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Sample records for airbag deployment decision

  1. Missile launch pad: an unusual consequence of airbag deployment

    PubMed Central

    Ronnie, Davies; Emecheta, Ikechukwu E; Kevin, Hancock

    2011-01-01

    Vehicle airbags significantly reduce vehicle occupant injuries and fatalities in road accidents. However, a number of injuries are recognised as being directly attributable to airbag deployment. The majority of these are blunt injuries due to the high force of airbag deployment and include ocular injuries, burns, chest trauma and, rarely, fatalities. The authors describe a case of mixed blunt ocular and penetrating facial trauma as a result of airbag deployment. PMID:22707498

  2. Missile launch pad: an unusual consequence of airbag deployment.

    PubMed

    Ronnie, Davies; Emecheta, Ikechukwu E; Kevin, Hancock

    2011-02-17

    Vehicle airbags significantly reduce vehicle occupant injuries and fatalities in road accidents. However, a number of injuries are recognised as being directly attributable to airbag deployment. The majority of these are blunt injuries due to the high force of airbag deployment and include ocular injuries, burns, chest trauma and, rarely, fatalities. The authors describe a case of mixed blunt ocular and penetrating facial trauma as a result of airbag deployment.

  3. The effect of motor vehicle airbag deployment on tooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ashar, A; James, H; Higgins, D; Kaidonis, J; Anderson, R W G

    2009-12-01

    Motor vehicle airbag technology is directed at the reduction of injury to drivers and passengers however a number of researchers have reported cases of injuries caused by airbags. Injuries to tooth surfaces, particularly tooth wear following the deployment of motor vehicle airbags, have never been studied. A review of the literature and clinical experience does not suggest tooth enamel abrasion to be a likely outcome following airbag deployment. This in vitro pilot study was conducted to assess the effect on tooth surfaces following the deployment of motor vehicle airbags, and in particular to attempt to reproduce the injuries claimed in a case report published in the Journal of Forensic Odonto- Stomatology in December 2007. A sample of extracted upper anterior teeth (n = 20) were analyzed using unaided visual observation, photographic and microscopic observation pre- and post- airbag deployment. Teeth were mounted on a fabricated head form (similar to those used in crash test dummies) using dental putty. The tests were performed using a modified airbag test rig with airbags deployed in 5 different positions relative to the head, with respect to distance and angulations. The result of the tests showed no changes to the teeth with unaided observation, macro photography or under the microscope. Tooth wear patterns described in the case report were not observed. Although accurate reproduction of an in vivo situation is not possible, this study has given some insight into the effects of motor vehicle airbag deployment, and suggests that significant tooth wear is an unlikely outcome from airbag deployment.

  4. Retinal dialysis and detachment in a child after airbag deployment.

    PubMed

    Eliott, Dean; Hauch, Adam; Kim, Rubin W; Fawzi, Amani

    2011-04-01

    A variety of airbag-associated ocular injuries have been reported in children sitting in the front passenger seat during automobile collisions. These injuries range from corneal abrasions to traumatic hyphema with secondary glaucoma and cataract. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy who experienced retinal dialysis and detachment associated with airbag deployment. The patient recovered 20/20 visual acuity after cryopexy and placement of a radial sponge.

  5. Fetal intracranial injuries following motor vehicle accidents with airbag deployment.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroshi; Harada, Atsuko; Sato, Takashi; Kurabayashi, Takumi

    2014-02-01

    The effects of airbag deployment in motor vehicle accidents (MVA) on the fetus are poorly understood. A 22-year-old woman at 24 weeks of gestation collided with a telephone pole while driving. She was restrained and an airbag deployed. Although she had no major injuries, she experienced decreased fetal movements. Fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring revealed loss of variability without any evidence of abruptio placentae, and 4 days later, the variability spontaneously recovered. Two weeks after the MVA, ultrasonography showed unilateral ventricular dilatation suggestive of fetal brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed subdural hematoma, intraventricular hemorrhage and cystic lesions, interpreted as indirect (hypoxic-ischemic) and direct (hemorrhagic) intracranial injuries. After MVA with airbag deployment, FHR monitoring can show a transient loss of variability, which may precede the appearance of fetal brain injury.

  6. Lateral impact injuries with side airbag deployments--a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Zhang, Jiangyue; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to provide descriptive data on side impact injuries in vehicles equipped with side airbags using the United States National Automotive Sampling System (NASS). The database was queried with the constraint that all vehicles must adhere to the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards FMVSS 214, injured occupants be in the front outboard seats with no rollovers or ejections, and side impacts airbags be deployed in lateral crashes. Out of the 7812 crashes in the 1997-2004 weighted NASS files, AIS > or = 2 level injuries occurred to 5071 occupants. There were 3828 cases of torso-only airbags, 955 cases of torso-head bag combination, and 288 inflatable tubular structure/curtain systems. Side airbags were not attributed to be the cause of head or chest injury to any occupant at this level of severity. The predominance of torso-only airbags followed by torso-head airbag combination reflected vehicle model years and changing technology. Head and chest injuries were coupled for the vast majority of occupants with injuries to more than one body region. Comparing literature data for side impacts without side airbag deployments, the presence of a side airbag decreased AIS=2 head, chest, and extremity injuries when examining raw data incidence rates. Although this is the first study to adopt strict inclusion-exclusion criteria for side crashes with side airbag deployments, future studies are needed to assess side airbag efficacy using datasets such as matched-pair occupants in side impacts.

  7. Minimizing the injury potential of deploying airbag interactions with car occupants.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Harold J; Prasad, Priya; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2013-11-01

    Minimizing the injury potential of the interactions between deploying airbags and car occupants is the major issue with the design of airbag systems. This concern was identified in 1964 by Carl Clark when he presented the results of human volunteer and dummy testing of the "Airstop" system that was being developed for aircraft. The following is a chronological summary of the actions taken by the car manufacturers, airbag suppliers, SAE and ISO task groups, research institutes and universities, and consumer and government groups to address this issue.

  8. Touch DNA of shed skin cells from the deployed airbag to address drunken driving crimes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Sun, Hong-bin; Luo, Ji-huai; Wei, Shu-guang; Li, Sheng-bin

    2014-08-01

    In the criminal cases of driving under the influence (DUI), DNA evidence can be collected from the deployed airbag of the motor vehicle and submitted to the crime lab for touch DNA analysis. The evidence can be acquired when the skin cells are observed on the surface of the airbag in a traffic accident. However, the low quantity or quality of the evidence collected from a crime scene prevents further identification analysis in many cases. In the current study, we reported a case of identifying touch DNA extraction from the shed skin cells from the deployed airbag of a motor vehicle. We managed to collect DNA evidence from the shed skin cells in an airbag using a proper approach of collection and extraction. The 5.87 ng of extracted DNA was sufficient for genotyping and forensic identification, which helped to identify the driver of the car in collision with a pier in the street. In DUI cases and other traffic accidents, therefore, the amount of touch DNA extracted from the deployed airbag can be sufficient for DNA marker genotyping and further analysis.

  9. Investigating the effects of side airbag deployment in real-world crashes using crash comparison techniques.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Kathryn L; Weaver, Ashley A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate side airbag (SAB) deployment in near side crashes and compare injuries and contact points between occupants with and without SAB deployment. Using NASS 2000-2008 and selecting for near side cases, with PDOF ± 20 degrees from 90 or 270, for non-pregnant adult belted occupants, there were 20,253 (weighted) SAB deployments. NASS showed that SABs have been increasing within the fleet, comprising 2% of airbags in 2000 and increasing to 33% of airbags in 2008. To investigate deployed SABs, we developed a three-step methology to pair CIREN cases to study the effects of deployment on occupant outcome. The first step involved extracting near side impacts from CIREN with adult, non-pregnant occupants seated in row 1 (drivers or right front passengers). In the second step, each case was quantitatively compared to FMVSS 214 barrier test standards using a 6 point similarity scoring system. Cases scoring at least 3 points were then qualitatively analyzed and 33 pairs of cases of the same vehicle make/model but opposite SAB status were chosen. Occupants with deployed SAB had reduced occurrences and severity of head and face, neck and cervical spine, and thoracic injuries and fewer injurious contacts to side components including the door, a-pillar, and window sill. SAB deployment was statistically significant for reducing occupant MAIS and ISS and thorax airbags were statistically significant for reducing thoracic and neck/cervical spine injury severity. The average ISS with SAB deployment was 21, while the average ISS of those without was 33. This study establishes methods for performing comparisons between CIREN cases based on regulatory conditions and shows injury reduction in key body regions with SAB deployment.

  10. Packing and deploying Soft Origami to and from cylindrical volumes with application to automotive airbags.

    PubMed

    Bruton, Jared T; Nelson, Todd G; Zimmerman, Trent K; Fernelius, Janette D; Magleby, Spencer P; Howell, Larry L

    2016-09-01

    Packing soft-sheet materials of approximately zero bending stiffness using Soft Origami (origami patterns applied to soft-sheet materials) into cylindrical volumes and their deployment via mechanisms or internal pressure (inflation) is of interest in fields including automobile airbags, deployable heart stents, inflatable space habitats, and dirigible and parachute packing. This paper explores twofold patterns, the 'flasher' and the 'inverted-cone fold', for packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. Two initial packing methods and mechanisms are examined for each of the flasher and inverted-cone fold patterns. An application to driver's side automobile airbags is performed, and deployment tests are completed to compare the influence of packing method and origami pattern on deployment performance. Following deployment tests, two additional packing methods for the inverted-cone fold pattern are explored and applied to automobile airbags. It is shown that modifying the packing method (using different methods to impose the same base pattern on the soft-sheet material) can lead to different deployment performance. In total, two origami patterns and six packing methods are examined, and the benefits of using Soft Origami patterns and packing methods are discussed. Soft Origami is presented as a viable method for efficiently packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes.

  11. Packing and deploying Soft Origami to and from cylindrical volumes with application to automotive airbags

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Todd G.; Zimmerman, Trent K.; Fernelius, Janette D.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Packing soft-sheet materials of approximately zero bending stiffness using Soft Origami (origami patterns applied to soft-sheet materials) into cylindrical volumes and their deployment via mechanisms or internal pressure (inflation) is of interest in fields including automobile airbags, deployable heart stents, inflatable space habitats, and dirigible and parachute packing. This paper explores twofold patterns, the ‘flasher’ and the ‘inverted-cone fold’, for packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. Two initial packing methods and mechanisms are examined for each of the flasher and inverted-cone fold patterns. An application to driver’s side automobile airbags is performed, and deployment tests are completed to compare the influence of packing method and origami pattern on deployment performance. Following deployment tests, two additional packing methods for the inverted-cone fold pattern are explored and applied to automobile airbags. It is shown that modifying the packing method (using different methods to impose the same base pattern on the soft-sheet material) can lead to different deployment performance. In total, two origami patterns and six packing methods are examined, and the benefits of using Soft Origami patterns and packing methods are discussed. Soft Origami is presented as a viable method for efficiently packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. PMID:27703707

  12. Packing and deploying Soft Origami to and from cylindrical volumes with application to automotive airbags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruton, Jared T.; Nelson, Todd G.; Zimmerman, Trent K.; Fernelius, Janette D.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.

    2016-09-01

    Packing soft-sheet materials of approximately zero bending stiffness using Soft Origami (origami patterns applied to soft-sheet materials) into cylindrical volumes and their deployment via mechanisms or internal pressure (inflation) is of interest in fields including automobile airbags, deployable heart stents, inflatable space habitats, and dirigible and parachute packing. This paper explores twofold patterns, the `flasher' and the `inverted-cone fold', for packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. Two initial packing methods and mechanisms are examined for each of the flasher and inverted-cone fold patterns. An application to driver's side automobile airbags is performed, and deployment tests are completed to compare the influence of packing method and origami pattern on deployment performance. Following deployment tests, two additional packing methods for the inverted-cone fold pattern are explored and applied to automobile airbags. It is shown that modifying the packing method (using different methods to impose the same base pattern on the soft-sheet material) can lead to different deployment performance. In total, two origami patterns and six packing methods are examined, and the benefits of using Soft Origami patterns and packing methods are discussed. Soft Origami is presented as a viable method for efficiently packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes.

  13. Investigating occupant safety through simulating the interaction between side curtain airbag deployment and an out-of-position occupant.

    PubMed

    Potula, S R; Solanki, K N; Oglesby, D L; Tschopp, M A; Bhatia, M A

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the effect of side curtain airbag deployment on occupant injuries and safety when the occupant is either in-position or out-of-position (OOP). We used side impact vehicle collision simulations with a 1996 Dodge Neon model, which was further modified to include a side curtain airbag, a seatbelt, and a 50th percentile Hybrid III dummy. The airbag used in the study was inflated using both the uniform pressure (UP) and smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods. In-position and OOP simulations were performed to assess and establish guidelines for airbag aggressivity thresholds and occupant position versus risk of injury. Three different OOP scenarios (OOP1, OOP2, OOP3) were initially setup following the work of Lund (2003), then modified such that the dummy's head was closer to the airbag, increasing the chance of injury caused by the airbag. The resultant head acceleration as a function of time for in-position and OOP simulations shows that both UP and SPH methods produce similar peak accelerations in cases where the airbag is fully inflated prior to impact. In all cases, the head peak accelerations and the head injury criteria for simulations with an airbag were significantly lower when compared with the no airbag case, which would typically indicate that the use of an airbag results in improved occupant protection during side impact. However, in the case of OOP2 and OOP3, the neck flexion forces actually increase significantly when compared with the no airbag case. This finding indicates that the HIC and neck flexion forces criterion are in conflict and that there may be a tradeoff in terms of occupant injury/safety with a side curtain airbag that is strongly correlated to the occupant position. Consequently, this study shows that safety devices result in a significant effect on occupant injury/safety when the occupant is in OOP conditions. Moreover, in some cases, simulation results show that the side curtain airbag

  14. Analysis of particles produced during airbag deployment by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and their deposition on surrounding surfaces: a mid-research summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, J. Matney

    2011-06-01

    Airbags can be encountered in forensic work when investigating a car crash and are typically constructed with primerlike material to begin the deployment apparatus. The mechanisms of airbag deployment can produce particles ideal for scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis. A recent study published by Berk studied airbags with vents and showed that it is possible for particles generated from the deployment of these airbags to deposit on surfaces in the vehicle as the airbags deflate.1 Another paper published by Berk reported particles similar in morphology and composition to primer gunshot residue (GSR) are produced by side impact airbags.2 This paper's aim will be to show mid-point results of a study still in progress in which non-vented airbags were analyzed to determine if they exhibited the same particle depositing features as their vented airbag counterparts. Further investigation in this study is being performed to find more airbags which produce primer gunshot residue-like particles containing lead, barium, and antimony from airbag deployment. To date, the study has resulted in (1) non-vented airbags exhibiting deposition of particles suitable for SEM/EDS analysis and (2) no gunshot residue-like particles being detected from the airbag residues studied thus far.

  15. Real-world personal conversations using a hands-free embedded wireless device while driving: effect on airbag-deployment crash rates.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard A; Schreiner, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    A wireless device embedded in the vehicle allowed the user to engage in a personal hands-free conversation (HFC), and automatically placed an emergency notification call to an OnStar call center if the vehicle was involved in a crash in which its airbag deployed. A database stored the exact counts, start timestamps, and billed durations of all HFC and airbag notification calls. In 30 months of naturalistic driving, there were 91 million HFC calls from an average of 323,994 drivers per month who made calls. There were 14 airbag deployments in 276 million driver-minutes of HFC conversation for an exposed incidence rate of 5.08 airbag crashes per 100 million driver-minutes. There were 2,023 airbag deployments in an estimated 24.7 billion driver-minutes of no HFC conversation for a not-exposed incidence rate of 8.18 airbag crashes per 100 million driver-minutes. The crash incidence rate ratio (IRR) is the ratio of these two rates or 0.62 (95% C.I. 0.37 to 1.05). Sensitivity analyses controlled for the impact on the crash IRR of estimated time spent driving per day and calls by passengers. Counting all crashes as much as 20 minutes later than a call as related to that call gave similar results. We conclude that for personal conversations using a hands-free embedded device the risk of an airbag crash is somewhere in a range from a moderately lower risk to a risk near that of driving without a recent personal conversation. These results are not consistent with the large increase in crash risk reported in epidemiological studies using the case-crossover method.

  16. Occipital condyle fracture: an unusual airbag injury.

    PubMed

    Zaglia, Elisabetta; De Leo, Domenico; Lanzara, Guido; Urbani, Urbano; Dolci, Marco

    2007-05-01

    The installation of airbags in motor vehicles, in association with the use of seat belts, has reduced the incidence of head injuries, as well as significantly decreasing morbidity and mortality in motor vehicle accidents. Nevertheless, the literature on the subject increasingly refers to lesions related to airbag deployment. These are usually minor, but in certain circumstances, severe and fatal injuries can result. This is a case report of serious injury due to airbag deployment, involving a restrained driver who suffered occipital condylar injury when his airbag deployed in a frontal collision. The range of airbag associated injuries is reported and predisposing factors, such as the probable proximity to the airbag housing, is discussed.

  17. Airbag retraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows that the Mars Pathfinder airbags have been successfully retracted, allowing safe deployment of the rover ramps. The Sojourner rover, still in its deployed position, is at center image, and rocks are visible in the background. Mars Pathfinder landed successfully on the surface of Mars today at 10:07 a.m. PDT.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  18. Sternal fracture due to airbag injury: case report.

    PubMed

    Kapisiz, Nazmiye Selçuk; Ozpolat, Berkant; Kapisiz, Fahri; Yücel, Ertan

    2010-03-01

    Although airbags reduce the overall risk of injury and death from motor vehicle accidents, the airbag may cause injuries during deployment. We present a case of apparently isolated sternal fracture caused by airbag deployment during a motor vehicle crash and we discuss the ultrasonographic diagnosis. We also examine the mechanism of injury caused by the airbag.

  19. Airbag Trails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This segment of the first color image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rover's airbag trails. These depressions in the soil were made when the airbags were deflated and retracted after landing.

  20. Airbag retraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows that the Mars Pathfinder airbags have been successfully retracted, allowing safe deployment of the rover ramps. The Sojourner rover is at lower right, and rocks are visible in the background. Mars Pathfinder landed successfully on the surface of Mars today at 10:07 a.m. PDT.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  1. Upper extremity interaction with a deploying side airbag: a characterization of elbow joint loading.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Boggess, Brian M; Crandall, Jeff R; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Seki, Kazuhiro; Aoki, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    Computer simulations, dummy experiments with a new enhanced upper extremity and small female cadaver experiments were used to analyze the small female upper extremity response under side airbag loading. After establishing a worst case initial position, three tests were performed with the fifth percentile female hybrid III anthropometric test dummy and six experiments with small female cadaver subjects. A new fifth percentile female enhanced upper extremity was developed for the dummy experiments that included a two-axis wrist load cell in addition to the existing six-axis load cells in both the forearm and humerus. Forearm pronation was also included in the new dummy upper extremity to increase the biofidelity of the interaction with the handgrip. Instrumentation for both the cadaver and dummy tests included accelerometers and MHD angular rate sensors on the forearm, humerus, upper and lower spine. In order to quantify the applied loads to the cadaver hand and wrist from the door mounted handgrip, the handgrip was mounted to the door through a five-axis load cell and instrumented with accelerometers for inertial compensation. All six of the cadaver tests resulted in upper extremity injuries including comminuted mid-shaft humerus fractures, osteochondral fractures of the elbow joint surfaces, a transverse fracture of the distal radius and an osteochondral fracture of the lunate carpal bone. The results from the 6 cadaver tests presented in this study were combined with the results from 12 previous cadaver tests. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the correlation between observed injuries and measured occupant response. Using inertially compensated force measurements from the dummy mid-shaft forearm load cell, the linear combination of elbow axial force and shear force was significantly (P=0.05) correlated to the observed elbow injuries.

  2. Rethinking airbag safety: airbag injury causing bilateral blindness.

    PubMed

    Ogun, Olufunmilola Abimbola; Ikyaa, Sewuese Yangi; Ogun, Gabriel Olabiyi

    2014-01-01

    A healthy 40-year-old man, restrained in the front passenger seat, suffered visually disabling blunt ocular trauma following spontaneous release of the passenger side air-bag module, during vehicular deceleration, without an automobile crash. Though the driver-side airbag was also released, the driver was unharmed. The passenger suffered bilateral hyphema, bilateral vitreous hemorrhage and suspected posterior scleral rupture in the left eye and also had an eyebrow laceration, from impact with the dashboard panel covering the air-bag module, which was detached by the force of airbag deployment. This is the first reported case from West Africa and the first case in which part of the airbag module detached to cause additional trauma. This report adds to the growing burden of evidence world-wide, for a review of the safety aspects of the automobile airbag. This case clearly illustrates that although airbags reduce mortality, they carry a high risk of ocular morbidity, even with seat belt restraint.

  3. A case of severe airbag related ocular alkali injury.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Shawn S; Wong, William; Affeldt, John C

    2012-08-01

    While airbags have saved many lives and are clearly beneficial overall, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) powder produced by the inflation reaction can cause significant alkali ocular injury if not irrigated promptly. Here we report a case of severe airbag related ocular alkali injury as a way to bring attention to the need for prompt ocular irrigation following motor vehicle accidents (MVA) with airbag deployment. A 47-year-old man was involved in a MVA with airbag deployment in a rural setting. Attention was paid to several other life-threatening traumatic injuries, however, ocular irrigation was not performed until some 6-7 hours after the MVA. Over the course of 6 months, airbag related alkali injury caused severe limbal ischemia, conjunctivalization of the cornea, corneal epithelial defects, cicatricial scarring, haze, and corneal/limbal vascularization despite amniotic membrane graft. Awareness of the importance of ocular irrigation following airbag deployment must be raised both in the ophthalmology and emergency medicine communities.

  4. Investigation into the Noise Associated with Airbag Deployment: Part III – Sound Pressure Level and Auditory Risk as a Function of Inflatable Device

    PubMed Central

    Banglmaier, R.F.; Rouhana, S.W.

    2003-01-01

    Several criteria for assessing noise-induced hearing loss from automotive inflatable devices, such as airbags, were proposed in the past. However, their development was based on epidemiological studies of steady state noise and not impulsive noise. More recently, the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) developed and validated a mathematical model of the ear, which may be used to assess noise induced hearing loss from impulsive noise sources. Previous studies have contributed to understanding the effects of impulse noise on occupants, but were performed on first generation frontal airbags and did not provide information on airbag and occupant safety systems in today’s fleet of vehicles. This study presents the results of a parametric investigation of current inflatable devices across a variety of vehicles and considers the size and seating location of the occupant in vehicles of varying volume. In addition, the study considers advanced airbag technologies such as dual stage frontal airbags, side airbags, inflatable curtains, and seat belt pretensioners. PMID:12941213

  5. Finite element analysis of occupant head injuries: parametric effects of the side curtain airbag deployment interaction with a dummy head in a side impact crash.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xingqiao; Potula, S; Grewal, H; Solanki, K N; Tschopp, M A; Horstemeyer, M F

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we investigated and assessed the dependence of dummy head injury mitigation on the side curtain airbag and occupant distance under a side impact of a Dodge Neon. Full-scale finite element vehicle simulations of a Dodge Neon with a side curtain airbag were performed to simulate the side impact. Owing to the wide range of parameters, an optimal matrix of finite element calculations was generated using the design method of experiments (DOE); the DOE method was performed to independently screen the finite element results and yield the desired parametric influences as outputs. Also, analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques were used to analyze the finite element results data. The results clearly show that the influence of moving deformable barrier (MDB) strike velocity was the strongest influence parameter on both cases for the head injury criteria (HIC36) and the peak head acceleration, followed by the initial airbag inlet temperature. Interestingly, the initial airbag inlet temperature was only a ~30% smaller influence than the MDB velocity; also, the trigger time was a ~54% smaller influence than the MDB velocity when considering the peak head accelerations. Considering the wide range in MDB velocities used in this study, results of the study present an opportunity for design optimization using the different parameters to help mitigate occupant injury. As such, the initial airbag inlet temperature, the trigger time, and the airbag pressure should be incorporated into vehicular design process when optimizing for the head injury criteria.

  6. [An unusual case of fatal airbag injury].

    PubMed

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Hikiji, Wakako; Kudo, Keiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2008-11-01

    We report an unusual case of fatal airbag injury. A woman in her forties was driving a light car when it was involved in an accident. When the car was found, the left front wheel had dropped into the gutter, the front bumper was dented and the airbag had deployed. Forensic autopsy revealed that the right subclavian artery and the left vertebral artery were ruptured and 1,570 ml and 360 ml of blood with clots were observed in the left and the right thoracic cavity, respectively. It was considered that the unusual collision produced by deployment of the airbag had caused these ruptures and massive hemorrhaging. Although an airbag is an effective tool for ensuring the safety of a driver and the passengers, it may injure and occasionally kill the occupants if they do not remain in the appropriate and restrained seating position.

  7. Airbag-induced chemical eye injury.

    PubMed

    Subash, Malavika; Manzouri, Bita; Wilkins, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Chemical injuries of the eye are a rare complication of airbag deployment and result from seepage of the chemical, causing inflation through vents in the airbag. We describe a severe case of bilateral alkali eye injury upon airbag contact in a road traffic accident. Delayed recognition and irrigation of the eyes exacerbated the injury with a resultant poor healing response of the left eye. Consequently, a left amniotic membrane graft was performed to promote corneal epithelial healing. The use of an amniotic membrane graft in the acute period after a chemical keratitis is unusual and reflects the severity of the corneal injuries sustained by this patient. This case illustrates the vision-threatening risk of alkali keratitis secondary to airbag deployment and highlights the importance of early recognition and management.

  8. Airbag system and method for facilitating emergency egress from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Blaine K. (Inventor); Hawley, Arthur V. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An airbag system for elevating the fuselage of an aircraft off a landing surface a sufficient degree to allow for emergency egress of passengers and crew through ventral emergency exit doors. An airbag assembly made up of a plurality of independent airbags is disposed within the aircraft. When activated, the airbag system deploys the airbags external of the aircraft that elevate the fuselage of the aircraft a sufficient degree to allow for utilizing the ventral emergency exit doors on the fuselage to enable evacuating the passengers and crew. An activation mechanism is connected to the inflation.devices associated with each of the airbags. The activation mechanism generates an electrical signal which activates the inflation devices, which in turn fill the airbags with a compressed fluid, thus expanding the airbags and lifting the fuselage. A crew member initiates the activation of the airbag system through one or more switches.

  9. Airbag-Systeme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Florian

    Heutige Pkw sind zum Schutz der Insassen bei Frontalkollisionen zu etwa 90 % fahrerseitig und zu ca. 70 % auf der Beifahrerseite mit Airbags ausgestattet, während die Seiten-Airbags zum Schutz des Kopfes und des Thorax von Insassen bei Seitenkollisionen nur mit ungefähr 40 bis 50% vertreten sind [1]. Weitere Schutzmaßnahmen wie Fuß- und Fond-Airbags befinden sich im Entwicklungsstadium, ihr Einsatz in der Serie ist umstritten und wird sich, wenn überhaupt, nur in Einzelfällen durchsetzen. In Bild C3-1 sind Airbags dargestellt, die heute serienmäßig in Pkw anzutreffen sind.

  10. Airbag Seams Leave Trails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows where the rover's airbag seams left impressions in the martian soil. The drag marks were made after the rover successfully landed at Meridiani Planum and its airbags were retracted. The rover can be seen in the foreground.

  11. Airbag Impressions in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows where the rover's airbags left impressions in the martian soil. The drag marks were made after the rover successfully landed at Meridiani Planum and its airbags were retracted. The rover can be seen in the foreground.

  12. Airbag Trails-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This segment of the first color image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rover's airbag trails (upper left). These depressions in the soil were made when the airbags were deflated and retracted after landing.

  13. Characterization of torso side airbag aggressivity - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Jason J; Yoganandan, Narayan A; Pintar, Frank A

    2009-01-01

    Torso side airbags are typically seat- or door-mounted; i.e., mounted within the seat back or within the door panel lateral to the occupant. Because previous work has shown the propensity of airbags to cause harm in unintended out-of-position occupant orientations, scientific investigation of injury risks continues. Such work involves anthropomorphic test devices and cadaveric specimens which have time and monetary costs associated with their use. These costs necessitate experimental efficiency, achieved by selecting representative airbags from the multitude of options in contemporary automobiles. This study proposes a novel method for characterizing torso side airbag deployment aggressivity for purposes of selection. The test fixture consisted of an array of rigidly positioned three-axis load cells oriented in opposition to a rigid airbag mount at fixed distances of 6 or 8 cm. Six exemplar torso airbag modules were subjected to these two deployment configurations. Force characteristics of maximum resultant force, peak and mean force onset rate, and linear impulse were quantified for comparison. Force characteristics demonstrated ranges between 210% (linear impulse) and 2,500% (mean force onset rate) of minimum value. This test method demonstrated differentiation in the diversity of SAB designs and quantified the airbagenvironment interaction during deployment. These force characteristics may correlate to thoracic injury risk from out-of position torso side airbag deployment.

  14. Door velocity and occupant distance affect lateral thoracic injury mitigation with side airbag.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Jason J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between thoracic injury risk and parameters of door velocity and occupant distance was delineated in blunt lateral impact with side airbag deployment. A sled impact model was exercised with the validated MADYMO fiftieth percentile facet occupant model and a generalized finite element torso side airbag. Impact velocity was incremented from 4.0 to 9.0m/s; occupant-airbag distance (at time of airbag activation) was incremented from 2.0 to 24.0 cm; simulations without airbag were also examined. Using compression, deflection rate, and the Viscous Criterion, airbag performance was characterized with respect to occupant injury risk at three points of interest: occupant distance of most protection, distance of greatest injury risk, and the newly defined critical distance. The occupant distance which demonstrated the most airbag protection, i.e., lowest injury risk, increased with increasing impact velocity. Greatest injury risk resulted when the occupant was nearest the airbag regardless of impact velocity. The critical distance was defined as the farthest distance at which airbag deployment exacerbated injury risk. This critical distance only varied considering chest compression, between 3 and 10 cm from the airbag, but did not vary when the Viscous Criterion was evaluated. At impact velocities less than or equal to 6m/s, the most protective occupant location was within 2 cm of the critical distance at which the airbag became harmful. Therefore, injury mitigation with torso airbag may be more difficult to achieve at lower ΔV.

  15. Airbag Deflates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, shows the airbags used to protect the rover during landing. One bright, dust-covered bag is slightly puffed up against the lander.

  16. Tracks 'Seam' Like Airbags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Bearing a striking resemblance to a cluster of paper lanterns, these inflated airbags show a pattern of seams exactly like those left in the martian soil by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during landing at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken during airbag testing at NASA's Plum Brook Station, located about 50 miles west of Cleveland in Sandusky, Ohio and operated by NASA's Glenn Research Center.

  17. Analysis-test correlation of airbag impact for Mars landing

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.; Davis, G.; Kuo, C.P.

    1994-12-31

    The NASA Mars Pathfinder mission is intended to demonstrate key low cost technologies for use in future science missions to Mars. Among these technologies is the landing system. Upon entering in Martian atmosphere at about 7000 m/sec., the spacecraft will deploy a series of breaking devices (parachute and solid rockets) to slow down its speed to less than 20 m/sec. as it impacts with the Martian ground. To cushion science instruments form the landing impact, an airbag system is inflated to surround the lander approximately five seconds before impact. After multiple bounces, the lander/airbags comes to rest, the airbags are deflated and retracted, and the lander opens up its petals to allow a microrover to begin exploration. Of interest here, is the final landing phase. Specifically, this paper will focus on the methodology used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of lander/airbags landing impact, and how this simulation correlates with initial tests.

  18. Rover, airbags, & surrounding rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the Martian surface was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) before sunset on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on Mars. The airbags have been partially retracted, and portions the petal holding the undeployed rover Sojourner can be seen at lower left. The rock in the center of the image may be a future target for chemical analysis. The soil in the foreground has been disturbed by the movement of the airbags as they retracted.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  19. Evaluation of vehicle side airbag effectiveness in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Angelo; Newstead, Stuart; Scully, Jim

    2013-05-01

    Side airbag systems were first introduced into vehicles around 1995 to help protect occupants from injury in side impact crashes. International studies have shown that side airbags are effective in reducing the risk of death and injury, however, serious injuries can still occur even when side airbags deploy. The objective of this study was to use detailed injury information from insurance injury compensation claims data linked to Police reported crash data to determine the effectiveness of side airbags in reducing the risk of death or injury for occupants involved in side impact crashes in Victoria, Australia based on the specific body regions that side airbag systems are designed to protect. It was found that head and torso-protecting dual airbag systems designed to protect the head, neck, face, chest and abdomen are highly effective in reducing driver death or injury due to near side crashes. They were associated with a statistically significant reduction of 41.1% (25.9%, 53.2%) in the odds of death or injury across all body regions; and a 48.0% (28.0%, 62.4%) reduction in the odds of death or injury to the head, neck, face, chest and abdomen. The study did not find any evidence that torso-protecting airbags alone are effective in reducing death or injury. Analysis results indicate that head and torso-protecting side airbag systems in vehicles are a highly effective technology for reducing the risk of death or injury to vehicle occupants in near side crashes. The magnitude of the injury reduction benefits estimated indicate that fitment of this technology to all vehicles should be a high priority and will yield significant savings in overall road trauma.

  20. Airbag vent valve and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Leslie D. (Inventor); Zimmermann, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An energy absorbing airbag system includes one or more vent valve assemblies for controlling the release of airbag inflation gases to maintain inflation gas pressure within an airbag at a substantially constant pressure during a ride-down of an energy absorbing event. Each vent valve assembly includes a cantilever spring that is flat in an unstressed condition and that has a free end portion. The cantilever spring is secured to an exterior surface of the airbag housing and flexed to cause the second free end portion of the cantilever spring to be pressed, with a preset force, against a vent port or a closure covering the vent port to seal the vent port until inflation gas pressure within the airbag reaches a preselected value determined by the preset force whereupon the free end portion of the cantilever spring is lifted from the vent port by the inflation gases within the airbag to vent the inflation gases from within the airbag. The resilience of the cantilever spring maintains a substantially constant pressure within the airbag during a ride-down portion of an energy absorbing event by causing the cantilever spring to vent gases through the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases reaches the preselected value and by causing the cantilever spring to close the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases falls below the preselected value.

  1. An experimental study of airbag impact to the orbit using an instrumented Hybrid III headform.

    PubMed

    Duma, S M; Kress, T A; Porta, D J; Martin, P G; Simmons, R J; Alexander, C L

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides the results from an experimental study intended to assess airbag impact to the orbit. Twenty-seven airbags were deployed onto an instrumented Hybrid III headform. Seven different types of airbags were used that included tethered and nontethered, light to heavy nylon weaves, and different coating types. The airbags were deployed via a pneumatic deployment system. Seven individual force transducers, each having a 2.25 cm2 contact area, were placed on the right orbital region to evaluate the force patterns. The midpoint of the two ocular regions of the headform was positioned 12.5 cm above and 15.0 cm away from the center of the airbag, a position determined from previous airbag deployments to yield the highest leading edge velocity. The average maximum force per sensor ranged from 15.4 N to 63.6 N, and peak pressure ranged from 68 kPa to 282 kPa. The upper center of the orbit presented the highest values while the center of the orbit recorded the lowest values, a comparison that was proven to be statistically significant. For this configuration, the maximum force on the ocular region was found to be independent of the presence of a tether or the maximum internal airbag pressure.

  2. a Design of the Driver Airbag Module with Floating Horn Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Chang-Min; Lee, Young-Hoon; Suh, Duck-Young

    The driver airbag system is designed as a supplemental restraint system in addition to the seatbelt, and is designed to protect the driver's head and chest against severe injury by a device that is actuated in case of vehicle's fronted impact. Deployment of an airbag module with floating horn assembly is a highly dynamic process. The concept of driver airbag module with floating horn assembly and aluminum emblem is presented as a useful parameter when the airbag deploys and the energy is evaluated as performance factor in airbag module. Floating horn assembly is also one of the major factors for driver airbag module design to perform its horn function and check the package between driver airbag module and steering wheel. This study on the design of driver airbag module with floating horn assembly proved the feasibility as a new safety device. However, the system level study is needed for decrease of passenger injury. This study can be used for the implementation of a prototype of DABM with floating horn device.

  3. Airbag Tracks on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The circular shapes seen on the martian surface in these images are 'footprints' left by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's airbags during landing as the spacecraft gently rolled to a stop. Opportunity landed at approximately 9:05 p.m. PST on Saturday, Jan. 24, 2004, Earth-received time. The circular region of the flower-like feature on the right is about the size of a basketball. Scientists are studying the prints for more clues about the makeup of martian soil. The images were taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars, by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

  4. Soil disturbance by airbags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Disturbance of the drift at the Pathfinder landing site reveals a shallow subsurface that is slightly darker but has similar spectral properties. The top set of images, in true color, shows the soils disturbed by the last bounce of the lander on its airbags before coming to rest and the marks created by retraction of the airbags. In the bottom set of images color differences have been enhanced. The mast at center is the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET). The ASI/MET is an engineering subsytem that acquired atmospheric data during Pathfinder's descent, and will continue to get more data through the entire landed mission. A shadow of the ASI/MET appears on a rock at left.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  5. Next-generation airbags and the possibility of negative outcomes due to thoracic injury.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Rami N; Al-Mawed, Saleem; Farah, Victor; Mizeracki, Adam

    2014-04-01

    Airbags have been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with motor vehicle accidents when used in conjunction with seat belts. Airbag deployment alone however, has recently been implicated as a cause of significant thoracic injuries to unrestrained drivers. Resulting injuries include major cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. Airbags provide safety to occupants of cars and reduce mortality by 25%-30%. When not used in accordance with international standards, however, they can cause serious injury. We searched online databases from 1970 to January 2013 and included 17 retrospective studies, 12 systematic review articles, 18 case reports, 5 prospective studies, 1 lab study, 3 cohort studies, and 1 meta-analysis. Outcomes included clinical/functional response, left ventricular remodelling, hospitalizations, and mortality. Physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for injury when evaluating drivers who were not wearing seat belts when airbags deployed, regardless of the speed of the collision, because increased risk of thoracic injury with airbags has been described in the literature. Our review indicates that even new technology, specifically the side air bag, has been associated with a risk of thoracic injury. Considering that regulations are a driving force for airbag technology, further research and scrutiny by medical teams is needed to consider the effects of airbag technology advancements on morbidity and mortality rates of car accidents, to help in guiding further improvement, and to help lawmakers in implementing rules that protect the safety of occupants.

  6. Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet' (QTVR)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Magic Carpet Close-upMagic Carpet Close-up HD

    This section of the first color image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been further processed to produce a sharper look at a trail left by the one of rover's airbags. The drag mark was made after the rover landed and its airbags were deflated and retracted. Scientists have dubbed the region the 'Magic Carpet' after a crumpled portion of the soil that appears to have been peeled away (lower left side of the drag mark). Rocks were also dragged by the airbags, leaving impressions and 'bow waves' in the soil. The mission team plans to drive the rover over to this site to look for additional clues about the composition of the martian soil. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera.

    This extreme close-up image (see insets above) highlights the martian feature that scientists have named 'Magic Carpet' because of its resemblance to a crumpled carpet fold. Scientists think the soil here may have detached from its underlying layer, possibly due to interaction with the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's airbag after landing. This image was taken on Mars by the rover's panoramic camera.

  7. Airbag roll marks & displaced rocks and soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Looking southwest from the lander, soil disturbances indicating the spacecraft rolled through the landing site are visible. Arriving from the east, the lander, still encased in its protective airbags, rolled up a slight rise and then rolled back down to its final position. The inset at left shows displaced rocks near the rock 'Flat Top.' Dark patches of disturbed soil indicate where the rocks had originally rested Both insets show rocks that were pushed into the soil from the weight of the lander, visible from the areas of raised rims of dark, disturbed soil around several rocks. The south summit of Twin Peaks is in the background, while a lander petal, deflated airbag, and rear rover deployment ramp are in the foreground.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  8. JPL Testbed Image of Airbag Retraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the deflated airbags retracted underneath the lander petal at the JPL In-Situ Instrument Laboratory. Retracting the airbags helps clear the path for the rover to roll off the lander and onto the martian surface.

  9. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gerbert S.; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  10. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Gerbert S; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops.

  11. Mars Pathfinder airbag impact attenuation system

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, D.E.; Cole, J.K.; Rivellini, T.P.

    1995-04-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, scheduled for launch in November 1996, is designed to validate a low cost Entry, Descent, and Landing system and to perform scientific surface operations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to design, fabricate, test and validate a prototype 0.38 scale model of an airbag impact attenuation system. A computer code was developed to predict the performance of the airbag system. A test program in Sandia`s High Altitude Chamber was performed to validate the code and demonstrate the feasibility of the airbag concept and design. In addition, freefall tests were performed at representative velocities to demonstrate the structural integrity of the airbag system design. The feasibility program demonstrated that the airbag impact attenuation design will protect the lander upon impact with the Martian surface.

  12. Mars Pathfinder Airbag Impact Attenuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waye, Donald; Cole, J. Kenneth; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, scheduled for launch in December 1996, is designed to validate a low cost Entry, Descent, and Landing system and to perform scientific surface operations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to design, fabricate, test and validate a prototype 0.38 scale model of an airbag impact attenuation system. A computer code was developed to predict the performance of the airbag system. A test program in Sandia's High Altitude Chamber was performed to validate the code and demonstrate the feasibility of the airbag concept and design. In addition, freefall tests were performed at representative velocities to demonstrate the structural integrity of the airbag system design. The feasibility program demonstrated that the airbag impact attenuation design will protect the lander upon impact with the Martian surface.

  13. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  14. A wearable airbag to prevent fall injuries.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo; Yoshimura, Takumi; Sekine, Masaki; Uchida, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Osamu

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a wearable airbag that incorporates a fall-detection system that uses both acceleration and angular velocity signals to trigger inflation of the airbag. The fall-detection algorithm was devised using a thresholding technique with an accelerometer and gyro sensor. Sixteen subjects mimicked falls, and their acceleration waveforms were monitored. Then, we developed a fall-detection algorithm that could detect signals 300 ms before the fall. This signal was used as a trigger to inflate the airbag to a capacity of 2.4 L. Although the proposed system can help to prevent fall-related injuries, further development is needed to miniaturize the inflation system.

  15. Biomechanical and Injury Response to Posterolateral Loading from Torso Side Airbags

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, Jason J.; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    This study characterized thoracoabdominal response to posterolateral loading from a seat-mounted side airbag. Seven unembalmed post-mortem human subjects were exposed to ten airbag deployments. Subjects were positioned such that the deploying airbag first contacted the posterolateral thorax between T6 and L1 while stationary (n = 3 × 2 aspects) or while subjected to left lateral sled impact at ΔV = 6.7 m/s (n = 4). Chestband contours were analyzed to quantify deformation direction in the thoracic x–y plane (zero degrees indicating anterior and 180° indicating posterior), magnitude, rate, and viscous response. Skeletal injuries were consistent with posterolateral contact; visceral injuries consisted of renal (n = 1) or splenic (n = 3) lacerations. Deformation direction was transient during sled impact, progressing from 122 ± 5° at deformation onset to 90° following maximum deflection. Angles from stationary subjects progressed from 141 ± 9° to 120°. Peak normalized deflections, peak rates, and VCmax ranges were 0.075 – 0.171, 3.7 – 12.7 m/s, and 0.3 – 0.6 m/s with stationary airbag, respectively; ranges were 0.167 – 0.297, 7.4 – 18.3 m/s, and 0.7 – 3.0 m/s with airbag sled impact, respectively. Peak deflections were measured at angles between 99° – 135° and 98° – 125° for stationary and dynamic conditions, respectively. Because of deflection angle transience and localized injury response, both posterolateral and lateral injury metrics may be required for this boundary condition. Contrasted with flat rigid or anterolateral loading, biomechanical response to side airbag interaction may be augmented by peak normalized deflection or VCmax at 130°. PMID:21512911

  16. [Airbag-related death in a toddler. A poorly known danger?].

    PubMed

    Cabasson, S; Bauvin, I; Firah, N; David, A; Bèze-Beyrie, P; Gréteau, S; Mensire-Marinier, A; Oilleau, L; Mansir, T

    2015-04-01

    We report the case of an 8-month-old baby killed by the deployment of an airbag. He was correctly positioned, in a safety seat designed for his age class, on the passenger side, and rear-facing. The accident occurred at low speed, on the left front of the car, without provoking any harm to the mother who was driving the vehicle, but the impact led to airbag deployment. A CT scan showed an occipital fracture, hemorrhagic parenchymal contusions, subarachnoid hemorrhage and edema, which quickly led to fatal intracranial hypertension. Severe retinal hemorrhages were also noted. Brain death was declared 24h later. Both direct impact and violent projection of the head are involved in the severity of brain lesions. Retinal hemorrhages are similar to what is observed in shaken-baby syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first French publication on this topic in childhood. In France, children are allowed to be positioned on the passenger side seat, but the airbag, if present, is supposed to be deactivated, which is not always possible. In recent cars, depowering the airbag is easy, with on/off switches, but these systems are not uniform between models. Moreover, it is very likely that this possibility is ignored by numerous parents. A widespread communication on this topic should be initiated in France to prevent such events. Banning infants from front passenger seats completely does not seem possible. Nevertheless, greater attention on the part of police departments and better information to drivers appear necessary.

  17. Full-thickness burn to the hand from an automobile airbag.

    PubMed

    Vitello, W; Kim, M; Johnson, R M; Miller, S

    1999-01-01

    An 18-year-old male was involved in a single car motor vehicle accident in which the driver's side airbag was deployed. He presented to the trauma center with complex injuries to the left hand, lacerations to the scalp, and a full-thickness burn to the ulnar aspect of the right hand that included the hypothenar area and the fifth digit. The patient was admitted to the trauma center and received immediate consultation from the burn service. He underwent debridement and split-thickness skin grafting of 50 cm2 of the right hand on postburn day 3. The graft became necrotic and the patient underwent debridement of the skin and the abductor minimi muscle of the right hand on postburn day 32. Split-thickness skin grafting and release of flexion contracture were successfully completed 18 days later. The police and fire departments reported that the airbag showed signs of thermal destruction. Upon request, Honda motors submitted information from the TRW safety systems and material safety data sheet (Mesa, Ariz, issued 1989) that showed that airbag canisters contain the chemicals sodium azide and cupric oxide. Water may react with sodium azide to form highly toxic and explosive hyfrazoic acid. These chemicals are converted to sodium hydroxide, which can cause significant chemical burns. In addition, these chemicals may ignite when exposed to live electrical wires or temperatures greater than 300 degrees F. We conclude that burns associated with damaged deployed airbags in motor vehicle accidents may be the results of both chemical and thermal injury. The extent of the burn wound may be underestimated, as our case illustrates. Full-thickness burns resulting from airbag deployment may require more aggressive initial debridement and treatment.

  18. Upper extremity interaction with a helicopter side airbag: injury criteria for dynamic hyperextension of the female elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Hansen, Gail A; Kennedy, Eric A; Rath, Amber L; McNally, Craig; Kemper, Andrew R; Smith, Eric P; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Stitzel, Joel D; Davis, Martin B; Bass, Cameron R; Brozoski, Frederick T; McEntire, B Joseph; Alem, Nabih M; Crowley, John S

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes a three part analysis to characterize the interaction between the female upper extremity and a helicopter cockpit side airbag system and to develop dynamic hyperextension injury criteria for the female elbow joint. Part I involved a series of 10 experiments with an original Army Black Hawk helicopter side airbag. A 5(th) percentile female Hybrid III instrumented upper extremity was used to demonstrate side airbag upper extremity loading. Two out of the 10 tests resulted in high elbow bending moments of 128 Nm and 144 Nm. Part II included dynamic hyperextension tests on 24 female cadaver elbow joints. The energy source was a drop tower utilizing a three-point bending configuration to apply elbow bending moments matching the previously conducted side airbag tests. Post-test necropsy showed that 16 of the 24 elbow joint tests resulted in injuries. Injury severity ranged from minor cartilage damage to more moderate joint dislocations and severe transverse fractures of the distal humerus. Peak elbow bending moments ranged from 42.4 Nm to 146.3 Nm. Peak bending moment proved to be a significant indicator of any elbow injury (p = 0.02) as well as elbow joint dislocation (p = 0.01). Logistic regression analyses were used to develop single and multiple variate injury risk functions. Using peak moment data for the entire test population, a 50% risk of obtaining any elbow injury was found at 56 Nm while a 50% risk of sustaining an elbow joint dislocation was found at 93 Nm for the female population. These results indicate that the peak elbow bending moments achieved in Part I are associated with a greater than 90% risk for elbow injury. Subsequently, the airbag was re-designed in an effort to mitigate this as well as the other upper extremity injury risks. Part III assessed the redesigned side airbag module to ensure injury risks had been reduced prior to implementing the new system. To facilitate this, 12 redesigned side airbag deployments were conducted

  19. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  20. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. Patterns of injury associated with automobile airbag use.

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, A. A.; Banerjee, A.

    1998-01-01

    The wide use of automobile airbags has undoubtedly reduced the mortality and the incidence of serious injuries from motor vehicle accidents. However, automobile airbags appear to be associated with a variety of injuries including fatal injuries, ocular injuries, upper limb and chest injuries. Further improvements in airbag design together with education of the general public in their use should help reduce airbag-related injuries. PMID:9926118

  2. Interactions of out-of-position small-female surrogates with a depowered driver airbag.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Priya; Schneider, Lawrence W; Hardy, Warren N

    2008-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the response, repeatability, and injury predictive ability of the Hybrid III small-female dummy to static out-of-position (OOP) deployments using a depowered driver-side airbag. Five dummy tests were conducted in two OOP configurations by two different laboratories. The OOP configurations were nose-on-rim (NOR) and chest-on-bag (COB). Four cadaver tests were conducted using unembalmed small-female cadavers and the same airbags used in the dummy tests under similar OOP conditions. One cadaver test was designed to increase airbag loading of the face and neck (a forehead-on-rim, or FOR test). Comparison between the dummy tests of Lab 1 and of Lab 2 indicated the test conditions and results were repeatable. In the cadaver tests no skull fractures or neck injuries occurred. However, all four cadavers had multiple rib fractures. These results suggested that an older, osteoporatic, small-female driver would experience AIS > or = 3 thoracic injury if exposed to this type of depowered airbag inflation for the three positions tested, but would be unlikely to experience any head or neck injury. The cadaver results provided no information about the possibility of AIS > or = 3 rib fractures for the average small, female driver. The Hybrid III small-female dummy results suggest that a low percentage (15%) of small, female drivers would experience AIS > or = 3 thoracic injuries if they had their chest on the module cover at the time of deployment of this depowered airbag. Also, for this position, the dummy results indicated a risk of an AIS = 2 neck injury for some small, female drivers. For all positions tested, the dummy results predicted that head injury was unlikely for most small-female drivers.

  3. Airbag lung: an unusual case of sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease after a rollover motor vehicle accident.

    PubMed

    Waring, Thomas P; Hegde, Poornima; Foley, Raymond J

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease (SLGLD) is a condition associated with the formation of noncaseating, nonnecrotizing granulomas. The final by-product of airbag deployment is alkaline silicates or glass. Silicates trapped and sequestered in the lung parenchyma are a potential mediator for immune system activation and development of sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease.

  4. Need for airbag and seatbelt to reduce orbital injuries from steering wheel knob.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study are to report a blowout fracture of the orbital floor and medial wall caused by being struck by a steering wheel knob of an automobile and to discuss the use of airbags and seatbelts as a preventive measure for orbital injuries. A 58-year-old man was struck in the left eye by a steering wheel. His car hit a telephone pole, and he had a frontal collision injury. In this frontal impact, his left eye was hit by a Brodie knob attached to the steering wheel. At the time of injury, the speed of the car was about 65 km/h. He was not wearing a seatbelt, and the airbag had not deployed. Swelling and ecchymosis were observed at the left periorbital area, and he had diplopia on a left-side gaze. A CT revealed fractures in the medial and inferior wall of the left orbit. Entrapped soft tissues were reduced, and the medial wall and floor were reconstructed with a resorbable sheet. His diplopia disappeared 12 days after surgery. To prevent the injury from the steering wheel knob, an airbag should be installed in any vehicle, which has a steering wheel knob. Legislation mandating the use of airbags as well as seatbelts in vehicles with attached steering wheel knobs should be made.

  5. Lifting and protecting residential structures from subsidence damage using airbags

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, T.L.; Bennett, R.M.

    1998-12-31

    Conventional practice in protecting residential structures from subsidence damage concentrates on saving the superstructure. The foundation is sacrificed, even though it represents the structural component with the greatest replacement cost. In this study, airbags were used to lift a 20 ft x 30 ft structure to test their ability to protect both the foundation and superstructure from ground settlement. Two contiguous sides of the test foundation were unreinforced, and the other two contiguous sides incorporated footing and wall reinforcement. The airbags successfully lifted the structure without causing damage, even on the unreinforced sides. This paper gives a procedure for determining airbag spacing, and describes installation and operation techniques of the airbags. The paper then focuses on the performance of the airbags in lifting the structure, and shows that airbags can preserve existing foundations during subsidence movements.

  6. Thoracic Injury Investigation using PMHS in Frontal Airbag Out-of-Position Situations.

    PubMed

    Lebarbé, Matthieu; Potier, Pascal; Baudrit, Pascal; Petit, Philippe; Trosseille, Xavier; Vallancien, Guy

    2005-11-01

    Many studies have reported multiple rib fractures sustained by an Out-of-Position (OOP) driver subjected to a frontal airbag deployment, but the injury mechanisms and thresholds remain unclear. Two successive phases occur during the bag deployment: punch-out loading of the thorax, followed by a membrane effect (Horsch et al. 1990). The aim of this study was to investigate the thoracic injuries generated by each phase separately. Tests of nine post-mortem human surrogates (PMHS) were carried out on a static test bench using a driver side airbag module described by Petit et al. (2003). The steering wheel was replaced by a plate in order to increase the loading generated by the airbag. Three loading configurations were performed: membrane only, punch-out only, and both types combined. The membrane-only tests were performed with the thorax initially positioned at 13, 78 and 128 mm from the plate in order to vary the load magnitude. The punch-out and the combined tests were performed with the thorax initially 8 mm from the module. Accelerometers and angular rate sensors were fixed on the sternum and on the first, fourth, and eighth thoracic vertebrae of the PMHS. Ribs 2 to 6 were instrumented with strain gauges. The reaction force of the bag on the plate was measured using four 2-axis load cells. Results show that both pure punch-out and pure membrane loading can result in thoracic injuries. However, the rib fracture locations seemed to differ from one type of loading to the other. Moreover, for the same initial distance between the airbag module and the thorax, the injuries were more severe in the combined effect tests than in the pure punch-out or pure membrane. The nine PMHS tests formed a matrix allowing validation of a finite element model and further analysis of thoracic injury mechanisms and thresholds.

  7. Overpressure and noise due to multiple airbag systems in a passenger car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert; Henning, Peter J.; Newton, Gary, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Multiple airbag systems in passenger cars can generate overpressure and noise that may be hazardous to human hearing. Overpressure is compression of the air inside a closed compartment caused by deployment of the bags. Noise results from the action of the gas inflating the bags. SAE J247 provides a standard for measuring the combination of overpressure and noise in a passenger compartment. A special microphone has recently been developed that meets this standard, which operates down to a fraction of a hertz. Details of the microphone are given. Little appears to have been published on the overpressure and noise of modern multiple airbag systems, but early results [R. Hickling, ''The noise of the automotive safety air cushion,'' Noise Control Eng., May-June, 110-121 (1976)] provide a basic understanding of the phenomenon. Spectral data shows that peak overpressure occurs at about 2 to 3 Hz. A significant reduction in overpressure and noise can be achieved with an aspirating airbag, originally developed at General Motors, whose outer structure is inflated with gas from the inflator, and whose inner structure draws in air from the passenger compartment through one-way cloth valves. Tests have shown that such bags function well when impacted.

  8. Development, deployment and usability of a point-of-care decision support system for chronic disease management using the recently-approved HL7 decision support service standard.

    PubMed

    Lobach, David F; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Anstrom, Kevin J; Russell, Michael L; Woods, Peter; Smith, Dwight

    2007-01-01

    Clinical decision support is recognized as one potential remedy for the growing crisis in healthcare quality in the United States and other industrialized nations. While decision support systems have been shown to improve care quality and reduce errors, these systems are not widely available. This lack of availability arises in part because most decision support systems are not portable or scalable. The Health Level 7 international standard development organization recently adopted a draft standard known as the Decision Support Service standard to facilitate the implementation of clinical decision support systems using software services. In this paper, we report the first implementation of a clinical decision support system using this new standard. This system provides point-of-care chronic disease management for diabetes and other conditions and is deployed throughout a large regional health system. We also report process measures and usability data concerning the system. Use of the Decision Support Service standard provides a portable and scalable approach to clinical decision support that could facilitate the more extensive use of decision support systems.

  9. A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J.; Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2013-07-01

    To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision.

  10. Occupant kinematics and estimated effectiveness of side airbags in pole side impacts using a human FE model with internal organs.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shigeki; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Kitagawa, Yuichi

    2008-11-01

    When a car collides against a pole-like obstacle, the deformation pattern of the vehicle body-side tends to extend to its upper region. A possible consequence is an increase of loading to the occupant thorax. Many studies have been conducted to understand human thoracic responses to lateral loading, and injury criteria have been developed based on the results. However, injury mechanisms, especially those of internal organs, are not well understood. A human body FE model was used in this study to simulate occupant kinematics in a pole side impact. Internal organ parts were introduced into the torso model, including their geometric features, material properties and connections with other tissues. The mechanical responses of the model were validated against PMHS data in the literature. Although injury criterion for each organ has not been established, pressure level and its changes can be estimated from the organ models. Finite element simulations were conducted assuming a case where a passenger vehicle collides against a pole at 29km/h. Occupant kinematics, force-deformation responses and pressure levels were compared between cases with and without side airbag deployment. The results indicated that strain to the ribs and pressure to the organs was smaller with side airbag deployment. The side airbag widened the contact area at the torso, helping to distribute the force to the shoulder, arm and chest. Such distributed force helped generate relatively smaller deformation in the ribs. Furthermore, the side airbag deployment helped restrict the spine displacement. The smaller displacement contributed to lowering the magnitude of contact force between the torso and the door. The study also examined the correlations between the pressure levels in the internal organs, rib deflection, and V*C of chest. The study found that the V*C(t) peak appeared to be synchronized with the organ pressure peak, suggesting that the pressure level of the internal organs could be one possible

  11. Close-up of deflated airbag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Details of one of Pathfinder's deflated airbags adjacent to a lander petal are prominent in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). The blue tiles on top of the petal are solar cells that are used to give power to the lander.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  12. Characterization of Martian Rock Shape for MER Airbag Drop Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimaggio, E. N.; Schroeder, R. D.; Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A.; Castle, N.

    2003-03-01

    To aid in defining the rock distributions for MER airbag tests, images from the Viking Landers 1 and 2 and MPF were used to identify rocks that are >20 cm high and characterize them by their shape and burial.

  13. HP3 on ExoMars - Cutting airbag cloths with the sharp tip of a mechanical mole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, C.; Izzo, M.; Re, E.; Mehls, C.; Richter, L.; Coste, P.

    2009-04-01

    The HP3 - Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package - is planned to be one of the Humboldt lander-based instruments on the ESA ExoMars mission. HP3 will allow the measurement of the subsurface temperature gradient and physical as well as thermophysical properties of the subsurface regolith of Mars down to a depth of 5 meters. From these measurements, the planetary heat flux can be inferred. The HP³ instrument package consists of a mole trailing a package of thermal and electrical sensors into the regolith. Beside the payload elements Thermal Excitation and Measurement Suite and a Permittivity Probe the HP3 experiment includes sensors to detect the forward motion and the tilt of the HP3 payload compartment. The HP3 experiment will be integrated into the lander platform of the ExoMars mission. The original accommodation featured a deployment device or a robotic arm to place HP3 onto the soil outside the deflated lander airbags. To avoid adding such deployment devices, it was suggested that the HP3 mole should be capable of piercing the airbags under the lander. The ExoMars lander airbag is made of 4 Kevlar layers (2 abrasive and 2 bladders). A double fold of the airbag (a worst case) would represent a pile of 12 layers. An exploratory study has examined the possibility of piercing airbag cloths by adding sharp cutting blades on the tip of a penetrating mole. In the experimental setup representative layers were laid over a Mars soil simulant. Initial tests used a hammer-driven cutting tip and had moderate to poor results. More representative tests used a prototype of the HP3 mole and were fully successful: the default 4 layer configuration was pierced as well as the 12 layer configuration, the latter one within 3 hours and about 3000 mole strokes This improved behaviour is attributed to the use of representative test hardware where guidance and suppression of mole recoil were concerned. The presentation will provide an explanation of the technical requirements on

  14. Mars Exploration Rover airbag landing loads testing and analsysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Douglas S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the testing and analysis used to quantify the expected airbag landing loads for the Mars Exploration Rovers. The airbag drop test setup, lander instrumentation, and the test data reduction method are discussed in order to provide an understanding of the empirical loads. A set of limiting cases that bound the empirical data are developed for use in finite element modeling of the lander and rover models.

  15. A personal airbag system for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Sydney; de Weck, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Airbag-based methods for crew impact attenuation have been highlighted as a potential simple, lightweight means of enabling safe land-landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, and the next generation of ballistic shaped spacecraft. To investigate the feasibility of this concept during a nominal 7.62 m/s Orion landing, a full-scale personal airbag system 24% lighter than the Orion baseline has been developed, and subjected to 38 drop tests on land. Through this effort, the system has demonstrated the ability to maintain the risk of injury to an occupant during a 7.85 m/s, 0° impact angle land-landing to within the NASA specified limit of 0.5%. In accomplishing this, the personal airbag system concept has been proven to be feasible. Moreover, the obtained test results suggest that by implementing anti-bottoming airbags to prevent direct contact between the system and the landing surface, the system performance during landings with 0° impact angles can be further improved, by at least a factor of two. Additionally, a series of drop tests from the nominal Orion impact angle of 30° indicated that severe injury risk levels would be sustained beyond impact velocities of 5 m/s. This is a result of the differential stroking of the airbags within the system causing a shearing effect between the occupant seat structure and the spacecraft floor, removing significant stroke from the airbags.

  16. Dynamic response of a collidant impacting a low pressure airbag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, Peter A.

    There are many uses of low pressure airbags, both military and commercial. Many of these applications have been hampered by inadequate and inaccurate modeling tools. This dissertation contains the derivation of a four degree-of-freedom system of differential equations from physical laws of mass and energy conservation, force equilibrium, and the Ideal Gas Law. Kinematic equations were derived to model a cylindrical airbag as a single control volume impacted by a parallelepiped collidant. An efficient numerical procedure was devised to solve the simplified system of equations in a manner amenable to discovering design trends. The largest public airbag experiment, both in scale and scope, was designed and built to collect data on low-pressure airbag responses, otherwise unavailable in the literature. The experimental results were compared to computational simulations to validate the simplified numerical model. Experimental response trends are presented that will aid airbag designers. The two objectives of using a low pressure airbag to demonstrate the feasibility to (1) accelerate a munition to 15 feet per second velocity from a bomb bay, and (2) decelerate humans hitting trucks below the human tolerance level of 50 G's, were both met.

  17. Development and Validation of a Portable Platform for Deploying Decision-Support Algorithms in Prehospital Settings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-21

    Advanced decision-support capabilities for prehospital trauma care may prove effec- tive at improving patient care. Such functionality would be possible...illustrate two sets of important questions: are the individual com- ponents reliable (e.g., physical integrity, power, core functionality , and end-user...challenges may be relevant to broader efforts in de- ploying automated decision-support functionality in prehospital environments. In addition, the ex

  18. Characterization of Martian Rock Shape for MER Airbag Drop Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimaggio, E. N.; Schroeder, R.; Castle, N.; Golombek, M.

    2002-12-01

    Rock distributions for the final platforms used in airbag drop tests are currently being designed for the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) scheduled to launch in 2003. Like Mars Pathfinder (MPF), launched in 1996, MER will use a series of airbags to cushion its landing on the surface of Mars. Previous MER airbag drop tests have shown that sharp, angular (triangular) rocks >20 cm high may be hazardous. To aid in defining the rock distributions for the final airbag tests, images from the Viking Landers 1 and 2 and MPF were used to identify rocks that are >20 cm high, and characterize them as triangular, square or round. Approximately 33% of all rocks analyzed are triangular. Of the rocks analyzed that are ~20-60 cm high, ~14% are triangular. Most of these triangular rocks are small, ~20-30 cm high. Rock distributions of previous airbag platforms were similarly classified and show a greater percentage of triangular and square rocks that are ~20-60 cm high than at the landing sites. The burial of a rock (perched, partially buried or buried) was also considered because perched rocks may pose less of a threat to the airbags than those buried because perched rocks can be dislodged and roll during impact. Approximately 19% of all rocks analyzed, and ~19% of rocks that are ~20-60 cm high, are triangular and partially buried or buried. These data suggest that the platform rock distributions appropriately represented the risks to the airbags associated with triangular rocks. A similar percentage of >20 cm high triangular rocks will be added to the drop test platforms to represent landing site rock distributions.

  19. Test Case Selection in Pre-Deployment Testing of Complex Clinical Decision Support Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Geoffrey J.; Yuen, Kaeli; Martins, Susana; Tu, Samson W.; Ashcraft, Michael; Heidenreich, Paul; Hoffman, Brian B.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems with complex logic are being developed. Ensuring the quality of CDS is imperative, but there is no consensus on testing standards. We tested ATHENA-HTN CDS after encoding updated hypertension guidelines into the system. A logic flow and a complexity analysis of the encoding were performed to guide testing. 100 test cases were selected to test the major pathways in the CDS logic flow, and the effectiveness of the testing was analyzed. The encoding contained 26 decision points and 3120 possible output combinations. The 100 cases selected tested all of the major pathways in the logic, but only 1% of the possible output combinations. Test case selection is one of the most challenging aspects in CDS testing and has a major impact on testing coverage. A test selection strategy should take into account the complexity of the system, identification of major logic pathways, and available resources. PMID:27570678

  20. The Results of Dynamic Data Acquisition During Mars Pathfinder Prototype Airbag Drop Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gregory L.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission, scheduled for launch in December 1996, will use an airbag system to safely deliver a lander to the Martian surface.The airbag landing system has undergone a comprehensive test program during its evolution from initial design phase to final qualification and acceptance testing. This paper outlines the test approach used in the airbag development program, describes the data acquisition system used to obtain and evaluate airbag performance data, and presents test results.

  1. Tricuspid valve chordal rupture due to airbag injury and review of pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Thekkudan, Joyce; Luckraz, Heyman; Ng, Alex; Norell, Mike

    2012-09-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The latter is usually due to an aortic transection, whereas the former is related to myocardial contusion, cardiac valve injury, coronary artery disruption and intracardiac shunts due to the formation of septal defects. The main mechanisms causing these injuries are due to the sudden deceleration force and compression within the chest cavity. Moreover, there is also the sudden increase in intravascular pressure due to a mechanical compression effect and a hormonal adrenergic surge during the event. We report a case of a tricuspid valve injury caused by the deployment of the airbag during a high-speed impact car accident and the subsequent damage to the tricuspid valve chordal mechanism. The patient's management and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the injury are reviewed.

  2. Airbag Landing Impact Performance Optimization for the Orion Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; McKinney, John; Corliss, James M.

    2008-01-01

    This report will discuss the use of advanced simulation techniques to optimize the performance of the proposed Orion Crew Module airbag landing system design. The Boeing Company and the National Aeronautic and Space Administration s Langley Research Center collaborated in the analysis of the proposed airbag landing system for the next generation space shuttle replacement, the Orion spacecraft. Using LS-DYNA to simulate the Crew Module landing impacts, two main objectives were established and achieved: the investigation of potential methods of optimizing the airbag performance in order to reduce rebound on the anti-bottoming bags, lower overall landing loads, and increase overall Crew Module stability; and the determination of the Crew Module stability and load boundaries using the optimized airbag design, based on the potential Crew Module landing pitch angles and ground slopes in both the center of gravity forward and aft configurations. This paper describes the optimization and stability and load boundary studies and presents a summary of the results obtained and key lessons learned from this analysis.

  3. Right coronary artery dissection and aneurysm presented as acute inferior myocardial infarction from an automobile airbag trauma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunlai; Hu, Wuming; Zhu, Ning; Zhao, Xuyong; Xu, Jian; Ye, Shiyong; Xiang, Yijia; Lv, Linchun

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery dissection and aneurysm culminating in acute myocardial infarction are rare after blunt chest trauma. We are reporting a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with right inferior lobe contusion, pleural effusion, right interlobar fissure effusion, bone fracture of right fourth rib, and acute inferior wall myocardial infarction and who experienced blunt trauma in his right chest wall by an airbag deployment in a car accident. Coronary angiography showed an aneurysm in the middle of right coronary artery with 70% afferent narrowing just distal to the aneurysm with no visible atherosclerotic lesion. A 4.0×20 mm TEXUS Liberté stent in the lesion was deployed, and a good coronary flow was obtained without residual stenosis and the aneurysm vanished.

  4. Pneumatic protection applied to an airbag for para-gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raievski, V.; Valladas, G.

    1998-02-01

    We present a theory of pneumatic protection based on the laws of thermodynamics, elasticity and fluid mechanics. A general pneumatic protection system is made up of several communicating compartments, the differences in pressure of the compartments generating a transfer of mass and energy between them. The transfer offers interesting possibilities to improve the performance of the system. An example of this type of protection in aerial sport is the airbag for para-gliders, it is used in this paper to illustrate the theory. As the pressure in the airbag depends uniquely on its volume, the geometric model in the theory can be simplified. Experiments carried out with crash-test dummies equipped with sensors have confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  5. Characterization of Martian Rock Shape for MER Airbag Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMaggio, E. N.; Schroeder, R. D.; Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A.; Castle, N.

    2003-01-01

    Using the Viking and Mars Pathfinder landing sites as a guide, this study assessed rock shapes, sizes and burial so they could be compared with rocks on the test platforms. This work allowed comparison of the severity of the rock distributions on the test platforms with the 3 landing sites and helped guide the rocks used on the test platforms during the final airbag qualification tests.

  6. Airbags & children: making correct choices in child passenger restraints.

    PubMed

    Kamerling, Susan Nudelman

    2002-01-01

    Countless numbers of young lives are lost each year due to motor vehicle crashes. One of the most effective means of reducing the number of children killed and injured as occupants in motor vehicles is through the use of child passenger restraints. Seat belts and child safety seats save lives and reduce the severity of injuries sustained by occupants in motor vehicle crashes. Nurses are in a unique position to educate and influence families on the proper way to safely transport all motor vehicle passengers. Therefore, nurses working with infants, children, and families have a moral and professional obligation to understand the basics of child passenger safety. At the very least, nurses should be able to direct families appropriately for specifics related to child passenger restraints. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of child passenger safety through a historical, theoretical, and clinical approach. Proper child restraint use is reviewed based on current recommendations for age and size. The potential hazards of child restraint misuse, with an in-depth discussion on airbags, is presented. The discussion on airbags serves to dispel any misconceptions that may be held about airbags. The article includes two case studies that illustrate the injury potential of relatively common misuse patterns. The clinical implications for maternal-child nurses include the recognition that child passenger deaths are primarily due to child restraint nonuse and misuse and the realization of nursing's role in the promotion of proper child passenger restraint.

  7. Safety and efficacy of airbag midwifery in promoting normal vaginal delivery and reducing caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianting; Shao, Huajiang; Lu, Xingren; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Guanger

    2012-01-01

    Background: Balloon bionic midwifery has been applied in clinical obstetrics in China for 10 years, although played a certain role in controlling and improving the quality of obstetrics and caesarean section rate, but some questions have not been resolved. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of airbag midwifery. Materials and Methods: Primiparas (2410 cases) with various medical conditions were randomly divided into airbag and control groups undergoing the same obstetrical treatments, but airbag midwifery as a birthing option was chosen twice when the cervix was dilated to 2-4 cm during labor. Results: The duration of the first and second stages, as well as the total delivery process, of the airbag group was shorter than that for the controls. The natural delivery rate of the airbag group was higher than that of the control group. The forcep delivery rate, cesarean section rate, amount of vaginal bleeding within 2 h after delivery, rate of postpartum hemorrhage, fetal distress, and pitocin use in the airbag group were all lower than those in the control group. No significant difference in the rate of maternal and fetal complications was observed in the two groups. The bionic airbag midwifery approach did not contribute to the incidence rate of urine retention, leukocyte count, neutrophil proportion, and level of creactive protein and IL-6 24 h after delivery. Conclusion: Airbag midwifery skill is a simple, effective, and safe procedure. PMID:25246932

  8. Aspects of the passenger airbag E.C.U. location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soica, A.

    2016-08-01

    Road accidents represent the dark side of road traffic, their consequences leading to material damage and often to vehicle occupant fatalities. Passive safety systems offer a high level of protection to vehicle occupants; yet, depending on a number of constructive factors and not only, these systems can not always ensure a high survival rate. The costs of road traffic accidents are to be borne by the whole society, with high amounts of money required. In this paper we analyze how the collision is felt in various points on the vehicle, at a given time and how this may affect the proper functioning of the passive safety systems, especially the airbag system.

  9. The Mars Frisbee: A Small, Lightweight Deployment Mechanism for In-Situ Instruments on the Proposed Mars Scout Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D. T.

    2000-07-01

    The proposed Mars Scout lander is conceived as a robust airbag landing system to deliver small five-kilogram scientific payloads to a variety of Martian terrains. This lander has very strong constraints on delivered instruments in mass, volume, and footprint. Another constraint on possible instruments will be the large footprint of the airbag landing system that will surround the lander after it deflates. This could make difficult to deploy in-situ instruments such as Alpha X-Ray Proton or Mossbauer spectrometers without a relatively large and heavy deployment arm.

  10. Establishment and validation for the theoretical model of the vehicle airbag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junyuan; Jin, Yang; Xie, Lizhe; Chen, Chao

    2015-05-01

    The current design and optimization of the occupant restraint system (ORS) are based on numerous actual tests and mathematic simulations. These two methods are overly time-consuming and complex for the concept design phase of the ORS, though they're quite effective and accurate. Therefore, a fast and directive method of the design and optimization is needed in the concept design phase of the ORS. Since the airbag system is a crucial part of the ORS, in this paper, a theoretical model for the vehicle airbag is established in order to clarify the interaction between occupants and airbags, and further a fast design and optimization method of airbags in the concept design phase is made based on the proposed theoretical model. First, the theoretical expression of the simplified mechanical relationship between the airbag's design parameters and the occupant response is developed based on classical mechanics, then the momentum theorem and the ideal gas state equation are adopted to illustrate the relationship between airbag's design parameters and occupant response. By using MATLAB software, the iterative algorithm method and discrete variables are applied to the solution of the proposed theoretical model with a random input in a certain scope. And validations by MADYMO software prove the validity and accuracy of this theoretical model in two principal design parameters, the inflated gas mass and vent diameter, within a regular range. This research contributes to a deeper comprehension of the relation between occupants and airbags, further a fast design and optimization method for airbags' principal parameters in the concept design phase, and provides the range of the airbag's initial design parameters for the subsequent CAE simulations and actual tests.

  11. Deployable System for Crash-Load Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    An externally deployable honeycomb structure is investigated with respect to crash energy management for light aircraft. The new concept utilizes an expandable honeycomb-like structure to absorb impact energy by crushing. Distinguished by flexible hinges between cell wall junctions that enable effortless deployment, the new energy absorber offers most of the desirable features of an external airbag system without the limitations of poor shear stability, system complexity, and timing sensitivity. Like conventional honeycomb, once expanded, the energy absorber is transformed into a crush efficient and stable cellular structure. Other advantages, afforded by the flexible hinge feature, include a variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid deployment methods. Radial deployment is utilized when omnidirectional cushioning is required. Linear deployment offers better efficiency, which is preferred when the impact orientation is known in advance. Several energy absorbers utilizing different deployment modes could also be combined to optimize overall performance and/or improve system reliability as outlined in the paper. Results from a series of component and full scale demonstration tests are presented as well as typical deployment techniques and mechanisms. LS-DYNA analytical simulations of selected tests are also presented.

  12. Photogrammetric Measurements of CEV Airbag Landing Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Berry, Felecia C.; Dismond, Harriett R.; Cate, Kenneth H.

    2008-01-01

    High-speed photogrammetric measurements are being used to assess the impact dynamics of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) for ground landing contingency upon return to earth. Test articles representative of the Orion capsule are dropped at the NASA Langley Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility onto a sand/clay mixture representative of a dry lakebed from elevations as high as 62 feet (18.9 meters). Two different types of test articles have been evaluated: (1) half-scale metal shell models utilized to establish baseline impact dynamics and soil characterization, and (2) geometric full-scale drop models with shock-absorbing airbags which are being evaluated for their ability to cushion the impact of the Orion CEV with the earth s surface. This paper describes the application of the photogrammetric measurement technique and provides drop model trajectory and impact data that indicate the performance of the photogrammetric measurement system.

  13. Airbags to Martian Landers: Analyses at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, K.W.

    1994-03-01

    A new direction for the national laboratories is to assist US business with research and development, primarily through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Technology transfer to the private sector has been very successful as over 200 CRADAs are in place at Sandia. Because of these cooperative efforts, technology has evolved into some new areas not commonly associated with the former mission of the national laboratories. An example of this is the analysis of fabric structures. Explicit analyses and expertise in constructing parachutes led to the development of a next generation automobile airbag; which led to the construction, testing, and analysis of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mars Environmental Survey Lander; and finally led to the development of CAD based custom garment designs using 3D scanned images of the human body. The structural analysis of these fabric structures is described as well as a more traditional example Sandia with the test/analysis correlation of the impact of a weapon container.

  14. Airbag and ASI/MET instrument in 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This view from the lander was imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. A deflated airbag is at the bottom of the image. At the extreme right, the Atmospheric Structure Instrument and Meteorology package (ASI/MET)mast, with its three windsocks, is visible.are at the bottom right of the image.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  15. Effect of weight, height and BMI on injury outcome in side impact crashes without airbag deployment.

    PubMed

    Pal, Chinmoy; Tomosaburo, Okabe; Vimalathithan, K; Jeyabharath, M; Muthukumar, M; Satheesh, N; Narahari, S

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive analysis is performed to evaluate the effect of weight, height and body mass index (BMI) of occupants on side impact injuries at different body regions. The accident dataset for this study is based on the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for accident year 2000-08. The mean BMI values for driver and front passenger are estimated from all types of crashes using NASS database, which clearly indicates that mean BMI has been increasing over the years in the USA. To study the effect of BMI in side impact injuries, BMI was split into three groups namely (1) thin (BMI<21), (2) normal (BMI 24-27), (3) obese (BMI>30). For more clear identification of the effect of BMI in side impact injuries, a minimum gap of three BMI is set in between each adjacent BMI groups. Car model years from MY1995-1999 to MY2000-2008 are chosen in order to identify the degree of influence of older and newer generation of cars in side impact injuries. Impact locations particularly side-front (F), side-center (P) and side-distributed (Y) are chosen for this analysis. Direction of force (DOF) considered for both near side and far side occupants are 8 o'clock, 9 o'clock, 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock, 3 o'clock and 4 o'clock respectively. Age <60 years is also one of the constraints imposed on data selection to minimize the effect of bone strength on the occurrence of occupant injuries. AIS2+ and AIS3+ injury risk in all body regions have been plotted for the selected three BMI groups of occupant, delta-V 0-60kmph, two sets (old and new) of car model years. The analysis is carried with three approaches: (a) injury risk percentage based on simple graphical method with respect to a single variable, (b) injury distribution method where the injuries are marked on the respective anatomical locations and (c) logistic regression, a statistical method, considers all the related variables together. Lower extremity injury risk appears to be high for thin BMI group. It is found that BMI does not have much influence on head injuries but it is influenced more by the height of the occupant. Results of logistic analysis suggest that BMI, height and weight may have significant contribution towards side impact injuries across different body regions.

  16. Feasibility Study of an Airbag-Based Crew Impact Attenuation System for the Orion MPCV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Do, Sydney; deWeck, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Airbag-based methods for crew impact attenuation have been highlighted as a potential lightweight means of enabling safe land-landings for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, and the next generation of ballistic shaped spacecraft. To investigate the performance feasibility of this concept during a nominal 7.62m/s Orion landing, a full-scale personal airbag system 24% lighter than the Orion baseline has been developed, and subjected to 38 drop tests on land. Through this effort, the system has demonstrated the ability to maintain the risk of injury to an occupant during a 7.85m/s, 0 deg. impact angle land-landing to within the NASA specified limit of 0.5%. In accomplishing this, the airbag-based crew impact attenuation concept has been proven to be feasible. Moreover, the obtained test results suggest that by implementing anti-bottoming airbags to prevent direct contact between the system and the landing surface, the system performance during landings with 0 deg impact angles can be further improved, by at least a factor of two. Additionally, a series of drop tests from the nominal Orion impact angle of 30 deg indicated that severe injury risk levels would be sustained beyond impact velocities of 5m/s. This is a result of the differential stroking of the airbags within the system causing a shearing effect between the occupant seat structure and the spacecraft floor, removing significant stroke from the airbags.

  17. A Summary of the Development of a Nominal Land Landing Airbag Impact Attenuation System for the Orion Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tutt, Ben; Gill, Susannah; Wilson, Aaron; Johnson, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Airborne Systems North America (formally Irvin Aerospace Inc) has developed an Airbag Landing System for the Orion Crew Module of the Crew Exploration Vehicle. This work is in support of the NASA Langley Research Center Landing System Advanced Development Project. Orion is part of the Constellation Program to send human explorers back to the moon, and then onwards to Mars and other destinations in the Solar System. A component of the Vision for Space Exploration, Orion is being developed to also enable access to space following the retirement of the Space Shuttle in the next decade. This paper documents the development of a conceptual design, fabrication of prototype assemblies, component level testing and two generations of airbag landing system testing. The airbag system has been designed and analyzed using the transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA(RegisteredTradeMark). The landing system consists of six airbag assemblies; each assembly comprising a primary impact venting airbag and a non-venting anti-bottoming airbag. The anti-bottoming airbag provides ground clearance following the initial impact attenuation sequence. Incorporated into each primary impact airbag is an active vent that allows the entrapped gas to exit the control volume. The size of the vent is tailored to control the flow-rate of the exiting gas. An internal shaping structure is utilized to control the shape of the primary or main airbags prior to ground impact; this significantly improves stroke efficiency and performance.

  18. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  19. Dynamic Analysis of a Mechanical Airbag System Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, N. G.; Tetzlaff, S. A.; Hess, D. P.

    1998-10-01

    All-mechanical sensors for automotive airbag systems offer a compact and low cost yet highly reliable alternative to electrical sensors. In this paper, a non-linear dynamic model is presented that was used to improve the hammer-blow immunity of an all-mechanical ball-in-tube sensor without jeopardizing its endurance performance. Hammer-blows are impacts from within an automobile to the steering wheel or inflator shell that can occur during system installation or from aggressive driving. Sensor endurance is measured by the stability of calibration after being subjected to a sustained vibration environment. Numerical simulations of the model have elucidated the dynamics and mechanisms of operation of such sensors. Experimental hammer-blow tests and endurance tests, as well as simulations of these tests, have been performed. It is found that hammer-blow immunity can be improved without compromising endurance performance when a ball-seat spring is introduced with at least a 2·0 mm allowable deflection. Results which show the effect of varying the spring stiffness, allowable deflection, and pre-load are presented.

  20. Airbag accelerometer with a simple switched-capacitor readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugai, Masahiro; Hirata, Yoshiaki; Tanimoto, Koji; Usami, Teruo; Araki, Toru; Otani, Hiroshi

    1997-09-01

    A bulk micromachined capacitive accelerometer for airbag applications based on (110) silicon anisotropic KOH etching is presented. The sensor is a two-chip accelerometer that consists of a glass-silicon-glass stacked sense element and an interface ASIC containing an impedance converter for capacitance detection, an EPROM and DACs for digital trimming, and a self-test feature for diagnosis. A simple switched-capacitor readout circuit with DC offset error cancellation scheme is proposed as the impedance converter. The dependence of narrow gap etching, surface roughness, and uniformity of the groove depth on the KOH concentration are also investigated for the fabrication of the device, and it is shown that the etch rate of the plane intrinsically controls the depth of the narrow gap with a KOH concentration of over 30 wt. percent, and smooth surface and uniformity of groove depth are obtained at 40 wt. percent KOH. The nonlinearity of the output is about 1.5 percent FS. The temperature coefficient of sensitivity and the off-axis sensitivity are 150 ppm/degree C and 2 percent respectively. The dimensions of the sensor are 10.3 X 10.3 X 3 mm.

  1. The effect of driver age on the incidence and severity of upper extremity injuries due to second generation front air bag deployment.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Rafael; Hunting, Katherine; McKay, Mary Pat

    2010-01-01

    This study used NHTSA NASS/CDS data to examine whether advancing age was associated with a higher incidence and severity of front airbag-related upper extremity injury (UEI). Using a retrospective cohort design we analyzed weighted data from 1998-2007 for. The study population consisted of lap/shoulder belted people over 16 years of age who were driving passenger vehicles with model years 1998-2003 and were involved in a frontal crash where their front airbag deployed. Drivers who were ejected, involved in a vehicle rollover, or accompanied by a passenger sitting directly behind them were omitted. The exposure variable was age and the outcome variables were UEI incidence and severity. Associations were adjusted for gender, seat track position, vehicle type, vehicle weight, intrusion, and delta-v. Logistic regressions were performed using SAS survey procedures to account for the complex survey design. Overall, 42% of drivers sustained an UEI. Advancing age was associated with a higher incidence (p<0. 0001) and severity (p<0. 0001) of UEI. Nineteen percent of drivers sustained an UEI related to the airbag. No significant differences in the incidence or severity of airbag-related UEI were found between young drivers and older driver age groups. The degree of severity due to airbag-related UEI was generally minor. The majority of airbag-related UEI appeared to shift slightly from abrasions to contusions with aging. These results indicate that UEI due to depowered airbag deployment is common but not disproportionately high among older drivers, and injury severity is generally minor across all age groups.

  2. Mining Deployment Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čech, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    The deployment problem, researched primarily in the military sector, is emerging in some other industries, mining included. The principal decision is how to deploy some activities in space and time to achieve desired outcome while complying with certain requirements or limits. Requirements and limits are on the side constraints, while minimizing costs or maximizing some benefits are on the side of objectives. A model with application to mining of polymetallic deposit is presented. To obtain quick and immediate decision solutions for a mining engineer with experimental possibilities is the main intention of a computer-based tool. The task is to determine strategic deployment of mining activities on a deposit, meeting planned output from the mine and at the same time complying with limited reserves and haulage capacities. Priorities and benefits can be formulated by the planner.

  3. Mars pathfinder lander deployment mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Lander employs numerous mechanisms, as well as autonomous mechanical functions, during its Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Sequence. This is the first US lander of its kind, since it is unguided and airbag-protected for hard landing using airbags, instead of retro rockets, to soft land. The arrival condition, location, and orientation of the Lander will only be known by the computer on the Lander. The Lander will then autonomously perform the appropriate sequence to retract the airbags, right itself, and open, such that the Lander is nearly level with no airbag material covering the solar cells. This function uses two different types of mechanisms - the Airbag Retraction Actuators and the Lander Petal Actuators - which are designed for the high torque, low temperature, dirty environment and for limited life application. The development of these actuators involved investigating low temperature lubrication, Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) to cut gears, and gear design for limited life use.

  4. Simulation of airbag inflation processes using a coupled fluid structure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, P.-O.; Nilsson, L.

    This paper explores simulation techniques for airbag inflation problems using a coupled fluid structure approach. It is to be seen as an initial study on the phenomena occurring in an airbag during a so called out of position occupant impact. The problem studied in this paper is an airbag which is set to impact a head form. The head form is positioned at a very short distance from the airbag. A multi material arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian technique in the explicit finite element code LS-DYNA is used for the fluid and it is coupled to the structure using a penalty based fluid structure contact algorithm. The results for the head form acceleration and velocity show a good agreement to experimentally obtained values. At the early stages of the inflation process a high pressure zone is found to develop between the gas inlet and the head form. Consequently the pressure difference between the inlet and the high pressure zone is too low for an a priori assumption of sonic flow at the inlet, which is a common requirement in the control volume models used in the industry today.

  5. Modeling and Optimization of Airbag Helmets for Preventing Head Injuries in Bicycling.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Mehmet; Laksari, Kaveh; Kuo, Calvin; Grant, Gerald A; Camarillo, David B

    2017-04-01

    Bicycling is the leading cause of sports-related traumatic brain injury. Most of the current bike helmets are made of expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam and ultimately designed to prevent blunt trauma, e.g., skull fracture. However, these helmets have limited effectiveness in preventing brain injuries. With the availability of high-rate micro-electrical-mechanical systems sensors and high energy density batteries, a new class of helmets, i.e., expandable helmets, can sense an impending collision and expand to protect the head. By allowing softer liner medium and larger helmet sizes, this novel approach in helmet design provides the opportunity to achieve much lower acceleration levels during collision and may reduce the risk of brain injury. In this study, we first develop theoretical frameworks to investigate impact dynamics of current EPS helmets and airbag helmets-as a form of expandable helmet design. We compared our theoretical models with anthropomorphic test dummy drop test experiments. Peak accelerations obtained from these experiments with airbag helmets achieve up to an 8-fold reduction in the risk of concussion compared to standard EPS helmets. Furthermore, we construct an optimization framework for airbag helmets to minimize concussion and severe head injury risks at different impact velocities, while avoiding excessive deformation and bottoming-out. An optimized airbag helmet with 0.12 m thickness at 72 ± 8 kPa reduces the head injury criterion (HIC) value to 190 ± 25 at 6.2 m/s head impact velocity compared to a HIC of 1300 with a standard EPS helmet. Based on a correlation with previously reported HIC values in the literature, this airbag helmet design substantially reduces the risks of severe head injury up to 9 m/s.

  6. Deployment Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-11

    memorandum, “Improved Occupational and Environmental Health Surveillance Reporting and Archiving” (Reference (e)); and assigns responsibilities for...Injury (DI) to control or reduce Occupational and Environmental Health (OEH) risks; to document and link OEH exposures with deployed personnel, including...infectious disease threats, environmental health risks, toxic industrial chemical threats, and developments in biotechnology and biomedical subjects

  7. Deployable robotic woven wire structures and joints for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahinpoor, MO; Smith, Bradford

    1991-01-01

    Deployable robotic structures are basically expandable and contractable structures that may be transported or launched to space in a compact form. These structures may then be intelligently deployed by suitable actuators. The deployment may also be done by means of either airbag or spring-loaded typed mechanisms. The actuators may be pneumatic, hydraulic, ball-screw type, or electromagnetic. The means to trigger actuation may be on-board EPROMS, programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that trigger actuation based on some input caused by the placement of the structure in the space environment. The actuation may also be performed remotely by suitable remote triggering devices. Several deployable woven wire structures are examined. These woven wire structures possess a unique form of joint, the woven wire joint, which is capable of moving and changing its position and orientation with respect to the structure itself. Due to the highly dynamic and articulate nature of these joints the 3-D structures built using them are uniquely and highly expandable, deployable, and dynamic. The 3-D structure naturally gives rise to a new generation of deployable three-dimensional spatial structures.

  8. HCPV deployment by Aerojet Rocketdyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Michael; Miner, Kris; Ghosal, Kanchan; Lilly, Doug

    2014-09-01

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR), with essential support from HCPV module supplier, Semprius, is implementing a HCPV commercialization process by deploying HCPV systems of increasing scope and size. The process is designed to gather field data, create learning opportunities and reduce risk while leading to large scale commercial field of HCPV systems. The process steps, key lessons learned, performance data and design decisions are presented.

  9. A parametric study of a side airbag system to meet deflection based criteria.

    PubMed

    Håland, Y; Pipkorn, B

    1996-08-01

    A side airbag system comprising of 12 liter bag to cover the BioSid chest and the abdomen down to the arm rest level, and 75 mm of padding to cover the pelvic/thigh area was evaluated by a series of sled tests at two different velocities, 10 m/s and 12 m/s. The initial bag (over) pressure was varied from 0 to 80 kPa and the bag ventilation area was varied from zero to 1500 mm2. Compressed air was used to fill the bag. It was found that the ventilation of the bag reduced the maximum chest deflection by 30 percent and the maximum viscous criterion, VC, by 50 percent (comparison was made with the same bag without ventilation). A suitable initial bag (over) pressure was found to be about 50 kPa, when the loading of the abdomen was also taken into consideration. The results indicate that the chest deflection is proportioned to the door average velocity (during the first 20 ms of deflection) to the power of about 2 and that the VC is proportional to the same velocity to the power of about 4. It was also found that a 12 liter ventilated side airbag resulted in 30-40 percent lower chest deflection and about 60 percent lower VC than 50 mm of chest padding (Ethafoam 220).

  10. Airbag-Associated Severe Blunt Eye Injury Causes Choroidal Rupture and Retinal Hemorrhage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih Hao; Lim, Chen Chee; Teng, Yu Ti

    2017-01-01

    A case of choroidal rupture caused by airbag-associated blunt eye trauma and complicated with massive subretinal hemorrhage and vitreous hemorrhage that was successfully treated with intravitreal injection of expansile gas and bevacizumab is presented. A 53-year-old man suffered from loss of vision in his right eye due to blunt eye trauma by a safety airbag after a traffic accident. On initial examination, the patient had no light perception in his right eye. Dilated ophthalmoscopy revealed massive subretinal hemorrhage with macular invasion and faint vitreous hemorrhage. We performed intravitreal injection of pure sulfur hexafluoride twice for displacement, after which visual acuity improved to 0.03. For persistent subretinal hemorrhage and suspicion of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) injection was administered. After 3 weeks, the visual acuity of his right eye recovered to 0.4. For early-stage choroidal rupture-induced subretinal hemorrhage and complications of suspected CNV, intravitreal injection of expandable gas and intraocular injection of antiangiogenesis drugs seem to be an effective treatment. PMID:28203191

  11. Biofidelity evaluation of WorldSID and ES-2re under side impact conditions with and without airbag.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taewung; Shaw, Greg; Lessley, David; Park, Gwansik; Crandall, Jeff; Svendsen, Andy; Whitcomb, Bryant; Ayyagari, Murthy; Mishra, Prashast; Markusic, Craig

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the biofidelity of the WorldSID and the ES-2re under whole-body side impact conditions with and without a side airbag using the biomechanical cadaveric response data generated from 4.3m/s whole-body side impact tests. Impact forces, spinal kinematics, and chest deflections were considered in the biofidelity evaluation. Average responses and response corridors of PMHS were created using a time-alignment technique to reduce variability of the PMHS responses while maintaining the sum of the time shifts to be zero for each response. Biofidelity of the two dummies was compared using a correlation and analysis (CORA) method. The WorldSID demonstrated better biofidelity than the ES-2re in terms of CORA ratings in the conditions with airbag (0.53 vs. 0.46) and without an airbag (0.57 vs. 0.49). Lastly, the kinematic analysis of the two dummies indicated an overly compliant shoulder response of the WorldSID and excessive forward rotation of the ES-2re relative to the PMHS.

  12. Deployable Temporary Shelter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Joe R.; Headley, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Compact storable components expand to create large shelter. Fully deployed structure provides large, unobstructed bay. Deployed trusses support wall and roof blankets. Provides temporary cover for vehicles, people, and materials. Terrestrial version used as garage, hangar, or large tent.

  13. Synchronously Deployable Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Structure lightweight, readily deployed, and has reliable joints. New truss concept, designated as "pac truss," developed. Features easy deployment without need for complex mechanisms. Structures of this type deployed in free flight by controlled release of stored energy in torsional springs at selected hinges located throughout structure. Double-folding technique used in beam model applicable to flat planar trusses, allowing structures of large expanse to fold into compact packages and be deployed for space-platform applications.

  14. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  15. Deployer: A Robot-Deploying Robot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    6: Bandicoot 11 Figure 7: Deployer mast in a.) retracted, b.) extending, and c.) fully extended positions. 13 Figure 8: Wombat climbing stairs with...mast in a.) retracted, b.)extending, and c.) fully extended positions. 13 Deploy er Outfitting - Wombat The second Urban Robot, Wombat (Fig.8), was...equipped with a single, rear-mounted ISIS transceiver and a Swarm Radio to communicate with all of the Joeys. In addition, Wombat was equipped with

  16. Dynamic PIV measurement of a compressible flow issuing from an airbag inflator nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Jang, Young Gil; Kim, Seok; Kim, Chang Soo

    2006-12-01

    Among many equipment for passenger safety, the air bag system is the most fundamental and effective device for an automobile. The inflator housing is a main part of the curtain-type air bag system, which supplies high-pressure gases in pumping up the air bag-curtain which is increasingly being adapted in deluxe cars for protecting passengers from the danger of side clash. However, flow information on the inflator housing is very limited. In this study, we measure the instantaneous velocity fields of a high-speed compressible flow issuing from the exit nozzle of an inflator housing using a dynamic PIV system. From the velocity field data measured at a high frame-rate, we evaluate the variation of the mass flow rate with time. The dynamic PIV system consists of a high-repetition Nd:YLF laser, a high-speed CMOS camera, and a delay generator. The flow images are taken at 4000 fps with synchronization of the trigger signal for inflator ignition. From the instantaneous velocity field data of flow ejecting from the airbag inflator housing at the initial stage, we can see a flow pattern of broken shock wave front and its downward propagation. The flow ejecting from the inflator housing is found to have very high velocity fluctuations, with the maximum velocity at about 700 m/s. The time duration of the high-speed flow is very short, and there is no perceptible flow after 100 ms.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Folded Airbag in Frontal Impact of Adapted Vehicles for Disabled Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiá, J.; Eixerés, B.; Dols, J. F.; Esquerdo, T. V.

    2009-11-01

    The car control adaptations are used in vehicles in order to facilitate the driving to persons with physical handicaps. This does not have to suppose a decrease of the passive safety that is required to the vehicles. In order to analyze this relation there will be characterized the different control adaptations that are in use together with the different devices of passive safety that can be mounted in the vehicles in diverse cases of impact in order to generate models of simulation. The methodology used to generate this simulation consists of the first phase in which there develops the three-dimensional model of the driving place. For it, there has been used a commercial software of three-dimensional design. Once realized this one divides, the model is imported to the finite elements software in which meshing is generated. Finally, dynamic simulation software is used to assign the most important characteristics like material properties, contact interfaces, gas expansion models, airbag fold types, etc.

  18. Large Deployable Shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary design proposed for large, lightweight telescope shroud or light shield carried to orbit in single Space Shuttle cargo load. Shroud concept applied on Earth in portable, compactly storable displays or projection screens. Large telescope shroud includes four deployable masts erecting eight walls of hinged panels of polyimide film. Panels stored fanfolded before deployment and threaded on guide wires unwinding from spools and remain taut during deployment.

  19. Deployable geodesic truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Simonton, J. Wayne (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A deployable geodesic truss structure which can be deployed from a stowed state to an erected state is described. The truss structure includes a series of bays, each bay having sets of battens connected by longitudinal cross members which give the bay its axial and torsional stiffness. The cross members are hinged at their mid point by a joint so that the cross members are foldable for deployment or collapsing. The bays are deployed and stabilized by actuator means connected between the mid point joints of the cross members. Hinged longerons may be provided to also connect the sets of battens and to collapse for stowing with the rest of the truss structure.

  20. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  1. From Deploying Individuals to Deploying Departments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    the help of regulators, lawyers, customs of!cials, and private sector and regional market experts to develop comprehensive and effective solutions...the management of deploying and rede - ploying personnel across the government. Continuous Education, Training, and Exercising. Classroom education...domestic agencies must con- duct periodic exercises in order to socialize new participants and to re!ne existing processes and policies in the forward and

  2. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  3. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  4. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  5. Strain Gage Loads Calibration Testing with Airbag Support for the Gulfstream III SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed (SCRAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Miller, Eric J.; Hudson, Larry D.; Holguin, Andrew C.; Neufeld, David C.; Haraguchi, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and conduct of the strain-gage load calibration ground test of the SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed, Gulfstream III aircraft, and the subsequent data analysis and results. The goal of this effort was to create and validate multi-gage load equations for shear force, bending moment, and torque for two wing measurement stations. For some of the testing the aircraft was supported by three airbags in order to isolate the wing structure from extraneous load inputs through the main landing gear. Thirty-two strain gage bridges were installed on the left wing. Hydraulic loads were applied to the wing lower surface through a total of 16 load zones. Some dead-weight load cases were applied to the upper wing surface using shot bags. Maximum applied loads reached 54,000 lb. Twenty-six load cases were applied with the aircraft resting on its landing gear, and 16 load cases were performed with the aircraft supported by the nose gear and three airbags around the center of gravity. Maximum wing tip deflection reached 17 inches. An assortment of 2, 3, 4, and 5 strain-gage load equations were derived and evaluated against independent check cases. The better load equations had root mean square errors less than 1 percent. Test techniques and lessons learned are discussed.

  6. The Combination of Speckle Correlation and Fringe Projection for the Measurement of Dynamic 3-D Deformations of Airbag Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Herbert; Lichtenberger, Ralf; Wolf, Thomas

    Highly dynamic 3-D deformations of airbag caps in the time interval from the ignition of the airbag to the fracture of the covers have been studied optically. The large out-of-plane displacement compared to the in-plane displacements afforded that the measurement problem was solved by combining white light speckle correlation with fringe projection. In order to record the speckle patterns and the fringe patterns simultaneously by two high speed CCD cameras they had to be separated spectrally. The in-plane displacements yield from the speckle patterns by pattern recognition methods. The out-of-plane displacements can be calculated from the contour of the caps. They yield from the phase maps which are calculated from the fringe patterns. For each time instant only one image is available so that phase shifting procedures to evaluate the fringe patterns could not be applied. In this paper we present a method which is based on the simulation of a phase locked loop (PLL). This results in continuous phase maps without phase unwrapping.

  7. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  8. Deployment and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Building Resilience Sleep Growing Healthy Healthy Children > Healthy Living > Emotional Wellness > Building Resilience > Deployment and Children Healthy Living Listen Español Text ...

  9. Glory Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Glory spacecraft uses Orbital Sciences Corporation Space Systems Group's LEOStar-1 bus design, with deployable, four-panel solar arrays. This conceptual animation reveals Glory's unique solar a...

  10. Umbilical Deployment Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Gallon, John C.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2011-01-01

    The landing scheme for NASA's next-generation Mars rover will encompass a novel landing technique (see figure). The rover will be lowered from a rocket-powered descent stage and then placed onto the surface while hanging from three bridles. Communication between the rover and descent stage will be maintained through an electrical umbilical cable, which will be deployed in parallel with structural bridles. The -inch (13-mm) umbilical cable contains a Kevlar rope core, around which wires are wrapped to create a cable. This cable is helically coiled between two concentric truncated cones. It is deployed by pulling one end of the cable from the cone. A retractable mechanism maintains tension on the cable after deployment. A break-tie tethers the umbilical end attached to the rover even after the cable is cut after touchdown. This break-tie allows the descent stage to develop some velocity away from the rover prior to the cable releasing from the rover deck, then breaks away once the cable is fully extended. The descent stage pulls the cable up so that recontact is not made. The packaging and deployment technique can store a long length of cable in a relatively small volume while maintaining compliance with the minimum bend radius requirement for the cable being deployed. While the packaging technique could be implemented without the use of break-ties, they were needed in this design due to the vibratory environment and the retraction required by the cable. The break-ties used created a series of load-spikes in the deployment signature. The load spikes during the deployment of the initial three coils of umbilical showed no increase between the different temperature trials. The cold deployment did show an increased load requirement for cable extraction in the region where no break-ties were used. This increase in cable drag was superimposed on the loads required to rupture the last set of break-ties, and as such, these loads saw significant increase when compared to

  11. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  12. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  13. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  14. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  15. Parametric Cost Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis is a mathematical approach to estimating cost. Parametric cost analysis uses non-cost parameters, such as quality characteristics, to estimate the cost to bring forth, sustain, and retire a product. This paper reviews parametric cost analysis and shows how it can be used within the cost deployment process.

  16. Deployable video conference table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Inventor); Lissol, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A deployable table is presented. The table is stowed in and deployed from a storage compartment based upon a non-self rigidizing, 4-hinge, arch support structure that folds upon itself to stow and that expands to deploy. The work surfaces bypass each other above and below to allow the deployment mechanism to operate. This assembly includes the following: first and second primary pivot hinges placed at the opposite ends of the storage compartment; first and second lateral frame members with proximal ends connected to the first and second pivot hinges; a medial frame member offset from and pivotally connected to distal ends of the first and second members through third and fourth medial pivot hinges; and left-side, right-side, and middle trays connected respectively to the first, second, and third frame members and being foldable into and out of the storage compartment by articulation of the first, second, third, and fourth joints. At least one of the third and fourth joints are locked to set the first, second, and third frame members in a desired angular orientation with respect to each other.

  17. Fusion Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

    2002-02-06

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

  18. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  19. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  20. Dedicated Deployable Aerobraking Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    A dedicated deployable aerobraking structure concept was developed that significantly increases the effective area of a spacecraft during aerobraking by up to a factor of 5 or more (depending on spacecraft size) without substantially increasing total spacecraft mass. Increasing the effective aerobraking area of a spacecraft (without significantly increasing spacecraft mass) results in a corresponding reduction in the time required for aerobraking. For example, if the effective area of a spacecraft is doubled, the time required for aerobraking is roughly reduced to half the previous value. The dedicated deployable aerobraking structure thus enables significantly shorter aerobraking phases, which results in reduced mission cost, risk, and allows science operations to begin earlier in the mission.

  1. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  2. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Plum, Martin Michael

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE -owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that the treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  3. Newly Deployed Sojourner Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 8-image mosaic was acquired during the late afternoon (near 5pm LST, note the long shadows) on Sol 2 as part of the predeploy 'insurance panorama' and shows the newly deployed rover sitting on the Martian surface. This color image was generated from images acquired at 530,600, and 750 nm. The insurance panorama was designed as 'insurance' against camera failure upon deployment. Had the camera failed, the losslessly-compressed, multispectral insurance panorama would have been the main source of image data from the IMP.

    However, the camera deployment was successful, leaving the insurance panorama to be downlinked to Earth several weeks later. Ironically enough, the insurance panorama contains some of the best quality image data because of the lossless data compression and relatively dust-free state of the camera and associated lander/rover hardware on Sol 2.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  4. Deployable Crew Quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    The deployable crew quarters (DCQ) have been designed for the International Space Station (ISS). Each DCQ would be a relatively inexpensive, deployable boxlike structure that is designed to fit in a rack bay. It is to be occupied by one crewmember to provide privacy and sleeping functions for the crew. A DCQ comprises mostly hard panels, made of a lightweight honeycomb or matrix/fiber material, attached to each other by cloth hinges. Both faces of each panel are covered with a layer of Nomex cloth and noise-suppression material to provide noise isolation from ISS. On Earth, the unit is folded flat and attached to a rigid pallet for transport to the ISS. On the ISS, crewmembers unfold the unit and install it in place, attaching it to ISS structural members by use of soft cords (which also help to isolate noise and vibration). A few hard pieces of equipment (principally, a ventilator and a smoke detector) are shipped separately and installed in the DCQ unit by use of a system of holes, slots, and quarter-turn fasteners. Full-scale tests showed that the time required to install a DCQ unit amounts to tens of minutes. The basic DCQ design could be adapted to terrestrial applications to satisfy requirements for rapid deployable emergency shelters that would be lightweight, portable, and quickly erected. The Temporary Early Sleep Station (TeSS) currently on-orbit is a spin-off of the DCQ.

  5. Management of Suicide-Related Events during Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0003 TITLE: Management of Suicide -Related Events during Deployment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Jan 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Management of Suicide -Related Events during Deployment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0003...providers and chaplains with targeted, practical, and scientifically-informed guidelines and decision aids on how to respond to suicide -related events

  6. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  7. Deployment of a Curved Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Structures capable of deployment into complex, three-dimensional trusses have well known space technology applications such as the support of spacecraft payloads, communications antennas, radar reflectors, and solar concentrators. Such deployable trusses could also be useful in terrestrial applications such as the rapid establishment of structures in military and emergency service situations, in particular with regard to the deployment of enclosures for habitat or storage. To minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a single arch-shaped truss is preferable to multiple straight trusses arranged vertically and horizontally. To further minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a synchronous deployment with a single degree of freedom is also preferable. One method of synchronizing deployment of a truss is the use of a series of gears; this makes the deployment sequence predictable and testable, allows the truss to have a minimal stowage volume, and the deployed structure exhibits the excellent stiffness-to-mass and strength-to-mass ratios characteristic of a truss. A concept for using gears with varying ratios to deploy a truss into a curved shape has been developed and appears to be compatible with both space technology applications as well as potential use in terrestrial applications such as enclosure deployment. As is the case with other deployable trusses, this truss is formed using rigid elements (e.g., composite tubes) along the edges, one set of diagonal elements composed of either cables or folding/hinged rigid members, and the other set of diagonal elements formed by a continuous cable that is tightened by a motor or hand crank in order to deploy the truss. Gears of varying ratios are used to constrain the deployment to a single degree of freedom, making the deployment synchronous, predictable, and repeatable. The relative sizes of the gears and the relative dimensions of the diagonal elements determine the deployed geometry (e

  8. National Missile Defense Contingency Deployment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Defense Organization PMCS IDEA PAPER TITLE: National Missile Defense, Contingency Deployment Planning PMCS CLASS: 95C AUTHOR: Clifford E. Reeves... NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENSE CONTINGENCY DEPLOYMENT INTRODUCTION The author feels it is vital to start strategic planning for the development of operational...PROFESSIONAL MILITARY COMPTROLLER SCHOOL IDEA PAPER TITLE NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENSE CONTINGENCY DEPLOYMENT AUTHOR CLIFFORD E. REEVES GS-15, OSD

  9. Self-Deployable Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Willis, Paul B.; Tan, Seng C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently existing approaches for deployment of large, ultra-lightweight gossamer structures in space rely typically upon electromechanical mechanisms and mechanically expandable or inflatable booms for deployment and to maintain them in a fully deployed, operational configuration. These support structures, with the associated deployment mechanisms, launch restraints, inflation systems, and controls, can comprise more than 90 percent of the total mass budget. In addition, they significantly increase the stowage volume, cost, and complexity. A CHEM (cold hibernated elastic memory) membrane structure without any deployable mechanism and support booms/structure is deployed by using shape memory and elastic recovery. The use of CHEM micro-foams reinforced with carbon nanotubes is considered for thin-membrane structure applications. In this advanced structural concept, the CHEM membrane structure is warmed up to allow packaging and stowing prior to launch, and then cooled to induce hibernation of the internal restoring forces. In space, the membrane remembers its original shape and size when warmed up. After the internal restoring forces deploy the structure, it is then cooled to achieve rigidization. For this type of structure, the solar radiation could be utilized as the heat energy used for deployment and space ambient temperature for rigidization. The overall simplicity of the CHEM self-deployable membrane is one of its greatest assets. In present approaches to space-deployable structures, the stow age and deployment are difficult and challenging, and introduce a significant risk, heavy mass, and high cost. Simple procedures provided by CHEM membrane greatly simplify the overall end-to-end process for designing, fabricating, deploying, and rigidizing large structures. The CHEM membrane avoids the complexities associated with other methods for deploying and rigidizing structures by eliminating deployable booms, deployment mechanisms, and inflation and control systems

  10. Joint for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, N. D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A joint is described for connecting a pair of beams to pivot them between positions in alignment or beside one another, which is of light weight and which operates in a controlled manner. The joint includes a pair of fittings and at least one center link having opposite ends pivotally connected to opposite fittings and having axes that pass through centerplates of the fittings. A control link having opposite ends pivotally connected to the different fittings controls their relative orientations, and a toggle assemly holds the fittings in the deployed configuration wherein they are aligned. The fittings have stops that lie on one side of the centerplane opposite the toggle assembly.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-Year-Old Dummies in Biofidelity and Static Out-of-Position Airbag Tests.

    PubMed

    Berliner, J; Athey, J; Baayoun, E; Byrnes, K; Elhagediab, A; Hultman, R; Jensen, J; Kim, A; Kostyniuk, G; Mertz, H; Prest, J; Rouhana, S; Scherer, R; Xu, L

    2000-11-01

    A comparison of the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-year-old crash test dummies is presented in this paper. The performance of the dummies were compared in sixty biofidelity tests, seventy-seven static out-of-position airbag tests and sixty-three calibration tests. Various time histories and other data pertaining to accelerations, deflections, forces and moments are compared. In addition, the ease of positioning, handling, and the durability of the dummies in various out-of-position test configurations was assessed. Both the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-year-old dummies were calibrated to their respective specifications. The Hybrid III 3-year-old met its calibration requirements, while the Q3 did not always meet its own calibration requirements. The calibration specifications of the Q3 dummy need to be re-examined and possibly refined. The biofidelity of the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-year-old dummies were evaluated in both frontal and lateral test modes. Each dummy was evaluated against its own and the other's specified requirements, when possible. In the frontal test mode, the Hybrid III 3-year-old acceptably met all of its requirements. The Q3 dummy did not meet all of its own frontal biofidelity requirements. Based on these results, the Hybrid III 3-year-old is more biofidelic for primarily frontal loading conditions. With respect to the lateral biofidelity specifications, neither the Hybrid III 3-year-old nor the Q3 dummy met the requirements for the thorax and pelvis tests performed. Both dummies met the head drop requirements. Neither dummy is recommended for lateral loading conditions. For lateral testing where only the head is impacted, the Hybrid III 3-year-old could be used. In general, the responses of both dummies were repeatable in both the frontal and lateral biofidelity tests performed. The Hybrid III 3-year-old and the Q3 dummies were evaluated in static out-of-position airbag tests with three different side airbag systems (two seat-mounted and one door-mounted system), and

  12. ALMR deployment economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This analysis seeks to model and evaluate the economics of the use of Advanced Liquid Metal Reactors (ALMR) as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel). While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

  13. Economics of ALMR deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) has the potential to extend the economic life of the nuclear option and of reducing the number of high level waste repositories which will eventually be needed in an expanding nuclear economy. This paper reports on an analysis which models and evaluates the economics of the use of ALMRs as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel) or from surplus weapons grade material. While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

  14. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  15. Overview of Deployed EDS Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C

    2009-09-24

    The term explosive detection system (EDS) is used by the TSA to describe equipment that is certified to detect explosives in checked bags. The EDS, as certified, by the TSL must consist of device for interrogating a bag and an automated detection algorithm (ATD) for evaluating the results of the interrogation. We only consider CT as the interrogation device in this report. A schematic drawing of a CT-based EDS is shown in Figure 2. The output of the ATD is the binary decision of alarm or non-alarm. Alarms may true- or false-positives. Non-alarms may be true- or false-negatives. False positives are also denoted false alarms. The true detection means that the ATD reports an alarm when a threat is present in the scanned bag. The probability of detecting a threat given that a threat is present is denoted the probability of detection (PD). The probability of false alarm (PFA) is the case when an alarm is reported when a threat is not present in a bag. Certification in this context means passing tests for PD and PFA at the TSL. The results of the EDS include CT cross-sectional images of the bag and specifics about the alarmed objects generated by ATD. These results are presented on a display so that a person may override the decision of ATD and declare the alarm to be a non-alarm. This process is denoted clearing. Bags that are not cleared by the person are sent to a secondary inspection process. Here the bags may be opened or assessed with explosive trace detection (ETD) in order to clear the bags. Bags that are not cleared at this point are evaluated by an ordinance disposal team. The CT scanner along with ATD is denoted Level 1 screening. The process of clearing on a display is denoted Level 2 screening. Secondary inspection is denoted Level 3 screening. Vendors of the deployed EDSs supply the TSA with equipment for all three levels. Therefore, the term EDS may include the equipment provided for Levels 1, 2 and 3. A schematic diagram of an EDS and the levels of

  16. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  17. Thermally stable deployable structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegg, Colleen M.

    1988-01-01

    A deployable structure which meets stringent thermal and strength requirements in a space environment was developed. A mast with a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was required to limit the movement from thermal distortion over the temperature range of -200 C to 80 C to .064 cm (.025 in). In addition, a high bending strength over the temperature range and weight less than 18.1 kg (40 lbs) was needed. To meet all of the requirements, a composite, near-zero CTE structure was developed. The measured average CTE over the temperature range for the mast was .70 x .000001/C (.38 x .000001/F). The design also has the advantage of being adjustable to attain other specific CTE if desired.

  18. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  19. Deployable Pipe-Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawidzki, Machi

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a concept of deployable Pipe-Z (dPZ): a modular structural system which takes advantage of the robustness of rigid-panel mechanism and allows to create free-form links which are also reconfigurable and deployable. The concept presented can be applied for building habitats and infrastructures for human exploration of oceans and outer space. dPZ structures can adapt to changing requirements e.g. mission objectives, crew condition and technological developments. Furthermore, such lightweight and adaptable structural concept can assist in sustainable exploration development. After brief introduction, the concept of Pipe-Z (PZ) is presented. Next, the reconfigurability of PZ is explained and illustrated with continuous and collision-free transition from a PZ forming a Trefoil knot to a Figure-eight knot. The following sections introduce, explain and illustrate the folding mechanism of a single foldable Pipe-Z module (fPZM) and entire dPZ structure. The latter is illustrated with asynchronous (delayed) unfolding of a relatively complex Unknot. Several applications of PZ are suggested, namely for underwater and deep-space and surface habitats, for permanent, but in particular, temporary or emergency passages. As an example, a scenario of a failure of one of the modules of the International Space Station is presented where a rigid structure of 40 fPZMs bypasses the "dead link". A low-fidelity prototype of a 6-module octagonal dPZ is presented; several folding schemes including concentric toric rings are demonstrated. Practical issues of pressurization and packing are briefly discussed.

  20. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  1. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  2. Intelligent transportation infrastructure deployment analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, A.K.; Harding, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    Much of the work on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to date has emphasized technologies, standards/protocols, architecture, user services, core infrastructure requirements, and various other technical and institutional issues. ITS implementations in the United States and elsewhere in the world have demonstrated benefits in the areas of safety, productivity, efficiency, and environmental impact. However, quantitative benefits and satisfactory cost estimates are not available or cannot be derived for many components of the ITS, whether deployed individually or in some integrated fashion. The limitations of existing analysis and evaluation capabilities coupled with the lack of strong empirical evidence presents a major knowledge and data gap for infrastructure investment decisions involving ITS alternatives. This paper describes the over-arching issues and requirements associated with the analysis capabilities required for a systematic, faithful, and rigorous evaluation of the impacts of deploying ITS in a metropolitan area. It then describes the conceptual framework of a modeling system that will provide a preliminary analysis capability to support ITS deployment analysis and evaluation.

  3. Two Concepts for Deployable Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Two concepts that could be applied separately or together have been suggested to enhance the utility of deployable truss structures. The concepts were intended originally for application to a truss structure to be folded for compact stowage during transport and subsequently deployed in outer space. The concepts may also be applicable, with some limitations, to deployable truss structures designed to be used on Earth. The first concept involves a combination of features that would help to maximize reliability of a structure while minimizing its overall mass, the complexity of its deployment system, and the expenditure of energy for deployment. The deployment system would be integrated into the truss: some of the truss members would contain folding/unfolding-detent mechanisms similar to those in umbrellas; other truss members would contain shape-memory-alloy (SMA) coil actuators (see Figure 1). Upon exposure to sunlight, the SMA actuators would be heated above their transition temperature, causing them to extend to their deployment lengths. The extension of the actuators would cause the structure to unfold and, upon completion of unfolding, the umbrellalike mechanisms would lock the unfolded truss in the fully deployed configuration. The use of solar heating to drive deployment would eliminate the need to carry a deployment power source. The actuation scheme would offer high reliability in that the truss geometry would be such that deployment could be completed even if all actuators were not functioning. Of course, in designing for operation in normal Earth gravitation, it would be necessary to ensure that the SMA actuators could apply forces large enough to overcome the deploymentresisting forces attributable to the weights of the members. The second concept is that of an improved design for the joints in folding members. Before describing this design,

  4. Deploying the Mental Eye

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing) and an “illumination direction” (for the shading). Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.” PMID:27648221

  5. Comparison of Real World Side Impact/Rollover Collisions With and Without Thorax Airbag/Head Protection System: A First Field Experience Study

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Peter; Lange, Wolfgang; Messner, Georg; Rauscher, Stefan; Pieske, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    After the introduction of the Thorax Airbag (TA) and the Head Protection System (HPS) by BMW there has been a significant reduction of injuries in real-world collisions. Comparison of similar collisions (in-depth collision analyses) of vehicles with and without HPS/TA indicates that the effectiveness of the system was credible. Minor injuries (AIS 1) increase while serious injuries (AIS 3+) are reduced. Based on the limited cases available, a proper statistical sampling could not be achieved at this time, however the results are to be understood as indicative of a trend. PMID:11558083

  6. Device Measures Angle Of Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jermakian, Joel B.

    1991-01-01

    Simple electromechanical device indicates angular position of unfolding panel during and after deployment. Resistance of potentiometer gradually increases as unfolding of solar panel about hinge moves wiper of potentiometer. At full deployment, panel pushes and opens normally closed switch. Designed for use on panel of solar photovoltaic cells in spacecraft, modified for use in other, similar position-indicating applications.

  7. Rapidly Deployed Modular Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a telemetry system, and more specifically is a rapidly deployed modular telemetry apparatus which utilizes of SDR technology and the FPGA programming capability to reduce the number of hardware components and programming required to deploy a telemetry system.

  8. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  9. New concepts in deployable beam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The design of deployable structures involves a complicated tradeoff of packaging efficiency, the overall mechanism associated with deploying and latching beam joints, and the requirements and complexity of the beam deployer/repacker. Three longeron deployable beams, controllable geometry beams, and hybrid deployable/erectable beam concepts are evaluated.

  10. On the Application of a Response Surface Technique to Analyze Roll-over Stability of Capsules with Airbags Using LS-Dyna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.

    2008-01-01

    As NASA moves towards developing technologies needed to implement its new Exploration program, studies conducted for Apollo in the 1960's to understand the rollover stability of capsules landing are being revisited. Although rigid body kinematics analyses of the roll-over behavior of capsules on impact provided critical insight to the Apollo problem, extensive ground test programs were also used. For the new Orion spacecraft being developed to implement today's Exploration program, new air-bag designs have improved sufficiently for NASA to consider their use to mitigate landing loads to ensure crew safety and to enable re-usability of the capsule. Simple kinematics models provide only limited understanding of the behavior of these air bag systems, and more sophisticated tools must be used. In particular, NASA and its contractors are using the LS-Dyna nonlinear simulation code for impact response predictions of the full Orion vehicle with air bags by leveraging the extensive air bag prediction work previously done by the automotive industry. However, even in today's computational environment, these analyses are still high-dimensional, time consuming, and computationally intensive. To alleviate the computational burden, this paper presents an approach that uses deterministic sampling techniques and an adaptive response surface method to not only use existing LS-Dyna solutions but also to interpolate from LS-Dyna solutions to predict the stability boundaries for a capsule on airbags. Results for the stability boundary in terms of impact velocities, capsule attitude, impact plane orientation, and impact surface friction are discussed.

  11. SMAP Launch and Deployment Sequence

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video combines file footage of a Delta II rocket and computer animation to depict the launch and deployment of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite. SMAP is scheduled to launch on Nov...

  12. Deployable Wastewater Treatment Technology Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    AFRL/MLQD is expanding the Deployable Waste Disposal System to include bare base wastewater treatment. The goal of AFRL/MLQD is for the deployable... wastewater treatment system to be integrated into a waste treatment system that will treat both solid and aqueous waste. The US Army (TARDEC) and the... Air Force (AAC/WMO) have been involved in preliminary studies that provide extensive useful background information for this project. These studies show

  13. The Deployment Life Study. Appendixes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    prepare children for deployment | Have you talked with a professional (like someone in children and youth services) about how to help | your...military sponsored, school sponsored, or | non-military deployment support activities (such as Guard youth programs or Operation Purple Camp?) Baseline...assistance provided by the military | | 7 Complementary child care provided by the military | | 8 Children and Youth Services | | 9 Relief/aid

  14. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  15. MODEP Modified DEPLOY Program. Volume II - Appendixes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    requirements for PBV’s (post boost vehicles) carrying a number of objects which are deployed to various target geometries. Since MODEP lacks some of the...capabilities of the DEPLOY program, such as a sizing option, an active deployment option, and a deployed objects pattern analysis option, MODEP is...intended to supplement rather than replace the DEPLOY program. The capabilities not found in the DEPLOY program but contained in MODEP are the

  16. MODEP Modified DEPLOY Program Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    requirements for PBV’s (post boost vehicles) carrying a number of objects which are deployed to various target geometries. Since MODEP lacks some of the...capabilities of the DEPLOY program, such as a sizing option, an active deployment option, and a deployed objects pattern analysis option, MODEP is...intended to supplement rather than replace the DEPLOY program. The capabilities not found in the DEPLOY program but contained in MODEP are the

  17. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  18. Regular Deployment of Wireless Sensors to Achieve Connectivity and Information Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Yong; Jiang, Yi; Yin, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    Coverage and connectivity are two of the most critical research subjects in WSNs, while regular deterministic deployment is an important deployment strategy and results in some pattern-based lattice WSNs. Some studies of optimal regular deployment for generic values of rc/rs were shown recently. However, most of these deployments are subject to a disk sensing model, and cannot take advantage of data fusion. Meanwhile some other studies adapt detection techniques and data fusion to sensing coverage to enhance the deployment scheme. In this paper, we provide some results on optimal regular deployment patterns to achieve information coverage and connectivity as a variety of rc/rs, which are all based on data fusion by sensor collaboration, and propose a novel data fusion strategy for deployment patterns. At first the relation between variety of rc/rs and density of sensors needed to achieve information coverage and connectivity is derived in closed form for regular pattern-based lattice WSNs. Then a dual triangular pattern deployment based on our novel data fusion strategy is proposed, which can utilize collaborative data fusion more efficiently. The strip-based deployment is also extended to a new pattern to achieve information coverage and connectivity, and its characteristics are deduced in closed form. Some discussions and simulations are given to show the efficiency of all deployment patterns, including previous patterns and the proposed patterns, to help developers make more impactful WSN deployment decisions. PMID:27529246

  19. Centrifugal regulator for control of deployment rates of deployable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermalle, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements, design, and performance of a centrifugal regulator aimed at limiting deployment rates of deployable elements are discussed. The overall mechanism is comprised of four distinct functional parts in a machined housing: (1) the centrifugal brake device, which checks the payout of a deployment cable; (2) the reducing gear, which produces the spin rate necesary for the braking device; (3) the payout device, which allows the unwinding of the cable; and (4) the locking device, which prevents untimely unwinding. The centrifugal regulator is set into operation by a threshold tension of the cable which unlocks the mechanism and allows unwinding. The pulley of the windout device drives the centrifugal brake with the help of the reducing gear. The centrifugal force pushes aside weights that produce friction of the studs in a cylindrical housing. The mechanism behaved well at qualification temperature and vibrations.

  20. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  1. Deployable teleradiology: Bosnia and beyond.

    PubMed

    Levine, B A; Cleary, K; Mun, S K

    1998-03-01

    The United States military has been an effective proponent of digital imaging and teleradiology for the past 15 years [1]. A digital imaging network that eliminates the use of x-ray film makes military medicine requirements simpler. X-ray film requirements include storage of new, unexposed films, storage and use of chemicals and water for processing, and disposal of chemicals. In some deployed situations, the chemical discharge needs to be collected and shipped out of the area. Therefore, the ability to implement electronic imaging and eliminate or greatly reduce the dependence on film, chemicals, and water are intrinsically important to military medicine. In December 1995, the United States government began deployment of 20,000 United States troops to Bosnia-Herzegovina as part of NATO's peacekeeping implementation force (IFOR) operation. A full complement of military medical support facilities was established in Bosnia. An army base in Hungary was the location from which the deployment was staged. The project to deploy telemedicine and teleradiology capabilities to the medical treatment facilities (MTF) in Bosnia and Hungary became known as PrimeTime III [2]. This paper deals with the deployable teleradiology (DEPRAD) system that was installed by the Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Department of Radiology, Georgetown Medical Center, Washington, DC, at a number of facilities to implement filmless radiology and teleradiology services in support of PrimeTime III.

  2. Deployable truss structure advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, J. E.; Dudeck, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The 5-meter technology antenna program demonstrated the overall feasibility of integrating a mesh reflector surface with a deployable truss structure to achieve a precision surface contour compatible with future, high-performance antenna requirements. Specifically, the program demonstrated: the feasibility of fabricating a precision, edge-mounted, deployable, tetrahedral truss structure; the feasibility of adjusting a truss-supported mesh reflector contour to a surface error less than 10 mils rms; and good RF test performance, which correlated well with analytical predictions. Further analysis and testing (including flight testing) programs are needed to fully verify all the technology issues, including structural dynamics, thermodynamics, control, and on-orbit RF performance, which are associated with large, deployable, truss antenna structures.

  3. Airbag bounce marks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Looking east from the lander, the last few bounce marks as Pathfinder rolled to a stop on July 4 are visible in the soil in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). The two most distant marks, identified by pointers in the image, consist of dark patches of disturbed soil. The three closest marks are clearly visible in the foreground, with one easily identifiable behind the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET) mast, is at right. The most distant positively identified bounce mark, indicated by the pointer at right, is approximately 11.3 meters (37 feet) from the lander.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  4. Sample acquisition and instrument deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing the Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID) system, a robotic system for deploying science instruments and acquiring samples for analysis. The system is a conventional four degree of freedom manipulator 2 meters in length. A baseline design has been achieved through analysis and trade studies. The design considers environmental operating conditions on the surface of Mars, as well as volume constraints on proposed Mars landers. Control issues have also been studied, and simulations of joint and tip movements have been performed. The systems have been fabricated and tested in environmental chambers, as well as soil testing and robotic control testing.

  5. ROBODEXS; Multi-robot Deployment & Extraction System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-03

    Deployment & Extraction System (ROBODEXS) is a result of our development research to improve marsupial robotic deployment at safe standoff distances. The...Keywords: ROBODEXS, Marsupial , Deployment, Extraction, Multiple UGV, Modular, Scalable, Robot, Unmanned 1. INTRODUCTION Until recently, small...down to the ground level for deployment.. Research has shown commercial robotics developers have also experimented with marsupial capabilities, allowing

  6. Attentional deployment impacts neural response to regret

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Lin; Zheng, Li; Xu, Min; Zhou, Fanzhi Anita; Guo, Xiuyan

    2017-01-01

    Regret results from comparing non-optimal outcomes containing both gain and loss parts to better alternatives during decision-making. The present fMRI study aimed to explore whether levels of regret could change when gain or loss part of a non-optimal outcome was focused during a sequential risk taking task, i.e. the effect of an important emotional regulation strategy named as attentional deployment on regret. Participants were asked to open a series of boxes consecutively and decided when to stop. Each box contained a reward, except for one containing a devil to zero one’s gain in the trial. After participants stopped, both collected gains and missed chances were revealed. Besides, participants were induced to focus on collected gains (GF) or missed chances (MF), by highlighting different parts of the outcome with red squares. Behaviorally, participants rated less regret to their decisions in GF than MF context. Moreover, participants tended to be less risk-taking after GF context relative to MF. At the neural level, bilateral straitum showed increased activations in both optimal outcome and GF context. However, right MFG and IPL only showed stronger activation in GF than MF context. Additionally, pgACC and mPFC activations were found only in optimal outcome. PMID:28145480

  7. Deployment Effects on Children and Adolescents: Designing and Deploying a Developmentally Appropriate Education and Screening Video Program for Military Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-22

    therapy for our military children. Monitoring of active duty troops for mental health issues has been ongoing for deploying military service members...with the separation, may be called home (redeployed prematurely ), adversely impacting unit mission completion (Patrin, 2000). It is imperative...them make the decision to seek out a definitive evaluation or therapy (Hardaway, 2004). Active duty military programs expend significant resources to

  8. A Rapidly Deployable Bridge System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-15

    A Rapidly Deployable Bridge System Gareth R. Thomas1 and Bernard J. Sia2 1ATA Engineering, 11995 El Camino Real, San Diego, CA 92130; PH (858) 480...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ATA Engineering,11995 El Camino Real,San Diego,CA,92130 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER

  9. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains deploy) to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the CHEM structure can be rigidified by cooling below Tg to the glassy state. The structure could be subsequently reheated above Tg and recompacted. The compaction/deployment/rigidification cycle could be repeated as many times as needed.

  10. Space deployable truss structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.; Tobey, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The development status of the deployable box truss structure is summarized. Potential applications for this structural system are described. Structural and component design requirements derived from these applications are discussed. Components of prototype 4.6 m cubes which incorporate graphite/epoxy structural members, fittings, and mechanisms are described. The benefits of the component designs and their respective manufacturing processes are presented.

  11. OMV Deployed From Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    In this 1986 artist's concept, the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), at right, prepares to reboost the Hubble Space Telescope after being deployed from an early Space Station configuration (left). As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  12. Military Deployments: Evaluating Teacher Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the possible influence of a military deployment online tutorial on teacher knowledge. DoDEA and public school teachers were the two groups used for the study. From this exploratory study, the researcher also wanted to explore if teachers would find professional development provided in an online tutorial relevant…

  13. Optimal deployment of missile interceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Johnson, M.E.; Stein, M.L.

    1987-03-01

    Ballistic missile defenses composed of one- and two layers of interceptors that protect multiple assets from attacks by several types of warheads are modeled mathematically. Investigated are the most effective divisions of resources between midcourse and terminal defenses and the optimal deployments of terminal interceptors.

  14. Green light for deployment of ESA's Mars Express radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    ESA's decision to deploy MARSIS follows eight months of intensive computer simulations and technical investigations on both sides of the Atlantic. These were to assess possible harmful boom configurations during deployment and to determine any effects on the spacecraft and its scientific instruments. The three radar booms of MARSIS were initially to have been deployed in April 2004, towards the end of the Mars Express instrument commissioning phase. They consist of a pair of 20-metre hollow cylinders, each 2.5 centimetres in diameter, and a 7-metre boom. No satisfactory ground test of deployment in flight conditions was possible, so that verification of the booms' performance had to rely on computer simulation. Just prior to their scheduled release, improved computer simulations carried out by the manufacturer, Astro Aerospace (California), revealed the possibility of a whiplash effect before they locked in their final outstretched positions, so that they might hit the spacecraft. Following advice from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), which contributed the boom system to the Italian-led MARSIS radar instrument, and the Mars Express science team, ESA put an immediate hold on deployment until a complete understanding of the dynamics was obtained. JPL led a comprehensive investigation, including simulations, theoretical studies and tests on representative booms, the latter to assess potential aging of the boom material. European experts, from ESA and the former spacecraft prime contractor, Astrium SAS, France, worked closely with JPL throughout the entire investigation. An independent engineering review board, composed of ESA and industry experts, met in January to evaluate the findings and advise on ‘if and when’ to proceed with deployment. The ESA review board, at its final meeting on 25 January, recommended deployment of the MARSIS booms. The rationale for the decision was based on the results of the analyses, which showed the possible impact scenarios

  15. Rapidly deployable emergency communication system

    DOEpatents

    Gladden, Charles A.; Parelman, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A highly versatile, highly portable emergency communication system which permits deployment in a very short time to cover both wide areas and distant isolated areas depending upon mission requirements. The system employs a plurality of lightweight, fully self-contained repeaters which are deployed within the mission area to provide communication between field teams, and between each field team and a mobile communication control center. Each repeater contains a microcomputer controller, the program for which may be changed from the control center by the transmission of digital data within the audible range (300-3,000 Hz). Repeaters are accessed by portable/mobile transceivers, other repeaters, and the control center through the transmission and recognition of digital data code words in the subaudible range.

  16. Arusha Rover Deployable Medical Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Tyrone; Hopson, Sonya; Marzette, Russell; Monroe, Gilena; Mustafa, Ruqayyah

    2014-01-01

    The NSBE Arusha rover concept offers a means of human transport and habitation during long-term exploration missions on the moon. This conceptual rover calls for the availability of medical supplies and equipment for crew members in order to aid in mission success. This paper addresses the need for a dedicated medical work station aboard the Arusha rover. The project team investigated multiple options for implementing a feasible deployable station to address both the medical and workstation layout needs of the rover and crew. Based on layout specifications and medical workstation requirements, the team has proposed a deployable workstation concept that can be accommodated within the volumetric constraints of the Arusha rover spacecraft

  17. Integrated Risk Framework for Gigawatt-Scale Deployments of Renewable Energy: The U.S. Wind Energy Case; October 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, B.

    2010-04-01

    Assessing the potential environmental and human effects of deploying renewable energy on private and public lands, along our coasts, on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and in the Great Lakes requires a new way of evaluating potential environmental and human impacts. The author argues that deployment of renewables requires a framework risk paradigm that underpins effective future siting decisions and public policies.

  18. Automated Anti-Virus Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    External collaborators and visitors also need to keep in contact with their home laboratories or institutes, using the Internet to exchange e - mails or...layered defence system deployed with other components like host or network- based intrusion detection, global and personal firewalls, logical network...and provides the standard services that are requested to a modern enterprise network: office automation, e - mail , Internet access and workgroup file

  19. Sequential deployment of truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgebeth, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The geometry investigated most intensively was the triangular tetrahedral truss. A square type truss having the same topology was also investigated. The tetrahedral truss is composed of surface struts and core members. In the deployable form, the entire truss is viewed as being made up of a number of parallel truss ribs connected to each other by interrib struts and members. The packaging efficiency of the truss was evaluated.

  20. Air Deployed Oceanographic Mooring (ADOM).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Ocean Electronic Applications, Inc. Naval Air Development Center 50 W. Mashta Drive, 44, Key Biscayne , F. 33149 Warminster, PA 18974 Summ ary program...or in the bomb bay . Dimensions were limited to tution (Mooring Mechanics). The University of Miami 330 cm (130 in.) in length, 71 cm (28 in.) in dia... Biscayne , Florida. Data was tele- attaching the ADOM to the cross. The 1981 deployment metered over a three day period. The data is demon- was only

  1. Deployable M-Braced Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Tension/compression and shear separated structurally in deployable beam. M-Braced Sections Packaged using combination of hinges and telescoping sections. When upper sections telescope into base, diagonals hinge, telescope, and rotate along batten. Components of M-braced truss fabricated from conventional metallic materials or nonmetallic materials such as graphite/epoxy. Applications include masts for antenna feed horns and ribs for solar array blankets.

  2. Lifecycle Readiness and Ship Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    The physical fatigue associated with ship motions has significant consequences for today’s minimally manned ships. “Because of minimally sized...a deployment. The inefficiencies in performance may develop from lack of training, different personal aptitude, and individual’s mental or physical ...exacerbation of symptoms known as the avalanche phenomenon follows which includes: increased salivation, bodily warmth , and light- headedness” (Stevens

  3. Expected Deployment Dynamics of Proseds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M. L.; Welzyn, K.

    2003-01-01

    The control law for The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployment System (ProSEDS) deployment is a modification of the control routine that was successfully used in the flight of SEDS-II. Unlike SEDS, the tether of ProSEDS consists of different sections with different mechanical characteristics. A non-linear control trajectory in phase-space (i.e., the reference profile) is fed forward to the controller to guide the satellite, at the tether tip, to the desired final state under nominal conditions and no external perturbations. A linear feedback control is applied by the brake to keep the actual trajectory as close as possible to the reference. The paper also shows the results of simulations of deployment dynamics with and without noise. The control law has thus far been developed and tested on the ground for the original ProSEDS tether configuration of 15 km. A new reference will have to be designed and tested for other tether configurations.

  4. Design of amall deployable satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumbo, S.; Leofanti, J.; Corradi, S.; Allegri, G.; Marchetti, M.

    2003-08-01

    One of the scientific satellite programmes of Rome University "La Sapienza", called DeSat, is here reported, with major emphasis on the mechanical and structure subsystems. The principal payload of the entire system is represented by a titanium recirculating ball screw boom whose mass reaches one third of the total mass budget. The goal of the mission is to space qualify a new micro-satellite multipurpose platform, called LEO-MicroBAR, and to qualify the titanium linear actuator. Both the two systems have been developed by the Aerospace and Astronautics Engineering Department (AAED). The boom will be used to investigate the validity of its design for space applications, like precise off platform positioning of devices and instruments, GPS interferometry, sensor measurements and robotics. It will be shielded against space interactions by a titanium bellow system whose main functions will be impact protection, antirotation, boom passive thermal control. The satellite geometry, when the boom is in deployed configuration, is highly stretched and the name "deployable satellite" was natural. The large deployment mechanism, compared to the small bus, has influenced the design of every satellite subsystem leading to innovative solutions in terms of design, materials, equipment and instruments.

  5. Decision making.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2011-01-01

    A decision is a commitment of resources under conditions of risk in expectation of the best future outcome. The smart decision is always the strategy with the best overall expected value-the best combination of facts and values. Some of the special circumstances involved in decision making are discussed, including decisions where there are multiple goals, those where more than one person is involved in making the decision, using trigger points, framing decisions correctly, commitments to lost causes, and expert decision makers. A complex example of deciding about removal of asymptomatic third molars, with and without an EBD search, is discussed.

  6. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  7. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  8. Deployment Mechanism for Thermal Pointing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koski, Kraig

    2014-01-01

    The Deployment Mechanism for the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is responsible for bringing the Thermal Pointing System (TPS) from its stowed, launch locked position to the on-orbit deployed, operational position. The Deployment Mechanism also provides structural support for the TSIS optical bench and two-axis gimbal. An engineering model of the Deployment Mechanism has been environmentally qualified and life tested. This paper will give an overview of the TSIS mission and then describe the development, design, and testing of the Deployment Mechanism.

  9. InSight Instrument Deployment Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischner, Richard

    2013-09-01

    The Mars InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Program will utilize a special lightweight robotic arm termed the Instrument Deployment Arm (IDA). This paper will focus on the mechanical implementation of the IDA.The IDA originated as the robotic arm built for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the cancelled Mars 2001 Surveyor mission in 1998. The IDA is slated for refurbishment, followed by subsystem testing of its actuators, and then system testing of the full arm.This paper will delve into the specifics of the IDA electro-mechanical design, which includes light-weight actuators, multi-conductor flex-print cable, and a self- triggered launch-restraint system. The history of the design, which draws from elements as far back as the Mars Pathfinder Sojourner rover, will be discussed.Also discussed will be the specifics of the refurbishment, decisions made governing the level of refurbishment enacted, and planned post-refurbishment testing.

  10. Crash Test of an MD-500 Helicopter with a Deployable Energy Absorber Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2010-01-01

    On December 2, 2009, a full scale crash test was successfully conducted of a MD-500 helicopter at the NASA Langley Research Center Landing and Impact Research Facility . The purpose of this test was to evaluate a novel composite honeycomb deployable energy absorbing (DEA) concept for attenuation of structural and crew loads during helicopter crashes under realistic crash conditions. The DEA concept is an alternative to external airbags, and absorbs impact energy through crushing. In the test, the helicopter impacted the concrete surface with 11.83 m/s (38.8 ft/s) horizontal, 7.80 m/s (25.6 ft/s) vertical and 0.15 m/s (0.5 ft/s) lateral velocities; corresponding to a resultant velocity of 14.2 m/s (46.5 ft/s). The airframe and skid gear were instrumented with accelerometers and strain gages to determine structural integrity and load attenuation, while the skin of the airframe was covered with targets for use by photogrammetry to record gross vehicle motion before, during, and after the impact. Along with the collection of airframe data, one Hybrid III 50th percentile anthropomorphic test device (ATD), two Hybrid II 50th percentile ATDs and a specialized human surrogate torso model (HSTM) occupant were seated in the airframe and instrumented for the collection of occupant loads. Resultant occupant data showed that by using the DEA, the loads on the Hybrid II and Hybrid III ATDs were in the Low Risk regime for the injury criteria, while structural data showed the airframe retained its structural integrity post crash. Preliminary results show that the DEA is a viable concept for the attenuation of impact loads.

  11. Decision technology.

    PubMed

    Edwards, W; Fasolo, B

    2001-01-01

    This review is about decision technology-the rules and tools that help us make wiser decisions. First, we review the three rules that are at the heart of most traditional decision technology-multi-attribute utility, Bayes' theorem, and subjective expected utility maximization. Since the inception of decision research, these rules have prescribed how we should infer values and probabilities and how we should combine them to make better decisions. We suggest how to make best use of all three rules in a comprehensive 19-step model. The remainder of the review explores recently developed tools of decision technology. It examines the characteristics and problems of decision-facilitating sites on the World Wide Web. Such sites now provide anyone who can use a personal computer with access to very sophisticated decision-aiding tools structured mainly to facilitate consumer decision making. It seems likely that the Web will be the mode by means of which decision tools will be distributed to lay users. But methods for doing such apparently simple things as winnowing 3000 options down to a more reasonable number, like 10, contain traps for unwary decision technologists. The review briefly examines Bayes nets and influence diagrams-judgment and decision-making tools that are available as computer programs. It very briefly summarizes the state of the art of eliciting probabilities from experts. It concludes that decision tools will be as important in the 21st century as spreadsheets were in the 20th.

  12. Intent-based resource deployment in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mel, Geeth; Pham, Tien; Sullivan, Paul; Grueneberg, Keith; Vasconcelos, Wamberto; Norman, Tim

    2012-06-01

    Information derived from sensor networks plays a crucial role in the success of many critical tasks such as surveillance, and border monitoring. In order to derive the correct information at the right time, sensor data must be captured at desired locations with respect to the operational tasks in concern. Therefore, it is important that at the planning stage of a mission, sensing resources are best placed in the field to capture the required data. For example, consider a mission goal identify snipers, in an operational area before troops are deployed - two acoustic arrays and a day-night video camera are needed to successfully achieve this goal. This is because, if the resources are placed in correct locations, two acoustic arrays could provide direction of the shooter and a possible location by triangulating acoustic data whereas the day-night camera could produce an affirmative image of the perpetrators. In order to deploy the sensing resources intelligently to support the user decisions, in this paper we propose a Semantic Web based knowledge layer to identify the required resources in a sensor network and deploy the needed resources through a sensor infrastructure. The knowledge layer captures crucial information such as resources configurations, their intended use (e.g., two acoustic arrays deployed in a particular formation with day-night camera are needed to identify perpetrators in a possible sniper attack). The underlying sensor infrastructure will assists the process by exposing the information about deployed resources, resources in theatre, and location information about tasks, resources and so on.

  13. Visual Analysis in a Deployable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Fukase, Y.; Harima, K.; Sato, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2002-01-01

    in space under the size constraints of available delivery vehicles. A large space antenna should make it possible to improve the telecommunication bandwidth and reduce the size of ground terminals. reliable and precise deployment. Since the antenna is a highly complex structure, monitoring the deployment process and the detection of anomalies are also important. The deployed antenna should be collimated to achieve its optimal performance. such as tension and acceleration sensors. With a visual analysis, we can acquire information at many locations without complex wiring, which can increase the complexity of the system. Therefore, visual analysis should be used in conjunction with other methods for monitoring large deployable antennas. combination of cross-correlations between images and approximation at sub-pixel precision enables us to detect shifts in images with a precision of up to 0.01 pixels. This method is effective for monitoring and collimation of a deployable antenna. broadcast technologies which was developed by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) under the cooperation with Communications Research Lab. and NTT Network Innovation Lab.. One of the most important missions of ETS-VIII is to construct a large deployable antenna for S-band telecommunication. In December 2001, the LDREX mission, which was a preliminary experiment for the large deployable antenna of ETS-VIII , was performed as an Ariane-5 auxiliary payload (ASAP). A 6m scale model of the ETS-VIII deployable antenna was launched and deployed in geo-transfer orbit (GTO). During this experiment, anomalies occurred in the deployable antenna, and deployment was aborted. analysis method. Using this analysis, we detected vibrating features of the deployable antenna , which were useful for explaining the anomalies deployable antenna.

  14. Method for deploying multiple spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharer, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for deploying multiple spacecraft is disclosed. The method can be used in a situation where a first celestial body is being orbited by a second celestial body. The spacecraft are loaded onto a single spaceship that contains the multiple spacecraft and the spacecraft is launched from the second celestial body towards a third celestial body. The spacecraft are separated from each other while in route to the third celestial body. Each of the spacecraft is then subjected to the gravitational field of the third celestial body and each of the spacecraft assumes a different, independent orbit about the first celestial body. In those situations where the spacecraft are launched from Earth, the Sun can act as the first celestial body, the Earth can act as the second celestial body and the Moon can act as the third celestial body.

  15. Pre-deployment Year Mental Health Diagnoses and Treatment in Deployed Army Women.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Nikki R; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Mohr, Beth A; Jeffery, Diana D; Funk, Wendy; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2016-07-01

    We estimated the prevalence of select mental health diagnoses (MHDX) and mental health treatment (MHT), and identified characteristics associated with MHT during the pre-deployment year (365 days before deployment) in active duty Army women (N = 14,633) who returned from Iraq or Afghanistan deployments in FY2010. Pre-deployment year prevalence estimates were: 26.2 % for any select MHDX and 18.1 % for any MHT. Army women who had physical injuries since FY2002 or any behavioral health treatment between FY2002 and the pre-deployment year had increased odds of pre-deployment year MHT. During the pre-deployment year, a substantial percentage of Army women had MHDX and at least one MHT encounter or stay. Future research should determine if pre-deployment MHDX among Army women reflect vulnerability to future MHDX, or if pre-deployment MHT results in protection from chronic symptoms.

  16. Deployable and retractable telescoping tubular structure development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new deployable and retractable telescoping boom capable of high deployed stiffness and strength is described. Deployment and retraction functions are controlled by simple, reliable, and fail-safe latches between the tubular segments. The latch and a BI-STEM (Storable Tubular Extendible Member) actuator work together to eliminate the need for the segments to overlap when deployed. This yields an unusually lightweight boom and compact launch configuration. An aluminum space-flight prototype with three joints displays zero structural deadband, low hysteresis, and high damping. The development approach and difficulties are discussed. Test results provide a joint model for sizing flight booms of any diameter and length.

  17. GPM Solar Array Gravity Negated Deployment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, Jonathan; Johnson, Chris; Lewis, Jesse; Dear, Trevin; Stewart, Alphonso

    2014-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) successfully developed a g-negation support system for use on the solar arrays of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Satellite. This system provides full deployment capability at the subsystem and observatory levels. In addition, the system provides capability for deployed configuration first mode frequency verification testing. The system consists of air pads, a support structure, an air supply, and support tables. The g-negation support system was used to support all deployment activities for flight solar array deployment testing.

  18. Development of modular cable mesh deployable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Akira; Mitsugi, Jin; Andou, Kazuhide

    1993-03-01

    This report describes a concept and key technologies for the modular mesh deployable antenna. The antenna reflector composed of independently manufactured and tested modules is presented. Each module consists of a mesh surface, a cable network, and a deployable truss structure. The cable network comprises three kinds of cables, surface, tie, and back cables. Adjustment of tie cable lengths improves the surface accuracy. Synchronous deployment truss structures are considered as a supporting structure. Their design method, BBM's (Bread Board Model) and deployment analysis are also explained.

  19. Methods and Apparatus for Deployable Swirl Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Parthiv N. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft control structure for drag management includes a nozzle structure configured to exhaust a swirling fluid stream. A plurality of swirl vanes are positioned within the nozzle structure, and an actuation subsystem is configured to cause the plurality of swirl vanes to move from a deployed state to a non-deployed state. In the non-deployed state, the plurality of swirl vanes are substantially flush with the inner surface of the nozzle structure. In the deployed state, the plurality of swirl vanes produce the swirling fluid stream.

  20. Family adjustment of deployed and non-deployed mothers in families with a parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; McMorris, Barbara J.; Hanson, Sheila; Davis, Laurel

    2014-01-01

    Almost nothing is known about the family and individual adjustment of military mothers who have deployed to the conflicts in Iraq or Afghanistan (Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn; OIF, OEF, OND), constituting a gap in psychologists’ knowledge about how best to help this population. We report baseline data on maternal, child, parenting, and couple adjustment for mothers in 181 families in which a parent deployed to OIF/OEF/OND. Among this sample, 34 mothers had deployed at least once, and 147 mothers had experienced the deployment of a male spouse/partner. Mothers completed self-report questionnaires assessing past year adverse life events, war experiences (for deployed mothers only), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, difficulties in emotion regulation, parenting, couple adjustment, and child functioning. Mothers who had deployed reported greater distress than non-deployed mothers (higher scores on measures of PTSD and depression symptoms), and slightly more past year adverse events. A moderate number of war experiences (combat and post-battle aftermath events) were reported, consistent with previous studies of women in current and prior conflicts. However, no differences were found between the two groups on measures of couple adjustment, parenting, or child functioning. Results are discussed in terms of the dearth of knowledge about deployed mothers, and implications for psychologists serving military families. PMID:25663739

  1. Family adjustment of deployed and non-deployed mothers in families with a parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; McMorris, Barbara J; Hanson, Sheila; Davis, Laurel

    2014-12-01

    Almost nothing is known about the family and individual adjustment of military mothers who have deployed to the conflicts in Iraq or Afghanistan (Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn; OIF, OEF, OND), constituting a gap in psychologists' knowledge about how best to help this population. We report baseline data on maternal, child, parenting, and couple adjustment for mothers in 181 families in which a parent deployed to OIF/OEF/OND. Among this sample, 34 mothers had deployed at least once, and 147 mothers had experienced the deployment of a male spouse/partner. Mothers completed self-report questionnaires assessing past year adverse life events, war experiences (for deployed mothers only), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, difficulties in emotion regulation, parenting, couple adjustment, and child functioning. Mothers who had deployed reported greater distress than non-deployed mothers (higher scores on measures of PTSD and depression symptoms), and slightly more past year adverse events. A moderate number of war experiences (combat and post-battle aftermath events) were reported, consistent with previous studies of women in current and prior conflicts. However, no differences were found between the two groups on measures of couple adjustment, parenting, or child functioning. Results are discussed in terms of the dearth of knowledge about deployed mothers, and implications for psychologists serving military families.

  2. Impact of Military Deployment and Distance Learning on Soldier-Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, August T.

    2013-01-01

    Soldiers face complex challenges, issues, and decisions when pursuing distance learning while deployed. These challenges are encountered frequently while completing undergraduate and graduate degree programs on active duty overseas. Many learning programs and benefits are available and utilized by military online learners in a war zone. Education…

  3. Mechanically scanned deployable antenna study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Mechanically Scanned Deployable Antenna which is launched by the STS (Space Shuttle) to provide radiometric brightness temperature maps of the Earth and oceans at selected frequency bands in the frequency range of 1.4 GHz to 11 GHz is presented. Unlike previous scanning radiometric systems, multiple radiometers for each frequency are required in order to fill in the resolution cells across the swath created by the 15 meter diameter spin stabilized system. This multiple beam radiometric system is sometimes designated as a ""whiskbroom'' system in that it combines the techniques of the scanning and ""pushbroom'' type systems. The definition of the feed system including possible feed elements and location, determination of the fundamental reflector feed offset geometry including offset angles and f/D ratio, preliminary estimates of the beam efficiency of the feed reflector system, a summary of reflector mesh losses at the proposed radiometric frequency bands, an overall conceptual configuration design and preliminary structural and thermal analyses are included.

  4. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.; Killian, M.A.

    1993-03-02

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  5. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.; Killian, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  6. Organizational Decisions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    240 finance departments of county, city and state governments’ promotion decisions, Halabv (1976) obtained evidence that the analysis of the decision...oper- ations research techniques and practicing finance managers avoid complex mathematical models in favor of a few simple rules in investment decision...likely its managers to spend time with outside organizations. Similarly, organizations that depend on outside financing select more outside members

  7. Quality Function Deployment in Launch Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-23

    tool in translating these requirements throughout the whole process of design, development, manufacture, and operations. This report explores the...Command operational requirements. 4 2. QUALITY FUNCTION DEPLOYMENT OVERVIEW Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is a planning tool to improve the process...Finish Process Control Production Control Insulation Welding Forming Machining Trimming Composites Fabrication Environmental Control 0 33 In order to

  8. Army Deployments of OIF and OEF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Congress Cataloging -in-Publication Data Bonds, Tim, 1962– Army deployments to OIF and OEF / Timothy M. Bonds, Dave Baiocchi, Laurie L. McDonald. p...for a short period one or more times to those with 365 days of continuous deployed duty. (The previous “ tachometer ” chart, in contrast, better

  9. Air deployment of satellite-tracked drifters

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, R.E.; Richardson, P.L.; Blumenthal, B.P.

    1980-05-20

    Six free-drifting buoys tracked by the Nimbus 6 satellite were successfully launched by C-130 aircraft in a series of deployments during 1977-1979. The buoys were launched in Gulf Stream rings which had been identified with airborne XBT surveys and satellite infrared images. This is the first operational test of these air-deployable buoys.

  10. Military Children: When Parents Are Deployed Overseas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimons, Virginia M.; Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Armed Services and Reserve Unit Members, both male and female, are being deployed to distant lands for long periods of time, disrupting family life and causing stressful times for the adults and children in the family. Traditionally, the mother of the military family was left to be the caregiver after the deployment of the…

  11. Experimental thermal mechanics of deployable boom structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predmore, R.

    1972-01-01

    An apparatus was developed for thermal distortion measurements on deployable boom structures. The calibration procedure and thermal static bending plus twist measurements are considered. The thermal mechanics test facility is described. A table is presented for several examples of spacecraft applications of thermal static distortion measurements on 3-m deployable booms.

  12. Seismic SMHD -- Rotational Sensor Development and Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, Darren; Pierson, Bob; Brune, Bob

    2016-06-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding development and deployment of a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, high dynamic range, low noise floor, proven ruggedness, and high repeatability. This paper presents current status of sensor development and deployment opportunities.

  13. Self-deploying photovoltaic power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A lightweight flexible photovoltaic (PV) blanket is attached to a support structure of initially stowed telescoping members. The deployment mechanism comprises a series of extendable and rotatable columns. As these columns are extended the PV blanket is deployed to its proper configuration.

  14. Heart rate variability: Pre-deployment predictor of post-deployment PTSD symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Constans, Joseph I.; Wiederhold, Mark D.; Gibson, Douglas P.; Kimbrell, Timothy; Kramer, Teresa L.; Pitcock, Jeffery A.; Han, Xiaotong; Williams, D. Keith; Chartrand, Don; Gevirtz, Richard N.; Spira, James; Wiederhold, Brenda K.; McCraty, Rollin; McCune, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate variability is a physiological measure associated with autonomic nervous system activity. This study hypothesized that lower pre-deployment HRV would be associated with higher post-deployment post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Three-hundred-forty-three Army National Guard soldiers enrolled in the Warriors Achieving Resilience (WAR) study were analyzed. The primary outcome was PTSD symptom severity using the PTSD Checklist – Military version (PCL) measured at baseline, 3- and 12-month post-deployment. Heart rate variability predictor variables included: high frequency power (HF) and standard deviation of the normal cardiac inter-beat interval (SDNN). Generalized linear mixed models revealed that the pre-deployment PCL*ln(HF) interaction term was significant (p < 0.0001). Pre-deployment SDNN was not a significant predictor of post-deployment PCL. Covariates included age, pre-deployment PCL, race/ethnicity, marital status, tobacco use, childhood abuse, pre-deployment traumatic brain injury, and previous combat zone deployment. Pre-deployment heart rate variability predicts post-deployment PTSD symptoms in the context of higher pre-deployment PCL scores. PMID:27773678

  15. Military children: when parents are deployed overseas.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Virginia M; Krause-Parello, Cheryl A

    2009-02-01

    Members of the Armed Services and Reserve Unit Members, both male and female, are being deployed to distant lands for long periods of time, disrupting family life and causing stressful times for the adults and children in the family. Traditionally, the mother of the military family was left to be the caregiver after the deployment of the husband/father. Today, extended family members as well as mothers or fathers are asked to serve as caregivers for dependent children of deployed servicemen and servicewomen. This article provides information about the challenges families face and the psychosocial developmental needs of children and families during the five stages of military deployment: predeployment, deployment, sustainment, redeployment, and postdeployment. School nurses can offer children and families support and link them with available resources and networks that will assist them with their needs.

  16. Structures for remotely deployable precision antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for completely deployable large antenna reflectors capable of efficiently handling millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation. The structural concepts and technologies that are appropriate to fully automated deployment of dish-type antennas with solid reflector surfaces were studied. First, the structural requirements are discussed. Then, existing concepts for fully deployable antennas are described and assessed relative to the requirements. Finally, several analyses are presented that evaluate the effects of beam steering and segmented reflector design on the accuracy of the antenna.

  17. Dynamic Deployment Simulations of Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of using Control Volume (CV) method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method in LSDYNA to simulate the dynamic deployment of inflatable space structures is investigated. The CV and ALE methods were used to predict the inflation deployments of three folded tube configurations. The CV method was found to be a simple and computationally efficient method that may be adequate for modeling slow inflation deployment sine the inertia of the inflation gas can be neglected. The ALE method was found to be very computationally intensive since it involves the solving of three conservative equations of fluid as well as dealing with complex fluid structure interactions.

  18. Breastfeeding during military deployment: a soldier's story.

    PubMed

    Sleutel, Martha Rider

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of women of childbearing age are serving and being deployed in the United States military. U.S. Department of Defense policies related to breastfeeding and deployment are inconsistent among the different branches of the military and sometimes conflict with evidence-based guidelines about optimal breastfeeding practices. This is the story of an active duty soldier who was deployed while breastfeeding and the obstacles she encountered trying to send breast milk home to her son. The article explores policy, health and professional practice implications.

  19. Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities - MRW Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mathew; Bowen, Brian; Coles, Dwight; Cleal, Thomas; Quarles, Elliott; Gurule, Kaitlyn; Kagie, Matthew

    2014-09-18

    The Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities consists the these three components: MAD: Utility designed to automate the deployment of java applications to multiple java application servers. The product contains a front end web utility and backend deployment scripts. MAR: Web front end to maintain and update the components inside database. MWR-Encrypt: Web utility to convert a text string to an encrypted string that is used by the Oracle Weblogic application server. The encryption is done using the built in functions if the Oracle Weblogic product and is mainly used to create an encrypted version of a database password.

  20. Deployable M-braced truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, M. D. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A deployable M-braced truss structure, efficiently packaged into a compact stowed position and expandable to an operative position at the use site is described. The M-braced configuration effectively separates tension compression and shear in the structure and permits efficient structural design. Both diagonals and longerons telescope from an M-braced base unit and deploy either pneumatically, mechanically by springs or cables, or by powered reciprocating mechanisms. Upon full deployment, the diagonals and longerons lock into place with a simple latch mechanism.

  1. Coronary angioscopy before and after stent deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardo, Scott J.; Schatz, Richard A.; Rocha-Singh, Krishna J.; Wong, S. Chiu; Morris, Nancy A.; Strumpf, Robert K.; Heuser, Richard R.; Teirstein, Paul

    1993-09-01

    Coronary angioscopy was used in an attempt to visualize the internal architecture of cardiac vessels before and after deployment of Palmaz-Schatz stents in 50 patients. The vessel was successfully visualized in 48 (96%) of these patients. In 24 patients, angioscopy was performed both after preliminary balloon angioplasty and then again after stent deployment. In all 24 patients the diameter of the lumen appeared larger after stent deployment as compared to after balloon angioplasty. In 16 of these 24 patients a dissection was documented by angioscopy after balloon angioplasty. The dissection was absent after stent deployment in all 16 patients. In seven patients, thrombus that was not apparent by angiography was visualized by angioscopy. Moreover, in four patients, thrombus that was suggested by angiography could not be confirmed by angioscopy.

  2. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction and ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55-m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror.

  3. Tethered satellite system deployer flight thermal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapter, John J.

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is a Space Shuttle payload that was flown on July 31, 1992. Though anomalies prevented full deployment, the duration of the mission was approximately as planned, so it was possible to assess system thermal performance. The deployer, which supports the satellite and controls tether movement, has a thermal design that includes multilayer insulation, heaters, and the Spacelab Freon Loop. The deployer Thermal Subsystem met all requirements, and there were no anomalies during the flight. This paper summarizes the TSS deployer thermal design and compares pre- and post-flight thermal analyses. It also decribes simplified personal-computer thermal models of the TSS-1 and presents analysis results for the as-flown timeline.

  4. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  5. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  6. Analysis of Security Contractors in Deployed Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    of Security Contractors in Deployed Environments 6. AUTHOR(S) Herron, Jennifer F Santiago, Gregory 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION... 5 II. DEFINITIONS AND BACKGROUND .....................................................................7 A. DEFINITIONS...Firms..................................35 5 . Legal Authority over Security Firms ...............................................35 C

  7. Perceptions of stigma and barriers to care among UK military personnel deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq.

    PubMed

    Osório, Carlos; Jones, Norman; Fertout, Mohammed; Greenberg, Neil

    2013-09-01

    Perceived stigma and organizational barriers to care (stigma/BTC) can influence the decision to seek help for military personnel when they are suffering from mental health problems. We examined the relationship between stigmatizing beliefs, perceived BTC, and probable post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 23,101 UK military personnel deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq both during and after deployment; and in a smaller group some six months later. Overall, our results suggest that stigma/BTC perceptions were significantly, and substantially higher during deployment than when personnel are returning home; however, within the smaller follow-up group, the rates climbed significantly over the first six-months post-deployment although they still remained lower than during-deployment levels. Male personnel, those who reported higher levels of PTSD symptoms and/or greater combat exposure were significantly more likely to endorse more stigma/BTC at both sampling points. Rates of stigma/BTC on deployment are substantially higher than rates measured when personnel are in less threatening environments. We suggest that the considerable efforts that military forces make to encourage effective help seeking should take account of the fluctuating levels of stigma/BTC. Commanders should be aware that encouraging help seeking may be more difficult in operational environments than when personnel have returned home.

  8. Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-15

    the Air Force and Navy to counter challenges to U.S. freedom of action, defeat adversaries with sophisticated anti- access and area-denial (A2/AD...Force Base in North Dakota ) to deploy to Andersen arrived in February 2004. B-52 bombers can each carry 20 AGM-86C/D conventional air-launched...negotiate with sovereign countries on force deployments or face the risks of losing bases or access . Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld visited Guam in

  9. Deployable radiator with flexible line loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Bryan V. (Inventor); Lehtinen, Arthur Mathias (Inventor); McGee, Billy W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Radiator assembly (10) for use on a spacecraft (12) is provided including at least one radiator panel assembly (26) repeatably movable between a panel stowed position (28) and a panel deployed position (36), at least two flexible lines (40) in fluid communication with the at least one radiator panel assembly (26) and repeatably movable between a stowage loop (42) and a flattened deployed loop (44).

  10. Towards the Ubiquitous Deployment of DNSSEC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JAN 2011 – JUN 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TOWARDS THE UBIQUITOUS DEPLOYMENT OF DNSSEC 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This report describes the effort performed under contract number FA8750-11-C-0088 for supporting the ubiquitous deployment of DNSSEC...outreach, standardization and education related activities. As part of our effort on this contract , we have made a number of contributions towards

  11. Deployment of Military Mothers during Wartime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-12

    months old if you’re not breastfeeding because I think the younger they are, the less long term effects it’s going to have on them. I don’t think he...been back. Several of the mothers of young children were still breastfeeding while they prepared to deploy. [P34] I was still breastfeeding ... breastfeeding a lot more than that. To preserve their bond, an area of importance in the pre-deployment phase was setting up communication pathways

  12. Supporting spouses during a military deployment.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Thora T

    2008-01-01

    US National Guard and Reserves members are deploying at the highest rates since World War II, leaving behind spouses in community settings without the full support of the military. Deployment may create or intensify existing stressors to spouses and bring about changes in coping strategies. The goal of this article is to increase the healthcare provider's knowledge about the stressors these spouses may experience and provide resources in case they may require extra support and assistance.

  13. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, T.

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  14. Affects of Multiple Deployments on Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-11

    are faced with during lengthy deployments. “Certainly, the nature of the deployment and the role of the service member in the military action can...and sadness. Preschoolers may display regressive behavior, irritation, sadness, and aggressiveness and may have somatic complaints. School-age...may also be hesitant to be affectionate with the returned parent. Preschoolers may feel scared or angry. School-age children may crave attention from

  15. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  16. 78 FR 77550 - Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Federal Highway Administration Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants AGENCY: Federal... is extending the application period for the Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants... Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants. The purpose of this notice was to invite...

  17. A gendered perspective on military deployment.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patricia J; Nilsson, Johanna; Berkel, Laverne

    2014-01-01

    Military deployment, especially in combat or dangerous areas, can have a strong influence on subsequent mental health. This effect may be intensified as a result of the potential stigma that admission of mental health problems indicates weakness. Additional mental health issues exist for female soldiers from the National Guard who are pulled from non-military environments to work under dangerous conditions far from home and traditional social support. Minimal documentation is available about the day-to-day, gendered experiences of deployment for this group of female soldiers. To provide background for appropriate training and support, the aim of this study was to understand better the experiences of military deployment for women in the National Guard. We used content analysis to analyze individual, semi-structured interviews with a sample of 42 women from 7 U.S. National Guard units who were deployed in combat areas. Four general themes emerged about deployment experience: the general environment of stress, heterogeneous job responsibilities, home comes with you, and gendered stress. Military efforts are needed to address gender-specific issues associated with deployment and to develop resilience training that will optimize the mental health of female soldiers.

  18. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction a nd ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55- m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror. Keywords: precision deployment, hinge joint, latch joint, deployable structures, fabrication, space telescopes, optical instruments, microdynamics.

  19. Designing Planar Deployable Objects via Scissor Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Wang, Shiwei; Chen, Xuejin; Ding, Chao; Jiang, Luo; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Ligang

    2016-02-01

    Scissor structure is used to generate deployable objects for space-saving in a variety of applications, from architecture to aerospace science. While deployment from a small, regular shape to a larger one is easy to design, we focus on a more challenging task: designing a planar scissor structure that deploys from a given source shape into a specific target shape. We propose a two-step constructive method to generate a scissor structure from a high-dimensional parameter space. Topology construction of the scissor structure is first performed to approximate the two given shapes, as well as to guarantee the deployment. Then the geometry of the scissor structure is optimized in order to minimize the connection deflections and maximize the shape approximation. With the optimized parameters, the deployment can be simulated by controlling an anchor scissor unit. Physical deployable objects are fabricated according to the designed scissor structures by using 3D printing or manual assembly. We show a number of results for different shapes to demonstrate that even with fabrication errors, our designed structures can deform fluently between the source and target shapes.

  20. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  1. Joints in deployable space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the response of deployable structural concepts being considered for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) backup structure will be dominated by the response of joints, the joint characteristics are significant. An overview is given of the research activities at LaRC on the static behavior of joints for deployable space truss structures. Since a pin-clevis-type joint will be utilized in deployable structures, an experimental research program to characterize the joint parameters which affect stiffness was conducted. An experimental research program was conducted on a second type of joint, referred to as a near-center latch joint. It was used in the center of members on the deployable truss structure for the Control of Flexible Structures (COFS) flight experiment. The test results of the near-center latch joint and the member with the joints indicated that the stiffness of the near-center joint is linear and stiffer than the stiffness of the total member, and that non-linearities in the stiffness characteristics of the total member were due to bending introduced at the ends of the member. The resulting data indicates that stiff linear folding joints can be designed and that bending load paths should be avoided whenever possible. In summary, for deployable structures, special attention to the joint and the structure design is required to minimize the undesirable structural non-linearities.

  2. New Antenna Deployment, Pointing and Supporting Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costabile, V.; Lumaca, F.; Marsili, P.; Noni, G.; Portelli, C.

    1996-01-01

    On ITALSAT Flight 2, the Italian telecommunications satellite, the two L-Ka antennas (Tx and Rx) use two large deployable reflectors (2000-mm diameter), whose deployment and fine pointing functions are accomplished by means of an innovative mechanism concept. The Antenna Deployment & Pointing Mechanism and Supporting Structure (ADPMSS) is based on a new configuration solution, where the reflector and mechanisms are conceived as an integrated, self-contained assembly. This approach is different from the traditional configuration solution. Typically, a rigid arm is used to deploy and then support the reflector in the operating position, and an Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM) is normally interposed between the reflector and the arm for steering operation. The main characteristics of the ADPMSS are: combined implementation of deployment, pointing, and reflector support; optimum integration of active components and interface matching with the satellite platform; structural link distribution to avoid hyperstatic connections; very light weight and; high performance in terms of deployment torque margin and pointing range/accuracy. After having successfully been subjected to all component-level qualification and system-level acceptance tests, two flight ADPMSS mechanisms (one for each antenna) are now integrated on ITALSAT F2 and are ready for launch. This paper deals with the design concept, development, and testing program performed to qualify the ADPMSS mechanism.

  3. A module concept for a cable-mesh deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meguro, Akira

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacture, and deployment tests of a modular mesh deployable antenna. Reaction forces and moments created by a mesh and cable network are estimated using CASA. Deployment analysis is carried out using DADS. Three types of deployable antenna modules are developed and fabricated. Their design approach and deployment characteristics are also presented. Ground deployment tests are performed to verify design criteria.

  4. The Design of a Portable and Deployable Solar Energy System for Deployed Military Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    The Design of a Portable and Deployable Solar Energy System for Deployed Military Applications Justin Tyner, Matt Coates, Dave Holloway, Kyle...energy systems and to specifically design a portable solar energy system for use tailored for a deployed military/combat unit. We considered ease...where diesel generators are superior and areas where the solar energy systems are superior. The remainder of this paper outlines our process and

  5. The VII Corps Deployment to Saudi Arabia: An Analysis of Deployment Transportation Planning and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-04

    as VII Corps did during the Gulf War. Transportation Managemen t Deployment of forces relies on the careful management of the transportation assets...disobedient, was wasting money and a lot of people’s time and was slowing the deployment down. Further, if containers were not stuffed and pulled soon, the...ships are easier to load 71 and there would have been less time wasted waiting for ships to move to and from the berths. The Deployment Process When MG

  6. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  7. Deployment of the MARSIS Radar Antennas On-Board Mars Express

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Michel; Moorhouse, A.; Smith, A.; McKay, Mike; Fischer, J.; Jayaraman, P.; Mounzer, Z.; Schmidt, R.; Reddy, J.; Ecale, E.; Horttor, R.; Adams, D.; Flamini, E.

    2006-01-01

    On the first European planetary mission, the deployment of the two 20-meter long MARSIS antennas onboard the ESA Mars Express spacecraft has represented an unprecedented technological challenge, in the middle of a successful science mission. While Mars Express was already performing regular observations at Mars, a complex process has been performed on Earth, involving the ESA Project, coordination between ESA, NASA and ASI, the Mars Science community, the spacecraft manufacturer EADS Astrium and the Mission Control Centre at ESOC. This paper describes the steps that led from an initial nogo in 2004 to deployment one year later, as well as the conditions and difficulties encountered during the actual deployment. It provides insights in the technical and managerial processes that made it a success, and analyses the rationale behind the decisions.

  8. Lightweight, Self-Deploying Foam Antenna Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Levin, Steven; Rand, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight, deployable antennas for a variety of outer-space and terrestrial applications would be designed and fabricated according to the concept of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures, according to a proposal. Mechanically deployable antennas now in use are heavy, complex, and unreliable, and they utilize packaging volume inefficiently. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would be simple and would deploy themselves without need for any mechanisms and, therefore, would be more reliable. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would also weigh less, could be packaged in smaller volumes, and would cost less, relative to mechanically deployable antennas. The CHEM concept was described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56; and "Solar Heating for Deployment of Foam Structures" (NPO-20961), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 36. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The CHEM concept is one of utilizing opencell foams of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) to make lightweight, reliable, simple, and inexpensive structures that can be alternately (1) compressed and stowed compactly or (2) expanded, then rigidified for use. A CHEM structure is fabricated at full size from a block of SMP foam in its glassy state [at a temperature below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the SMP]. The structure is heated to the rubbery state of the SMP (that is, to a temperature above Tg) and compacted to a small volume. After compaction, the structure is cooled to the glassy state of the SMP. The compacting force can then be released and the structure remains compact as long as the temperature is kept below Tg. Upon subsequent heating of the structure above Tg, the simultaneous elastic recovery of the foam and its shape-memory effect cause the structure to expand to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the structure can be rigidified by

  9. Multifunctional Deployment Hinges Rigidified by Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Simburger, Edward J.; Matusmoto, James; Giants, Thomas W.; Garcia, Alexander; Perry, Alan; Rawal, Suraj; Marshall, Craig; Lin, John Kun Hung; Day, Jonathan Robert; Scarborough, Stephen Emerson

    2005-01-01

    Multifunctional hinges have been developed for deploying and electrically connecting panels comprising planar arrays of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells. In the original intended application of these hinges, the panels would be facets of a 32-sided (and approximately spherical) polyhedral microsatellite (see figure), denoted a PowerSphere, that would be delivered to orbit in a compact folded configuration, then deployed by expansion of gas in inflation bladders. Once deployment was complete, the hinges would be rigidified to provide structural connections that would hold the panels in their assigned relative positions without backlash. Such hinges could also be used on Earth for electrically connecting and structurally supporting solar panels that are similarly shipped in compact form and deployed at their destinations. As shown in section A-A in the figure, a hinge of this type is partly integrated with an inflation bladder and partly integrated with the frame of a solar panel. During assembly of the hinge, strip extensions from a flexible circuit harness on the bladder are connected to corresponding thin-film conductors on the solar panel by use of laser welding and wrap-around contacts. The main structural component of the hinge is a layer of glass fiber impregnated with an ultraviolet-curable resin. After deployment, exposure to ultraviolet light from the Sun cures the resin, thereby rigidifying the hinge.

  10. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  11. Industrial Wireless Sensors: A User's Perspective on the Impact of Standards on Wide-spread Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Cyrus W.; Manges, Wayne W; Sorge, John N

    2012-01-01

    The role of wireless sensing technologies in industrial instrumentation will undoubtedly become more important in the years ahead. . Deployment of such instrumentation in an industrial setting with its heightened security and robustness criteria hinges on user acceptance of verified performance as well as meeting cost requirements. Today, industrial users face many choices when specifying a wireless sensor network, including radio performance, battery life, interoperability, security, and standards compliance. The potential market for industrial wireless sensors is literally millions of wireless instruments and it is imperative that accurate information for applying the technology to real-world applications be available to the end-user so that they can make informed deployment decisions. The majority of industrial wireless automation designs now being deployed or being considered for deployment are based on three different standards . The HART Communications Foundation s WirelessHART (IEC 62591), the International Society of Automation s ISA100.11a, and the offering from the Industrial Wireless Alliance of China known as WIA-PA (IEC 62601). Aside from these industrial automation standards, users must also be cognizant of the underlying wireless network standards IEEE 802.11, IEEE 802.15.4, and IEEE 802.15.3a and their interactions with the three principal industrial automation protocols mentioned previously. The crucial questions being asked by end users revolve around sensor network performance, interoperability, reliability, and security. This paper will discuss potential wireless sensor applications in power plants, barriers to the acceptance of wireless technology, concerns related to standards, and provide an end user prospective on the issues affecting wide-spread deployment of wireless sensors. Finally, the authors conclude with a discussion of a recommended path forward including how standards organizations can better facilitate end user decision making and

  12. Research on lightweight passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror in the deployable space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Peifeng; Li, Chuang; Jing, Nan; Chong, Yaqin; Ren, Guorui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a new type of lightweight passive deployment mechanism based on the tape spring and the shape memory alloy is presented for the secondary mirror of a deployable space telescope. In this passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror, the high elastic potential energy of the folded tape springs is used as driving force when the support structure is extended, and the high stiffness characteristics of the circular arc cross section of the tape spring can be used to achieve structure self-locking after deployment. Then a deployable space telescope combined with lightweight passive deployable mechanism for the secondary mirror is designed for applying to nanosatellite imaging. Furthermore, a lock-release device is designed to achieve the function of locking the folded structure and releasing on orbit by taking advantage of the phase transformation characteristics of shape memory alloy with temperature changing. Finally, the correction method for the deployment error of secondary mirror is discussed. The temperature of the tape springs is controlled respectively to make a required length change. This can achieve the purpose of adjusting the position of the secondary mirror and improve the deployment accuracy.

  13. Deployment of human-machine dialogue systems.

    PubMed Central

    Roe, D B

    1995-01-01

    The deployment of systems for human-to-machine communication by voice requires overcoming a variety of obstacles that affect the speech-processing technologies. Problems encountered in the field might include variation in speaking style, acoustic noise, ambiguity of language, or confusion on the part of the speaker. The diversity of these practical problems encountered in the "real world" leads to the perceived gap between laboratory and "real-world" performance. To answer the question "What applications can speech technology support today?" the concept of the "degree of difficulty" of an application is introduced. The degree of difficulty depends not only on the demands placed on the speech recognition and speech synthesis technologies but also on the expectations of the user of the system. Experience has shown that deployment of effective speech communication systems requires an iterative process. This paper discusses general deployment principles, which are illustrated by several examples of human-machine communication systems. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7479719

  14. Preliminary design method for deployable spacecraft beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Cassapakis, Costas

    1995-01-01

    There is currently considerable interest in low-cost, lightweight, compactly packageable deployable elements for various future missions involving small spacecraft. These elements must also have a simple and reliable deployment scheme and possess zero or very small free-play. Although most small spacecraft do not experience large disturbances, very low stiffness appendages or free-play can couple with even small disturbances and lead to unacceptably large attitude errors which may involve the introduction of a flexible-body control system. A class of structures referred to as 'rigidized structures' offers significant promise in providing deployable elements that will meet these needs for small spacecraft. The purpose of this paper is to introduce several rigidizable concepts and to develop a design methodology which permits a rational comparison of these elements to be made with alternate concepts.

  15. Deploying Embodied AI into Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, David J. H.

    The last two years have seen the start of commercial activity within virtual worlds. Unlike computer games where Non-Player-Character avatars are common, in most virtual worlds they are the exception — and until recently in Second Life they were non-existent. However there is real commercial scope for Als in these worlds — in roles from virtual sales staff and tutors to personal assistants. Deploying an embodied AI into a virtual world offers a unique opportunity to evaluate embodied Als, and to develop them within an environment where human and computer are on almost equal terms. This paper presents an architecture being used for the deployment of chatbot driven avatars within the Second Life virtual world, looks at the challenges of deploying an AI within such a virtual world, the possible implications for the Turing Test, and identifies research directions for the future.

  16. Deploying Darter A Cray XC30 System

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Mark R; Budiardja, Reuben D; Crosby, Lonnie D; McNally, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    TheUniversityofTennessee,KnoxvilleacquiredaCrayXC30 supercomputer, called Darter, with a peak performance of 248.9 Ter- aflops. Darter was deployed in late March of 2013 with a very aggressive production timeline - the system was deployed, accepted, and placed into production in only 2 weeks. The Spring Experiment for the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) largely drove the accelerated timeline, as the experiment was scheduled to start in mid-April. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) project also needed access and was able to meet their tight deadlines on the newly acquired XC30. Darter s accelerated deployment and op- erations schedule resulted in substantial scientific impacts within the re- search community as well as immediate real-world impacts such as early severe tornado warnings

  17. Thermal static bending of deployable interlocked booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L.; Predmore, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Metal ribbons processed with a heat-forming treatment are enabled to form tubelike structures when deployed from a roll. Deployable booms of this have been utilized for gravity-gradient stabilization on the RAE, ATS, and Nimbus D satellites. An experimental thermal-mechanics test apparatus was developed to measure the thermal static bending and twist of booms up to 3 meters long. The apparatus was calibrated by using the correlation between calculated and observed thermal bending of a seamless tube. Thermal static bending values of 16 interlocked deployable booms were observed to be within a factor of 2.5 of the values calculated from seamless-tube theory. Out-of-Sun-plane thermal bending was caused by complex heat transfer across the interlocked seam. Significant thermal static twisting was not observed.

  18. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  19. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Estes, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Enrico; Martinez-Sanchez, Manual; Sanmartin, Juan

    1999-01-01

    Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can extract orbital energy to 'push' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System experiment will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a 5 km bare copper tether from a Delta II upper stage to achieve approximately 0.4 N drag thrust, thus lowering the altitude of the stage. The experiment will use a predominantly 'bare' tether for current collection in lieu of the endmass collector and insulated tether approach used on previous missions. The flight experiment is a precursor to a more ambitious electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes - all using electrodynamic thrust. The expected performance of the tether propulsion system during the experiment is described.

  20. Deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Quan; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Shao-Jing; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast are investigated. The adopted solar array system is introduced firstly, including system configuration, deployable mast and solar arrays with several mechanisms. Then dynamic equation of the solar array system is established by the Jourdain velocity variation principle and a method for dynamics with topology changes is introduced. In addition, a PD controller with disturbance estimation is designed to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody. Finally the validity of the dynamic model is verified through a comparison with ADAMS software and the deployment process and dynamic behavior of the system are studied in detail. Simulation results indicate that the proposed model is effective to describe the deployment dynamics of the large-scale flexible solar arrays and the proposed controller is practical to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody.

  1. Optimal deployment of emissions reduction technologies for construction equipment.

    PubMed

    Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul; Zietsman, Josias; Quadrifoglio, Luca; Farzaneh, Mohamadreza

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a multiobjective optimization model to deploy emissions reduction technologies for nonroad construction equipment to reduce emissions in a cost-effective and optimal manner. Given a fleet of construction equipment emitting different pollutants in the nonattainment (NA) and near -nonattainment (NNA) counties of a state and a set of emissions reduction technologies available for installation on equipment to control pollution/emissions, the model assists in determining the mix of technologies to be deployed so that maximum emissions reduction and fuel savings are achieved within a given budget. Three technologies considered for emissions reduction were designated as X, Y, and Z to keep the model formulation general so that it can be applied for any other set of technologies. Two alternative methods of deploying these technologies on a fleet of equipment were investigated with the methods differing in the technology deployment preference in the NA and NNA counties. The model having a weighted objective function containing emissions reduction benefits and fuel-saving benefits was programmed with C++ and ILOG-CPLEX. For demonstration purposes, the model was applied for a selected construction equipment fleet owned by the Texas Department of Transportation, located in NA and NNA counties of Texas, assuming the three emissions reduction technologies X, Y, and Z to represent, respectively, hydrogen enrichment, selective catalytic reduction, and fuel additive technologies. Model solutions were obtained for varying budget amounts to test the sensitivity of emissions reductions and fuel-savings benefits with increasing the budget. Different mixes of technologies producing maximum oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) reductions and total combined benefits (emissions reductions plus fuel savings) were indicated at different budget ranges. The initial steep portion of the plots for NO(x) reductions and total combined benefits against budgets

  2. Mars pathfinder Rover egress deployable ramp assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Brian R.; Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Program is a NASA Discovery Mission, led by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to launch and place a small planetary Rover for exploration on the Martian surface. To enable safe and successful egress of the Rover vehicle from the spacecraft, a pair of flight-qualified, deployable ramp assemblies have been developed. This paper focuses on the unique, lightweight deployable ramp assemblies. A brief mission overview and key design requirements are discussed. Design and development activities leading to qualification and flight systems are presented.

  3. Clevis joint for deployable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to pin clevis joints, and more particularly, to zero play pin clevis joints for connecting structural members of a deployable space structure. A joint includes a pin, a tang, and a shackle. The pin is tapered at the same angle as the bores extending through the projections of the shackle and the tang. A spring washer biases the tang onto the tapered sidewall of the pin. The invention solves the free play problem associated with deployable space structures by using a tapered pin which is held in tapered holes by the spring washers.

  4. Development of Norms for the Post-deployment Reintegration Scale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    perspective. Recognizing the importance of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers...of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers developed the Army Post- Deployment... successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, and attempting to address the gaps and limitations of existing

  5. Wind deployment in the United States: states, resources, policy, and discourse.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Elizabeth J; Stephens, Jennie C

    2009-12-15

    A transformation in the way the United States produces and uses energy is needed to achieve greenhouse gas reduction targets for climate change mitigation. Wind power is an important low-carbon technology and the most rapidly growing renewable energy technology in the U.S. Despite recent advances in wind deployment, significant state-by-state variation in wind power distribution cannot be explained solely by wind resource patterns nor by state policy. Other factors embedded within the state-level socio-political context also contribute to wind deployment patterns. We explore this socio-political context in four U.S. states by integrating multiple research methods. Through comparative state-level analysis of the energy system, energy policy, and public discourse as represented in the media, we examine variation in the context for wind deployment in Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, and Texas. Our results demonstrate that these states have different patterns of wind deployment, are engaged in different debates about wind power, and appear to frame the risks and benefits of wind power in different ways. This comparative assessment highlights the complex variation of the state-level socio-political context and contributes depth to our understanding of energy technology deployment processes, decision-making, and outcomes.

  6. Evaluation of Trap Designs and Deployment Strategies for Capturing Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Morrison, William R; Cullum, John P; Leskey, Tracy C

    2015-08-01

    Halyomorpha halys (Stål) is an invasive pest that attacks numerous crops. For growers to make informed management decisions against H. halys, an effective monitoring tool must be in place. We evaluated various trap designs baited with the two-component aggregation pheromone of H. halys and synergist and deployed in commercial apple orchards. We compared our current experimental standard trap, a black plywood pyramid trap 1.22 m in height deployed between border row apple trees with other trap designs for two growing seasons. These included a black lightweight coroplast pyramid trap of similar dimension, a smaller (29 cm) pyramid trap also ground deployed, a smaller limb-attached pyramid trap, a smaller pyramid trap hanging from a horizontal branch, and a semipyramid design known as the Rescue trap. We found that the coroplast pyramid was the most sensitive, capturing more adults than all other trap designs including our experimental standard. Smaller pyramid traps performed equally in adult captures to our experimental standard, though nymphal captures were statistically lower for the hanging traps. Experimental standard plywood and coroplast pyramid trap correlations were strong, suggesting that standard plywood pyramid traps could be replaced with lighter, cheaper coroplast pyramid traps. Strong correlations with small ground- and limb-deployed pyramid traps also suggest that these designs offer promise as well. Growers may be able to adopt alternative trap designs that are cheaper, lighter, and easier to deploy to monitor H. halys in orchards without a significant loss in sensitivity.

  7. Evaluation of robot deployment in live missions with the military, police, and fire brigade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, Carl; Reinhold, Roger; Christensen, Henrik I.

    2007-04-01

    Robots have been successfully deployed within bomb squads all over the world for decades. Recent technical improvements are increasing the prospects to achieve the same benefits also for other high risk professions. As the number of applications increase issues of collaboration and coordination come into question. Can several groups deploy the same type of robot? Can they deploy the same methods? Can resources be shared? What characterizes the different applications? What are the similarities and differences between different groups? This paper reports on a study of four areas in which robots are already, or are about to be deployed: Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT), Military and Police Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD), Military Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear contamination control (CBRN), and Fire Fighting (FF). The aim of the study has been to achieve a general overview across the four areas to survey and compare their similarities and differences. It has also been investigated to what extent it is possible for the them to deploy the same type of robot. It was found that the groups share many requirements, but, that they also have a few individual hard constrains. A comparison across the groups showed the demands of man-portability, ability to access narrow premises, and ability to handle objects of different weight to be decisive; two or three different sizes of robots will be needed to satisfy the need of the four areas.

  8. A Buildings Module for the Stochastic Energy Deployment System

    SciTech Connect

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2008-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) is building a new long-range (to 2050) forecasting model for use in budgetary and management applications called the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS), which explicitly incorporates uncertainty through its development within the Analytica(R) platform of Lumina Decision Systems. SEDS is designed to be a fast running (a few minutes), user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual programming interface. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is responsible for implementing the SEDS Buildings Module. The initial Lite version of the module is complete and integrated with a shared code library for modeling demand-side technology choice developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lumina. The module covers both commercial and residential buildings at the U.S. national level using an econometric forecast of floorspace requirement and a model of building stock turnover as the basis for forecasting overall demand for building services. Although the module is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies, it differs from standard energy forecasting models by including considerations of passive building systems, interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains), and on-site power generation.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Tritium Technology Deployments Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project

    SciTech Connect

    McFee, J.; Blauvelt, D.; Stallings, E.; Willms, S.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the organization, planning and initial implementation of a DOE OST program to deploy proven, cost effective technologies into D&D programs throughout the complex. The primary intent is to accelerate closure of the projects thereby saving considerable funds and at the same time being protective of worker health and the environment. Most of the technologies in the ''toolkit'' for this program have been demonstrated at a DOE site as part of a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP). The Mound Tritium D&D LSDDP served as the base program for the technologies being deployed in this project but other LSDDP demonstrated technologies or ready-for-use commercial technologies will also be considered. The project team will evaluate needs provided by site D&D project managers, match technologies against those needs and rank deployments using a criteria listing. After selecting deployments the project will purchase the equipment and provide a deployment engineer to facilitate the technology implementation. Other cost associated with the use of the technology will be borne by the site including operating staff, safety and health reviews etc. A cost and performance report will be prepared following the deployment to document the results.

  10. Diogenes, Dogfaced Soldiers, and Deployment Music Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Geoffrey; Williamson, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This webtext explores the cynical/kynical humor of soldier videos, suggesting that amateur videos paradoxically both undercut authority and honor effective leaders, both make light of and also publicly reveal deployment hardships, both distance the performers from military groupthink and celebrate unit camaraderie.

  11. Solar array deployment from a spinning spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, A. H.; Gardner, J. B.; Lassen, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    Cylindrical drum, wrapped with flexible solar array of solar cells mounted on Mylar sheet, is held by two end-fittings with cable (under tension) passing through axel of drum. Drum is held to end-fittings by axial cable through drum axel; drum is released for deployment when cable is cut at each end and end-fittings spring outward.

  12. Military Deployment and Elementary Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Terri; Dunham, Mardis; Lyons, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the impact that military deployment has upon academic achievement of elementary school students. TerraNova test scores of 137 fourth and fifth grade students in two elementary schools with a high proportion of military dependent children were examined for two consecutive years. Although the academic test performance fell…

  13. Launch Deployment Assembly Human Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the human engineering analysis performed by the Systems Branch in support of the 6A cargo element design. The human engineering analysis is limited to the extra vehicular activities (EVA) which are involved in removal of various cargo items from the LDA and specific activities concerning deployment of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).

  14. Strategic Deployment Requirements for an Expeditionary Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-29

    operations will directly depend on effective integration of Army combat system development, deployment infrastructure and evolution of strategic lift...Enduring Freedom, (Air Force Historical Research Agency, 14 November 2002), 6. 40 Eastward, the pilings of the bridge were Moron (Spain), Rhein

  15. A Quality Function Deployment Analysis of Customer Needs for Meeting School Improvement Goals: The Voice of the School Principal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Susan N.; And Others

    In providing leadership for school improvement teams, principals must employ group communication and decision-making skills. In this study, a planning procedure called Quality Function Deployment (QFD) was modified for use with school-based administrators. Teams of school leaders used QFD to generate the top priority needs of school customers…

  16. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  17. Identification of and At-Risk Interventions for Pre-Deployment Psychophysiologic Predictors of PostDeployment Mental Health Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    symptoms. Low HRV is associated with increased physical and emotional stress . The time between pre-deployment SDNN and post-deployment PTSD symptom...objective pre-deployment predictors for post- deployment post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to test two pre-deployment interventions designed...laptop computers. Task 4: Modify existing video game stress inoculation biofeedback training for use in the study (Mos. 1-6): • Modify existing

  18. Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-134 38 - 1 Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life ...Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks. In Human Dimensions...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life

  19. A Decision Support System for Managing a Diverse Portfolio of Technology Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an automated decision support system designed to facilitate the management of a continuously changing portfolio of technologies as new technologies are deployed and older technologies are decommissioned.

  20. Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings continue deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  1. Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings fully deployed during flight following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Californiaornia. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  2. Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  3. Dynamic analysis of the deployment for mesh reflector deployable antennas with the cable-net structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiqun; Li, Na; Yang, Guigeng; Ru, Wenrui

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a dynamic analysis approach for the composite structure of a deployable truss and cable-net system. An Elastic Catenary Element is adopted to model the slack/tensioned cables. Then, from the energy standpoint, the kinetic energy, elasticity-potential energy and geopotential energy of the cable-net structure and deployable truss are derived. Thus, the flexible multi-body dynamic model of the deployable antenna is built based on the Lagrange equation. The effect of the cable-net tension on the antenna truss is discussed and compared with previous publications and a dynamic deployment analysis is performed. Both the simulation and experimental results verify the validity of the method presented.

  4. Capability 9.3 Assembly and Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John

    2005-01-01

    Large space systems are required for a range of operational, commercial and scientific missions objectives however, current launch vehicle capacities substantially limit the size of space systems (on-orbit or planetary). Assembly and Deployment is the process of constructing a spacecraft or system from modules which may in turn have been constructed from sub-modules in a hierarchical fashion. In-situ assembly of space exploration vehicles and systems will require a broad range of operational capabilities, including: Component transfer and storage, fluid handling, construction and assembly, test and verification. Efficient execution of these functions will require supporting infrastructure, that can: Receive, store and protect (materials, components, etc.); hold and secure; position, align and control; deploy; connect/disconnect; construct; join; assemble/disassemble; dock/undock; and mate/demate.

  5. Advanced deployable reflectors for communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Elvin; Josephs, Michael; Hedgepeth, John

    1993-02-01

    This paper discusses a concept for a deployable mesh reflector for large spacecraft antennas and the processes used in design, fabrication and testing. A set of overall reflector requirements such as stowed volume, deployed diameter and RF loss derived from system specifications are presented. The development of design and analysis tools to allow parametric studies such as facet size, number of ribs and number of rib segments is discussed. CATIA (a commercially available three-dimensional design and analysis tool) is used to perform kinematic analyses as well as to establish the database to be used by the several groups participating in the development is examined. Results of trade studies performed to reduce cost with minimum risk to product delivery are included. A thirty foot reflector has been built and tested.

  6. Average deployments versus missile and defender parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    This report evaluates the average number of reentry vehicles (RVs) that could be deployed successfully as a function of missile burn time, RV deployment times, and the number of space-based interceptors (SBIs) in defensive constellations. Leakage estimates of boost-phase kinetic-energy defenses as functions of launch parameters and defensive constellation size agree with integral predictions of near-exact calculations for constellation sizing. The calculations discussed here test more detailed aspects of the interaction. They indicate that SBIs can efficiently remove about 50% of the RVs from a heavy missile attack. The next 30% can removed with two-fold less effectiveness. The next 10% could double constellation sizes. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S.; Stephens, T.; McManus, W.

    2013-03-01

    Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways. An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, Steve; Stephens, Thomas; McManus, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  9. Options for Deploying Missile Defenses in Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    the location and description of the radar have not yet been specified. For this analysis, CBO assumed that the radar would resemble an AN/ TPY -2 3 ...of the options, with the European Midcourse Radar and AN/ TPY -2 radar both estimated to cost about $150 mil- lion apiece. Option 3 also includes about...MISSILE DEFENSES IN EUROPE CBOContinued Box 3 - 3 . Placing a Forward-Based Radar in Israel Recently, the United States deployed an AN/ TPY -2 radar to

  10. Estimating Inter-Deployment Training Cycle Performances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    DEPLOYMENT TRAINING CYCLE PERFORMANCES by Levent Eriskin December 2003 Thesis Advisor: Samuel E. Buttrey Second Reader: Robert A...Eriskin Approved by: Samuel E. Buttrey Thesis Advisor Robert A. Koyak Second Reader James N. Eagle Chairman, Department of Operations...1 USS LAKE ERIE USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN Figure 23. Force Maintenance and Material Management Values on Predictor Axis Ships ∆B USS LAKE ERIE 39

  11. Multistage Deployment of the Army Theater Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    organic to the supported unit typically provide role-1 and role-2 care with capabilities for immediate lifesaving measures and stabilization for...conform to the tactical plans of the combat forces, and are located close to the forward line of troops to allow rapid acquisition , stabilization...deployment, mobility, and logistical strain are not a key measure of combat service support performance. Recently however, as the battlefield morphs

  12. Deployable Hexapod Using Tape-Springs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    main advantages of this concept compared to classical hyper-stable telescope structures are: - a reduced volume during launch allowing large systems...The main advantages of a deployable and active telescope structure compared to classical hyperstable telescope structures are a reduced volume...developed and manufactured by IWF TÜ Braunschweig who already applied them to motorised applications. The steel tape-spring can be rolled in the coiling

  13. Deployed Base Solar Power (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    have come as a result of this program. solar power, photovoltaics, Renewable Energy Tent City, deployed shelter U U U UU 13 Robert Diltz Reset 1...Value: >$5M - World Class Capability One-of-a-Kind 50,000 sq. ft. Renewable Energy Tent City • Ability to Study Grid Parallel and Autonomous...BOS) 9 Renewable Energy Tent City Real World Energy Dynamics Study Reliability & Durability  Visual Inspections  I-V Characteristics Performance

  14. Coordinated Deployment of Multiple, Heterogeneous Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Coordinated Deployment of Multiple, Heterogeneous Robots Reid Simmons1, David Apfelbaum1, Dieter Fox1, Robert P. Goldman2, Karen Zita Haigh2, David J...Drive Pittsburgh PA 15213 Minneapolis MN 55418 Abstract To be truly useful, mobile robots need to be fairly autonomous and easy to control. This is...especially true in situations where multiple robots are used, due to the increase in sensory information and the fact that the robots can interfere with

  15. Quality Function Deployment for Large Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1992-01-01

    Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is typically applied to small subsystems. This paper describes efforts to extend QFD to large scale systems. It links QFD to the system engineering process, the concurrent engineering process, the robust design process, and the costing process. The effect is to generate a tightly linked project management process of high dimensionality which flushes out issues early to provide a high quality, low cost, and, hence, competitive product. A pre-QFD matrix linking customers to customer desires is described.

  16. Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R.; Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G.

    2014-02-18

    For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

  17. Hybrid deployable support truss designs for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J.

    1988-01-01

    Concepts for a 20-meter diameter Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) deployable truss backup structure, and analytical predictions of its structural characteristics are discussed. The concept shown is referred to as the SIXPAC; It is a combination of the PACTRUSS concept and a single-fold beam, which would make up the desired backup structure. One advantage of retaining the PACTRUSS concept is its packaging density and its capability for synchronous deployment. Various 2-meter hexagonal panel arrangements are possible for this Hybrid PACTRUSS structure depending on the panel-to-structure attachment strategies used. Static analyses of the SIXPAC using various assumptions for truss designs and panel masses of 10 kg sq meters were performed to predict the tip displacement of the structure when supported at the center. The tip displacement ranged from 0.20 to 0.44 mm without the panel mass, and from 0.9 to 3.9 mm with the panel mass (in a 1-g field). The data indicate that the structure can be adequately ground tested to validate its required performance in space, assuming the required performance in space is approximately 100 microns. The static displacement at the tip of the structure when subjected to an angular acceleration of 0.001 rad/sec squared were estimated to range from 0.8 to 7.5 microns, depending on the type of truss elements.

  18. Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    This report details the interim progress for contract NASW-4818, Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID), a robotic system for deploying science instruments and acquiring samples for analysis. The system is a conventional four degree of freedom manipulator 2 meters in length. A baseline design has been achieved through analysis and trade studies. The design considers environmental operating conditions on the surface of Mars, as well as volume constraints on proposed Mars landers. Control issues have also been studied, and simulations of joint and tip movements have been performed. A passively braked shape memory actuator with the ability to measure load has been developed. The wrist also contains a mechanism which locks the lid output to the bucket so that objects can be grasped and released for instrument deployment. The wrist actuator has been tested for operational power and mechanical functionality at Mars environmental conditions. The torque which the actuator can produce has been measured. Also, testing in Mars analogous soils has been performed.

  19. Structures for remotely deployable precision antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Future space missions such as the Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESGP) will require highly accurate antennas with apertures that cannot be launched fully formed. The operational orbits are often inaccessible to manned flight and will involve expendable launch vehicles such as the Delta or Titan. There is therefore a need for completely deployable antenna reflectors of large size capable of efficiently handling millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation. The parameters for the type of mission are illustrated. The logarithmic plot of frequency versus aperture diameter shows the regions of interest for a large variety of space antenna applications, ranging from a 1500-meter-diameter radio telescope for low frequencies to a 20-meter-diameter infrared telescope. For the ESGP, a major application is the microwave radiometry at high frequencies for atmospheric sounding. Almost all existing large antenna reflectors for space employ a mesh-type reflecting surface. Examples are shown and discussed which deal with the various structural concepts for mesh antennas. Fortunately, those concepts are appropriate for creating the very large apertures required at the lower frequencies for good resolution. The emphasis is on the structural concepts and technologies that are appropriate to fully automated deployment of dish-type antennas with solid reflector surfaces. First the structural requirements are discussed. Existing concepts for fully deployable antennas are then described and assessed relative to the requirements. Finally, several analyses are presented that evaluate the effects of beam steering and segmented reflector design on the accuracy of the antenna.

  20. Ultralightweight Space Deployable Primary Reflector Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Zeiders, Glenn W.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A concept has been developed and analyzed and several generational prototypes built for a gossamer-class deployable truss for a mirror or reflector with many smaller precisely-figured solid elements attached will, for at least the next several decades, minimize the mass of a large primary mirror assembly while still providing the high image quality essential for planet-finding and cosmological astronomical missions. Primary mirror segments are mounted in turn on ultralightweight thermally-formed plastic panels that hold clusters of mirror segments in rigid arrays whose tip/tilt and piston would be corrected over the scale of the plastic panels by the control segments. Prototype panels developed under this program are 45 cm wide and fabricated from commercially available Kaplan sheets. A three-strut octahedral tensegrity is the basis for the overall support structure. Each fundamental is composed of two such octahedrons, rotated oppositely about a common triangular face. Adjacent modules are joined at the nodes of the upper and lower triangles to form a deployable structure that could be made arbitrarily large. A seven-module dowel-and-wire prototype has been constructed. Deployment techniques based on the use of collapsing toggled struts with diagonal tensional elements allows an assembly of tensegrities to be fully collapsed and redeployed. The prototype designs will be described and results of a test program for measuring strength and deformation will be presented.

  1. Burn injuries caused by air bag deployment.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D; Noah, E M; Fuchs, P; Pallua, N

    2001-03-01

    Automobile air bags have gained acceptance as an effective measure to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with motor vehicle accidents. As more cars have become equipped with them, new problems have been encountered that are directly attributable to the deployment of the bag itself. An increasing variety of associated injuries has been reported, including minor burns. We present two automobile drivers who were involved in front-impact crashes with air bag inflation. They sustained superficial and partial-thickness burns related to the deployment. The evaluation of these cases shows mechanisms involved in burn injuries caused by the air bag system. Most of the burns are chemical and usually attributed to sodium hydroxide in the aerosol created during deployment. Also direct thermal burns from high-temperature gases or indirect injuries due to the melting of clothing, as well as friction burns from physical contact are possible. However, the inherent risks of air bag-related burns are still outweighed by the benefits of preventing potentially life-threatening injuries.

  2. Tether deployment monitoring system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An operational Tether Deployment Monitoring System (TEDEMS) was constructed that would show system functionality in a terrestrial environment. The principle function of the TEDEMS system is the launching and attachment of reflective targets onto the tether during its deployment. These targets would be tracked with a radar antenna that was pointed towards the targets by a positioning system. A spring powered launcher for the targets was designed and fabricated. An instrumentation platform and launcher were also developed. These modules are relatively heavy and will influence tether deployment scenarios, unless they are released with a velocity and trajectory closely matching that of the tether. Owing to the tracking range limitations encountered during field trails of the Radar system, final TEDEMS system integration was not completed. The major module not finished was the system control computer. The lack of this device prevented any subsystem testing or field trials to be conducted. Other items only partially complete were the instrumentation platform launcher and modules and the radar target launcher. The work completed and the tests performed suggest that the proposed system continues to be a feasible approach to tether monitoring, although additional effort is still necessary to increase the range at which modules can be detected. The equipment completed and tested, to the extent stated, is available to NASA for use on any future program that requires tether tracking capability.

  3. Experiences and Psychosocial Impact of West Africa Ebola Deployment on US Health Care Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Robyn; Dernehl, Liza A.; Nwankwo, Ezinne; Zhi, Qi; Qureshi, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Background: This qualitative study was designed to assess health care volunteers’ experiences and psychosocial impacts associated with deployment to the West Africa Ebola epidemic. Methods: In 2015, using snowball sampling, 16 US health care volunteers who had recently returned from West Africa were recruited for this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect information associated with each phase of deployment (pre, peri, and post). Results: Participants reported that they were motivated to volunteer because of a sense of responsibility and feelings of empathy and altruism. Immediately prior to deployment, most reported fear of contagion and death, as well as doubts regarding the adequacy of their training. Family members and close friends expressed high levels of concern regarding participants’ decisions to volunteer. During the deployment, participants were fearful of exposure and reported feeling emotionally and physically exhausted. They also reported feeling frustrated by extreme resource limitations, poor management of the mission, lack of clearly defined roles and responsibilities, and inability to provide high quality care. Upon return home, participants felt a sense of isolation, depression, stigmatization, interpersonal difficulties, and extreme stress. Conclusion: Preparedness of volunteers was suboptimal at each stage of deployment. All stakeholders, including volunteers, sponsoring organizations, government agencies, and professional organizations have a shared responsibility in ensuring that volunteers to medical missions are adequately prepared. This is especially critical for high risk deployments. Effective policies and practices need to be developed and implemented in order to protect the health and well-being of health care volunteers to the fullest extent possible. PMID:27803840

  4. Deployable Wide-Aperture Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Chu, Andrew; Scully, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Inexpensive, lightweight array antennas on flexible substrates are under development to satisfy a need for large-aperture antennas that can be stored compactly during transport and deployed to full size in the field. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, antennas of this type also have potential terrestrial uses . most likely, as means to extend the ranges of cellular telephones in rural settings. Several simple deployment mechanisms are envisioned. One example is shown in the figure, where the deployment mechanism, a springlike material contained in a sleeve around the perimeter of a flexible membrane, is based on a common automobile window shade. The array can be formed of antenna elements that are printed on small sections of semi-flexible laminates, or preferably, elements that are constructed of conducting fabric. Likewise, a distribution network connecting the elements can be created from conventional technologies such as lightweight, flexible coaxial cable and a surface mount power divider, or preferably, from elements formed from conductive fabrics. Conventional technologies may be stitched onto a supporting flexible membrane or contained within pockets that are stitched onto a flexible membrane. Components created from conductive fabrics may be attached by stitching conductive strips to a nonconductive membrane, embroidering conductive threads into a nonconductive membrane, or weaving predetermined patterns directly into the membrane. The deployable antenna may comprise multiple types of antenna elements. For example, thin profile antenna elements above a ground plane, both attached to the supporting flexible membrane, can be used to create a unidirectional boresight radiation pattern. Or, antenna elements without a ground plane, such as bow-tie dipoles, can be attached to the membrane to create a bidirectional array such as that shown in the figure. For either type of antenna element, the dual configuration, i.e., elements formed of slots in a conductive

  5. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has produced many standards and recommendations whose aim is to generate an architecture that starts from astrophysical resources, in a general sense, and ends up in deployed consumable services (that are themselves astrophysical resources). Focusing on the Data Access Layer (DAL) system architecture, that these standards define, in the last years a web based application has been developed and maintained at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives) to try to deploy and manage multiple VO (Virtual Observatory) services in a uniform way: VO-Dance. However a set of criticalities have arisen since when the VO-Dance idea has been produced, plus some major changes underwent and are undergoing at the IVOA DAL layer (and related standards): this urged IA2 to identify a new solution for its own service layer. Keeping on the basic ideas from VO-Dance (simple service configuration, service instantiation at call time and modularity) while switching to different software technologies (e.g. dismissing Java Reflection in favour of Enterprise Java Bean, EJB, based solution), the new solution has been sketched out and tested for feasibility. Here we present the results originating from this test study. The main constraints for this new project come from various fields. A better homogenized solution rising from IVOA DAL standards: for example the new DALI (Data Access Layer Interface) specification that acts as a common interface system for previous and oncoming access protocols. The need for a modular system where each component is based upon a single VO specification allowing services to rely on common capabilities instead of homogenizing them inside service components directly. The search for a scalable system that takes advantage from distributed systems. The constraints find answer in the adopted solutions hereafter sketched. The

  6. Deployable Aeroshell Flexible Thermal Protection System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Ware, Joanne S.; DelCorso, Joseph A.; Lugo, Rafael A.

    2009-01-01

    Deployable aeroshells offer the promise of achieving larger aeroshell surface areas for entry vehicles than otherwise attainable without deployment. With the larger surface area comes the ability to decelerate high-mass entry vehicles at relatively low ballistic coefficients. However, for an aeroshell to perform even at the low ballistic coefficients attainable with deployable aeroshells, a flexible thermal protection system (TPS) is required that is capable of surviving reasonably high heat flux and durable enough to survive the rigors of construction handling, high density packing, deployment, aerodynamic loading and aerothermal heating. The Program for the Advancement of Inflatable Decelerators for Atmospheric Entry (PAIDAE) is tasked with developing the technologies required to increase the technology readiness level (TRL) of inflatable deployable aeroshells, and one of several of the technologies PAIDAE is developing for use on inflatable aeroshells is flexible TPS. Several flexible TPS layups were designed, based on commercially available materials, and tested in NASA Langley Research Center's 8 Foot High Temperature Tunnel (8ft HTT). The TPS layups were designed for, and tested at three different conditions that are representative of conditions seen in entry simulation analyses of inflatable aeroshell concepts. Two conditions were produced in a single run with a sting-mounted dual wedge test fixture. The dual wedge test fixture had one row of sample mounting locations (forward) at about half the running length of the top surface of the wedge. At about two thirds of the running length of the wedge, a second test surface drafted up at five degrees relative to the first test surface established the remaining running length of the wedge test fixture. A second row of sample mounting locations (aft) was positioned in the middle of the running length of the second test surface. Once the desired flow conditions were established in the test section the dual wedge

  7. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    analysis. In both cases, the profitable price point is decreased, making more markets open to profitable entry. Overall, the economic attractiveness of a nuclear power construction project is not only a function of its own costs, but a function of the market into which it is deployed. Many of the market characteristics are out of the control of the potential nuclear power plant operators. The decision-making process for the power industry in general is complicated by the short-term market volatility in both the wholesale electricity market and the commodity (natural gas) market. Decisions based on market conditions today may be rendered null and void in six months. With a multiple-year lead time, nuclear power plants are acutely vulnerable to market corrections.

  8. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for

  9. WE WISH Deploys From the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    JAXA astronaut Aki Hoshide commanded the first deployment from the station, with the second commanded from the ground control team. This video shows footage of the satellite WE WISH, as it deploys ...

  10. Psychiatric Effects of Military Deployment on Children and Families

    PubMed Central

    James, Trenton

    2012-01-01

    Deployments in the United States military have increased greatly in the past 10 years. Families and children are psychiatrically affected by these deployments, and recent studies are clarifying these effects. This article focuses on the psychiatric effects of deployment on children and uses a composite case example to review the use of play therapy to treat children who are having psychiatric issues related to the deployment of one or both parents. PMID:22468239

  11. Effects of Deployments on Spouses of Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    produced child care (babysitters, nursery school, kindergarten, school) declines as the child grows older, so the response to deployment may depend...Campaign 61 5.2.5 Spouses Do not Respond to Non-Hostile Deployments . . . . . . . . 64 5.2.6 Effects of Deployments on the Use of Child Care Services...66 5.10 Results for Use of Child Care Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 6.1 OLS Estimates of the Effect of Deployment on Retention

  12. Deployable structure design for the science and applications space platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    Basic concepts regarding deployable structures design, including systematic design/classification schemes and a deployability criterion, were proposed for use in synthesis, analysis and evaluation of alternative deployable structure designs. Using design guidelines based on SASP requirements and the basic concepts developed, a variety of designs were synthesized, and these along with previously proposed designs were analyzed and evaluated. Recommendations and conclusions regarding optimal deployable structure design were made.

  13. Recent Experiences and Challenges of Military Physiotherapists Deployed to Afghanistan: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Military physiotherapists in the Canadian Forces meet the unique rehabilitation needs of military personnel. Recently, the physiotherapy officer role has evolved in response to the Canadian Forces' involvement in the combat theatre of operations of Afghanistan, and this has created new and unique challenges and demands. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and challenges of military physiotherapists deployed to Afghanistan. Methods: A qualitative research design guided by descriptive phenomenology involved recruitment of key informants and in-depth interviews as the data collection method. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and the data analyzed using a foundational thematic analysis approach. Strategies of peer review and member checking were incorporated into the study design. Results: Six military physiotherapists were interviewed. They described rewarding experiences that were stressful yet highly career-satisfying. Main challenges revolved around heavy workloads, an expanded scope of practice as sole-charge practitioners, and the consequences and criticality of their clinical decisions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that enhanced pre-deployment training and the implementation of a stronger support network will improve the capabilities of military physiotherapists deployed to difficult theatres of operations. This type of systematic and comprehensive research is needed to assist the Canadian Forces in proactively preparing and supporting physiotherapists deployed on future missions. PMID:22942524

  14. Biomimetic Models for An Ecological Approach to Massively-Deployed Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Lodding, Kenneth N.; Olariu, Stephan; Wilson, Larry; Xin, Chunsheng

    2005-01-01

    Promises of ubiquitous control of the physical environment by massively-deployed wireless sensor networks open avenues for new applications that will redefine the way we live and work. Due to small size and low cost of sensor devices, visionaries promise systems enabled by deployment of massive numbers of sensors ubiquitous throughout our environment working in concert. Recent research has concentrated on developing techniques for performing relatively simple tasks with minimal energy expense, assuming some form of centralized control. Unfortunately, centralized control is not conducive to parallel activities and does not scale to massive size networks. Execution of simple tasks in sparse networks will not lead to the sophisticated applications predicted. We propose a new way of looking at massively-deployed sensor networks, motivated by lessons learned from the way biological ecosystems are organized. We demonstrate that in such a model, fully distributed data aggregation can be performed in a scalable fashion in massively deployed sensor networks, where motes operate on local information, making local decisions that are aggregated across the network to achieve globally-meaningful effects. We show that such architectures may be used to facilitate communication and synchronization in a fault-tolerant manner, while balancing workload and required energy expenditure throughout the network.

  15. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are among the most promising technologies of the new millennium. The opportunities afforded by being able to program networks of small, lightweight, low-power, computation- and bandwidth-limited nodes have attracted a large community of researchers and developers. However, the unique set of capabilities offered by the technology produces an exciting but complex design space, which is often difficult to negotiate in an application context. Deploying sensing physical environments produces its own set of challenges, and can push systems into failure modes, thus revealing problems that can be difficult to discover or reproduce in simulation or the laboratory. Sustained efforts in the area of wireless networked sensing over the last 15 years have resulted in a large number of theoretical developments, substantial practical achievements, and a wealth of lessons for the future. It is clear that in order to bridge the gap between (on the one hand) visions of very large scale, autonomous, randomly deployed networks and (on the other) the actual performance of fielded systems, we need to view deployment as an essential component in the process of developing sensor networks: a process that includes hardware and software solutions that serve specific applications and end-user needs. Incorporating deployment into the design process reveals a new and different set of requirements and considerations, whose solutions require innovative thinking, multidisciplinary teams and strong involvement from end-user communities. This special feature uncovers and documents some of the hurdles encountered and solutions offered by experimental scientists when deploying and evaluating wireless sensor networks in situ, in a variety of well specified application scenarios. The papers specifically address issues of generic importance for WSN system designers: (i) data quality, (ii) communications availability and quality, (iii) alternative, low-energy sensing

  16. Options for improving computing and data system support for HQ USTRANSCOM (Headquarters, US Transportation Command) deployment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The Decision Systems Research Section of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is assisting the Deployment Systems Division of the Headquarters, US Transportation Command (HQ USTRANSCOM) with an evaluation of options for improving the computing and data systems support for deliberate and time-critical joint deployment planning. USTRANSCOM, which is a unified command (i.e., personnel are drawn from all the services), was created in the fall of 1987 to consolidate the functions of the former military transportation operating agencies (the Military Airlift Command, the Military Traffic Management Command, and the Military Sealift Command). An important factor in the creation of USTRANSCOM was the possibility of achieving more efficient joint deployment planning through consolidation of the computing and data systems used by the command's strategic mobility planners and operation center personnel. This report, the third in a series to be produced in the course of ORNL studies for USTRANSCOM, presents options for improving automation support for HQ USTRANSCOM deployment planning. The study covered methods for improving data concepts used in deployment databases, recommendations for extending the life of the Joint Deployment system, and alternatives for integrating HQ USTRANSCOM planning support with systems at MAC, MTMC, and MSC. 36 refs.

  17. Development of Formation Deployment and Intialization Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badesha, Surjit S.; Heyler, Gene A.; Sharer, Peter J.; Strikwerda, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Cross-Cutting Technology Development Program identified formation flying as a key enabler for the next generation Earth and Sciences campaign. It is hoped that this technology will allow a distributed network of autonomous satellites to act collaboratively as a single collective unit paving the way for extensive co-observing campaigns, coordinated multi-point observing programs, improved space-based interferometry, and entirely new approaches to conducting science. APL as a team member with GSFC, funded by the Earth Sciences and Technology Organization (ESTO), investigated formation deployment and initialization concepts which is central to the formation flying concept. This paper presents the analytical approach and preliminary results of the study. The study investigated a simple mission involving the deployment of six micro-satellites, one at a time, from a bus. At the initialization state, the satellites fly in an along-track trajectory separated by nominal spacing. The study entailed the development of a two-body (bus and satellite) relative motion propagator based on Clohessy-Wiltshire (C-W) equations with drag from which the relative motion of the micro-satellites is deduced. This code was used to investigate cluster development characteristics subject to "tip-off' (ejection) conditions. Results indicate that cluster development is very sensitive to the ballistic coefficients of the bus and satellites, and to relative ejection velocity. This information can be used to identify optimum deployment parameters, along with accuracy bounds for a particular mission, and to develop a cluster control strategy minimizing global fuel and cost. A suitable control strategy concept has been identified, however, it needs to be developed further.

  18. Formal evaluation of the ADVANCE targeted deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C.L.; Belella, P.A.; Koppelman, F.S.; Schofer, J.L.; Sen, A.K.

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) advanced traveler information system (ATIS) demonstration project in northeastern Illinois was re-scoped in late 1994 from its originally-planned deployment of 3,000--5,000 in-vehicle navigation units to a so-called ``targeted`` deployment in which up to 75 vehicles were equipped with devices enabling them to receive real-time traffic information. These devices included (1) global positioning system (GPS) transmitters/receivers that enabled the vehicles while in the ADVANCE study area to serve as dynamic traffic probes as well as recipients of location data; and (2) navigation units that employed a comprehensive map data base and average (static) link travel times by time of day, stored on CD-ROM, which together computed efficient (least duration) routes between any origin and destination in the northwest portion of the Chicago metropolitan area. Experiments were designed to dispatch these equipped vehicles along links at headways or frequencies comparable to what would have been observed had full deployment actually occurred. Thus, within the limitations of this controlled environment, valuative experiments were conducted to assess the quality of several of the key sub-systems of ADVANCE in the context of structured performance hypotheses. Focused on-road tests began on June 1 and continued through December 14, 1995, followed by a period of data evaluation, documentation of results, and development of conclusions about the findings and usefulness of the project. This paper describes the tests, discusses development of the overall evaluation plan and the evaluation management concept which guided them, and reports on issuses and results of data analysis known at time of writing.

  19. Project ADIOS: Aircraft Deployable Ice Observation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    Regions of the Antarctic that are of scientific interest are often too heavily crevassed to enable a plane to land, or permit safe access from a field camp. We have developed an alternative strategy for instrumenting these regions: a sensor that can be dropped from an overflying aircraft. Existing aircraft deployable sensors are not suitable for long term operations in areas where snow accumulates, as they are quickly buried. We have overcome this problem by shaping the sensor like an aerodynamic mast with fins and a small parachute. After being released from the aircraft, the sensor accelerates to 42m/s and stabilizes during a 10s descent. On impact with the snow surface the sensor package buries itself to a depth of 1m then uses the large surface area of the fins to stop it burying further. This leaves a 1.5m mast protruding high above the snow surface to ensure a long operating life. The high impact kinetic energy and robust fin braking mechanism ensure that the design works in both soft and hard snow. Over the past two years we have developed and tested our design with a series of aircraft and wind tunnel tests. Last season we used this deployment strategy to successfully install a network of 31 single band GPS sensors in regions where crevassing has previously prevented science operations: Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, and Scar Inlet, Antarctic Peninsula. This season we intend to expand on this network by deploying a further 25 single and dual band GPS sensors on Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica.

  20. Modal identification of a deployable space truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Axel; Pappa, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    Work performed under a collaborative research effort between NASA and the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) is summarized. The objective is to develop and demonstrate advanced technology for system identification of future large space structures. Recent experiences using the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA) for modal identification of Mini-Mast are reported. Mini-Mast is a 20-meter-long deployable space truss used for structural dynamics and active-vibration control research at the NASA Langley Research Center. Due to nonlinearities and numerous local modes, modal identification of Mini-Mast proved to be surprisingly difficult. Methods available with ERA for obtaining detailed, high-confidence results are illustrated.

  1. Right-sizing the Logistics Deployment Footprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    ISER -MLB-PR-08-61 Right-sizing the Logistics Deployment Footprint 76th MORS Symposium 10-12 June, 2008 Tom Collipi Mike Albright Northrop Grumman...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ISER -MLB-PR-08-61 3 Purpose • Present A Simulation-Based Methodology For Sizing The Logistics...Avoidance Associated With The “Optimal” Footprint ISER -MLB-PR-08-61 4 Agenda • Tool Overview • Scenario And Trade Space • Input Data • Initial Results

  2. Sensor deployment mechanism for Surfer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Robert; Flom, James; Gibbons, Donald

    1988-01-01

    A design is presented for a sensor-deployment mechanism to be used aboard the Surfer satellite, from which scientific instruments will be extended to study the earth ionosphere during the Space Shuttle Tether Experiment. The design discussed uses four folding arms to extend the radial sensors, as well as two storable tubular extendible members or spirally wound self-extending tube booms to project the axial sensors outward. The design solution chosen, a folding arm, is discussed in detail with attention to mechanical operation and component functions. Test program results are presented.

  3. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  4. Burn injury secondary to air bag deployment.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Ingrid; Mancini, Luca Livio; Guizzardi, Marco; Monti, Marcello

    2002-02-01

    The efficacy of air bags has been proven in diminishing the rate of fatalities and severity of injury in motor vehicle crashes. Unfortunately, as with any developing technology, new problems have been encountered that are directly attributable to the deployment of the air bag itself. Most air bag-related injuries are minor and, surprisingly, more than 7% are burns typically involving the upper extremity or head or neck. Fortunately, these are superficial burns that usually require only expectant therapy, but a high degree of suspicion in these circumstances is needed to make the proper diagnosis.

  5. Ambulance deployment with the hypercube queuing model.

    PubMed

    Larson, R C

    1982-01-01

    A computer-implemented mathematical model has been developed to assist planners in the spatial deployment and dispatching of ambulances. The model incorporates uncertainties in the arrival times, locations, and service requirements of patients, building on the branch of operations research known as queuing theory. Several system-performance measures are generated by the model, including mean neighborhood-specific response times, mean utilization of each ambulance, and statistical profiles of ambulance response patterns. This model has been implemented by the Department of Health and Hospitals of the City of Boston.

  6. Quality function deployment: application to rehabilitation services.

    PubMed

    Einspruch, E M; Omachonu, V K; Einspruch, N G

    1996-01-01

    Describes how the challenge of providing rehabilitative services at reasonable costs is beginning to mount. The management of quality in rehabilitative services is therefore gaining increasing attention in the health care arena. States that if a link is implied between the above stated goal and customer satisfaction, it is imperative to evaluate quality or customer satisfaction in the context of the patient's experience. Describes the quality function deployment (QFD) system and how it leads to a better understanding of the customer's needs and wants. Explores the process of applying the concept of QFD to physical therapy.

  7. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  8. Space Situational Awareness of Large Numbers of Payloads From a Single Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segerman, A.; Byers, J.; Emmert, J.; Nicholas, A.

    2014-09-01

    The nearly simultaneous deployment of a large number of payloads from a single vehicle presents a new challenge for space object catalog maintenance and space situational awareness (SSA). Following two cubesat deployments last November, it took five weeks to catalog the resulting 64 orbits. The upcoming Kicksat mission will present an even greater SSA challenge, with its deployment of 128 chip-sized picosats. Although all of these deployments are in short-lived orbits, future deployments will inevitably occur at higher altitudes, with a longer term threat of collision with active spacecraft. With such deployments, individual scientific payload operators require rapid precise knowledge of their satellites' locations. Following the first November launch, the cataloguing did not initially associate a payload with each orbit, leaving this to the satellite operators. For short duration missions, the time required to identify an experiment's specific orbit may easily be a large fraction of the spacecraft's lifetime. For a Kicksat-type deployment, present tracking cannot collect enough observations to catalog each small object. The current approach is to treat the chip cloud as a single catalog object. However, the cloud dissipates into multiple subclouds and, ultimately, tiny groups of untrackable chips. One response to this challenge may be to mandate installation of a transponder on each spacecraft. Directional transponder transmission detections could be used as angle observations for orbit cataloguing. Of course, such an approach would only be employable with cooperative spacecraft. In other cases, a probabilistic association approach may be useful, with the goal being to establish the probability of an element being at a given point in space. This would permit more reliable assessment of the probability of collision of active spacecraft with any cloud element. This paper surveys the cataloguing challenges presented by large scale deployments of small spacecraft

  9. Reservists in a postconflict zone: deployment stressors and the deployment experience.

    PubMed

    Orme, Geoffrey J; Kehoe, E James

    2014-02-01

    In postconflict zones, both aid and military personnel face chronic stress, including boredom, isolation, family separation, and difficult living conditions, plus the intra-organizational and interpersonal frictions found in all work settings. Australian Army reservists (N = 350) were surveyed during and after peacekeeping in the Solomon Islands. Most respondents reported having a positive experience (66%) and fewer reported their experience was neutral (16%) or negative (17%). The stressors reported by reservists predominately emanated from work-related sources rather than from separation or the operational environment. The discussion considers leadership factors, especially the role of organizational justice in deployed organizations, that may influence the deployment experience.

  10. IPv6 testing and deployment at Prague Tier 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Tomáŝ; Chudoba, Jiří; Eliáŝ, Marek; Fiala, Lukáŝ

    2012-12-01

    Computing Center of the Institute of Physics in Prague provides computing and storage resources for various HEP experiments (D0, Atlas, Alice, Auger) and currently operates more than 300 worker nodes with more than 2500 cores and provides more than 2PB of disk space. Our site is limited to one C-sized block of IPv4 addresses, and hence we had to move most of our worker nodes behind the NAT. However this solution demands more difficult routing setup. We see the IPv6 deployment as a solution that provides less routing, more switching and therefore promises higher network throughput. The administrators of the Computing Center strive to configure and install all provided services automatically. For installation tasks we use PXE and kickstart, for network configuration we use DHCP and for software configuration we use CFEngine. Many hardware boxes are configured via specific web pages or telnet/ssh protocol provided by the box itself. All our services are monitored with several tools e.g. Nagios, Munin, Ganglia. We rely heavily on the SNMP protocol for hardware health monitoring. All these installation, configuration and monitoring tools must be tested before we can switch completely to IPv6 network stack. In this contribution we present the tests we have made, limitations we have faced and configuration decisions that we have made during IPv6 testing. We also present testbed built on virtual machines that was used for all the testing and evaluation.

  11. Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

    2006-11-01

    A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

  12. Deployment Simulation of Ultra-Lightweight Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic deployment analyses of folded inflatable tubes are conducted to investigate modeling issues related to the deployment of solar sail booms. The analyses are necessary because ground tests include gravity effects and may poorly represent deployment in space. A control volume approach, available in the LS-DYNA nonlinear dynamic finite element code, and the ideal gas law are used to simulate the dynamic inflation deployment process. Three deployment issues are investigated for a tube packaged in a Z-fold configuration. The issues are the effect of the rate of inflation, the effect of residual air, and the effect of gravity. The results of the deployment analyses reveal that the time and amount of inflation gas required to achieve a full deployment are related to these issues.

  13. Clinical decision support foundations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Malcolm; Liaw, Siaw Teng

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The elements of a clinical decision; * The elements of decision making: prior probability, evidence (likelihood), posterior probability, actions, utility (value); * A framework for decision making, and support, encompassing validity, utility, importance and certainty; and * The required elements of a clinical decision support system. * The role of knowledge management in the construction and maintenance of clinical decision support.

  14. STS-70 landing drag chute deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery deploys its drag chute after a smooth touchdown on KSC's Runway 33, marking a successful conclusion to the STS-70 mission. Discovery landed on orbit 143, during the second opportunity of the day. Main gear touchdown was unofficially listed at 8:02 a.m. EDT on July 22, 1995. The orbiter traveled some 3.7 million statute miles during the nearly nine-day flight, which included a one-day extension because of fog and low visibility conditions at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility on July 21. STS-70 was the 24th landing at KSC and the 70th Space Shuttle mission. The five-member crew deployed a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-G (TDRS-G). Crew members were Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks, Pilot Kevin R. Kregel, and Mission Specialists Nancy Jane Currie, Donald A. Thomas and Mary Ellen Weber. STS-70 also was the maiden flight of the new Block I orbiter main engine, which flew in the number one position. The other two engines were of the existing Phase II design.

  15. Infrastructure for deployment of power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary effort in characterizing the types of stationary lunar power systems which may be considered for emplacement on the lunar surface from the proposed initial 100-kW unit in 2003 to later units ranging in power from 25 to 825 kW is presented. Associated with these power systems are their related infrastructure hardware including: (1) electrical cable, wiring, switchgear, and converters; (2) deployable radiator panels; (3) deployable photovoltaic (PV) panels; (4) heat transfer fluid piping and connection joints; (5) power system instrumentation and control equipment; and (6) interface hardware between lunar surface construction/maintenance equipment and power system. This report: (1) presents estimates of the mass and volumes associated with these power systems and their related infrastructure hardware; (2) provides task breakdown description for emplacing this equipment; (3) gives estimated heat, forces, torques, and alignment tolerances for equipment assembly; and (4) provides other important equipment/machinery requirements where applicable. Packaging options for this equipment will be discussed along with necessary site preparation requirements. Design and analysis issues associated with the final emplacement of this power system hardware are also described.

  16. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  17. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  18. 100G Deployment@(DE-KIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, Bruno; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has been involved fairly early in 100GE network technology. Initiated by DFN1 (the German NREN), a first 100GE wide area network testbed over a distance of approx. 450 km was deployed between the national research organizations KIT and FZ-Jülich in 2010. Three years later in 2013. KIT joined the Caltech SuperComputing 2013 (SC132) 100GE "show floor" initiative using the transatlantic ANA-100GE link to transfer LHC data from a storage at DE-KIT (GridKa) in Europe to hard disks at the show floor of SC13 in Denver (USA). The network infrastructure of KIT as well as of the German Tier-1 installation DE-KIT (GridKa). however. is still based on 10Gbps. As highlighted in the contribution "Status and Trends in Networking at LHC Tier1 Facilities" to CHEP 2012. proactive investment is required at the Tier-1 sites. Bandwidth requirements will grow beyond current capacity and the required upgrades are expected in 2015. In close cooperation with DFN. KIT drives the upgrade from 10GE to 100GE. The process is divided into several phases. due to upgrade costs and differing requirements in different parts of the network infrastructure. The requirements of the different phases as well as the planned topology will be described. Some of the obstacles we discovered during the deployment will be discussed and solutions or workarounds presented.

  19. Payload deployment systems and advanced manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The results of discussions on future development of avionics to support payload deployment systems and advanced manipulators are discussed. The discussions summarized here were held during the Space Transportation Avionics Technology Symposium in Williamsburg, Virginia on November 7 to 9, 1989. Symposium participants agreed that this subpanel would have benefitted from more participation by users. It was suggested that inputs from Shuttle payload users should be incorporated, either by direct discussions with users or by incorporating comments from users as kept by Payload Accommodations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Goddard, and Langley, as builders of payloads, and the Space Station Utilization Office could also provide useful inputs. Other potential users for future systems should also be identified as early as possible to determine what they anticipate their needs to be. Symposium participants also recognized that payload deployment is normally not a safety critical area, and as such, is vulnerable to budget cuts that defer costs from development to operations. This does give opportunities for upgrades of operational systems, but these must be very cost effective to compete with vehicle requirements that enhance safety or increase lifetime.

  20. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that ``competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.`` Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  1. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.'' Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  2. Open architecture for rapid deployment of capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Modern warfare has drastically changed from conventional to non-conventional and from fixed threats to dynamic ones over the past several decades. This unprecedented fundamental shift has now made our adversaries and their weapons more nebulous and ever changing. Our current acquisition system however is not suited to develop, test and deploy essential capability to counter these dynamic threats in time to combat them. This environment requires a new infrastructure in our system design to rapidly adopt capabilities that we do not currently plan for or even know about. The key to enabling this rapid implementation is Open Architecture in acquisition. The DoD has shown it can rapidly prototype capabilities such as unmanned vehicles but has severely struggled in moving from the prototyping to deployment. A major driver of this disconnect is the lack of established infrastructure to employ said capability such as launch and recovery systems and command and control. If we are to be successful in transitioning our rapid capability to the warfighter we must implement established well defined interfaces and enabling technologies to facilitate the rapid adoption of capability so the warfighter has the tools to effectively counter the threat.

  3. SMUD Community Renewable Energy Deployment Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sison-Lebrilla, Elaine; Tiangco, Valentino; Lemes, Marco; Ave, Kathleen

    2015-06-08

    This report summarizes the completion of four renewable energy installations supported by California Energy Commission (CEC) grant number CEC Grant PIR-11-005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistance Agreement, DE-EE0003070, and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CRED) program. The funding from the DOE, combined with funding from the CEC, supported the construction of a solar power system, biogas generation from waste systems, and anaerobic digestion systems at dairy facilities, all for electricity generation and delivery to SMUD’s distribution system. The deployment of CRED projects shows that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be successfully implemented under favorable economic conditions and business models and through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, the projects also demonstrate that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be readily implemented through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region.

  4. Forecasting Residential Solar Photovoltaic Deployment in California

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Changgui; Sigrin, Benjamin; Brinkman, Gregory

    2016-12-06

    Residential distributed photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the United States has experienced robust growth, and policy changes impacting the value of solar are likely to occur at the federal and state levels. To establish a credible baseline and evaluate impacts of potential new policies, this analysis employs multiple methods to forecast residential PV deployment in California, including a time-series forecasting model, a threshold heterogeneity diffusion model, a Bass diffusion model, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's dSolar model. As a baseline, the residential PV market in California is modeled to peak in the early 2020s, with a peak annual installation of 1.5-2 GW across models. We then use the baseline results from the dSolar model and the threshold model to gauge the impact of the recent federal investment tax credit (ITC) extension, the newly approved California net energy metering (NEM) policy, and a hypothetical value-of-solar (VOS) compensation scheme. We find that the recent ITC extension may increase annual PV installations by 12%-18% (roughly 500 MW, MW) for the California residential sector in 2019-2020. The new NEM policy only has a negligible effect in California due to the relatively small new charges (< 100 MW in 2019-2020). Furthermore, impacts of the VOS compensation scheme ($0.12 per kilowatt-hour) are larger, reducing annual PV adoption by 32% (or 900-1300 MW) in 2019-2020.

  5. Probabilistic deployment for multiple sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ming; Ferrari, Silvia

    2005-05-01

    The performance of many multi-sensor systems can be significantly improved by using a priori environmental information and sensor data to plan the movements of sensor platforms that are later deployed with the purpose of improving the quality of the final detection and classification results. However, existing path planning algorithms and ad-hoc data processing (e.g., fusion) techniques do not allow for the systematic treatment of multiple and heterogeneous sensors and their platforms. This paper presents a method that combines Bayesian network inference with probabilistic roadmap (PRM) planners to utilize the information obtained by different sensors and their level of uncertainty. The uncertainty of prior sensed information is represented by entropy values obtained from the Bayesian network (BN) models of the respective sensor measurement processes. The PRM algorithm is modified to utilize the entropy distribution in optimizing the path of posterior sensor platforms that have the following objectives: (1) improve the quality of the sensed information, i.e., through fusion, (2) minimize the distance traveled by the platforms, and (3) avoid obstacles. This so-called Probabilistic Deployment (PD) method is applied to a demining system comprised of ground-penetrating radars (GPR), electromagnetic (EMI), and infrared sensors (IR) installed on ground platforms, to detect and classify buried mines. Numerical simulations show that PD is more efficient than path planning techniques that do not utilize a priori information, such as complete coverage, random coverage method, or PRM methods that do not utilize Bayesian inference.

  6. New OBS network deployment offshore Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, Florian; Bean, Chris; Craig, David; Jousset, Philippe; Horan, Clare; Hogg, Colin; Donne, Sarah; McCann, Hannah; Möllhoff, Martin; Kirk, Henning; Ploetz, Aline

    2016-04-01

    With the presence of the stormy NE Atlantic, Ireland is ideally located to investigate further our understanding of ocean generated microseisms and use noise correlation methods to develop seismic imaging in marine environments as well as time-lapse monitoring. In order to study the microseismic activity offshore Ireland, 10 Broad Band Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBSs) units including hydrophones have been deployed in January 2016 across the shelf offshore Donegal and out into the Rockall Trough. This survey represents the first Broadband passive study in this part of the NE Atlantic. The instruments will be recovered in August 2016 providing 8 months worth of data to study microseisms but also the offshore seismic activity in the area. One of the main goal of the survey is to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of dominant microseism source regions, close to the microseism sources. Additionally we will study the coupling of seismic and acoustic signals at the sea bed and its evolution in both the deep water and continental shelf areas. Furthermore, the survey also aims to investigate further the relationship between sea state conditions (e.g. wave height, period), seafloor pressure variations and seismic data recorded on both land and seafloor. Finally, the deployed OBS network is also the first ever attempt to closely monitor local offshore earthquakes in Ireland. Ireland seismicity although relatively low can reduce slope stability and poses the possibility of triggering large offshore landslides and local tsunamis.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of a DECSMAR Structure’s Deployment and Deployed Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    compromise of deployed performance due to the hinge cross- section, Nitinol SMA wires can be embedded in the composite lay-up across the reduced...100 !m 0˚ 2 (two, 1.47 mm width wires positioned along longitudinal edges) Nitinol 305 !m N/A 3 IM7/977-2 100 !m 0˚ batten transition 1 IM7

  8. Testing the Deployment Repeatability of a Precision Deployable Boom Prototype for the Proposed SWOT Karin Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Waldman, Jeff; Hughes, Richard; Peterson, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's proposed Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, scheduled to launch in 2020, would provide critical information about Earth's oceans, ocean circulation, fresh water storage, and river discharge. The mission concept calls for a dual-antenna Ka-band radar interferometer instrument, known as KaRIn, that would map the height of water globally along two 50 km wide swaths. The KaRIn antennas, which would be separated by 10 meters on either side of the spacecraft, would need to be precisely deployable in order to meet demanding pointing requirements. Consequently, an effort was undertaken to design build and prototype a precision deployable Mast for the KaRIn instrument. Each mast was 4.5-m long with a required dilitation stability of 2.5 microns over 3 minutes. It required a minimum first mode of 7 Hz. Deployment repeatability was less than +/- 7 arcsec in all three rotation directions. Overall mass could not exceed 41.5 Kg including any actuators and thermal blanketing. This set of requirements meant the boom had to be three times lighter and two orders of magnitude more precise than the existing state of the art for deployable booms.

  9. The clinical decision analysis using decision tree.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    The clinical decision analysis (CDA) has used to overcome complexity and uncertainty in medical problems. The CDA is a tool allowing decision-makers to apply evidence-based medicine to make objective clinical decisions when faced with complex situations. The usefulness and limitation including six steps in conducting CDA were reviewed. The application of CDA results should be done under shared decision with patients' value.

  10. The clinical decision analysis using decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    The clinical decision analysis (CDA) has used to overcome complexity and uncertainty in medical problems. The CDA is a tool allowing decision-makers to apply evidence-based medicine to make objective clinical decisions when faced with complex situations. The usefulness and limitation including six steps in conducting CDA were reviewed. The application of CDA results should be done under shared decision with patients’ value. PMID:25358466

  11. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  12. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  13. Evaluation of Trap Designs and Deployment Strategies for Capturing Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, William R.; Cullum, John P.; Leskey, Tracy C.

    2015-01-01

    Halyomorpha halys (Stål) is an invasive pest that attacks numerous crops. For growers to make informed management decisions against H. halys, an effective monitoring tool must be in place. We evaluated various trap designs baited with the two-component aggregation pheromone of H. halys and synergist and deployed in commercial apple orchards. We compared our current experimental standard trap, a black plywood pyramid trap 1.22 m in height deployed between border row apple trees with other trap designs for two growing seasons. These included a black lightweight coroplast pyramid trap of similar dimension, a smaller (29 cm) pyramid trap also ground deployed, a smaller limb-attached pyramid trap, a smaller pyramid trap hanging from a horizontal branch, and a semipyramid design known as the Rescue trap. We found that the coroplast pyramid was the most sensitive, capturing more adults than all other trap designs including our experimental standard. Smaller pyramid traps performed equally in adult captures to our experimental standard, though nymphal captures were statistically lower for the hanging traps. Experimental standard plywood and coroplast pyramid trap correlations were strong, suggesting that standard plywood pyramid traps could be replaced with lighter, cheaper coroplast pyramid traps. Strong correlations with small ground- and limb-deployed pyramid traps also suggest that these designs offer promise as well. Growers may be able to adopt alternative trap designs that are cheaper, lighter, and easier to deploy to monitor H. halys in orchards without a significant loss in sensitivity. PMID:26470309

  14. Regulated deployment mechanism for a panel like appendage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, José Ignacio; Vázquez, Javier; Gavira, José Manuel; Migliorero, Gerard

    2001-09-01

    The definition of a cost effective deployment mechanism to deploy 180° panel like appendages in a safe way and with minimum end stroke deployment shock has been a challenge that led the design to achieve a low cost, light, compact, simple, flexible, modular, and low power demanding configuration. This mechanism is composed of an active hinge, that includes an optimised helical torsion spring with a deployment regulator in parallel, and a passive hinge, that includes the end stop and the monitorisation. The main functions of the mechanisms are decoupled in order to make the mechanism as flexible as possible to be adapted to very different needs such as different deployment torque, deployment angle, stiffness, interfaces, monitorisation, etc. The deployment mechanism is provided with a very compact novel deployment regulator based on the progressive melting of a band made of a low melting temperature metal alloy, that is cylindrically disposed. The deployment mechanism has been subject to a qualification test campaign including an extensive characterisation of the deployment regulator.

  15. ROBODEXS: multi-robot deployment and extraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeremy P.; Mason, James R.; Patterson, Michael S.; Skalny, Matthew W.

    2012-06-01

    The importance of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV's) in the Military's operations is continually increasing. All Military branches now rely on advanced robotic technologies to aid in their missions' operations. The integration of these technologies has not only enhanced capabilities, but has increased personnel safety by generating larger standoff distances. Currently most UGV's are deployed by an exposed dismounted Warfighter because the Military possess a limited capability to do so remotely and can only deploy a single UGV. This paper explains the conceptual development of a novel approach to remotely deploy and extract multiple robots from a single host platform. The Robotic Deployment & Extraction System (ROBODEXS) is a result of our development research to improve marsupial robotic deployment at safe standoff distances. The presented solution is modular and scalable, having the ability to deploy anywhere from two to twenty robots from a single deployment mechanism. For larger carrier platforms, multiple sets of ROBODEXS modules may be integrated for deployment and extraction of even greater numbers of robots. Such a system allows mass deployment and extraction from a single manned/unmanned vehicle, which is not currently possible with other deployment systems.

  16. Deployer Performance Results for the TSS-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Leland S.; Geiger, Ronald V.

    1995-01-01

    Performance of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Deployer during the STS-46 mission (July and August 1992) is analyzed in terms of hardware operation at the component and system level. Although only a limited deployment of the satellite was achieved (256 meters vs 20 kilometers planned), the mission served to verify the basic capability of the Deployer to release, control and retrieve a tethered satellite. - Deployer operational flexibility that was demonstrated during the flight is also addressed. Martin Marietta was the prime contractor for the development of the Deployer, under management of the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The satellite was provided by Alenia, Torino, Italy under contract to the Agencia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). Proper operation of the avionics components and the majority of mechanisms was observed during the flight. System operations driven by control laws for the deployment and retrieval of the satellite were also successful for the limited deployment distance. Anomalies included separation problems for one of the two umbilical connectors between the Deployer and satellite, tether jamming (at initial Satellite fly-away and at a deployment distance of 224 meters), and a mechanical interference which prevented tether deployment beyond 256 meters. The Deployer was used in several off-nominal conditions to respond to these anomalies, which ultimately enabled a successful satellite retrieval and preservation of hardware integrity for a future re-flight. The paper begins with an introduction defining the significance of the TSS-1 mission. The body of the paper is divided into four major sections: (1) Description of Deployer System and Components, (2) Deployer Components/Systems Demonstrating Successful Operation, (3) Hardware Anomalies and Operational Responses, and (4) Design Modifications for the TSS-1R Re-flight Mission. Conclusions from the TSS-1 mission, including lessons learned are presented at the end of the

  17. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants’ (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  18. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-01

    The work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and KGS Building LLC (KGS). PNNL and KGS both believe that the widespread adoption of automated fault de4tection and diagnostic (AFDD) tools will result in significant reduction to energy and peak energy consumption. The report provides an introduction, and summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA. The CRADA project had three major focus areas: 1) Technical Assistance for Whole Building Energy Diagnostician (WBE) Commercialization, 2) Market Transfer of the Outdoor Air/Economizer Diagnostician (OAE), and 3) Development and Deployment of Automated Diagnostics to Improve Large Commercial Building Operations.

  19. Deployment and Testing of KELT-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Rudi; Pepper, J.; Stassun, K.; James, D. J.; Siverd, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    The KELT-South telescope is a wide-field, small aperture robotic telescope recently deployed at Sutherland, South Africa. Based on the design of the KELT-North telescope in Arizona, KELT-South will survey the southern sky for planetary transits of bright (8 < V < 10) stars. It consists of a 4k by 4k Apogee CCD camera with a medium format telephoto lens, mounted on a Paramount ME mount. Here we describe the instrument, robotic operations, site, and observing strategy. We also describe the instrument's performance and prospects for planet discovery based on initial measurements and observations. The KELT-South project is funded by the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-intensive Astrophysics (VIDA) at Vanderbilt University, and by the NSF PAARE grant AST-0849736. We also thank the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) for cooperation with KELT-South and operational support.

  20. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  1. Stochastic Optimization for Nuclear Facility Deployment Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Ross Daniel

    Single-use, low-enriched uranium oxide fuel, consumed through several cycles in a light-water reactor (LWR) before being disposed, has become the dominant source of commercial-scale nuclear electric generation in the United States and throughout the world. However, it is not without its drawbacks and is not the only potential nuclear fuel cycle available. Numerous alternative fuel cycles have been proposed at various times which, through the use of different reactor and recycling technologies, offer to counteract many of the perceived shortcomings with regards to waste management, resource utilization, and proliferation resistance. However, due to the varying maturity levels of these technologies, the complicated material flow feedback interactions their use would require, and the large capital investments in the current technology, one should not deploy these advanced designs without first investigating the potential costs and benefits of so doing. As the interactions among these systems can be complicated, and the ways in which they may be deployed are many, the application of automated numerical optimization to the simulation of the fuel cycle could potentially be of great benefit to researchers and interested policy planners. To investigate the potential of these methods, a computational program has been developed that applies a parallel, multi-objective simulated annealing algorithm to a computational optimization problem defined by a library of relevant objective functions applied to the Ver ifiable Fuel Cycle Simulati on Model (VISION, developed at the Idaho National Laboratory). The VISION model, when given a specified fuel cycle deployment scenario, computes the numbers and types of, and construction, operation, and utilization schedules for, the nuclear facilities required to meet a predetermined electric power demand function. Additionally, it calculates the location and composition of the nuclear fuels within the fuel cycle, from initial mining through

  2. Clean energy deployment: addressing financing cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, Nadia; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2012-09-01

    New methods are needed to accelerate clean energy policy adoption. To that end, this study proposes an innovative financing scheme for renewable and energy efficiency deployment. Financing barriers represent a notable obstacle for energy improvements and this is particularly the case for low income households. Implementing a policy such as PACE—property assessed clean energy—allows for the provision of upfront funds for residential property owners to install electric and thermal solar systems and make energy efficiency improvements to their buildings. This paper will inform the design of better policies tailored to the creation of the appropriate conditions for such investments to occur, especially in those countries where most of the population belongs to the low-middle income range facing financial constraints.

  3. Time Deployment Study for Annulus Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    REBERGER, D.W.

    2000-02-16

    Radioactive wastes from processing irradiated uranium fuels have been stored as alkaline slurries in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) of various sizes were used for waste storage. Of the total 177 tanks, there are 28 DSTs. DSTs are located in AN, AP, AW, AY, AZ, and SY tank farms in the 200 East (200E) and 200-West (200W) Areas. The storage capacities of the DSTs vary from 980,000 to 1,140,000 gal. DSTs are designed and constructed as an integral steel structure, i.e., an inner shell within an outer shell, so that any leak from the inner shell is confined within the annulus without impacting the environment. The inner shell provides primary containment for the wastes and the outer shell provides secondary containment in the form of an annulus. The annulus of a DST is equipped with a pump pit, leak detection probes, and other accessories. The existing annulus pumps in the DSTs need to be revamped with a new system to reduce operating costs and reduce the time to deploy a pumping system. The new pumping system will minimize the likelihood of a release of waste into the environment; improve capability of waste removal to the maximum extent possible to comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 and Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 40 CFR 265.193. This study addresses the time required to deploy an annulus pumping system designed to fit any DST after detection of a leak in the inner shell of the DST.

  4. Lightweight optical barrel assembly structures for large deployable space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Peter A.; Silver, Mark J.; Dobson, Benjamin J.

    2009-08-01

    Future space based telescopes will need apertures and focal lengths that exceed the dimensions of the launch vehicle shroud. In addition to deploying the primary mirror and secondary mirror support structure, these large telescopes must also deploy the stray light and thermal barriers needed to ensure proper telescope performance. The authors present a deployable light and thermal optical barrel assembly approach for a very large telescope with a variable sun angle and fast slew rate. The Strain Energy Deployable Optical Barrel Assembly (SEDOBA) uses elastic composite hinges to power the deployment of a hierarchical truss structure that supports the thermal and stray light shroud material that form the overall system. The paper describes the overall design approach, the key component technologies, and the design and preliminary testing of a self deploying scale model prototype.

  5. Military Wives' Transition and Coping: Deployment and the Return Home

    PubMed Central

    Marnocha, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative study is to explore the experiences of wives of deployed soldiers. Semistructured interviews were used to answer the research questions. Meleis' Transitions Theory was used to guide the understanding of the wives' experiences. Phase One: news of deployment, property of awareness, themes of emotional chaos and making preparations. Phase Two: during deployment, property of engagement, themes of taking the reins and placing focus elsewhere, along with the property of change and difference, with themes of emotional and physical turmoil, staying strong, and reaching out. Phase Three: after deployment, property of time span, themes of absence makes the heart grow fonder and reestablishing roles. The study concluded that the wife often feels forgotten during deployment. Nurses can give better care by understanding how the different phases of deployment and separation affect the wife's coping ability and her physical and emotional health. PMID:22844613

  6. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Estes, Robert D.; Sanmartin, Juan; Pelaez, Jesus; Ruiz, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    This Final Report covers the following main topics: 1) Brief Description of ProSEDS; 2) Mission Analysis; 3) Dynamics Reference Mission; 4) Dynamics Stability; 5) Deployment Control; 6) Updated System Performance; 7) Updated Mission Analysis; 8) Updated Dynamics Reference Mission; 9) Updated Deployment Control Profiles and Simulations; 10) Updated Reference Mission; 11) Evaluation of Power Delivered by the Tether; 12) Deployment Control Profile Ref. #78 and Simulations; 13) Kalman Filters for Mission Estimation; 14) Analysis/Estimation of Deployment Flight Data; 15) Comparison of ED Tethers and Electrical Thrusters; 16) Dynamics Analysis for Mission Starting at a Lower Altitude; 17) Deployment Performance at a Lower Altitude; 18) Satellite Orbit after a Tether Cut; 19) Deployment with Shorter Dyneema Tether Length; 20) Interactive Software for ED Tethers.

  7. Deployment dynamics of tethered-net for space debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Minghe; Guo, Jian; Gill, Eberhard

    2017-03-01

    A tethered-net is a promising method for space debris capturing. However, its deployment dynamics is complex because of the flexibility, and its dependency of the deployment parameters is insufficiently understood. To investigate the deployment dynamics of tethered-net, four critical deployment parameters, namely maximum net area, deployment time, traveling distance and effective period are identified in this paper, and the influence of initial deployment conditions on these four parameters is investigated. Besides, a comprehensive study on a model for the tethered-net based on absolute nodal coordinates formulation (ANCF) is provided. Simulations show that the results based on the ANCF modeling method present a good agreement with that based on the conventional mass-spring modeling method. Moreover, ANCF model is capable of describing the flexibility between two nodes on the net. However, it is more computationally expensive.

  8. System interface for an integrated intelligent safety system (ISS) for vehicle applications.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Hussain, Aini; Samad, Salina A

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the interface-relevant activity of a vehicle integrated intelligent safety system (ISS) that includes an airbag deployment decision system (ADDS) and a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS). A program is developed in LabWindows/CVI, using C for prototype implementation. The prototype is primarily concerned with the interconnection between hardware objects such as a load cell, web camera, accelerometer, TPM tire module and receiver module, DAQ card, CPU card and a touch screen. Several safety subsystems, including image processing, weight sensing and crash detection systems, are integrated, and their outputs are combined to yield intelligent decisions regarding airbag deployment. The integrated safety system also monitors tire pressure and temperature. Testing and experimentation with this ISS suggests that the system is unique, robust, intelligent, and appropriate for in-vehicle applications.

  9. System Interface for an Integrated Intelligent Safety System (ISS) for Vehicle Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Hussain, Aini; Samad, Salina A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the interface-relevant activity of a vehicle integrated intelligent safety system (ISS) that includes an airbag deployment decision system (ADDS) and a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS). A program is developed in LabWindows/CVI, using C for prototype implementation. The prototype is primarily concerned with the interconnection between hardware objects such as a load cell, web camera, accelerometer, TPM tire module and receiver module, DAQ card, CPU card and a touch screen. Several safety subsystems, including image processing, weight sensing and crash detection systems, are integrated, and their outputs are combined to yield intelligent decisions regarding airbag deployment. The integrated safety system also monitors tire pressure and temperature. Testing and experimentation with this ISS suggests that the system is unique, robust, intelligent, and appropriate for in-vehicle applications. PMID:22205861

  10. The Experiences of U.S. Army Primary Care Providers Meeting Sexual Health Care Needs During Post-Vietnam Deployments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    deployments and associated ethical issues providing care in an atmosphere that forbids sexual contact. As the Army has sought to add the role of...four structures are: provider experiences, soldier experiences, command experiences, and ethical experiences. Recommendations for further areas of...research include rates of STI and pregnancy, feminine hygiene needs in the field, suppression of sexuality in the field, and ethical decision making among

  11. On the design of large space deployable modular antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.; Woods, A. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large deployable antenna modules were verified. Mesh attachment methods compatible with full scale modules were devised. Parametric studies of large modular reflectors established size, mass, and aperture frequency capabilities for these assemblies. Preliminary studies were made devising means of delivering modules to orbit, and once there, of assembling the modules into complete modular antenna reflectors. The basic feasibility of creating mass efficient modules erectable into large structures in space was established.

  12. Martian environmental simulation for a deployable lattice mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission (formerly Mars Environmental Survey or MESUR) is scheduled for launch in December 1996 and is designed to place a small lander on the surface of Mars. After impact, the lander unfolds to expose its solar panels and release a miniature rover. Also on board is the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) binocular camera which is elevated by a deployable mast to obtain a panoramic view of the landing area. The design of this deployable mast is based on similar designs which have a long and successful flight history. In the past when this type of self-deployable mast has been used, a rate limiter has been incorporated to control the speed of deployment. In this application, to reduce weight and complexity, it was proposed to eliminate the rate limiter so that the mast would deploy without restraint. Preliminary tests showed that this type of deployment was possible especially if the deployed length was relatively short, as in this application. Compounding the problem, however, was the requirement to deploy the mast at an angle of up to 30 degrees from vertical. The deployment process was difficult to completely analyze due to the effects of gravitational and inertial loads on the mast and camera during rapid extension. Testing in a realistic manner was imperative to verify the system performance. A deployment test was therefore performed to determine the maximum tilt angle at which the mast could reliably extend and support the camera on Mars. The testing of the deployable mast requires partial gravity compensation to simulate the smaller force of Martian gravity. During the test, mass properties were maintained while weight properties were reduced. This paper describes the testing of a deployable mast in a simulated Martian environment as well as the results of the tests.

  13. Flight qualification of mortar-actuated parachute deployment systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasants, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief discussion outlines background of mortar use in parachute deployment systems. A description of the system operation is presented. Effects of the environment on performance are discussed as well as the instrumentation needed to assess this performance. Power unit qualification and lot qualification for shear pins and cartridges is delineated. Functional mortar system tests are described. Finally, bridle deployment and parachute deployment are discussed.

  14. Market and Policy Barriers to Energy Storage Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services; there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  15. Using Power Purchase Agreements for Solar Deployment at Universities

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, Jenny; O'Shaughnessy, Eric

    2016-02-24

    More than 60 universities have used solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) to deploy more than 100 megawatts of solar PV on campuses around the country. This webinar is intended for university financial planners and other stakeholders who are assessing the financial aspects of deploying solar. The speakers will provide an overview of how universities are using PPAs and key PPA components. In addition, they will discuss the process of using PPAs, why PPAs make sense for campus solar deployment, and the benefits and challenges for universities. Tools and other resources will be shared to help universities interested in using PPAs for campus solar deployment.

  16. Dynamic analysis of satellites with deployable hinged appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear equations of motion determining the planar dynamical behavior of an orbiting satellite deploying both one and two rigid appendages have been formulated using Lagrange's equations. The analysis accounts for large angle rotations, Coriolis effects, and the gravitational gradient, and the resulting coupled governing equations are integrated numerically. The analysis is applied to the Space Shuttle based deployment of rigid truss-like members, and results show that spacecraft inertia parameters, appendage mass and length, deployment velocity, and initial conditions all influence the system response. It is found that the resulting librational movement is related to the size of the deployment payload, and that gravitational forces lead to vehicle stabilization.

  17. Mechanism Design Principle for Optical-Precision, Deployable Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Hachkowski, M. Roman

    2000-01-01

    The present paper is intended to be a guide for the design of 'microdynamically quiet' deployment mechanisms for optical-precision structures, such as deployable telescope mirrors and optical benches. Many of the guidelines included herein come directly from the field of optomechanical engineering, and are neither newly developed guidelines nor are they uniquely applicable to high-precision deployment mechanisms. However, the application of these guidelines to the design of deployment mechanisms is a rather new practice, so efforts are made herein to illustrate the process through the discussion of specific examples. The present paper summarizes a more extensive set of design guidelines for optical-precision mechanisms that are under development.

  18. Deployable radiators for waste heat dissipation from Shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. L.; Dietz, J. B.; Leach, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    Prototypes of two types of modularized, deployable radiator systems with a high degree of configuration and component commonality to minimize design, development and fabrication costs are currently under development for Shuttle payloads with high waste heat: a rigid radiator system which utilizes aluminum honeycomb panels that are deployed by a scissors mechanism; and two 'flexible' radiator systems which use panels constructed from flexible metal/dielectric composite materials that are deployed by 'unrolling' or 'extending' in orbit. Detail descriptions of these deployable radiator systems along with design and performance features are presented.

  19. Design and operation of a deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, K.

    1984-01-01

    A concept for the one dimensional deployable truss structure is presented. The deployed configuration of the structure consists of the repetition of a longitudinal octahedral truss module. The principal mechanical feature of the truss is that the lateral members comprising the lateral triangular truss are telescoping beams. Contracting of the lateral members results in the deployment of the truss structure. The geometric transformation of this truss of variable geometry is presented. Both simultaneous and sequential modes of transformation are possible. The validity of the transformation applied to the deployment is verified through design of a conceptual model.

  20. Preparation and Deployment of a Forward-Deployed, Heavy Air Defense Battalion to Southwest Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    would have been among the first division soldiers on the ground . We addressed this point early in deployment planning, but 27 armored and mechanized...survivability of crews is jeopardized by the lack of armor protection possessed by the forces being protec.ted. During the ground phase, two of our Stinger...the armored division air defense battalion espoused in the manuals and taught in schools were validated by Operation Desert Shield and Storm. The

  1. Effect of Navy Individual Augmentee Deployment/s on Mental Health Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    who were deployed twice would have twice the rate, if it is incident based. Orcutt, Erickson , and Wolfe (2004) designed a study to examine the PTSD...www.armymedicine.army.mil/news/mhat/mhat_iv/MHAT _IV_Report_17NOV06.pdf (accessed November 25, 2007). 22 Orcut, Erickson , and Wolfe found in...military cohesion literature. Military Psychology, 11(1), 57-83. Orcutt, H.K., Erickson , D.J., & Wolfe, J. (2004, June). The course of PTSD symptoms

  2. Swarm Deployable Boom Assembly (DBA) Development of a Deployable Magnetometer Boom for the Swarm Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Paul; Jung, Hans-Juergen; Edwards, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The Swarm programme consists of 3 magnetically clean satellites flying in close formation designed to measure the Earth's magnetic field using 2 Magnetometers mounted on a 4.3m long deployable boom.Deployment is initiated by releasing 3 HDRMs, once released the boom oscillates back and forth on a pair of pivots, similar to a restaurant kitchen door hinge, for around 120 seconds before coming to rest on 3 kinematic mounts which are used to provide an accurate reference location in the deployed position. Motion of the boom is damped through a combination of friction, spring hysteresis and flexing of the 120+ cables crossing the hinge. Considerable development work and accurate numerical modelling of the hinge motion was required to predict performance across a wide temperature range and ensure that during the 1st overshoot the boom did not damage itself, the harness or the spacecraft.Due to the magnetic cleanliness requirements of the spacecraft no magnetic materials could be used in the design of the hardware.

  3. Strategic Defense System: Stable Design and Adequate Testing must Precede Decision to Deploy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    software prototypes with human intervention. Furthermore, most of the system tests and evaluations so far have been based on the pre- Brilliant...software prototypes with human intervention. Further, the Secretary should ensure that required oversight by the Defense Acquisition Board be followed. The...integrated system-level tests in real time, using system hardware and software prototypes with human intervention. Agency Comments As requested by

  4. Waste-to-Energy Decision Support Method for Forward Deployed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    0.1429 In the report from USALIA liquid represented liquid left over from drinking bottles and for most waste to energy processes, liquid is not...may be better suited for other roles including recycling (glass, metal) or construction filling materials (rocks, concrete, dirt, etc.) One category

  5. The Falklands War, 1982: How Technological Deployments Shaped Decisions and the Outcome of the War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    fire, and Argonaut , a frigate, and Antrim, a Type 82 destroyer, had been temporarily put out of action with unexploded bombs inside them. Ten...British ships were hit by bombs but did not sink: Antrim, Argonaut , Broadsword, Plymouth, Sir Tristram, and Foxtrot Four. It is the luck of the English

  6. Lightweight Deployable Mirrors with Tensegrity Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.; Bradford, Larry J.; Cleve, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    The upper part of Figure 1 shows a small-scale prototype of a developmental class of lightweight, deployable structures that would support panels in precise alignments. In this case, the panel is hexagonal and supports disks that represent segments of a primary mirror of a large telescope. The lower part of Figure 1 shows a complete conceptual structure containing multiple hexagonal panels that hold mirror segments. The structures of this class are of the tensegrity type, which was invented five decades ago by artist Kenneth Snelson. A tensegrity structure consists of momentfree compression members (struts) and tension members (cables). The structures of this particular developmental class are intended primarily as means to erect large segmented primary mirrors of astronomical telescopes or large radio antennas in outer space. Other classes of tensegrity structures could also be designed for terrestrial use as towers, masts, and supports for general structural panels. An important product of the present development effort is the engineering practice of building a lightweight, deployable structure as an assembly of tensegrity modules like the one shown in Figure 2. This module comprises two octahedral tensegrity subunits that are mirror images of each other joined at their plane of mirror symmetry. In this case, the plane of mirror symmetry is both the upper plane of the lower subunit and the lower plane of the upper subunit, and is delineated by the midheight triangle in Figure 2. In the configuration assumed by the module to balance static forces under mild loading, the upper and lower planes of each sub-unit are rotated about 30 , relative to each other, about the long (vertical) axis of the structure. Larger structures can be assembled by joining multiple modules like this one at their sides or ends. When the module is compressed axially (vertically), the first-order effect is an increase in the rotation angle, but by virtue of the mirror arrangement, the net

  7. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2014 December

    SciTech Connect

    Arterburn, George K.

    2014-12-01

    This report is a summary of key Technology Deployment activities and achievements for 2014, including intellectual property, granted copyrights, royalties, license agreements, CRADAs, WFOs and Technology-Based Economic Development. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees also work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further develop emerging technologies. In our multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational instiutitons throughout the world. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically

  8. Application of information technology within a field hospital deployment following the January 2010 Haiti earthquake disaster.

    PubMed

    Levy, Gad; Blumberg, Nehemia; Kreiss, Yitshak; Ash, Nachman; Merin, Ofer

    2010-01-01

    Following the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the Israel Defense Force Medical Corps dispatched a field hospital unit. A specially tailored information technology solution was deployed within the hospital. The solution included a hospital administration system as well as a complete electronic medical record. A light-weight picture archiving and communication system was also deployed. During 10 days of operation, the system registered 1111 patients. The network and system up times were more than 99.9%. Patient movements within the hospital were noted, and an online command dashboard screen was generated. Patient care was delivered using the electronic medical record. Digital radiographs were acquired and transmitted to stations throughout the hospital. The system helped to introduce order in an otherwise chaotic situation and enabled adequate utilization of scarce medical resources by continually gathering information, analyzing it, and presenting it to the decision-making command level. The establishment of electronic medical records promoted the adequacy of medical treatment and facilitated continuity of care. This experience in Haiti supports the feasibility of deploying information technologies within a field hospital operation. Disaster response teams and agencies are encouraged to consider the use of information technology as part of their contingency plans.

  9. Managing Widely Disparate Code Bases Through Automation of Continuous Integration and Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. D.; Joshi, T.

    2013-12-01

    NASA EOSDIS tools, services, and service endpoints are widely dispersed across different sub-agencies and sub-organizations. Each of these entities has a different set of skills and widely varying codebases. Some produce sophisticated, well-tested, stable and deployable code, while others are struggling to meet stringent requirements with limited resources. This disparity makes the process of partnering with and deploying code onto the Earthdata platform (https://earthdata.nasa.gov) difficult, even at times impossible. The Earthdata Code Collaborative (ECC) is a project repository and code hosting facility that addresses this problem directly through a three-tiered approach: 1. Provide a standardized set of testing and automation tools for all hosted projects. 2. Regularly report on bugs and features as well as testing coverage and success through Web-based tools. 3. Directly pipeline projects from the ECC into the Earthdata production environment. This session will explain the architecture behind the ECC, including the custom software and 3rd party tools used. It will also detail the process by which decisions were and are being made to arrive at a fully-automated suite of tools and tests that allow any code base to quickly improve its quality and become a candidate for Earthdata inclusion. The session is oriented towards developers, managers, and team members involved in the process of developing, testing, deploying, and ensuring the quality of a code base, whether that code base be tens of millions of lines of code or simply hundreds.

  10. Application of information technology within a field hospital deployment following the January 2010 Haiti earthquake disaster

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Nehemia; Kreiss, Yitshak; Ash, Nachman; Merin, Ofer

    2010-01-01

    Following the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the Israel Defense Force Medical Corps dispatched a field hospital unit. A specially tailored information technology solution was deployed within the hospital. The solution included a hospital administration system as well as a complete electronic medical record. A light-weight picture archiving and communication system was also deployed. During 10 days of operation, the system registered 1111 patients. The network and system up times were more than 99.9%. Patient movements within the hospital were noted, and an online command dashboard screen was generated. Patient care was delivered using the electronic medical record. Digital radiographs were acquired and transmitted to stations throughout the hospital. The system helped to introduce order in an otherwise chaotic situation and enabled adequate utilization of scarce medical resources by continually gathering information, analyzing it, and presenting it to the decision-making command level. The establishment of electronic medical records promoted the adequacy of medical treatment and facilitated continuity of care. This experience in Haiti supports the feasibility of deploying information technologies within a field hospital operation. Disaster response teams and agencies are encouraged to consider the use of information technology as part of their contingency plans. PMID:20962123

  11. Deployment Plan for Bioremediation and Natural Attenuation for In Situ Restoration of Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, L.N.; Starr, R.C.; Sorenson, K.S.; Smith, R.W.; Phelps, T.J.

    1999-03-01

    This deployment plan describes a project funded by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective is to facilitate deployment of enhanced in situ bioremediation (ISB) an monitored natural attenuation (MNA) or chloroethene-contaminated groundwater to DOE sites. Enhanced ISB accelerates dechlorination of chloroethenes under anaerobic conditions by providing nutrients to the microbial community. Natural attenuation does not require nutrient addition. Enhanced ISB in the upgradient portion of a contaminant plume couples with MNA in the downgradient portion is being implemented at Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Selected DOE sites will be screened to assess their suitability for enhanced ISB/MNA. Tasks include: (1) characterization of the TAN microbial community and correlation of community characteristics with chloroethene degradation ability, (2) installation of wells to facilitate evaluation of MNA at TAN, (3) monitoring to better delineate MNA at TAN, and (4) screening of selected other DOE sites for suitability of ISB/MNA, and limited supplemental characterization. Data evaluation will provide a sound technical basis for decision makers to consider use of enhanced ISB and MNA, alone or together, as remedial technologies for these sites.

  12. Deployment models for commercialized carbon capture and storage.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Richard A; Monroe, Larry S; Friedman, Julio S

    2011-01-01

    Even before technology matures and the regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been developed, electrical utilities will need to consider the logistics of how widespread commercial-scale operations will be deployed. The framework of CCS will require utilities to adopt business models that ensure both safe and affordable CCS operations while maintaining reliable power generation. Physical models include an infrastructure with centralized CO(2) pipelines that focus geologic sequestration in pooled regional storage sites or supply CO(2) for beneficial use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and a dispersed plant model with sequestration operations which take place in close proximity to CO(2) capture. Several prototypical business models, including hybrids of these two poles, will be in play including a self-build option, a joint venture, and a pay at the gate model. In the self-build model operations are vertically integrated and utility owned and operated by an internal staff of engineers and geologists. A joint venture model stresses a partnership between the host site utility/owner's engineer and external operators and consultants. The pay to take model is turn-key external contracting to a third party owner/operator with cash positive fees paid out for sequestration and cash positive income for CO(2)-EOR. The selection of a business model for CCS will be based in part on the desire of utilities to be vertically integrated, source-sink economics, and demand for CO(2)-EOR. Another element in this decision will be how engaged a utility decides to be and the experience the utility has had with precommercial R&D activities. Through R&D, utilities would likely have already addressed or at least been exposed to the many technical, regulatory, and risk management issues related to successful CCS. This paper provides the framework for identifying the different physical and related prototypical business models that may play a role for electric utilities in

  13. Deploying temporary networks for upscaling of sparse network stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, Evan J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Bell, Jesse E.; Kelly, Victoria; Hall, Mark; Palecki, Michael A.; Temimi, Marouane

    2016-10-01

    Soil observations networks at the national scale play an integral role in hydrologic modeling, drought assessment, agricultural decision support, and our ability to understand climate change. Understanding soil moisture variability is necessary to apply these measurements to model calibration, business and consumer applications, or even human health issues. The installation of soil moisture sensors as sparse, national networks is necessitated by limited financial resources. However, this results in the incomplete sampling of the local heterogeneity of soil type, vegetation cover, topography, and the fine spatial distribution of precipitation events. To this end, temporary networks can be installed in the areas surrounding a permanent installation within a sparse network. The temporary networks deployed in this study provide a more representative average at the 3 km and 9 km scales, localized about the permanent gauge. The value of such temporary networks is demonstrated at test sites in Millbrook, New York and Crossville, Tennessee. The capacity of a single U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) sensor set to approximate the average of a temporary network at the 3 km and 9 km scales using a simple linear scaling function is tested. The capacity of a temporary network to provide reliable estimates with diminishing numbers of sensors, the temporal stability of those networks, and ultimately, the relationship of the variability of those networks to soil moisture conditions at the permanent sensor are investigated. In this manner, this work demonstrates the single-season installation of a temporary network as a mechanism to characterize the soil moisture variability at a permanent gauge within a sparse network.

  14. Development, deployment and operations of ATLAS databases.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniachine, A. V.; von der Schmitt, J. G.; High Energy Physics; Mac-Planck-Inst.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for ATLAS data taking, a coordinated shift from development towards operations has occurred in ATLAS database activities. In addition to development and commissioning activities in databases, ATLAS is active in the development and deployment (in collaboration with the WLCG 3D project) of the tools that allow the worldwide distribution and installation of databases and related datasets, as well as the actual operation of this system on ATLAS multi-grid infrastructure. We describe development and commissioning of major ATLAS database applications for online and offline. We present the first scalability test results and ramp-up schedule over the initial LHC years of operations towards the nominal year of ATLAS running, when the database storage volumes are expected to reach 6.1 TB for the Tag DB and 1.0 TB for the Conditions DB. ATLAS database applications require robust operational infrastructure for data replication between online and offline at Tier-0, and for the distribution of the offline data to Tier-1 and Tier-2 computing centers. We describe ATLAS experience with Oracle Streams and other technologies for coordinated replication of databases in the framework of the WLCG 3D services.

  15. Development of the Toggle Deployment Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher W.

    1994-01-01

    The Toggle Deployment Mechanism (TDM) is a two fault tolerant, single point, low shock pyro/mechanical releasing device. Many forms of releasing are single fault tolerant and involve breaking of primary structure. Other releasing mechanisms, that do not break primary structure, are only pyrotechnically redundant and not mechanically redundant. The TDM contains 3 independent pyro actuators, and only one of the 3 is required for release. The 2 separating members in the TDM are held together by a toggle that is a cylindrical stem with a larger diameter spherical shape on the top and flares out in a conical shape at the bottom. The spherical end of the toggle sits in a socket with the top assembly and the bottom is held down by 3 pins or hooks equally spaced around the conical shaped end. Each of the TDM's 3 independent actuators shares a third of the separating load and does not require as much pyrotechnic energy as many single fault tolerant actuators. Other single separating actuators, i.e., separating nuts or pin pullers, have the pyrotechnic energy releasing the entire preload holding the separating members together. Two types of TDM's ,described in this paper, release the toggle with pin pullers, and the third TDM releases the toggle with hooks. Each design has different advantages and disadvantages. This paper describes the TDM's construction and testing up to the summer of 1993.

  16. Promoting international deployment of greenhouse gas technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Kelley, J.S.; Voss, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing emission of greenhouse gases from human activities are predicted to lead to significant global warming and possible undesirable Environmental effects by the middle of the next century. These gases trap solar energy that is reradiated from the earth`s surface, raising its temperature. The gases-carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)-are emitted as the result of a wide range of anthropogenic activities, including the production and conversion of energy from fossil fuels, the operation of air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and coal mining, domestic sewage treatment, and the manufacture of cement and nylon. To slow global warming, technologies are being developed, promoted, and deployed to reduce these emissions. To make a practical response to global environmental issues such as greenhouse gas emissions, it is recognized that international collaboration is needed. Because of the accelerating pace of technology innovation and the increasingly interconnected world economy, national efforts to adapt to global environmental challenges are no longer sufficient. Through international collaboration, scarce resources can be shared and technological solutions can be adapted and replicated. ORNL is responsible for managing and supporting the U.S, involvement in many of the implementing agreements. In addition to collaborating with GREENTIE, ORNL is involved with the following other IEA implementing agreements, either as executive committee members, national team leaders, or operating agents: the Center for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies, Heat Pump Program, Buildings and Community Systems, Alternative Motor Fuels, and Fusion Energy Stellerator Concept.

  17. Transportation Deployment; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    Automakers, commercial fleet operators, component manufacturers, and government agencies all turn to the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to help put more green vehicles on the road. The lab’s independent analysis and evaluation pinpoint fuel-efficient and low-emission strategies to support economic and operational goals, while breaking down barriers to widespread adoption. Customized assessment of existing equipment and practices, energy-saving alternatives, operational considerations, and marketplace realities factor in the multitude of variables needed to ensure meaningful performance, financial, and environmental benefits. NREL provides integrated, unbiased, 360-degree sustainable transportation deployment expertise encompassing alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and related infrastructure. Hands-on support comes from technical experts experienced in advanced vehicle technologies, fleet operations, and field data collection coupled with extensive modeling and analysis capabilities. The lab’s research team works closely with automakers and vehicle equipment manufacturers to test, analyze, develop, and evaluate high-performance fuel-efficient technologies that meet marketplace needs.

  18. Issues concerning centralized versus decentralized power deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.; Harty, Richard B.; Robin, James F.

    1991-03-01

    The results of a study of proposed lunar base architectures to identify issues concerning centralized and decentralized power system deployment options are presented. The power system consists of the energy producing system (power plant), the power conditioning components used to convert the generated power into the form desired for transmission, the transmission lines that conduct this power from the power sources to the loads, and the primary power conditioning hardware located at the user end. Three power system architectures, centralized, hybrid, and decentralized, were evaluated during the course of this study. Candidate power sources were characterized with respect to mass and radiator area. Two electrical models were created for each architecture to identify the preferred method of power transmission, dc or ac. Each model allowed the transmission voltage level to be varied at assess the impact on power system mass. The ac power system models also permitted the transmission line configurations and placements to determine the best conductor construction and installation location. Key parameters used to evaluate each configuration were power source and power conditioning component efficiencies, masses, and radiator areas; transmission line masses and operating temperatures; and total system mass.

  19. Automating NEURON Simulation Deployment in Cloud Resources.

    PubMed

    Stockton, David B; Santamaria, Fidel

    2017-01-01

    Simulations in neuroscience are performed on local servers or High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Recently, cloud computing has emerged as a potential computational platform for neuroscience simulation. In this paper we compare and contrast HPC and cloud resources for scientific computation, then report how we deployed NEURON, a widely used simulator of neuronal activity, in three clouds: Chameleon Cloud, a hybrid private academic cloud for cloud technology research based on the OpenStack software; Rackspace, a public commercial cloud, also based on OpenStack; and Amazon Elastic Cloud Computing, based on Amazon's proprietary software. We describe the manual procedures and how to automate cloud operations. We describe extending our simulation automation software called NeuroManager (Stockton and Santamaria, Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, 2015), so that the user is capable of recruiting private cloud, public cloud, HPC, and local servers simultaneously with a simple common interface. We conclude by performing several studies in which we examine speedup, efficiency, total session time, and cost for sets of simulations of a published NEURON model.

  20. Issues concerning centralized versus decentralized power deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.; Harty, Richard B.; Robin, James F.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a study of proposed lunar base architectures to identify issues concerning centralized and decentralized power system deployment options are presented. The power system consists of the energy producing system (power plant), the power conditioning components used to convert the generated power into the form desired for transmission, the transmission lines that conduct this power from the power sources to the loads, and the primary power conditioning hardware located at the user end. Three power system architectures, centralized, hybrid, and decentralized, were evaluated during the course of this study. Candidate power sources were characterized with respect to mass and radiator area. Two electrical models were created for each architecture to identify the preferred method of power transmission, dc or ac. Each model allowed the transmission voltage level to be varied at assess the impact on power system mass. The ac power system models also permitted the transmission line configurations and placements to determine the best conductor construction and installation location. Key parameters used to evaluate each configuration were power source and power conditioning component efficiencies, masses, and radiator areas; transmission line masses and operating temperatures; and total system mass.

  1. Deployment of the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.; Rock, D.W.

    1989-01-20

    This paper discusses the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment, currently in operation, set up by members of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Treaty Verification Program and the Oklahoma Geophysical Observatory to determine deep-borehole seismic characteristics in geology typical of large regions in the Soviet Union. We evaluated and logged an existing 772-m deep borehole on the Observatory site by running caliper, cement bonding, casing inspection, and hole-deviation logs. Two Teledyne Geotech borehole-clamping seismometers were placed at various depths and spacings in the deep borehole. Currently, they are deployed at 727 and 730 m. A Teledyne Geotech shallow-borehole seismometer was mounted in a 4.5-m hole, one meter from the deep borehole. The seismometers' system coherency were tested and found to be excellent to 35 Hz. We have recorded seismic noise, quarry blasts, regional earthquakes and teleseisms in the present configuration. We will begin a study of seismic noise and attenuation as a function of depth in the near future. 7 refs., 18 figs.

  2. Research for deployment: incorporating risk, regulation, and liability for carbon capture and sequestration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Elizabeth J; Friedmann, S Julio; Pollak, Melisa F

    2007-09-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has the potential to enable deep reductions in global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, however this promise can only be fulfilled with large-scale deployment. For this to happen, CCS must be successfully embedded into a larger legal and regulatory context, and any potential risks must be effectively managed. We developed a list of outstanding research and technical questions driven by the demands of the regulatory and legal systems for the geologic sequestration (GS) component of CCS. We then looked at case studies that bound uncertainty within two of the research themes that emerge. These case studies, on surface leakage from abandoned wells and groundwater quality impacts from metals mobilization, illustrate how research can inform decision makers on issues of policy, regulatory need, and legal considerations. A central challenge is to ensure that the research program supports development of general regulatory and legal frameworks, and also the development of geological, geophysical, geochemical, and modeling methods necessary for effective GS site monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols, as well as mitigation and remediation plans. If large-scale deployment of GS is to occur in a manner that adequately protects human and ecological health and does not discourage private investment, strengthening the scientific underpinnings of regulatory and legal decision-making is crucial.

  3. Study of advanced sunflower precision deployable antenna. [space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giebler, M. M.; Palmer, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The maximum deployed diameter stowable in shuttle was determined for the original concept and for new more efficient concepts. Estimates of weight, surface accuracy and cost were made for the various configurations. Five critical technologies were identified which would be required to manufacture large solid deployable reflectors. These technologies are concerned with surface accuracy improvement and verification.

  4. Accommodating Thickness in Origami-Based Deployable Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirbel, Shannon A.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.; Lang, Robert J.; Thomson, Mark W.; Sigel, Deborah A.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Trease, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to create deployment systems with a large ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter. Deployment from a compact form to a final flat state can be achieved through origami-inspired folding of panels. There are many models capable of this motion when folded in a material with negligible thickness; however, when the application requires the folding of thick, rigid panels, attention must be paid to the effect of material thickness not only on the final folded state, but also during the folding motion (i.e., the panels must not be required to flex to attain the final folded form). The objective is to develop new methods for deployment from a compact folded form to a large circular array (or other final form). This paper describes a mathematical model for modifying the pattern to accommodate material thickness in the context of the design, modeling, and testing of a deployable system inspired by an origami six-sided flasher model. The model is demonstrated in hardware as a 1/20th scale prototype of a deployable solar array for space applications. The resulting prototype has a ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter of 9.2 (or 1.25 m deployed outer diameter to 0.136 m stowed outer diameter).

  5. The Impact of Deployment on U.S. Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Sean C.; Malatras, Jennifer Weil; Israel, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent articles have explored the effects of military deployment on U.S. service members' mental health outcomes. Although increased attention has also begun to focus on the effects of deployment on military families, providing a conceptualization for the mechanisms of this process can help organize existing information and inform future…

  6. Educators Supporting Families in Times of Crisis: Military Reserve Deployments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Judy; Vannest, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    With the large number of National Guard members and reservists being deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, public educators find themselves endeavoring to support the emotional and academic needs of military children and their families. Military children may exhibit behavioral and emotional difficulties during these deployments. Educator awareness of…

  7. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    2002-01-01

    This Annual Report covers the following main topics: 1) Updated Reference Mission. The reference ProSEDS (Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System) mission is evaluated for an updated launch date in the Summer of 2002 and for the new 80-s current operating cycle. Simulations are run for nominal solar activity condition at the time of launch and for extreme conditions of dynamic forcing. Simulations include the dynamics of the system, the electrodynamics of the bare tether, the neutral atmosphere and the thermal response of the tether. 2) Evaluation of power delivered by the tether system. The power delivered by the tethered system during the battery charging mode is computed under the assumption of minimum solar activity for the new launch date. 3) Updated Deployment Control Profiles and Simulations. A number of new deployment profiles were derived based on the latest results of the deployment ground tests. The flight profile is then derived based on the friction characteristics obtained from the deployment tests of the F-1 tether. 4) Analysis/estimation of deployment flight data. A process was developed to estimate the deployment trajectory of the endmass with respect to the Delta and the final libration amplitude from the data of the deployer turn counters. This software was tested successfully during the ProSEDS mission simulation at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) EDAC (Environments Data Analysis Center).

  8. Optimizing System Compute and Bandwidth Density for Deployed HPEC Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Optimizing System Compute and Bandwidth Density for Deployed HPEC Applications Randy Banton and Richard Jaenicke Mercury Computer Systems, Inc...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9... Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Optimizing System Compute Density for Deployed HPEC Applications Randy Banton, Director, Defense Electronics Engineering

  9. Dengue Virus Exposures among Deployed U.S. Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Elisabeth M; Martinez, Luis J; Jarman, Richard G; Lyons, Arthur G; Eckels, Kenneth H; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-02-13

    Dengue virus infections have adversely impacted U.S. military operations since the Spanish-American War. The erosion of mission capabilities and lost duty days are underestimated. Appreciating the incidence and prevalence of dengue infections in U.S. military personnel is important to inform disease prevention strategies. Banked pre- and post-deployment serum samples from 1,000 U.S. military personnel with a single deployment to a dengue-endemic region were tested using a screening microneutralization assay to detect anti-dengue-virus-neutralizing antibodies. A total of 76 (7.6%) post-deployment samples were positive and 15 of the pre-deployment samples were negative. These figures represent an infection incidence of 1.5% and total of 17.6 seroconversions per 10,000 deployment months. These data represent a deploying military population with a relatively high background rate of dengue seropositivity, a low level of infection during deployment compared with background infection rates in the local populations, and the potential for worsening clinical attack rates with increased frequency of deployment. Additional studies are required to more clearly elucidate the dengue infection and disease risk in U.S. military personnel.

  10. Deployable Rhombic Dodecahedral Modules Consisting of Struts and Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki

    A novel deployable rhombic dodecahedral module is proposed and its mechanical characteristics are investigated. This module has a rhombic dodecahedral shape and consists of struts, cables, and vertex joints. Two types of stowed configurations, planar and linear, are applicable to the module. Cables are provided to ensure the stability of the module. The module is deployed to its objective shape from the stowed configuration by changing the lengths of the cables. In order to investigate the structural characteristics of the deployable module, mechanism analyses are carried out, and a prototype is built and tested. The results clearly indicate that the proposed rhombic dodecahedral module is deployable and that it is stable in the deployed configuration.

  11. Deployable radiators for waste heat dissipation from Shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. L.; Dietz, J. B.; Leach, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal control of Shuttle instruments will require the use of a pumped fluid space radiator system to reject large quantities of waste heat. Many payloads, however, will have insufficient vehicle surface area available for radiators to reject this waste heat and will, therefore, require the use of deployed panels. It is desirable to utilize modularized, deployable radiator systems which have a high degree of configuration and component commonality to minimize the design, development, and fabrication costs. Prototypes of two radiator systems which meet these criteria are currently under development for Shuttle payload utilization: a 'rigid' radiator system which utilizes aluminum honeycomb panels of the Shuttle Orbiter configuration that are deployed by an Apollo Telescope Mount type scissors mechanism; and two 'flexible' radiator systems which use panels constructed from flexible metal/dielectric composite materials that are deployed by 'unrolling' or 'extending' in orbit. Detailed descriptions of these deployable radiator systems, along with design and performance features, are presented.

  12. Solar array deployment qualification for the LMX of buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kathy

    2005-07-01

    The solar array deployment system for the LMX line of buses deploys rigid Solar Array Wing Assemblies (SAWAs). Each SAWA has a set of Solar Array Deployment Mechanisms (SADM), which consists of two hinges, a strut, and two Hold Down Release Mechanisms (HDRMs). To qualify the SADM for flight, each mechanism component was qualified individually, then assembled to a qualification SAWA on Special Test Equipment (STE) and deployed in a thermal vacuum chamber at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures. These mechanisms were designed, built, and tested by the Power and Mechanisms part of the Power, Thermal, Structures & Mechanisms Product Center, which develops products for both internal and external customers. This paper will discuss the qualification effort for the LMX Solar Array deployment, including qualification hardware and STE. It will focus on unique challenges presented by each aspect of the qualification, and lessons learned from the hardware integration and the qualification testing.

  13. Chronic Left Lower Lobe Pulmonary Infiltrates During Military Deployment.

    PubMed

    Hunninghake, John C; Skabelund, Andrew J; Morris, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Deployment to Southwest Asia is associated with increased airborne hazards such as geologic dusts, burn pit smoke, vehicle exhaust, or air pollution. There are numerous ongoing studies to evaluate the potential effects of inhaled particulate matter on reported increases in acute and chronic respiratory symptoms. Providers need to be aware of potential causes of pulmonary disease such as acute eosinophilic pneumonia, asthma, and vocal cord dysfunction that have been associated with deployment. Other pulmonary disorders such as interstitial lung disease are infrequently reported. Not all deployment-related respiratory complaints may result from deployment airborne hazards and a broad differential should be considered. We present the case of a military member with a prolonged deployment found to have lobar infiltrates secondary to pulmonary vein stenosis from treatment for atrial fibrillation.

  14. Investigating the respiratory health of deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Zacher, Lisa L; Jackson, David A

    2011-10-01

    Recent news media articles have implied a direct relationship between environmental exposures such as burn pits during current deployments and the development of serious and debilitating chronic pulmonary disease. These articles suggest that the military is superficially investigating evidence that establishes a link between deployment and development of chronic lung disease. Anecdotal cases of military personnel with lung disease are detailed to suggest a systemic problem with undiagnosed and untreated pulmonary disease in deployed service members. Despite these contentions, the U.S. Army Medical Department and other agencies have been actively pursuing numerous scientific investigations into deployment-related lung disease to define the severity and prevalence of the issue. This article will review relevant research efforts by the U.S. military in the existing medical literature and address the current efforts planned by the services to systematically investigate the possibility of deployment-related pulmonary disease.

  15. Automation: Decision Aid or Decision Maker?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skitka, Linda J.

    1998-01-01

    This study clarified that automation bias is something unique to automated decision making contexts, and is not the result of a general tendency toward complacency. By comparing performance on exactly the same events on the same tasks with and without an automated decision aid, we were able to determine that at least the omission error part of automation bias is due to the unique context created by having an automated decision aid, and is not a phenomena that would occur even if people were not in an automated context. However, this study also revealed that having an automated decision aid did lead to modestly improved performance across all non-error events. Participants in the non- automated condition responded with 83.68% accuracy, whereas participants in the automated condition responded with 88.67% accuracy, across all events. Automated decision aids clearly led to better overall performance when they were accurate. People performed almost exactly at the level of reliability as the automation (which across events was 88% reliable). However, also clear, is that the presence of less than 100% accurate automated decision aids creates a context in which new kinds of errors in decision making can occur. Participants in the non-automated condition responded with 97% accuracy on the six "error" events, whereas participants in the automated condition had only a 65% accuracy rate when confronted with those same six events. In short, the presence of an AMA can lead to vigilance decrements that can lead to errors in decision making.

  16. An innovative deployable solar panel system for Cubesats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Donati, Serena; Perelli, Massimo; Negri, Andrea; Marino, Michele

    2014-02-01

    One of the main Cubesat bus limitations is the available on-board power. The maximum power obtained using body mounted solar panels and advanced triple junction solar cells on a triple unit Cubesat is typically less than 10 W. The Cubesat performance and the mission scenario opened to these small satellite systems could be greatly enhanced by an increase of the available power. This paper describes the design and realization of a modular deployable solar panel system for Cubesats, consisting of a modular hinge and spring system that can be potentially used on-board single (1U), double(2U), triple (3U) and six units (6U) Cubesats. The size of each solar panels is the size of a lateral Cubesat surface. The system developed is the basis for a SADA (Solar Array Drive Assembly), in which a maneuvering capability is added to the deployed solar array in order to follow the apparent motion of the sun. The system design trade-off is discussed, comparing different deployment concepts and architectures, leading to the final selection for the modular design. A prototype of the system has been realized for a 3U Cubesat, consisting of two deployable solar panel systems, made of three solar panels each, for a total of six deployed solar panels. The deployment system is based on a plastic fiber wire and thermal cutters, guaranteeing a suitable level of reliability. A test-bed for the solar panel deployment testing has been developed, supporting the solar array during deployment reproducing the dynamical situation in orbit. The results of the deployment system testing are discussed, including the design and realization of the test-bed, the mechanical stress given to the solar cells by the deployment accelerations and the overall system performance. The maximum power delivered by the system is about 50.4 W BOL, greatly enhancing the present Cubesat solar array performance.

  17. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  18. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2013 December

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2014-01-01

    available to the INL’s Office of Technology Deployment. However, the accomplishments cataloged in the report reflect the achievements and creativity of the researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce.

  19. CONSOL`s perspective on CCT deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Statnick, R.M.

    1997-12-31

    The principal focus of government investment in Clean Coal Technology must be to serve the interests of the US energy consumer. Because of its security of supply and low cost, coal will continue to be the fuel of choice in the existing domestic electricity generating market. The ability of coal to compete for new generating capacity will depend largely on natural gas prices and the efficiency of coal and gas-fired generating options. Furthermore, potential environmental regulations, coupled with utility deregulation, create a climate of economic uncertainty that may limit future investment decisions favorable to coal. Therefore, the federal government, through programs such as CCT, should promote the development of greenfield and retrofit coal use technology that improves generating efficiency and meets environmental requirements for the domestic electric market.

  20. Low validity of self-report in identifying recent mental health diagnosis among U.S. service members completing Pre-Deployment Health Assessment (PreDHA) and deployed to Afghanistan, 2007: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Remington L

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 1998, the U.S. Armed Forces has used the mandatory Pre-Deployment Health Assessment (PreDHA) screening questionnaire as a means of assessing the health and suitability of U.S. service members for deployment. Limited data exists to quantify the validity of the self-reported PreDHA. This study was conducted to assess the validity of self-reporting in PreDHA to identify deployed service members who have had a recent mental health disorder diagnosis. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 15,195 U.S. service members deployed in support of combat and reconstruction operations in Afghanistan. The Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS), the DoD's longitudinal medical surveillance database, was queried to identify cases among the cohort with a recent diagnosis of a pertinent mental health disorder and to obtain those subjects' responses to the PreDHA. Results Of the study cohort, 11,179 (73.6%) subjects had a PreDHA available within the DMSS at the time of analysis. A total of 615 subjects (4.0%) had one or more mental health disorder diagnoses during the pre-deployment period. Out the 615 subjects with diagnosed mental health disorders, 465 had a PreDHA. Among these, only 224, not quite half, answered in the affirmative to the PreDHA question: "During the past year, have you sought counseling or care for your mental health?" Conclusion This study demonstrates that the self-reported PreDHA has low validity for identifying service members with diagnosed mental health disorders. The development of electronic decision-support systems which automatically screen electronic health records to identify high-risk service members may prove a valuable component of improved pre-deployment screening processes. PMID:19811664

  1. Navigation for IUS deployment. TDRSS navigation accuracy in support of IUS deployment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wylie, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    The navigation accuracy for tracking the orbiter prior to interim upper stage (IUS) deployment using the tracking data relay satellite system (TDRSS) was studied. The orbiter navigation accuracy for both one and two TDRSS satellites, for short and long data arcs, and for Doppler-only and Doppler-plus range solutions was examined. All test cases were run with the orbiter in a 150-n. mi. circular orbit, 28.5 degree inclination, at the time interval from the completion of the orbital maneuvering system (OMS)-2 maneuver to OMS-2 plus 2 hours (approximate time for IUS deployment). The data used were simulated by the simulation navigation (SIMNAV) program. The software tool used to process the TDRS data was the Shuttle Navigation Analysis Program (SNAP), a Kalman filter tool used to solve for the orbiter position and velocity. Results summarize the expected navigation accuracy using the TDRS system. It was concluded that: (1) data from both TDRS satellites were essential for accurate navigation results: (2) range data were essential for the short arc test case but were not needed for the long arc test case; and (3) with Doppler and range data from both TDRS satellites, the results converged to a reasonable solution after 5 to 10 minutes of data.

  2. Long Cable Deployments During Martian Touchdown: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Sell, Steven W.

    2009-01-01

    The launch of NASA/JPL's next generation Mars rover is planned for the fall of 2011. The landing scheme chosen for this rover represents a step forward in unmanned payload delivery. The rover will be lowered from a rocket powered descent stage and then placed onto the surface while hanging from three bridles. During this touchdown event, the communication between the rover and descent stage is maintained by an electrical umbilical cable which is deployed in parallel with the structural bridles. During the development of the deployment device for the electrical umbilical, many obstacles were identified and overcome. Many of these challenges were due in large part to the helical nature of the packing geometry of the umbilical cable. And although none of these issues resulted in the failure of the design, they increased both development and assembly time. Many of the issues and some of the benefits of a helical deployment were not immediately apparent during the trade studies carried out during the deployment selection process. Tests were conducted upon completion of the device in order to characterize both the deployment and separation characteristics of the cable. Extraction loads were needed for inputs to touchdown models and separation dynamics were required to assess cable-rover recontact risk. Understanding the pros and cons surrounding the deployment of a helically packed cable would most certainly influence the outcome of future trade studies surrounding the selection of cable deployment options.

  3. Intertemporal cumulative radiative forcing effects of photovoltaic deployments.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Dwarakanath; Seager, Thomas P; Chester, Mikhail V; Fraser, Matthew P

    2014-09-02

    Current policies accelerating photovoltaics (PV) deployments are motivated by environmental goals, including reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by displacing electricity generated from fossil-fuels. Existing practice assesses environmental benefits on a net life-cycle basis, where displaced GHG emissions offset those generated during PV production. However, this approach does not consider that the environmental costs of GHG release during production are incurred early, while environmental benefits accrue later. Thus, where policy targets suggest meeting GHG reduction goals established by a certain date, rapid PV deployment may have counterintuitive, albeit temporary, undesired consequences. On a cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) basis, the environmental improvements attributable to PV might be realized much later than is currently understood, particularly when PV manufacturing utilizes GHG-intensive energy sources (e.g., coal), but deployment occurs in areas with less GHG-intensive electricity sources (e.g., hydroelectric). This paper details a dynamic CRF model to examine the intertemporal warming impacts of PV deployments in California and Wyoming. CRF payback times are longer than GHG payback times by 6-12 years in California and 6-11 years in Wyoming depending on the PV technology mix and deployment strategy. For the same PV capacity being deployed, early installations yield greater CRF benefits (calculated over 10 and 25 years) than installations occurring later in time. Further, CRF benefits are maximized when PV technologies with the lowest manufacturing GHG footprint (cadmium telluride) are deployed in locations with the most GHG-intensive grids (i.e., Wyoming).

  4. Effects of Deployment on Musculoskeletal and Physiological Characteristics and Balance.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Keenan, Karen A; McGrail, Mark A; Smalley, Brian W; Lephart, Scott M

    2016-09-01

    Despite many nonbattle injuries reported during deployment, few studies have been conducted to evaluate the effects of deployment on musculoskeletal and physiological characteristics and balance. A total of 35 active duty U.S. Army Soldiers participated in laboratory testing before and after deployment to Afghanistan. The following measures were obtained for each Soldier: shoulder, trunk, hip, knee, and ankle strength and range of motion (ROM), balance, body composition, aerobic capacity, and anaerobic power/capacity. Additionally, Soldiers were asked about their physical activity and load carriage. Paired t tests or Wilcoxon tests with an α = 0.05 set a priori were used for statistical analyses. Shoulder external rotation ROM, torso rotation ROM, ankle dorsiflexion ROM, torso rotation strength, and anaerobic power significantly increased following deployment (p < 0.05). Shoulder extension ROM, shoulder external rotation strength, and eyes-closed balance (p < 0.05) were significantly worse following deployment. The majority of Soldiers (85%) engaged in physical activity. In addition, 58% of Soldiers reported regularly carrying a load (22 kg average). The deployment-related changes in musculoskeletal and physiological characteristics and balance as well as physical activity and load carriage during deployment may assist with proper preparation with the intent to optimize tactical readiness and mitigate injury risk.

  5. Deploying an Intelligent Pairing Assistant for Air Operation Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-23

    This paper describes the Intelligent Pairing Assistant (IPA) decision aid , which provides pairing recommendations at specific decision points in...software. First, MAAPTK is briefly described. Second, we describe the IPA user decision aid , which functions as a plugin to MAAPTK. MAAPTK is a...system to make recommendations to planners in the context of a particular wizard page. That is, IPA is a decision aid that highlights preferred decisions

  6. Decisions for Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atthill, Charles

    1974-01-01

    The main aim of the Decisions projects is to illustrate, through group work, some of the features of decision making in the business world. The exercises take as their starting point real problems confronting an oil company, and use real data as the basis for problem solving and decision making. (Author)

  7. Sustainability Based Decision Making

    EPA Science Inventory

    With sustainability as the “true north” for EPA research, a premium is placed on the ability to make decisions under highly complex and uncertain conditions. The primary challenge is reconciling disparate criteria toward credible and defensible decisions. Making decisions on on...

  8. Measurement Decision Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    This paper describes and evaluates the use of decision theory as a tool for classifying examinees based on their item response patterns. Decision theory, developed by A. Wald (1947) and now widely used in engineering, agriculture, and computing, provides a simple model for the analysis of categorical data. Measurement decision theory requires only…

  9. Cell-tower deployment of counter-sniper sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, Michael T.

    2004-09-01

    Cellular telephone antenna towers are evaluated as sites for rapid, effective & efficient deployment of counter-sniper sensors, especially in urban environments. They are expected to offer a suitable density, excellent LOS, and a generally limited variety of known or readily-characterized mechanical interfaces. Their precise locations are easily mapped in advance of deployment, are easily accessible by ground and air, and are easily spotted by deployment teams in real-time. We survey issues of EMI & RFI, susceptibility to denial & ambush in military scenarios, and the impact of trends in cell tower design & construction.

  10. Make better decisions.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H

    2009-11-01

    Traditionally, decision making in organizations has rarely been the focus of systematic analysis. That may account for the astounding number of recent poor calls, such as decisions to invest in and securitize subprime mortgage loans or to hedge risk with credit default swaps. Business books are rich with insights about the decision process, but organizations have been slow to adopt their recommendations. It's time to focus on decision making, Davenport says, and he proposes four steps: (1) List and prioritize the decisions that must be made; (2) assess the factors that go into each, such as who plays what role, how often the decision must be made, and what information is available to support it; (3) design the roles, processes, systems, and behaviors your organization needs; and (4) institutionalize decision tools and assistance. The Educational Testing Service and The Stanley Works, among others, have succeeded in improving their decisions. ETS established a centralized deliberative body to make evidence-based decisions about new-product offerings, and Stanley has a Pricing Center of Excellence with internal consultants dedicated to its various business units. Leaders should bring multiple perspectives to their decision making, beware of analytical models that managers don't understand, be clear about their assumptions, practice "model management," and--because only people can revise decision criteria over time--cultivate human backups.

  11. Risk Analysis and Decision Making FY 2013 Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward; Thompson, J.

    2013-06-01

    Risk analysis and decision making is one of the critical objectives of CCSI, which seeks to use information from science-based models with quantified uncertainty to inform decision makers who are making large capital investments. The goal of this task is to develop tools and capabilities to facilitate the development of risk models tailored for carbon capture technologies, quantify the uncertainty of model predictions, and estimate the technical and financial risks associated with the system. This effort aims to reduce costs by identifying smarter demonstrations, which could accelerate development and deployment of the technology by several years.

  12. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, S.; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-30

    Operational faults are pervasive across the commercial buildings sector, wasting energy and increasing energy costs by up to about 30% (Mills 2009, Liu et al. 2003, Claridge et al. 2000, Katipamula and Brambley 2008, and Brambley and Katipamula 2009). Automated fault detection and diagnostic (AFDD) tools provide capabilities essential for detecting and correcting these problems and eliminating the associated energy waste and costs. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technology Program (BTP) has previously invested in developing and testing of such diagnostic tools for whole-building (and major system) energy use, air handlers, chillers, cooling towers, chilled-water distribution systems, and boilers. These diagnostic processes can be used to make the commercial buildings more energy efficient. The work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and KGS Building LLC (KGS). PNNL and KGS both believe that the widespread adoption of AFDD tools will result in significant reduction to energy and peak energy consumption. The report provides an introduction and summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA. The CRADA project had three major focus areas: (1) Technical Assistance for Whole Building Energy Diagnostician (WBE) Commercialization, (2) Market Transfer of the Outdoor Air/Economizer Diagnostician (OAE), and (3) Development and Deployment of Automated Diagnostics to Improve Large Commercial Building Operations. PNNL has previously developed two diagnostic tools: (1) whole building energy (WBE) diagnostician and (2) outdoor air/economizer (OAE) diagnostician. WBE diagnostician is currently licensed non-exclusively to one company. As part of this CRADA, PNNL developed implementation documentation and provided technical support to KGS to implement the tool into their software suite, Clockworks. PNNL also

  13. Water Quality Vocabulary Development and Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, B. A.; Yu, J.; Cox, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Semantic descriptions of observed properties and associated units of measure are fundamental to understanding of environmental observations, including groundwater, surface water and marine water quality. Semantic descriptions can be captured in machine-readable ontologies and vocabularies, thus providing support for the annotation of observation values from the disparate data sources with appropriate and accurate metadata, which is critical for achieving semantic interoperability. However, current stand-alone water quality vocabularies provide limited support for cross-system comparisons or data fusion. To enhance semantic interoperability, the alignment of water-quality properties with definitions of chemical entities and units of measure in existing widely-used vocabularies is required. Modern ontologies and vocabularies are expressed, organized and deployed using Semantic Web technologies. We developed an ontology for observed properties (i.e. a model for expressing appropriate controlled vocabularies) which extends the NASA/TopQuadrant QUDT ontology for Unit and QuantityKind with two additional classes and two properties (see accompanying paper by Cox, Simons and Yu). We use our ontology to populate the Water Quality vocabulary with a set of individuals of each of the four key classes (and their subclasses), and add appropriate relationships between these individuals. This ontology is aligned with other relevant stand-alone Water Quality vocabularies and domain ontologies. Developing the Water Quality vocabulary involved two main steps. First, the Water Quality vocabulary was populated with individuals of the ObservedProperty class, which was determined from a census of existing datasets and services. Each ObservedProperty individual relates to other individuals of Unit and QuantityKind (taken from QUDT where possible), and to IdentifiedObject individuals. As a large fraction of observed water quality data are classified by the chemical substance involved, the

  14. 78 FR 65751 - Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants AGENCY: Federal... continue Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) development with their partners, such as arterial management.... The purpose of this program is to promote the integrated management and operations of...

  15. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy (Narrated)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  16. Pretraumatic Stress Reactions in Soldiers Deployed to Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is a diagnosis related to the past. Pre-traumatic stress reactions, as measured by intrusive involuntary images of possible future stressful events and their associated avoidance and increased arousal, have been overlooked in the PTSD literature. Here we introduce a scale that measures pre-traumatic stress reactions providing a clear future-oriented parallel to the posttraumatic stress reactions described in the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. We apply this pre-traumatic stress reactions checklist (PreCL) to Danish soldiers before, during, and after deployment to Afghanistan. The PreCL has good internal consistency and is highly correlated with a standard measure of PTSD symptoms. The PreCL as answered before the soldiers’ deployment significantly predicted level of PTSD symptoms during and after their deployment, while controlling for baseline PTSD symptoms and combat exposure measured during and after deployment. The findings have implications for the conceptualization of PTSD, screening, and treatment. PMID:26366328

  17. Astronaut-Deployable Geophysical and Environmental Monitoring Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, S. D.; Bleacher, J. E.; Smith, M. D.; Khayat, A.; Conrad, P.

    2017-02-01

    Geophysical and environmental monitoring stations could be deployed by astronauts exploring Mars, the Moon, or asteroids, and create a broad network that would collect high-value scientific information while also enhancing astronaut safety.

  18. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned: Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the lessons learned from heritage adoption designs. A general overview of cover deployment hardware that includes the three mechanisms of latch, hinge, and energy absorbers are also discussed.

  19. 4D fibrous materials: characterising the deployment of paper architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulakkal, Manu C.; Seddon, Annela M.; Whittell, George; Manners, Ian; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-09-01

    Deployment of folded paper architecture using a fluid medium as the morphing stimulus presents a simple and inexpensive methodology capable of self-actuation; where the underlying principles can be translated to develop smart fibrous materials capable of programmable actuations. In this study we characterise different paper architectures and their stimuli mechanisms for folded deployment; including the influence of porosity, moisture, surfactant concentration, temperature, and hornification. We observe that actuation time decreases with paper grammage; through the addition of surfactants, and when the temperature is increased at the fluid-vapour interface. There is a clear effect of hydration, water transport and the interaction of hydrogen bonds within the fibrous architecture which drives the deployment of the folded regions. The importance of fibre volume fraction and functional fillers in shape recovery was also observed, as well as the effect of a multilayer composite paper system. The design guidelines shown here will inform the development of synthetic fibrous actuators for repeated deployment.

  20. Design of an inflatable and deployable space reflecting concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benxin; Yang, Zhao; Mao, Bingjing; Zhang, Tianxiang; Feng, Yukun

    2008-03-01

    An inflatable and deployable reflecting concentrator has been designed based on the Advanced Technology of Inflatable and Deployable Space Structure to concentrate solar energy. Around the focal area, a conversion plate made of thermoelectric semiconductor is set to convert the solar energy gathered into electricity to drive various spacecrafts. The whole system will be made mainly of polyester membrane. In pursuit of steady performance, solidify-technology is applied to solidify the structure after it is deployed. The membrane structure boasts the following advantages: lightweight, high efficiency, easy deployment and low cost. Those are of great importance in resolving the contradiction of launch vehicle's limit capability and the growing size of space equipments. Its efficiency and manufacturability have been analyzed and proved. The result shows that it has great business value. Several plans of its application in the aerospace engineering are also presented in this paper.

  1. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  2. Deployment Mechanism for the Space Technology 5 Micro Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossoni, Peter; Cooperrider, Caner; Durback, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a technology mission that will send three spin-stabilized, 25-kg satellites into a highly elliptical Earth orbit. Each of these satellites must be deployed separately from the same launch vehicle with a spin rate of 3.4 rad/s (32.4 rpm). Because of the satellite's small size and the requirement to achieve its mission spin rate on deploy, typical spin table, pyrotechnic deployment devices or spin up thrusters could not be used. Instead, this new mechanism design employs a 'Frisbee' spin up strategy with a shape memory alloy actuated Pinpuller to deploy each satellite. The mechanism has undergone several design and test iterations and has been successfully qualified for flight.

  3. Deployment Mechanism for the Space Technology 5 Micro Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossoni, Peter; Cooperrider, Caner; Durback, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a technology mission that will send three spin-stabilized, 25-kg satellites into a highly elliptical Earth orbit. Each of these satellites must be deployed separately from the same launch vehicle with a spin rate of 3.4 rads (32.4 rpm). Because of the satellite's small size and the requirement to achieve its mission spin rate on deploy, typical spin table, pyrotechnic deployment devices or spin up thrusters could not be used. Instead, this new mechanism design employs a "Frisbee" spin up strategy with a shape memory alloy actuated Pinpuller to deploy each satellite. The mechanism has undergone several design and test iterations and has been successfully qualified for flight.

  4. Convected transient analysis for large space structures maneuver and deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Convected-transient analysis techniques in the finite-element method are used to investigate the deployment and maneuver of large spacecraft structures with multiple-member flexible trusses and frames. Numerical results are presented for several sample problems.

  5. Operation United Assistance: infectious disease threats to deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Yun, Heather C; Markelz, Ana Elizabeth; Okulicz, Jason F; Vento, Todd J; Burgess, Timothy H; Cardile, Anthony P; Miller, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    As part of the international response to control the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Department of Defense has deployed military personnel to train Liberians to manage the disease and build treatment units and a hospital for health care volunteers. These steps have assisted in providing a robust medical system and augment Ebola diagnostic capability within the affected nations. In order to prepare for the deployment of U.S. military personnel, the infectious disease risks of the regions must be determined. This evaluation allows for the establishment of appropriate force health protection posture for personnel while deployed, as well as management plans for illnesses presenting after redeployment. Our objective was to detail the epidemiology and infectious disease risks for military personnel in West Africa, particularly for Liberia, along with lessons learned from prior deployments.

  6. The American Satellite Company (ASC) satellite deployed from payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The American Satellite Company (ASC) communications satellite is deployed from the payload bay of the Shuttle Discovery. A portion of the cloudy surface of the earth can be seen to the left of the frame.

  7. Technology development for deployable aerodynamic decelerators at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciarelli, James P.

    2002-01-01

    Parachutes used for Mars landing missions are only certified for deployment at Mars behind blunt bodies flying at low angles of attack, Mach numbers up to 2.2, and dynamic pressures of up to 800 Pa. NASA is currently studying entry vehicle concepts for future robotic missions to Mars that would require parachutes to be deployed at higher Mach numbers and dynamic pressures. This paper demonstrates the need for expanding the parachute deployment envelope, and describes a three-phase technology development activity that has been initiated to address the need. The end result of the technology development program will be a aerodynamic decelerator system that can be deployed at Mach numbers of up to 3.1 and dynamic pressures of up to 1400 Pa. .

  8. PTSD Symptom Increases in Iraq-Deployed Soldiers: Comparison with NonDeployed Soldiers and Associations with Baseline Symptoms, Deployment Experiences, and Postdeployment Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    proportion of deployed U.S. forces. Because of the potential fo r greater occupational disruption, less consistent opportunity for combat training...deployment experiences, an occupational context notable for continuity of miliury-rdevanr duties and organizational structure, amI a readily accessible...Tnuma,ic Stres., 21, 290- 300. lOomC)’, R., K"ng, H. K, Kulinsky,j .. Bal<cr. D. G .. V"" .. ling.J. J .. Alpern, R., .t aI. (2007). Men",] healt h of

  9. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    in child development , parenting and coparenting assessment, and family-based intervention with military communities. d) Participation in the...reintegration? Here is what Military Families Think. Poster presentation at the 2015 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Child Development ...family resilience and child well-being, Soldier and non-deploying parents must successfully meet the challenges of caregiving throughout the deployment

  10. A Novel Approach for a Low-Cost Deployable Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amend, Chris; Nurnberger, Michael; Oppenheimer, Paul; Koss, Steve; Purdy, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has designed, built, and fully qualified a low cost, low Passive Intermodulation (PIM) 12-foot (3.66-m) diameter deployable ultra high frequency (UHF) antenna for the Tacsat-4 program. The design utilized novel approaches in reflector material and capacitive coupling techniques. This paper discusses major design trades, unique design characteristics, and lessons learned from the development of the Tacsat 4 deployable antenna. This antenna development was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  11. Power Projection-The Need For Operational Deployment Doctrine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-26

    years later, would this nation deploy large formations of its armed orces frmar(XNJS in circumstances that potentially would require irmne- diate...forward deployed forces. Consequently, the nation is returning to a policy in which its military is based predominantly in the continen- tal United...contingency. As A. C. P. Wavell once said: "It takes little skill or imagi- nation to see where you would like your army to be and when: it takes much

  12. The milspouse battle rhythm: communicating resilience throughout the deployment cycle.

    PubMed

    Villagran, Melinda; Canzona, Mollie Rose; Ledford, Christy J W

    2013-01-01

    Military spouses (milspouses) enact resilience through communication before, during, and after military deployments. Based on an organizing framework of resilience processes ( Buzzanell, 2010 ), this study examined milspouses' communicative construction of resilience during an increasingly rapid military deployment cycle. Narratives from in-depth interviews with military spouses (n = 24) revealed how resilience is achieved through communication seeking to reconcile the often contradictory realities of milspouses who endure physical, psychological, and social difficulties due to prolonged separations from their partners.

  13. Finite element analysis of a deployable space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the dynamic characteristics of a deployable space truss, a finite element model of the Scientific Applications Space Platform (SASP) truss has been formulated. The model incorporates all additional degrees of freedom associated with the pin-jointed members. Comparison of results with SPAR models of the truss show that the joints of the deployable truss significantly affect the vibrational modes of the structure only if the truss is relatively short.

  14. Mathematical modeling of the deployment of a multileaf solar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panichkin, V. I.

    1992-02-01

    A study is made of the plane motion of a system of hinged rigid rods modeling the frames of solar arrays which unfold into a straight structure by means of a spring and linkage mechanism. Changes in the configuration of the system of rods in the deployment plane are described by equations of plane-parallel motion for an absolutely rigid body, which are solved numerically using Newmark's (1959) method. The results make it possible to select the optimum deployment parameters.

  15. Current Strategic Issue: Deployed Reserve Component Soldiers and Civilian Employers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-10

    reservists’ 9 active deployment up to five years. Archer Daniels offers pay differential throughout the deployment. Coca - Cola personnel will receive...of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional...accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

  16. Modeling the Economic Impacts of Large Deployments on Local Communities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    0.019 0.492 EL PASO* -2.452 -1.021 0.154 RIO BLANCO 0.333 0.247 0.402 ELBERT -2.298 -1.129 0.129 RIO GRANDE 0.823 0.460 0.323 FREMONT* -0.090 0.010...provided an estimate for an area newspaper, on the employment impacts of a deployment of troops from Fort Stewart, GA . He found that the deployment of

  17. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Curtis, Leslie (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The summary of activity during this reporting period, most of which was covered by a no-cost extension of the grant, is as follows: 1) Participation in remote and in-situ (at MSFC EDAC facility) mission operation simulations; 2) Analysis of the decay rate of ProSEDS when starting the mission at a lower altitude; 3) Analysis of the deployment control law performance when deploying at a lower altitude.

  18. Forward-deployed Medical Assets and the COIN Offensive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    sur- gical teams ( FSTs ) are scattered over the battlefield and generally care for a young, fit force operating on the relatively nonkinetic COIN...forward-deployed military medical units, such as medical companies and FSTs . Not coincidentally, these areas tend to be havens for insurgents because...forward-deployed medical assets can participate in direct COIN engagements with ready availability and low cost. Con- ventional medical companies and FSTs

  19. Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Naval Health Research Center Is Military Deployment A Risk Factor for Maternal Depression ? Stacie Nguyen Cynthia A. LeardMann Besa Smith...Sylvester Road San Diego, California 92106-3521 Original Articles Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression ? Stacie Nguyen, MPH...Tyler C. Smith, PhD,1 for the Millennium Cohort Study Team Abstract Background: Maternal depression is a common condition among new mothers that can

  20. Air Force Deployment Reintegration Research: Implications for Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Air Force Deployment Reintegration Research: Implications for Leadership Wendy Sullivan-Kwantes Angela R. Febbraro Ann-Renee Blais...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Deployment Reintegration Research: Implications for Leadership 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 DRDC Toronto TR 2004-149 i Abstract Expanding on previous research on the reintegration

  1. Deploying Low-Latency Anonymity: Design Challenges and Social Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Page 1 of 807-1226-2439.txt Printed: 12/16/08 Dec 16 4:39:54 PM Printed For: Kate Green Deploying Low-Latency Anonymity : Design Challenges and Social...Security & Privacy, September/October 2007 (Vol. 5, No. 5), pp. 83-87 Anonymous communication systems hide conversations against unwanted observations...Deploying an anonymous communications infrastructure presents surprises unlike those found in other types of systems. For example, given that

  2. Information Analysis Methodology for Border Security Deployment Prioritization and Post Deployment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Paul M.; Maple, Scott A.

    2010-06-08

    Due to international commerce, cross-border conflicts, and corruption, a holistic, information driven, approach to border security is required to best understand how resources should be applied to affect sustainable improvements in border security. The ability to transport goods and people by land, sea, and air across international borders with relative ease for legitimate commercial purposes creates a challenging environment to detect illicit smuggling activities that destabilize national level border security. Smuggling activities operated for profit or smuggling operations driven by cross border conflicts where militant or terrorist organizations facilitate the transport of materials and or extremists to advance a cause add complexity to smuggling interdiction efforts. Border security efforts are further hampered when corruption thwarts interdiction efforts or reduces the effectiveness of technology deployed to enhance border security. These issues necessitate the implementation of a holistic approach to border security that leverages all available data. Large amounts of information found in hundreds of thousands of documents can be compiled to assess national or regional borders to identify variables that influence border security. Location data associated with border topics of interest may be extracted and plotted to better characterize the current border security environment for a given country or region. This baseline assessment enables further analysis, but also documents the initial state of border security that can be used to evaluate progress after border security improvements are made. Then, border security threats are prioritized via a systems analysis approach. Mitigation factors to address risks can be developed and evaluated against inhibiting factor such as corruption. This holistic approach to border security helps address the dynamic smuggling interdiction environment where illicit activities divert to a new location that provides less resistance

  3. 78 FR 12359 - Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Employment and Training Administration Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Including Workers in the Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division in... of Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division,...

  4. 78 FR 775 - Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Alpharetta, GA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Alpharetta, GA; Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Hunt Valley, MD; Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering)...

  5. 47 CFR 51.233 - Significant degradation of services caused by deployment of advanced services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... deployment of advanced services. 51.233 Section 51.233 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... relevant state commission that a particular technology deployment is causing the significant degradation... carrier demonstrates that a deployed technology is significantly degrading the performance of...

  6. Self-Deploying Trusses Containing Shape-Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Composite truss structures are being developed that can be compacted for stowage and later deploy themselves to full size and shape. In the target applications, these smart structures will precisely self-deploy and support a large, lightweight space-based antenna. Self-deploying trusses offer a simple, light, and affordable alternative to articulated mechanisms or inflatable structures. The trusses may also be useful in such terrestrial applications as variable-geometry aircraft components or shelters that can be compacted, transported, and deployed quickly in hostile environments. The truss technology uses high-performance shape-memory-polymer (SMP) thermoset resin reinforced with fibers to form a helical composite structure. At normal operating temperatures, the truss material has the structural properties of a conventional composite. This enables truss designs with required torsion, bending, and compression stiffness. However, when heated to its designed glass transition temperature (Tg), the SMP matrix acquires the flexibility of an elastomer. In this state, the truss can be compressed telescopically to a configuration encompassing a fraction of its original volume. When cooled below Tg, the SMP reverts to a rigid state and holds the truss in the stowed configuration without external constraint. Heating the materials above Tg activates truss deployment as the composite material releases strain energy, driving the truss to its original memorized configuration without the need for further actuation. Laboratory prototype trusses have demonstrated repeatable self-deployment cycles following linear compaction exceeding an 11:1 ratio (see figure).

  7. A Bayesian Framework for Reliability Analysis of Spacecraft Deployments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, John W.; Gallo, Luis; Kaminsky, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Deployable subsystems are essential to mission success of most spacecraft. These subsystems enable critical functions including power, communications and thermal control. The loss of any of these functions will generally result in loss of the mission. These subsystems and their components often consist of unique designs and applications for which various standardized data sources are not applicable for estimating reliability and for assessing risks. In this study, a two stage sequential Bayesian framework for reliability estimation of spacecraft deployment was developed for this purpose. This process was then applied to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Sunshield subsystem, a unique design intended for thermal control of the Optical Telescope Element. Initially, detailed studies of NASA deployment history, "heritage information", were conducted, extending over 45 years of spacecraft launches. This information was then coupled to a non-informative prior and a binomial likelihood function to create a posterior distribution for deployments of various subsystems uSing Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling. Select distributions were then coupled to a subsequent analysis, using test data and anomaly occurrences on successive ground test deployments of scale model test articles of JWST hardware, to update the NASA heritage data. This allowed for a realistic prediction for the reliability of the complex Sunshield deployment, with credibility limits, within this two stage Bayesian framework.

  8. Development of a verification program for deployable truss advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Jack E.

    1988-01-01

    Use of large deployable space structures to satisfy the growth demands of space systems is contingent upon reducing the associated risks that pervade many related technical disciplines. The overall objectives of this program was to develop a detailed plan to verify deployable truss advanced technology applicable to future large space structures and to develop a preliminary design of a deployable truss reflector/beam structure for use a a technology demonstration test article. The planning is based on a Shuttle flight experiment program using deployable 5 and 15 meter aperture tetrahedral truss reflections and a 20 m long deployable truss beam structure. The plan addresses validation of analytical methods, the degree to which ground testing adequately simulates flight and in-space testing requirements for large precision antenna designs. Based on an assessment of future NASA and DOD space system requirements, the program was developed to verify four critical technology areas: deployment, shape accuracy and control, pointing and alignment, and articulation and maneuvers. The flight experiment technology verification objectives can be met using two shuttle flights with the total experiment integrated on a single Shuttle Test Experiment Platform (STEP) and a Mission Peculiar Experiment Support Structure (MPESS). First flight of the experiment can be achieved 60 months after go-ahead with a total program duration of 90 months.

  9. Parenting Stress After Deployment in Navy Active Duty Fathers.

    PubMed

    Yablonsky, Abigail M; Yan, Guofen; Bullock, Linda

    2016-08-01

    Military fathers are being deployed, and leaving their families, for greater lengths of time and more frequently than ever before. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of recent deployment on parenting stress in U.S. Navy fathers with young children. Of the 111 participants who completed the one-time study questionnaire at a large military outpatient clinic on the Eastern seaboard, 67.6% had returned from a ship-based deployment. Regression analyses were performed, using the Parenting Stress Index as the outcome variable, deployment elements (such as time away from home in the past 5 years) as predictors, and adjusting for other factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Higher perceived threat and greater warfare exposure were both associated with increased parenting stress (p < 0.05) in the unadjusted model. These associations were greatly attenuated and no longer significant after adjustment for depression. In addition, rates of positive screens for PTSD and depression (17.1%) in this sample were higher than in other recent studies. In summary, these data indicate that various deployment factors are associated with increased parenting stress in Navy fathers back from deployment within the past year; these relationships are largely explained by depressive symptoms. Clinical implications are discussed.

  10. Identification of and At-Risk Interventions for Pre-Deployment Psychophysiologic Predictors of Post-Deployment Mental Health Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    variability biofeedback training and 2) computerized cognitive bias training. Objective assessment and training measures are more reliably measured and...500 pre-deployment assessments. Subjects will be randomized to one of three groups: heart rate variability biofeedback training, cognitive bias

  11. Installed Cost Benchmarks and Deployment Barriers for Residential Solar Photovoltaics with Energy Storage: Q1 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Ardani, Kristen; O'Shaughnessy, Eric; Fu, Ran; McClurg, Chris; Huneycutt, Joshua; Margolis, Robert

    2016-12-01

    In this report, we fill a gap in the existing knowledge about PV-plus-storage system costs and value by providing detailed component- and system-level installed cost benchmarks for residential systems. We also examine other barriers to increased deployment of PV-plus-storage systems in the residential sector. The results are meant to help technology manufacturers, installers, and other stakeholders identify cost-reduction opportunities and inform decision makers about regulatory, policy, and market characteristics that impede solar plus storage deployment. In addition, our periodic cost benchmarks will document progress in cost reductions over time. To analyze costs for PV-plus-storage systems deployed in the first quarter of 2016, we adapt the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's component- and system-level cost-modeling methods for standalone PV. In general, we attempt to model best-in-class installation techniques and business operations from an installed-cost perspective. In addition to our original analysis, model development, and review of published literature, we derive inputs for our model and validate our draft results via interviews with industry and subject-matter experts. One challenge to analyzing the costs of PV-plus-storage systems is choosing an appropriate cost metric. Unlike standalone PV, energy storage lacks universally accepted cost metrics, such as dollars per watt of installed capacity and lifetime levelized cost of energy. We explain the difficulty of arriving at a standard approach for reporting storage costs and then provide the rationale for using the total installed costs of a standard PV-plus-storage system as our primary metric, rather than using a system-size-normalized metric.

  12. Arduino-based control system for measuring ammonia in air using conditionally-deployed diffusive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Williams, C.; Shonkwiler, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Arduino microcontrollers, wireless modules, and other low-cost hardware were used to develop a new type of air sampler for monitoring ammonia at strong areal sources like dairies, cattle feedlots, and waste treatment facilities. Ammonia was sampled at multiple locations on the periphery of an operation using Radiello diffusive passive samplers (Cod. RAD168- and RAD1201-Sigma-Aldrich). However, the samplers were not continuously exposed to the air. Instead, each sampling station included two diffusive samplers housed in specialized tubes that sealed the cartridges from the atmosphere. If a user-defined set of wind and weather conditions were met, the Radiellos were deployed into the air using a micro linear actuator. Each station was solar-powered and controlled by Arduinos that were linked to a central weather station using Xbee wireless modules (Digi International Inc.). The Arduinos also measured the total time of exposure using hall-effect sensors to verify the position of the cartridge (i.e., deployed or retracted). The decision to expose or retract the samplers was made every five minutes based on wind direction, wind speed, and time of day. Typically, the diffusive samplers were replaced with fresh cartridges every two weeks and the used samplers were analyzed in the laboratory using ion chromatography. Initial studies were conducted at a commercial dairy in northern Colorado. Ammonia emissions along the Front Range of Colorado can be transported into the mountains where atmospheric deposition of nitrogen can impact alpine ecosystems. Therefore, low-cost air quality monitoring equipment is needed that can be widely deployed in the region. Initial work at the dairy showed that ammonia concentrations ranged between 600 to 1200 ppb during the summer; the highest concentrations were downwind of a large anaerobic lagoon. Time-averaged ammonia concentrations were also used to approximate emissions using inverse dispersion models. This methodology provides a

  13. GPS Decision Analysis Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-23

    712 A/B: GPS Decision Analysis Process Revised title:___________________________________________________________________ Presented in (input and Bold...JUN 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Decision Analysis Process 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 GPS Decision Analysis Process Nisha Shah The Boeing Company 73rd MORS Symposium US Military Academy – West Point 21-23

  14. Decision Making in Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The importance of decision-making to safety in complex, dynamic environments like mission control centers and offshore installations has been well established. NASA-ARC has a program of research dedicated to fostering safe and effective decision-making in the manned spaceflight environment. Because access to spaceflight is limited, environments with similar characteristics, including aviation and nuclear power plants, serve as analogs from which space-relevant data can be gathered and theories developed. Analyses of aviation accidents cite crew judgement and decision making as causes or contributing factors in over half of all accidents. A similar observation has been made in nuclear power plants. Yet laboratory research on decision making has not proven especially helpful in improving the quality of decisions in these kinds of environments. One reason is that the traditional, analytic decision models are inappropriate to multidimensional, high-risk environments, and do not accurately describe what expert human decision makers do when they make decisions that have consequences. A new model of dynamic, naturalistic decision making is offered that may prove useful for improving decision making in complex, isolated, confined and high-risk environments. Based on analyses of crew performance in full-mission simulators and accident reports, features that define effective decision strategies in abnormal or emergency situations have been identified. These include accurate situation assessment (including time and risk assessment), appreciation of the complexity of the problem, sensitivity to constraints on the decision, timeliness of the response, and use of adequate information. More effective crews also manage their workload to provide themselves with time and resources to make good decisions. In brief, good decisions are appropriate to the demands of the situation. Effective crew decision making and overall performance are mediated by crew communication. Communication

  15. A Rapidly Deployable Operational Mesoscale Modeling System for Emergency-Response Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Thomas T.; Bowers, James F.; Swerdlin, Scott P.; Beitler, Brian A.

    2004-05-01

    An operational mesoscale model based forecasting system has been developed for use by U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command meteorologists in their support of test-range operations. This paper reports on the adaptation of this system to permit its rapid deployment in support of a variety of civilian and military emergency-response applications. The innovation that allows for this rapid deployment is an intuitive graphical user interface that permits a non-expert to quickly configure the model for a new application, and launch the forecast system to produce operational products without further intervention. The graphical interface is Web based and can be run on a wireless laptop or a personal digital assistant in the field. The instructions for configuring the modeling system are transmitted to a compute engine [generally a personal computer (PC) cluster], and forecast products are placed on a Web site that can be accessed by emergency responders or other forecast users. This system has been used operationally for predicting the potential transport and dispersion of hazardous material during the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah, and during military operations in Afghanistan. It has also been used operationally to satisfy the rapidly evolving needs of wildfire managers. Continued use of the modeling system by nonexperts will allow developers to refine the graphical interface and make the model and the interface more fault tolerant with respect to the decisions of model users.(The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation

  16. Deployment-related insomnia in military personnel and veterans.

    PubMed

    Bramoweth, Adam D; Germain, Anne

    2013-10-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder that greatly impacts military personnel, especially those deployed in support of combat efforts. Deployment-related stressors like combat exposure, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) irregular sleep-wake schedules, and adjustment to the return home all contribute to insomnia. However, insomnia can also exacerbate the deployment experience and is a risk factor for traumatic stress reactions such as PTSD, depression, and suicide. Military personnel with mTBI are significantly impacted by insomnia; the majority experience sleep disruption and this can impede recovery and rehabilitation. As more service members return home from deployment, treatment is vital to reduce the impact of insomnia. Preliminary outcome data, showing positive results for reduction of sleep disruption, has been found with treatments such as combined cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia (CBTI) and imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT), preference-based interventions, as well as efforts to broadly disseminate CBTI. The recent literature on the impact and treatment of deployment-related insomnia is reviewed.

  17. High-performance, flexible, deployable array development for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehling, Russell N.; Armstrong, Joseph H.; Misra, Mohan S.

    1994-01-01

    Flexible, deployable arrays are an attractive alternative to conventional solar arrays for near-term and future space power applications, particularly due to their potential for high specific power and low storage volume. Combined with low-cost flexible thin-film photovoltaics, these arrays have the potential to become an enabling or an enhancing technology for many missions. In order to expedite the acceptance of thin-film photovoltaics for space applications, however, parallel development of flexible photovoltaics and the corresponding deployable structure is essential. Many innovative technologies must be incorporated in these arrays to ensure a significant performance increase over conventional technologies. For example, innovative mechanisms which employ shape memory alloys for storage latches, deployment mechanisms, and array positioning gimbals can be incorporated into flexible array design with significant improvement in the areas of cost, weight, and reliability. This paper discusses recent activities at Martin Marietta regarding the development of flexible, deployable solar array technology. Particular emphasis is placed on the novel use of shape memory alloys for lightweight deployment elements to improve the overall specific power of the array. Array performance projections with flexible thin-film copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) are presented, and government-sponsored solar array programs recently initiated at Martin Marietta through NASA and Air Force Phillips Laboratory are discussed.

  18. Comparison of Select Health Outcomes by Deployment Health Assessment Completion.

    PubMed

    Luse, Tina M; Slosek, Jean; Rennix, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) requires service members to complete regular health assessments for identification of deployment-related physical/behavioral issues and environmental/occupational exposures. Compliance among active duty Department of the Navy personnel varies; however, and the impact of incomplete assessments on generalizability of results is unclear. This study examines the differences between Navy and Marine Corps service members who completed both the Post-Deployment Health Assessment and Post-Deployment Health Reassessment (n = 9,452) as compared to service members who never attempted either form (n = 5,603) in fiscal year 2010. Deployment rosters, assessments, and clinical data were analyzed to determine certified assessment completion rates and incidence of certain health conditions in these populations. Only 38.9% of applicable personnel met the completion and certification criteria for the required assessments. Service members who did not complete the forms were distinctly different demographically and at increased risk for psychotropic drug use, post-traumatic stress disorder diagnosis, and traumatic brain injury diagnosis following deployment. The prevailing assumption that the risk of adverse health effects on operational forces can be estimated using the population that completed the required assessments is incorrect, and the true operational impact and medical burden of these conditions may be underestimated.

  19. Synchronously deployable double fold beam and planar truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Hedgepeth, John M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A deployable structure that synchronously deploys in both length and width is disclosed which is suitable for use as a structural component for orbiting space stations or large satellites. The structure is designed with maximum packing efficiency so that large structures may be collapsed and transported in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The synchronous deployment feature allows the structure to be easily deployed in space by two astronauts, without a complex deployment mechanism. The structure is made up of interconnected structural units, each generally in the shape of a parallelepiped. The structural units are constructed of structural members connected with hinged and fixed connections at connection nodes in each corner of the parallelepiped. Diagonal members along each face of the parallelepiped provide structural rigidity and are equipped with mid-length, self-locking hinges to allow the structure to collapse. The structure is designed so that all hinged connections may be made with simple clevis-type hinges requiring only a single degree of freedom, and each hinge pin is located along the centerline of its structural member for increased strength and stiffness.

  20. Bayesian Approach for Reliability Assessment of Sunshield Deployment on JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminskiy, Mark P.; Evans, John W.; Gallo, Luis D.

    2013-01-01

    Deployable subsystems are essential to mission success of most spacecraft. These subsystems enable critical functions including power, communications and thermal control. The loss of any of these functions will generally result in loss of the mission. These subsystems and their components often consist of unique designs and applications, for which various standardized data sources are not applicable for estimating reliability and for assessing risks. In this study, a Bayesian approach for reliability estimation of spacecraft deployment was developed for this purpose. This approach was then applied to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Sunshield subsystem, a unique design intended for thermal control of the observatory's telescope and science instruments. In order to collect the prior information on deployable systems, detailed studies of "heritage information", were conducted extending over 45 years of spacecraft launches. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Spacecraft Operational Anomaly and Reporting System (SOARS) data were then used to estimate the parameters of the conjugative beta prior distribution for anomaly and failure occurrence, as the most consistent set of available data and that could be matched to launch histories. This allows for an emperical Bayesian prediction for the risk of an anomaly occurrence of the complex Sunshield deployment, with credibility limits, using prior deployment data and test information.