the linearly accelerating flow, we find that the flow is always stable for an air velocity below 0.6 m s-1. Instabilities first appear in the form of surface waves with a phase speed of approximately 30 cm s-1 and a wavenumber of O(1) cm-1. In cases when the flow in the air is turbulent, and represented by a continuously differentiable analytical approximation of the log-linear mean velocity profile, we find that the flow is rapidly unstable to surface waves. Comparisons are made with the previous computations of Kawai (1979) and Wheless and Csanady (1993), and with the measurements of Veron and Melville (2000).

  8. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-10-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw, the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β , the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  9. Surface shear rheology of WPI-monoglyceride mixed films spread at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2004-07-01

    Surface shear viscosity of food emulsifiers may contribute appreciably to the long-term stability of food dispersions (emulsions and foams). In this work we have analyzed the structural, topographical, and shear characteristics of a whey protein isolate (WPI) and monoglyceride (monopalmitin and monoolein) mixed films spread on the air-water interface at pH 7 and at 20 degrees C. The surface shear viscosity (etas) depend on the surface pressure and on the composition of the mixed film. The surface shear viscosity varies greatly with the surface pressure. In general, the greater the surface pressure, the greater are the values of etas. The values of etas for the mixed WPI-monoolein monolayer were more than one order of magnitude lower than those for a WPI-monopalmitin mixed film, especially at the higher surface pressures. At higher surface pressures, collapsed WPI residues may be displaced from the interface by monoglyceride molecules with important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films. A shear-induced change in the topography and a segregation between domains of the film forming components were also observed. The displacement of the WPI by the monoglycerides is facilitates under shear conditions, especially for WPI-monoolein mixed films.

  10. Equation of state and adsorption dynamics of soft microgel particles at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Omkar S; Maestro, Armando; Duits, Michel H G; van den Ende, Dirk; Stuart, Martien Cohen; Mugele, Frieder

    2014-09-28

    Understanding the adsorption dynamics of soft microgel particles is a key step in designing such particles for potential applications as stimuli-responsive Pickering stabilizers for foams or emulsions. In this study we experimentally determine an equation of state (EOS) for poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles adsorbed onto an air-water interface using a Langmuir film balance. We detect a finite surface pressure at very low surface concentration of particles, for which standard theories based on hard disk models predict negligible pressures, implying that the particles must deform strongly upon adsorption to the interface. Furthermore, we study the evolution of the surface pressure due to the adsorption of PNIPAM particles as a function of time using pendant drop tensiometry. The equation of state determined in the equilibrium measurements allows us to extract the adsorbed amount as a function of time. We find a mixed-kinetic adsorption that is initially controlled by the diffusion of particles towards the interface. At later stages, a slow exponential relaxation indicates the presence of a coverage-dependent adsorption barrier related to crowding of particles at the interface.

  11. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  12. Proton transport by bacteriorhodopsin in planar membranes assembled from air-water interface films

    PubMed Central

    Korenbrot, J. I.; Hwang, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, in known amounts and controlled orientation, is incorporated into planar membrane films. These films are formed by the sequential transfer of two air-water interface films onto a thin, hydrophilic, electrically conductive support cast from nitrocellulose. The films are easily accessible to electrical measurements and to control of the ionic milieu on either side of the membrane. The area of the assembled membrane films can be varied between 2.3 x 10(-2) cm2 and 0.7 cm2. Illumination of these films produces photocurrents, photovoltages, and changes in the pH of the surrounding medium. The peak amplitude of the photocurrent increases linearly with light intensity for dim lights, and it approaches a saturating value for brighter lights. In the linear range, the stoichiometry of transport is 0.65 +/- 0.06 protons/absorbed photon. The rate of transport is linearly proportional to light at all intensities tested. The amplitude and kinetics of the photovoltage measured are accurately predicted by the photocurrent generated and the passive electrical features of the film. Parallel measurements of pH and photocurrent reveal that the light-induced changes in pH are fully accounted for by the rate and amount of charge transport across the membrane. Preceding the transport of protons, a transient photovoltage is detected that exhibits no detectable latency, reaches peak in about 80 microseconds, and probably arises from light-induced intramolecular charge displacements. PMID:10822498

  13. Dynamic mechanical properties of a polyelectrolyte adsorbed insoluble lipid monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Young; Kim, Mahn Won

    2015-04-23

    Polymers have been used to stabilize interfaces or to tune the mechanical properties of interfaces in various contexts, such as in oil emulsions or biological membranes. Although the structural properties of these systems are relatively well-studied, instrumental limitations continue to make it difficult to understand how the addition of polymer affects the dynamic mechanical properties of thin and soft films. We have solved this challenge by developing a new instrument, an optical-tweezer-based interface shear microrheometer (ISMR). With this technique, we observed that the interface shear modulus, G*, of a dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) monolayer at the air-water interface significantly increased with adsorption of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS). In addition, the viscous film (DODAC monolayer) became a viscoelastic film with PSS adsorption. At a low salt concentration, 10 mM of NaCl in the subphase, the viscoelasticity of the DODAC/PSS composite was predominantly determined by a particular property of PSS, that is, it behaves as a Gaussian chain in a θ-solvent. At a high salt concentration, 316 mM of NaCl, the thin film behaved as a polymer melt excluding water molecules.

  14. Mechanistic Insights on the Photosensitized Chemistry of a Fatty Acid at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment and many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol, and cloud formation are, at one stage or another, strongly impacted by physical and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Here, the photoinduced chemistry of an air/water interface coated with nonanoic acid—a fatty acid surfactant we use as a proxy for chemically complex natural aqueous surface microlayers—was investigated as a source of volatile and semivolatile reactive organic species. The carboxylic acid coating significantly increased the propensity of photosensitizers, chosen to mimic those observed in real environmental waters, to partition to the interface and enhance reactivity there. Photochemical formation of functionalized and unsaturated compounds was systematically observed upon irradiation of these coated surfaces. The role of a coated interface appears to be critical in providing a concentrated medium allowing radical–radical reactions to occur in parallel with molecular oxygen additions. Mechanistic insights are provided from extensive analysis of products observed in both gas and aqueous phases by online switchable reagent ion-time of flight-mass spectrometry and by off-line ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer through heated electrospray ionization, respectively. PMID:27611489

  15. Fabrication and properties of YBa2Cu3O7- x ceramics at different sintering temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayoonphokkharat, Poom; Jiansirisomboon, Sukanda; Watcharapasorn, Anucha

    2013-07-01

    The influence of sintering temperatures on the fabrication of YBCO ceramics under normal air atmosphere was investigated in this study. YBCO ceramics were prepared by mixing starting compounds of Y2O3, BaCO3 and CuO powders, which were calcined at 850°C for 12 h. The powder was pelletized and sintered at different temperatures, from 930°C-1050°C, for 12 h. Phase identification was carried out by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS) was used to study microstructure and chemical composition. In addition, density, Vickers hardness properties, the change of resistance and dielectric properties with temperature above T c were investigated. It was found that, at 950°C-1000°C, high-purity YBCO ceramic could be obtained. Outside this temperature range, either impurity phases were present or melting occurred. SEM images showed that grain size, which ranged from 1.5-2.5 µm, and hardness were related to density and liquid phase present in the sample. Furthermore, the sintering temperature affected oxygen content which, in turn, determined the conductive or semi-conductive behavior observed by electrical property measurement.

  16. Specific electrical capacitance and voltage breakdown as a function of temperature for different planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Velikonja, Aljaž; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan; Maček Lebar, Alenka

    2016-12-01

    The breakdown voltage and specific electrical capacitance of planar lipid bilayers formed from lipids isolated from the membrane of archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 as a function of temperature were studied and compared with data obtained previously in MD simulation studies. Temperature dependence of breakdown voltage and specific electrical capacitance was measured also for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers and bilayers formed from mixture of diphytanoylphosphocholine (DPhPC) and DPPC in ratio 80:20. The breakdown voltage of archaeal lipids planar lipid bilayers is more or less constant until 50°C, while at higher temperatures a considerable drop is observed, which is in line with the results from MD simulations. The breakdown voltage of DPPC planar lipid bilayer at melting temperature is considerably higher than in the gel phase. Specific electrical capacitance of planar lipid bilayers formed from archaeal lipids is approximately constant for temperatures up to 40°C and then gradually decreases. The difference with MD simulation predictions is discussed. Specific electrical capacitance of DPPC planar lipid bilayers in fluid phase is 1.75 times larger than that of the gel phase and it follows intermediated phases before phase transition. Increase in specific electrical capacitance while approaching melting point of DPPC is visible also for DPhPC:DPPC mixture.

  17. Antioxidant activities of orange peel extract in ghee (butter oil) stored at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Asha, A; Manjunatha, M; Rekha, R M; Surendranath, B; Heartwin, P; Rao, J; Magdaline, E; Sinha, Chitranayak

    2015-12-01

    Antioxidant activities of butylatedhydroxyanisole (BHA) and orange peel powder extract in ghee stored at different storage temperatures (T1:6 ± 2 °C; T2: 32 ± 2 °C; T3:60 ± 2 °C) were evaluated during storage period of 21 days. Peroxide value (PV), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), radical scavenging activity (RSA) and free fatty acids (FFA) of ghee samples were analyzed during the study. PV, TBA and FFA of ghee samples increased significantly while radical scavenging activity (RSA) of ghee samples decreased significantly at accelerated temperature (T3) as compared to the temperatures at T1 and T2. Effect of storage temperature on development of peroxides and TBA of ghee samples was significantly higher than the effect of treatment and storage period while treatment had more significant effect on the change in FFA and RSA as compared to storage temperature and storage period. Ghee incorporated with orange peel extract (OPE) showed stronger activity in quenching DPPH radicals and least development of PV, TBA and FFA than ghee incorporated with BHA and control. The study revealed that orange peel could be a good natural source of antioxidants which can be used in fat rich food products like ghee to retard oxidative deterioration.

  18. Effect of four different reflective barriers on black-globe temperatures in calf hutches.

    PubMed

    Friend, T H; Haberman, J A; Binion, W R

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene hutches are a popular method of housing dairy calves from 0 to 60 or more days of age, although these hutches get hot when in full sun. This study characterized the relative differences in the ability of four different types of radiant barriers to reduce black-globe temperature within these hutches. Treatments included three different types of covers (two types of laminates (Cadpak P and Cadpak ESD) and an aluminized 3.0-mil white low-density polyethylene (LDPE)) and a reflective paint (LO/MIT-1). The reflective covers were 1.8 × 3 m finished size, and covered the top and sides of the hutch down to 0.15 m above the ground, leaving the front and back exposed. The LO/MIT-1 paint covered the entire sides and roof of the hutch. Two 24-h trials 1 week apart were conducted during relatively hot and clear days in early August. Black-globe temperatures were recorded in duplicate and averaged at 20-min intervals using blackened table tennis balls mounted 0.3 m above the floor in the center of each hutch. Ambient temperature (shade) during the hottest 2-h period for both trials averaged 39.9 °C while the uncovered control averaged 41.1 °C, and LO/MIT-1 averaged 39.9 °C; both of which were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than the Cadpak P (38.9 °C), Cadpak ESD (38.6 °C), and aluminized LDPE (38.7 °C). During periods of high solar radiation, the hutches with covers had lowest black-globe temperatures followed by hutches painted with reflective paint, while control hutches had the highest temperature.

  19. Antioxidant and oxidative stress responses of sojourners at high altitude in different climatic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sanchari; Singh, Som Nath; Saha, Mantu; Kain, T. C.; Tyagi, A. K.; Ray, Uday Sankar

    2010-01-01

    High altitude (HA) is a multi-stressor environment comprising hypobaric hypoxia and cold. Climatic temperature varies with seasonal variation at HA. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on antioxidant profile among sojourners at HA. The study was conducted on sojourners exposed to an altitude of 4,560 m in two different seasons and categorized into two groups (SOJ 1, n = 63, ambient temp. at HA: -6º to +10ºC; SOJ 2, n = 81, ambient temp. at HA: 3º-22ºC). Blood was collected at sea level (SL) and after 4 weeks of HA exposure. Antioxidant enzymes showed significant upregulation in SOJ 2 at HA. In SOJ 1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase showed significant upregulation but catalase and glutathione reductase showed significant decrease at HA. Non-enzymatic antioxidants showed significant reduction in SOJ 1 whereas a sustained antioxidant profile was observed in SOJ 2 at HA. Oxidative stress markers showed higher levels in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2 at HA. Differences observed between SOJ 1 and SOJ 2 at HA may be the consequence of different environmental temperatures. Cold stress was higher in SOJ 1 as evidenced from the significantly lower oral temperature in SOJ 1 as compared to SOJ 2. Cold- and hypoxia-induced increase in energy expenditure was significantly high in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2. To conclude, chronic exposure to hypoxia in moderate climatic temperature has a potential preconditioning effect on antioxidant system, but exposure to both cold and hypoxia causes greater oxidative stress due to altered metabolic rate.

  20. Temperature control during therapeutic hypothermia for newborn encephalopathy using different Blanketrol devices.

    PubMed

    Laptook, Abbot R; Kilbride, Howard; Shepherd, Edward; McDonald, Scott A; Shankaran, Seetha; Truog, William; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves the survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with newborn encephalopathy of a hypoxic-ischemic origin. The NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) Whole Body Cooling trial used the Cincinnati Sub-Zero Blanketrol II to achieve therapeutic hypothermia. The Blanketrol III is now available and provides additional cooling modes that may result in better temperature control. This report is a retrospective comparison of infants undergoing hypothermia using two different cooling modes of the Blanketrol device. Infants from the NRN trial were cooled with the Blanketrol II using the Automatic control mode (B2 cohort) and were compared with infants from two new NRN centers that adopted the NRN protocol and used the Blanketrol III in a gradient mode (B3 cohort). The primary outcome was the percent time the esophageal temperature stayed between 33°C and 34°C (target 33.5°C) during maintenance of hypothermia. Cohorts had similar birth weight, gestational age, and level of encephalopathy at the initiation of therapy. Baseline esophageal temperature differed between groups (36.6°C ± 1.0°C for B2 vs. 33.9°C ± 1.2°C for B3, p<0.0001) reflecting the practice of passive cooling during transport prior to initiation of active device cooling in the B3 cohort. This difference prevented comparison of temperatures during induction of hypothermia. During maintenance of hypothermia the mean and standard deviation of the percent time between 33°C and 34°C was similar for B2 compared to B3 cohorts (94.8% ± 0.1% vs. 95.8% ± 0.1%, respectively). Both the automatic and gradient control modes of the Blanketrol devices appear comparable in maintaining esophageal temperature within the target range during maintenance of therapeutic hypothermia.

  1. Effect of four different reflective barriers on black-globe temperatures in calf hutches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, T. H.; Haberman, J. A.; Binion, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene hutches are a popular method of housing dairy calves from 0 to 60 or more days of age, although these hutches get hot when in full sun. This study characterized the relative differences in the ability of four different types of radiant barriers to reduce black-globe temperature within these hutches. Treatments included three different types of covers (two types of laminates (Cadpak P and Cadpak ESD) and an aluminized 3.0-mil white low-density polyethylene (LDPE)) and a reflective paint (LO/MIT-1). The reflective covers were 1.8 × 3 m finished size, and covered the top and sides of the hutch down to 0.15 m above the ground, leaving the front and back exposed. The LO/MIT-1 paint covered the entire sides and roof of the hutch. Two 24-h trials 1 week apart were conducted during relatively hot and clear days in early August. Black-globe temperatures were recorded in duplicate and averaged at 20-min intervals using blackened table tennis balls mounted 0.3 m above the floor in the center of each hutch. Ambient temperature (shade) during the hottest 2-h period for both trials averaged 39.9 °C while the uncovered control averaged 41.1 °C, and LO/MIT-1 averaged 39.9 °C; both of which were significantly higher ( P < 0.01) than the Cadpak P (38.9 °C), Cadpak ESD (38.6 °C), and aluminized LDPE (38.7 °C). During periods of high solar radiation, the hutches with covers had lowest black-globe temperatures followed by hutches painted with reflective paint, while control hutches had the highest temperature.

  2. Analyzing the impact of ambient temperature indicators on transformer life in different regions of Chinese mainland.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cui-fen; Gao, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to quantitatively analyze the impact of different ambient temperature characteristics on the transformer life at different locations of Chinese mainland. 200 typical locations in Chinese mainland are selected for the study. They are specially divided into six regions so that the subsequent analysis can be done in a regional context. For each region, the local historical ambient temperature and load data are provided as inputs variables of the life consumption model in IEEE Std. C57.91-1995 to estimate the transformer life at every location. Five ambient temperature indicators related to the transformer life are involved into the partial least squares regression to describe their impact on the transformer life. According to a contribution measurement criterion of partial least squares regression, three indicators are conclusively found to be the most important factors influencing the transformer life, and an explicit expression is provided to describe the relationship between the indicators and the transformer life for every region. The analysis result is applicable to the area where the temperature characteristics are similar to Chinese mainland, and the expressions obtained can be applied to the other locations that are not included in this paper if these three indicators are known.

  3. Degradation of typical antibiotics during human feces aerobic composting under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Honglei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Li, Qian; Jiang, Shanqing

    2016-08-01

    Four typical antibiotics were added to human feces for aerobic composting using batch reactors with sawdust as the bulk matrix. Under three composting temperatures (room temperature, 35 ± 2 °C and 55 ± 2 °C), decreases in the extractable concentrations of antibiotics in the compost were monitored for 20 days. As a result, the removals of extractable tetracycline and chlortetracycline were found to be more temperature-dependent than the removals of sulfadiazine and ciprofloxacin. However, more than 90 % of all of the extractable antibiotics were removed at 55 ± 2 °C. Three specific experiments were further conducted to identify the possible actions for antibiotic removal, including self-degradation in aqueous solution, composting with a moist sterile sawdust matrix without adding feces and composting with human feces and moist sterile sawdust. As a result, it was found that the removal of tetracycline and chlortetracycline was mainly due to chemical degradation in water, whereas the removal of sulfadiazine was mainly attributed to adsorption onto sawdust particles. The microbial activity of compost varied with temperature to a certain extent, but the differences were insignificant among different antibiotics. Although microbial action is important for organic matter decomposition, its contribution to antibiotic degradation was small for the investigated antibiotics, except for ciprofloxacin, which was degraded by up to 20 % due to microbial action.

  4. Spatiotemporal Divergence of the Warming Hiatus over Land Based on Different Definitions of Mean Temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunlüe; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-08-17

    Existing studies of the recent warming hiatus over land are primarily based on the average of daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). This study compared regional warming rates of mean temperature based on T2 and T24 calculated from hourly observations available from 1998 to 2013. Both T2 and T24 show that the warming hiatus over land is apparent in the mid-latitudes of North America and Eurasia, especially in cold seasons, which is closely associated with the negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) and cold air propagation by the Arctic-original northerly wind anomaly into mid-latitudes. However, the warming rates of T2 and T24 are significantly different at regional and seasonal scales because T2 only samples air temperature twice daily and cannot accurately reflect land-atmosphere and incoming radiation variations in the temperature diurnal cycle. The trend has a standard deviation of 0.43 °C/decade for T2 and 0.41 °C/decade for T24, and 0.38 °C/decade for their trend difference in 5° × 5° grids. The use of T2 amplifies the regional contrasts of the warming rate, i.e., the trend underestimation in the US and overestimation at high latitudes by T2.

  5. Spatiotemporal Divergence of the Warming Hiatus over Land Based on Different Definitions of Mean Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunlüe; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-01-01

    Existing studies of the recent warming hiatus over land are primarily based on the average of daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). This study compared regional warming rates of mean temperature based on T2 and T24 calculated from hourly observations available from 1998 to 2013. Both T2 and T24 show that the warming hiatus over land is apparent in the mid-latitudes of North America and Eurasia, especially in cold seasons, which is closely associated with the negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) and cold air propagation by the Arctic-original northerly wind anomaly into mid-latitudes. However, the warming rates of T2 and T24 are significantly different at regional and seasonal scales because T2 only samples air temperature twice daily and cannot accurately reflect land-atmosphere and incoming radiation variations in the temperature diurnal cycle. The trend has a standard deviation of 0.43 °C/decade for T2 and 0.41 °C/decade for T24, and 0.38 °C/decade for their trend difference in 5° × 5° grids. The use of T2 amplifies the regional contrasts of the warming rate, i.e., the trend underestimation in the US and overestimation at high latitudes by T2. PMID:27531421

  6. Spatiotemporal Divergence of the Warming Hiatus over Land Based on Different Definitions of Mean Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunlüe; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-08-01

    Existing studies of the recent warming hiatus over land are primarily based on the average of daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). This study compared regional warming rates of mean temperature based on T2 and T24 calculated from hourly observations available from 1998 to 2013. Both T2 and T24 show that the warming hiatus over land is apparent in the mid-latitudes of North America and Eurasia, especially in cold seasons, which is closely associated with the negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) and cold air propagation by the Arctic-original northerly wind anomaly into mid-latitudes. However, the warming rates of T2 and T24 are significantly different at regional and seasonal scales because T2 only samples air temperature twice daily and cannot accurately reflect land-atmosphere and incoming radiation variations in the temperature diurnal cycle. The trend has a standard deviation of 0.43 °C/decade for T2 and 0.41 °C/decade for T24, and 0.38 °C/decade for their trend difference in 5° × 5° grids. The use of T2 amplifies the regional contrasts of the warming rate, i.e., the trend underestimation in the US and overestimation at high latitudes by T2.

  7. A Study of Contact Binaries with Large Temperature Differences between Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwak, M.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present an extensive analysis of new light and radial velocity (RV) curves, as well as high quality broadening function (BF) profiles of twelve binary systems for which a contact configuration with large temperature differences between components has been reported in the literature. We find that six systems (V1010 Oph, WZ Cyg, VV Cet, DO Cas, FS Lup, V747 Cen) have near contact configurations. For the remaining systems (CX Vir, FT Lup, BV Eri, FO Hya, CN And, BX And), our solutions of the new observations once again converge in a contact configuration with large temperature differences between the components. However, the bright regions discovered in the BFs for V747 Cen, CX Vir, FT Lup, BV Eri, FO Hya, and CN And, and further attributed to hot spots, shed new light on the physical processes taking place between the components and imply the possibility that the contact configurations obtained from light and RV curve modeling are a spurious result.

  8. Influence of Light Intensity at Different Temperatures on Rate of Respiration of Douglas-Fir Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Brix, Holger

    1968-01-01

    The rate of photorespiration of Douglas-fir seedlings was measured under different light intensities by: (1) extrapolating the curve for CO2 uptake in relation to atmospheric CO2 content to zero CO2 content, and (2) measuring CO2 evolution of the plants into a CO2-free airstream. Different results, obtained from these techniques, were believed to be caused by a severe restriction of the photosynthetic activity when the latter was used. With the first method, CO2 evolution was lower than the dark respiration rate at low light intensity. For all temperatures studied (6°, 20°, 28°) a further increase in light intensity raised the CO2 evolution above dark respiration before it leveled off. The rate of CO2 evolution was stimulated by increase in temperature at all light intensities. With the CO2-free air method, CO2 evolution in the light was less than dark respiration at all light intensities. PMID:16656775

  9. Releasing H2 molecules with a partial pressure difference without the use of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoonkyung; Huang, Bing; Duan, Wenhui; Ihm, Jisoon

    2010-08-01

    Using the pseudopotential density-functional method as well as equilibrium thermodynamic functions, we explore the process of releasing H2 molecules adsorbed on a transition-metal atom caused by the hydrogen-ammonia partial pressure difference. The H2 molecules bind to a transition-metal atom at H2 pressure- NH3 pressure-temperature 50atm-10-9atm-25°C , and they are released at 3atm-10-6atm-25°C . This process involves the same mechanism responsible for carbon monoxide poisoning of hemoglobin with the O2-CO partial pressure difference. We show that our findings can be applicable to an approach to induce hydrogen desorption on nanostructured hydrogen-storage materials without the need for increasing temperature.

  10. The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-05-15

    Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

  11. Avoiding hypothermia in neonatal pigs: effect of duration of floor heating at different room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L J; Malmkvist, J; Kammersgaard, T; Jørgensen, E

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different farrowing room temperatures (15, 20, or 25°C), combined with floor heating (FH) at the birth site, on the postnatal rectal temperature of pigs, use of creep area, and latency to first colostrum uptake was investigated with 61 litters born by loose-housed sows. Pig rectal temperature was measured at birth, as well as at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 12, 24, and 48 h after birth. The drop in rectal temperature from birth to 0.5 h postpartum was less (P<0.05) at room temperature of 25°C compared with 20 and 15°C. Minimum rectal temperature was less (P<0.001) at 15°C than either 20 or 25°C, and the time it took for rectal temperature to increase above 37°C was longer (P<0.05) when room temperature was 15°C than 20 and 25°C. Rectal temperatures at 24 (P<0.001) and 48 h (P<0.05) postpartum were also lower at room temperature of 15°C than 20 and 25°C. Duration of FH (12 or 48 h) did not influence (P>0.28) the rectal temperature at 24 or 48 h after birth. More pigs used the creep area 12 to 60 h after birth of the first pig at a room temperature of 15°C with 12 h FH compared with all other treatments. During the latter part of this period, more pigs stayed in the creep area also at 20°C with 12 h FH. After 60 h, more pigs (P<0.01) used the creep area at low compared with high room temperatures (15°C>20°C>25°C). Odds ratio of pigs dying before they had suckled was 6.8 times greater (P=0.03) at 15 than 25°C (95% CI of 1.3 to 35.5), whereas the odds ratio of dying during the first 7 d was 1.6 greater (P=0.05) for 48 vs. 12 h of FH (95% CI of 1.0 to 2.57), mainly due to more pigs being crushed. In conclusion, FH for 48 h was no more favorable than 12 h for pigs because the risk of hypothermia was equal in the 2 treatments, and the risk of dying increased with the longer FH duration. Increasing the room temperature to 25°C reduced hypothermia and the risk of pigs dying before colostrum intake.

  12. The circadian body temperature rhythm of Djungarian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) revealing different circadian phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schöttner, Konrad; Waterhouse, Jim; Weinert, Dietmar

    2011-06-01

    Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) of our breeding stock show three rhythmic phenotypes: wild type (WT) animals which start their activity shortly after "lights-off" and are active until "lights-on"; delayed activity onset (DAO) hamsters whose activity onset is delayed after "lights-off" but activity offset coincides with "lights-on"; and arrhythmic hamsters (AR) that are episodically active throughout the 24-h day. The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether the observed phenotypic differences are caused by an altered output from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). As a marker of the circadian clock, the body temperature rhythm purified from masking effects due to motor activity was used. Hamsters were kept singly under standardized laboratory conditions (L:D=14:10h, T: 22°C±2°C, food and water ad libitum). Body temperature and motor activity were monitored by means of implanted G2-E-Mitters and the VitalView(®) System (MiniMitter). Each phenotype showed distinctive rhythms of overt activity and body temperature, these two rhythms being very similar for each phenotype. Correcting body temperatures for the effects of activity produced purified temperature rhythms which retained profiles that were distinctive for the phenotype. These results show that the body temperature rhythm is not simply a consequence of the activity pattern but is caused by the endogenous circadian system. The purification method also allowed estimation of thermoregulatory efficiency using the gradients as a measure for the sensitivity of body temperature to activity changes. In WT and DAO hamsters, the gradients were low during activity period and showed two peaks. The first one occurred after "lights-on", the second one preceded the activity onset. In AR hamsters, the gradients did not reveal circadian changes. The results provide good evidence that the different phenotypes result from differences in the circadian clock. In AR hamsters, the SCN do not produce an

  13. Mass-controlled capillary viscometer for a Newtonian liquid: viscosity of water at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Digilov, Rafael M; Reiner, M

    2007-03-01

    The operation principle of the mass-controlled capillary viscometer is presented for a Newtonian liquid. The derived equation for the temporal changes of the mass in a liquid column draining under gravity through a discharge capillary tube accounts self-consistently for the inertial convective term associated with the acceleration effect. The viscosity of water measured at different temperatures using the new approach is in good agreement with literature data.

  14. The ratios of partition functions at different temperatures - Sensitivity to potential energy shape II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchowiecki, Marcin

    2016-05-01

    The ratios of partition functions at different temperatures are calculated and its dependence on potential energy shape is analyzed. The role of anharmonicity and non-rigidity of rotations is discussed in the context of the angular frequency and the shape of potential energy curve. A role of inflection point of potential energy curve for the quality of rigid rotor harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor Morse oscillator is elucidated.

  15. Perselectivity of porous cellulose nitrate membranes in evapomeation with temperature difference

    SciTech Connect

    Uragami, T.; Komatsu, R.; Miyata, T.

    1995-12-01

    Ethanol-permselectivity from aqueous ethanol solutions through porous cellulose nitrate membranes was investigated by evaporation with temperature difference under various conditions. On the other hand, same experiments using porous cellulose acetate were carried out. From these results of porous cellulose nitrate and cellulose acetate membranes, mechanism of permeation and separation for ethanol-permselectivity through cellulose nitrate membranes is discussed from viewpoints of physical and chemical structures of porous cellulose ester membranes.

  16. Influence of temperature difference calculation method on the evaluation of Rankine cycle performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisaki, Takafumi.; Ikegami, Yasuyuki.

    2014-02-01

    In the new century, energy and environmental problems are becoming more critical, and the development of natural energy is desired. Low-grade Thermal Energy Conversion (LTEC) is refocused as one of the renewable energy methods. The usefulness of LTEC is expected using hot springs and waste heat. In the case of the Rankine cycle using ammonia as the working fluid, the thermal properties of the working fluid changes in the evaporator. The traditional evaluation method of heat exchanger performance is the LMTD (Logarithmic Mean Temperature Difference) method. On the other hand, the GMTD (Generalized Mean Temperature Difference) method allows the variation of thermal properties in the heat exchanger. The aim of this study is to compare the two methods for the calculation of temperature differences and the corresponding influence on the total performance of the Rankine cycle that is operated using ammonia as a working fluid. As a result, the thermal efficiency of the Rankine cycle is greater than that of the LMTD method. Moreover, the computable range of the GMTD calculation method is less than that of the LMTD calculation method.

  17. Water structure-forming capabilities are temperature shifted for different models.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Roman; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Rao, Francesco

    2012-06-28

    A large number of water models exist for molecular simulations. They differ in the ability to reproduce specific features of real water instead of others, like the correct temperature for the density maximum or the diffusion coefficient. Past analysis mostly concentrated on ensemble quantities, while few data were reported on the different microscopic behavior. Here, we compare seven widely used classical water models (SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP4P-Ew, TIP4P/2005, and TIP5P) in terms of their local structure-forming capabilities through hydrogen bonds for temperatures ranging from 210 to 350 K by the introduction of a set of order parameters taking into account the configuration of up to the second solvation shell. We found that all models share the same structural pattern up to a temperature shift. When this shift is applied, all models overlap onto a master curve. Interestingly, increased stabilization of fully coordinated structures extending to at least two solvation shells is found for models that are able to reproduce the correct position of the density maximum. Our results provide a self-consistent atomic-level structural comparison protocol, which can be of help in elucidating the influence of different water models on protein structure and dynamics.

  18. Relationships between the addition rates of cellulase or glucose and silage fermentation at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Kawamoto, Hidenori; Cai, Yi-Min

    2010-06-01

    The influence of the application rates of cellulase preparation and glucose on silage fermentation at different temperatures was studied with the straw of naked barley (Hordeum vulgare L. emand Lam) and guineagrass (Panicum maximum Jacq.). Addition rate of cellulase and glucose, temperature and their interaction had significant effects on pH value, lactic acid content, butyric acid content and propionic acid content of naked barley straw silage and significant effects on all the parameters of guineagrass silage (P < 0.01). Temperature and interaction had significant effect on acetic acid content (P < 0.05) and no significant effect on NH(3)-N content of naked barley straw silage (P > 0.05). Under all the temperatures, the pH values of barley straw and guineagrass silages were reduced by cellulase and glucose addition even at the lowest rate (P < 0.05), compared with their corresponding control. Lactic acid contents of silages were the highest within the same temperature and same additive when glucose and cellulase were added at the highest rates, whereas the effect of cellulase and glucose addition on butyric acid production varied with their application rates and silage storage temperature. The addition rate of restricting butyric acid fermentation was lower at 20 degrees C than that at 30 degrees C, and it was the lowest at 40 degrees C where cellulase and glucose addition restricted butyric acid fermentation even at 0.1 g/kg and 10 g/kg, respectively, when compared to the control. While the addition rate was lower than the above level, cellulase and glucose addition also promoted butyric acid fermentation.

  19. Effect of Different Cooling Regimes on the Mechanical Properties of Cementitious Composites Subjected to High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiangtao; Weng, Wenfang; Yu, Kequan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different cooling regimes (quenching in water and cooling in air) on the residual mechanical properties of engineered cementitious composite (ECC) subjected to high temperature up to 800°C was discussed in this paper. The ECC specimens are exposed to 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800°C with the unheated specimens for reference. Different cooling regimens had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of postfire ECC specimens. The microstructural characterization was examined before and after exposure to fire deterioration by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results from the microtest well explained the mechanical properties variation of postfire specimens. PMID:25161392

  20. A comparison of three different types of temperature measurement in HITU fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, J.; Jenderka, K.-V.; Seifert, F.; Klepsch, T.; Martin, E.; Shaw, A.; Durando, G.; Guglielmone, C.; Girard, F.

    2012-10-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of the temperature elevation caused by high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) in a tissue-mimicking material (TMM) has been determined with magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry, infrared (IR) thermometry and a thermal test object with an integrated thin-film thermocouple at three different National Metrological Institutes (PTB/Germany, NPL/UK, INRIM/Italy). Results obtained from the different types of measurement are compared and some general aspects of the methods are discussed, particularly with regard to their suitability for the in vitro characterization of transducers for treatment planning.

  1. Determination of regional brain temperature using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess brain-body temperature differences in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine; Hiltunen, Yrjö; Vidyasagar, Rishma; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2007-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) was used to determine brain temperature in healthy volunteers. Partially water-suppressed (1)H MRS data sets were acquired at 3T from four different gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) volumes. Brain temperatures were determined from the chemical-shift difference between the CH(3) of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) at 2.01 ppm and water. Brain temperatures in (1)H MRS voxels of 2 x 2 x 2 cm(3) showed no substantial heterogeneity. The volume-averaged temperature from single-voxel spectroscopy was compared with body temperatures obtained from the oral cavity, tympanum, and temporal artery regions. The mean brain parenchyma temperature was 0.5 degrees C cooler than readings obtained from three extra-brain sites (P < 0.01). (1)H MRS imaging (MRSI) data were acquired from a slice encompassing the single-voxel volumes to assess the ability of spectroscopic imaging to determine regional brain temperature within the imaging slice. Brain temperature away from the center of the brain determined by MRSI differed from that obtained by single-voxel MRS in the same brain region, possibly due to a poor line width (LW) in MRSI. The data are discussed in the light of proposed brain-body temperature gradients and the use of (1)H MRSI to monitor brain temperature in pathologies, such as brain trauma.

  2. Charge recombination reactions in photosystem II. 2. Transient absorbance difference spectra and their temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, B; Brettel, K; van Mieghem, F; Kamlowski, A; Rutherford, A W; Schlodder, E

    1995-04-11

    Absorbance difference spectra of the transient states in photosystem II (PS II) have been examined in the Qv absorption region between 660 and 700 nm. The P680+Pheo-/P680Pheo, 3P680/P680, and P680+QA-/P680QA spectra were measured in O2-evolving PS II core complexes from Synechococcus and PS II-enriched membrane fragments from spinach. The low-temperature absorbance difference spectra vary only slightly between both PS II preparations. The 3P680/P680 spectrum is characterized by a bleaching at 685 nm at 25 K and indicates weak exciton coupling with neighboring pigment(s). We conclude that P680 absorbs at 685 nm in more intact PS II preparations at cryogenic temperature. The difference spectra of the radical pairs are strongly temperature dependent. At low temperature the P680+QA-/P680QA- spectrum exhibits the strongest bleaching at 675 nm whereas the P680+Phe-/P680Pheo spectra show two distinct bleaching bands at 674 and 684 nm. It is suggested that an electrochronic red shift resulting in a bleaching at 675 nm and an absorbance increase at about 682 nm dominates the spectral features of the charge-separated states. On the basis of the present results and those in the literature, we conclude that the interactions between the pigments and especially the organization of the primary donor must be quite different in PS II compared to bacterial reaction centers, although the basic structural arrangement of the pigments might be similar. Spectral data obtained with samples in the presence of singly and doubly reduced QA indicate that the primary photochemistry in PS II is not strongly influenced by the redox state of QA at low temperature and confirm the results of the accompanying paper [Van Mieghem, F. J. E., Brettel, K., Hillmann, B., Kamlowski, A., Rutherford, A. W., & Schlodder, E. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 4798-4813]. The spectra of the primary radical pair and the reaction center triplet obtained with more intact PS II preparations differ widely from those of D1/D2

  3. A comparison of temperature and precipitation responses to different Earth radiation management geoengineering schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, J. A.; Jackson, L. S.; Osprey, S. M.; Forster, P. M.

    2015-09-01

    Earth radiation management has been suggested as a way to rapidly counteract global warming in the face of a lack of mitigation efforts, buying time and avoiding potentially catastrophic warming. We compare six different radiation management schemes that use surface, troposphere, and stratosphere interventions in a single climate model in which we projected future climate from 2020 to 2099 based on RCP4.5. We analyze the surface air temperature responses to determine how effective the schemes are at returning temperature to its 1986-2005 climatology and analyze precipitation responses to compare side effects. We find crop albedo enhancement is largely ineffective at returning temperature to its 1986-2005 climatology. Desert albedo enhancement causes excessive cooling in the deserts and severe shifts in tropical precipitation. Ocean albedo enhancement, sea-spray geoengineering, cirrus cloud thinning, and stratospheric SO2 injection have the potential to cool more uniformly, but cirrus cloud thinning may not be able to cool by much more than 1 K globally. We find that of the schemes potentially able to return surface air temperature to 1986-2005 climatology under future greenhouse gas warming, none has significantly less severe precipitation side effects than other schemes. Despite different forcing patterns, ocean albedo enhancement, sea-spray geoengineering, cirrus cloud thinning, and stratospheric SO2 injection all result in large scale tropical precipitation responses caused by Hadley cell changes and land precipitation changes largely driven by thermodynamic changes. Widespread regional scale changes in precipitation over land are significantly different from the 1986-2005 climatology and would likely necessitate significant adaptation despite geoengineering.

  4. Effects of elevated temperatures on different restorative materials: An aid to forensic identification processes

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Chetan A.; Ghige, Suvarna K.; Gosavi, Suchitra R.; Hazarey, Vinay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heat-induced alterations to dental and restorative materials can be of great interest to forensic dentistry. Knowing the specific optical behavior of dental materials can be of high importance as recognition of changes induced by high temperatures can lead to the determination of material which was used in a dental restoration, facilitating identification of burned human remains. Aim: To observe the effects of predetermined temperatures (200°C–400°C–600°C–800°C–1000°C) on unrestored teeth and different restorative materials macroscopically and then examine them under a stereomicroscope for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 375 extracted teeth which were divided into five groups of 75 teeth each as follows: group 1- unrestored teeth, group 2- teeth restored with all-ceramic crowns, Group 3- with class I silver amalgam filling, group 4- with class I composite restoration, and group 5- with class I glass ionomer cement restoration. Results: Unrestored and restored teeth display a series of specific macroscopic & stereomicroscopic structural changes for each range of temperature. Conclusion: Dental tissues and restorative materials undergo a series of changes which correlate well with the various temperatures to which they were exposed. These changes are a consequence of the nature of the materials and their physicochemical characteristics. PMID:26005305

  5. Temperature-induced gene expression associated with different thermal reaction norms for growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ellers, Jacintha; Mariën, Janine; Driessen, Gerard; van Straalen, Nico M

    2008-03-15

    Although nearly all organisms are subject to fluctuating temperature regimes in their natural habitat, little is known about the genetics underlying the response to thermal conditions, and even less about the genetic differences that cause individual variation in thermal response. Here, we aim to elucidate possible pathways involved in temperature-induced phenotypic plasticity of growth rate. Our model organism is the collembolan Orchesella cincta that occurs in a wide variety of habitats and is known to be adapted to local thermal conditions. Because sequence information is lacking in O. cincta, we constructed cDNA libraries enriched for temperature-responsive genes using suppression subtractive hybridization. We compared gene expression of O. cincta with steep thermal reaction norms (high plasticity) to those with flat thermal reaction norms (low plasticity) for juvenile growth after exposure to a temperature switch composed of a cooling or a warming treatment. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, we found differential expression of ten nuclear genes, including several genes involved in energy metabolism, such as pantothenate kinase and carbonic anhydrase. In addition, seven mitochondrial genes were found in the cloned subtracted library, but further analysis showed this was caused by allelic variation in mitochondrial genes in our founder population, and that a specific haplotype was associated with high thermal responsiveness. Future work will focus on candidate genes from pathways such as the oxidative phosphorylation and biosynthesis of coenzyme A which are possibly involved in thermal responsiveness of juvenile growth rate.

  6. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  7. Long-term global temperature variations under the influence of different cosmophysical factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed different cosmophysical factors which have effect on long-term global temperature variations during solar cycles 20-24. A detailed analysis of total solar irradiance (TSI), the spectral solar ultraviolet emission (UV), space weather and cosmic rays (CRs) have effects on the atmosphere processes. We have shown that increasing of global temperature is likely affected by TSI and UV during solar maxima. During the descending phases of these solar cycles the interplanetary magnetic field and long-lasting solar wind high speed streams occurred frequently and were the primary contributors to minimize of CRs effect on the Earth's atmosphere. In this case global temperature is increased extra as result of increase in the atmosphere's transparency. We show that there are a few effective physical mechanisms of the action of solar activity and space weather on the global temperature. TSI and CRs play essential role in climate change and main part of climate variations can be explained by the mechanism of action TSI and CRs modulated by the solar activity on the state of lower atmosphere and meteorological parameters.

  8. Pore distribution and material properties of bone cement cured at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Matthew H; Lau, Abe C B; Smitham, Peter J; Nielsen, Gary; Walsh, William R

    2010-03-01

    Implant heating has been advocated as a means to alter the porosity of the bone cement/implant interface; however, little is known about the influence on cement properties. This study investigates the mechanical properties and pore distribution of 10 commercially available cements cured in molds at 20, 37, 40 and 50 degrees Celsius. Although each cement reacted differently to the curing environments, the most prevalent trend was increased mechanical properties when cured at 50 degrees Celsius vs. room temperature. Pores were shown to gather near the surface of cooler molds and near the center in warmer molds for all cement brands. Pore size was also influenced. Small pores were more often present in cements cured at cooler temperatures, with higher-temperature molds producing more large pores. The mechanical properties of all cements were above the minimum regulatory standards. This work shows the influence of curing temperature on cement properties and porosity characteristics, and supports the practice of heating cemented implants to influence interfacial porosity.

  9. CREST modelling of PBX 9502 corner turning experiments at different initial temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, N. J.

    2014-05-01

    Corner turning is an important problem in regard to detonation wave propagation in TATB-based explosives. Experimentally, a sudden change in the direction of the propagating wave, such as turning a sharp corner, can result in dead-zones being left behind in the corner turn region, with the observed behaviour being particularly sensitive to the initial temperature of the explosive. In this paper, the entropy-dependent CREST reactive burn model is used to simulate corner turning experiments on the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502. Calculated results of double cylinder tests at three different initial temperatures (-54°C, ~23°C, and 75°C), and a "hockey puck" experiment at ambient temperature, are compared to the corresponding test measurements. The results show that the model is able to: (i) calculate persistent dead-zones in PBX 9502 without recourse to any shock desensitisation treatment, and (ii) predict changes in corner turning behaviour with initial temperature using one set of coefficients.

  10. CREST Modelling of PBX 9502 Corner Turning Experiments at Different Initial Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    Corner turning is an important problem in regard to detonation wave propagation in TATB-based explosives. Experimentally, a sudden change in direction of the propagating wave, such as turning a sharp corner, can result in dead-zones being left behind in the corner turn region, with the observed behaviour being particularly sensitive to the initial temperature of the explosive. In this paper, the entropy-dependent CREST reactive burn model is used to simulate corner turning experiments on the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502. Calculated results of double cylinder tests at three different initial temperatures (-54°C, 25°C, and 75°C), and a ``hockey puck'' experiment at ambient temperature, are compared to the corresponding test measurements. The results show that the model is able to: (i) calculate persistent dead-zones in PBX 9502 without recourse to any shock desensitisation treatment, and (ii) predict changes in corner turning behaviour with initial temperature using one set of coefficients.

  11. Thermal decay analysis of fiber Bragg gratings at different temperature annealing rates using demarcation energy approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardena, Dinusha Serandi; Lai, Man-Hong; Lim, Kok-Sing; Ahmad, Harith

    2017-03-01

    In this study the thermal degradation of gratings inscribed in three types of fiber namely, PS 1250/1500, SM 1500 and zero water peak single mode fiber is demonstrated. A comparative investigation is carried out on the aging characteristics of the gratings at three different temperature ramping rates of 3 °C/min, 6 °C/min and 9 °C/min. During the thermal annealing treatment, a significant enhancement in the grating reflectivity is observed for PS 1250/1500 fiber from ∼1.2 eV until 1.4 eV which indicates a thermal induced reversible effect. Higher temperature ramping rates lead to a higher regeneration temperature. In addition, the investigation also reflects that regardless of the temperature ramping rate the thermal decay behavior of a specific fiber can be successfully characterized when represented in a demarcation energy domain. Moreover, this technique can be accommodated when predicting the thermal decay characteristics of a specific fiber.

  12. Comparison of different methods of estimating the mean radiant temperature in outdoor thermal comfort studies.

    PubMed

    Krüger, E L; Minella, F O; Matzarakis, A

    2014-10-01

    Correlations between outdoor thermal indices and the calculated or measured mean radiant temperature T(mrt) are in general of high importance because of the combined effect on human energy balance in outdoor spaces. The most accurate way to determine T(mrt) is by means of integral radiation measurements, i.e. measuring the short- and long-wave radiation from six directions using pyranometers and pyrgeometers, an expensive and not always an easily available procedure. Some studies use globe thermometers combined with air temperature and wind speed sensors. An alternative way to determine T(mrt) is based on output from the RayMan model from measured data of incoming global radiation and morphological features of the monitoring site in particular sky view factor (SVF) data. The purpose of this paper is to compare different methods to assess the mean radiant temperature T(mrt) in terms of differences to a reference condition (T(mrt) calculated from field measurements) and to resulting outdoor comfort levels expressed as PET and UTCI values. The T(mrt) obtained from field measurements is a combination of air temperature, wind speed and globe temperature data according to the forced ventilation formula of ISO 7726 for data collected in Glasgow, UK. Four different methods were used in the RayMan model for T(mrt) calculations: input data consisting exclusively of data measured at urban sites; urban data excluding solar radiation, estimated SVF data and solar radiation data measured at a rural site; urban data excluding solar radiation with SVF data for each site; urban data excluding solar radiation and including solar radiation at the rural site taking no account of SVF information. Results show that all methods overestimate T(mrt) when compared to ISO calculations. Correlations were found to be significant for the first method and lower for the other three. Results in terms of comfort (PET, UTCI) suggest that reasonable estimates could be made based on global radiation

  13. Prediction of the thermal imaging minimum resolvable (circle) temperature difference with neural network application.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi-Chin; Wu, Bo-Wen

    2008-12-01

    Thermal imaging is an important technology in both national defense and the private sector. An advantage of thermal imaging is its ability to be deployed while fully engaged in duties, not limited by weather or the brightness of indoor or outdoor conditions. However, in an outdoor environment, many factors, including atmospheric decay, target shape, great distance, fog, temperature out of range and diffraction limits can lead to bad image formation, which directly affects the accuracy of object recognition. The visual characteristics of the human eye mean that it has a much better capacity for picture recognition under normal conditions than artificial intelligence does. However, conditions of interference significantly reduce this capacity for picture recognition for instance, fatigue impairs human eyesight. Hence, psychological and physiological factors can affect the result when the human eye is adopted to measure MRTD (minimum resolvable temperature difference) and MRCTD (minimum resolvable circle temperature difference). This study explores thermal imaging recognition, and presents a method for effectively choosing the characteristic values and processing the images fully. Neural network technology is successfully applied to recognize thermal imaging and predict MRTD and MRCTD (Appendix A), exceeding thermal imaging recognition under fatigue and the limits of the human eye.

  14. Monoethanol amine modified zeolite 13X for CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    P.D. Jadhav; R.V. Chatti; R.B. Biniwale; N.K. Labhsetwar; S. Devotta; S.S. Rayalu . s_rayalu@neeri.res.in

    2007-12-15

    Zeolite 13X has been modified with monoethanol amine (MEA). MEA loadings of 0.5-25 wt % have been achieved using the impregnation method in different solvents. The mode of incorporation based on methanol with stirring at room temperature appears to be the most feasible. The adsorbent has been characterized for crystallinity, surface area, pore volume, and pore size. The thermal stability of the adsorbent is studied using a thermal analyzer. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of adsorbents is evaluated using the breakthrough adsorption method with a packed column on a 10 g scale. The adsorption capacities of adsorbents are estimated in the temperature range 30-120{sup o}C. The adsorbents show improvement in CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity over the unmodified zeolite by a factor of ca. 1.6 at 30{sup o}C, whereas at 120{sup o}C the efficiency improved by a factor of 3.5. For adsorption at these temperatures, different MEA loading levels were found to be suitable as per the governing adsorption phenomena, that is, physical or chemical. The adsorbent is also studied for CO{sub 2} selectivity over N{sub 2} at 75{sup o}C. The MEA-modified adsorbent shows better CO{sub 2} selectivity, which was improved further in the presence of moisture. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3t abs.

  15. Antigenicity and viability of Anisakis larvae infesting hake heated at different time-temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Vidacek, Sanja; de las Heras, Cristina; Solas, Maria Teresa; Mendizábal, Angel; Rodriguez-Mahillo, Ana I; Tejada, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Heat treatments (40 to 94 degrees Celsius, 30 s to 60 min) were applied to different batches of Anisakis simplex L3 larvae isolated from hake ovaries and viscera to study the effect of heat on the viability of the larvae measured as mobility, emission of fluorescence under UV light, and changes in color after staining with specific dyes, and on A. simplex antigenic proteins. The aim was to determine the lowest time-temperature conditions needed to kill the larvae to avoid anisakiasis in consumers, and to evaluate whether high temperature modifies the antigenicity of A. simplex extracts. Heating at 60 degrees Celsius for 10 min (recommended by some authors) was considered unsafe, as differences in viability between batches were found, with some larvae presenting spontaneous movements in one batch. At higher temperatures (> or = 70 degrees Celsius for > or = 1 min), no movement of the larvae was observed. Antigenic protein Ani s 4 and A. simplex crude antigens were detected in the larvae heated at 94 + or - 1 degrees Celsius for 3 min. This indicates that allergic symptoms could be provoked in previously sensitized consumers, even if the larvae were killed by heat treatment.

  16. Formation of brominated pollutants during the pyrolysis and combustion of tetrabromobisphenol A at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, Nuria; Moltó, Julia; Conesa, Juan A; Font, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the most widely used brominated flame retardant worldwide. A detailed examination of the degradation products emitted during thermal decomposition of TBBPA is presented in the study. Runs were performed in a laboratory furnace at different temperatures (650 and 800 °C) and in different atmospheres (nitrogen and air). More than one hundred semivolatile compounds have been identified by GC/MS, with special interest in brominated ones. Presence of HBr and brominated light hydrocarbons increased with temperature and in the presence of oxygen. Maximum formation of PAHs is observed at pyrolytic condition at the higher temperature. High levels of 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6- bromophenols were found. The levels of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans have been detected in the ppm range. The most abundant isomers are 2,4,6,8-TeBDF in pyrolysis and 1,2,3,7,8-PeBDF in combustion. These results should be considered in the assessment of thermal treatment of materials containing brominated flame retardants.

  17. Application of a laser Doppler vibrometer for air-water to subsurface signature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Phillip; Roeder, James; Robinson, Dennis; Majumdar, Arun

    2015-05-01

    There is much interest in detecting a target and optical communications from an airborne platform to a platform submerged under water. Accurate detection and communications between underwater and aerial platforms would increase the capabilities of surface, subsurface, and air, manned and unmanned vehicles engaged in oversea and undersea activities. The technique introduced in this paper involves a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) for acousto-optic sensing for detecting acoustic information propagated towards the water surface from a submerged platform inside a 12 gallon water tank. The LDV probes and penetrates the water surface from an aerial platform to detect air-water surface interface vibrations caused by an amplifier to a speaker generating a signal generated from underneath the water surface (varied water depth from 1" to 8"), ranging between 50Hz to 5kHz. As a comparison tool, a hydrophone was used simultaneously inside the water tank for recording the acoustic signature of the signal generated between 50Hz to 5kHz. For a signal generated by a submerged platform, the LDV can detect the signal. The LDV detects the signal via surface perturbations caused by the impinging acoustic pressure field; proving a technique of transmitting/sending information/messages from a submerged platform acoustically to the surface of the water and optically receiving the information/message using the LDV, via the Doppler Effect, allowing the LDV to become a high sensitivity optical-acoustic device. The technique developed has much potential usage in commercial oceanography applications. The present work is focused on the reception of acoustic information from an object located underwater.

  18. Surfactant-Induced Flow in Unsaturated Porous Media: Implications for Air-Water Interfacial Area Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, M. S.; Zheng, Z.; Estabrook, B.; Henry, E. J.; Littlefield, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Air-water interfacial area (AI) in porous media is an important factor governing equilibrium contaminant retention, as well as the kinetics of interphase mass transfer. Interfacial-partitioning tracer (IPT) tests are a common technique for measuring AI at a given moisture saturation (SW), where AI is calculated based on the ratio of arrival times of a surfactant and a non-reactive tracer. At surfactant concentrations often used, the aqueous surface tension of the interfacial tracer solution is ~30% lower than that of the resident porewater in the system, creating transient surface tension gradients during the IPT measurement. Because surface tension gradients create capillary pressure gradients, surfactant-induced unsaturated flow may occur during IPT tests, a process that would violate fundamental assumptions of constant SW, of steady-state flow, and of nonreactive and surfactant tracers experiencing the same transport conditions. To examine the occurrence and magnitude of surfactant-induced flow, we conducted IPT tests for unsaturated systems at ~84% initial SW using surfactant input concentrations that bracket concentrations commonly used. Despite constant boundary conditions (constant inlet flux and outlet pressure), the introduction of the surfactant solution induced considerable transience in column effluent flowrate and SW. Real-time system mass measurements revealed drainage of 20-40% SW, with the amount of drainage and the maximum rate of drainage proportional to the influent surfactant concentration, as would be expected. Because AI is inversely related to SW, the use of higher surfactant concentrations should yield larger AI estimates. Measured AI values, however, showed no clear relationship to surfactant concentration or the time-averaged SW of the system. These findings cast doubt on the reliability of IPT for AI determination.

  19. Advances in simulating radiance signatures for dynamic air/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.; Gerace, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    The air-water interface poses a number of problems for both collecting and simulating imagery. At the surface, the magnitude of observed radiance can change by multiple orders of magnitude at high spatiotemporal frequency due to glinting effects. In the volume, similarly high frequency focusing of photons by a dynamic wave surface significantly changes the reflected radiance of in-water objects and the scattered return of the volume itself. These phenomena are often manifest as saturated pixels and artifacts in collected imagery (often enhanced by time delays between neighboring pixels or interpolation between adjacent filters) and as noise and greater required computation times in simulated imagery. This paper describes recent advances made to the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model to address the simulation issues to better facilitate an understanding of a multi/hyper-spectral collection. Glint effects are simulated using a dynamic height field that can be driven by wave frequency models and generates a sea state at arbitrary time scales. The volume scattering problem is handled by coupling the geometry representing the surface (facetization by the height field) with the single scattering contribution at any point in the water. The problem is constrained somewhat by assuming that contributions come from a Snell's window above the scattering point and by assuming a direct source (sun). Diffuse single scattered and multiple scattered energy contributions are handled by Monte Carlo techniques employed previously. The model is compared to existing radiative transfer codes where possible, with the objective of providing a robust movel of time-dependent absolute radiance at many wavelengths.

  20. Air-water exchange of PAHs and OPAHs at a superfund mega-site.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Lane G; Blair Paulik, L; Anderson, Kim A

    2017-03-31

    Chemical fate is a concern at environmentally contaminated sites, but characterizing that fate can be difficult. Identifying and quantifying the movement of chemicals at the air-water interface are important steps in characterizing chemical fate. Superfund sites are often suspected sources of air pollution due to legacy sediment and water contamination. A quantitative assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAH (OPAHs) diffusive flux in a river system that contains a Superfund Mega-site, and passes through residential, urban and agricultural land, has not been reported before. Here, passive sampling devices (PSDs) were used to measure 60 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 22 oxygenated PAH (OPAHs) in air and water. From these concentrations the magnitude and direction of contaminant flux between these two compartments was calculated. The magnitude of PAH flux was greater at sites near or within the Superfund Mega-site than outside of the Superfund Mega-site. The largest net individual PAH deposition at a single site was naphthalene at a rate of -14,200 (±5780) (ng/m(2))/day. The estimated one-year total flux of phenanthrene was -7.9×10(5) (ng/m(2))/year. Human health risk associated with inhalation of vapor phase PAHs and dermal exposure to PAHs in water were assessed by calculating benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentrations. Excess lifetime cancer risk estimates show potential increased risk associated with exposure to PAHs at sites within and in close proximity to the Superfund Mega-site. Specifically, estimated excess lifetime cancer risk associated with dermal exposure and inhalation of PAHs was above 1 in 1 million within the Superfund Mega-site. The predominant depositional flux profile observed in this study suggests that the river water in this Superfund site is largely a sink for airborne PAHs, rather than a source.

  1. Size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochar from different plant type of feedstock with different heating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Yang; Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Biochar application to soil is a strategy to decelerate the increase in the atmospheric carbon concentration. The composition of condensed aromatic clusters appears to be an important determinant of the degradation rate of char in soil. The objective of the present study was to determine the size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochars produced from different types of feedstock (a broadleaf and a coniferous tree and two herbs) using different heating treatment temperatures (HTT; 400 °C-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction 11 band profile analysis. (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance with the phase-adjusted spinning side bands of the chars indicated different spectral features depending on the HTT and similar carbon composition among the plant types at each HTT. Both the content and composition of carbon layer planes in biochar produced using the same HTT were also similar among the plant types. The carbon layer plane size in the 400 °C and 600 °C chars was distributed from 0.24 to 1.68 or 1.92 nm (corresponding to 37 or 52 rings) with the mean size of 0.79-0.92 and 0.80-1.14 nm, respectively. The carbon layer planes in the 800 °C chars ranged from 0.72-0.96 nm (7-14 rings) to 2.64-3.60 nm (91-169 rings) and the mean values were 1.47-1.89 nm. The relative carbon layer plane content in the 600 °C and 800 °C chars was typically 2 and 3 times that in the 400 °C chars. These results indicate the progression of the formation and/or the size development of graphite-like structures, suggesting that a char produced at a higher HTT would have better carbon sequestrating characteristics.

  2. Single Molecule Lateral Mobility and Membrane Organization in DMPC/Cholesterol Mixtures at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Saame; Stillwell, William; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    To better understand the lipid heterogeneity of biological membranes, we have studied the lateral mobility and membrane organization of DMPC and cholesterol (Chol) mixtures at the air-water interface using single molecule fluorescence imaging and epifluorescence microscopy. The single molecule imaging technique was used to track the lateral diffusion of single molecules of TRITC-DPPE or cholesteryl Bodipy. In the absence of Chol, mean square displacement histograms obtained from single molecule tracking of TRITC-DPPE show unobstructed diffusion. Including Chol at low levels of Chol (<10 moldiffusion at intermediate levels ( 30 molof Chol (>40 molmacroscopic phase separations. Data obtained from tracking experiments of cholesteryl-Bodipy also show complementary changes in diffusion. Our results indicate that our techniques provide insight into the micro and macro organization of lipid domains at the air-water interface.

  3. In situ air-water and particle-water partitioning of perfluorocarboxylic acids, perfluorosulfonic acids and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide at a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Vierke, Lena; Ahrens, Lutz; Shoeib, Mahiba; Palm, Wolf-Ulrich; Webster, Eva M; Ellis, David A; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Harner, Tom

    2013-08-01

    In situ measurements of air and water phases at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were used to investigate the partitioning behavior of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide (HFOSA) and their conjugate bases (PFC(-)s, PFS(-)s, and FOSA(-), respectively). Particle-dissolved (Rd) and air-water (QAW) concentration ratios were determined at different tanks of a WWTP. Sum of concentrations of C4-12,14 PFC(A)s, C4,6,8,10 PFS(A)s and (H)FOSA were as high as 50 pg m(-3) (atmospheric gas phase), 2300 ng L(-1) (aqueous dissolved phase) and 2500 ng L(-1) (aqueous particle phase). Particle-dissolved concentration ratios of total species, log Rd, ranged from -2.9 to 1.3 for PFS(A)s, from -1.9 to 1.1 for PFC(A)s and was 0.71 for (H)FOSA. These field-based values agree well with equilibrium partitioning data reported in the literature, suggesting that any in situ generation from precursors, if they are present in this system, occurs at a slower rate than the rate of approach to equilibrium. Acid QAW were also estimated. Good agreement between the QAW and the air-water equilibrium partition coefficient for C8PFCA suggests that the air above the WWTP tanks is at or near equilibrium with the water. Uncertainties in these QAW values are attributed mainly to variability in pKa values reported in the literature. The WWTP provides a unique environment for investigating environmental fate processes of the PFCAs and PFSAs under 'real' conditions in order to better understand and predict their fate in the environment.

  4. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Dan; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C) quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm), microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm), and mineral fractions (MF, <53 μm) collected from an Inner Mongolian temperate grassland. The results showed that temperature and aggregate size significantly affected on SOM decomposition, with notable interactive effects (P<0.0001). For 2 weeks, the decomposition rates of bulk soil and soil aggregates increased with increasing incubation temperature in the following order: MA>MF>bulk soil >MI(P <0.05). The Q10 values were highest for MA, followed (in decreasing order) by bulk soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea) for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (P<0.05) suggested that the CQT hypothesis is applicable to soil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P <0.0001), with the largest values occurring in MA (1101 μg g-1), followed by MF (976 μg g-1) and MI (879 μg g-1). These findings suggest that feedback from SOM decomposition in response to changing temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  5. Tuning the hopping conductivity of WO3 films by ion bombardment at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, B.; Merz, M.; Widmayer, P.; Ziemann, P.

    2001-10-01

    WO3 films, either prepared by sputtering or evaporation under high or ultrahigh vacuum conditions, were irradiated with He+ and Ar+ ions (energy range 300-350 keV) at ambient and low temperatures (77-100 K). The resulting ion induced changes of the optical absorption as well as of the electrical conductivity could be determined on one and the same sample, which enables the variable range hopping (VRH) model to be tested under the assumption that the density of irradiation induced color centers is proportional to the electronic density of states contributing to the hopping conductivity. It is found that the data obtained at 300 K for He+ and Ar+ bombardment can be described within the VRH model by one common conductivity versus absorption curve, even though the effectiveness per projectile of the heavier ion for coloration as well as for increasing the conductivity is much higher. This is different at low temperatures. While the ion induced coloration is practically independent of the irradiation temperature for both projectiles, the effectiveness per projectile to enhance the conductivity is interchanged. This is attributed to the additional damage produced by the heavier ion at low temperatures resulting in strongly impeded hopping processes. Consistent with the VRH model, the temperature dependence of the conductivity of ion bombarded WO3 films follow the Mott "T-1/4" law, if the ion induced conductivity is not too high. For very high ion fluences clear deviations from the VRH model are observed for the conductivity versus absorption curves accompanied by a shift of the above power laws from T-1/4 towards T-1/2.

  6. Basal and maximal metabolic rates differ in their response to rapid temperature change among avian species.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Karine; Hallot, Fanny; Vézina, François

    2016-10-01

    In birds, acclimation and acclimatization to temperature are associated with changes in basal (BMR), summit (Msum) and maximal (MMR) metabolic rates but little is known about the rate at which species adjust their phenotype to short-term temperature variations. Our aims were (1) to determine the pattern of metabolic adjustments following a rapid temperature change, (2) to determine whether performance varies at similar rates during exposure to warm or cold environments, and (3) to determine if BMR, Msum and MMR change at comparable rates during thermal acclimation. We measured these parameters in white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis), black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), and snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis) after acclimation to 10 °C (day 0) and on the 4th and 8th days of acclimation to either -5 or 28 °C. Birds changed their metabolic phenotype within 8 days with patterns differing among species. Sparrows expressed the expected metabolic increases in the cold and decreases at thermoneutrality while performance in chickadees and buntings was not influenced by temperature but changed over time with inverse patterns. Our results suggest that BMR varies at comparable rates in warm and cold environments but changes faster than Msum and MMR, likely due to limitations in the rate of change in organ size and function. They also suggest that maximal metabolic capacity is lost faster in a warm environment than it is gained in a cold environment. With the expected increase in temperature stochasticity at northern latitudes, a loss of thermogenic capacity during warm winter days could, therefore, be detrimental if birds are slow to readjust their phenotype with the return of cold days.

  7. Difference analysis method for negative bias temperature instability lifetime prediction in deeply scaled pMOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yiming; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chengxu; Huang, Xiaolin; Xu, Yue; Yan, Feng

    2017-04-01

    The fluctuation significantly affects the lifetime prediction of negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) for deeply scaled pMOSFETs. In this paper, we present a novel difference method to separate the time dependent fluctuation-related component from the NBTI quasi-static component in the threshold voltage shift. The extracted fluctuation-related component exhibits weak temperature and time dependences which is consistent with the characteristic of as-grown defect-induced trapping and detrapping while the quasi-static component presents electrical behaviors of generated-defect-induced NBTI degradation. On the basis of these results, a composite NBTI model is constructed and lifetime projection is derived for the small pMOSFETs.

  8. Studies of Water Absorption Behavior of Plant Fibers at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Dip

    2010-05-01

    Moisture absorption of natural fiber plastic composites is one major concern in their outdoor applications. The absorbed moisture has many detrimental effects on the mechanical performance of these composites. A knowledge of the moisture diffusivity, permeability, and solubility is very much essential for the application of natural fibers as an excellent reinforcement in polymers. An effort has been made to study the water absorption behavior of some natural fibers such as bowstring hemp, okra, and betel nut at different temperatures to improve the long-term performance of composites reinforced with these fibers. The gain in moisture content in the fibers due to water absorption was measured as a function of exposure time at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 340 K. The thermodynamic parameters of the sorption process, such as diffusion coefficients and corresponding activation energies, were estimated.

  9. Properties of Cement-based Composite Materials under Different Storing Environment Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, T. L.; Weng, S. H.; Cho, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    This study reports on the properties of cement-based composite materials (mortars) under different storing environment temperature, as determined using the accelerated chloride migration test (ACMT). Mortars with a water/cement ratio of 0.45 and five fine aggregate volume fractions (0%, 15%, 30%, 50% and 60%) under various environment temperatures (25, 40, 60 and 80°C) were evaluated according to the passage of chloride ions through the specimens using ACMT. Calculate chloride migration coefficients on the steady-state. Cement-based composite materials with 60 % fine aggregate presented a migration coefficient higher than that of other specimens, whereas mortar with 30 % fine aggregate was lower, due to the effects of dilution and tortuosity.

  10. Hawking radiation as perceived by different observers: an analytic expression for the effective-temperature function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbado, L. C.; Barceló, C.; Garay, L. J.

    2012-04-01

    Given a field vacuum state in a black hole spacetime, this state can be analysed in terms of how it is perceived (in terms of particle content) by different observers. This can be done by means of the effective-temperature function introduced by Barceló et al (2011 Phys. Rev. D 83 041501). In Barbado et al (2011 Class. Quantum Grav. 28 125021), this function was analysed in a case-by-case basis for a number of interesting situations. In this work, we find a general analytic expression for the effective-temperature function which, apart from the vacuum state choice, depends on the position, the local velocity and the acceleration of the specific observer. We give a clear physical interpretation of the quantities appearing in the expression, and illustrate its potentiality with a few examples.

  11. Thermal Diffusivity for III-VI Semiconductor Melts at Different Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, H.; Li, C.; Lin, B.; Emoto, K.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The change of the thermal properties of semiconductor melts reflects the structural changes inside the melts, and a fundamental understanding of this structural transformation is essential for high quality semiconductor crystal growth process. This paper focused on the technical development and the measurement of thermal properties of III-VI semiconductor melts at high temperatures. Our previous work has improved the laser flash method for the specialized quartz sample cell. In this paper, we reported the results of our recent progress in further improvements of the measurement system by minimizing the free convection of the melt, adding a front IR detector, and placing the sample cell in a vacuum environment. The results for tellurium and selenium based compounds, some of which have never been reported in the literature, were obtained at different temperatures as a function of time. The data were compared with other measured thermophysical properties to shed light on the structural transformations of the melt.

  12. Investigation of temperature and aridity at different elevations of Mt. Ailao, SW China.

    PubMed

    You, Guangyong; Zhang, Yiping; Liu, Yuhong; Schaefer, Douglas; Gong, Hede; Gao, Jinbo; Lu, Zhiyun; Song, Qinghai; Zhao, Junbin; Wu, Chuansheng; Yu, Lei; Xie, Youneng

    2013-05-01

    Our current understanding is that plant species distribution in the subtropical mountain forests of Southwest China is controlled mainly by inadequate warmth. Due to abundant annual precipitation, aridity has been less considered in this context, yet rainfall here is highly seasonal, and the magnitude of drought severity at different elevations has not been examined due to limited access to higher elevations in this area.In this study, short-term micrometeorological variables were measured at 2,480 m and 2,680 m, where different forest types occur. Drought stress was evaluated by combining measurements of water evaporation demand (E p) and soil volumetric water content (VWC). The results showed that: (1) mean temperature decreased 1 °C from 2,480 m to 2,680 m and the minimum temperature at 2,680 m was above freezing. (2) Elevation had a significant influence on E p; however, the difference in daily E p between 2,480 m and 2,680 m was not significant, which was possibly due to the small difference in elevation between these two sites. (3) VWC had larger range of annual variation at 2,680 m than at 2,480 m, especially for the surface soil layer.We conclude that the decrease in temperature does not effectively explain the sharp transition between these forest types. During the dry season, plants growing at 2,680 m are likely to experience more drought stress. In seeking to understand the mountain forest distribution, further studies should consider the effects of drought stress alongside those of altitude.

  13. Mantle heterogeneity and temperatures inferred from magmas from different tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. H.

    2003-04-01

    In many earth models, Mid-Ocean Ridge magmatism is attributed to decompression melting of upwelling upper mantle/asthenosphere at normal mantle temperature. By contrast, upwelling of anomalously high temperature deep mantle plumes is invoked as the cause of "hot spots" (Hawaii, Iceland). The compositions of olivine phenocrysts in picritic magmas define both the coexisting magma composition and the temperature of crystallization. Olivine phenocrysts in Mid-Ocean Ridge tholeiitic picrites and in Hawaiian picrites range up to Mg#92.1 and Mg#91.3 respectively. The anhydrous liquidus temperatures (1 bar pressure) of N-MORB picrites average 1335^oC, of E-MORB picrites average 1355^oC and of Hawaiian picrites average 1365^oC. Correction of liquidus temperatures for dissolved volatiles leads to the conclusion that magma temperatures for all types were approximately 1325^oC implying mantle potential temperature Tp˜1430^oC. The evidence from magmatic temperatures and compositions is that the temperature contrast between the magmatic products of "hot spots" and mid-ocean ridges is <= 20^oC. The study of distinctive primitive magmas from back-arc basins (tholeiitic picrite) and island arcs (boninite, picritic ankaramite), using both the phenocryst phase of the magmas themselves, and experimental studies of picrites and peridotites demonstrate significant roles for volatiles (C-H-O fluids) and for addition of components from the subducted slab into the overlying mantle wedge. Mantle potential temperatures of Tp˜ 1430^oC are also appropriate for these settings. As well as demonstrating consistent mantle potential temperature in upwelling regions of different tectonic settings, the constraints from experimental studies of liquid/residue equilibria require mantle compositional heterogeneity in major elements and mineral phases. Refractory elements (Cr, Mg, Ni) and phase relationships (chromite-bearing harzburgite vs spinel-bearing lherzolite residues) provide signatures for

  14. NMR metabolomic analysis of exhaled breath condensate of asthmatic patients at two different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Motta, Andrea; Paris, Debora; D'Amato, Maria; Melck, Dominique; Calabrese, Cecilia; Vitale, Carolina; Stanziola, Anna A; Corso, Gaetano; Sofia, Matteo; Maniscalco, Mauro

    2014-12-05

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection is a noninvasive method to investigate lung diseases. EBC is usually collected with commercial/custom-made condensers, but the optimal condensing temperature is often unknown. As such, the physical and chemical properties of exhaled metabolites should be considered when setting the temperature, therefore requiring validation and standardization of the collecting procedure. EBC is frequently used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics, which unambiguously recognizes different pulmonary pathological states. Here we applied NMR-based metabolomics to asthmatic and healthy EBC samples collected with two commercial condensers operating at -27.3 and -4.8 °C. Thirty-five mild asthmatic patients and 35 healthy subjects were included in the study, while blind validation was obtained from 20 asthmatic and 20 healthy different subjects not included in the primary analysis. We initially analyzed the samples separately and assessed the within-day, between-day, and technical repeatabilities. Next, samples were interchanged, and, finally, all samples were analyzed together, disregarding the condensing temperature. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis of NMR spectra correctly classified samples, without any influence from the temperature. Input variables were either integral bucket areas (spectral bucketing) or metabolite concentrations (targeted profiling). We always obtained strong regression models (95%), with high average-quality parameters for spectral profiling (R(2) = 0.84 and Q(2) = 0.78) and targeted profiling (R(2) = 0.91 and Q(2) = 0.87). In particular, although targeted profiling clustering is better than spectral profiling, all models reproduced the relative metabolite variations responsible for class differentiation. This warrants that cross comparisons are reliable and that NMR-based metabolomics could attenuate some specific problems linked to standardization of EBC collection.

  15. The Statistical Differences Between the Gridded Temperature Datasets, and its Implications for Stochastic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksen, H. B.; Løvsletten, O.; Rypdal, M.; Rypdal, K.

    2014-12-01

    Several research groups around the world collect instrumental temperature data and combine them in different ways to obtain global gridded temperature fields. The three most well known datasets are HadCRUT4 produced by the Climatic Research Unit and the Met Office Hadley Centre in UK, one produced by NASA GISS, and one produced by NOAA. Recently Berkeley Earth has also developed a gridded dataset. All these four will be compared in our analysis. The statistical properties we will focus on are the standard deviation and the Hurst exponent. These two parameters are sufficient to describe the temperatures as long-range memory stochastic processes; the standard deviation describes the general fluctuation level, while the Hurst exponent relates the strength of the long-term variability to the strength of the short-term variability. A higher Hurst exponent means that the slow variations are stronger compared to the fast, and that the autocovariance function will have a stronger tail. Hence the Hurst exponent gives us information about the persistence or memory of the process. We make use of these data to show that data averaged over a larger area exhibit higher Hurst exponents and lower variance than data averaged over a smaller area, which provides information about the relationship between temporal and spatial correlations of the temperature fluctuations. Interpolation in space has some similarities with averaging over space, although interpolation is more weighted towards the measurement locations. We demonstrate that the degree of spatial interpolation used can explain some differences observed between the variances and memory exponents computed from the various datasets.

  16. Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, R

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C). Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Varioloink II (Ivoclar), Maxcem (Kerr), Nexus2 (Kerr) and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs); GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation), and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE). The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15) was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements produced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm. Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature. PMID:24724120

  17. Mass, phylogeny, and temperature are sufficient to explain differences in metabolic scaling across mammalian orders?

    PubMed

    Griebeler, Eva Maria; Werner, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Whether basal metabolic rate-body mass scaling relationships have a single exponent is highly discussed, and also the correct statistical model to establish relationships. Here, we aimed (1) to identify statistically best scaling models for 17 mammalian orders, Marsupialia, Eutheria and all mammals, and (2) thereby to prove whether correcting for differences in species' body temperature and their shared evolutionary history improves models and their biological interpretability. We used the large dataset from Sieg et al. (The American Naturalist174, 2009, 720) providing species' body mass (BM), basal metabolic rate (BMR) and body temperature (T). We applied different statistical approaches to identify the best scaling model for each taxon: ordinary least squares regression analysis (OLS) and phylogenetically informed analysis (PGLS), both without and with controlling for T. Under each approach, we tested linear equations (log-log-transformed data) estimating scaling exponents and normalization constants, and such with a variable normalization constant and a fixed exponent of either ⅔ or ¾, and also a curvature. Only under temperature correction, an additional variable coefficient modeled the influence of T on BMR. Except for Pholidata and Carnivora, in all taxa studied linear models were clearly supported over a curvature by AICc. They indicated no single exponent at the level of orders or at higher taxonomic levels. The majority of all best models corrected for phylogeny, whereas only half of them included T. When correcting for T, the mathematically expected correlation between the exponent (b) and the normalization constant (a) in the standard scaling model y = a x(b) was removed, but the normalization constant and temperature coefficient still correlated strongly. In six taxa, T and BM correlated positively or negatively. All this hampers a disentangling of the effect of BM, T and other factors on BMR, and an interpretation of linear BMR-BM scaling

  18. Temperature effect on the mechanical properties of gold nano films with different thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birleanu, C.; Pustan, M.; Merie, V.; Müller, R.; Voicu, R.; Baracu, A.; Craciun, S.

    2016-08-01

    The microelectronic industry has been growing rapidly over the past 10-20 years, as has its reliance on thin-film deposition techniques for components manufacturing. As modern devices generate quite a bit of heat and peak temperatures can reach over 100°C, there is a need to provide adequate cooling for a device to stay operable. A series of chrome gold films with various thicknesses were prepared on silicon substrate. The structural and surface morphology, adhesion, friction, Young's modulus and hardness of this thin film were studied for three different thicknesses under temperature variations between 20 to 100°C. The variation of the film thickness and temperature affects the structure, surface and mechanical properties of Cr/Au thin films. Obviously these thermal cycles are unavoidable and eventually lead to thermal fatigue damage and device failure. Consequently, the knowledge of mechanical properties of thin films at elevated temperatures is required for proper chip design and reliability assessments. Elastic modulus and hardness are two important mechanical properties of the thin-film structural materials used in microelectromechanical systems. The mechanical properties of electroplated chrome-gold thin film are found to be highly dependent on the manufacturing process and also of the thin film thickness. On the other hand it is important to find the effect of temperature on these properties. Investigated samples are made of thin layers of chromium and gold with differences in thickness. The three levels of nominal thicknesses of Au films are: 100, 300 and 500 nm. In order to obtain the relations between surface pattern/surface chemistry and nanotribological properties and adhesive behaviors of the films were evaluated