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Sample records for airblown asphalt membrane

  1. Polypropylene - asphalt mixtures for waterproofing membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Italia, P.; Brandolese, E.

    1996-12-31

    In any field of polymer-asphalt mixtures application is extremely important to achieve a very good compatibility between the components in order to improve as much as possible the performances due to the polymer content. In the case of waterproofing membranes application this compatibility reduce, moreover, the amount of polymer required to obtain the best performances. Using the Colloidal Instability Index Ic, as measured by the Iatroscan device, we propose a correlation between asphalt`s chemical characteristics and the polymer minimum amount sufficient to disperse in a stable way the asphalt itself in the polymeric matrix. As a result, through the proposed correlation, with a simple asphalt composition analysis it is possible to predict its performance when mixed with polypropilene. In the paper, beside the description of the Iatroscan analytical technique, we also present a method for determining phase inversion based on optical fluorescence microscopy performed on about 30 different samples of asphalt. We also present the experimental correlation laws between the polymer amount at phase inversion and the asphalt single components content.

  2. Evaluation of asphalt-rubber membrane field performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, S.; Gallaway, B. M.; Epps, J. A.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents a record of asphalt-rubber membrane field performance in Texas. An evaluation of performance is presented for forty-five separate projects in thirteen state highway districts. Approximately 850 lane miles of highways are represented by materials constructed as stress absorbing membranes (asphalt-rubber seal coats beneath asphalt concrete overlay). All projects reviewed were constructed between June, 1976 and September, 1981.

  3. Development of criteria for the use of asphalt-rubber as a Stress-Absorbing Membrane Interlayer (SAMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, D. E.; McKeen, R. G.

    1983-12-01

    This report documents over 2 years of research efforts to characterize asphalt-rubber mixtures to be used in Stress-Absorbing Membrane Interlayers (SAMI). The purpose of these SAMIs is to retard or prevent reflection cracking in asphalt-concrete overlays. Several laboratory experiments and one field trial were conducted to define significant test methods and parameters for incorporation into construction design and specification documents. Test methods used in this study included a modified softening point test, force-ductility, and Schweyer viscosity. Variables investigated included (1) Laboratory-mixing temperature; (2) Rubber type; (3) Laboratory storage time; (4) Laboratory storage condition; (5) Laboratory batch replication; (6) Laboratory mixing time; (7) Field mixing time; (8) Laboratory test temperature; (9) Force-Ductility elongation rates; and (10) Asphalt grade. It was found that mixing temperature, mixing time, rubber type, and asphalt grade all have significant effects upon the behavior of asphalt-rubber mixtures. Significant variability was also noticed in different laboratory batch replications. Varying laboratory test temperature and force-ductility elongation rate revealed further differences in asphalt-rubber mixtures.

  4. Air-blown Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Clean Power Cogeneration, Inc. (CPC) has requested financial assistance from DOE for the design construction, and operation of a normal 1270 ton-per-day (120-MWe), air-blown integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) demonstration plant. The demonstration plant would produce both power for the utility grid and steam for a nearby industrial user. The objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate air-blown, fixed-bed Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology. The integrated performance to be demonstrated will involve all the subsystems in the air-blown IGCC system to include coal feeding; a pressurized air-blown, fixed-bed gasifier capable of utilizing caking coal; a hot gas conditioning systems for removing sulfur compounds, particulates, and other contaminants as necessary to meet environmental and combustion turbine fuel requirements; a conventional combustion turbine appropriately modified to utilize low-Btu coal gas as fuel; a briquetting system for improved coal feed performance; the heat recovery steam generation system appropriately modified to accept a NO{sub x} reduction system such as the selective catalytic reduction process; the steam cycle; the IGCC control systems; and the balance of plant. The base feed stock for the project is an Illinois Basin bituminous high-sulfur coal, which is a moderately caking coal. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Asphalt and asphalt additives. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Contents: use of asphalt emulsions for in-place recycling: oregon experience; gap-graded cold asphalt concrete: benefits of polymer-modified asphalt cement and fibers; cold in-place recycling for rehabilitation and widening of low-volume flexible pavements in indiana; in situ cold recycling of bituminous pavements with polymer-modified high float emulsions; evaluation of new generation of antistripping additives; correlation between performance-related characteristics of asphalt cement and its physicochemical parameters using corbett's fractions and hpgc; reaction rates and hardening susceptibilities as determined from pressure oxygen vessel aging of asphalts; evaluation of aging characteristics of asphalts by using tfot and rtfot at different temperature levels; summary of asphalt additive performance at selected sites; relating asphalt absorption to properties of asphalt cement and aggregate; study of the effectiveness of styrene-butadiene rubber latex in hot mix asphalt mixes; stability of straight and polymer-modified asphalts.

  6. Recycled rubber, aggregate, and filler in asphalt paving mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    ;Contents(Partial): Evaluation Systems for Crumb Rubber Modified Binders and Mixtures; Hot Mix Asphalt Rubber Applications in Virginia; Evaluation of Pyrolized Carbon Black from Scrap Tires as Additive in Hot Mix Asphalt; Use of Scrap Tire Chips in Asphaltic Membrane; Effects of Mineral Fillers on Properties of Stone Matrix Asphalt Mixtures; and Quantitative Analysis of Aggregate Based on Hough Transform.

  7. The Asphalt Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    The new and completely revised edition of the Asphalt Handbook, a standard reference work in the field of asphalt technology and construction, summarizes with reference the information contained in other Asphalt Institute technical manuals. Major areas discussed include the following--(1) uses of asphalt, (2) terms relating to asphalt and its…

  8. Gas dynamics of an air-blown electric are

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, N.S.; Belousov, G.E.; Burmistrov, M.P.; Khitrov, V.G.; Suvorova, S.N.

    1986-05-01

    The authors obtained the basic evidence on the gas dynamics of an air-blown arc by modification of the track method, which involves photographing the tracks of incandescent particles and determining the lengths of the individual tracks and their positions in the arc. To photograph the tracks, the camera was placed so that the shutter blind moved in the opposite direction of the particles or perpendicular to that direction, while the plane of the film (FOTO-250) was 300-400mm from the electrodes. In the model for the blowing method, it is shown that there are differing factors rather than identical ones controlling the residence times for particles and vapor in the discharge zone, so it may be possible to control them seperately. This is particularly important for using chemical isoformation in conjunction with spectral analysis; it is not necessary for the collector particles to evaporate completely, and their higher transport speed in the discharge tends to reduce the intensity of the incoherent background, while the thin films of relevance on the particles, which may be refractory, enter the discharge fully. The emission time remains sufficient for the vapors.

  9. High temperature air-blown woody biomass gasification model for the estimation of an entrained down-flow gasifier.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nobusuke; Tanaka, Miku; Piao, Guilin; Kobayashi, Jun; Hatano, Shigenobu; Itaya, Yoshinori; Mori, Shigekatsu

    2009-01-01

    A high temperature air-blown gasification model for woody biomass is developed based on an air-blown gasification experiment. A high temperature air-blown gasification experiment on woody biomass in an entrained down-flow gasifier is carried out, and then the simple gasification model is developed based on the experimental results. In the experiment, air-blown gasification is conducted to demonstrate the behavior of this process. Pulverized wood is used as the gasification fuel, which is injected directly into the entrained down-flow gasifier by the pulverized wood banner. The pulverized wood is sieved through 60 mesh and supplied at rates of 19 and 27kg/h. The oxygen-carbon molar ratio (O/C) is employed as the operational condition instead of the air ratio. The maximum temperature achievable is over 1400K when the O/C is from 1.26 to 1.84. The results show that the gas composition is followed by the CO-shift reaction equilibrium. Therefore, the air-blown gasification model is developed based on the CO-shift reaction equilibrium. The simple gasification model agrees well with the experimental results. From calculations in large-scale units, the cold gas is able to achieve 80% efficiency in the air-blown gasification, when the woody biomass feedrate is over 1000kg/h and input air temperature is 700K. PMID:18653324

  10. Asphalt in Pavement Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    Maintenance methods that can be used equally well in all regions of the country have been developed for the use of asphalt in pavement maintenance. Specific information covering methods, equipment and terminology that applies to the use of asphalt in the maintenance of all types of pavement structures, including shoulders, is provided. In many…

  11. Chemical modification of asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Ruei Fu.

    1989-01-01

    Desirable properties of asphalt pavements include high stability, flexibility, and durability. In order to achieve these properties, the asphalt should bind well with mineral aggregates and the properties of the resulting asphalt concrete should change as slowly as possible during service life. The interaction of water and asphaltic concrete under particular circumstances may cause stripping or loss of adhesion and consequential detachment of the asphalt from the aggregate. Use of aggregates treated with these polymer emulsions resulted in a much stronger bond at the asphalt-aggregate interface. Scanning electron microscope studies showed that a thin polymer film covers the aggregate surface. Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer resin 460, ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer resin 240, styrene butadiene copolymer, cis-1,4-polybutadiene copolymer, and polyethylene were tested as additives. The effect of these on the resistance to permanent deformation and dynamic stiffness is described in this study. The chemical changes that occurred during weathering were also addressed. The effect of oxidation on aged asphalt was determined by measuring the change in infrared absorption with time of exposure. Antioxidants which are capable of decomposing peroxides were found to extend the durability of the asphalt. By observing the concentration of peroxy radicals during the course of a chemical process as indicated by electron spin resonance peak intensity, it was possible to obtain quantitative information on the interaction of antioxidants with peroxy radicals. Indications were obtained that antioxidants are not effective in reducing the brittleness of asphalt upon aging. The effect of six plasticizers on thermal and mechanical properties of asphalt was studied. In general, use of plasticizers resulted in lowered rigidity, increased ductility and increased toughness. Tricresyl phosphate was the most effective.

  12. Asphalt cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... substances in asphalt that can be harmful are: Hydrocarbons Industrial glues Industrial solvents Tar ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 91. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  13. Modified Asphalt Binder with Natural Zeolite for Warm Mix Asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubravský, Marián; Mandula, Ján

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, warm mix asphalt (WMA) is becoming more and more used in the asphalt industry. WMA provide a whole range of benefits, whether economic, environmental and ecological. Lower energy consumption and less pollution is the most advantages of this asphalt mixture. The paper deals with the addition of natural zeolite into the sub base asphalt layers, which is the essential constituent in the construction of the road. Measurement is focused on basic physic - mechanical properties declared according to the catalog data sheets. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ability of addition the natural zeolite into the all asphalt layers of asphalt pavement. All asphalt mixtures were compared with reference asphalt mixture, which was prepared in reference temperature.

  14. Coal-based synthetic asphalts

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The study investigated the technical and economic feasibility of producing a specification-grade, local-based asphalt from a raw coal available in the United States. Bench-scale hydrogenation experiments were performed in a one-gallon autoclave to produce asphalts from Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal and Clovis Point subbituminous coal. Samples from the process streams of a continuous coal liquefaction pilot plant at Wilsonville, AL were also evaluated to determine the potential for making a paving asphalt. The results showed that coal-based asphalts have a higher age-hardening rate than petroleum asphalts; also, they have a higher viscosity-temperature susceptibility (VTS) number. The high age-hardening rate of coal-based asphalts could be offset satisfactorily via catalytic hydrogenation. The VTS of these asphalts could be markedly reduced by adding a certain amount of styrene/butadiene copolymer. As a result, a specification grade, coal-based asphalt was successfully made via catalytic hydrogenation of coal combined with the incorporation of ca. 3 wt% styrene/butadiene copolymer into the coal-based asphalt. Marshall stability testing showed that coal based asphalt/aggregate compacted mixes had excellent resistance to plastic flow. Immersion compression testing revealed that the compacted mixes had a high initial compression strength and retained strength. A two-stage coal-based asphalt process was designed for producing 1000 tons/day. Economic analyses showed that the coal-based asphalt would be more expensive than currently used petroleum asphalt.

  15. Gasification of torrefied Miscanthus × giganteus in an air-blown bubbling fluidized bed gasifier.

    PubMed

    Xue, G; Kwapinska, M; Horvat, A; Kwapinski, W; Rabou, L P L M; Dooley, S; Czajka, K M; Leahy, J J

    2014-05-01

    Torrefaction is suggested to be an effective method to improve the fuel properties of biomass and gasification of torrefied biomass should provide a higher quality product gas than that from unprocessed biomass. In this study, both raw and torrefied Miscanthus × giganteus (M×G) were gasified in an air-blown bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) gasifier using olivine as the bed material. The effects of equivalence ratio (ER) (0.18-0.32) and bed temperature (660-850°C) on the gasification performance were investigated. The results obtained suggest the optimum gasification conditions for the torrefied M × G are ER 0.21 and 800°C. The product gas from these process conditions had a higher heating value (HHV) of 6.70 MJ/m(3), gas yield 2m(3)/kg biomass (H2 8.6%, CO 16.4% and CH4 4.4%) and cold gas efficiency 62.7%. The comparison between raw and torrefied M × G indicates that the torrefied M × G is more suitable BFB gasification. PMID:24681300

  16. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: ASPHALT HOT MIX

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the asphalt hot mix industry. A representative asphalt hot mix plant was defined, based on the results of an industrial survey, to assess the severity of emissions from this industry. Source severity was defined as the ratio of th...

  17. Polyurethane synthesis reactions in asphalts

    SciTech Connect

    Bukowski, A.; Gretkiewicz, J.

    1982-04-01

    A series of asphalt-polyurethane composites was prepared by means of polyurethane synthesis in asphalt and carried out in melt. The applied materials were asphalts of differentiated group components content, polyester polyols of chain structure from linear to strongly branched, 2,4-tolylene diisocyanate, 4,4-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate), and tinorganic catalyst. The asphalt components react with isocyanates to a minimal degree. The influence of the applied substrates, temperature, and polyurethane content in the system on the basic kinetic relations characterizing the process is presented. Polyurethane synthesis in asphalts does not differ in a fundamental way from the obtaining of polyurethanes, especially when their content in the composition is significant, 20 wt% and more.

  18. Interaction nonlinearity in asphalt binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamed, Arash; Bhasin, Amit; Liechti, Kenneth M.

    2012-05-01

    Asphalt mixtures are complex composites that comprise aggregate, asphalt binder, and air. Several research studies have shown that the mechanical behavior of the asphalt mixture is strongly influenced by the matrix, i.e. the asphalt binder. Characterization and a thorough understanding of the binder behavior is the first and crucial step towards developing an accurate constitutive model for the composite. Accurate constitutive models for the constituent materials are critical to ensure accurate performance predictions at a material and structural level using micromechanics. This paper presents the findings from a systematic investigation into the nature of the linear and nonlinear response of asphalt binders subjected to different types of loading using the Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR). Laboratory test data show that a compressive normal force is generated in an axially constrained specimen subjected to torsional shear. This paper investigates the source of this normal force and demonstrates that the asphalt binder can dilate when subjected to shear loads. This paper also presents the findings from a study conducted to investigate the source of the nonlinearity in the asphalt binder. Test results demonstrate that the application of cyclic shear loads results in the development of a normal force and a concomitant reduction in the dynamic shear modulus. This form of nonlinear response is referred to as an "interaction nonlinearity". A combination of experimental and analytical tools is used to demonstrate and verify the presence of this interaction nonlinearity in asphalt binders. The findings from this study highlight the importance of modeling the mechanical behavior of asphalt binders based on the overall stress state of the material.

  19. Rehabilitating asphalt highways

    SciTech Connect

    Butalia, T.S.

    2007-07-01

    Coal fly ash has been used on two Ohio full-depth reclamation projects in Delaware and Warren. The object of the project carried out with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science at Ohio State University is to demonstrate the effective use of Class fly ash in combination with lime or lime kiln dust in the full depth reclamation of asphalt pavements. The article describes the mixes used for the highway reconstruction of part of Section Line Road Delaware County and of a road in Warren County. During construction the pavement sections were instrumented with several structural and environmental monitoring devices and data is being collected on a quarterly basis. Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) tests to measure load defection behaviour, resilient of pavement layers and soil and base structural layer coefficient are being carried out twice a year. It was shown that use of fly ash increased the elastic modulus of base layers. This article first appeared in the Feb/May 2007 issue of Asphalt Contractor. 4 photos.

  20. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology data and status report - FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.; Zacher, A.H.

    1994-09-01

    The asphalt layer within the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier (HPIB) is an important component of the overall design. This layer provides a RCRA equivalent backup to the overlying earthen layers in the unlikely event that these layers are not able to reduce the infiltration rate to less than 0.05 cm/yr. There is only limited amount of information on using asphalt for a moisture infiltration barrier over the long times required by the HPIB. Therefore, a number of activities are under way, as part of the Barrier Development Program, to obtain data on the performance of asphalt as a moisture barrier in a buried environment over a 1000-year period. These activities include (1) determining RCRA equivalency, (2) measurement of physical properties, (3) measurement of aging characteristics, and (4) relationship to ancient asphalt analogs. During FY 1994 progress was made on all of these activities. Studies were conducted both in the laboratory and on the prototype barrier constructed over the 216-B-57 crib in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site. This report presents results obtained from the asphalt technology tasks during FY 1994. Also included are updates to planned activities for asphalt analogs and monitoring the asphalt test pad near the prototype barrier. Measurements of hydraulic conductivity on the HMAC portion of the prototype barrier show that the asphalt layers easily meet the RCRA standard of 1 {times} 10{sup -7} cm/s. In-place measurements using a new field falling head technique show an average of 3.66 {times} 10{sup -8} cm/s, while cores taken from the north end of the prototype and measured in a laboratory setup averaged 1.29 {times} 10{sup -9} cm/s. Measurements made on the fluid applied asphalt membrane (polymer-modified asphalt) show an extremely low permeability of less than 1 {times} 10{sup -11} cm/s.

  1. Investigation of modified asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimich, Vita

    2016-01-01

    Currently the problem of improving the asphalt quality is very urgent. It is used primarily as topcoats exposed to the greatest relative to the other layers of the road, dynamic load - impact and shear. The number of cars on the road, the speed of their movement, as well as the traffic intensity increase day by day. We have to upgrade motor roads, which entails a huge cost. World experience shows that the issue is urgent not only in Russia, but also in many countries in Europe, USA and Asia. Thus, the subject of research is the resistance of asphalt concrete to water and its influence on the strength of the material at different temperatures, and resistance of pavement to deformation. It is appropriate to search for new modifiers for asphaltic binder and mineral additives for asphalt mix to form in complex the skeleton of the future asphalt concrete, resistant to atmospheric condensation, soil characteristics of the road construction area, as well as the growing road transport load. The important task of the work is searching special modifying additives for bitumen binder and asphalt mixture as a whole, which will improve the quality of highways, increasing the period between repairs. The methods described in the normative-technical documentation were used for the research. The conducted research allowed reducing the frequency of road maintenance for 7 years, increasing it from 17 to 25 years.

  2. Flame retarded asphalt blend composition

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.B.

    1987-04-21

    This patent describes a flame retarded asphalt composition consisting essentially of a blend of: (a) thermoplastic elastomer modified bitumen; (b) 20-30 wt % inert filler; (c) 1-20 wt % of at least one halogenated flame retardant; and (d) 1-5 wt % of at least one inorganic phosphorus containing compound selected from the group consisting of ammonium phosphate compounds and red phosphorus.

  3. Preliminary results of an economic and engineering evaluation of the M.W. Kellogg air-blown gasification combined cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeldon, J.M.; Booras, G.S.; Styles, G.A.; Vansickle, R.J.; Longanbach, J.; Mahajan, K.

    1998-12-31

    The capital cost of a coal-based power plant contributes over 50% to the busbar cost of electricity. For new coal-based power plants to be competitive, it is imperative that the capital cost be reduced. Additionally, they must have excellent environmental performance and high cycle efficiency. One of the most cost-competitive, coal-based power plant technologies is believed to be an air-blown, combined cycle incorporating a partial gasifier and pressurized char combustor. These two coal-conversion stages provide fuel gas and vitiated air to fire a combustion turbine. To protect the turbine from particle erosion damage, all the dust must be removed from the two hot gas streams. This operation involves high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration, a technology currently under development at several locations funded by the Department of Energy. One of these locations is the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) at Wilsonville, Alabama. At this same site two potential air-blown, coal-based combined cycle power plant technologies are under development. These are: the M.W. Kellogg Company`s (Kellogg) gasification combined cycle (GCC), incorporating their transport reactor design as both the gasifier and the combustor; and Foster Wheeler`s (FW) topped pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC), incorporating a bubbling-bed carbonizer and a circulating PFBC. It was decided to complete an engineering and economic evaluation of the technologies under development at the PSDF. The results are to quantify the process economics, and to focus the supporting Research and Development activities on those areas offering the greatest economic advantage. This paper presents preliminary results from the evaluation of a Kellogg air-blow GCC unit. Capital cost and thermal performance data are presented along with costs of electricity based on recent fuel price projections for the US. Space limitations prevent presentation of the results for the FW advanced PFBC train and these

  4. A laboratory evaluation of modified asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, D. E.; Paul, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    The structural properties of sand mixes incorporating Chem-Crete binder compare favorably with densegraded asphaltic concrete. This binder, processed according to a new refinery technique, is purported to improve asphalt properties such as strength, durability, temperature susceptibility and water resistance. These attributes and other properties of sand/Chem-Crete mixes are examined. Generally, upon curing, sand mixes utilizing Chem-Crete binder demonstrate properties equal to or superior to Louisiana's dense-graded Type 1 asphaltic concrete (1200-lb. stability).

  5. Nature of the chemical reaction for furfural modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Memon, G.M.; Chollar, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    Three of the most serious problems of asphalt pavements today are rutting, cracking, and susceptibility to moisture damage (stripping). Asphalt manufacturers have been mixing asphalts with polymers to produce polymer-modified asphalts with improved rheological properties. However, the costs for these improved polymer-modified asphalts are almost double that of regular asphalts. FHWA researchers have found that asphalt modified by the chemical, furfural (which is prepared by simple elimination reaction of aldopentoses obtained from oat hulls), exhibited better stripping properties and was less temperature susceptible than the virgin asphalt while costing less than polymer-modified asphalts. This paper discusses the possible structure of the furfural-modified asphalt, data for the virgin and furfural-modified asphalts and their Corbett fractions, data from a model reaction between phenol and furfural, and a possible explanation of this structure based on these data.

  6. Sustainable asphalt pavement: Application of slaughterhouse waste oil and fly ash in asphalt binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Ramos, Jorge Luis

    Increasing energy costs, lack of sufficient natural resources and the overwhelming demand for petroleum has stimulated the development of alternative binders to modify or replace petroleum-based asphalt binders. In the United States, the petroleum-based asphalt binder is mainly used to produce the Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA). There are approximately 4000 asphalt plants that make 500 million tons of asphalt binder valued at roughly 3 billion/year. The instability of the world's oil market has pushed oil prices to more than 80 per barrel in 2012, which increased the cost of asphalt binder up to $570 per ton. Therefore, there is a timely need to find alternative sustainable resources to the asphalt binder. This paper investigates the possibility of the partial replacement of the asphalt binder with slaughterhouse waste and/or fly ash. In order to achieve this objective, the asphalt binder is mixed with different percentages of waste oil and/or fly ash. In order to investigate the effect of these additives to the performance of the asphalt binder, a complete performance grade test performed on multiple samples. The results of the performance grade tests are compared with a control sample to observe how the addition of the waste oil and/or fly ash affects the sample. Considering the increasing cost and demand of asphalt, the use of slaughterhouse waste oil and/or fly ash as a partial replacement may result in environmental and monetary improvements in the transportation sector.

  7. MATCON MODIFIED ASPHALT COVER CONTAINMENT SYSTEM DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to make improvements to conventional paving asphalt to make it more suitable for containment applications, Wilder Construction Co. of Everett, WA offers MatCon, a polymer modified asphalt system comprised of proprietary binder, when coupled with a selected aggregate type...

  8. EVALUATION OF EMISSION FROM PAVING ASPHALTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides data from pilot-scale measurements of the emissions of specific air pollutants from paving asphalt both with and without recycled crumb rubber additives. he methods used in this work measured emissions from a static layer of asphalt maintained for several hour...

  9. Asphalt Raking. Instructor Manual. Trainee Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Pomfret Center, CT.

    This packet consists of the instructor and trainee manuals for an asphalt raking course. The instructor manual contains a course schedule for 4 days of instruction, content outline, and instructor outline. The trainee manual is divided into five sections: safety, asphalt basics, placing methods, repair and patching, and clean-up and maintenance.…

  10. EVALUATION OF EMISSIONS FROM PAVING ASPHALTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides data from pilot-scale measurements of the emissions of specific air pollutants from paving asphalt both with and without recycled crumb rubber additives. The methods used in this work measured emissions from a static layer of asphalt maintained for several hou...

  11. Latex improvement of recycled asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennon, C.

    1982-08-01

    The performance of a single unmodified milled recycled asphalt concrete was compared to milled asphalt concrete modified by addition of three types of rubber latex. Latex was added at 2, 3, 5, and 8 percent latex by weight of asphalt in the asphalt concrete. Lattices used were a styrene butadiene (SBR), a natural rubber (NR), an acrylonitrile butadiene (NBR), and four varieties of out of specification SBR lattices. Marshall tests, while indecisive, showed a modest improvement in properties of SBR and NR added material at 3 and 5 percent latex. Addition of NBR latex caused deterioration in Marshall stability and flow over that of control. Repeated load tests were run using the indirect tensile test, analyzed by the VESYS program, which computes life of pavements. Repeated load tests showed improvement in asphalt concrete life when 3 and 5 percent SBR was added. Improvement was also shown by the out of specification SBR.

  12. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  13. Compatibilizer for crumb rubber modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Labib, M.E.; Memon, G.M.; Chollar, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    The United States of America discards more than 300 million tires each year, and out of that a large fraction of the tires is dumped into stock piles. This large quantity of tires creates an environmental problem. The use of scrap tires is limited. There is a usage potential in such fields as fuel for combustion and Crumb Rubber-Modified Asphalt binder (CRMA). The use of crumb rubber in modifying asphalt is not a new technique; it is been used since early 1960 by pavement engineers. Crumb rubber is a composite of different blends of natural and synthetic rubber (natural rubber, processing oils, polybutadiene, polystyrene butadiene, and filler). Prior research had concluded that the performance of crumb rubber modified asphalt is asphalt dependent. In some cases it improves the Theological properties and in some cases it degrades the properties of modified asphalt.

  14. Life-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions for air-blown gasification combined-cycle using selexol

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

    1993-06-01

    Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. With its higher efficiency, this process can reduce CO{sub 2} production. It is also amenable to CO{sub 2} capture, because CO{sub 2} Can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, CO{sub 2} transport -by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of CO{sub 2} in geological reservoirs. The intent of this study is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the fill study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget will be 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh{sub e}. The base case is a 470-MW (at the busbar) IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, US Illinois {number_sign}6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 461 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.830 kg/kWh{sub e}. In the CO{sub 2} recovery case, the gasifier output is taken through water-gas shift and then to Selexol, a glycol-based absorber-stripper process that recovers CO{sub 2} before it enters the combustion turbine. This process results in 350 MW at the busbar.

  15. Determination of total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole in asphalt fume samples by gas chromatography with sulfur chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Jaycox, L B; Olsen, L D

    2000-09-01

    As part of a collaborative project between the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Federal Highway Administration to evaluate asphalt pavers' exposures to asphalt fume and their potential health effects, a method was developed for the determination of total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole in asphalt fume samples. Asphalt fume samples were collected from asphalt mixtures with and without the addition of ground-up rubber tires. The asphalt fume samples were collected with sampling trains that consisted of a Teflon membrane filter and an XAD-2 adsorbent tube. Filter and sampling tube media were extracted with hexane and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector. Separation was achieved with a 100 percent dimethyl polysiloxane fused silica column. Typical calibration curves had linear correlation coefficients of 0.99 or better with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5 percent. Benzothiazole desorption efficiency (DE) determined using spiked sampling tubes ranged from 96.5 percent at 5.0 micrograms to 89.4 percent at 40 micrograms with RSD values from 0.9 to 4.0 percent. Benzothiazole storage recovery determined using sampling tubes spiked at 20 micrograms and refrigerated for 30 days at 4 degrees C was 89.8 percent when corrected for the DE with an RSD of 1.1 percent. The limit of detection for the method determined using spiked sampling tubes was 0.30 microgram. Quantitation for total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole was against benzothiazole standards in hexane. Because of detector selectivity, sample preparation consisted of a simple hexane extraction even when samples had a high background due to hydrocarbon overload. Detector sensitivity provided quantitation in the sub-microgram region. Because of the sample preparation step and because benzothiazole was determined during the same analysis run, this method is straightforward and analytically efficient. The method has been used to

  16. Competitiveness of small power plants using ambient pressure, air-blown gasifiers. Final report. [Seven 50 MW designs using fuel gas, fuel oil, natural gas and coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boulay, R.B.; Chen, H.T.; Harvey, L.E.; Losovsky, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Small power plants have become more attractive to utilities recently for a variety of reasons, including the desire to minimize new plant investment and to tailor increases in generation base to smaller annual load growths. The study presented herein is an analysis and comparison of seven different 50 MW commercially available power plants designs, including four utilizing ambient pressure, air-blown, fixed-bed coal gasifiers for fuel supply. Plant designs, capital costs, and busbar electricity costs for each plant are presented. The results of the study indicate that nominal 50 MW coal gasification based power plants, when using commercially available, ambient pressure, air-blown, fixed-bed gasifiers, are not competitive with conventional coal-fired steam plants or combined cycle plants fueled with fuel oil or natural gas. Capital costs, heat rates, and operating costs are higher for the coal gasification based plants. This leads to costs-of-electricity for gasification based plants that range from 18 to 59% higher than costs of electricity produced in conventional plants. The two major influences leading to high costs of the gasification based plants are the small size of a gasification train (about 5 MW) and the need to compress the ambient pressure gas to required combustion pressure. 47 figs., 89 tabs.

  17. Nonlinearity of asphalt binders and the relationship with asphalt mixture permanent deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgadillo, Rodrigo

    Asphalt mixtures are widely used in pavements, they are composed of asphalt binder, mineral aggregates and air voids. Asphalt mixtures show permanent deformation when subjected to repeated loading, like the traffic loading on pavements. The contribution of the asphalt binder to resisting asphalt mixture permanent deformation is the main focus of this study. Asphalt binders and asphalt mixtures are viscoelastic materials, and are nonlinear in their stress-strain response. In the current specifications of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), asphalt binders are tested at short times and with small stresses in the linear viscoelastic range, which does not allow to truly characterize the binder contribution to asphalt mixture permanent deformation. Nonlinear characterization of asphalt binders is needed in order to accurately predict the binder contribution to resisting asphalt mixture permanent deformation. This study tested the following hypotheses: a test method can be developed to capture the nonlinear properties of asphalt binders for a wide range of stresses and loading times; a nonlinear constitutive relationship can be developed to model the binder nonlinear response; and the nonlinear binder response can be directly correlated with the permanent deformation of asphalt mixtures. Creep and recovery testing was performed on asphalt binders and on asphalt mixtures. The binder testing included a polymer modified binder and an unmodified binder. They were tested using a Dynamic Shear Rheometer with cone and plate geometry. Five different stresses and four different loading times were used. The creep response was successfully modeled using a nonlinear power law with two terms. A nonlinear constitutive relationship was obtained by separating the nonlinear viscous part from the linear viscoelastic recoverable part. Repeated creep and recovery testing of mixture was performed. The mixtures were prepared using the same two

  18. Linking asphalt binder fatigue to asphalt mixture fatigue performance using viscoelastic continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaei, Farinaz; Castorena, Cassie; Kim, Y. Richard

    2016-08-01

    Fatigue cracking is a major form of distress in asphalt pavements. Asphalt binder is the weakest asphalt concrete constituent and, thus, plays a critical role in determining the fatigue resistance of pavements. Therefore, the ability to characterize and model the inherent fatigue performance of an asphalt binder is a necessary first step to design mixtures and pavements that are not susceptible to premature fatigue failure. The simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model has been used successfully by researchers to predict the damage evolution in asphalt mixtures for various traffic and climatic conditions using limited uniaxial test data. In this study, the S-VECD model, developed for asphalt mixtures, is adapted for asphalt binders tested under cyclic torsion in a dynamic shear rheometer. Derivation of the model framework is presented. The model is verified by producing damage characteristic curves that are both temperature- and loading history-independent based on time sweep tests, given that the effects of plasticity and adhesion loss on the material behavior are minimal. The applicability of the S-VECD model to the accelerated loading that is inherent of the linear amplitude sweep test is demonstrated, which reveals reasonable performance predictions, but with some loss in accuracy compared to time sweep tests due to the confounding effects of nonlinearity imposed by the high strain amplitudes included in the test. The asphalt binder S-VECD model is validated through comparisons to asphalt mixture S-VECD model results derived from cyclic direct tension tests and Accelerated Loading Facility performance tests. The results demonstrate good agreement between the asphalt binder and mixture test results and pavement performance, indicating that the developed model framework is able to capture the asphalt binder's contribution to mixture fatigue and pavement fatigue cracking performance.

  19. Linking asphalt binder fatigue to asphalt mixture fatigue performance using viscoelastic continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaei, Farinaz; Castorena, Cassie; Kim, Y. Richard

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue cracking is a major form of distress in asphalt pavements. Asphalt binder is the weakest asphalt concrete constituent and, thus, plays a critical role in determining the fatigue resistance of pavements. Therefore, the ability to characterize and model the inherent fatigue performance of an asphalt binder is a necessary first step to design mixtures and pavements that are not susceptible to premature fatigue failure. The simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model has been used successfully by researchers to predict the damage evolution in asphalt mixtures for various traffic and climatic conditions using limited uniaxial test data. In this study, the S-VECD model, developed for asphalt mixtures, is adapted for asphalt binders tested under cyclic torsion in a dynamic shear rheometer. Derivation of the model framework is presented. The model is verified by producing damage characteristic curves that are both temperature- and loading history-independent based on time sweep tests, given that the effects of plasticity and adhesion loss on the material behavior are minimal. The applicability of the S-VECD model to the accelerated loading that is inherent of the linear amplitude sweep test is demonstrated, which reveals reasonable performance predictions, but with some loss in accuracy compared to time sweep tests due to the confounding effects of nonlinearity imposed by the high strain amplitudes included in the test. The asphalt binder S-VECD model is validated through comparisons to asphalt mixture S-VECD model results derived from cyclic direct tension tests and Accelerated Loading Facility performance tests. The results demonstrate good agreement between the asphalt binder and mixture test results and pavement performance, indicating that the developed model framework is able to capture the asphalt binder's contribution to mixture fatigue and pavement fatigue cracking performance.

  20. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  1. Mutagenicity of bitumen and asphalt fumes.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, P R; Väänänen, V; Hämeilä, M; Linnainmaa, K

    2003-08-01

    The mutagenicity of asphalt fumes was tested with the Salmonella bioassays. The aim was to investigate if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of emissions. Recycling of old asphalt is increasing, and we studied also the mutagenicity of emissions sampled during the re-use of asphalt. The composition of vapours and fumes were analysed by gas chromatography and by liquid chromatography. Bitumens containing coal fly ash (CFA) or waste plastics were heated to the paving temperatures in the laboratory. In the field, bitumen fumes were collected during paving of stone mastic asphalts (lime or CFA as a filler), remixing of stone mastic asphalt (lime or CFA as a filler), and of asphalt concrete. All the lab-generated vapour fractions were non-mutagenic. The particulate fractions were mutagenic with TA98 in the presence of the S9 activation. In addition, the lab-fumes from bitumen containing waste plastics were positive with both strains without S9. Only particulate fractions sampled in the field were tested. They were mutagenic with and without metabolic activation with both strains. The mutagenic potency of the field samples was higher than that of the lab-generated fumes without S9, and the remixing fumes were more mutagenic than the normal paving and lab-generated fumes with S9. The use of inorganic additive, CFA, did not change the mutagenicity of the fumes, whereas the organic additive, waste plastics, increased the mutagenicity of the laboratory emissions significantly. PMID:12849723

  2. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore » present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  3. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  4. Reclaimed manufacturer asphalt roofing shingles in asphalt mixtures. Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, A.B.

    1999-04-23

    The purpose of this project was to pave a test section using hot mix asphalt with roofing shingle pieces in the wearing and binder courses and to evaluate. The test project near Allentown, PA plus two other test projects in 1998 provide evidence of very good pavement performance. The bituminous concrete mix was modified with shredded shingles with a maximum size of 1/2 inch which added 1% of the asphalt content. The Department issued a statewide Provisional Specification titled Reclaimed Manufacturer Asphalt Roofing Shingles in Plant-Mixed Bituminous Concrete Courses'' on March 15, 1999. New manufacturer asphalt roofing shingle scrap including tab punch-outs can be successfully incorporated in bituminous concrete pavements if the shingles are shredded to 100% passing the 3/4 inch sieve. To take full advantage of the potential to replace a portion of the asphalt and therefore, reduce mix costs, shingles should be shredded to 100% passing minus 1/2 inch sieve.

  5. ASPHALTIC CONCRETE INDUSTRY PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the asphaltic concrete industry. After review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from asphalt concrete plants, the data were summarized...

  6. Preparation and rheological behavior of polymer-modified asphalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Ali Akbar

    1999-09-01

    Different materials and methods were used to prepare and stabilize polymer-modified asphalts. Addition of thermoplastic elastomers improved some technically important properties of asphalt. Due to inherent factors like large density difference between asphalt and polyethylene, many physical methods in which the structure of asphalt is unchanged, failed to stabilize this system. The effect of addition of copolymers and a pyrolytic oil residue derived from used tire rubber were also studied and found to be ineffective on the storage stability of the polymer-asphalt emulsions while high and moderate temperature properties of the asphalt were found to be improved. Finally, the technique of catalytic grafting of polymer on the surface of high-density particles (e.g. carbon black) was used to balance the large density difference between asphalt and polymer. The resulting polymer-asphalts were stable at high temperatures and showed enhanced properties at low and high temperatures.

  7. Effects of preparation process on performance of rubber modified asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanbing; Luo, Guobao; Wang, Xianqiang; Jiao, Yubo

    2015-06-01

    The rational utilization of waste rubber tire is essential for the environmental protection. Utilizing rubber particles to modify asphalt can not only improve asphalt performance, but also help the recycling of waste materials. Considering the effect of different preparation process parameters on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, this paper analyzes the effects of the shear temperature, shear time and shear rate on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, and provided a reference for its preparation.

  8. Evaluation of low temperature properties of warm mix asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin; Liu, Zhifei; Wu, Shaopeng

    2010-03-01

    Warm mix asphalt (WMA), which reduces the mixing and compaction temperature of conventional hot mix asphalt (HMA), is becoming an attractive paving material. It is critical to identify the low temperature properties of warm mix asphalt. In this study, the three-point bending, bending creep tests and indirect tensile tests were conducted to test the low-temperature properties of warm mix asphalt as well as the conventional hot mix asphalt, which was used as the control mixture. Sasobit and Aspha-min were used as additives for warm mix asphalt, which was mixed and compacted lower than the traditional hot mix asphalt about 25°C dosages accounted for 3% of asphalt, and 0.3% of mixture, respectively. The results of bending strength, bending modulus, and creep rate indicate that warm mix asphalt using Sasobit and Aspha-min slightly affects the resistance property to cracking compared with the conventional hot mix asphalt. The results suggest that the warm mix asphalt can maintain the low temperature properties of hot mix asphalt.

  9. Evaluation of low temperature properties of warm mix asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin; Liu, Zhifei; Wu, Shaopeng

    2009-12-01

    Warm mix asphalt (WMA), which reduces the mixing and compaction temperature of conventional hot mix asphalt (HMA), is becoming an attractive paving material. It is critical to identify the low temperature properties of warm mix asphalt. In this study, the three-point bending, bending creep tests and indirect tensile tests were conducted to test the low-temperature properties of warm mix asphalt as well as the conventional hot mix asphalt, which was used as the control mixture. Sasobit and Aspha-min were used as additives for warm mix asphalt, which was mixed and compacted lower than the traditional hot mix asphalt about 25°C dosages accounted for 3% of asphalt, and 0.3% of mixture, respectively. The results of bending strength, bending modulus, and creep rate indicate that warm mix asphalt using Sasobit and Aspha-min slightly affects the resistance property to cracking compared with the conventional hot mix asphalt. The results suggest that the warm mix asphalt can maintain the low temperature properties of hot mix asphalt.

  10. 40 CFR 52.2054 - Control of asphalt paving material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of asphalt paving material. 52... asphalt paving material. (a) Notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary in the Pennsylvania Implementation Plan, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation shall restrict the annual usage of asphalts...

  11. Full-Depth Asphalt Pavements for Parking Lots and Driveways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    The latest information for designing full-depth asphalt pavements for parking lots and driveways is covered in relationship to the continued increase in vehicle registration. It is based on The Asphalt Institute's Thickness Design Manual, Series No. 1 (MS-1), Seventh Edition, which covers all aspects of asphalt pavement thickness design in detail,…

  12. Multiscale Constitutive Modeling of Asphalt Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Benjamin Shane

    Multiscale modeling of asphalt concrete has become a popular technique for gaining improved insight into the physical mechanisms that affect the material's behavior and ultimately its performance. This type of modeling considers asphalt concrete, not as a homogeneous mass, but rather as an assemblage of materials at different characteristic length scales. For proper modeling these characteristic scales should be functionally definable and should have known properties. Thus far, research in this area has not focused significant attention on functionally defining what the characteristic scales within asphalt concrete should be. Instead, many have made assumptions on the characteristic scales and even the characteristic behaviors of these scales with little to no support. This research addresses these shortcomings by directly evaluating the microstructure of the material and uses these results to create materials of different characteristic length scales as they exist within the asphalt concrete mixture. The objectives of this work are to; 1) develop mechanistic models for the linear viscoelastic (LVE) and damage behaviors in asphalt concrete at different length scales and 2) develop a mechanistic, mechanistic/empirical, or phenomenological formulation to link the different length scales into a model capable of predicting the effects of microstructural changes on the linear viscoelastic behaviors of asphalt concrete mixture, e.g., a microstructure association model for asphalt concrete mixture. Through the microstructural study it is found that asphalt concrete mixture can be considered as a build-up of three different phases; asphalt mastic, fine aggregate matrix (FAM), and finally the coarse aggregate particles. The asphalt mastic is found to exist as a homogenous material throughout the mixture and FAM, and the filler content within this material is consistent with the volumetric averaged concentration, which can be calculated from the job mix formula. It is also

  13. High Modulus Asphalt Concrete with Dolomite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Smirnovs, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dolomite is one of the most widely available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1,000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality, mainly, its LA index (The Los Angeles abrasion test). Therefore, mostly the imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used, which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue, and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance with EN 13108-1 standard.

  14. Asphalt and risk of cancer in man.

    PubMed

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Amsel, J

    1991-08-01

    Epidemiological publications regarding the carcinogenic potential of asphalt (bitumen) are reviewed. In 1984 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) stated that there is "inadequate evidence that bitumens alone are carcinogenic to humans." They did, however, conclude that animal data provided sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity of certain extracts of steam refined and air refined bitumens. In the absence of data on man, IARC considered it reasonable to regard chemicals with sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in animals as if they presented a carcinogenic risk to man. Epidemiological data for man accumulated since the IARC report do not fulfil the criteria for showing a causal association between exposure to asphalt and development of cancer. The studies cited all suffer from a lack of data on exposure or potential confounders, which are necessary to establish whether or not such an association may or may not exist. In view of the evidence (or lack thereof) regarding asphalt today, an appropriate public health attitude suggests at least that action be taken to protect those working with asphalt by monitoring the workplace, taking whatever steps are possible to minimise exposures and to inform workers of potential hazards. At the same time, a need exists for well designed analytical epidemiological studies to determine whether a risk of cancer in man exists from exposure to asphalt. PMID:1878310

  15. Asphalt and risk of cancer in man.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Amsel, J

    1991-01-01

    Epidemiological publications regarding the carcinogenic potential of asphalt (bitumen) are reviewed. In 1984 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) stated that there is "inadequate evidence that bitumens alone are carcinogenic to humans." They did, however, conclude that animal data provided sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity of certain extracts of steam refined and air refined bitumens. In the absence of data on man, IARC considered it reasonable to regard chemicals with sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in animals as if they presented a carcinogenic risk to man. Epidemiological data for man accumulated since the IARC report do not fulfil the criteria for showing a causal association between exposure to asphalt and development of cancer. The studies cited all suffer from a lack of data on exposure or potential confounders, which are necessary to establish whether or not such an association may or may not exist. In view of the evidence (or lack thereof) regarding asphalt today, an appropriate public health attitude suggests at least that action be taken to protect those working with asphalt by monitoring the workplace, taking whatever steps are possible to minimise exposures and to inform workers of potential hazards. At the same time, a need exists for well designed analytical epidemiological studies to determine whether a risk of cancer in man exists from exposure to asphalt. PMID:1878310

  16. Biodegradation of Asphalt Cement-20 by Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pendrys, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Seven gram-negative, aerobic bacteria were isolated from a mixed culture enriched for asphalt-degrading bacteria. The predominant genera of these isolates were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Flavimonas, and Flavobacterium. The mixed culture preferentially degraded the saturate and naphthene aromatic fractions of asphalt cement-20. A residue remained on the surface which was resistant to biodegradation and protected the underlying asphalt from biodegradation. The most potent asphalt-degrading bacterium, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NAV2, excretes an emulsifier which is capable of emulsifying the saturate and naphthene aromatic fractions of asphalt cement-20. This emulsifier is not denatured by phenol. PMID:16347928

  17. Characteristics of asphalt mixes with FT additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefunková, S.

    2012-03-01

    This article is focused on low-temperature asphalt mixture technologies using FT additive and RAP. The modern production and use of asphalt mixture technologies with reduced temperatures has many advantages. These advantages mainly help to save energy and the environment. Lower temperatures enable a reduction in energy consumption, a more acceptable working environment for workers, a reduction in negative environmental effects, such as greenhouse gas emissions, and an improvement in the workability of mixtures and a prolongation of their duration. This technology is currently becoming popular in many countries.

  18. Petroleum degradation and associated microbial signatures at the Chapopote asphalt volcano, Southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Kasten, Sabine; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Zabel, Matthias; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    At the Chapopote Knoll in the Southern Gulf of Mexico, deposits of asphalt provide the substrate for a prolific cold seep ecosystem extensively colonized by chemosynthetic communities. This study investigates microbial life and associated biological processes within the asphalts and surrounding oil-impregnated sediments by analysis of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs), petroleum hydrocarbons and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ 13C) of hydrocarbon gases. Asphalt samples are lightly to heavily biodegraded suggesting that petroleum-derived hydrocarbons serve as substrates for the chemosynthetic communities. Accordingly, detection of bacterial diester and diether phospholipids in asphalt samples containing finely dispersed gas hydrate suggests the presence of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Biological methanogenesis contributes a substantial fraction to the methane captured as hydrate in the shallow asphalt deposits evidenced by significant depletion in 13C relative to background thermogenic methane. In sediments, petroleum migrating from the subsurface stimulates both methanogenesis and methanotrophy at a sulfate-methane transition zone 6-7 m below the seafloor. In this zone, microbial IPLs are dominated by archaeal phosphohydroxyarchaeols and archaeal diglycosidic diethers and tetraethers. Bacterial IPLs dominate surface sediments that are impregnated by severely biodegraded oil. In the sulfate-reduction zone, diagnostic IPLs indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in petroleum degradation. A diverse mixture of phosphohydroxyarchaeols and mixed phospho- and diglycosidic archaeal tetraethers in shallow oil-impregnated sediments point to the presence of anaerobic methane-oxidizing ANME-2 and ANME-1 archaea, respectively, or methanogens. Archaeal IPLs increase in relative abundance with increasing sediment depth and decreasing sulfate concentrations, accompanied by a shift of archaeol-based to tetraether-based archaeal IPLs. The

  19. Gas permeability measurements on asphalts using the electrodynamic balance

    SciTech Connect

    Periasamy, R.; Newsome, J.R.; Andrady, A.L.; Ensor, D.S. )

    1990-07-01

    Volatilization, oxide degradation, and steric hardening are the degradation processes believed to be responsible for the weathering of asphalts. The fundamental mechanisms that govern the rates at which these degradation processes occur are not understood, but the transport of oxygen through the asphalt matrix is an important aspect of the weathering of asphalts under field conditions. Therefore, the measurement of diffusion, solubility, and permeability constants for oxygen in asphalts is crucial to better understand the long-term weathering of the asphalt materials. A novel and precise gravimetric technique, hitherto not applied in asphalt research is described here: an electrodynamic balance is used in this technique for the measurement of key transport properties for oxygen in micrometer-size asphalt particle samples.

  20. Used Cylinder Oil Modified Cold-Mix Asphalt Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri Borhan, Muhamad; Suja, Fatihah; Ismail, Amiruddin; Rahmat, Riza Atiq O. K.

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate mechanical properties of control and modified asphalt mixtures. The modified asphalt mixtures were studied on cold-mix asphalt. Used Cylinder Oil (UCO) was used as a modifier in this study. The modification efficiency was evaluated by the improvement in the performance of prepared asphalt concrete mixes. Physical analysis of the UCO was then performed. Asphalt concrete mixes having different percentages of UCO (0, 20, 25 and 30%) as a modifier were prepared. These samples were characterized using the Marshall Stability, indirect tension test, static creep and dynamic creep test. As a result, the addition of oil to the asphalt has reduced the solvency of maltenes. The higher the added percentages of oil are seen, the softer the asphalt-UCO binders happen. It is believed that the higher the percentages of the UCO were existed, the lower the ability of the mixes to resist deformation occurred.

  1. Evaluation of Warm Mix Asphalt Additives for Use in Modified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamoun, Zahi

    The objective of this research effort is to evaluate the use of warm-mix additives with polymer modified and terminal blend tire rubber asphalt mixtures from Nevada and California. The research completed over two stages: first stage evaluated two different WMA technologies; Sasobit and Advera, and second stage evaluated one additional WMA technology; Evotherm. The experimental program covered the evaluation of resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage, the performance characteristics of the mixtures, and mechanistic analysis of mixtures in simulated pavements. In the both stages, the mixture resistance to moisture damage was evaluated using the indirect tensile test and the dynamic modulus at multiple freeze-thaw cycles, and the resistance of the various asphalt mixtures to permanent deformation using the Asphalt Mixture Performance Tester (AMPT). Resistance of the untreated mixes to fatigue cracking using the flexural beam fatigue was only completed for the first stage. One source of aggregates was sampled in, two different batches, three warm mix asphalt technologies (Advera, Sasobit and Evotherm) and three asphalt binder types (neat, polymer-modified, and terminal blend tire rubber modified asphalt binders) typically used in Nevada and California were evaluated in this study. This thesis presents the resistance of the first stage mixtures to permanent deformation and fatigue cracking using two warm-mix additives; Advera and Sasobit, and the resistance to moisture damage and permanent deformation of the second stage mixtures with only one warm-mix additive; Evotherm.

  2. Microbial Life in a Liquid Asphalt Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Haque, Shirin; de Sousa Antonio, Marina Resendes; Ali, Denzil; Hosein, Riad; Song, Young C.; Yang, Jinshu; Zaikova, Elena; Beckles, Denise M.; Guinan, Edward; Lehto, Harry J.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Pitch Lake in Trinidad and Tobago is a natural asphalt reservoir nourished by pitch seepage, a form of petroleum that consists of mostly asphaltines, from the surrounding oil-rich region. During upward seepage, pitch mixes with mud and gases under high pressure, and the lighter portion evaporates or is volatilized, which produces a liquid asphalt residue characterized by low water activity, recalcitrant carbon substrates, and noxious chemical compounds. An active microbial community of archaea and bacteria, many of them novel strains (particularly from the new Tar ARC groups), totaling a biomass of up to 107 cells per gram, was found to inhabit the liquid hydrocarbon matrix of Pitch Lake. Geochemical and molecular taxonomic approaches revealed diverse, novel, and deeply branching microbial lineages with the potential to mediate anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in different parts of the asphalt column. In addition, we found markers for archaeal methane metabolism and specific gene sequences affiliated with facultative and obligate anaerobic sulfur- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The microbial diversity at Pitch Lake was found to be unique when compared to microbial communities analyzed at other hydrocarbon-rich environments, which included Rancho Le Brea, a natural asphalt environment in California, USA, and an oil well and a mud volcano in Trinidad and Tobago, among other sites. These results open a window into the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of recalcitrant hydrocarbon matrices and establish the site as a terrestrial analogue for modeling the biotic potential of hydrocarbon lakes such as those found on Saturn's largest moon Titan.

  3. Analysis of asphalt-based roof systems using thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, R.M.; Delgado, A.H.

    1996-10-01

    Asphalt is used extensively in roofing applications. Traditionally, it is used in a built-up roof system, where four or five plies are applied in conjunction with asphalt. This is labour intensive and requires good quality assurance on the roof top. Alternatively, asphalt can be used in a polymer-modified sheet where styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) or atactic polypropylene (APP) are added to the asphalt shipped in a roll where reinforcement (e.g., glass fibre mat) has been added. Regardless of the system used, the roof must be able to withstand the environmental loads such UV, heat, etc. Thermoanalytical techniques such as DSC, DMA, TMA and TG/DTA are ideally suited to monitor the weathering of asphalt. This paper presents data obtained using these techniques and shows how the performance of asphalt-based roof systems can be followed by thermal analysis.

  4. Research on Surfactant Warm Mix Asphalt Construction Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoliang; Sun, Jingxin; Guo, Xiufeng

    Discharging temperature of hot asphalt mixture is about 150°C-185°C, volatilization of asphalt fume harms people's health and fuel cost is high. Jinan Urban Construction Group applies PTL/01 asphalt warm mix agent to produce warm mix asphalt to construction of urban roads' asphalt bituminous pavement. After comparing it with performance of traditional hot asphalt mixture, mixing temperature may be reduced by 30°C-60°C, emission of poisonous gas is reduced, energy conservation and environmental protection are satisfied, construction quality reaches requirements of construction specifications and economic, social and environmental benefits are significant. Thus, it can be used for reference for green construction of urban roads.

  5. Use of scrap rubber in asphalt pavement surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Robert A.; Roberts, Richard J.; Blackburn, Robert R.

    1991-12-01

    Scrap tire rubber was mixed into an asphalt concrete wearing course to study the effect of ice disbonding from the pavement surface under traffic. Rubber contents of 0, 3, 6, and 12 percent by weight were studied. Initial laboratory ice disbonding test results led to the development of a new paving material, Chunk Rubber Asphalt Concrete (CRAC), that uses larger pieces of rubber in a much denser asphalt concrete mix. Strength values doubled and ice disbonding performance was enhanced.

  6. Production variability analysis of hot-mixed asphalt concrete containing reclaimed asphalt pavement. Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    Solaimanian, M.; Kennedy, T.W.

    1995-02-01

    A research project was undertaken to evaluate the production and construction variability of Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) containing high quantities of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) material. Four construction projects were selected for this purpose. Two of the projects used 35 percent RAP material (both type-C mixes), while the other two used 40 percent (a type-B mix) and 50 percent (a type-D mix) of the RAP material, respectively. The projects differed in sizes, with total construction tonnage ranging from 10.9 million kg to 27.2 million kg (12,000 to 30,000 tons). In all cases, dedicated stockpiles of RAP material were used. Analysis was performed on the results obtained from the tests. The gradation and asphalt content deviations, air voids, penetration and viscosities, and stabilities, were included in the analysis. Pay adjustment factors were determined for gradation and asphalt content deviation, as well as for air voids (based on TxDOT Specification 3007). In general, these high-percent RAP projects indicated a variability higher than that of a typical HMAC without RAP. The pay adjustment factors for gradation and asphalt content deviation were lower than typical values. The construction gradations were finer than the job-mix formula target gradations, possibly a result of aggregate crushing during the milling operation.

  7. Bone Glue Modified Asphalt: A Step towards Energy Conservation and Environment Friendly Modified Asphalts

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Hashim Raza; Gallo, August A.

    2014-01-01

    Asphalt has been modified for the past several decades using various additives, including synthetic polymers. Polymer modification improves structural and engineering characteristics of the binder, which is a result of improvement in rheological characteristics of binder as well as its adhesion capability with the aggregate. Such enhancement inevitably enhances the performance characteristics of hot mix asphalts (HMA) such as fatigue life, resistance to rutting, and thermal cracking. Even though polymer-modified HMA is popular in North America and European countries, its use is still limited in developing countries of Southeast Asia due to high costs associated with its manufacturing, processing, and energy consumption. In this study, a new kind of asphalt modifier derived from animal wastes, such as bones, hides, and flesh commonly known as Bone Glue, is studied. This biomaterial which is a by-product of food and cattle industries is cheap, conveniently available, and produced locally in developing countries. The results of the research study showed that the bone glue can easily be mixed with asphalt without significantly altering the asphalt binder's viscosity and mixing and compaction temperatures of HMA. Additionally, improvements in complex shear modulus for a range of temperatures were also determined and it was found that complex shear modulus was improved by bone glue modification. PMID:27437456

  8. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    An important component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier is the use of a two-layer composite asphalt system, which provides backup water diversion capabilities if the primary capillary barrier fails to meet infiltration goals. Because of asphalt`s potential to perform to specification over the 1000-year design life criterion, a composite asphalt barrier (HMAC/fluid-applied polymer-modified asphalt) is being considered as an alternative to the bentonite clay/high density poly(ethylene) barriers for the low-permeability component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier. The feasibility of using asphalt as a long-term barrier is currently being studied. Information that must be known is the ability of asphalt to retain desirable physical properties over a period of 1000 years. This paper presents the approach for performing accelerated aging tests and evaluating the performance of samples under accelerated conditions. The results of these tests will be compared with asphalt artifact analogs and the results of modeling the degradation of the selected asphalt composite to make life-cycle predictions.

  9. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  10. Injuries in short track asphalt racing.

    PubMed

    Busby, J D

    1978-10-01

    Stock car racing is a popular activity. Although spectators are seldom injured, drivers at short asphalt tracks often sustain minor injuries. The neck and the knee are the most commonly injured areas. Rigid safety requirements are essential and help to prevent serious injuries. Severe injuries occur on an average of once a year, but no fatalities have been recorded at one short track that has been studied for a six-year period. PMID:707264

  11. Microbial life in a liquid asphalt desert.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Haque, Shirin; de Sousa Antonio, Marina Resendes; Ali, Denzil; Hosein, Riad; Song, Young C; Yang, Jinshu; Zaikova, Elena; Beckles, Denise M; Guinan, Edward; Lehto, Harry J; Hallam, Steven J

    2011-04-01

    Pitch Lake in Trinidad and Tobago is a natural asphalt reservoir nourished by pitch seepage, a form of petroleum that consists of mostly asphaltines, from the surrounding oil-rich region. During upward seepage, pitch mixes with mud and gases under high pressure, and the lighter portion evaporates or is volatilized, which produces a liquid asphalt residue characterized by low water activity, recalcitrant carbon substrates, and noxious chemical compounds. An active microbial community of archaea and bacteria, many of them novel strains (particularly from the new Tar ARC groups), totaling a biomass of up to 10(7) cells per gram, was found to inhabit the liquid hydrocarbon matrix of Pitch Lake. Geochemical and molecular taxonomic approaches revealed diverse, novel, and deeply branching microbial lineages with the potential to mediate anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in different parts of the asphalt column. In addition, we found markers for archaeal methane metabolism and specific gene sequences affiliated with facultative and obligate anaerobic sulfur- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The microbial diversity at Pitch Lake was found to be unique when compared to microbial communities analyzed at other hydrocarbon-rich environments, which included Rancho Le Brea, a natural asphalt environment in California, USA, and an oil well and a mud volcano in Trinidad and Tobago, among other sites. These results open a window into the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of recalcitrant hydrocarbon matrices and establish the site as a terrestrial analogue for modeling the biotic potential of hydrocarbon lakes such as those found on Saturn's largest moon Titan. PMID:21480792

  12. Dynamic linear viscoelastic properties and extensional failure of asphalt binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yonghong

    Billions of dollars are spent annually in USA to maintain old pavements that are badly cracked. In order to reduce this expenditure, it is desirable to have criteria for selecting asphalts with superior cracking resistance that will provide pavements with longer durability. Literature reports indicate that the ductility of binders recovered from asphalt pavements correlates with cracking failure. However, ductility measurement is a time and material consuming process, and subject to reproducibility difficulties, as are all failure tests. In addition, ductility measurement does not belong to the currently used Superpave(TM) specification. Correlations between ductility and dynamic viscoelastic properties (measured with the dynamic shear rheometer, DSR), which are much easier and faster to perform and may be included into the Superpave(TM) system, are studied for both straight and modified binders. Ductility correlates quite well with G'/(eta '/G') for conventional asphalt binders aged at different conditions, especially when ductility is below 10 cm. However, for modified asphalts, there is no universal correlation between ductility and G'/(eta'/G'), even in the low ductility region. As far as the asphalt binder in pavement is concerned, the loss due to oxidative aging of its ductility is an important reason for pavement cracking. Polymer modification modifies the rheological and oxidative hardening properties of asphalt binders. The effect of polymeric modifiers on various properties of asphalt binders was investigated. Modifiers studied were diblock poly (styrene-b-butadiene) rubber (SBR), triblock poly (styrene-b-butadiene-b-styrene) (SBS), and tire rubber. Polymer modified binders have a lower hardening and oxidation rate than their corresponding base asphalts. In addition, modified binders have lower hardening susceptibility compared with their base materials and in some cases the results can be dramatic. Polymer modification improves asphalt binders' shear

  13. 7 CFR 3201.65 - Concrete and asphalt cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt cleaners. 3201.65 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.65 Concrete and asphalt cleaners. (a) Definition. Chemicals used in concrete etching as well as to remove petroleum-based soils, lubricants, paints, mastics, organic...

  14. 7 CFR 3201.65 - Concrete and asphalt cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt cleaners. 3201.65 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.65 Concrete and asphalt cleaners. (a) Definition. Chemicals used in concrete etching as well as to remove petroleum-based soils, lubricants, paints, mastics, organic...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.65 - Concrete and asphalt cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt cleaners. 3201.65 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.65 Concrete and asphalt cleaners. (a) Definition. Chemicals used in concrete etching as well as to remove petroleum-based soils, lubricants, paints, mastics, organic...

  16. 7 CFR 2902.36 - Concrete and asphalt release fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt release fluids. 2902.36 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.36 Concrete and asphalt release fluids. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to provide a lubricating barrier between the composite surface materials (e.g., concrete...

  17. 7 CFR 3201.36 - Concrete and asphalt release fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt release fluids. 3201.36 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.36 Concrete and asphalt release fluids. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to provide a lubricating barrier between the composite surface materials (e.g., concrete...

  18. 7 CFR 3201.36 - Concrete and asphalt release fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt release fluids. 3201.36 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.36 Concrete and asphalt release fluids. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to provide a lubricating barrier between the composite surface materials (e.g., concrete...

  19. 7 CFR 2902.36 - Concrete and asphalt release fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt release fluids. 2902.36 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.36 Concrete and asphalt release fluids. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to provide a lubricating barrier between the composite surface materials (e.g., concrete...

  20. 7 CFR 3201.36 - Concrete and asphalt release fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt release fluids. 3201.36 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.36 Concrete and asphalt release fluids. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to provide a lubricating barrier between the composite surface materials (e.g., concrete...

  1. Hot asphalt burns: a review of injuries and management options.

    PubMed

    Bosse, George M; Wadia, Shernaz A; Padmanabhan, Pradeep

    2014-07-01

    Hot asphalt burns to human tissue can increase the likelihood of infection and potential conversion of partial thickness to full-thickness injuries. Successful intervention for hot asphalt burns requires immediate and effective cooling of the asphalt on the tissue followed by subsequent gradual removal of the cooled asphalt. A review of the literature reveals that multiple substances have been used to remove asphalt, including topical antibiotics, petroleum jelly, a commercial product known as De-Solv-It (ORANGE-SOL, Chandler, AZ), sunflower oil, baby oil, liquid paraffin, butter, mayonnaise, and moist-exposed burn ointment (MEBO). Although many of these products may be effective in the removal of asphalt, they may not be readily available in an emergency department setting. Topical antibiotics are readily available, are more commonly described in the medical literature, and would be expected to be effective in the removal of asphalt. We developed guidelines for on scene (first-aid) management and the initial care of such patients upon presentation to a health care facility. These guidelines emphasize the principles of early cooling, gradual removal of adherent asphalt using topical antibiotics, and avoidance of the use of topical agents, which are likely to result in tissue toxicity. PMID:24630605

  2. Improving the quality of asphalt coating with carbon nanomodifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larisa, Urkhanova; Nikolay, Shestakov; Aleksandr, Semenov; Natalya, Smirnyagina; Irina, Semenova

    2015-07-01

    This article deals with the possibility of modifying the binder by adding carbon nanomodifier to bitumen to improve the quality of asphalt. Addition of 0.05%-0.5% of nanomodifier significantly changes the properties of bitumen. Asphalt with this astringent has increased strength, heat resistance and shear resistance.

  3. 40 CFR 443.20 - Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... asphalt concrete subcategory. 443.20 Section 443.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.20 Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  4. 40 CFR 443.20 - Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asphalt concrete subcategory. 443.20 Section 443.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.20 Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  5. 40 CFR 443.20 - Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... asphalt concrete subcategory. 443.20 Section 443.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.20 Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  6. 40 CFR 443.20 - Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asphalt concrete subcategory. 443.20 Section 443.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.20 Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. 40 CFR 443.20 - Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... asphalt concrete subcategory. 443.20 Section 443.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.20 Applicability; description of the asphalt concrete subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  8. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  9. 40 CFR 443.40 - Applicability; description of the linoleum and printed asphalt felt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... linoleum and printed asphalt felt subcategory. 443.40 Section 443.40 Protection of Environment... PAVING AND ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Linoleum and Printed Asphalt Felt Subcategory § 443.40 Applicability; description of the linoleum and printed asphalt felt subcategory....

  10. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  11. 40 CFR 443.30 - Applicability; description of the asphalt roofing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asphalt roofing subcategory. 443.30 Section 443.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Roofing Subcategory § 443.30 Applicability; description of the asphalt roofing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing... Area Sources: Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Other Requirements and Information... of Part 63—Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations For * * * You must meet...

  13. Regulation of properties of oxidized asphalt from heavy crude

    SciTech Connect

    Yudina, E.E.; Bam, V.Ya.; Antoshkin, A.S.

    1988-03-01

    The commercial properties of the Karazhanbas crude asphalts obtained by oxidation were regulated by adding asphalt-resin and wax deposits (ARWD) to the crude. The liquid-phase oxidation was performed in a laboratory unit using the method of R. B. Gun. Control of the physiocochemical properties of oxidized asphalt was obtained by varying the dimensions of the complex structural units of the petroleum disperse system, on the basis of a theory by Z. I. Syunyaev. The effects of varying the crude oil/ARWD ratio in the mixture on certain physiocochemical properties of the starting material and the final asphalt were established. It was possible to control the asphalt properties by changing the complex structural unit dimensions to obtain the required structural-mechanical properties.

  14. Monitoring asphalt pavement damages using remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettas, Christodoulos; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Neocleous, Kyriacos; Christofe, Andreas; Pilakoutas, Kypros; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2015-06-01

    One of the main issues in the maintenance plans of road agencies or governmental organizations is the early detection of damaged asphalt pavements. The development of a smart and non-destructive systematic technique for monitoring damaged asphalt pavements is considered a main priority to fill this gap. During the 1970's, remote sensing was used to map road surface distress, while during the last decade, remote sensing became more advanced, thereby assisting in the evolution of the identification and mapping of roads. Various techniques were used in order to explore condition, age, weaknesses and imperfections of asphalted pavements. These methods were fairly successful in the classification of asphalted surfaces and in the detection of some of their characteristics. This paper explores the state of the art of using remote sensing techniques for monitoring damaged pavements and some typical spectral profiles of various asphalt pavements in Cyprus area acquired using the SVC1024 field spectroradiometer.

  15. Utilization of Recycled Asphalt Concrete with Warm Mix Asphalt and Cost-Benefit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Julide; Sengoz, Burak

    2015-01-01

    The asphalt paving industries are faced with two major problems. These two important challenges are generated with an increase in demand for environmentally friendly paving mixtures and the problem of rapidly rising raw materials. Recycling of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) is a critical necessity to save precious aggregates and reduce the use of costly bitumen. Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technology provides not only the option of recycling asphalt pavement at a lower temperature than the temperature maintained in hot mixtures but also encourages the utilization of RAP and therefore saves energy and money. This paper describes the feasibility of utilizing three different WMA additives (organic, chemical and water containing) at recommended contents with different percentages of RAP. The mechanical properties and cost-benefit analysis of WMA containing RAP have been performed and compared with WMA without RAP. The results indicated that, 30%, 10% and 20% can be accepted as an optimum RAP addition related to organic, chemical and water containing additives respectively and organic additive with 30% RAP content has an appreciable increase in tensile strength over the control mix. It was also concluded that the RAP with WMA technology is the ability to reduce final cost compared to HMA and WMA mixtures. PMID:25574851

  16. Utilization of recycled asphalt concrete with warm mix asphalt and cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Oner, Julide; Sengoz, Burak

    2015-01-01

    The asphalt paving industries are faced with two major problems. These two important challenges are generated with an increase in demand for environmentally friendly paving mixtures and the problem of rapidly rising raw materials. Recycling of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) is a critical necessity to save precious aggregates and reduce the use of costly bitumen. Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technology provides not only the option of recycling asphalt pavement at a lower temperature than the temperature maintained in hot mixtures but also encourages the utilization of RAP and therefore saves energy and money. This paper describes the feasibility of utilizing three different WMA additives (organic, chemical and water containing) at recommended contents with different percentages of RAP. The mechanical properties and cost-benefit analysis of WMA containing RAP have been performed and compared with WMA without RAP. The results indicated that, 30%, 10% and 20% can be accepted as an optimum RAP addition related to organic, chemical and water containing additives respectively and organic additive with 30% RAP content has an appreciable increase in tensile strength over the control mix. It was also concluded that the RAP with WMA technology is the ability to reduce final cost compared to HMA and WMA mixtures. PMID:25574851

  17. Moving-bed gasification - combined-cycle control study. Volume 1: results and conclusions, Case 1 - air-blown dry-ash operation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ahner, D.J.; Brower, A.S.; Dawes, M.H.; Patel, A.S.

    1981-03-01

    A simulation study has been conducted to investigate the inherent process dynamics and required control strategies for an integrated coal gasification/combined cycle (GCC) power plant to operate successfully under load-changing conditions to meet power system requirements. The simulated GCC plant configuration is similar to the flowsheet developed in earlier EPRI economic studies (RP239), based on an air-blown, dry-ash, moving-bed gasifier of the Lurgi-type. A following GCC plant control study will be based on a Lurgi-type gasifier modified for oxygen-blown, slagging operations such as that being developed by British Gas Corporation. A large ditial computer simulation model of the GCC plant operating on a large utility power system network was developed to examine alternate plant control strategies. Gas turbine-lead and gasifier-lead control modes were evaluated with respect to power system requirements for daily load following, tie-line flow regulation with thermal backup, and frequency regulation. Inherent features of the gasifier led to unique process dynamics for the GCC plant. Sizeable transients were observed during load-changing operations, both in the fuel process and the steam system. However, the plant compensated effectively for such transients with a modified gas turbine-lead control strategy, by making use of fast-responding gas turbine controls and the large inherent volume of the fuel process. The results verify the capability of the GCC plant to operate with the fuel process closely integrated with the combined cycle plant under rapidly changing conditions. Furthermore, a GCC plant control strategy was developed which can successfully meet power sytem requirements within fuel system limitations, allowing an overall plant response rate of four (4) percent per minute.

  18. Evaluation of Warm Mix Asphalt Technologies and Recycled Asphalt Pavements in Truckee Meadows, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Montecino, Cristian

    This study evaluated the properties and laboratory-performance of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) and Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) mixtures with different levels of Recycled Asphalt Pavements (RAP) content: none for control mixtures, around 15% by dry weight of aggregates, and more than 30% by dry weight of aggregates. The rheological properties were evaluated for virgin and recovered RAP asphalt binders. The target amount of RAP in the mixtures was determined by using Blending Charts and Mortar Experiments. The mixtures are design through the guidelines established in Marshall Mix Design Method considering additional modifications for RAP and WMA from Superpave Mix Design. The mixtures are evaluated for their resistance to moisture damage by means of measuring the Dynamic Modulus |E*| after three freeze/thaw cycles and the indirect tensile strength after one and three freeze/thaw cycles. The resistance of the mixtures to permanent deformation was also evaluated by using the Asphalt Mixture Performance Tester (AMPT) to measure the flow number (FN). For this study, it was determined that the resistance to moisture damage decreases as the number of freeze/thaw cycles increases for most of the evaluated mixtures. Mixtures exhibited an increase in dynamic modulus as the RAP percentage increased. A decrease in the resistance to moisture damage was detected with the increase in RAP content for most of the mixtures. HMA mixtures exhibited a better performance in rutting than the WMA mixtures. An increase in rutting resistance was observed with the increase in RAP percentage for HMA mixtures whereas an inconsistent trend was observed for WMA mixtures. Further study is needed to validate the use of the high percentage of RAP in Washoe County.

  19. Performance-based asphalt mixture design methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Al-Hosain Mansour

    Today, several State D.O.T.s are being investigating the use of tire rubber with local conventional materials. Several of the ongoing investigations identified potential benefits from the use of these materials, including improvements in material properties and performance. One of the major problems is being associated with the transferability of asphalt rubber technology without appropriately considering the effects of the variety of conventional materials on mixture behavior and performance. Typically, the design of these mixtures is being adapted to the physical properties of the conventional materials by using the empirical Marshall mixture design and without considering fundamental mixture behavior and performance. Use of design criteria related to the most common modes of failure for asphalt mixtures, such as rutting, fatigue cracking, and low temperature thermal cracking have to be developed and used for identifying the "best mixture," in term of performance, for the specific local materials and loading conditions. The main objective of this study was the development of a mixture design methodology that considers mixture behavior and performance. In order to achieve this objective a laboratory investigation able to evaluate mixture properties that can be related to mixture performance, (in terms of rutting, low temperature cracking, moisture damage and fatigue), and simulating the actual field loading conditions that the material is being exposed to, was conducted. The results proved that the inclusion of rubber into asphalt mixtures improved physical characteristics such as elasticity, flexibility, rebound, aging properties, increased fatigue resistance, and reduced rutting potential. The possibility of coupling the traditional Marshall mix design method with parameters related to mixture behavior and performance was investigated. Also, the SHRP SUPERPAVE mix design methodology was reviewed and considered in this study for the development of an integrated

  20. Influence of roofing shingles on asphalt concrete mixture properties. Final report, 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, D.; Stroup-Gardiner, M.; Weikle, B.; Drescher, A.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the use of waste shingles from manufacturing and roof reconstruction projects in hot mix asphalt concrete mixtures. In dense-graded asphalt mixtures, it was hypothesized that the waste material might serve as an extender for the new asphalt in the mix as well as a fiber reinforcement. In the stone mastic asphalt (SMA), it could serve as the binder stiffener typically used to prevent the asphalt from draining out of these types of mixtures.

  1. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  2. An investigation of the effectiveness of asphalt durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoehl, N. H.; Kemp, G. R.

    1980-05-01

    Included are analyses which show that the effects of voids and aggregate porosity are less severe than the thermal oxidation effect in hot desert climates. A comparison of the results of laboratory tests for predicting asphalt hardening with the results for the field weathered briquettes show that none of the procedures is capable of adequately predicting asphalt weathering in a hot weathering site. A procedure was developed to approximate the effect produced at Indio in two years. Some correlation to briquette results was obtained. A climatic specification to control asphalt hardening in the hot climatic areas is proposed.

  3. Characterization of asphalt materials containing bio oil from michigan wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills-Beale, Julian

    The objective of this research is to develop sustainable wood-blend bioasphalt and characterize the atomic, molecular and bulk-scale behavior necessary to produce advanced asphalt paving mixtures. Bioasphalt was manufactured from Aspen, Basswood, Red Maple, Balsam, Maple, Pine, Beech and Magnolia wood via a 25 KWt fast-pyrolysis plant at 500 °C and refined into two distinct end forms - non-treated (5.54% moisture) and treated bioasphalt (1% moisture). Michigan petroleum-based asphalt, Performance Grade (PG) 58-28 was modified with 2, 5 and 10% of the bioasphalt by weight of base asphalt and characterized with the gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and the automated flocculation titrimetry techniques. The GC-MS method was used to characterize the Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen (CHN) elemental ratio whiles the FTIR and the AFT were used to characterize the oxidative aging performance and the solubility parameters, respectively. For rheological characterization, the rotational viscosity, dynamic shear modulus and flexural bending methods are used in evaluating the low, intermediate and high temperature performance of the bio-modified asphalt materials. 54 5E3 (maximum of 3 million expected equivalent standard axle traffic loads) asphalt paving mixes were then prepared and characterized to investigate their laboratory permanent deformation, dynamic mix stiffness, moisture susceptibility, workability and constructability performance. From the research investigations, it was concluded that: 1) levo, 2, 6 dimethoxyphenol, 2 methoxy 4 vinylphenol, 2 methyl 1-2 cyclopentandione and 4-allyl-2, 6 dimetoxyphenol are the dominant chemical functional groups; 2) bioasphalt increases the viscosity and dynamic shear modulus of traditional asphalt binders; 3) Bio-modified petroleum asphalt can provide low-temperature cracking resistance benefits at -18 °C but is susceptible to cracking at -24 °C; 3) Carbonyl and sulphoxide

  4. Asphalt durability: From laboratory test to field implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, J.W.H. )

    1990-07-01

    This paper describes how data from field trials, which were originally laid to validate the Australian Road Research Board asphalt durability test, were used to develop a field hardening model for the asphalt binder in sprayed seals. The work has been previously reported, and only sufficient information is given here to permit developments in the use of the model to be followed. A second model, which allows prediction of the asphalt viscosity level associated with seal distress in different climatic regions, is put forward in this paper. By using the two models it is possible to make predictions concerning seal life in different areas of a country.

  5. HP-GPC characterization of asphalt and modified asphalts from gulf countries and their relation to performance based properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wahhab, H.I.A.; Ali, M.F.; Asi, I.M.; Dubabe, I.A.

    1996-12-31

    Asphalt producing refineries in the Gulf countries include Ras Tanura and Riyadh (Saudi Arabia), Al-Ahmadi (Kuwait), and BAPCO (Bahrain). Riyadh and Ras Tanura refineries are located in the central and eastern Saudi Arabia respectively. Arabian light crude oil is used to produce 2000 to 3000 tons of asphalt per day using vacuum distillation, air blowing and grade blending techniques to produce 60/70 penetration grade asphalts in each of these two Saudi refineries. All of the asphalt cement used in Saudi Arabia, Qatar and parts of the United Arab Emirates is supplied by Riyadh and Ras Tanura refineries. Al-Ahmadi refinery supplies all of the asphalt cement needed for construction in the state of Kuwait. Ratwi-Burgan crude off mix is used to produce 750 to 1000 tons of asphalt per day using vacuum distillation and air blowing processes. This study was initiated to evaluate different locally available polymers in order to identify potential polymers to modify asphalts to satisfy the performance requirements in the Gulf countries environmental conditions.

  6. A review of the fundamentals of polymer-modified asphalts: Asphalt/polymer interactions and principles of compatibility.

    PubMed

    Polacco, Giovanni; Filippi, Sara; Merusi, Filippo; Stastna, George

    2015-10-01

    During the last decades, the number of vehicles per citizen as well as the traffic speed and load has dramatically increased. This sudden and somehow unplanned overloading has strongly shortened the life of pavements and increased its cost of maintenance and risks to users. In order to limit the deterioration of road networks, it is necessary to improve the quality and performance of pavements, which was achieved through the addition of a polymer to the bituminous binder. Since their introduction, polymer-modified asphalts have gained in importance during the second half of the twentieth century, and they now play a fundamental role in the field of road paving. With high-temperature and high-shear mixing with asphalt, the polymer incorporates asphalt molecules, thereby forming a swallowed network that involves the entire binder and results in a significant improvement of the viscoelastic properties in comparison with those of the unmodified binder. Such a process encounters the well-known difficulties related to the poor solubility of polymers, which limits the number of macromolecules able to not only form such a structure but also maintain it during high-temperature storage in static conditions, which may be necessary before laying the binder. Therefore, polymer-modified asphalts have been the subject of numerous studies aimed to understand and optimize their structure and storage stability, which gradually attracted polymer scientists into this field that was initially explored by civil engineers. The analytical techniques of polymer science have been applied to polymer-modified asphalts, which resulted in a good understanding of their internal structure. Nevertheless, the complexity and variability of asphalt composition rendered it nearly impossible to generalize the results and univocally predict the properties of a given polymer/asphalt pair. The aim of this paper is to review these aspects of polymer-modified asphalts. Together with a brief description of

  7. The wind resistance of asphalt roofing shingles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Craig Robert

    Asphalt shingle roofing is the leading cause of hurricane wind-related insured losses in residential buildings. Damage statistics generated from recent hurricanes indicate shingle roofs sustain damage in wind velocities below design-level with damage frequency increasing with shingle roof age. The objective of this dissertation is the identification of primary mechanisms triggering the failure of shingle roof systems in wind. The research goal is to reduce future shingle roof wind damage and improve our ability to predict asphalt shingle wind resistance. Five studies comprising this dissertation addressed the adhesive consistency and strength of aged asphalt shingles, system-level wind resistance, and the load model underpinning the ASTM D7158 wind test standard. The most significant and unexpected finding was partially unsealed shingles on field, hip, and ridge locations on Florida and Texas homes. Location on the shingle's sealant strip where unsealed and failure mode were consistent at each location. Total quantity of partially unsealed shingles in the field of the roof significantly increased with age, aligning with damage statistics. Full-scale wind tunnel tests demonstrate partially unsealed shingles are more vulnerable than fully sealed due to increased distributed force on sealant strip and concentrated force at the adhered and non-adhered interface. Uplift resistance was measured in artificially and naturally aged shingles. For artificially aged shingles, one of three products evaluated had statistically significant decreases in mean uplift resistance as exposure time increased. However, resistance was above design-level at all exposure test intervals. Naturally aged shingles also had resistance above design-level. Combined results demonstrate that reduced uplift capacity can occur, but high initial bond strength promotes long-term uplift resistance. Wind loads exerted on the shingles sealant strip load path were directly measured on fully sealed and

  8. 5. VIEW OF SECOND ELEVATOR WITH WOODFRAME HEADHOUSE AND ASPHALTIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF SECOND ELEVATOR WITH WOOD-FRAME HEADHOUSE AND ASPHALTIC SIDING, LOOKING WEST. - Lockport DuPage Farmer's Elevator Company Grain Elevator, South of Romeoville Road, Lockport, Will County, IL

  9. Comprehensive research program: Wind resistance of asphalt shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.E.; Metz, R.E.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association's comprehensive research program which has resulted in a validated wind load model that can be used to calculate the uplift pressure on asphalt shingles as a function of approach wind velocities and other wind and building conditions. Also, a tab uplift resistance test method has been developed to measure the ability of asphalt shingles to withstand the imposed pressures due to the wind. In combination, the results of these two efforts provide the shingle manufacturers with the methodology to evaluate and improve their products. The results are not only of interest to the roofing manufacturers, but also to contractors, code officials, insurance companies, roofing specifiers and other professionals in the roofing industry. The results of this work should provide building owners and homeowners with high performance asphalt shingles for extreme wind conditions.

  10. Performance modeling of Arabian asphalt using HP-GPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asi, I. M.; Wahhab, H. I. Al-Abdul; Al-Dubabi, I. A.; Ali, M. F.

    1997-08-01

    In this study, Arabian neat asphalt samples were collected from different asphalt producing refineries in the Gulf countries. Another set of polymer modified samples was also included in this study. In the polymer modification process, 5,10, and 15% crumb rubber (CRT) and 3,6, and 9% styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) were used. All asphalt samples were subjected to two aging processes to simulate heating, mixing, compaction, and in-service aging. The asphalt samples at the different aging stages were subjected to performance-based tests that were adapted and/or modified by the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) team. High pressure gel permeation chromatography (HP-GPC) was used to chemically analyze the test samples by generating profiles of their molecular size distribution. Models were built to predict the performance-based properties from the produced HP-GPC profiles.

  11. Effect of moisture on the aging behavior of asphalt binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tao; Huang, Xiao-Ming; Mahmoud, Enad; Garibaldy, Emil

    2011-08-01

    The moisture aging effect and mechanism of asphalt binder during the in-service life of pavement were investigated by laboratory simulating tests. Pressure aging vessel (PAV) test simulating the long-term aging of binder during the in-service life of pavement was modified to capture the long-term moisture aging effect of binder. Penetration grade tests including penetration test, soften point test, and ductility test as well as Superpave™ performance grade tests including viscosity test, dynamic shear rheometer test, and bending beam rheometer test were conducted to fully evaluate the moisture aging effect of binder. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy test and Gel-permeation chromatography test were applied to provide a fundamental understanding of the moisture aging mechanism of binder. The results indicate that moisture condition can accelerate the aging of asphalt binder and shorten the service life of asphalt binder. The modified PAV test with moisture condition can well characterize the moisture aging properties of asphalt binder.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of activated carbon from asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandah, Munther Issa; Shawabkeh, Reyad; Al-Zboon, Mahmoud Ar'ef

    2006-11-01

    Asphalt (cheap and available in huge amount in Jordan) was converted into activated carbon powder by chemical treatment with sulphuric and nitric acids at 450 °C. The final product was characterized and found effective as adsorbent material. Its cation exchange capacity reaches 191.2 meq/100-g carbons when treated with 30 wt% acid/asphalt ratio without airflow rate injection and 208 meq/100-g carbons when 6.5 ml air/min was injected into the surface of the asphalt during activation at the same acid/asphalt weight ratio of 30 and temperature 450 °C. The zero point of charge for this product was found to be stable at pH value around 3 in the range of initial pH between 3 and 10.

  13. Hot in-place recycling of asphalt concrete. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Button, J.W.; Little, D.N.; Estakhri, C.K.; Mason, L.S.

    1994-01-01

    ;Contents: Hot in place recycling processes and equipment; HIPR as a tool for asphalt pavement rehabilitation; Mixture design for HIPR processes; Relative performance of HIPR pavements; Guidelines for effective use of HIPR; and Conclusions and recommendations.

  14. Wavelet-based asphalt concrete texture grading and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuntashri, Ali; Agaian, Sos

    2011-03-01

    In this Paper, we introduce a new method for evaluation, quality control, and automatic grading of texture images representing different textural classes of Asphalt Concrete (AC). Also, we present a new asphalt concrete texture grading, wavelet transform, fractal, and Support Vector Machine (SVM) based automatic classification and recognition system. Experimental results were simulated using different cross-validation techniques and achieved an average classification accuracy of 91.4.0 % in a set of 150 images belonging to five different texture grades.

  15. Hot Mix Asphalt Using Light Weight Aggregate Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwad, Mohammad T.

    Hot mix asphalt concrete is produced by properly blending asphalt, coarse and fine aggregates in addition to filler at temperatures ranging from 80 to 165°C. This research is directed to study the effect of replacing the conventional aggregates by the recycled Light Weight Aggregate Concrete (LWAC) on the properties of the produced asphalt mix. The research studied the optimum asphalt content and the effect of some parameters on the properties of the recycled LWAC. The research included studying thirty-six Marshal Specimens lie in four main groups. Each group was made from crushed LWAC in addition to a comparison group used the pumice instead of the crushed LWAC. The LWAC mixes contained (0, 10, 15 and 20%) of silica powder content. The density, stability, flow, percentages of the air Voids in the Compacted Mixture (VTM), compacted mineral aggregate (VMA) and the Voids Filled by Asphalt (VFA) were investigated for all the studied specimens. The main conclusions drawn from the current research implies that the optimum percent of asphalt was 7.5% for the different percentages of silica powder ratios. The presence of voids in the light weight aggregates and the porosity of the obtained concrete affected largely the behavior of the obtained mix.

  16. Bacteria and asphalt stripping. Final report, December 1983-August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurti, K.; Jayaprakash, G.P.

    1987-08-01

    Major types of bituminous pavement distress were rutting, cracking (longitudinal, transverse, and alligator) and stripping. The rubble and loosely bound material contained bacteria. The deterioration lessened upward from the pavement-soil interface. The soil appears to be the prime source of the bacteria. Most of the bacterial cells were sausage shaped with polar flagellation. They appeared to belong to the genus Pseudomonas, which is a known user of asphaltic hydrocarbons. Cocci-type bacteria and a virus were also noted. Increasing the density of some asphaltic concrete and strengthening the bond between aggregate and asphalt are considered as the preferred alternatives to using chemical biocides. Anything to reduce pavement cracking would help. Adding lime to asphalt mixes may be one effective means of improving aggregate-asphalt bond and controlling biodeterioration. Lime stabilization of soils under asphalt pavements may provide an added protection against bacterial attack by rendering the soil more hostile to bacterial habitat. Full-depth hot-mix recycling would be more effective than partial-depth recycling in retarding bacterial decay at cracks.

  17. The use of waste materials in asphalt concrete mixtures.

    PubMed

    Tuncan, Mustafa; Tuncan, Ahmet; Cetin, Altan

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) the effects of rubber and plastic concentrations and rubber particle sizes on properties of asphalt cement, (b) on properties of asphalt concrete specimens and (c) the effects of fly ash, marble powder, rubber powder and petroleum contaminated soil as filler materials instead of stone powder in the asphalt concrete specimens. One type of limestone aggregate and one penetration-graded asphalt cement (75-100) were used. Three concentrations of rubber and plastic (i.e. 5%, 10% and 20% of the total weight of asphalt cement), three rubber particle sizes (i.e. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 20 [0.85 mm], No. 20 [0.85mm] - 200 [0.075mm] and No. 4 [4.75mm] - 200 [0.075mm]) and one plastic particle size (i.e. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 10 [2.00mm]) were also used. It was found that while the addition of plastic significantly increased the strength of specimens, the addition of rubber decreased it. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 200 [0.075mm] rubber particles showed the best results with respect to the indirect tensile test. The Marshall stability and indirect tensile strength properties of plastic modified specimens increased. Marble powder and fly ash could be used as filler materials instead of stone powder in the asphalt concrete pavement specimens. PMID:12739723

  18. Application of Common Mid-Point Method to Estimate Asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shan; Al-Aadi, Imad

    2015-04-01

    3-D radar is a multi-array stepped-frequency ground penetration radar (GPR) that can measure at a very close sampling interval in both in-line and cross-line directions. Constructing asphalt layers in accordance with specified thicknesses is crucial for pavement structure capacity and pavement performance. Common mid-point method (CMP) is a multi-offset measurement method that can improve the accuracy of the asphalt layer thickness estimation. In this study, the viability of using 3-D radar to predict asphalt concrete pavement thickness with an extended CMP method was investigated. GPR signals were collected on asphalt pavements with various thicknesses. Time domain resolution of the 3-D radar was improved by applying zero-padding technique in the frequency domain. The performance of the 3-D radar was then compared to that of the air-coupled horn antenna. The study concluded that 3-D radar can be used to predict asphalt layer thickness using CMP method accurately when the layer thickness is larger than 0.13m. The lack of time domain resolution of 3-D radar can be solved by frequency zero-padding. Keywords: asphalt pavement thickness, 3-D Radar, stepped-frequency, common mid-point method, zero padding.

  19. Use of tire rubber in asphalt material and evaluation of asphalt rubber binders in porous friction courses

    SciTech Connect

    Anderton, G.L.; Salami, M.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this research by Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was to evaluate the effectiveness of using asphalt rubber binders in porous friction course`s (PFC`s). This research provides a sound basis for using asphalt rubber binders in order to provide a more durable, cost-effective PFC. The information provided by this research has the potential to increase the volume of PFC`s constructed in the future and to make these future pavements longer lasting. The objectives of this research were: (1) to determine the potential benefits of asphalt rubber binders when used in PFC`s and (2) to recommend the asphalt cement grades and mix design procedure required to achieve optimum field performance. The scope of this study included a review of available literature and existing data, a three-phase laboratory study, and an analysis of all collected data.

  20. APPLICATION OF LOW TEMPERATU RE PROPERTIES IMPROVEMENT ASPHALT TO REPAIRE WORK OF RO CK FILL DAM WITH ASPHALT FACING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Masaru; Tsunoo, Takashi; Kasahara, Atsushi

    The low temperature properties improvement asphalt that is no decreasing the transformation follow and the stress relaxation properties at the low temperature was developed. It aimed at properties of PG64-28 (lowest temperature 28 degree C and maximum temperature 64 degree C that was able to be used) from PG (Performance Grade) of mix design method SUPERPAVE (Superior Performance Pavement) of new road-building plan SHRP (Strategic Highway Research Program) in the United States when developing. When the repair work of the rock fill dam with asphalt facing located in Kyogoku-cho Abuta-gun Hokkaido was planned, the applicability of the developed asphalt was verified. As for the verification outcome and the developed asphalt, it was proven that it was applied to the repair construction, and there was no problem in manufacturing and construction.

  1. Replacement of asphalt in glass-mat roofing shingles. Final report, March 1980-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bastian, E.J. Jr.; McCandlish, E.F.K.; Sieling, F.W.

    1982-05-01

    Up to 50% of the asphalt now used in glass-mat shingles may be replaceable by increasing the mineral filler content and/or extending the asphalt with elemental sulfur. Highly filled, lab-made shingles containing asphalt flux perform acceptably in fire tests, slide tests, blister tests, granule adhesion, and freeze-thaw cracking tests. They have high stain and scuff potential and are too limp for convenient application around 110/sup 0/F. Lab-made shingles containing asphalt saturant are satisfactory in most respects, but they are still too limp for high temperature application. Various methods to stiffen highly filled shingles were tried. The most promising method is the use of two lightweight glass mats, laminated together with asphalt. Shingles made in this way have handling properties superior to conventional shingles and are economically feasible. In the area of replacement of asphalt with sulfur, five small-scale plant trials produced shingles which, after a year of outdoor exposure, are satisfactory. On the basis of preliminary measurements, no important difference in tensile or flexural properties between asphalt and sulfur/asphalt shingles is expected. In Weather-Ometer tests, sulfur/asphalt tends to have lower durability than conventional coating. This is confirmed by outside weathering of sulfur/asphalt films. By choosing the correct asphalt softening point and correct filler level, sulfur/asphalt/filler can have equal durability to conventional asphalt/filler combinations.

  2. Quantitative exposure matrix for asphalt fume, total particulate matter, and respirable crystalline silica among roofing and asphalt manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Fayerweather, William E; Trumbore, David C; Johnson, Kathleen A; Niebo, Ronald W; Maxim, L Daniel

    2011-09-01

    This paper summarizes available data on worker exposures to asphalt fume (soluble fraction), total particulate matter, and respirable crystalline silica (quartz) [hereinafter RCS] over a 30-year period in Owens Corning's asphalt production and roofing manufacturing plants. For the period 1977 through 2006, the air-monitoring database contains more than 1,400 personal samples for asphalt fume (soluble fraction), 2,400 personal samples for total particulate, and 1,300 personal samples for RCS. Unique process-job categories were identified for the asphalt production and roofing shingle manufacturing plants. Quantitative exposures were tabulated by agent, process-job, and calendar period to form an exposure matrix for use in subsequent epidemiologic studies of the respiratory health of these workers. Analysis of time trends in exposure data shows substantial and statistically significant exposure reductions for asphalt fume (soluble fraction), total particulate matter, and respirable crystalline silica at Owens Corning plants. Cumulative distribution plots for the most recent sampling period (2001-2006) show that 95% of the asphalt fume (soluble fraction) measurements were less than 0.25 mg/m3; 95% of the total particulate measurements were less than 2.2 mg/m3; and 95% of the RCS measurements were less than 0.05 mg/m3. Several recommendations are offered to improve the design of future monitoring efforts. PMID:21879950

  3. 40 CFR 436.60 - Applicability; description of the asphaltic mineral subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... asphaltic mineral subcategory. 436.60 Section 436.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphaltic Mineral Subcategory § 436.60 Applicability; description of the...

  4. 40 CFR 436.60 - Applicability; description of the asphaltic mineral subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asphaltic mineral subcategory. 436.60 Section 436.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphaltic Mineral Subcategory § 436.60 Applicability; description of the...

  5. 40 CFR 436.60 - Applicability; description of the asphaltic mineral subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... asphaltic mineral subcategory. 436.60 Section 436.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphaltic Mineral Subcategory § 436.60 Applicability; description of the...

  6. Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, Rex, PE

    2008-04-28

    Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

  7. On the representative volume element of asphalt concrete at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasteanu, Mihai; Cannone Falchetto, Augusto; Velasquez, Raul; Le, Jia-Liang

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of characterizing asphalt mixtures' rheological and failure properties at low temperatures by means of the Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) is investigated in this paper. The main issue is the use of thin beams of asphalt mixture in experimental procedures that may not capture the true behavior of the material used to construct an asphalt pavement.

  8. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Manufacturing (Coating) Operations 2 Table 2 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Area Sources: Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Other Requirements and... AAAAAAA of Part 63—Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations For * * *...

  9. Specifications and Construction Methods for Asphalt Concrete and Other Plant-Mix Types, 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    The purpose of this publication is to assist engineers in the analysis, design and control of paving projects that use asphalt concrete and other asphalt plant-mixes. The scope of this new third edition has been enlarged, and changes necessitated by advances in asphalt technology have been incorporated. Chapters I and II and Appendices A and B…

  10. 40 CFR 436.60 - Applicability; description of the asphaltic mineral subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... asphaltic mineral subcategory. 436.60 Section 436.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphaltic Mineral Subcategory § 436.60 Applicability; description of the asphaltic mineral subcategory....

  11. ASPHALT FOR OFF-STREET PAVING AND PLAY AREAS, 3RD EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    THIS PAMPHLET DISCUSSES THE ALTERNATIVE METHODS, APPLICATIONS, AND TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR OFF-STREET PAVING AND PLAY AREAS. OFF-STREET PAVING INCLUDES--(1) ASPHALT-PAVED PARKING AREAS, (2) ROOF DECK PARKING AREAS, (3) ASPHALT-PAVED DRIVEWAYS, (4) ASPHALT-PAVED SERVICE STATION LOTS, AND (5) SIDEWALKS. THE DISCUSSION OF PLAY AREAS…

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Manufacturing (Coating) Operations 2 Table 2 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Area Sources: Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Other Requirements and... AAAAAAA of Part 63—Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations For * * *...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Manufacturing (Coating) Operations 2 Table 2 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Area Sources: Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Other Requirements and... AAAAAAA of Part 63—Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations For * * *...

  14. Asphalt mounds and associated biota on the Angolan margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel O. B.; Walls, Anne; Clare, Michael; Fiske, Mike S.; Weiland, Richard J.; O'Brien, Robert; Touzel, Daniel F.

    2014-12-01

    Release of hydrocarbons from sediments is important in increasing habitat heterogeneity on deep ocean margins. Heterogeneity arises from variation in abiotic and biotic conditions, including changes in substratum, geochemistry, fluid flow, biological communities and ecological interactions. The seepage of heavy hydrocarbons to the seafloor is less well studied than most other cold seep systems and may lead to the formation of asphalt mounds. These have been described from several regions, particularly the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we describe the structure, potential formation and biology of a large asphalt mound province in Block 31SE Angola. A total of 2254 distinct mound features was identified by side-scan sonar, covering a total area of 3.7 km2 of seafloor. The asphalt mounds took a number of forms from small (<0.5 m diameter; 13% observations) mounds to large extensive (<50 m diameter) structures. Some of the observed mounds were associated with authigenic carbonate and active seepage (living chemosynthetic fauna present in addition to the asphalt). The asphalt mounds are seabed accumulations of heavy hydrocarbons formed from subsurface migration and fractionation of reservoir hydrocarbons primarily through a network of faults. In Angola these processes are controlled by subsurface movement of salt structures. The asphalt mounds were typically densely covered with epifauna (74.5% of mounds imaged had visible epifauna) although individual mounds varied considerably in epifaunal coverage. Of the 49 non-chemosynthetic megafaunal taxa observed, 19 taxa were only found on hard substrata (including asphalt mounds), 2 fish species inhabited the asphalt mounds preferentially and 27 taxa were apparently normal soft-sediment fauna. Antipatharians (3.6±2.3% s.e.) and poriferans (2.6±1.9% s.e.) accounted for the highest mean percentage of the observed cover, with actinarians (0.9±0.4% s.e.) and alcyonaceans (0.4±0.2% s.e.) covering smaller proportions of the area

  15. Recycling of plastic and rubber tire waste in asphalt pavements

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.R.; Lee, N.K.; Hesp, S.A.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses some important issues related to the use of recycled thermoplastics and rubber tire waste in asphalt binders for hot-mix pavements. Both high temperature rheological and low temperature fracture studies are presented on recycled polyethylene, devulcanized and crumb rubber-modified asphalt binders. The results are compared to unmodified and commercially available modified binders. This research is especially timely in light of the US Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, Section 1038 which, starting in 1995, will force state and local governments to use significant amounts of recycled rubber tire or plastic waste in federally funded highway projects. High temperature rheological measurements of the loss modulus, loss tangent and complex modulus show a significant improvement when only small quantities of crumb rubber, devulcanized crumb rubber or waste polyethylene are added to the asphalt binders. The low temperature fracture performance of the modified asphalts is greatly influenced by the interfacial strength between the dispersed and continuous phase. The fracture toughness increases dramatically, only when low molecular weight polymers are grafted in-situ onto the rubber and polymer dispersed phases in order to strength the interface. This points to a crack-pinning mechanism as being responsible for the dramatic increase in fracture toughness that is observed in this work. Single phase, devulcanized crumb rubber-asphalt systems perform quite poorly at low temperatures.

  16. Application of asphalt rubber technology to recreational trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Haifeng

    Crumb rubber aggregate was employed instead of stone/sand aggregate in asphalt pavement that was modified by fine rubber particles. Crumb rubber aggregate forms an elastic network in the asphalt, which improves the pavement's susceptibility to low-temperature cracking, and absorb more stress at the crack tips than the conventional asphalt pavement. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the tension/compression performance of a blend of asphalt rubber with rubber aggregate (ARRA). An optimum design methodology was introduced by examining the effect of asphalt source, curing temperature, curing time, rubber content, aggregate size, compaction pressure, and the effect of certain additives. At ambient temperature, the ARRA with equal amount of binder and aggregate exhibits good mechanical properties. Vestenamer helps improve the pavement's strength, stiffness, and fracture resistance to low temperature cracking. It was demonstrated that such pavement meets the mechanical requirements for recreational trails, such as bicycle, or pedestrian trails. ARRA is a viscoelastic material which exhibits time-dependent and loading rate-dependent behavior. Temperature is a key issue to its response to an external load. Both temperature and rate dependences were investigated. A series of uniaxial compression relaxation tests on ARRA or Vestenamer modified ARRA were conducted at room temperature to study the time-dependent performance of ARRA. Schapery's theory was applied to characterize the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of ARRA.

  17. Aqueous leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from bitumen and asphalt.

    PubMed

    Brandt, H C; de Groot, P C

    2001-12-01

    The application of bitumen in, e.g. asphalt roads, roofs and hydraulic applications will lead to the leaching of compounds from the bitumen/asphalt into the environment. Because polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in bitumen, static and dynamic leach tests have been performed to study the leaching behaviour of this class of compounds. Nine petroleum bitumens covering a representative range of commercially available products and one asphalt made from one of the bitumens have been tested in a static leach test. The asphalt has been also subjected to a dynamic leach test. The main conclusions are that a 30h dynamic leach test is sufficient to determine the equilibrium concentration that will be reached after bitumen or asphalt has been in contact with the water for more than 3-6 days. As an alternative to performing a leach test, this concentration can be calculated from the PAH concentrations in the bitumen, and their distribution coefficients, as calculated here, or from their aqueous solubilities. The equilibrium PAH concentrations in the leach water from bitumens stay well below the surface water limits that exist in several EEC-countries and are also more than an order of magnitude lower than the current EEC limits for potable water. PMID:11791850

  18. Performance evaluation of high modulus asphalt concrete mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Zaumanis, M.

    2016-04-01

    Dolomite is one of the most available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality (mainly, LA index). Therefore, mostly imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance to EN 13108-1 standard.

  19. Recovery and reuse of asphalt roofing waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, S.; Graziano, G.; Shepherd, P.

    1984-02-02

    Burning of asphalt roofing waste as a fuel and incorporating asphalt roofing waste in bituminous paving were identified as the two outstanding resource recovery concepts out of ten studied. Four additional concepts might be worth considering under different market or technical circumstances. Another four concepts were rated as worth no further consideration at this time. This study of the recovery of the resource represented in asphalt roofing waste has identified the sources and quantities of roofing waste. About six million cubic yards of scrap roofing are generated annually in the United States, about 94% from removal of old roofing at the job site and the remainder from roofing material production at factories. Waste disposal is a growing problem for manufacturers and contractors. Nearly all roofing waste is hauled to landfills at a considerable expense to roofing contractors and manufacturers. Recovery of the roofing waste resource should require only a modest economic incentive. The asphalt contained in roofing waste represents an energy resource of more than 7 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year. Another 1 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year may be contained in field-applied asphalt on commercial building roofs. The two concepts recommended by this study appear to offer the broadest applicability, the most favorable economics, and the highest potential for near-term implementation to reuse this resource.

  20. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample. PMID:21524677

  1. Effect of pyrolyzed carbon black on asphalt cement. Part 2. Asphalt binder. Final report, September 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Lovell, C.W.

    1996-02-20

    Scrap tires derived from automobiles have become a large environmental problem in the United States. In the study, research is carried out to investigate the potential use of tire-derived pyrolyzed carbon black from scrap tires as an asphalt cement modifier. The asphlat cements used in the research were AC10 and AC20. Penetration and softening point tests were performed to obtain the consistency of the asphalt cements. The pyrolyzed carbon black, as provided by Wolf Industries, was combined with the asphalt cement in the following percentages: 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. Penetration, softening point and ductility tests were performed to determine the temperature susceptibility of the modified binder as altered by the pyrolyzed carbon black. In order that the results are comparable to previous testing, commercial carbon black purchased from CABOT Industry was also used as a modifier in the tests. The same test procedures were applied to the asphalt cements modified by commercial carbon black. The test results contained in the report illustrate the viability of the pyrolyzed carbon black as an asphalt modifier. Recommendations are provided to facilitate further research on this particular project. A preliminary assessment of a test road using the pyrolyzed carbon is appended.

  2. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1980 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Buelt, J.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Elmore, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Studies of asphalt emulsion sealants conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have demonstrated that the sealants are effective in containing radon and other potentially hazardous material within uranium tailings. The laboratory and field studies have further demonstrated that radon exhalation from uranium tailings piles can be reduced by greater than 99% to near background levels. Field tests at the tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado, confirmed that an 8-cm admix seal containing 22 wt% asphalt could be effectively applied with a cold-mix paver. Other techniques were successfully tested, including a soil stabilizer and a hot, rubberized asphalt seal that was applied with a distributor truck. After the seals were applied and compacted, overburden was applied over the seal to protect the seal from ultraviolet degradation.

  3. Deformation Parameters and Fatigue of the Recycled Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šrámek, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    The deformational properties of asphalt mixtures measured by dynamic methods and fatigue allow a design the road to suit the expected traffic load. Quality of mixtures is also expressed by the resistance to permanent deformation. Complex modulus of stiffness and fatigue can reliably characterize the proposed mixture of asphalt pavement. The complex modulus (E*) measurement of asphalt mixtures are carried out in laboratory of Department of Construction Management at University of Žilina by two-point bending test method on trapezoid-shaped samples. Today, the fatigue is verified on trapezoid-shaped samples and is assessed by proportional strain at 1 million cycles (ɛ6). The test equipment and software is used to evaluate fatigue and deformation characteristics.

  4. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers.

  5. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt.

  6. Test of LOX compatibility for asphalt and concrete runway materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyers, C. V.; Bryan, C. J.; Lockhart, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A literature survey and a telephone canvass of producers and users of LOX is reported which yielded one report of an accident resulting from a LOX spill on asphalt, one discussion of hazardous conditions, and an unreferenced mention of an incident. Laboratory tests using standard LOX impact apparatus yielded reactions with both old and new alphalt, but none with concrete. In the final test, using a larger sample of asphalt, the reaction caused extensive damage to equipment. Initial field experiments using 2-meter square asphalt slabs covered with LOX, conducted during rainy weather, achieved no reaction with plummets, and limited reaction with a blasting cap as a reaction initiator. In a final plummet-initiated test on a dry slab, a violent reaction, which appeared to have propagated over the entire slab surface, destroyed the plummet fixture and threw fragments as far as 48 meters.

  7. Evaluation of products recovered from scrap tires for use as asphalt modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, J.

    1992-05-01

    Western Research Institute performed rheological tests and water sensitivity tests on asphalt cements that had been modified with carbonous residues obtained from the pyrolysis of scrap tires and waste motor oil. These tests are part of an ongoing program at the University of Wyoming Chemical Engineering Department to evaluate, as asphalt additives, solid carbonous products recovered from the scrap tire and waste motor oil pyrolysis experiments conducted at the University. The tests showed that carbonous residues increased the viscosity and decreased the elasticity of AC-10 and AC-20 asphalts. The tests also indicatedthat asphalt cements modified with carbonous residues were less sensitive to water damage and age embrittlement than unmodified asphalt cements.

  8. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOEpatents

    Pauli, Adam T.; Robertson, Raymond E.; Branthaver, Jan F.; Schabron, John F.

    2012-08-07

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  9. Energy conservation through recycling of factory asphalt roofing waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, P.B.; Powers, T.J. . Manville Technical Center); Hardy, J.; Maloof, R.; Patenaude, C.; Zilfi, J. )

    1989-12-31

    Prior DOE laboratory research showed that it was possible to recover the energy resource represented in factory shingle waste. This waste could be processed and recycled into the asphalt composition used to make new shingles. This bench-scale research concluded that factory experiments were all that were needed to provide a basis for commercial implementation. The project reported here completed that full scale research. Factory fiber glass shingle waste was processed to a form suitable for recycling. The processed waste was then mixed into the asphalt used to make new shingles. Process parameters and shingle quality were measured to provide a basis for commercial implementation.

  10. Asphalt roofing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy modified bitumen

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    A Request for Emissions Testing at Four Asphalt Roofing and Processing Facilities was submitted by the US EPA Emission Standards Division (ESD), Minerals and Inorganic Chemicals Group (MICG) to the Emission Measurement Center (EMC). The Emission Measurement Center directed Midwest Research Institute (MRI) to conduct emissions testing at asphalt roofing plants. This report presents results of MRI`s FTIR and Method 25A testing conducted at US Intec in Port Arthur, Texas. The field measurements were performed in September 1997 under several test conditions for both controlled and uncontrolled emissions.

  11. Final environmental and regulatory assessment of using asphalt as a sealant in mine shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This report discusses the properties of asphalt, the current regulatory status governing asphalt and future regulatory implications which may be pertinent in using asphalt as a waterproof shaft sealant. An understanding of the inherent organic composition of asphalt, an increase in the number of health and environmental research publications conducted on asphalt and an examination of the apparent trend of regulatory agencies toward more stringent environmental regulation governing the use of organic materials suggests asphalt could become regulated at a future time. This would only occur, however, if asphalt was found to conform to the present regulatory definitions of pollutants, contaminants or hazardous substances or if asphalt was included on a regulated substance list. In this regard, the study points out that asphalt contains very low levels of hazardous poly-nuclear aromatics (PNA's). These levels are significantly lower than the levels present in coal tars, a substance known to contain high levels of hazardous PNA's. Asphalt, however, has the inherent potential of producing higher concentrations of PNA's if the adverse condition of cracking should occur during the refinery production stage or on-site preparation of the asphalt. Also, unless existing control technology is applied, emission levels of sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, particulates and volatile organic carbons from the on-site preparation facilities could approach the permissible health standard levels of EPA. The study indicates, however, that available literature is limited on these issues.

  12. Criteria for asphalt-rubber concrete in civil airport pavements: Mixture design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, F. L.; Lytton, R. L.; Hoyt, D.

    1986-07-01

    A mixture design procedure is developed to allow the use of asphalt-rubber binders in concrete for flexible airport pavement. The asphalt-rubber is produced by reacting asphalt with ground, scrap tire rubber to produce the binder for the asphalt-rubber concrete. Procedures for laboratory preparation of alsphalt-rubber binders using an equipment setup that was found by researchers to produce laboratory binders with similar properties to field processes are included. The rubber-asphalt concrete mixture design procedure includes adjustments to the aggregate gradation to permit space for the rubber particles in the asphalt-rubber binder as well as suggested mixing and compaction temperatures, and compaction efforts. While the procedure was used in the laboratory to successfully produce asphalt-rubber concrete mixtures, it should be evaluated in the field to ensure that consistent results can be achieved in a production environment.

  13. Effects of asphalt rejuvenator on thermal and mechanical properties on oxidized hot mixed asphalt pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Nicholas A.; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of asphalt rejuvenator, and its effectiveness for restoring thermal and mechanical properties was investigated via Disk-shaped Compact Tension (DC(T)) and acoustic emission (AE) testing for determining mechanical properties and embrittlement temperatures of the mixtures. During the DC(T) testing the fracture energies and peak loads were used to measure the resistance of the rejuvenated asphalt to low temperature cracking. The AE testing monitored the acoustic emission activity while the specimens were cooled from room temperature to -40 °C to estimate the temperature at which thermal cracking began (i.e. the embrittlement temperature). First, a baseline response was obtained by obtaining the mechanical and thermal response of virgin HMA samples and HMA samples that had been exposed to oxidative aging for 36 hours at 135°C. The results showed the virgin samples had much higher peak loads and fracture energies than the 36 hours aged samples. Acoustic Emission showed similar results with the virgin samples having embrittlement temperatures 10 °C cooler than the 36 hours aged specimens. Then, overaged for 36 hours specimens were treated different amounts of rejuvenator (10%, 15%, and 20% by weight of binder content) and left to dwell for increased amount of time periods varying from one to eight weeks. It was observed that the AE results showed an improvement of embrittlement temperature with increasing with the dwell times. The 8 weeks specimens had cooler embrittlement temperatures than the virgin specimens. Finally, the low temperature effects on fracture energy and peak load of the rejuvenated asphalt was investigated. Rejuvenator was applied (10% by weight of binder) to specimens aged 36 hours at 135 °C, and the dwell time was varied from 1 to 4 weeks. The results showed that the peak loads were restored to levels of the virgin specimens, and the fracture energies improved to levels beyond that of the virgin specimens. The results also showed a

  14. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt. PMID:27115043

  15. Coal tar-containing asphalt - resource or hazardous waste?

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson-Skold, Y.; Andersson, K.; Lind, B.; Claesson, A.; Larsson, L.; Suer, P.; Jacobson, T.

    2007-09-30

    Coal tar was used in Sweden for the production of asphalt and for the drenching of stabilization gravel until 1973. The tar has high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), some of which may be strongly carcinogenic. Approximately 20 million tonnes of tar-containing asphalt is present in the public roads in Sweden. Used asphalt from rebuilding can be classified as hazardous waste according to the Swedish Waste Act. The cost of treating the material removed as hazardous waste can be very high due to the large amount that has to be treated, and the total environmental benefit is unclear. The transport of used asphalt to landfill or combustion will affect other environmental targets. The present project, based on three case studies of road projects in Sweden, evaluates the consequences of four scenarios for handling the material: reuse, landfill, biological treatment, and incineration. The results show that reuse of the coal tar-containing materials in new road construction is the most favorable alternative in terms of cost, material use, land use, energy consumption, and air emissions.

  16. Assessment of Water Quality of Runoff from Sealed Asphalt Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses the results of runoff tests from recently-sealed asphalt surfaces conducted at EPA's Urban Watershed Research Facility (UWRF) in Edison, New Jersey. Both bench-scale panels and full-scale test plots were evaluated. Full-scale tests were performed on an asp...

  17. Asphalt and Wood Shingling. Roofing Workbook and Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Arthur

    This combination workbook and set of tests contains materials on asphalt and wood shingling that have been designed to be used by those studying to enter the roofing and waterproofing trade. It consists of seven instructional units and seven accompanying objective tests. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: shingling…

  18. Leaching of organic contaminants from storage of reclaimed asphalt pavement.

    PubMed

    Norin, Malin; Strömvall, A M

    2004-03-01

    Recycling of asphalt has been promoted by rapid increases in both the use and price of petroleum-based bitumen. Semi-volatile organic compounds in leachates from reclaimed asphalt pavement, measured in field samples and in laboratory column test, were analysed through a GC/MS screen-test methodology. Sixteen PAH (polyaromatic hydrocarbons) were also analysed in leachates from the column study. The highest concentrations of semi-volatile compounds, approximately 400 microg l(-1), were measured in field samples from the scarified stockpile. Naphthalene, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) were the most dominant of the identified semi-volatiles. The occurrence of these compounds in urban groundwater, also indicate high emission rates and persistent structures of the compounds, making them potentially hazardous. Car exhausts, rubber tires and the asphalt material itself are all probable emission sources, determined from the organic contaminants released from the stockpiles. The major leaching mechanism indicated was dissolution of organic contaminants from the surface of the asphalt gravels. In the laboratory column test, the release of high-molecular weight and more toxic PAH was higher in the leachates after two years than at the commencement of storage. The concentrations of semi-volatiles in leachates, were also several times lower than those from the field stockpile. These results demonstrate the need to follow up laboratory column test with real field measurements. PMID:15176747

  19. Paleomagnetism of paleozoic asphaltic deposits in southern Oklahoma, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, Brooks B.; Crick, Rex E.

    1988-05-01

    Paleomagnetic measurements on asphaltic samples from two formations in southern Oklahoma have been performed. A bioclastic unit from the Boggy Formation, known as the Buckhorn asphalt, exhibited a stable, characteristic remanent moment (RM) after A.F. demagnetization between 5-20 mT. We infer from our data that very fine, possibly authigenic magnetite, like that shown to have a genetic relationship with the migration through rocks of hydrocarbons [Elmore et al., 1987], is the primary RM carrier in these samples. The tilt corrected paleopole for the Buckhorn asphalt (121.9 E; 43.5N; δp=1.3 δm=2.3) falls on the Early Permian Apparent Polar Wander Path for North America of Irving and Irving [1982], using a 30 Ma window (270-280 Ma). Because the Boggy Form-ation, containing the Buckhorn asphalt, was depos-ited during the Late Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian), we interpret the data to indicate magnetization during minor uplift in the Early Permian of the Arbuckle Mountain region. The RM appears to have been acquired at this time, probably as the result of magnetite production facilitated by the introduction time of sulfate reducing bacteria.

  20. The Asphalt Identikit: Old Age and the Driver's License.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhandler, Susan A.

    1990-01-01

    Used a recent study of older adults (N=50) from a small community to explore use of the "asphalt identikit" (possession of a valid driver's license and driving) to maintain non-age-related and hence unstigmatized identity. Found resistance to giving up driving was strong even as self-imposed limits curtailed driving. (Author/TE)

  1. Effect of gilsonite-modified asphalt on hot-mix asphaltic concrete mixes used in District 12, Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.; Ho, M.K.

    1990-06-01

    Gilsonite is a naturally occurring black hydrocarbon from Utah with a high asphaltene content and an unusual amount of nitrogen compounds. Because of its composition, it is believed that the addition of gilsonite will increase the viscosity, stability, water susceptibility and durability of the asphalt mix. The District 12 laboratory conducted tests on two hot mix designs using gilsonite-modified asphalts. A control batch and batches containing 4%, 6% and 8% gilsonite by weight of asphalt were tested. The appropriate gilsonite-aggregate mixtures were molded and evaluated for stability, specific gravity, indirect tensile strength and water susceptibility. From the results of the laboratory tests, it was evident that gilsonite-modified asphalt mixes did increase dry and wet tensile strength but did not increase H veem stability. Since there is no overwhelming proof of gilsonite's ability as an anti-stripping agent, it has been recommended that gilsonite be used with an anti-stripping agent to combat stripping and rutting. It is further recommended that the field performance of gilsonite be evaluated before approval is given for its use.

  2. Relating tensile, bending, and shear test data of asphalt binders to pavement performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.S.; Tsai, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Eight different asphalt binders representing a wide range of applications for pavement construction were tested in uniaxial tension, bending, and shear stresses. Theoretical analyses were performed in this study to covert the data from the three engineering tests to stiffness moduli for predicting pavement performance. At low temperatures, high asphalt stiffness may induce pavement thermal cracking; thus, the allowable maximum stiffness was set at 1,000 MPa. At high temperatures, low asphalt stiffness may lead to pavement rutting (ruts in the road); master curves were constructed to rank the potential for rutting in the asphalts. All three viscoelastic functions were shown to be interchangeable within the linear viscoelastic region. When subjected to large deformation in the direct tension test, asphalt binders behaved nonlinear viscoelastic in which the data under bending, shear and tension modes were not comparable. The asphalts were, however, found toe exhibit linear viscoelasticity up to the failure point in the steady-state strain region.

  3. SGC tests for influence of material composition on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Li, Yuzhi

    2013-01-01

    Compaction characteristic of the surface layer asphalt mixture (13-type gradation mixture) was studied using Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) simulative compaction tests. Based on analysis of densification curve of gyratory compaction, influence rules of the contents of mineral aggregates of all sizes and asphalt on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures were obtained. SGC Tests show that, for the mixture with a bigger content of asphalt, its density increases faster, that there is an optimal amount of fine aggregates for optimal compaction and that an appropriate amount of mineral powder will improve workability of mixtures, but overmuch mineral powder will make mixtures dry and hard. Conclusions based on SGC tests can provide basis for how to adjust material composition for improving compaction performance of asphalt mixtures, and for the designed asphalt mixture, its compaction performance can be predicted through these conclusions, which also contributes to the choice of compaction schemes. PMID:23818830

  4. SGC Tests for Influence of Material Composition on Compaction Characteristic of Asphalt Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Compaction characteristic of the surface layer asphalt mixture (13-type gradation mixture) was studied using Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) simulative compaction tests. Based on analysis of densification curve of gyratory compaction, influence rules of the contents of mineral aggregates of all sizes and asphalt on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures were obtained. SGC Tests show that, for the mixture with a bigger content of asphalt, its density increases faster, that there is an optimal amount of fine aggregates for optimal compaction and that an appropriate amount of mineral powder will improve workability of mixtures, but overmuch mineral powder will make mixtures dry and hard. Conclusions based on SGC tests can provide basis for how to adjust material composition for improving compaction performance of asphalt mixtures, and for the designed asphalt mixture, its compaction performance can be predicted through these conclusions, which also contributes to the choice of compaction schemes. PMID:23818830

  5. Influence of limestone fillers on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar for pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke; Zhu, Kai; Wu, Hao; Han, Jun; Wang, Jin-Chang; Huang, Zhi-Yi; Liang, Pei

    2014-07-01

    Asphalt materials will be ignited and release significant toxic fumes within tunnel fires. Thus, combustion characteristics of asphalt materials used in road tunnel should be studied in order to limit such an adverse effect. In the present work we study the influence of limestone fillers on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar by thermogravimetric and kinetic analysis. It is shown that the combustion of asphalt mortar is not just a linear superposition of asphalt and limestone. The limestone will increase the ignition point and the activation energy of the primary volatile release, and will catalyze the char formation from the primary volatile release. Kinetic analysis shows that the primary volatile release stage of asphalt mortar combustion can be explained by a three-dimensional diffusion model, the secondary volatile release and char combustion stage can be explained by a model under the assumption of random nucleation and nuclei growth, whereas the limestone decomposition stage appears to follow the one-dimensional phase boundary model.

  6. Hanford protective barriers program: Status of asphalt barrier studies - FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1989-11-01

    The Hanford Protective Barrier Program is evaluating alternate barriers to provide a means of meeting stringent water infiltration requirements. One type of alternate barrier being considered is an asphalt-based layer, 1.3 to 15 cm thick. Evaluations of these barriers were initiated in FY 1988, and, based on laboratory studies, two asphalt formulations were selected for further testing in small-tube lysimeters: a hot rubberized asphalt and an admixture of cationic asphalt emulsion and concrete sand containing 24 wt% residual asphalt. Eight lysimeters containing asphalt seals were installed as part of the Small Tube Lysimeter Test Facility on the Hanford Site. Two control lysimeters containing Hanford sand with a surface gravel treatment were also installed for comparison. 5 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Plancher, Henry; Petersen, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

  8. The reinforcement and healing of asphalt mastic mixtures by rejuvenator encapsulation in alginate compartmented fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaković, A.; Post, W.; Cantero, D.; Copuroglu, O.; Garcia, S. J.; Schlangen, E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the potential use of compartmented alginate fibres as a new method of incorporating rejuvenators into asphalt pavement mixtures. The compartmented fibres are employed to locally distribute the rejuvenator and to overcome the problems associated with spherical capsules and hollow fibres. The work presents proof of concept of the encapsulation process which involved embedding the fibres into the asphalt mastic mixture and the survival rate of fibres in the asphalt mixture. To prove the effectiveness of the alginate as a rejuvenator encapsulating material and to demonstrate its ability survive asphalt production process, the fibres containing the rejuvenator were prepared and subjected to thermogravimetric analysis and uniaxial tensile test. The test results demonstrated that fibres have suitable thermal and mechanical strength to survive the asphalt mixing and compaction process. The CT scan of an asphalt mortar mix containing fibres demonstrated that fibres are present in the mix in their full length, undamaged, providing confirmation that the fibres survived the asphalt production process. In order to investigate the fibres physiological properties and ability to release the rejuvenator into cracks in the asphalt mastic, the environmental scanning electron microscope and optical microscope analysis were employed. To prove its success as an asphalt healing system, compartmented alginate fibres containing rejuvenator were embedded in asphalt mastic mix. The three point bend tests were performed on the asphalt mastic test samples and the degree to which the samples began to self-heal in response was measured and quantified. The research findings indicate that alginate fibres present a promising new approach for the development of self-healing asphalt pavement systems.

  9. Rapid repair of wet asphaltic concrete using fly ash. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Cherem-Sacal, D.; Price, D.A.; Fowler, D.W.; Meyer, A.H.

    1985-11-01

    During periods of wet weather, particularly when it is also cold, asphalt pavements develop potholes that cannot be immediately repaired with conventional asphalt materials. Materials are needed that can be successfully used to repair asphalt pavements in wet, or cold and wet, weather. The materials should be of reasonable cost and have at least a moderate life of one to three years. The work described in this volume is a summary of the research done on fly ash as part of the study.

  10. Feasibility of the use of ultrasound measurements for grade verification of the performance grade asphalt binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Mehdi

    This research investigates the feasibility of application of high frequency immersion ultrasonic measurement (UM) to discriminate different performance grade (PG) asphalt binders. PG asphalt binder is one of the main components of hot mix asphalt used for roadway construction. UT may provide an inexpensive alternative to sophisticated tests currently used for quality control of PG asphalt binders. Nine different PG asphalt binders used were selected for this investigation. Velocity (V) and integrated response (IR) of the ultrasonic wave were measured. The IR is a measure of the ratio of ultrasonic energy transmitted into the material to the ultrasonic energy reflected from the surface of material, in decibels. The physical properties of PG asphalt binders are temperature sensitive. Accordingly, the UM was performed at five temperatures. The results indicate that velocity decrease with increase in temperature of the asphalt binder. UT could distinguish between modified and non-modified asphalt binders. Discriminant Function Analysis was used to predict the grade of the performance grade asphalt binders using the UM.

  11. An atomistic-based chemophysical environment for evaluating asphalt oxidation and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tongyan; Sun, Lu; Yu, Qifeng

    2012-12-01

    Asphalt binders in service conditions are subject to oxidative aging that involves the reactions between oxygen molecules and the component species of bulk asphalt. As a result, significant alterations can occur to the desired physical and/or mechanical properties of asphalt. A common practice to alleviate asphalt aging has been to employ different chemical additives or modifiers as antioxidants. The current state of knowledge in asphalt oxidation and antioxidant evaluation is centered on determining the degradation of asphalt physical properties, mainly the viscosity and ductility. Such practices, although meeting direct engineering needs, do not contribute to the fundamental understanding of the aging and anti-oxidation mechanisms, and thereby developing anti-aging strategies. From this standpoint, this study was initiated to study the chemical and physical bases of asphalt oxidation, as well as the anti-oxidation mechanisms of bio-based antioxidants using the coniferyl-alcohol lignin as an example. A quantum chemistry (QC) based chemophysical environment is developed, in which the various chemical reactions between asphalt component species and oxygen, as well as the incurred physical changes are studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to validate the modified and unmodified asphalt models. PMID:22772829

  12. Laboratory and field evaluation of hot mix asphalt with high contents of reclaimed asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Winkle, Clinton Isaac

    Currently in Iowa, the amount of RAP materials allowed for the surface layer is limited to 15% by weight. The objective of this project was to develop quality standards for inclusion of RAP content higher than 15% in asphalt mixtures. To meet Superpave mix design requirements, it was necessary to fractionate the RAP materials. Based on the extensive sieve-by-sieve analysis of RAP materials, the optimum sieve size to fractionate RAP materials was identified. To determine if the higher percentage of RAP materials than 15% can be used in Iowa's state highway, three test sections with 30.0%, 35.5% and 39.2% of RAP materials were constructed on Highway 6 in Iowa City. The construction of the field test sections was monitored and the cores were obtained to measure field densities of test sections. Field mixtures collected from test sections were compacted in the laboratory in order to test the moisture sensitivity using a Hamburg Wheel Tracking Device. The binder was extracted from the field mixtures with varying amounts of RAP materials and tested to determine the effects of RAP materials on the PG grade of a virgin binder. Field cores were taken from the various mix designs to determine the percent density of each test section. A condition survey of the test sections was then performed to evaluate the short-term performance.

  13. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  14. Use of waste toner in asphaltic concrete. Research report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Solaimanian, M.; Kennedy, T.W.; McGennis, R.B.

    1997-02-01

    Every year, a tremendous amount of toner is produced for copiers and printers by toner manufacturing companies throughout the United States. Some of this toner does not meet quality specifications and consequently becomes a waste product of the manufacturing process. This manufacturing waste, along with the spent toner (residue) from copiers and printer cartridges, is dumped into landfills for lack of a better way utilizing the material. A cooperative research project undertaken by the Texas Department of Transportation and The University of Texas at Austin investigated the feasibility and potential benefits of utilizing waste toner in hot-mix asphalt concrete. The research program included procuring a number of different waste and spent toners, blending them with asphalt cement at different ratios, and evaluating the binder and mixtures properties resulting from the waste toner addition.

  15. Utilization of waste tires in asphaltic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amirkhanian, S.N.; Burati, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The research project was divided into two sections: laboratory phase and field phase. In the laboratory phase the use of crumb rubber utilizing the `wet` method was investigated. A total of 360 laboratory-prepared Marshall specimens were made and tested. The materials used to prepare the specimens were typical of those used for Type 1A Surve mixtures used by SC DOT. The experimental design consisted of using three aggregate sources, three antistrip additives, and four rubber percentages (i.e., 0%, 12%, 15%, and 18% by weight of asphalt cement). The indirect tensile strengths, tensile strength ratio, visual strip rating, percent air voids, and bulk specific gravities were determined and statistically analyzed. The results indicated that, in general, as the rubber percentage increased, the strength decreased. However, the specimens containing antistrip additives had a higher increase in strength compared to that of the virgin materials. In addition, the optimum asphalt content generally increased as the rubber percentage increased.

  16. Assessment of asphalt mixtures characteristics through GPR testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Jorge; Fernandes, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Road pavements are composed by granular and asphalt layers, placed over the pavement subgrade, which are designed to resist to traffic and climatic effects. Pavement distresses include permanent deformation mainly due to the contribution of the subgrade and fatigue cracking in the asphalt layers. Fatigue cracking is the main pavement distress and is responsible for the main rehabilitations carried out in road pavements which leads, in most cases, to the pavement reconstruction due to the severity of the cracking observed in many roads. For a given aggregate gradation, the fatigue cracking resistance is related to the proportions of the components in the asphalt mixtures, namely the void content and the binder content. Also the presence of water, or moisture, has an important influence in the fatigue resistance, and its effect is characterized by a reduction in the fatigue cracking resistance. The characteristics of the asphalt mixtures applied in road pavements can be assessed in laboratory through the testing of cores extracted from the pavement. These cores are extracted some representative section of the pavement, usually equally spaced in the road. Due to the construction process, the representative sections of the pavement don't allow to identify the quality of the whole pavement. Thus, the use of continuous measurement is essential to ensure the perfect assessment of the pavement quality and the use of the GPR assumes a paramount importance. Thus, this communication presents several GPR tests carried out on pavement slabs produced in laboratory with different void content, binder content and moisture content in order to establish different classifiers that will allow the identification of this condition during regular inspections. Furthermore, tests carried on specimens before and after fatigue tests will allow to calculate similar parameters to estimate the state of conservation of pavements in terms of stiffness and the presence of cracks. This work is a

  17. Experimental AC (Asphalt Concrete) overlays of PCC pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. D.

    1983-11-01

    A series of experimental asphalt concrete (AC) overlays was constructed over an existing distressed portland cement concrete pavement on Interstate 80 near Boca, California. The experimental overlays included rubberized dense-graded AC, rubberized open-graded AC, a rubber flush coat interlayer, dense-graded AC with short polyester fibers and Bituthene interlayer strips. The report presents a description and discussion of AC mix batching, construction observations, laboratory testing, overlay covering, and initial performance evaluation.

  18. Analyzing the influence of manufacturing conditions of reclaimed asphalt concrete on the characteristics of the asphalt binder: development of a gradual binder extraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navaro, J.; Bruneau, D.; Drouadaine, I.; Pouteau, B.; Colin, J.; Dony, A.

    2012-05-01

    When asphalt concrete is manufactured incorporating a high percentage (almost 70%) of reclaimed materials from the deconstruction of road surfaces under renovation, and when the corresponding production device is designed specifically to reduce the energy input need (lowering the production temperature), the resulting manufacturing process contributes to the protection of the environment and reduces production costs. However, to meet the quality requirements of the finished product, virgin materials of appropriate quality and quantity must also be added (mineral aggregates and new asphalt binder) and control systems set up to quantify and optimize the parameters involved (thus avoiding the guess work which still often prevails today). It was for this reason that a new experimental technique described here was devised, which will ultimately be used in asphalt concrete production plants. The technique involves lixiviating reclaimed asphalt concrete using a chlorinated solvent; the resulting solute is collected gradually, then the mixture of binders (virgin and reclaimed asphalt concrete) can be characterized and their mass fractions quantified using a combination of UV and IR spectrometry. With this experimental technique we were able to assess the extent to which the reclaimed asphalt pavement binder participates in the agglomeration and cohesion of the reclaimed asphalt concrete. This assessment was made in terms of the main parameters in the production process, temperature of the materials and mixing time.

  19. Airborne exposures to PAH and PM2.5 particles for road paving workers applying conventional asphalt and crumb rubber modified asphalt.

    PubMed

    Watts, R R; Wallingford, K M; Williams, R W; House, D E; Lewtas, J

    1998-01-01

    Personal exposure monitoring was conducted for road paving workers in three states. A research objective was to characterize and compare occupational exposures to fine respirable particles (< 2.5 microns) and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for road paving workers applying conventional (petroleum derived) asphalt and asphalt containing crumb rubber from shredded tires. Workers not exposed to asphalt fume were also included for comparison (to support the biomarker component of this study). The rubber content of the crumb rubber modified (CRM) asphalt at the three study sites was 12, 15, and 20%. A comparison of some specific job categories from two sites indicates greater potential carcinogenic PAH exposures during CRM asphalt work, however, the site with the greatest overall exposures did not indicate any differences for specific jobs. A statistical analysis of means for fine particle, pyrene and total carcinogenic PAH personal exposure shows, with two exceptions, there were no differences in exposures for these three measurement variables. One site shows significantly elevated pyrene exposure for CRM asphalt workers and another site similarly shows greater carcinogenic PAH exposure for CRM asphalt workers. Conventional and CRM asphalt worker airborne exposures to the PAH carcinogen marker, BaP, were very low with concentrations comparable to ambient air in many cities. However, this study demonstrates that asphalt road paving workers are exposed to elevated airborne concentrations of a group of unknown compounds that likely consist of the carcinogenic PAHs benz(a)anthracene, chrysene and methylated derivatives of both. The research described in this article has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. PMID:9577752

  20. Evaluation of energies of interaction correlated with observed stabilities and rheological properties of asphalt-aggregate mixtures of western shale-oil residue as a modifier to petroleum asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Tauer, J.E.; Ensley, E.K.; Harnsberger, P.M.; Robertson, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of improving bonding and aging characteristics using a distillation residue from the Green River Formation (western) shale oil as a modifier to a petroleum asphalt for use as a crack and joint filler material in portland cement concrete and asphaltic pavements. This study was to examine the differences in moisture damage resistance and adhesion properties, as measured by bonding energy, of shale-oil modified asphalts compared with non-modified asphalts. The shale-oil modified asphalts mechanical properties were not expected to match those of the rubberized asphalt. A commercially available rubberized asphalt crack and joint filler material was also tested only for comparison of mechanical properties. Portland cement concrete briquets prepared with an asphalt material sandwiched between two concrete wafers were tested in a stress-relaxation type of experiment to evaluate the relaxation and recovery properties of the sealant materials. Energy of interaction (bonding energy) measurements were performed on asphalt materials with portland cement concrete, two silicate aggregates, and a limestone aggregate to evaluate the compatibility of the asphalt materials with various aggregates. The results show that the shale-oil modified petroleum asphalt improved the relaxation time, percent recovery, and bonding energy compared with the petroleum asphalt.

  1. Thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified asphalt concrete mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Amy Louise

    Thermal cracking is one of the primary forms of distress in asphalt concrete pavements, resulting from either a single drop in temperature to an extreme low or from multiple temperature cycles above the fracture temperature of the asphalt-aggregate mixture. The first mode described is low temperature cracking; the second is thermal fatigue. The addition of crumb-rubber, manufactured from scrap tires, to the binder in asphalt concrete pavements has been suggested to minimize both types of thermal cracking. Four experiments were designed and completed to evaluate the thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified (CRM) asphalt-aggregate mixtures. Modified and unmodified mixture response to thermal stresses was measured in four laboratory tests. The Thermal Stress Restrained Specimen Test (TSRST) and the Indirect Tensile Test (IDT) were used to compare mixture resistance to low temperature cracking. Modified mixtures showed improved performance, and cooling rate did not affect mixture resistance according to the statistical analysis. Therefore results from tests with faster rates can predict performance under slower field rates. In comparison, predicted fracture temperatures and stresses (IDT) were generally higher than measured values (TSRST). In addition, predicted fracture temperatures from binder test results demonstrated that binder testing alone is not sufficient to evaluate CRM mixtures. Thermal fatigue was explored in the third experiment using conventional load-induced fatigue tests with conditions selected to simulate daily temperature fluctuations. Test results indicated that thermal fatigue may contribute to transverse cracking in asphalt pavements. Both unmodified and modified mixtures had a finite capacity to withstand daily temperature fluctuations coupled with cold temperatures. Modified mixtures again exhibited improved performance. The fourth experiment examined fracture properties of modified and unmodified mixtures using a common fracture toughness test

  2. Acute effects and exposure to organic compounds in road maintenance workers exposed to asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Norseth, T.; Waage, J.; Dale, I. )

    1991-01-01

    Subjective symptoms and exposure to organic compounds were recorded in road repair and construction workers. Abnormal fatigue, reduced appetite, laryngeal/pharyngeal irritation, and eye irritation were recorded more often in such workers handling asphalt than in a corresponding reference group without asphalt exposure. Mean daily exposure to volatile compounds was only occasionally above 1 ppm. Mean exposure to asphalt fume was 0.358 mg/m3. There was no correlation between symptoms and total amount of volatile compounds, but a significant positive correlation was demonstrated between symptoms and some substances. The highest correlation was found for 1, 2, 4 trimethyl benzene. Symptoms increased with increasing asphalt temperature and with increasing concentrations of asphalt fumes. Amine addition did not increase the sum of symptoms, but soft asphalt seems to result in fewer symptoms than the harder types. Symptoms were not related to external factors like weather, traffic density, or specific working operations. As preventive measures, asphalt temperature should be kept below 150 degrees C, fume concentrations below 0.40 mg/m3, and if possible, the use of harder asphalt types which also require high temperatures should be avoided.

  3. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations 2 Table 2 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment... AAAAAAA of Part 63—Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations For * * *...

  4. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties Using Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Eshan V.

    2009-01-01

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional…

  5. Remedial investigation/feasibility study analysis asphalt storage area, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.S.

    1993-01-01

    This report is focused on an abandoned material storage area located on Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB), Alaska. The site is located approximately 2000 feet from the east end of the east/west runway and includes approximately 25 acres. The site was used for asphalt storage and preparation activities during the 1940s and 1950s. Approximately 4,500 drums of asphalt and 29 drums of unknown materials have been abandoned at the site. The drums are located in 32 areas throughout the 25-acre site. Following several decades of exposure to the elements, many of the drums have corroded and leaked to the ground surface. Several acres of soil are inundated with liquid asphalt that has leaked from the drums. Depths of the asphalt range from 6 to 10 inches in areas where surface anomalies have created depressions, and thus a collection point for the asphalt. A 14-x 18-x 4 foot wood frame pit used to support previous asphalt operations is located at the north end of the site. The pit contains approximately 2300 gallons of asphalt. There are also locations where the soil appears to be contaminated by petroleum products other than asphalt.

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... following emission limits * * * 1. Blowing stills a. Limit PAH emissions to 0.003 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills;or b. Limit PM emissions to 1.2 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills....

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... following emission limits * * * 1. Blowing stills a. Limit PAH emissions to 0.003 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills;or b. Limit PM emissions to 1.2 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills....

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... following emission limits * * * 1. Blowing stills a. Limit PAH emissions to 0.003 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills;or b. Limit PM emissions to 1.2 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills....

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following emission limits * * * 1. Blowing stills a. Limit PAH emissions to 0.003 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills;or b. Limit PM emissions to 1.2 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills....

  10. Feasibility of using 100% Recycled Asphalt Pavement mixtures for road construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Russell Edgar, IV

    Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) is the largest recycled good in the United States and 80 million tons are recycled yearly, saving taxpayers about $1.5 billion dollars. This paper explores the possibility of utilizing 100% RAP materials in asphalt pavement. Asphalt mixtures are produced at 135°C in a typical asphalt plant. However, at 135°C, not all binder from RAP materials may not become effective for coating aggregates. The main objective of the study is to determine the amount of effective binder available from RAP in the asphalt plant. The 100% RAP mixes have aged binder that can alter mix designs and interaction with virgin binder. In this study, to determine low temperature cracking resistance and fatigue performance, samples were prepared using a 100% RAP mix with no virgin binder and a 100% RAP mix with virgin asphalt binder to achieve the optimum binder content of the mix. Second, to determine the effectiveness of binder from RAP materials, compaction tests were performed by heating RAP materials at various temperatures. It was found that 100% RAP mixes cannot be feasible for field use if additional virgin binder is added to reach the optimum asphalt content. Based on limited test results, the low temperature grade was not within proper limits but the beam fatigue testing results were acceptable. Based on compaction test results, additional heating is needed to increase the effectiveness of asphalt binder from RAP materials.

  11. 75 FR 12988 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Asphalt Processing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... the asphalt processing and asphalt roofing manufacturing area source category (74 FR 63236). Following... specified in Executive Order 13132, Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999). This action does not..., Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). This...

  12. Damage detection and artificial healing of asphalt concrete after trafficking with a load simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M.; Arraigada, M.; Partl, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    Artificial healing of asphalt concrete by induction heating requires the addition of electrically conductive and/or magnetic materials into the asphalt mixture. Hence, bitumen can be heated up by an alternating electromagnetic field, decreasing therefore its viscosity and allowing it to flow for closing cracks and recover bonding among the mineral aggregates.

  13. Furfural modified asphalt obtained by using a Lewis acid as a catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Memon, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    Asphalt is solid or semi-solid at room temperature, becomes soft and starts flowing upon heating, and becomes hard and brittle at very low temperatures. States have been facing problems such as cracking, rutting, and asphalt adhesion to aggregates in their asphaltic pavements for years. Many polymer additives have been used in asphalt to reduce these problems, but little work has been done using chemically modified products of asphalt to attempt to solve these serious problems of asphalt pavements. The above mentioned problems decrease the life of the pavements, resulting in an increase of maintenance and/or replacement costs. There are two types of cracking which can occur in asphalt pavement; one related to load, and the other related to thermal stress. The load-related cracking is known as fatigue cracking and is defined as fracture under repeated or cyclic stress having a maximum value of less than the tensile strength of the material. The thermal cracking occurs due to pavement shrinkage at low temperature causing the shrinkage stresses to exceed the tensile strength. FHWA researchers have found furfural to be a suitable candidate for functional group modification of asphalt. The modified product shows improved performance as well as improved rheological properties.

  14. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations 2 Table 2 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment... AAAAAAA of Part 63—Emission Limits for Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing (Coating) Operations For * * *...

  15. City finds new efficiencies in hot in-place asphalt recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This article reviews the experience of Boulder, Colorado, in recycling asphalt pavement in place during repair of a major city artery. The method used was able to recover, level and compact one inch of the existing roadway while filling potholes, cracks and other surface defects with asphaltic patching material. There was considerable savings in materials, cost and down-time for the roadway section.

  16. Airborne Exposures to Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds Among Workers in Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Trumbore, David C; Osborn, Linda V; Johnson, Kathleen A; Fayerweather, William E

    2015-01-01

    We studied exposure of 151 workers to polycyclic aromatic compounds and asphalt emissions during the manufacturing of asphalt roofing products-including 64 workers from 10 asphalt plants producing oxidized, straight-run, cutback, and wax- or polymer-modified asphalts, and 87 workers from 11 roofing plants producing asphalt shingles and granulated roll roofing. The facilities were located throughout the United States and used asphalt from many refiners and crude oils. This article helps fill a gap in exposure data for asphalt roofing manufacturing workers by using a fluorescence technique that targets biologically active 4-6 ring polycyclic aromatic compounds and is strongly correlated with carcinogenic activity in animal studies. Worker exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds were compared between manufacturing plants, at different temperatures and using different raw materials, and to important external benchmarks. High levels of fine limestone particulate in the plant air during roofing manufacturing increased polycyclic aromatic compound exposure, resulting in the hypothesis that the particulate brought adsorbed polycyclic aromatic compounds to the worker breathing zone. Elevated asphalt temperatures increased exposures during the pouring of asphalt. Co-exposures in these workplaces which act as confounders for both the measurement of total organic matter and fluorescence were detected and their influence discussed. Exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds in asphalt roofing manufacturing facilities were lower than or similar to those reported in hot-mix paving application studies, and much below those reported in studies of hot application of built-up roofing asphalt. These relatively low exposures in manufacturing are primarily attributed to air emission controls in the facilities, and the relatively moderate temperatures, compared to built-up roofing, used in these facilities for oxidized asphalt. The exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds was a very

  17. Reinforcement of asphalt concrete pavement by segments of exhausted fiber used for sorption of oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashevich, V. N.; Efanov, I. N.

    2015-01-01

    The paper is aimed at construction of the experimental road pavement made of dispersed reinforced asphalt concrete. Electronic paramagnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy and fluorescent bitumen studies were used to prove that disperse reinforcement of asphalt concrete mixtures with fibers of exhausted sorbents reduce the selective filtration of low polymeric fractions of petroleum bitumen and improve its properties in the adsorption layer. Sesquioxides are neutralized as catalysts aging asphalt binder. This leads to improvement in the elasticity of bitumen films at low temperatures and provide better crack resistance of coatings to reduce the intensity of the aging of asphalt binder, and, therefore, to increase the durability of road pavements. The experimental road pavement made of dispersed reinforced asphalt concrete operated during 4 years and demonstrated better transport- performance properties in comparison with the analogue pavements.

  18. Beneficial uses of recycled asphalt-stabilized products as landfill cover and capping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Camougis, G.

    1996-12-31

    The American Reclamation Corporation (AMREC{reg_sign}) has played a major role in the development of new programs for the recycling of discarded materials from construction, demolition, remediation and manufacturing operations. Excavated petroleum-contaminated soils (oily soils), asphalt paving, concrete rubble, and discarded asphalt roofing shingles have been processed and recycled into beneficially useful construction products. AMREC uses a cold-mix, asphalt-emulsion technology to process many of the recyclables received at its recycling facility in Charlton, MA. Recyclable materials are processed and blended to produce recycled, asphalt-stabilized products. In addition, recycled, asphalt-stabilized products are being investigated and tested for other beneficial uses. This includes their uses as capping materials and as containment materials.

  19. Characterization of asphalt cements modified with crumbed rubber from discarded tires. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, W.H.; Negulescu, I.I.

    1994-11-01

    The potential legislative requirement for incorporation of scrap rubber into asphalt blends mandated a thorough evaluation of the influence of scrap rubber additives on the physical properties and aging characteristics of rubber/asphalt blends. Blends with up to 20 percent ground vulcanized rubber (both crumb and 200 mesh powder particles) from recycled tires were prepared with asphalt cements of various grades (AC5 - AC30) and evaluated using DMA. Blends produced from powdered rubber particles exhibited Newtonian behavior at high temperatures; similar behavior was not observed with crumb rubber blends. The mechanical properties of asphalt-rubber blends depend upon the concentration of rubber additives, the particle dimensions, and the chemical composition of the asphalt.

  20. Drying of Porous Asphalt Concrete Investigated by X-Ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerjen, I.; Poulikakos, L. D.; Plamondon, M.; Schuetz, Ph.; Luethi, Th.; Flisch, A.

    Porous asphalt concrete is composed of aggregates, a bituminous binder and air voids which can form a complex network. Because rain water can easily drain through this network of voids, porous asphalt concrete is often used for improving the security of highways. However, porous asphalt concrete is often deteriorating fast due to its large contact area with environmental agents. A quantitative determination of the influence of rain water on the aging of porous asphalt concrete requires an understanding of water drainage and evaporation in the material. In this paper, the water evaporation rate in a sample of porous asphalt concrete was investigated by means of X-ray micro computed tomography. Discontinuities in the evaporation rate were observed. A qualitative inspection of the pore network allowed tentatively linking sudden acceleration of evaporation to the disappearance of water lids which were clogging pores.

  1. Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

    1995-09-01

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted by Western Research Institute (WRI). The ESO residue, have a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{lg_bullet}s at 60{degree}C (140{degree}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, ASD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, which are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a siliceous Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquettes. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquettes. The rheological analyses of the unaged petroleum-derived asphalts and their respective blends indicate that the samples satisfy the rutting requirement. However, the aging indexes for the rolling thin film oven (RTFO)-aged and RTFO/pressure aging vessel (PAV)-aged samples indicate that the blends are stiffer than the petroleum-derived asphalts. This means that when in service the blends will be more prone to pavement embrittlement and fatigue cracking than the petroleum-derived asphalts. Infrared analyses were also conducted on the three petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends before and after RTFO/PAV aging. In general, upon RTFO/PAV aging, the amounts of carbonyls and sulfoxides in the samples increase, indicating that the addition of the ESO residue does not mitigate the chemical aging (oxidation) of the petroleum-derived asphalts. This information correlates with the rheological data and the aging indexes that were calculated for the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends.

  2. Assessment of porous asphalt pavement performance: hydraulics and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, J. F.; Ballestero, T. P.; Roseen, R. M.; Houle, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study is to focus on the water quality treatment and hydraulic performance of a porous asphalt pavement parking lot in Durham, New Hampshire. The site was constructed in October 2004 to assess the suitability of porous asphalt pavement for stormwater management in cold climates. The facility consists of a 4-inch asphalt open-graded friction course layer overlying a high porosity sand and gravel base. This base serves as a storage reservoir in-between storms that can slowly infiltrate groundwater. Details on the design, construction, and cost of the facility will be presented. The porous asphalt pavements is qualitatively monitored for signs of distress, especially those due to cold climate stresses like plowing, sanding, salting, and freeze-thaw cycles. Life cycle predictions are discussed. Surface infiltration rates are measured with a constant head device built specifically to test high infiltration capacity pavements. The test measures infiltration rates in a single 4-inch diameter column temporarily sealed to the pavement at its base. A surface inundation test, as described by Bean, is also conducted as a basis for comparison of results (Bean, 2004). These tests assess infiltration rates soon after installation, throughout the winter, during snowmelt, after a winter of salting, sanding, and plowing, and after vacuuming in the spring. Frost penetration into the subsurface reservoir is monitored with a frost gauge. Hydrologic effects of the system are evaluated. Water levels are monitored in the facility and in surrounding wells with continuously logging pressure transducers. The 6-inch underdrain pipe that conveys excess water in the subsurface reservoir to a riprap pad is also continuously monitored for flow. Since porous asphalt pavement systems infiltrate surface water into the subsurface, it is important to assess whether water quality treatment performance in the subsurface reservoir is adequate. The assumed influent water quality is

  3. Dermal exposure and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene among asphalt roofing workers

    SciTech Connect

    McClean, M.D.; Rinehart, R.D.; Sapkota, A.; Cavallari, J.M.; Herrick, R.F.

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify significant determinants of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) among asphalt roofing workers and use urinary 1-hydroxyprene (1-OHP) measurements to evaluate the effect of dermal exposure on total absorbed dose. The study population included 26 asphalt roofing workers who performed three primary tasks: tearing off old roofs, putting down new roofs, and operating the kettle at ground level. During multiple consecutive work shifts, dermal patch samples were collected from the underside of each worker's wrists and were analyzed for PACs, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene (BAP). During the same work week, urine samples were collected at pre-shift, post-shift, and bedtime each day and were analyzed for 1-OHP (205 urine samples). Linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the dermal measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of exposure, and to evaluate urinary 1-OHP measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of total absorbed dose. Dermal exposures to PAC, pyrene, and BAP were found to vary significantly by roofing task and by the presence of an old coal tar pitch roof. For each of the three analytes, the adjusted mean dermal exposures associated with tear-off were approximately four times higher than exposures associated with operating the kettle. Exposure to coal tar pitch was associated with a 6-fold increase in PAC exposure, an 8-fold increase in pyrene exposure and a 35-fold increase in BAP exposure. The presence of coal tar pitch was the primary determinant of dermal exposure, particularly for exposure to BAP. However, the task-based differences that were observed while controlling for pitch suggest that exposure to asphalt also contributes to dermal exposures.

  4. Evaluation of the benefits of adding waste fiberglass roofing shingles to Hot-Mix asphalt. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulshafi, O.; Kedzierski, B.; Fitch, M.G.; Mukhtar, H.

    1997-07-03

    The decreased availability of landfills, growing concern over waste disposal, and rising cost of asphalt cement, resulted in an increased interest in incorporating waste asphalt roofing shingles in the production of asphalt concrete mixes. This project addressed Hot-Mix, surface course asphalt concrete mixes produced with an addition of waste fiberglass asphalt roofing shingles that were obtained from the shingle manufacturing process. A total of twenty-six asphalt concrete mixes were studied. The variables included: aggregate type, shingle producers, level of shingle addition (0, 5, 10, and 15%), and type of shingle size reduction. Properties of the produced asphalt concrete mixes were evaluated based on the results of applicable tests that were performed.

  5. Microstructural characterization of the chemomechanical behavior of asphalt in terms of aging and fatigue performance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Robert Grover

    The study of asphalt chemo-mechanics requires a basic understanding of the physical properties and chemical composition of asphalt and how these properties are linked to changes in performance induced by chemical modifications. This work uniquely implements the framework of chemo-mechanics by investigating two types of chemical modification processes, natural (oxidative aging) and synthetic (chemical doping) as they relate not only to macro-scale properties of asphalt binder but also to the asphalt microstructure and nanorheology. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and the extraction of nano-scale engineering properties, i.e. elastic modulus, relaxation modulus, and surface energy, as a method to predict performance related to the fatigue characteristics of asphalt binders by modeling intrinsic material flaws present amongst phase interfaces. It was revealed that oxidative aging induces substantial microstructural changes in asphalt, including variations in phase structure, phase properties, and phase distribution. It has also been shown that certain asphalt chemical parameters have a consistent and measureable effect on the asphalt microstructure that is observed with AFM. In fact, particular phases that emerged via chemical doping revealed a surprising correlation between oxidative aging and the saturates chemical parameter of asphalt in terms of how they explicitly impact durability and performance of asphalt. By implementing a crack initiation model---which requires measureable microstructural characteristics as an input parameter---it was found that microstructural flaws (depending on the extremity) can have a more profound impact on asphalt performance than the properties of the material located between the flaws. It was also discovered by comparing the findings to performance data in the Strategic Highway Research Program's (SHRP's) Materials Reference Library (MRL), that the crack initiation model

  6. Studies on Nigerian crudes. 3; Analysis of sulfurized asphalts

    SciTech Connect

    Oyekunle, L.O.; Onyehanere, L.N. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the residual asphalts obtained from three Nigerian medium crudes chemically treated with elemental sulfur at 210 to 250{degrees} C. The course of the reaction was followed by monitoring the growth of the asphaltene content of the products. The sulfurization reaction led to 5- to 10-fold increases in the asphaltene content of the products. The asphaltene content of one of the samples initially increased with temperature from 210 to 240{degrees}C. and then dropped sharply. The results obtained revealed that the optimum temperature of the sulfurization reaction was 240{degrees}C.

  7. Quantitative cancer risk assessment for occupational exposures to asphalt fumes during built-up roofing asphalt (BURA) operations.

    PubMed

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R; Mayfield, David B; Goodman, Julie E; Butler, Eric L; Nascarella, Marc A; Williams, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer qualitatively characterized occupational exposure to oxidized bitumen emissions during roofing as probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). We examine chemistry, exposure, epidemiology and animal toxicity data to explore quantitative risks for roofing workers applying built-up roofing asphalt (BURA). Epidemiology studies do not consistently report elevated risks, and generally do not have sufficient exposure information or adequately control for confounders, precluding their use for dose-response analysis. Dermal carcinogenicity bioassays using mice report increased tumor incidence with single high doses. In order to quantify potential cancer risks, we develop time-to-tumor model methods [consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dose-response analysis and mixtures guidelines] using the dose-time-response shape of concurrent exposures to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) as concurrent controls (which had several exposure levels) to infer presumed parallel dose-time-response curves for BURA-fume condensate. We compare EPA relative potency factor approaches, based on observed relative potency of BURA to B[a]P in similar experiments, and direct observation of the inferred BURA dose-time-response (scaled to humans) as means for characterizing a dermal unit risk factor. We apply similar approaches to limited data on asphalt-fume inhalation and respiratory cancers in rats. We also develop a method for adjusting potency estimates for asphalts that vary in composition using measured fluorescence. Overall, the various methods indicate that cancer risks to roofers from both dermal and inhalation exposure to BURA are within a range typically deemed acceptable within regulatory frameworks. The approaches developed may be useful in assessing carcinogenic potency of other complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic compounds. PMID:26515283

  8. Environmental impacts of asphalt mixes with electric arc furnace steel slag.

    PubMed

    Milačič, Radmila; Zuliani, Tea; Oblak, Tina; Mladenovič, Ana; Ančar, Janez Šč

    2011-01-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag can be used as an alternative high-quality material in road construction. Although asphalts with slag aggregates have been recognized as environmentally acceptable, there is a lack of data concerning the potential leaching of toxic Cr(VI) due to the highly alkaline media of EAF slag. Leaching of selected water extractable metals from slag indicated elevated concentrations of total chromium and Cr(VI). To estimate the environmental impacts of asphalt mixes with slag, leachability tests based on diffusion were performed using pure water and salt water as leaching agents. Compact and ground asphalt composites with natural aggregates, and asphalt composites in which the natural aggregates were completely replaced by slag were prepared. The concentrations of total chromium and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 6 mo. After 1 and 6 mo, the concentrations of some other metals were also determined in the leachates. The results indicated that chromium in leachates from asphalt composites with the addition of slag was present almost solely in its hexavalent form. However, the concentrations were very low (below 25 μg L) and did not represent an environmental burden. The leaching of other metals from asphalt composites with the addition of slag was negligible. Therefore, the investigated EAF slag can be considered as environmentally safe substitute for natural aggregates in asphalt mixes. PMID:21712585

  9. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Asphalt Pavement Construction: A Case Study in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feng; Sha, Aimin; Lin, Ruiyu; Huang, Yue; Wang, Chao

    2016-03-01

    In China, the construction of asphalt pavement has a significant impact on the environment, and energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from asphalt pavement construction have been receiving increasing attention in recent years. At present, there is no universal criterion for the evaluation of GHG emissions in asphalt pavement construction. This paper proposes to define the system boundaries for GHG emissions from asphalt pavement by using a process-based life cycle assessment method. A method for evaluating GHG emissions from asphalt pavement construction is suggested. The paper reports a case study of GHG emissions from a typical asphalt pavement construction project in China. The results show that the greenhouse gas emissions from the mixture mixing phase are the highest, and account for about 54% of the total amount. The second highest GHG emission phase is the production of raw materials. For GHG emissions of cement stabilized base/subbase, the production of raw materials emits the most, about 98%. The GHG emission for cement production alone is about 92%. The results indicate that any measures to reduce GHG emissions from asphalt pavement construction should be focused on the raw materials manufacturing stage. If the raw materials production phase is excluded, the measures to reduce GHG emissions should be aimed at the mixture mixing phase. PMID:27011196

  10. Rutting and Fatigue Cracking Resistance of Waste Cooking Oil Modified Trinidad Asphaltic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Rean; Ramjattan-Harry, Vitra; Mohamed, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    The influence of waste cooking oil (WCO) on the performance characteristics of asphaltic materials indigenous to Trinidad, namely, Trinidad Lake Asphalt (TLA), Trinidad Petroleum Bitumen (TPB), and TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blend, was investigated to deduce the applicability of the WCO as a performance enhancer for the base asphalt. The rheological properties of complex modulus (G∗) and phase angle (δ) were measured for modified base asphalt blends containing up to 10% WCO. The results of rheology studies demonstrated that the incremental addition of WCO to the three parent binders resulted in incremental decreases in the rutting resistance (decrease in G∗/sinδ values) and increases in the fatigue cracking resistance (decrease in G∗sinδ value). The fatigue cracking resistance and rutting resistance for the TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blends were between those of the blends containing pure TLA and TPB. As operating temperature increased, an increase in the resistance to fatigue cracking and a decrease in the rutting resistance were observed for all of the WCO modified asphaltic blends. This study demonstrated the capability to create customized asphalt-WCO blends to suit special applications and highlights the potential for WCO to be used as an environmentally attractive option for improving the use of Trinidad asphaltic materials. PMID:26336652

  11. The Potential of Heat Collection from Solar Radiation in Asphalt Solar Collectors in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddu, Salmia; Talib, Siti Hidayah Abdul; Itam, Zarina

    2016-03-01

    The implementation of asphalt solar collectors as a means of an energy source is being widely studied in recent years. Asphalt pavements are exposed to daily solar radiation, and are capable of reaching up to 70°C in temperature. The potential of harvesting energy from solar pavements as an alternative energy source in replace of non-renewable energy sources prone to depletion such as fuel is promising. In Malaysia, the sun intensity is quite high and for this reason, absorbing the heat from sun radiation, and then utilizing it in many other applications such as generating electricity could definitely be impressive. Previous researches on the different methods of studying the effect of heat absorption caused by solar radiation prove to be quite old and inaffective. More recent findings, on the otherhand, prove to be more informative. This paper focuses on determining the potential of heat collection from solar radiation in asphalt solar collectors using steel piping. The asphalt solar collector model constructed for this research was prepared in the civil engineering laboratory. The hot mixed asphalt (HMA) contains 10% bitumen mixed with 90% aggregates of the total size of asphalt. Three stainless steel pipes were embedded into the interior region of the model according to the design criteria, and then put to test. Results show that harvesting energy from asphalt solar collectors proves highly potential in Malaysia due its the hot climate.

  12. Size-dependent enrichment of waste slag aggregate fragments abraded from asphalt concrete.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Gardner, Kevin; Kida, Akiko

    2011-10-30

    Authors consider the environmental prospects of using melted waste slag as the aggregate for asphalt pavement. In particular, the enrichment of slag-derived fragments in fine abrasion dust particles originated from slag asphalt concrete and its size dependency were concerned. A series of surface abrasion tests for asphalt concrete specimens, containing only natural aggregates as reference or 30 wt% of substituted slag aggregates, were performed. Although two of three slag-asphalt concretes generated 1.5-3.0 times larger amount of abrasion dust than the reference asphalt concrete did, it could not be explained only by abrasion resistance of slag. The enrichment of slag-derived fragments in abrasion dust, estimated on the basis of the peak intensity of quartz and heavy metal concentrations, had size dependency for all slag-asphalt concretes. Slag-derived fragments were enriched in abrasion dust particles with diameters of 150-1000 μm. Enrichment factors were 1.4-2.1. In contrast, there was no enrichment in abrasion dust particles with diameter less than 75 μm. This suggests that prior airborne-size fragmentation of substituted slag aggregates does not need to be considered for tested slag aggregates when environmental risks of abrasion dust of slag-asphalt pavement are assessed. PMID:21868161

  13. Measurements of thermal and healing properties of nanoclay modified asphalt binders using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Dustin; Hawa, Takumi; Hossain, Zahid; Saha, Mrinal; Zaman, Musharraf

    2014-03-01

    A seven component molecular dynamics model has been developed to represent asphalt binder. The model has been developed to include the four major classes of molecules found in asphalt binders. The seven asphalt binder molecules were assembled with the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations force field (OPLS) and the Large-scale atomic/molecular massively parallel simulator (LAMMPS) was used to carry out all simulations. Diffusion and density values were determined to validate individual molecules; all values were within acceptable range. Diffusion values were also determined for each molecule while present in the asphalt binder mixture. Density of the asphalt binder was determined to compare to experimental results. Values appear to follow the same trend as seen in experimental results and were closer to experimental results than other asphalt binder models. A glass transition temperature of 263.59K was determined using the density results at nineteen temperatures and was found to be in an acceptable range. A nano-clay model has also been developed using Clay force field and combined with the asphalt binder model. Also, we have investigated how the nano-clay impacts thermal and healing properties of the binder.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Asphalt Pavement Construction: A Case Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Sha, Aimin; Lin, Ruiyu; Huang, Yue; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    In China, the construction of asphalt pavement has a significant impact on the environment, and energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from asphalt pavement construction have been receiving increasing attention in recent years. At present, there is no universal criterion for the evaluation of GHG emissions in asphalt pavement construction. This paper proposes to define the system boundaries for GHG emissions from asphalt pavement by using a process-based life cycle assessment method. A method for evaluating GHG emissions from asphalt pavement construction is suggested. The paper reports a case study of GHG emissions from a typical asphalt pavement construction project in China. The results show that the greenhouse gas emissions from the mixture mixing phase are the highest, and account for about 54% of the total amount. The second highest GHG emission phase is the production of raw materials. For GHG emissions of cement stabilized base/subbase, the production of raw materials emits the most, about 98%. The GHG emission for cement production alone is about 92%. The results indicate that any measures to reduce GHG emissions from asphalt pavement construction should be focused on the raw materials manufacturing stage. If the raw materials production phase is excluded, the measures to reduce GHG emissions should be aimed at the mixture mixing phase. PMID:27011196

  15. Rutting and Fatigue Cracking Resistance of Waste Cooking Oil Modified Trinidad Asphaltic Materials.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Rean; Ramjattan-Harry, Vitra; Mohamed, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    The influence of waste cooking oil (WCO) on the performance characteristics of asphaltic materials indigenous to Trinidad, namely, Trinidad Lake Asphalt (TLA), Trinidad Petroleum Bitumen (TPB), and TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blend, was investigated to deduce the applicability of the WCO as a performance enhancer for the base asphalt. The rheological properties of complex modulus (G (∗) ) and phase angle (δ) were measured for modified base asphalt blends containing up to 10% WCO. The results of rheology studies demonstrated that the incremental addition of WCO to the three parent binders resulted in incremental decreases in the rutting resistance (decrease in G (∗) /sinδ values) and increases in the fatigue cracking resistance (decrease in G (∗) sinδ value). The fatigue cracking resistance and rutting resistance for the TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blends were between those of the blends containing pure TLA and TPB. As operating temperature increased, an increase in the resistance to fatigue cracking and a decrease in the rutting resistance were observed for all of the WCO modified asphaltic blends. This study demonstrated the capability to create customized asphalt-WCO blends to suit special applications and highlights the potential for WCO to be used as an environmentally attractive option for improving the use of Trinidad asphaltic materials. PMID:26336652

  16. A review of changes in composition of hot mix asphalt in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Diane J; Marano, Kristin M; Nunes, Anthony P; Adams, Robert C

    2009-11-01

    This review researched the materials, methods, and practices in the hot mix asphalt industry that might impact future exposure assessments and epidemiologic research on road paving workers. Since World War II, the U.S. interstate highway system, increased traffic volume, transportation speeds, and vehicle axle loads have necessitated an increase in demand for hot mix asphalt for road construction and maintenance, while requiring a consistent road paving product that meets state-specific physical performance specifications. We reviewed typical practices in hot mix asphalt paving in the United States to understand the extent to which materials are and have been added to hot mix asphalt to meet specifications and how changes in practices and technology could affect evaluation of worker exposures for future research. Historical documents were reviewed, and industry experts from 16 states were interviewed to obtain relevant information on industry practices. Participants from all states reported additive use, with most being less than 2% by weight. Crumb rubber and recycled asphalt pavement were added in concentrations approximately 10% per unit weight of the mix. The most frequently added materials included polymers and anti-stripping agents. Crumb rubber, sulfur, asbestos, roofing shingles, slag, or fly ash have been used in limited amounts for short periods of time or in limited geographic areas. No state reported using coal tar as an additive to hot mix asphalt or as a binder alternative in hot mix pavements for high-volume road construction. Coal tar may be present in recycled asphalt pavement from historical use, which would need to be considered in future exposure assessments of pavers. Changes in hot mix asphalt production and laydown emission control equipment have been universally implemented over time as the technology has become available to reduce potential worker exposures. This work is a companion review to a study undertaken in the petroleum refining

  17. Glass Transition and Molecular Mobility in Styrene-Butadiene Rubber Modified Asphalt.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    2015-11-01

    Asphalt, a soft matter consisting of more than a thousand chemical species, is of vital importance for the transportation infrastructure, yet it poses significant challenges for microscopic theory and modeling approaches due to its multicomponent nature. Polymeric additives can potentially enhance the thermo-mechanical properties of asphalt, thus helping reduce the road repair costs; rational design of such systems requires knowledge of the molecular structure and dynamics of these systems. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the volumetric, structural, and dynamic properties of the neat asphalt as well as styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt systems. The volume-temperature behavior of the asphalt systems exhibited a glass transition phenomenon, akin to that observed in experiments. The glass transition temperature, room temperature density, and coefficient of volume thermal expansion of the neat asphalt systems so evaluated were in agreement with experimental data when the effect of the high cooling rate used in simulations was accounted for. While the volumetric properties of SBR modified asphalt were found to be insensitive to the presence of the SBR additive, the addition of SBR led to an increase in the aggregation of asphaltene molecules. Furthermore, addition of SBR caused a reduction in the mobility of the constituent molecules of asphalt, with the reduction being more significant for the larger constituent molecules. Similar to other glass forming liquids, the reciprocal of the diffusion coefficient of the selected molecules was observed to follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) behavior as a function of temperature. These results suggest the potential for using polymeric additives for enhancing the dynamic mechanical properties of asphalt without affecting its volumetric properties. PMID:26451630

  18. Habitat heterogeneity - biological association relationships in the asphalt volcano, SW Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, E.; Gaytan, A.

    2007-05-01

    A new class of cold seep, named asphalt volcano, was discovered in the Campeche Knolls region of the southern Gulf of Mexico, supporting chemosynthetic communities alike those lying at similar depth on the Angolan margin and the Barbados Prism suggesting an interesting longitudinal connectivity in the faunal components. The discovery of this novel deep-sea habitat has raised questions about diversity and process dynamics in this novel poorly described milieu. Results from two previous cruises jointly sponsored by German, US and Mexican funding agencies have allowed us to recognize the presence of large densities of background benthic megafauna, mainly represented by sea-cucumbers and galatheid crabs, which occupy diverse habitats in asphalt volcano and feed on microbial assemblages on the asphalt covering extended area. Asphalt displays different degrees of hardness suggesting ongoing activity of asphalt extrusion in the site that is reflected in biological benthic communities in different states succession and complexity. The fresh asphalt and the immediately surrounding soft sediment are colonized by mats of complex microbial assemblages where both background benthic megafauna and chemosynthetic tube worms and mussels aggregate. Our results focus on the diversity of the habitats associated with methane seepage through the example of geological structures in the asphalt volcano considering the small scale with the analysis of the relationships between biological assemblages and habitat heterogeneity assessing the role of the geological structure on biological communities. Bubbling of gas, oil and the content of thermogenic gas and gas hydrate in the asphalt suggests that the asphalt plays an important role as a reservoir of methane in this marginal deep sea.

  19. Group type analysis of asphalt by column liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Yang, J.; Xue, Y.; Li, Y.

    2008-07-01

    An improved analysis method for characterization of asphalt was established. The method is based on column chromatography technique. The asphalts were separated into four groups: saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes, quantitatively. About 0.1 g of sample was required in each analysis. About 20 mL of n-heptanes was used to separate out saturates first. Then about 35 mL of n-heptanes/dichloromethane (.5, v/v) mixture was used to separate out aromatics. About 30 mL of dichloromethane/tetrahydrofuran (1/3, v/v) mixture was used to separate out resin. The quality of the separation was confirmed by infrared spectra (IR) and {sup 1}H NMR analysis. The model compounds, tetracosan for saturates, dibenz(o)anthracen for aromatics, and acetanilide for resins were used for verification. The IR and {sup 1}H NMR analysis of the prepared fractions from the column liquid chromatography were in good agreement that of pure reagents.

  20. Leachability of dissolved chromium in asphalt and concrete surfacing materials.

    PubMed

    Kayhanian, Masoud; Vichare, Akshay; Green, Peter G; Harvey, John

    2009-08-01

    Leachate metal pollutant concentrations produced from different asphalt and concrete pavement surfacing materials were measured under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that, in general, the concentrations of most metal pollutants were below the reporting limits. However, dissolved chromium was detected in leachate from concrete (but not asphalt) specimens and more strongly in the early-time leachate samples. As the leaching continued, the concentration of Cr decreased to below or close to the reporting limit. The source of the chromium in concrete pavement was found to be cement. The concentration of total Cr produced from leachate of different cement coming from different sources that was purchased from retail distributors ranged from 124 to 641mug/L. This result indicates that the potential leachability of dissolved Cr from concrete pavement materials can be reduced through source control. The results also showed that the leachability of dissolved Cr in hardened pavement materials was substantially reduced. For example, the concentration of dissolved Cr measured in actual highway runoff was found to be much lower than the Cr concentration produced from leachate of both open and dense graded concrete pavement specimens under controlled laboratory study. It was concluded that pavement materials are not the source of pollutants of concern in roadway runoff; rather most pollutants in roadway surface runoff are generated from other road-use or land-use sources, or from (wet or dry) atmospheric deposition. PMID:19604624

  1. Performance/microstructure relationship of blends of asphalts with two incompatible polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lenoble, C. )

    1990-07-01

    Asphaltic binders highly modified with two incompatible polymers, a Styrene Butadiene Styrene triblock copolymer and an Atactic Polypropylene were studied. Using UV fluorescence reflexion microscopy it was shown that natural segregation of the polymers occurred in the binders and in order to obtain maximum effectiveness of both polymers there was an optimum in the polydispersity and mean value of the particle size distribution of the swollen SBS polymer. The fineness of the dispersion of the polymers and the cohesion at the asphalt/polymer phase were highly dependent upon the chemical composition of the asphalt.

  2. Recycling of asphalt mixtures containing crumb rubber. Final report, 1 September 1994-30 August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, B.E.; Tia, M.; Jonsson, G.; Setze, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    An investigation of the effects of Crumb Rubber Modifier (CRM) on asphalt binder and mixture properties was conducted to determine whether or not CRM would have a detrimental effect on the properties of recycled paving mixtures containing CRM RAP. Although CRM increased the viscosity and lowered the temperature susceptibility of the binder, the effect was not pronounced at CRM of 12 percent or less. Recycled structural asphalt mixtures containing 50 percent RAP with 12 percent CRM had essentially the same shear strength and air void content properties as a conventional asphalt mixture without any CRM. However, mixtures containing 18 percent or more CRM could have different properties which may affect recycling operations.

  3. Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (Contains a minimum of 160 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Influence of mixture characteristics on the oxidative aging of asphalt binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morian, Nathan E.

    The objective of this research effort focused on the evaluation of asphalt mixtures with respect to thermal cracking. Preliminary investigations soon indicated that a fundamental evaluation of thermal cracking was highly dependent upon the more complicated understanding of asphalt binder oxidation. The oxidation of asphalt binders within an asphalt mixture were understood to potentially be influenced by the mixture characteristics (i.e. air void levels, binder content, etc.) and aggregate properties (i.e. aggregate absorption, gradation, etc.). Therefore, this study was conducted in order to investigate and quantify the effects different aggregate sources and mixture properties may have on the oxidation and thermal cracking performance of asphalt mixtures. The investigation specifically focused on quantifying the oxidation of the asphalt binder alone and as part of the asphalt mixture when subjected to isothermal oven aging. The oxidation parameters of pan-aged asphalt binders were quantified, according to the standard of practice in the industry. These parameters were then compared to extracted and recovered mixture-aged asphalt binders to examine the influence of the main aggregate and mixture factors on the binder oxidation. The study observed differences between the pan-aged and mixture-aged asphalt binders in terms of oxidation kinetics, rheological measures, and the combined effect represented as the hardening susceptibility. Further evaluation of the binder oxidation based upon the dynamic modulus measures indicated marked influences of the mixture characteristics, the individual component materials, and the interactions between the investigated factors. Differentiation of the experimental factors was further identified by the newly developed low-temperature evaluation method, Uniaxial Thermal Stress and Strain Test (UTSST). The UTSST provides a fundamental approach to characterize the thermo-viscoelastic properties of asphalt mixtures permitting the

  5. Maturation trend in oils and asphalts of the Jordan Rift: Utilization of detailed vanadylporphyrin analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenshtat, Zeev; Sundararaman, Padmanabhan

    1989-12-01

    A comparison of analytical methods for porphyrin analysis shows that high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of intact vanadylporphyrins is more advantageous than, or superior to, mass spectral methods and is suited for routine analysis. HPLC has a higher resolving power compared with probe mass spectrometry. Detailed HPLC analysis of the vanadylporphyrins isolated from asphalts and oils from the Dead Sea area shows that the asphalts are products of early generation from an immature source rock. The light oils, Massada oil and Zuk Tamror, are more mature than the asphalts.

  6. Recovery of asphalt from methylene chloride and trichloroethylene by the abson method. Final report, November 1987-August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, K.D.; Kumari, D.; Tran, K.T.

    1989-11-01

    The objective of the in-house study was to determine if methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) can be used to recover asphalts using the Abson method (AASHTO T 170 and ASTM D 1856), and to compare its effects on recovered binder properties to those of trichloroethylene (C2HCl3). Current nationally standardized test procedures (AASHTO and ASTM) do not allow methylene chloride in the Abson method. Virgin paving grade asphalts and hardened asphalts were used in the evaluation. Hardened asphalts consisted of paving grade asphalts aged by the thin film oven procedure, paving grade asphalts extracted from aged loose mixtures and cores, and coating grade roofing asphalts. The following tests were performed before and after recovering the asphalts from trichloroethylene or methylene chloride: penetration at 25 C, viscosity at 60 C, viscosity at 135 C, high pressure gel permeation chromatography, and infrared spectral analysis. The data indicated that methylene chloride can be used to recover asphalts from mixtures using the Abson method. Both solvents had some statistically significant effects on some asphalt properties, but neither solvent could clearly be recommended over the other.

  7. Rheology of crumb-rubber modified asphalt binders and mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Vikas Rameshchandra

    Laboratory test procedures are presented to determine the rheological properties of crumb rubber modified asphalt (CRMA) binders and mixes. These tests provide simple, fast, and cost-effective alternatives to evaluate the performance (rutting and cracking potential) of binders and mixes used for pavement construction. Viscoelastic properties of CRMA binders are measured using dynamic shear analysis. Master curves were generated using the principle of time-temperature superposition to evaluate the effects of aging, rubber concentration, and curing conditions on the rheology of the modified binder. Results indicate that the rheology of CRMA binders can be divided into three regions of viscoelasticity: glassy region at high frequencies, transition/viscoelastic region at intermediate frequencies, and viscous region at low frequencies. Modification of the asphalt by addition of rubber leads to an improvement in both the high and low temperature properties, as reflected by changes in Gsp' and Gsp{''}, which causes the binder to have a greater resistance to specific pavement failure mechanisms. Both transient and dynamic properties of CRMA mixes were measured in the laboratory using the creep and recovery, direct tension, and frequency sweep tests. Rheological properties of the mix generated from the test data were compared to those of the binder to evaluate the effect of aging, rubber concentration, and curing conditions on mix performance. Several rheological parameters have been identified to characterize the rutting and cracking potential of mixes. A power law equation was found to give good correlations between several mix rheological parameters. Analysis of binder and mix failure energies show that work of cohesion of the binder is negligible compared to the failure energies. A unique relationship between Paris law material parameters has been confirmed. It is also shown that mix failure properties bear a one-to-one correlation with binder failure properties. Based

  8. Field Performance of Asphalt Pavements with New Technologies in Northern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faeth, Benjamin Michael

    The Regional Transportation Commission (RTC) of the Washoe Valley Area has been tasked to determine if three advanced asphalt pavement technologies and one modified aggregate gradation are suitable for implementation within Reno, Stead, and Sparks Nevada. This was accomplished through research and test roads and Intersections to determine if Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP), Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), Polymer-Modified Asphalt Binder, and the Type 2-R aggregate gradation were succeeding in their design plans. Over the course of several years the streets being used by RTC to test the technologies are succeeding within their design lifespans, and the Intersections being used to test the Type 2-R aggregate gradation are showing significant resistance to rutting. Due to the roads and Intersections not being more than 10 years old, these conclusions are subject to change over time.

  9. Determination of the biodegradation rate of asphalt for the Hanford grout vaults. Hanford Grout Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Luey, J.; Li, S.W.

    1993-04-01

    Testing was initiated in March 1991 and completed in November 1992 to determine the rate at which asphalt is biodegraded by microorganisms native to the Hanford Site soils. The asphalt tested (AR-6000, US Oil, Tacoma, Washington) is to be used in the construction of a diffusion barrier for the Hanford grout vaults. Experiments to determine asphalt biodegradation rates were conducted using three separate test sets. These test sets were initiated in March 1991, January 1992, and June 1992 and ran for periods of 6 months, 11 months, and 6 months, respectively. The experimental method used was one originally developed by Bartha and Pramer (1965), and further refined by Bowerman et al. (1985), that determined the asphalt biodegradation rate through the measurement of carbon dioxide evolved.

  10. Unsaturated zone moisture and vapor movement induced by temperature variations in asphalt barrier field lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J.; Fayer, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers are being considered for use at the Hanford Site to enhance the isolation of radioactive wastes from water, plant, and animal intrusion. Lysimeters were constructed to evaluate the performance of asphalt barrier formulations under natural environmental conditions. These lysimeters were constructed of 1.7-m lengths of PVC pipe that have a diameter of 30 cm. The lysimeters were filled with layers of gravel, coarse sand, and asphalt. The sand and gravel placed under the asphalt barrier were wet when installed. TOUGH was used to conduct simulations to assess the effect of temperature variations on moisture and vapor movement beneath the asphalt layer in field test lysimeters. All variables in TOUGH were converted to double precision so that simulations could be run on a Sun-4 UNIX workstation. A radially symmetric grid was used to simulate the lysimeter. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  11. A review on using crumb rubber in reinforcement of asphalt pavement.

    PubMed

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Ali, Asim Hassan; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdelaziz, Mahrez

    2014-01-01

    An immense problem affecting environmental pollution is the increase of waste tyre vehicles. In an attempt to decrease the magnitude of this issue, crumb rubber modifier (CRM) obtained from waste tyre rubber has gained interest in asphalt reinforcement. The use of crumb rubber in the reinforcement of asphalt is considered as a smart solution for sustainable development by reusing waste materials, and it is believed that crumb rubber modifier (CRM) could be an alternative polymer material in improving hot mix asphalt performance properties. In this paper, a critical review on the use of crumb rubber in reinforcement of asphalt pavement will be presented and discussed. It will also include a review on the effects of CRM on the stiffness, rutting, and fatigue resistance of road pavement construction. PMID:24688369

  12. SOLIDIFICATION AND THERMAL DEGRADATION OF TNT WASTE SLUDGES USING ASPHALT ENCAPSULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research is being conducted to investigate closure methods for lagoons containing TNT and RDX wastes (pink water). Research has included (1) an evaluation of existing asphalt encapsulation techniques for hazardous wastes, (2) an evaluation of alternative heating/mixing systems, (...

  13. Development of superior asphalt recycling agency: Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Glover, C.J.; Davison, R.R.; Lin, Moon-Sun; Chaffin, J.; Liu, Meng; Eckhardt, C.

    1996-04-01

    About every 12 years, asphalt roads must be reworked, and this is usually done by placing thick layers (hot-mix overlays) of new material on top of failed material, resulting in considerable waste of material and use of new asphalt binder. A good recycling agent is needed, not only to reduce the viscosity of the aged material but also to restore compatibility. Objective is to establish the technical feasibility (Phase I) of determining the specifications and operating parameters for producing high quality recycling agents which will allow most/all the old asphalt-based road material to be recycled. It is expected that supercritical fractionation can be used. The advanced road aging simulation procedure will be used to study aging of blends of old asphalt and recycling agents.

  14. A Review on Using Crumb Rubber in Reinforcement of Asphalt Pavement

    PubMed Central

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Ali, Asim Hassan; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdelaziz, Mahrez

    2014-01-01

    An immense problem affecting environmental pollution is the increase of waste tyre vehicles. In an attempt to decrease the magnitude of this issue, crumb rubber modifier (CRM) obtained from waste tyre rubber has gained interest in asphalt reinforcement. The use of crumb rubber in the reinforcement of asphalt is considered as a smart solution for sustainable development by reusing waste materials, and it is believed that crumb rubber modifier (CRM) could be an alternative polymer material in improving hot mix asphalt performance properties. In this paper, a critical review on the use of crumb rubber in reinforcement of asphalt pavement will be presented and discussed. It will also include a review on the effects of CRM on the stiffness, rutting, and fatigue resistance of road pavement construction. PMID:24688369

  15. Non-contact excitation of fundamental resonance frequencies of an asphalt concrete specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmarsson, Anders; Ryden, Nils; Birgisson, Björn

    2015-03-01

    Impact hammer and non-contact speaker excitation were applied to an asphalt concrete, a PVC-U and a concrete specimen to measure the fundamental longitudinal resonance frequency at different strain levels. The impact and the noncontact excitation methods resulted in similar resonance frequencies for the undamaged asphalt concrete and for the PVC-U specimen. However, the two excitation approaches gave different results for the concrete specimen, which was shown to have a nonlinear response to increasing strain levels. A reduction and a following recovery of the resonance frequency of the asphalt concrete were shown after the specimen was exposed to a small amount of damage. However, no fast nonlinear dynamics were observed for the asphalt concrete through the speaker measurements.

  16. Enhancing Asphalt Binder's Rheological Behavior and Aging Susceptibility Using Nano-Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Renaldo C.

    The life expectancy of Asphalt Binder (AB) has been negatively impacted by the harsh bombardment of UV rays. UV rays cause asphalt to oxidize faster which results in deterioration of asphalt rheological characteristics that can lead to pavement distresses. This study investigates the impact that nano-particles and bio modification have on the aging susceptibility of asphalt binder. As such, the following hypothesis was investigated: Introduction of nano particles to asphalt binder will reduce asphalt oxidation aging by increasing the inter layer spacing of the nano particles. Two nano scale materials were used for this study, nano-clay and bio-char as well as one micro scale material, silica fume. Nano-clay (Cloisite 30B) is a naturally occurring inorganic mineral. Bio-char is the waste product from bio-binder production. Bio-binder is produced from swine manure using a thermochemical conversion process. This process is then followed by a filtration procedure where the bio-char is produced. Chemical and physical properties of bio-char showed a significant presence of carbon which could in turn reduce the rate of asphalt oxidation. Silica Fume is an ultra-fine powder collected as a by-product of silicon and ferrosilicon alloy production and consists of spherical particles. In this study several mixtures are designed and evaluated using RV testing (Rotational Viscometer), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Nano-clay is blended at 2% and 4% by weight of dry mass, with and without bio-binder (5% by weight of dry mass). Bio-char is grinded to nano scale and added to the virgin asphalt binder (PG 64-22) at 2%, 5% and 10% by weight of dry mass. Silica Fume is added to virgin asphalt binder (PG 64-22) at 2%, 4% and 8% by weight of dry mass. The optimum percent of nano scale material that is added to virgin asphalt binder is expected to reduce aging susceptibility of asphalt binder, extending its service life.

  17. Laboratory evaluation of a chemical coupling agent to prevent debonding of asphalts from aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divito, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    Debonding of asphalt from mineral aggregates (stripping) was investigated. A silane coupling agent was compared with a well known, commercially available liquid antistrip (amine) in the immersion compression and double punch debonding tests on two Arizona mineral aggregate sources. The silane was used as a mineral aggregate pretreatment while the amine was added to the asphalt. It is indicated that the silane generally performed as well as the liquid antistrip or better.

  18. A multiscale model for predicting the viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cucalon, Lorena; Rahmani, Eisa; Little, Dallas N.; Allen, David H.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the accurate prediction of long term performance of asphalt concrete pavement requires modeling to account for viscoelasticity within the mastic. However, accounting for viscoelasticity can be costly when the material properties are measured at the scale of asphalt concrete. This is due to the fact that the material testing protocols must be performed recursively for each mixture considered for use in the final design.

  19. Time resolved analysis of water drainage in porous asphalt concrete using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, L D; Sedighi Gilani, M; Derome, D; Jerjen, I; Vontobel, P

    2013-07-01

    Porous asphalt as a road surface layer controls aquaplaning as rain water can drain through its highly porous structure. The process of water drainage through this permeable layer is studied using neutron radiography. Time-resolved water configuration and distribution within the porous structure are reported. It is shown that radiography depicts the process of liquid water transport within the complex geometry of porous asphalt, capturing water films, filled dead end pores and water islands. PMID:23500651

  20. Black curves and creep behaviour of crumb rubber modified binders containing warm mix asphalt additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Juan; Rodríguez-Alloza, Ana María; Giuliani, Felice

    2016-03-01

    Warm mix asphalt (WMA) is a new research topic in the field of road pavement materials. This technology allows lower energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by reducing compaction and placement temperatures of the asphalt mixtures. However, this technology is still under study, and the influence of the WMA additives has yet to be investigated thoroughly and clearly identified, especially in the case of crumb rubber modified (CRM) binders.

  1. Black curves and creep behaviour of crumb rubber modified binders containing warm mix asphalt additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Juan; Rodríguez-Alloza, Ana María; Giuliani, Felice

    2016-08-01

    Warm mix asphalt (WMA) is a new research topic in the field of road pavement materials. This technology allows lower energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by reducing compaction and placement temperatures of the asphalt mixtures. However, this technology is still under study, and the influence of the WMA additives has yet to be investigated thoroughly and clearly identified, especially in the case of crumb rubber modified (CRM) binders.

  2. Use of ground-penetrating radar for asphalt thickness determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubane, Bouzid; Fernando, Emmanuel; Ross, Stephen C.; Dietrich, Bruce T.

    2003-07-01

    A computer program, called TERRA (Thickness Evaluation of Roads by RAdar) was recently developed for estimating pavement layer thicknesses from ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. This program incorporates decision criteria for automated detection of layer interfaces, computation of layer thicknesses and a segmentation algorithm for delineating segments based on layer thicknesses. The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) initiated the present field study for an initial assessment of TERRA. Radar and core data were collected from several flexible pavement sections of Florida's roadway system. These sites were selected to represent the present Florida in-place mixes (Superpave and Marshall mixtures) and different asphalt layer thicknesses, which varied from approximately 50 to 300 mm (2 to 12 in). Radar data were collected at both highway speeds and in stationary mode. This paper presents a description of the data collection effort as well as the subsequent analysis and findings.

  3. Legionellosis Outbreak Associated with Asphalt Paving Machine, Spain, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Fenollar, José; Escribano, Isabel; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    From 1999 through 2005 in Alcoi, Spain, incidence of legionellosis was continually high. Over the next 4 years, incidence was lower, but an increase in July 2009 led health authorities to declare an epidemic outbreak. A molecular epidemiology investigation showed that the allelic profiles for all Legionella pneumophila samples from the 2009 outbreak patients were the same, thus pointing to a common genetic origin for their infections, and that they were identical to that of the organism that had caused the previous outbreaks. Spatial-temporal and sequence-based typing analyses indicated a milling machine used in street asphalt repaving and its water tank as the most likely sources. As opposed to other machines used for street cleaning, the responsible milling machine used water from a natural spring. When the operation of this machine was prohibited and cleaning measures were adopted, infections ceased. PMID:20735921

  4. Evaluation of the effects of crumb rubber and SBR on rutting resistance of asphalt concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Chuang-Tsair; Tia, Mang; Ruth, B.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the effects of addition of crumb rubber (CR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) on the rutting resistance of asphalt concrete. These two additives were blended with an AC-20 and an AC-30 grade asphalt cements at different levels of concentrations. These modified and unmodified asphalt blends were tested at intermediate and high temperatures to evaluate their rutting resistance characteristics. They were also used to make Florida type S-I structural surface mixtures. These mixtures were made into Marshall-size specimens by using Gyratory Testing Machine (GTM) equipped with air-roller to compact and density to three compaction levels which simulate three different conditions in the pavement. The FDOT`s (Florida Department of Transportation) Loaded Wheel Tester was also used to evaluate the rutting resistance of these asphalt mixtures. The test results indicate that the modified asphalt mixtures show relatively better rutting resistance and shear resistance as compared with the unmodified asphalt mixtures.

  5. A laboratory investigation on the use of framed asphalt for recycled bituminous pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M.

    1981-03-01

    The foaming characteristics of a selection of asphalts commonly used in construction in Indiana were recorded in terms of expansion ratio and half life. The performance of three of these asphalts as binders for a recycled bituminous paving mixture was evaluated using: (1) the Gyratory and the Marshall Compactive methods; (2) the Marshall stability testing procedure; and (3) the Hveem stability testing procedure. The effect of curing time and moisture on the stability of a recycled mix was also determined. A foaming temperature of 160 C (325 F) and an added water content of 2% were selected as the best conditions for optimum foam volume and half life. Excellent Marshall stability values were obtained with 0.5% and 1.0% foamed asphalt added to the recycled mixtures. Curing time had a marked effect on the lower additions of foamed asphalt. The effect of water decreases with increased amounts of foamed asphalt. Comparison of the Marshall Stability values and the Hveem Stability values indicates that the same optimum percent of foamed asphalt was obtained.

  6. Back-calculation of temperature parameters for determination of asphalt layer modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qinxi; Matsui, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Higashi, Shigeo

    2000-05-01

    The pavement elastic modulus of each layer was usually assumed not to be dependent on the environmental factors when the backcalculation of asphalt pavement was conducted from the measured surface deflections of FWD. However, it is well known that the elastic modulus of asphalt layer changes with the variation of temperature. Considering the influence of atmospheric temperature and radiant heat, the temperature distribution is nonlinear along the asphalt layer thickness, and has always been changed. Therefore, the distribution of elastic modulus in the asphalt layer has been considered to change as well. In this paper, we assume the elastic modulus distribution of the asphalt layer to vary with its temperature in terms of the exponential form. Based on the finite element method forward analysis, we propose a method to estimate a standard elastic modulus and temperature coefficient at 20 degrees Celsius for the asphalt layer from the backcalculation analysis. The corresponding FEM backcalculation program using Gauss-Newton method was developed to determine the pavement layer moduli and temperature dependent coefficient, in which the singular value decomposition (SVD) was used for the inverse analysis with scaling of unknown parameters. This method results in a smaller condition number that contributes to improvement of numerical stability. Both numerical simulation and measured data from FWD testing are used to demonstrate the potential applications of this method. As a result, the backcalculation procedure is less dependent on the user's initial values, fast in convergence rate and effective in the pavement engineering.

  7. Estimation of grain size in asphalt samples using digital image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Källén, Hanna; Heyden, Anders; Lindh, Per

    2014-09-01

    Asphalt is made of a mixture of stones of different sizes and a binder called bitumen, the size distribution of the stones is determined by the recipe of the asphalt. One quality check of asphalt is to see if the real size distribution of asphalt samples is consistent with the recipe. This is usually done by first extracting the binder using methylenchloride and the sieving the stones and see how much that pass every sieve size. Methylenchloride is highly toxic and it is desirable to find the size distribution in some other way. In this paper we find the size distribution by slicing up the asphalt sample and using image analysis techniques to analyze the cross-sections. First the stones are segmented from the background, bitumen, and then rectangles are fit to the detected stones. We then estimate the sizes of the stones by using the width of the rectangle. The result is compared with both the recipe for the asphalt and with the result from the standard analysis method, and our method shows good correlation with those.

  8. Investigation of Low Heat Accumulation Asphalt Mixture and Its Impact on Urban Heat Environment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianguang; Yang, Zhaoxu; Liang, Leilei

    2015-01-01

    This study is focused on investigating the effectiveness of low heat accumulation asphalt mixture and its impact on the urban heat environment. Infrared radiation experiments showed that the temperature of the asphalt mixture decreased with the increase in far-infrared radiant material. The results also revealed that, compared to asphalt with 0% far-infrared radiant content, the asphalt material with a certain ratio of far-infrared radiation material had higher stability at high and low temperatures as well as good water absorption capacity. The Marshall stability of the specimen mixed with 6% far-infrared radiant was higher by 12.2% and had a residual stability of up to 98.9%. Moreover, the low-temperature splitting tensile strength of the asphalt mixture with 6% far-infrared radiation material increased by 21.3%. The friction coefficient of the asphalt mixtures with 6% and 12% far-infrared radiation material increased by 17.7% and 26.9%, respectively. PMID:26222762

  9. Road Asphalt Pavements Analyzed by Airborne Thermal Remote Sensing: Preliminary Results of the Venice Highway

    PubMed Central

    Pascucci, Simone; Bassani, Cristiana; Palombo, Angelo; Poscolieri, Maurizio; Cavalli, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a fast procedure for evaluating asphalt pavement surface defects using airborne emissivity data. To develop this procedure, we used airborne multispectral emissivity data covering an urban test area close to Venice (Italy).For this study, we first identify and select the roads' asphalt pavements on Multispectral Infrared Visible Imaging Spectrometer (MIVIS) imagery using a segmentation procedure. Next, since in asphalt pavements the surface defects are strictly related to the decrease of oily components that cause an increase of the abundance of surfacing limestone, the diagnostic absorption emissivity peak at 11.2μm of the limestone was used for retrieving from MIVIS emissivity data the areas exhibiting defects on asphalt pavements surface.The results showed that MIVIS emissivity allows establishing a threshold that points out those asphalt road sites on which a check for a maintenance intervention is required. Therefore, this technique can supply local government authorities an efficient, rapid and repeatable road mapping procedure providing the location of the asphalt pavements to be checked.

  10. Investigation of Low Heat Accumulation Asphalt Mixture and Its Impact on Urban Heat Environment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianguang; Yang, Zhaoxu; Liang, Leilei

    2015-01-01

    This study is focused on investigating the effectiveness of low heat accumulation asphalt mixture and its impact on the urban heat environment. Infrared radiation experiments showed that the temperature of the asphalt mixture decreased with the increase in far-infrared radiant material. The results also revealed that, compared to asphalt with 0% far-infrared radiant content, the asphalt material with a certain ratio of far-infrared radiation material had higher stability at high and low temperatures as well as good water absorption capacity. The Marshall stability of the specimen mixed with 6% far-infrared radiant was higher by 12.2% and had a residual stability of up to 98.9%. Moreover, the low-temperature splitting tensile strength of the asphalt mixture with 6% far-infrared radiation material increased by 21.3%. The friction coefficient of the asphalt mixtures with 6% and 12% far-infrared radiation material increased by 17.7% and 26.9%, respectively. PMID:26222762

  11. Screening of crude oils for asphalt precipitation: Theory, practice, and the selection of inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, R.B. de; Leerlooyer, K.; Bergen, A.R.D. van ); Eigner, M.R.P.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a simple method to screen crude oils for their tendency to precipitate asphalt, which may cause problems during production. The method is based on a thermodynamic model of asphalt solubility, derived earlier by Flory and Huggins. The most important parameters in this model are the Hildebrand solubility parameters for oil and asphaltene, and their molar volumes. The oil parameters can all be correlated with the in-situ density of the crude. It is shown that heavy crudes usually will give fewer problems with asphalt precipitation, despite their higher asphaltene content, certainly if the reservoir pressure is close to bubblepoint pressure. Consequently, the tendency for asphalt precipitation is mainly determined by three parameters: the extent to which the crude is undersaturated with gas, the density of the crude at reservoir conditions, and its saturation with asphalt at downhole conditions. Apart from the simple screening method, more elaborate methods are described to assess the potential for asphalt precipitation more accurately; asphaltene analysis on produced reservoir fluid and tank oil; n-heptane titration of the tank oil; visual inspection of a bottom-hole sample in a high-pressure cell during pressure reduction; and dynamic flow tests on tank oil after n-heptane addition.

  12. A study on engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using filler with recycled waste lime.

    PubMed

    Sung Do, Hwang; Hee Mun, Park; Suk keun, Rhee

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on determining the engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using mineral fillers with recycled waste lime, which is a by-product of the production of soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)). The materials tested in this study were made using a 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% mixing ratio based on the conventional mineral filler ratio to analyze the possibility of using recycled waste lime. The asphalt concretes, made of recycled waste lime, hydrated lime, and conventional asphalt concrete, were evaluated through their fundamental engineering properties such as Marshall stability, indirect tensile strength, resilient modulus, permanent deformation characteristics, moisture susceptibility, and fatigue resistance. The results indicate that the application of recycled waste lime as mineral filler improves the permanent deformation characteristics, stiffness and fatigue endurance of asphalt concrete at the wide range of temperatures. It was also determined that the mixtures with recycled waste lime showed higher resistance against stripping than conventional asphalt concrete. It was concluded from various test results that a waste lime can be used as mineral filler and, especially, can greatly improve the resistance of asphalt concrete to permanent deformation at high temperatures. PMID:17408942

  13. Evaluation of Thermal Oxidative Aging Effect on the Rheological Performance of Modified Asphalt Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng

    Modified asphalt binder, which is combined by base binder and additive modifier, has been implemented in pavement industry for more than 30 years. Recently, the oxidative aging mechanism of asphalt binder has been studied for several decades, and appreciable finding results of asphalt binder aging mechanism were achieved from the chemistry and rheological performance aspects. However, most of these studies were conducted with neat binders, the research of aging mechanism of modified asphalt binder was limited. Nowadays, it is still highly necessary to clarify how the asphalt binder aging happens with the modified asphalt binder, what is the effect of the different modifiers (additives) on the binder aging process, how the rheological performance changes under the thermal oxidative aging conditions and so on. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of isothermal oxidative aging conditions on the rheological performance change of the modified and controlled asphalt binders. There were totally 14 different sorts of asphalt binders had been aged in the PAV pans in the air-force drafted ovens at 50°C, 60°C and 85°C for 0.5 day to 240 days. The Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) were used to perform the experiments. The analysis of rheological indices (Low shear viscosity-LSV, Crossover modulus-G*c, Glover-Rowe Parameter-G-R, DSR function-DSR Fn) as a function of carbonyl area (CA) was conducted. With the SBS modification, both of the hardening susceptibility of the rheological index-LSV and G-R decreases compared with the corresponding base binder. The TR increased the hardening susceptibility of all the rheological indexes. While for the G*c, SBS increases the slope of the most modified asphalt binders except A and B_TR_X series binders. The multiple linear regression statistical analysis results indicate that the oxidative aging conditions play an important role on the CA, and rheological performance

  14. Performance of the heavy fraction of pyrolysis oil derived from waste printed circuit boards in modifying asphalt.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Sun, Shuiyu; Zhong, Sheng; Li, Shenyong; Wang, Yi; Wu, Jiaqi

    2013-09-15

    The focus of this research was the development of efficient and affordable asphalt modifiers. Pyrolysis oil was produced as a byproduct from the pyrolysis of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). The high boiling point fraction was separated from the pyrolysis oil through distillation and is referred to as the heavy fraction of pyrolysis oil (HFPO). The HFPO was tested as an asphalt modifier. Three asphalt modifiers were tested: HFPO; styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR); and HFPO + SBR (1:1). The physical properties and road performance of the three modified asphalts were measured and evaluated. The results have shown that when the amount of modifier was less than 10%, the HFPO modified asphalt had the highest softening point of the three. The dynamic stability (DS) and water resistance of the asphalt mixture with the HFPO modified asphalt was 10,161 cycles/mm and 87.2%, respectively. The DS was much larger than for the HFPO + SBR and SBR modified asphalt mixtures. These results indicate that using HFPO as an asphalt modifier has significant benefits not only for road engineering but also for resource recycling. PMID:23644664

  15. About the sizes of elastomer particles in the asphalt concrete binder providing the maximum service life of pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, A. M.; Chekunaev, N. I.

    2014-05-01

    It is noted that the durability of asphalt concrete pavements is determined by the time of the trunk cracks formation in the polymer-containing composites - in the modified by elastomers (e.g., by rubber) bitumenous binder of asphalt. Developed by the authors previously the theory of the cracks propagation in heterosystems [1] has allowed to investigate the problem of the cracks propagation in the rubber-bitumen composite. This investigations show that most effectively to prevente the trunk cracks formation in asphalt concrete can ultrafine rubber particles (150-750 nm) in a bitumenos binder of asphalt.

  16. Effects of paving asphalt fume exposure on genotoxic and mutagenic activities in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Yin, X J; Frazer, D; Barger, M W; Siegel, P D; Millecchia, L; Zhong, B Z; Tomblyn, S; Stone, S; Ma, J K H; Castranova, V; Ma, J Y C

    2004-02-14

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of aerosols and vapors containing various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Previously, we have demonstrated that inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes resulted in dose-dependent induction of CYP1A1 with concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 and increased phase II enzyme quinone reductase activity in the rat lung. In the present study, the potential genotoxic effects of asphalt fume exposure due to altered lung microsomal enzymes were studied. Rats were exposed to air or asphalt fume generated under road paving conditions at various concentrations and sacrificed the next day. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and examined for DNA damage using the comet assay. To evaluate the systemic genotoxic effect of asphalt fume, micronuclei formation in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) was monitored. Lung S9 from various exposure groups was isolated from tissue homogenates and characterized for metabolic activity in activating 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) mutagenicity using the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 and YG1029. This study showed that the paving asphalt fumes significantly induced DNA damage in AM, as revealed by DNA migration in the comet assay, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the micronuclei formation in bone marrow PCEs was not detected even at a very high exposure level (1733 mg h/m3). The conversion of 2-AA to mutagens in the Ames test required lung S9-mediated metabolic activation in a dose-dependent manner. In comparison to the controls, lung S9 from rats exposed to asphalt fume at a total exposure level of 479+/-33 mg h/m3 did not significantly enhance 2-AA mutagenicity with either S. typhimurium YG1024 or YG1029. At a higher total asphalt fume exposure level (1150+/-63 mg h/m3), S9 significantly increased the mutagenicity of 2-AA as compared to the control. However, S9 from asphalt fume-exposed rats

  17. Investigation of mineral filler effects on the aging process of asphalt mastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Raquel

    Aging of asphalt binders is induced by chemical and/or physicochemical changes during production of pavement and throughout its service life. Although binder aging in pavement always occurs while binder is in contact with aggregates and mineral filler, in most laboratory aging studies, and in current specifications, asphalt binders are individually aged without accounting for aggregate induced interactions. Past research has had conflicting findings, attributing both mitigating and/or catalytic effects to the presence of mineral filler in asphalt binder with regards to oxidative aging. Thus, in the present study it was hypothesized that evaluation of asphalt oxidative aging without regard to interactive effect of the presence of mineral filler is inadequate as a specification tool. Effects of mineral fillers on oxidative aging of asphalt is investigated by means of accelerated aging of mastics (asphalt and fillers) in Pressure Aging Vessel (PAV). Testing matrix included aging evaluation of mastics containing different fillers content, mineralogy, and surface area. Results showed that low-temperature behavior of aged mastic can be modified by controlling filler concentration and type. Fillers acts as an agent adsorbing heavy fractions of asphalt binder, therefore reducing stiffness and changing glass-transition temperature. Also, during oxidative aging of asphalt binders and mastics, both diffusion and adsorption mechanisms play a role in the rate of aging of asphaltic material. A method to characterize the behavior of mastics with aging was also developed by monitoring the mastics |G*| aging index (ratio of complex modulus before and after aging). Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) testing results supported mentioned findings regarding |G*| changes, as the presence of mineral filler appears to decelerate the rate of production of larger molecular size oxidation products in the binder phase of mastics. Implication of the findings is that change in molecular size

  18. Effect of Crumb Rubber and Warm Mix Additives on Asphalt Aging, Rheological, and Failure Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Prashant

    Asphalt-rubber mixtures have been shown to have useful properties with respect to distresses observed in asphalt concrete pavements. The most notable change in properties is a large increase in viscosity and improved low-temperature cracking resistance. Warm mix additives can lower production and compaction temperatures. Lower temperatures reduce harmful emissions and lower energy consumption, and thus provide environmental benefits and cut costs. In this study, the effects of crumb rubber modification on various asphalts such as California Valley, Boscan, Alaska North Slope, Laguna and Cold Lake were also studied. The materials used for warm mix modification were obtained from various commercial sources. The RAF binder was produced by Imperial Oil in their Nanticoke, Ontario, refinery on Lake Erie. A second commercial PG 52-34 (hereafter denoted as NER) was obtained/sampled during the construction of a northern Ontario MTO contract. Some regular tests such as Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) and Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR), Multiple Stress Creep Recovery (MSCR) and some modified new protocols such as the extended BBR test (LS-308) and the Double-Edge Notched Tension (DENT) test (LS-299) are used to study, the effect of warm mix and a host of other additives on rheological, aging and failure properties. A comparison in the properties of RAF and NER asphalts has also been made as RAF is good quality asphalt and NER is bad quality asphalt. From the studies the effect of additives on chemical and physical hardening tendencies was found to be significant. The asphalt samples tested in this study showed a range of tendencies for chemical and physical hardening.

  19. GPR in Nondestructive Quality Assurance of New Asphalt Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poikajärvi, J.; Peisa, K.; Narbro, A.

    2012-04-01

    Mara Nord is an international cooperation project financed by Interreg IVA Nord funding program with partners from Finland, Sweden and Norway. One of the objectives in Mara Nord project has been to research the quality assurance of new asphalt pavement. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey is used as an alternative method for coring in quality assurance. There exist numerous advantages for the use of GPR. For example, the fluent measuring arrangements without closing the traffic on the road and the extensive continuous profile that can be constructed from the measuring data. Within the framework of Mara Nord Project field tests were organized in Seinäjoki region in Finland on August 2011. The tests were done by four consulting companies from Finland and Rovaniemi University of Applied Sciences. The aim of these tests was to compare the measured dielectric value profiles and the calculated void content profiles of the equipment. The tested equipment was GSSI manufactured SIR-20 and 1 GHz horn antennas. Void content values were calculated using the model presented by Mr. Roimela (1997). All core samples were taken from the right wheel path. The same reference core samples were used when analyzing the data of each GPR equipment. Some samples were taken right after the pavement work was completed with the rest three weeks after during the test measurements. The tests indicated that GPRs have very good repeatability in measuring dielectric changes on top surface layers of asphalt pavements. Furthermore, different GPRs locate the same detectable longitudinal dielectric changes with high accuracy. Some differences were found in the dielectric value levels, yet reproducibility of the calculated void content values was quite good. The test data was also used to evaluate the reliability of the regression model between the dielectric values measured through GPR and the void content of the pavement determined from reference cores. Test data indicated that accurate regression

  20. Evaluation of liners for a uranium-mill tailings disposal site: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.; Barnes, S.M.; Silviera, D.J.

    1981-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy is conducting a program designed to reclaim or stabilize inactive uranium-mill tailings sites. This report presents the status of the Liner Evaluation Program. The purpose of the study was to identify eight prospective lining materials or composites for laboratory testing. The evaluation was performed by 1) reviewing proposed regulatory requirements to define the material performance criteria; 2) reviewing published literature and communicating with industrial and government experts experienced with lining materials and techniques; and 3) characterizing the tailings at three of the sites for calcium concentration, a selection of anions, radionuclides, organic solvents, and acidity levels. The eight materials selected for laboratory testing are: natural soil amended with sodium-saturated montmorillonite (Volclay); locally available clay in conjunction with an asphalt emulsion radon suppression cover; locally available clay in conjunction with a multibarrier radon suppression cover; rubberized asphalt membrane; hydraulic asphalt concrete; chlorosulfonated polyethylene (hypalon) or high-density polyethylene; bentonite, sand and gravel mixture; and catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The materials will be exposed in test units now being constructed to conditions such as wet/dry cycles, temperature cycles, oxidative environments, ion-exchange elements, etc. The results of the tests will identify the best material for field study. The status report also presents the information gathered during the field studies at Grand Junction, Colorado. Two liners, a bentonite, sand and gravel mixture, and a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane, were installed in a prepared trench and covered with tailings. The liners were instrumented and are being monitored for migration of moisture, radionuclides, and hazardous chemicals. The two liner materials will also be subjected to accelerated laboratory tests for a comparative assessment.

  1. Investigation of the Effect of Oil Modification on Critical Characteristics of Asphalt Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golalipour, Amir

    Thermally induced cracking of asphalt pavement continues to be a serious issue in cold climate regions as well as in areas which experience extreme daily temperature differentials. Low temperature cracking of asphalt pavements is attributed to thermal stresses and strains developed during cooling cycles. Improving asphalt binder low temperature fracture and stiffness properties continues to be a subject of particular concern. Therefore, significant amount of research has been focused on improving asphalt binder properties through modification. In recent years, wide ranges of oil based modifications have been introduced to improve asphalt binder performance, especially at the low service temperatures. Although, significant use of these oils is seen in practice, knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of oil modification and their properties for achieving optimum characteristics is limited. Hence, this study focuses on better understanding of the effect of oil modifiers which would help better material selection and achieve optimum performance in terms of increasing the life span of pavements. In this study, the effect of oil modification on the rheological properties of the asphalt binder is investigated. To examine the effect of oil modification on binder characteristics, low temperature properties as well as high temperature performance of oil modified binders were evaluated. It is found that oils vary in their effects on asphalt binder performance. However, for all oils used in the study, adding an oil to binder can improve binder low temperature performance, and this result mainly attributed to the softening effect. In addition to that, a simple linear model is proposed to predict the performance grade of oil modified binder based on the properties of its constituents at high and low temperatures. Another part of this study focuses on the oil modification effect on asphalt binder thermal strain and stresses. A viscoelastic analytical procedure is combined with

  2. Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

    1995-12-19

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age-hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted. The ESO residue, having a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{sm_bullet}s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, AAD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age-hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a silicious Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquets. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquets. The abbreviations used above for the asphalts and the aggregates are part of the Strategic Highway Research Program nomenclature.

  3. The effects of salt on rheological properties of asphalt after long-term aging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Wang, Ying; Luo, Yilin; Yin, Long

    2013-01-01

    Limited studies in recent years have shown that asphalt pavement subject to seawater in coastal regions or deicing salt in cold regions may be seriously damaged after being soaked in saline water for a long time. However, there is limited research into the influence of salt on rheological properties of asphalt after long-term aging. In this study, rheological properties of unmodified and polymer-modified asphalt after long-term aging were tested after being soaked in different concentrations of salt (0.3%~5%) for different durations (1 day~30 days). Orthogonal array based on the Taguchi method was used for experimental design. The frequency sweep tests were performed on the specimens of aged asphalt after being soaked for complex modulus and phase angle master curves and ultimate fatigue temperature. BBR tests were performed for stiffness. The test results indicate that saline water appears to reduce low temperature properties and fatigue resistance properties and improved high temperature properties of aged asphalt, and it also affects the sensitivity of complex modulus and phase angles at low frequencies. PMID:24459450

  4. The Effects of Salt on Rheological Properties of Asphalt after Long-Term Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Luo, Yilin; Yin, Long

    2013-01-01

    Limited studies in recent years have shown that asphalt pavement subject to seawater in coastal regions or deicing salt in cold regions may be seriously damaged after being soaked in saline water for a long time. However, there is limited research into the influence of salt on rheological properties of asphalt after long-term aging. In this study, rheological properties of unmodified and polymer-modified asphalt after long-term aging were tested after being soaked in different concentrations of salt (0.3%~5%) for different durations (1 day~30 days). Orthogonal array based on the Taguchi method was used for experimental design. The frequency sweep tests were performed on the specimens of aged asphalt after being soaked for complex modulus and phase angle master curves and ultimate fatigue temperature. BBR tests were performed for stiffness. The test results indicate that saline water appears to reduce low temperature properties and fatigue resistance properties and improved high temperature properties of aged asphalt, and it also affects the sensitivity of complex modulus and phase angles at low frequencies. PMID:24459450

  5. Development of superior asphalt recycling agents. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J.; Chaffin, J.; Liu, M.; Madrid, R.

    1997-07-01

    After an introduction and a literature survey in Chap. 1, Chap. 2 describes the tasks, together with objectives and important results obtained for each task throughout the entire project. Chaps. 3 thru 7 detail work in developing a qualitative and quantitative knowledge of asphalt oxidation, composition dependence of asphalt properties, and guidelines for producing superior asphalt binders through composition control. They also detail the development of a kinetic model for asphalt oxidative aging and present an understanding of the composition dependence of asphalt oxidation as well as other performance-related properties. Chaps. 8 and 9 compare the aging performance of recycled blends produced using commercial recycling agents and industrial supercritical fractions as rejuvenating agents. Oxidative aging of the recycled blends were evaluated along with the performance of the recycled blends in terms of the strategic highway research program performance grading procedure. Chap. 10 summarizes the work completed in the areas of processing schemes development, projection updates, and scale-up and commercialization plans.

  6. Asphalt pavement aging and temperature dependent properties using functionally graded viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Eshan V.

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional finite-element modeling (FEM) technique discretizes the problem domain into smaller elements, each with a unique constitutive property. However the assignment of unique material property description to an element in the FEM approach makes it an unattractive choice for simulation of problems with material non-homogeneities. Specialized elements such as "graded elements" allow for non-homogenous material property definitions within an element. This dissertation describes the development of graded viscoelastic finite element analysis method and its application for analysis of asphalt concrete pavements. Results show that the present research improves efficiency and accuracy of simulations for asphalt pavement systems. Some of the practical implications of this work include the new technique's capability for accurate analysis and design of asphalt pavements and overlay systems and for the determination of pavement performance with varying climatic conditions and amount of in-service age. Other application areas include simulation of functionally graded fiber-reinforced concrete, geotechnical materials, metal and metal composites at high temperatures, polymers, and several other naturally existing and engineered materials.

  7. Solar-reflective coating as a cooling overlay for asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Xu, Geng; Feng, Decheng; Zhong, Jing; Xie, Ning

    2011-11-01

    Rutting is one of the most serious problems on asphalt pavements. Decrease the surface temperature of the asphalt pavement is an effective method to solve the rutting problem on asphalt pavements. In this study, nano sized particles filled polymer composite was developed as an overlay to reflect the solar energy and decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements. The overlay was composed of acrylic or epoxy resin filled with nano TiO2 or nano TiNO2. The solar reflection of the nano particle filled polymers was tested and the results showed that solar reflection effectiveness of the epoxy/TiO2 composite reached the highest value. The results of outdoor temperature test indicate that the solar-reflective overlay could decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements about 10 °C when the pavement temperature is about 60 °C. Pavement skid resistance was also tested, which expressed by micro/macrotexture depth and the results of which showed that both matrix was qualified after coated with aggregates on the surface.

  8. Solar-reflective coating as a cooling overlay for asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Xu, Geng; Feng, Decheng; Zhong, Jing; Xie, Ning

    2012-04-01

    Rutting is one of the most serious problems on asphalt pavements. Decrease the surface temperature of the asphalt pavement is an effective method to solve the rutting problem on asphalt pavements. In this study, nano sized particles filled polymer composite was developed as an overlay to reflect the solar energy and decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements. The overlay was composed of acrylic or epoxy resin filled with nano TiO2 or nano TiNO2. The solar reflection of the nano particle filled polymers was tested and the results showed that solar reflection effectiveness of the epoxy/TiO2 composite reached the highest value. The results of outdoor temperature test indicate that the solar-reflective overlay could decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements about 10 °C when the pavement temperature is about 60 °C. Pavement skid resistance was also tested, which expressed by micro/macrotexture depth and the results of which showed that both matrix was qualified after coated with aggregates on the surface.

  9. Modelling and Laboratory Studies on the Adhesion Fatigue Performance for Thin-Film Asphalt and Aggregate System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongsheng; Feng, Decheng

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion between asphalt and aggregate plays an important role in the performance of asphalt mixtures. A low-frequency adhesion fatigue test was proposed in this paper to study the effect of environment on the asphalt-aggregate adhesion system. The stress-based fatigue model had been utilized to describe the fatigue behavior of thin-film asphalt and aggregate system. The factors influencing the adhesion fatigue performance were also investigated. Experiment results show that asphalt has more important effect on the adhesion performance comparing with aggregate. Basalt, which is regarded as hydrophobic aggregates with low silica content, has better adhesion performance to asphalt binder when compared with granite. The effects of aging on the adhesion fatigue performance are different for PG64-22 and rubber asphalt. Long-term aging is found to reduce the adhesion fatigue lives for rubber asphalt and aggregate system, while the effect of long-term aging for aggregate and PG64-22 binder system is positive. Generally the increased stress amplitude and test temperature could induce greater damage and lead to less fatigue lives for adhesion test system. PMID:25054187

  10. 77 FR 50651 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Hampshire; Hot Mix Asphalt Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Hampshire; Hot... Hampshire Hot Mix Asphalt Plant Rule at Env-A 2703.02(a). This rule establishes and requires limitations on visible emissions from all hot mix asphalt plants. This revision is consistent with the maintenance of...

  11. Rubber modified and performance based asphalt binder pavements: I-5 Nisqually River to Gravelly Lake. Post construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    The report describes the construction of asphalt pavements made with three types of asphalt binders. The three types of binders were PBA-6, PBA-6GR (ground rubber), and AR4000W. The two modified binders, PBA-6 and PBA-6GR, are being evaluated to determine their resistance to rutting as compared to the conventional binder, AR4000W.

  12. Modelling and laboratory studies on the adhesion fatigue performance for thin-film asphalt and aggregate system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongsheng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion between asphalt and aggregate plays an important role in the performance of asphalt mixtures. A low-frequency adhesion fatigue test was proposed in this paper to study the effect of environment on the asphalt-aggregate adhesion system. The stress-based fatigue model had been utilized to describe the fatigue behavior of thin-film asphalt and aggregate system. The factors influencing the adhesion fatigue performance were also investigated. Experiment results show that asphalt has more important effect on the adhesion performance comparing with aggregate. Basalt, which is regarded as hydrophobic aggregates with low silica content, has better adhesion performance to asphalt binder when compared with granite. The effects of aging on the adhesion fatigue performance are different for PG64-22 and rubber asphalt. Long-term aging is found to reduce the adhesion fatigue lives for rubber asphalt and aggregate system, while the effect of long-term aging for aggregate and PG64-22 binder system is positive. Generally the increased stress amplitude and test temperature could induce greater damage and lead to less fatigue lives for adhesion test system. PMID:25054187

  13. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  14. Development of a rapid test method for asphalt concrete content determination in hot-mix paving mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, J. J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid test method was developed for the determination of asphalt cement content in hot-mix bituminous paving mixtures. It is based on the extraction of asphalt cement from mixtures with trichloroethylene and subsequent measurement of the transmittance of light through the extracted solution. A good correlation was found between the results obtained using the rapid test and those obtained using the standard test (ASTM D-2172, Method E1) for samples tested in the field at asphalt mix plants. The test uses a portable spectrophotometer and a metal can for extraction. The asphalt content can be determined in less than ten minutes. The possibility of using the rapid test on materials containing emulsified asphalt, slag aggregate, unusually high amounts of fine material and recycled material was also studied.

  15. The shakeout scenario: Meeting the needs for construction aggregates, asphalt, and concrete

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    An Mw 7.8 earthquake as described in the ShakeOut Scenario would cause significantdamage to buildings and infrastructure. Over 6 million tons of newly mined aggregate would be used for emergency repairs and for reconstruction in the five years following the event. This aggregate would be applied mostly in the form of concrete for buildings and bridges, asphalt or concrete for pavement, and unbound gravel for applications such as base course that goes under highway pavement and backfilling for foundations and pipelines. There are over 450 aggregate, concrete, and asphalt plants in the affected area, some of which would be heavily damaged. Meeting the increased demand for construction materials would require readily available permitted reserves, functioning production facilities, a supply of cement and asphalt, a source of water, gas, and electricity, and a trained workforce. Prudent advance preparations would facilitate a timely emergency response and reconstruction following such an earthquake. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  16. On the study of crack-initiation fracture toughness of fiber glass asphalt shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, M.L.

    1999-07-01

    The fracture behavior of fiber glass asphalt shingles was examined by measuring their J-integral fracture toughness at crack initiation. The corresponding fracture mechanisms were also studied by in situ fracture observation and by scanning electron microscopy. The applicability of using J-integral fracture toughness to characterize asphalt shingles was discussed and its relationships to other mechanical properties was established. The results indicated that the fracture toughness at crack initiation can be accurately measured for fiber glass shingles and the values may be used to characterize their cracking resistance. Fracture toughness measured from various shingle samples was found to correlate to the shingle's tensile toughness and to its tear strength. Preliminary results on fracture mechanisms suggested that failure in the asphalt coatings by micro-cavitation may be the controlling event leading to crack advance. The importance of the glass fiber mat on a shingle's resistance to fracture was also discussed.

  17. Separation of asphaltic materials from heptane soluble components in liquified solid hydrocarbonaceous extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Gleim, W.

    1980-07-08

    An improved method is described for maximizing the separation of the heat labile fraction of asphaltic materials in a liquified solid hydrocarbonaceous extract, which comprises the steps of: (A) adding a solvent having a boiling range of from about 50 to 200/sup 0/C for the heptane solubles of said extract, (B) effecting a mixing of said solvent and said extract and providing a pressurized centrifuging action of the combined stream in a confined pressure-tight powered centrifuging zone at a temperature in the range of 100/sup 0/C, to about 200/sup 0//c while at an elevated pressure at least sufficient to maintain the solvent material in a liquid state, whereby to separate the heavier heat labile asphaltic materials fraction from the mixture, and (C) effecting the withdrawal of the asphaltic fraction from the centrifuging zone substantially free of the resulting solution of the heptane soluble liquified fuel extract.

  18. Research on the Technology Applying Anti-Rutting Additive to Asphalt Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Huang, Liming; Li, Chun

    High-temperature problems like rutting, displacement and upheaval are the most serious ones for bituminous pavement of urban roads. Especially, such problems at crossroads and fixed places where buses stop, for instance, BRT, affect service ability and life of roads largely. Application of anti-rutting asphalt mixture mainly aims at reducing strain and deformation generated by bituminous concrete under effect of vehicle load, decreasing remainders that cannot be recovered in deformation, improving the ability of bituminous pavement to resist deformation under high temperature and delaying generation of rutting. Anti-rutting asphalt mixture in this thesis refers to the asphalt mixture where anti-rutting additive is added by dry method and high-temperature stability is improved.

  19. Analysis of ground reflection of jet noise obtained with various microphone arrays over an asphalt surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflection effects on the propagation of jet noise over an asphalt surface are discussed for data obtained using a 33.02-cm diameter nozzle with microphones at several heights and distances from the nozzle axis. Ground reflection effects are analyzed using the concept of a reflected signal transfer function which represents the influence of both the reflecting surface and the atmosphere on the propagation of the reflected signal in a mathematical model. The mathematical model used as a basis for the computer program was successful in significantly reducing the ground reflection effects. The range of values of the single complex number used to define the reflected signal transfer function was larger than expected when determined only by the asphalt surface. This may indicate that the atmosphere is affecting the propagation of the reflected signal more than the asphalt surface. The selective placement of the reinforcements and cancellations in the design of an experiment to minimize ground reflection effects is also discussed.

  20. Asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings: an overview of the technology

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, D.A.; Dunning, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, has developed an asphalt emulsion cover system to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. The system has been field tested at Grand Junction, Colorado. Results from laboratory and field tests indicate that this system is effective in reducing radon release to near-background levels (<2.5 pCi m/sup -2/s/sup -1/) and has the properties required for long-term effectiveness and stability. Engineering specifications have been developed, and analysis indicates that asphalt emulsion covers are cost-competitive with other cover systems. This report summarizes the technology for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. 59 references, 45 figures, 36 tables.

  1. Assessments of low emission asphalt mixtures produced using combinations of foaming agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Hasan, Mohd Rosli

    The asphalt foaming techniques have been used over the last couple of decades as an alternative to the traditional method of preparing asphalt mixtures. Based on positive feedback from the industry, this study was initiated to explore and evaluate the performance of the Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) mixture produced through a foaming process using physical and chemical foaming agents, which are ethanol and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), respectively. The success of this project may lead to new theories and provide an environmentally friendly technique to produce asphalt mixtures. This may advance the understanding of the foaming process and improve the performance of WMA to support sustainable development. Theoretically, ethanol can function in the same manner as water but requires less energy to foam due to its lower boiling point, 78°C. During the asphalt foaming process, numerous bubbles were generated by the vaporized ethanol, which significantly increased the volume of the asphalt binder, hence the coating potential of aggregates improves. The sodium bicarbonate was incorporated to enhance the quantity of bubbles and its stability. Therefore, understanding foaming agents, their solubility, chemical reactions, chemical function groups and rheological properties of the foamed binder are essential to help control the foam structure and final properties of the foamed WMA mixture. In order to understand the overall performance of newly developed foaming WMA, this material was evaluated for moisture susceptibility, rutting potential, and resistance to fracture and thermal cracking. The coatability, workability and compactability of foamed asphalt mixtures during production were also evaluated. Based on the results, it was found that the newly proposed foaming WMA has high potential to promote sustainable development by lowering the energy consumption and impacts on the environment. The ethanol is efficient in lowering the viscosity of asphalt binders, enhancing the

  2. Physical and chemical characteristics of synthetic asphalt produced from liquefaction of sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, J. M.; Batter, T. R.; Miller, R. K.; Lottman, R. P.

    1981-10-01

    Direct thermochemical liquefaction of primary undigested municipal sewage sludge was carried out to produce a low molecular weight steam volatile oil, a high molecular weight synthetic asphalt, and a residual char cake. The latter product is capable of supplying the thermal energy requirements of the conversion process. The steam volatile oil has immediate value as a synthetic fuel oil. The synthetic asphalt may prove to be a useful cement for paving or for fuel or coking stock. The thermochemical liquefaction process should be capable of operating technically and in an environmentally acceptable manner in conjunction with many existing waste water treatment facilities. The overall feasibility of the process depends on the value of the oil and synthetic asphalt products as petroleum replacements, and on the costs associated with disposal of sludge.

  3. Incorporation de particules de bardeaux d'asphalte de postconsommation dans les enrobes bitumineux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malo, Jean-Michel

    Every year, more than 200 000 tons of used residential roofing asphalt shingles are sent to landfills in Quebec. In order to reduce this amount, a research project funded by the 3RMCDQ and RECYC-QUÉBEC is ongoing at the LCMB at École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS) in Montreal. This project studies the feasibility of incorporating tear-off shingles particles in hot mix asphalt which could be used on Quebec roads. Currently, in Quebec, the ministry of Transportation (MTQ), allows the use of 5% of new asphalt shingles (factory reject) in the base course and 3% in the surface course, and tear-off shingles are not allowed. Incorporating new shingles particles is valued notably by the MTQ standardization for a reduction of binder in these mixes. As of now, the MTQ does not have a standard on the use of tear-off shingles, but the subject of experimental boards. The research done at ETS aim to characterize a standard base mix, GB20, and a standard surface mix, ESG-10, that contains tear-off shingles. Mixes containing different percentage of virgin binder were fabricated then tested on compaction capacity, on rutting resistance, on thermal cracking resistance (TSRST) and on complex modulus (E*). The amount of Virgin binder is calculated according to different percentage of effective binder from the shingles. This study has permitted to identify an optimal formula for both types of hot mix asphalt that were tested. Results show that for the standard ESG-10 surface mix, the possible contribution of tear-off asphalt shingles would be about 20%. For the standard GB-20 base mix, no reduction in the virgin binder may be considered for now when 5% of tear-off asphalt shingles are incorporated in the formula mix. In this case, further testing on complex modulus are recommended to obtain meaningful results that will determine if a reduction of the virgin binder would not be favorable.

  4. A multiscale model for predicting the viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cucalon, Lorena; Rahmani, Eisa; Little, Dallas N.; Allen, David H.

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that the accurate prediction of long term performance of asphalt concrete pavement requires modeling to account for viscoelasticity within the mastic. However, accounting for viscoelasticity can be costly when the material properties are measured at the scale of asphalt concrete. This is due to the fact that the material testing protocols must be performed recursively for each mixture considered for use in the final design. In this paper, a four level multiscale computational micromechanics methodology is utilized to determine the accuracy of micromechanics versus directly measured viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete pavement. This is accomplished by first measuring the viscoelastic dynamic modulus of asphalt binder, as well as the elastic properties of the constituents, and this comprised the first scale analysis. In the second scale analysis, the finite element method is utilized to predict the effect of mineral fillers on the dynamic modulus. In the third scale analysis, the finite element method is again utilized to predict the effect of fine aggregates on the dynamic modulus. In the fourth and final scale analysis, the finite element method is utilized to predict the effect of large aggregates on the dynamic modulus of asphalt concrete. This final predicted result is then compared to the experimentally measured dynamic modulus of two different asphalt concretes for various volume fractions of the constituents. Results reveal that the errors in predictions are on the order of 60 %, while the ranking of the mixtures was consistent with experimental results. It should be noted that differences between the "final predicted results" and the experimental results can provide fruitful ground for understanding the effect of interactions not considered in the multiscale approach, most importantly, chemical interactions.

  5. A Case-Control Study of Asphalt and Tar Exposure and Lung Cancer in Minorities

    PubMed Central

    McClean, Michael D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Sison, Jennette D; Quesenberry, Charles P; Wrensch, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Considerable controversy surrounds the carcinogenic potential of asphalt and tar. Since minority individuals may have had relatively high historical exposures, we investigated asphalt and tar exposure and lung cancer risk among African Americans and Latino Americans. Methods We conducted a case-control study of lung cancer among African Americans and Latino Americans in the San Francisco Bay area (422 cases, 894 controls). A questionnaire was used to obtain detailed work histories and exposure information. Self-reported exposure to asphalt and tar as well as other factors (eg. smoking, automobile exhaust, and asbestos) were evaluated as predictors of lung cancer risk. Potential effect modification by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 was also explored. Results Self-reported duration of exposure to asphalt and tar was associated with a statistically significant excess risk of lung cancer in the overall population (OR: 1.11, 95%CI: 1.01–1.22), evaluating risk per year of exposure. Years of exposure to automobile exhaust (OR: 1.02, 95%CI: 1.00–1.05) and asbestos (OR: 1.04, 95%CI: 1.02–1.06) were also associated with statistically significant elevations in risk. In Latino Americans, the lung cancer risks associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-related exposures were consistently higher in the CYP1A1 wildtype subjects as compared to the variant genotype subjects, and the interaction was statistically significant for smoking and the CYP1A1 M2 polymorphism (p-valueinteraction=0.02). Conclusions These data are consistent with the literature suggesting that exposure to asphalt and tar may increase risk of lung cancer. However, it was not possible to separate the effects and asphalt and tar in this study. PMID:21882217

  6. Experimental investigation of basic oxygen furnace slag used as aggregate in asphalt mixture.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yongjie; Wu, Shaopeng; Hou, Haobo; Zha, Jin

    2006-11-16

    Chinese researchers have commenced a great deal of researches on the development of application fields of basic oxygen steel making furnace slag (BOF slag) for many years. Lots of new applications and properties have been found, but few of them in asphalt mixture of road construction engineering. This paper discussed the feasibility of BOF steel slag used as aggregate in asphalt pavement by two points of view including BOF steel slag's physical and micro-properties as well as steel slag asphalt materials and pavement performances. For the former part, this paper mainly concerned the mechanochemistry and physical changes of the steel slag and studied it by performing XRD, SEM, TG and mercury porosimeter analysis and testing method. In the second part, this paper intended to use BOF steel slag as raw material, and design steel slag SMA mixture. By using traditional rutting test, soak wheel track and modified Lottman test, the high temperature stability and water resistance ability were tested. Single axes compression test and indirect tensile test were performed to evaluate the low temperature crack resistance performance and fatigue characteristic. Simultaneously, by observing steel slag SMA pavement which was paved successfully. A follow-up study to evaluate the performance of the experimental pavement confirmed that the experimental pavement was comparable with conventional asphalt pavement, even superior to the later in some aspects. All of above test results and analysis had only one main purpose that this paper validated the opinion that using BOF slag in asphalt concrete is feasible. So this paper suggested that treated and tested steel slag should be used in a more extensive range, especially in asphalt mixture paving projects in such an abundant steel slag resource region. PMID:16982138

  7. Development of superior asphalt recycling agents. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Glover, C.J.; Davison, R.R.; Chaffin, J.; Lin, Moon-Sun

    1995-07-01

    About 27 million tons of asphalt and nearly twenty times this much aggregate are consumed each year to build and maintain over two million miles of roads in this country. Over a cycle of about 12 years on the average, these roads must be reworked and much of these millions of tons of rock and asphalt cannot be reused with present recycling technology. Instead, much of the maintenance is accomplished by placing thick layers (hot-mix overlays) of new material on top of the failed material. This results in considerable waste of material, both in terms of quality aggregate and in terms of asphalt binder. In addition, the new asphalt binder represents a significant source of potential energy. The main impediment to recycling asphalt binder is the poorly developed science of recycling agent composition and, as a result, optimum recycling agents are not available. An excellent recycling agent should not only be able to reduce the viscosity of the aged material, but it must also be able to restore compatibility. The properties of the old material and recycling agent must be compatible to give both good initial properties and aging characteristics, and this must be understood. The agent must also be inexpensive and easily manufactured. A large quantity of potential feedstock for the production of recycling agents is available and much of it is now fed to cokers. This material could be recovered by supercritical extraction which is an existing refinery technology. A supercritical pilot plant is available at Texas A&M and has been used to produce fractions for study. The objective of this research is to establish the technical feasibility of determining the specifications and operating parameters necessary to produce high quality recycling agents which will allow most old asphalt-based road material to be recycled.

  8. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  9. Monitoring viscosity in asphalt binders using an ultrasonic guided wave approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haser, Alexandra N.; McGovern, Megan E.; Behnia, Behzad; Buttlar, William; Reis, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    A pulse-echo ultrasonic guided wave approach capable of monitoring the viscosity of asphalt binders as function of temperature is presented. The method consists of sending a torsional wave from one end of a cylindrical steel rod embedded in asphalt binder and receiving the reflected signals. Experiments were performed on several binders of different performance grades, at temperatures ranging from 25 to 1800C. First, the viscosity of the binders was measured using a rotational viscometer in accordance with ASTM standards. The change in signal strength of the end-of-waveguide reflection of the guided wave was also monitored for the same binders over the same range of temperatures. It was observed that the values obtained using the guided wave approach correlates well with the viscosity values obtained using the rotational viscometer. The method also appears capable of monitoring changes in viscosity due to aging of the binders. The method has the advantage of having no moving parts, which makes it attractive for the development of a system that is capable of monitoring viscosity in asphalt binders in the asphalt industry. Industrial applications examples are briefly summarized.

  10. Strain transfer analysis of optical fiber based sensors embedded in an asphalt pavement structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaping; Xiang, Ping

    2016-07-01

    Asphalt pavement is vulnerable to random damage, such as cracking and rutting, which can be proactively identified by distributed optical fiber sensing technology. However, due to the material nature of optical fibers, a bare fiber is apt to be damaged during the construction process of pavements. Thus, a protective layer is needed for this application. Unfortunately, part of the strain of the host material is absorbed by the protective layer when transferring the strain to the sensing fiber. To account for the strain transfer error, in this paper a theoretical analysis of the strain transfer of a three-layered general model has been carried out by introducing Goodman’s hypothesis to describe the interfacial shear stress relationship. The model considers the viscoelastic behavior of the host material and protective layer. The effects of one crack in the host material and the sensing length on strain transfer relationship are been discussed. To validate the effectiveness of the strain transfer analysis, a flexible asphalt-mastic packaged distributed optical fiber sensor was designed and tested in a laboratory environment to monitor the distributed strain and appearance of cracks in an asphalt concrete beam at two different temperatures. The experimental results indicated that the developed strain transfer formula can significantly reduce the strain transfer error, and that the asphalt-mastic packaged optical fiber sensor can successfully monitor the distributed strain and identify local cracks.

  11. Biodegradation of asphalt by Garciaella petrolearia TERIG02 for viscosity reduction of heavy oil.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Meeta; Cheema, Simrita; Sarma, Priyangshu Manab; Mandal, Ajoy Kumar; Lal, Banwari

    2012-02-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon is an important energy resource, but it is difficult to exploit due to the presence of dominated heavy constituents such as asphaltenes. In this study, viscosity reduction of Jodhpur heavy oil (2,637 cP at 50°C) has been carried out by the biodegradation of asphalt using a bacterial strain TERIG02. TERIG02 was isolated from sea buried oil pipeline known as Mumbai Uran trunk line (MUT) located on western coast of India and identified as Garciaella petrolearia by 16S rRNA full gene sequencing. TERIG02 showed 42% viscosity reduction when asphalt along with molasses was used as a sole carbon source compared to only asphalt (37%). The viscosity reduction by asphaltene degradation has been structurally characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). This strain also shows an additional preference to degrade toxic asphalt and aromatics compounds first unlike the other known strains. All these characteristics makes TERIG02 a potential candidate for enhanced oil recovery and a solution to degrading toxic aromatic compounds. PMID:21611744

  12. Technical, financial, and geographic challenges in recycling asphalt composition roof shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Reith, C.C.; Carpenter, M.; Robertson, D.T.

    1999-07-01

    Eleven million tons of asphalt composition shingles are disposed of annually in US landfills. The wastes from roof removal or repair operations are a promising, but under-harvested feedstock for recycling. This waste stream generally arrives by truck at local landfills, where it is relatively unmixed and ready for recycling. However, in most cases the shingles are landfilled at the local tipping fee. The authors analyzed impediments and opportunities in recycling asphalt shingles and elected to commence operations in the east San Francisco Bay area, where tipping fees as high as $50 per ton provide an economic incentive to intercept and recycle this waste stream. Their approach has been to use a 60 inch x 38 inch rotating-head grinder propelled by a 400 horsepower diesel engine. Roofing waste is introduced to the grinder, which processes up to 50 tons per hour. The product is half-inch minus granular asphalt with co-mingled sand that may be used as a feedstock (approximately 5%) in the production of hot-mix asphalt, as used for road construction. A potentially more profitable reuse of recycled product is in the production of a cold patch for road repair which, when fully commercialized, will further improve the economics of shingles recycling. Other reuse scenarios are being explored. The authors are carefully chronicling and optimizing the Bay Area recycling campaign with the intent of promoting similar activities nationwide as soon as the economics become favorable.

  13. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SYNTHETIC ASPHALT PRODUCED FROM LIQUEFACTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct thermochemical liquefaction of primary undigested municipal sewage sludge was carried out to produce a low molecular weight steam-volatile oil, a high molecular weight synthetic asphalt, and a residual char cake. The latter product is capable of supplying the thermal energ...

  14. Estimation of low-temperature cracking threshold for asphalt binders using an acoustic emmission approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apeagyei, Alex K.; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2009-03-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) approach to evaluate low temperature cracking susceptibility of asphalt binders is presented. Thin films of asphalt binders were bonded to granite substrates and exposed to temperatures ranging from 15°C to - 50°C. Differential thermal contraction between granite substrates and asphalt binders induces progressively higher thermal stress in the binders resulting in thermal crack formation, which is accompanied by a release of elastic energy in the form of transient waves. Using piezoelectric sensors (Digital Wave, Model B-1025), a four-channel acoustic emission system was used to record the acoustic emission activity during the binder/granite cooling process. Assuming the cracking temperature (Tcr) to be the temperature at which the AE signal energy exceeds a pre-selected threshold energy level, this AE testing approach was found to be sensitive and repeatable for predicting cracking temperatures (Tcr) in four SUPERPAVE core asphalt binders. These AE-based Tcr predictions showed strong correlation (R2 = 0.9) with predictions based on either AASHTO TP1 or MP1A protocols. Unlike TP1 and MP1A protocols, the presented AE approach does not require the use of sophisticated software for predicting thermal stresses, and no assumption is required regarding the testing cooling rate and the binder coefficient of thermal contraction.

  15. On the representative volume element of asphalt concrete at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasteanu, Mihai; Cannone Falchetto, Augusto; Velasquez, Raul; Le, Jia-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The feasibility of characterizing asphalt mixtures' rheological and failure properties at low temperatures by means of the Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) is investigated in this paper. The main issue is the use of thin beams of asphalt mixture in experimental procedures that may not capture the true behavior of the material used to construct an asphalt pavement. For the rheological characterization, three-point bending creep tests are performed on beams of different sizes. The beams are also analyzed using digital image analysis to obtain volumetric fraction, average size distribution, and spatial correlation functions. Based on the experimental results and analyses, it is concluded that representative creep stiffness values of asphalt mixtures can be obtained from testing at least three replicates of the thin (BBR) mixture beams. Failure properties are investigated by performing strength tests using a modified Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR), capable of applying loads at different loading rates. Histogram testing of BBR mixture beams and of larger beams is performed and the failure distribution is analyzed based on the size effect theory for quasibrittle materials. Different Weibull moduli are obtained from the two specimens sizes, which indicates that BBR beams do not capture the representative volume element (RVE) of the material.

  16. A Campus Planner Who Strives To Overcome "The Curse of Asphalt."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1998-01-01

    Architect Adam Gross, in working with campus planning for 15 years, has developed strong notions about what makes a campus appealing and how institutions should pursue fundraising and financing. He takes a holistic approach, which looks at buildings in relation to one another and to the surrounding spaces, and prefers green spaces to asphalt. (MSE)

  17. National Apprenticeship Standards for Cement Masonry, Asphalt, and Composition Trade. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training.

    These national standards are designed to guide local joint apprenticeship and training committees in establishing local apprenticeship programs to train individuals seeking to become skilled in the cement masonry, asphalt, and composition trade. Covered in the individual sections are the following topics: provisions of the apprenticeship standards…

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY RESIDUAL FUEL OILS AND ASPHALTS BY INFRARED SPECTROPHOTOMETRY USING STATISTICAL DISCRIMINANT FUNCTION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spilled asphaltic materials and heavy residual fuel oils, because of their high molecular weights, complexity, and physical nature, cannot be readily identified to a source since these materials are not usually amenable to analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization dete...

  19. 40 CFR 436.60 - Applicability; description of the asphaltic mineral subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the asphaltic mineral subcategory. 436.60 Section 436.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE...

  20. Intravascular haemolysis during prolonged running on asphalt and natural grass in long and middle distance runners.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Kamal; Shenoy, Shweta; Sandhu, Jaspal Singh

    2011-09-01

    Surface features such as uneven playing surfaces, low impact absorption capacity and inappropriate friction/traction characteristics are connected with injury prevalence whereas force impact during foot strike has been suggested to be an important mechanism of intravascular haemolysis during running. We aimed to evaluate intravascular haemolysis during running and compare the effect of running on two different types of surfaces on haemolysis. We selected two surfaces (asphalt and grass) on which these athletes usually run. Participants were randomly assigned to group A (asphalt) or group B (grass) with 10 athletes in each group. Each athlete completed one hour of running at the calculated target heart rate (60-70%). Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after running. We measured unconjugated bilirubin (UBR) (mg · dl(-1)), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (μ · ml(-1)), haemoglobin (g · l(-1)) and serum ferritin (ng · ml(-1)) as indicators of haemolysis. Athletes who ran on grass demonstrated an increase in the haematological parameters (UBR: P < 0.01, LDH: P < 0.05) when compared to athletes who ran on asphalt (UBR: P < 0.05, LDH: P = 0.241). Our findings indicate that intravascular haemolysis occurs significantly after prolonged running. Furthermore, we conclude that uneven grass surface results in greater haemolysis compared to asphalt road. PMID:21751854

  1. Maintenance of Vinyl Asbestos and Asphalt Tile Floors in Institutional, Industrial and Commercial Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt and Vinyl Asbestos Tile Inst., New York, NY.

    The claim is made that proper planning and modest outlays of time, labor, and material costs can provide and maintain a high appearance level for floors in institutional, commercial, and industrial buildings. Instructions for four basic steps in maintaining the good looks of vinyl asbestos and asphalt tile floors are treated in the booklet--(1)…

  2. Analysis of the dispersion of air pollutants from a factory Asphalt in Nuevo Vallarta, Nay., Mex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Gonzalez, F. M.; Gaitán-Rodríguez, M.; Cornejo-López, V. M.; Morales-Hernández, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    An asphalt factory has operated intermittently near the urban area of Nuevo Vallarta on Banderas Bay, Nayarit, Mex. This factory has emissions that can affect the health of people living in the colonies nearest are Valle Dorado and San Vicente. The dispersion of emissions depends on the wind (sea breeze-land breeze) and the roof of the inversion, these phenomena determined by the density and temperature of the lower layers of the atmosphere. Asphalts are dark colored binder materials, formed by a complex non-volatile hydrocarbon chains and high molecular weight. Asphalts are produced from petroleum, but by a process of evaporation of the volatiles, leaving the asphalt alone. Therefore, the material emitted by the fireplace are mainly low molecular weight hydrocarbons known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Emergency Response Guide 2008 developed by various agencies in Canada, U.S. and Mexico mentions that the hydrocarbon gas can have health effects. Animal studies have shown that PAHs can cause harmful effects to the skin, body fluids and some PAHs are carcinogenic. An analysis of the wind field, monthly and seasonal averages for the years 2010 and 2011, recorded in AWS administered by the CEMCO and other stations located near the study area.

  3. Gaps in scientific knowledge about the carcinogenic potential of asphalt/bitumen fumes.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Despite a relatively large body of published research, the potential carcinogenicity of asphalt/bitumen fumes is still a vexing question. Various uncertainties and gaps in scientific knowledge need to be addressed. These include uncertainties in chemistry, animal studies, and human studies. The chemistry of asphalt/bitumen fumes is complex and varies according to the source of the crude oil and the application parameters. The epidemiological studies, while showing weak evidence of lung cancer, are inconsistent and many confounding factors have not been addressed. Studies of animal exposure are also inconsistent regarding laboratory and field-generated fumes. There is a need for further human studies that address potential confounding factors such as smoking, diet, coal tar, and diesel exposures. Animal inhalation studies need to be conducted with asphalt/bitumen fumes that are chemically representative of roofing and paving fumes. Underlying all of this is the need for continued characterization of fumes so their use in animal and field studies can be properly assessed. Nonetheless, uncertainties such as these should not preclude appropriate public health actions to protect workers in the even that asphalt fumes are found to be a carcinogenic hazard. PMID:17503268

  4. Reconnaissance for uranium in asphalt-bearing rocks in the western states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hail, William James, Jr.

    1955-01-01

    Evaluation of field data indicates that naturally occurring asphalts with a relatively high uranium content probably originated in, or migrated through, rocks that contain more than average amounts of uranium. It is believed that some of the uranium was present as an original constituent of the oil but that some uranium may have been introduced during migration of the oil.

  5. Experimental testing of hot mix asphalt mixture made of recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Muhammad Masood; Qadir, Adnan; Siddiqui, Salman Hameed

    2011-12-01

    The migration of population towards big cities generates rapid construction activities. These activities not only put pressure on natural resources but also produce construction, renovation and demolition waste. There is an urgent need to find out ways to handle this waste owing to growing environmental concerns. This can reduce pressure on natural resources as well. This paper presents the results of experimental studies which were carried out on hot mix asphalt mixture samples. These samples were manufactured by adding recycled aggregates (RA) with natural crushed stone aggregates (CSA). Three levels of addition of RA were considered in the presented studies. RA were obtained from both the concrete waste of construction, renovation and demolition activities and reclaimed asphalt pavement. Separate samples were manufactured with the coarse and fine aggregate fractions of both types of RA. Samples made with CSA were used as control specimens. The samples were prepared and tested using the Marshall method. The performance of the samples was investigated in terms of density-void and stability/flow analysis and was compared with the performance criteria as given by National Highway Authority for wearing course material in Pakistan. Based on this data optimum asphalt contents were determined. All the samples made by adding up to 50% RA conform to the specification requirements of wearing course material as given by National Highway Authority in terms of optimum asphalt contents, voids in mineral aggregates and stability/flow. A statistical analysis of variation of these samples confirmed that addition is also possible statistically. PMID:20483876

  6. EMISSION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM DRUM-MIX ASPHALT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was undertaken in order to develop a quantitative estimate of the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from drum-mix asphalt plants. The study was carried out by field sampling of five drum-mix plants under a variety of operating conditions. Include...

  7. Thermoplastic rubber comprising ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, asphalt and fluxing oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendel, F. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A thermoplastic rubber is made from a mixture of between about 10 percent and about 50 percent of asphalt, between about 5 percent and about 30 percent fluxing oil, and between about 35 percent and about 70 percent of a copolymer of polyethylene and vinyl acetate.

  8. Recycled materials in asphalt pavements, January 1980-June 1991 (citations from the NTIS database). Rept. for Jan 80-Jun 91

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (The bibliography contains 75 citations.) (Also includes title list and subject index.)

  9. The utility of phenol-aldehyde cross linking resins in polymer modified asphalt - the Butaphalt (tm) process

    SciTech Connect

    Krivohlavek, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    The use of Phenol-Aldehyde cross linking or vulcanizing resin is well known in the rubber and plastics industry. Previous to our work little (if any) understanding of the utility of these compounds in polymer modified asphalt (or bitumen) was known. This presentation will hopefully enlighten practitioners of the art of asphalt modification on this subject. This art is commercially known as the Butaphalt(tm) Process. Of initial interest is the mechanism of reaction of Phenol-Aldehyde cross linking resins. As the quantitative analysis of such a mechanism in asphalt would likely need years of effort to resolve, we will look at possible mechanisms in a rubber system.

  10. Evaluation of western shale-oil residue as an additive to petroleum asphalt for use as a pavement crack and joint sealant material

    SciTech Connect

    Harnsberger, P.M.; Wolf, J.M.; Robertson, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of using a distillation residue from Green River Formation (western) shale oil as an additive to a petroleum asphalt for use as a crack and joint filler material in portland cement concrete and asphaltic pavements. A commercially available rubberized asphalt crack and joint filler material was also tested for comparison. ASTM specification tests for sealant materials used in concrete and asphalt pavements were performed on the sealant materials. Portland cement concrete briquets prepared with an asphalt material sandwiched between two concrete wafers were tested in a stress-relaxation experiment to evaluate the relaxation and recovery properties of the sealant materials. The results show that the shale-oil modified petroleum asphalts and the neat petroleum asphalt do not pass the extension portion of the ASTM test; however, there is indication of improvement in the adhesive properties of the shale-oil modified asphalts. There is also evidence that the addition of shale-oil residue to the petroleum asphalt, especially at the 20% level, improves the relaxation and recovery properties compared with the petroleum asphalt.

  11. Air quality assessment of benzo(a)pyrene from asphalt plant operation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Nigel; Stewart, Robert; Rankin, Erika

    2012-01-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the contribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) from asphalt plant operation, utilising Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as a marker for PAHs, to the background air concentration around asphalt plants in the UK. The purpose behind this assessment was to determine whether the use of published BaP emission factors based on the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology is appropriate in the context of the UK, especially as the EPA methodology does not give BaP emission factors for all activities. The study also aimed to improve the overall understanding of BaP emissions from asphalt plants in the UK, and determine whether site location and operation is likely to influence the contribution of PAHs to ambient air quality. In order to establish whether the use of US EPA emissions factors is appropriate, the study has compared the BaP emissions measured and calculated emissions rates from two UK sites with those estimated using US EPA emission factors. A dispersion modelling exercise was carried out to show the BaP contribution to ambient air around each site. This study showed that, as the US EPA methodology does not provide factors for all emission sources on asphalt plants, their use may give rise to over- or under-estimations, particularly where sources of BaP are temperature dependent. However, the contribution of both the estimated and measured BaP concentrations to environmental concentration were low, averaging about 0.05 ng m(-3) at the boundary of the sites, which is well below the UK BaP assessment threshold of 0.25 ng m(-3). Therefore, BaP concentrations, and hence PAH concentrations, from similar asphalt plant operations are unlikely to contribute negatively to ambient air quality. PMID:22116523

  12. Biogeochemical Controls on Authigenic Carbonate Formation at the Chapopote "Asphalt Volcano", Bay of Campeche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naehr, T. H.; Bohrmann, G.; Birgel, D.; MacDonald, I. R.

    2007-12-01

    Unusual hydrocarbon seep features, so-called "asphalt volcanoes" were explored in the Bay of Campeche, southern Gulf of Mexico, in the spring of 2006. Guided by data from satellite imagery that showed evidence for persistent oil seeps in the region, we investigated lava-like flows of solidified asphalt along the rim of a dissected salt dome at a water depth of about 3000 m. Fresh asphalt contains copious thermogenic gas and gas hydrate. Slabs of authigenic carbonate form surface crusts with layers of oil pooled beneath. Sediments are anoxic with H2S concentrations of 8 to 13 mM. Gas hydrate forms layers and mounds in the surface sediments. Alkalinity profiles show values from 29 to 35 mM, indicating oxidation of hydrocarbons by reduction of seawater sulfate. Molecular and isotopic compositions of gas hydrate and sediment headspace indicate moderately mature, thermogenic gas. Oily sediment extracts and asphalt pieces are composed of a degraded mixture of hydrocarbons with a peak at n-C30 and a few resolved C29 to C32 hopanes. Authigenic carbonate crusts from Chapopote are porous, aragonite-cemented mudstones. Peloidal textures are common, as are bivalve shells and at least two generations of aragonite-cemented intraclasts. The carbon isotopic composition of the authigenic aragonite cements varies between -28.6 ‰ and -17.9 ‰ (PDB), indicating a contribution of carbon from non-methane liquid hydrocarbons to the total pool of dissolved CO2. δ18O values of the carbonates range from +3.2 ‰ to +4.5 ‰ (PDB), suggesting aragonite formation under near-equilibrium conditions in the shallow subsurface. Molecular fossils extracted from one carbonate sample contain abundant 13C-depleted archeal lipids, derived from anaerobic methanotrophs, suggesting that organisms mediating the anaerobic oxidation of methane are closely associated with carbonate authigenesis at the Chapopote asphalt seep site.

  13. Bladder cancer incidence and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among asphalt pavers

    PubMed Central

    Burstyn, Igor; Kromhout, Hans; Johansen, Christoffer; Langard, Sverre; Kauppinen, Timo; Shaham, Judith; Ferro, Gilles; Boffetta, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) that arises during asphalt paving, and risk of bladder cancer. Methods 7298 men included in the historical cohort were first employed between 1913 and 1999 in companies applying asphalt in Denmark, Norway, Finland and Israel. The minimal duration of employment for inclusion in the cohort was two seasons of work. Occupational histories were extracted from personnel files. A follow‐up for cancer incidence was conducted through national cancer registries. The authors estimated exposures to benzo(a)pyrene as a marker for 4–6 ring PAH. Exposures were reconstructed by using information about changes in asphalt paving technology in each company over time, the modelled relation between production characteristics and exposure levels, and job histories. Relative risks and associated 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Poisson regression. Results 48 bladder cancers among asphalt paving workers were detected; of these, 39 cases were exposed at least 15 years before the diagnosis. Cumulative exposure to PAH was not associated with the incidence of bladder cancer. The association with average exposure became stronger when 15‐year lag was considered, revealing a twofold increase in relative bladder cancer risk in the two higher exposure categories. There was an indication of exposure‐response association with lagged averaged exposure. Risk estimates were adjusted for age, country, duration of employment and calendar period, did not show heterogeneity among countries and did not materially change when re‐estimated after excluding non‐primary cancers from follow‐up. Previously conducted sensitivity analysis indicates that confounding by cigarette smoking is an unlikely explanation for the observed exposure‐response trends. Conclusions The authors were unable to control for all possible sources of confounding and bias. The results do not allow conclusion on

  14. Evaluation of worker exposure to asphalt roofing fumes: influence of work practices and materials.

    PubMed

    Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Trumbore, David C; Kurek, Joseph T; Wissel, Herbert L; Rosinski, Klaus D

    2004-02-01

    A field study was conducted on 42 asphalt-roofing workers at 7 built-up roofing sites across the United States. Sixteen out of 42 samples show levels of exposure to asphalt fumes that exceed the current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH)-recommended threshold limit value of 0.5 mg/m(3) as benzene extractable inhalable particulate. Statistically, the geometric mean of all 42 worker samples was 0.27 mg/m(3) (geometric standard deviation = 3.40), the average was 0.70 mg/m(3) (standard deviation = 1.69) and the median value was 0.24 mg/m(3). The impact of work practices is discussed including the use of a novel product that uses a polymer skin to reduce fumes from built up roofing asphalt. Its use resulted in a reduction of benzene soluble matter (BSM) of >70%. Other testing measures utilized included total particulate matter, total organic matter, simulated distillation, and fluorescence analysis. Additionally, a controlled pilot study using 16 kettle-area and 16 worker samples clearly showed that when the temperature of the kettle was reduced by 28 degrees C, there was a 38-59% reduction in fume exposure and a 54% reduction in fluorescence with standard asphalts. Reduction of BSM exposures using fuming-suppressed asphalt was also confirmed during this pilot plant study (81-92%), with fluorescence lowered by 88%. Confounding agents such as roof tear-off materials were also analyzed and their contribution to worker exposure is discussed. PMID:15204883

  15. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  16. Membrane tethering

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Membrane trafficking depends on transport vesicles and carriers docking and fusing with the target organelle for the delivery of cargo. Membrane tethers and small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) mediate the docking of transport vesicles/carriers to enhance the efficiency of the subsequent SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor)-mediated fusion event with the target membrane bilayer. Different classes of membrane tethers and their specific intracellular location throughout the endomembrane system are now well defined. Recent biochemical and structural studies have led to a deeper understanding of the mechanism by which membrane tethers mediate docking of membrane carriers as well as an appreciation of the role of tethers in coordinating the correct SNARE complex and in regulating the organization of membrane compartments. This review will summarize the properties and roles of membrane tethers of both secretory and endocytic systems. PMID:25343031

  17. Inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures alters pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism pathways without lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y C; Rengasamy, Apavoo; Frazer, Dave; Barger, Mark W; Hubbs, Ann F; Battelli, Lori; Tomblyn, Seith; Stone, Samuel; Castranova, Vince

    2003-01-01

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs require bioactivation by the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system to exert toxic/carcinogenic effects. The present study was carried out to characterize the acute pulmonary inflammatory responses and the alterations of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways in rats exposed to asphalt fumes by inhalation. Rats were exposed at various doses and time periods to air or to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures. To assess the acute damage and inflammatory responses, differential cell counts, acellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alveolar macrophage (AM) function was assessed by monitoring generation of chemiluminescence and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. Alteration of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways was determined by monitoring the protein levels and activities of P-450 isozymes (CYP1A1 and CYP2B1), glutathioneS-transferase (GST), and NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). The results show that acute asphalt fume exposure did not cause neutrophil infiltration, alter LDH activity or protein content, or affect AM function, suggesting that short-term asphalt fume exposure did not induce acute lung damage or inflammation. However, acute asphalt fume exposure significantly increased the activity and protein level of CYP1A1 whereas it markedly reduced the activity and protein level of CYP2B1 in the lung. The induction of CYP1A1 was localized in nonciliated bronchiolar epithelial (Clara) cells, alveolar septa, and endothelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy. Cytosolic QR activity was significantly elevated after asphalt fume exposure, whereas GST activity was not affected by the exposure. This induction of CYP1A1 and QR with the concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 after asphalt fume exposure could alter PAH metabolism and may lead to potential

  18. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Y.; Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Ligouis, B.; Werth, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr2O7) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375??C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr2O7 oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr2O7 oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr2O7 oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Field data analysis of asphalt road paving damages caused by tree roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissteiner, Clemens; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2015-04-01

    Tree root damages are a frequent problem along paved cycling paths and service roads of rivers and streams. Damages occur mostly on streets with thin asphalt layers and especially in the upper part of the pavement structure. The maintainers of these roads are faced with frequent and high annual repair costs in order to guarantee traffic safety and pleasant cycling conditions. The focus of this research project is to get an insight in the processes governing the growth of the tree roots in asphalt layers and to develop test methods to avoid rood penetration into the road structure. Tree vegetation has been analysed selectively along a 300 km long cycle and service path of the Danube River in the region of Austria. Tree characteristics, topographic as well as hydrologic conditions have been analysed at 119 spots with different asphalt damage intensities. On 5 spots additional investigations on the root growth characteristics where performed. First results underline a high potential damage of pioneer trees which are growing naturally along rivers. Mostly, local occurring fast growing tree species penetrated the road layer structure. In a few cases other tree species where as well responsible for road structure damages. The age respectively the size of the trees didn't seem to influence significantly the occurrence of asphalt damages. Road structure damages were found to appear unaffected by hydrologic or topographic conditions. However, results have to be interpreted with care as the investigations represent a temporally limited view of the problem situation. The investigations of the root growth characteristics proved that tree roots penetrate the road structure mostly between the gravel sublayer and the asphalt layer as the layers it selves don't allow a penetration because of their high compaction. Furthermore roots appear to be attracted by condensed water at the underside of the asphalt layer. Further steps of the research project imply testing of different

  20. Amino acid geochemistry of fossil bones from the Rancho La Brea asphalt deposit, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMenamin, M.A.S.; Blunt, D.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Miller, S.E.; Marcus, L.F.; Pardi, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Low aspartic acid d:l ratios and modern collagenlike concentration values indicate that amino acids in bones from the Rancho La Brea asphalt deposit, Los Angeles, California are better preserved than amino acids in bones of equivalent age that have not been preserved in asphalt. Amino acids were recovered from 10 Rancho La Brea bone samples which range in age from less than 200 to greater than 36,000 yr. The calibrated rates of aspartic acid racemization range from 2.1 to 5.0 ?? 10-6yr-1. Although this wide range of rate constants decreases the level of confidence for age estimates, use of the larger rate constant of 5.0 ?? 10-6yr-1 provides minimum age estimates which fit the known stratigraphic and chronologic records of the Rancho La Brea deposits. ?? 1982.

  1. Study of asphalt/asphaltene precipitation during addition of solvents to West Sak crude

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Patil, S.L.; Kamath, V.A. )

    1990-07-01

    In this study, experimental data on the amount of asphalt and asphaltene precipitation due to addition of solvents to West Sak crude were gathered. The first set of tests were conducted for two types of West Sak stock tank oils. Solvents used include: ethane, carbon dioxide, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-heptane, Prudhoe Bay natural gas (PBG) and natural gas liquids (NGL). Effect of solvent to oil dilution ratio on the amount of precipitation was studied. Alteration of crude oil composition due to asphalt precipitation was measured using gas-liquid chromatography. A second set of experiments were conducted to measure asphaltene precipitation due to addition of CO{sub 2} to live (recombined) West Sak crude.

  2. Asphalt-aggregate interactions in hot recycling. Final report, April 1985-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggundu, B.M.; Newman, J.K.

    1987-07-01

    This report summarizes results of an investigation of asphalt-aggregate interactions in hot recycled systems. Materials used in the research included a severe stripping aggregate and a nonstripping aggregate. Both were evaluated using the Lottman 70% retained tensile-strength criteria. Additional materials included a 40/60 RAP new aggregate system, one virgin asphalt, two RAP recovered binders, one modifier or recycling agent, and two blends. The modifier was selected using a recently developed specification involving physical, composition, and solubility properties. Aggregates were evaluated for surface area, bulk composition, water-soluble ions, cation exchange capacity, gradation, and specific gravities. Binders were tested for physical properties and composition properties using a modified Clay-Gel procedure, and compatibility properties using a modified Heithaus procedure.

  3. Optical Characterization of Temperature-Dependent Microstructure of Polymeric Asphalt Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, Adam; Shafiei, Farbod; Zamani, Maryam; Sultana, Sharmin; Bhasin, Amit; Downer, M. C.

    2015-03-01

    Asphalt binders used in construction of pavements must be chemically engineered to withstand wide climatic variations. Ideal binders possess high stiffness at high temperatures, low stiffness with high relaxation rates at low temperatures, and high resistance to fatigue cracking at intermediate temperatures. Such bulk properties are conventionally measured with rheometers, but appear to be closely connected with temperature-dependent microstructural changes. AFM has been used to observe such microstructures, but is only possible near room temperature. Here we characterize asphalt binder microstructure over a wide range of temperatures and chemical compositions using noninvasive optical microscopy correlated with linear and second-harmonic optical scatter to measure statistical fluctuations. For example, micron-size ``bee''-structures previously observed by AFM are resolved optically, and are observed to vary as temperature and composition change, while inducing corresponding changes in optical scatter. We will present these and other optical measurements, and discuss their connection to bulk material properties.

  4. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Jacobs, Jeffry; Klink, Frank

    2008-02-17

    We analyze the solar reflectance of asphalt roofing shingles that are covered with pigmented mineral roofing granules. The reflecting surface is rough, with a total area approximately twice the nominal area. We introduce a simple analytical model that relates the 'micro-reflectance' of a small surface region to the 'macro-reflectance' of the shingle. This model uses a mean field approximation to account for multiple scattering effects. The model is then used to compute the reflectance of shingles with a mixture of different colored granules, when the reflectances of the corresponding mono-color shingles are known. Simple linear averaging works well, with small corrections to linear averaging derived for highly reflective materials. Reflective base granules and reflective surface coatings aid achievement of high solar reflectance. Other factors that influence the solar reflectance are the size distribution of the granules, coverage of the asphalt substrate, and orientation of the granules as affected by rollers during fabrication.

  5. Attenuation of foot pressure during running on four different surfaces: asphalt, concrete, rubber, and natural grass.

    PubMed

    Tessutti, Vitor; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Trombini-Souza, Francis; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2012-01-01

    The practice of running has consistently increased worldwide, and with it, related lower limb injuries. The type of running surface has been associated with running injury etiology, in addition other factors, such as the relationship between the amount and intensity of training. There is still controversy in the literature regarding the biomechanical effects of different types of running surfaces on foot-floor interaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of running on asphalt, concrete, natural grass, and rubber on in-shoe pressure patterns in adult recreational runners. Forty-seven adult recreational runners ran twice for 40 m on all four different surfaces at 12 ± 5% km · h(-1). Peak pressure, pressure-time integral, and contact time were recorded by Pedar X insoles. Asphalt and concrete were similar for all plantar variables and pressure zones. Running on grass produced peak pressures 9.3% to 16.6% lower (P < 0.001) than the other surfaces in the rearfoot and 4.7% to 12.3% (P < 0.05) lower in the forefoot. The contact time on rubber was greater than on concrete for the rearfoot and midfoot. The behaviour of rubber was similar to that obtained for the rigid surfaces - concrete and asphalt - possibly because of its time of usage (five years). Running on natural grass attenuates in-shoe plantar pressures in recreational runners. If a runner controls the amount and intensity of practice, running on grass may reduce the total stress on the musculoskeletal system compared with the total musculoskeletal stress when running on more rigid surfaces, such as asphalt and concrete. PMID:22897427

  6. Outbreak of illness due to volatilized asphalt coming from a malfunctioning fluorescent lighting fixture.

    PubMed Central

    Tavris, D R; Field, L; Brumback, C L

    1984-01-01

    We investigated an outbreak of headache, eye irritation, sore throat, nasal congestion, and nausea in an office complex, ongoing for three months and regularly resolved upon leaving the building. Investigation suggested that the etiology of the illness was malfunctioning fluorescent light ballasts , which overheated and resulted in melting and volatilization of contained asphalt . Correction of the problem resulted in almost complete disappearance of symptoms within two weeks. PMID:6721022

  7. Activation Pattern of Lower Leg Muscles in Running on Asphalt, Gravel and Grass.

    PubMed

    Dolenec, Aleš; Štirn, Igor; Strojnik, Vojko

    2015-07-01

    Running is performed on different natural surfaces (outdoor) and artificial surfaces (indoor). Different surface characteristics cause modification of the lower leg muscle activation pattern to adopt ankle stiffness to these characteristics. So the purpose of our investigation was to study changes of lower leg muscles activation pattern in running on different natural running surfaces. Six male and two female runners participated. The participants ran at a freely chosen velocity in trials on asphalt while in trials on gravel, and grass surfaces they were attempting to reach similar velocities as in the trials on asphalt. Muscle activation of the peroneus brevis, tibialis anterior, soleus, and gastrocnemius medialis of the right leg was recorded. Running on asphalt increased average EMG amplitude of the m. tibialis anterior in the pre-activation phase and the m. gastrocnemius medialis in the entire contact phase compared to running on grass from 0.222 ± 0.113 V to 0.276 ± 0.136 V and from 0.214 ± 0.084 V to 0.238 ± 0.088 V, respectively. The average EMG of m. peroneus brevis in pre-activation phase increased from 0.156 ± 0.026 V to 0.184 ± 0.455 V in running on grass in comparison to running on gravel. Running on different surfaces is connected with different activation patterns of lower leg muscles. Running on asphalt requires stiff ankle joints, running on gravel requires greater stability in ankle joints, while running on grass is the least demanding on lower leg muscles. PMID:26434026

  8. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive. PMID:25531980

  9. Outbreak of illness due to volatilized asphalt coming from a malfunction fluorescent lighting fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Tavris, D.R.; Field, L.; Brumback, C.L.

    1984-06-01

    An investigation was made of an outbreak of headache, eye irritation, sore throat, nasal congestion, and nausea in an office complex, ongoing for three months and regularly resolved upon leaving the building. Investigation suggested that the etiology of the illness was malfunctioning fluorescent light ballasts, which overheated and resulted in melting and volatilization of contained asphalt. Correction of the problem resulted in almost complete disappearance of symptoms within two weeks.

  10. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Sadler, Mary E; Greiner, Anthony D; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Min, Kyungnan; Zhang, Kai; Arabi, Sara; Burbano, Marie S; Kent, Fraser; Shoaf, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2014, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, fixed film and anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:26420079

  11. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Burbano, Marie S; Sadler, Mary E; Diamond, Jason; Baker, Simon; Greiner, Anthony D; Arabi, Sara; Wong, Joseph; Doody, Alexandra; Padhye, Lokesh P; Sears, Keith; Kistenmacher, Peter; Kent, Fraser; Tootchi, Leila; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Saddredini, Sara; Schilling, Bill; Min, Kyungnan; McCandless, Robert; Danker, Bryce; Gamage, Neranga P; Wang, Sunny; Aerts, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2015, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:27620084

  12. Implementation and Validation of the Viscoelastic Continuum Damage Theory for Asphalt Mixture and Pavement Analysis in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Luis Alberto Herrmann do

    This dissertation presents the implementation and validation of the viscoelastic continuum damage (VECD) model for asphalt mixture and pavement analysis in Brazil. It proposes a simulated damage-to-fatigue cracked area transfer function for the layered viscoelastic continuum damage (LVECD) program framework and defines the model framework's fatigue cracking prediction error for asphalt pavement reliability-based design solutions in Brazil. The research is divided into three main steps: (i) implementation of the simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model in Brazil (Petrobras) for asphalt mixture characterization, (ii) validation of the LVECD model approach for pavement analysis based on field performance observations, and defining a local simulated damage-to-cracked area transfer function for the Fundao Project's pavement test sections in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and (iii) validation of the Fundao project local transfer function to be used throughout Brazil for asphalt pavement fatigue cracking predictions, based on field performance observations of the National MEPDG Project's pavement test sections, thereby validating the proposed framework's prediction capability. For the first step, the S-VECD test protocol, which uses controlled-on-specimen strain mode-of-loading, was successfully implemented at the Petrobras and used to characterize Brazilian asphalt mixtures that are composed of a wide range of asphalt binders. This research verified that the S-VECD model coupled with the GR failure criterion is accurate for fatigue life predictions of Brazilian asphalt mixtures, even when very different asphalt binders are used. Also, the applicability of the load amplitude sweep (LAS) test for the fatigue characterization of the asphalt binders was checked, and the effects of different asphalt binders on the fatigue damage properties of the asphalt mixtures was investigated. The LAS test results, modeled according to VECD theory, presented a strong correlation with

  13. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L.

    2014-01-21

    The dynamics properties of a new “next generation” model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ∼42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  14. Thermal Stability Analysis under Embankment with Asphalt Pavement and Cement Pavement in Permafrost Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results. PMID:24027444

  15. A Study on the Rheological Properties of Recycled Rubber-Modified Asphalt Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Karacasu, Murat; Er, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Using waste rubber in asphalt mixes has become a common practice in road construction. This paper presents the results of a study on the rheological characteristics of rubber-modified asphalt (RMA) concrete under static and dynamic loading conditions. A number of static and dynamic creep tests were conducted on RMA mix specimens with different rubber sizes and contents, and a series of resonant column tests were conducted to evaluate the shear modulus and damping values. To simulate the stress-strain response of traffic-induced loading, the measurements were taken for different confining pressures and strain levels. The results of the study indicated that rubber modification increases stiffness and damping ratio, making it a very attractive material for use in road construction. However the grain size of the rubber is very important. Although RMA may cost up to 100% more than regular asphalt, the advantages it brings, such as an increased service life of the road and proper waste utilization contributing to a more sustainable infrastructure, may justify the added cost. PMID:25695096

  16. Thermal Behavior of an Asphalt Pavement in the Laboratory and in the Parking Lot

    PubMed Central

    Martinkauppi, J. B.; Mäkiranta, A.; Kiijärvi, J.; Hiltunen, E.

    2015-01-01

    The urban, constructed areas are full of buildings and different kinds of pavements and have a noticeable lack of trees and flora. These areas are accumulating the heat from the Sun, people, vehicles, and constructions. One interesting heat collector is the asphalt pavement. How does the heat transfer to different layers under the pavement or does it? What are the temperatures under the pavement in Finland where the winter can be pretty hard? How can those temperatures be measured accurately? These are the main questions this paper gives the preliminary answers to. First the thermal behavior of asphalt and the layers beneath are researched in the laboratory and then the measurement field is bored and dug in the parking in the Western coast of Finland, 63°5′45′′ N. Distributed temperature sensing method was found to be a good choice for temperature measurements. Thermal behavior of pavement has been monitored in different layers and the preliminary results have been published here. The goal of this research is to assess the applicability of asphalt pavements for heat energy collection. PMID:25861679

  17. Use of fabrics and other measures for retarding reflective cracking of asphaltic concrete overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. D.

    1980-03-01

    Prevention or control of reflection cracks in asphaltic concrete overlays has been a problem from the inception of this type of construction. The many different treatments that have been tried in an effort to solve this problem are: (1) reinforcement within and below the overlay, (2) bond breakers, (3) stress relieving layers, (4) asphalt-mix additives, and (5) placement of fabrics between the existing pavement and the overlay. At the present time, no treatment has been tried that will completely prevent the formation of reflection cracks. Some treatments do delay the formation of cracks, while others do not appear to help at all. Indications are that fabrics do have some beneficial effects, such as a moisture barrier, even though the overlays develop reflection cracks. The fabrics that have been tried for the control of reflection cracks included: (1) Petromat, (2) Bidim, (3) Typar, (4) Cerex, (5) Mirafi, (6) Structofors, (7) Bituthene, (8) Protecto-Wrap, and (9) Fiberglass. Asphalt-rubber interlayers, as formulated by the Arizona Refining Company and the Sahuaro Petroleum Company, show promise in retarding reflection cracks.

  18. A study on the rheological properties of recycled rubber-modified asphalt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Karacasu, Murat; Okur, Volkan; Er, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Using waste rubber in asphalt mixes has become a common practice in road construction. This paper presents the results of a study on the rheological characteristics of rubber-modified asphalt (RMA) concrete under static and dynamic loading conditions. A number of static and dynamic creep tests were conducted on RMA mix specimens with different rubber sizes and contents, and a series of resonant column tests were conducted to evaluate the shear modulus and damping values. To simulate the stress-strain response of traffic-induced loading, the measurements were taken for different confining pressures and strain levels. The results of the study indicated that rubber modification increases stiffness and damping ratio, making it a very attractive material for use in road construction. However the grain size of the rubber is very important. Although RMA may cost up to 100% more than regular asphalt, the advantages it brings, such as an increased service life of the road and proper waste utilization contributing to a more sustainable infrastructure, may justify the added cost. PMID:25695096

  19. Prediction of Frequency for Simulation of Asphalt Mix Fatigue Tests Using MARS and ANN

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue life of asphalt mixes in laboratory tests is commonly determined by applying a sinusoidal or haversine waveform with specific frequency. The pavement structure and loading conditions affect the shape and the frequency of tensile response pulses at the bottom of asphalt layer. This paper introduces two methods for predicting the loading frequency in laboratory asphalt fatigue tests for better simulation of field conditions. Five thousand (5000) four-layered pavement sections were analyzed and stress and strain response pulses in both longitudinal and transverse directions was determined. After fitting the haversine function to the response pulses by the concept of equal-energy pulse, the effective length of the response pulses were determined. Two methods including Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods were then employed to predict the effective length (i.e., frequency) of tensile stress and strain pulses in longitudinal and transverse directions based on haversine waveform. It is indicated that, under controlled stress and strain modes, both methods (MARS and ANN) are capable of predicting the frequency of loading in HMA fatigue tests with very good accuracy. The accuracy of ANN method is, however, more than MARS method. It is furthermore shown that the results of the present study can be generalized to sinusoidal waveform by a simple equation. PMID:24688400

  20. Analysis of ground reflection of jet noise obtained with various microphone arrays over an asphalt surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflection effects on the propagation of jet noise over an asphalt surface are discussed for data obtained using a 33.02 cm (13-in.) diameter nozzle with microphones at several heights and distances from the nozzle axis. Analysis of ground reflection effects is accomplished using the concept of a reflected signal transfer function which represents the influence of both the reflecting surface and the atmosphere on the propagation of the reflected signal in a mathematical model. The mathematical model used as a basis for the computer program was successful in significantly reducing the ground reflection effects. The range of values of the single complex number used to define the reflected signal transfer function was larger than expected when determined only by the asphalt surface. This may indicate that the atmosphere is affecting the propagation of the reflected signal more than the asphalt surface. Also discussed is the selective placement of the reinforcements and cancellations in the design of an experiment to minimize ground reflection effects.

  1. Hei-way general purpose recycled asphalt material (RHM). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, U.

    1993-02-01

    Utilization of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) in paving projects is a popular concept. It conserves material and can often provide an economical alternative to using virgin materials. The research summarizes the utilization of about 8000 tons of RAP in a project in Armstrong County (SR 3011 and SR 3013) using a proprietary process by Heilman Pavement Specialities. The mix is called Recycled Heilman Mix (RHM), which is prepared using a proprietary blend of asphalt cement (AC-5) and a rejuvenator mixed with equal weights of RAP and virgin aggregates in a batch-type pugmill. A control mix was produced by using 9.6 gallons per ton of E-5 emulsion and a blend of equal weights of RAP and coarse aggregates. The construction of the two sites were completed in September 1988 without any significant problems. A three-wheeled roller, ballasted rubber-tired roller and a second 1-ton tandem roller was used for compaction. There were no significant construction problems. RHM performed well on this project. The method of recycling asphalt pavements appears to be viable. RHM is stockpileable. Although RHM was 40 to 50 percent more expensive on the project, the life cycle costs on larger projects can be more competitive, especially when the cost of a seal coat is either avoided or delayed on RHM jobs when compared to E-5 mixes as control.

  2. Assessment of the aging level of rejuvenated hot mixed asphalt concrete pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Megan; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of asphalt rejuvenator on restoring the properties of oxidatively aged asphalt was tested via a non-collinear ultrasonic subsurface wave mixing technique modified for field use. Longitudinal transducers were mounted on angle wedges to generate subsurface dilatational waves to allow for pavement evaluation when there is only access to one side. Because in the field the asphalt concrete (AC) pavement properties (i.e., ultrasonic velocities and attenuations) are unknown, a pre-determined fixed incident angle (based on the AC mixture type) was used, which allows for practical implementation in the field. Oxidative aged AC specimens were coated with rejuvenator (10% by weight of the binder) and left to dwell for varying amounts of time. Once the dwell time reached the desired amount, the specimen was immediately ultrasonically tested. The frequency ratio, f2/f1, at which the interaction took place and the normalized nonlinear wave generation parameter, β/β0, were recorded and compared against a reference plot. It was observed that the rejuvenator had the effect of restoring the nonlinear properties to those corresponding to a virgin sample after a sufficient amount of dwell time. The ability of the rejuvenator to fully penetrate and act on the binder was observed to be dependent on the porosity and aggregate structure, and thus varied for each specimen. As a result, some portions of the binder were restored to a greater extent than others. This non-uniform nature was captured via the nonlinear ultrasonic technique.

  3. Preparation of capsules containing rejuvenators for their use in asphalt concrete.

    PubMed

    García, Alvaro; Schlangen, Erik; van de Ven, Martin; Sierra-Beltrán, Guadalupe

    2010-12-15

    Every year, there is a demand of more than 110 million metric tons of asphalt all around the world. This represents a huge amount of money and energy, from which a good part is for the preservation and renovation of the existing pavements. The problem of asphalt is that it oxidizes with time and therefore its beneficial properties disappear. Traditionally, rejuvenators spread in the road surface, are used to restore the original properties of the pavement. The problem is that, for a rejuvenator to be successful, it must penetrate the pavement surface. Furthermore, application of a rejuvenator will reduce the skid resistance of the pavement and, besides, rejuvenators have many aromatic compounds that can be harmful for the environment. To solve these problems this paper introduces a new concept in road construction: encapsulated rejuvenators. The basic principle is that when the stress in capsules embedded in the asphalt reaches a certain threshold value, the capsules break and some rejuvenator is released, restoring the original properties of the pavement. This paper will show how to prepare such capsules and how to determine their characteristics. This is one of the first steps towards intelligent pavements. PMID:20855160

  4. Thermal behavior of an asphalt pavement in the laboratory and in the parking lot.

    PubMed

    Martinkauppi, J B; Mäkiranta, A; Kiijärvi, J; Hiltunen, E

    2015-01-01

    The urban, constructed areas are full of buildings and different kinds of pavements and have a noticeable lack of trees and flora. These areas are accumulating the heat from the Sun, people, vehicles, and constructions. One interesting heat collector is the asphalt pavement. How does the heat transfer to different layers under the pavement or does it? What are the temperatures under the pavement in Finland where the winter can be pretty hard? How can those temperatures be measured accurately? These are the main questions this paper gives the preliminary answers to. First the thermal behavior of asphalt and the layers beneath are researched in the laboratory and then the measurement field is bored and dug in the parking in the Western coast of Finland, 63°5'45'' N. Distributed temperature sensing method was found to be a good choice for temperature measurements. Thermal behavior of pavement has been monitored in different layers and the preliminary results have been published here. The goal of this research is to assess the applicability of asphalt pavements for heat energy collection. PMID:25861679

  5. Microbial Diversity in Natural Asphalts of the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Shik; Crowley, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria commonly inhabit subsurface oil reservoirs, but almost nothing is known yet about microorganisms that live in naturally occurring terrestrial oil seeps and natural asphalts that are comprised of highly recalcitrant petroleum hydrocarbons. Here we report the first survey of microbial diversity in ca. 28,000-year-old samples of natural asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, CA. Microbiological studies included analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA encoding aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases from two tar pits differing in chemical composition. Our results revealed a wide range of phylogenetic groups within the Archaea and Bacteria domains, in which individual taxonomic clusters were comprised of sets of closely related species within novel genera and families. Fluorescent staining of asphalt-soil particles using phylogenetic probes for Archaea, Bacteria, and Pseudomonas showed coexistence of mixed microbial communities at high cell densities. Genes encoding dioxygenases included three novel clusters of enzymes. The discovery of life in the tar pits provides an avenue for further studies of the evolution of enzymes and catabolic pathways for bacteria that have been exposed to complex hydrocarbons for millennia. These bacteria also should have application for industrial microbiology and bioremediation. PMID:17416692

  6. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  7. The Asphalt Ecosystem of the Southern Gulf of Mexico: Results from F/S METEOR Cruise M114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Sahling, H.; Bohrmann, G.; Schubotz, F.

    2015-12-01

    Asphalt volcanism in the deep ocean can generate substantial areas of hard substratum and hydrocarbon fluxes that support chemosynthetic communities. The process was first described in the southern Gulf of Mexico following the discovery in 2003 of Chapopote, a knoll at 3200m depth that includes large asphalt flows. F/S METEOR returned to the region in February and March, 2015 to quantify the extent and characteristics of Chapopote and other asphalt-hosting knolls using the SEAL AUV, QUEST ROV, shipborne acoustics, and autonomous instrument landers. Preliminary findings have greatly expanded the number of confirmed asphalt volcanoes, as well as sites where seepage was detected as gas flares in the water column. The morphology of asphalt flows, which was investigated using large-scale photo-mosaicking techniques, indicated that they form with a complex interplay of gravity flows, buoyant uplift, and chemical weathering. Geochemical analysis of asphalt samples is underway to investigate the ages of material and the time-constants of alterations after exposure at the seafloor. Rapid gas hydrate formation had generated massive seafloor deposits at several sites. Notably, gas hydrate mounds had been colonized by aggregations of 2m long tubeworms that extended over areas approaching 1000 sq m in some cases. The biological community comprised an abundant assemblage in which the caridean shrimp Alvinocaris muricola and the squat lobsters Munidopsis geyeri and M. exuta were numerically dominant. Chemosynthetic fauna were primarily the tubeworm Escarpia laminate, observed on asphalt surfaces and gas hydrate substrate and the mussel Bathymodiolus heckarae, observed around active gas vents. Prospects for oil and gas development in the region raise questions regarding appropriate measures for safeguarding lush chemosynthetic communities.

  8. Development of indirect ring tension test for fracture characterization of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Siavashani, Alireza

    Low temperature cracking is a major distress in asphalt pavements. Several test configurations have been introduced to characterize the fracture properties of hot mix (HMA); however, most are considered to be research tools due to the complexity of the test methods or equipment. This dissertation describes the development of the indirect ring tension (IRT) fracture test for HMA, which was designed to be an effective and user-friendly test that could be deployed at the Department of Transportation level. The primary advantages of this innovative and yet practical test include: relatively large fracture surface test zone, simplicity of the specimen geometry, widespread availability of the required test equipment, and ability to test laboratory compacted specimens as well as field cores. Numerical modeling was utilized to calibrate the stress intensity factor formula of the IRT fracture test for various specimen dimensions. The results of this extensive analysis were encapsulated in a single equation. To develop the test procedure, a laboratory study was conducted to determine the optimal test parameters for HMA material. An experimental plan was then developed to evaluate the capability of the test in capturing the variations in the mix properties, asphalt pavement density, asphalt material aging, and test temperature. Five plant-produced HMA mixtures were used in this extensive study, and the results revealed that the IRT fracture test is highly repeatable, and capable of capturing the variations in the fracture properties of HMA. Furthermore, an analytical model was developed based on the viscoelastic properties of HMA to estimate the maximum allowable crack size for the pavements in the experimental study. This analysis indicated that the low-temperature cracking potential of the asphalt mixtures is highly sensitive to the fracture toughness and brittleness of the HMA material. Additionally, the IRT fracture test data seemed to correlate well with the data from

  9. Discovery and Description of Extinct Asphalt Volcanoes Along the Southern California Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. L.; Reddy, C.; Ventura, G. T.; Nelson, R. K.

    2007-12-01

    Asphalt volcanism is increasingly being recognized as an important process at cold seeps, linking ancient subsurface carbon reservoirs with more rapid biogeochemical processes at the surface. Here we describe two extinct asphalt volcanoes discovered off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA, using the DSV Alvin during the July 2007 SEEPS (Studies on the Ecology and Evolution of Petroleum Seeps) cruise. These structures are located approximately 10 kilometers offshore and 2 kilometers apart from each other, at a water depth of 150 to 200 meters. The volcanoes occur as asphalt mounds closely associated with sediment-laden depressions, suggesting extrusion of liquid petroleum coupled with localized subsidence or gas blowout. The volcanoes range from 10 to 30 meters in height off the sea floor and may extend below the present level of sediment cover. No active seepage was observed during approximately 10 hours of visual and video surveys from the DSV Alvin, but the volcanoes appear to serve as an oasis for benthic life when compared to the surrounding sediment. Four asphalt samples were collected throughout each site during these surveys and all show remarkable similarity in their structure and chemical composition. Organic carbon comprises 50 percent of the mass for each sample, with sulfur, hydrogen and nitrogen comprising another 10 percent in aggregate. Inclusions of fine-grained sediment and microfossils comprise much of the residual mass and are being used in an attempt to determine the timing of the eruptive events. Each sample was analyzed for the stable isotope composition of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur, and results are consistent with a petroleum source from the Miocene-age Monterey Formation. Analysis of biomarkers using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography yields a suite of hopanes and steranes also consistent with petroleum from the Monterey Formation, but with anomalously high concentrations of bisnorhopane. To our knowledge, this is the first report

  10. Implication of Coal Tar and Asphalt on Black Carbon Quantification in Urban Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Werth, C. J.; Ligouis, B.; Razzaque, M.

    2008-12-01

    Sorption to black carbon (BC) is an important process that controls the transport and fate of persistent organic pollutants in aquatic environments. Efforts have been made to measure BC in different environmental matrices including aerosols, soils, and sediments; however, few studies have attempted to evaluate BC in dust from urban streets or parking lots, which can be an important BC source in urban lake sediments. Methods to quantify BC in soils and sediments usually involve the removal of non-BC carbonaceous materials with chemical and/or thermal oxidation followed by elemental analysis. The presence of coal tar pitch and asphalt in urban pavement dust is hypothesized to potentially result in an overestimate of BC. The primary objectives of this research are to identify the distribution of BC in a small urban watershed and to investigate the potential interference from coal tar and asphalt on BC quantification by method intercomparison. Samples were collected from the Lake Como watershed in Fort Worth, Texas. They include dust from coal-tar-sealed and unsealed parking lots and residential streets, soils from residential and commercial areas, stream bed sediments, and lake sediment cores. After density separation, samples were subjected to sequential chemical treatments and thermal treatment. Commercial coal tar pitch and asphalt products were subjected to these same treatments for comparison. BC contents quantified with chemical treatment and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375°C (CTO-375) were compared with those characterized using organic petrography. The chemical treatment predicted greater BC contents than organic petrography in all samples, and the greatest difference is in the sealed parking lot dust. CTO-375 method also predicted greater BC content in this sample than organic petrography. Commercial coal tar pitch was resistant to thermal oxidation and both coal tar pitch and asphalt were resistant to the chemical treatment. These results indicate that

  11. Explosion investigation of asphalt-salt mixtures in a reprocessing plant.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Li, Y

    2000-12-15

    Cause investigation of a fire and explosion at the nuclear fuel waste reprocessing plant indicated that self-heating ignition of an asphalt-salt-waste, bituminized, mixture (AS) caused the disaster. A 220l drum was filled with the AS at a temperature of about 180 degrees C. About 20h later the drum ignited and burned as it was being cooled. It is estimated that the AS contained approximately 55wt.% blown asphalt, 25wt.% NaNO(3), 5wt.% NaNO(2), 8wt.% Na(2)CO(3), 2wt.% NaH(2)PO(4), 1wt.% Ba (OH)(2), 1wt.% K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)], and possibly 3wt.% of other materials. To determine the reaction promoting factors and pertinent chemical reaction rates, self-reaction of the AS has been investigated by the use of a C80D heat flux reaction calorimeter. The oxidizing reactions with asphalt are ruled by NaNO(2) rather than by NaNO(3), in spite of a lower concentration of NaNO(2). The kinetic rates of the interfacial reaction between salt particles and asphalt for the reaction controlled and diffusion controlled steps have been formulated as a function of salt particle size for both NaNO(2) and NaNO(3). Numerical solution of the heat balance equations formulating the heterogeneous reaction scheme indicates that a runaway reaction occurs when the AS-filling temperature is 208 degrees C for a drum filled with an AS mixture produced under standard operating conditions. Molecules containing intramolecular hydrogen, such as Na(2)HPO(4) and NaHCO(3), do not oxidize asphalt directly, however, their presence chemically promotes the oxidizing reaction of NaNO(2). Moreover, NaHCO(3) decomposition which produces gases creates many micro holes in the interior of the salt particles. This in turn promotes the oxidizing reactions that are diffusion controlled. Finally, the consequence of a runaway reaction at 180 degrees C or lower is qualitatively explained by taking into account the chemical effect of intramolecular hydrogen and the physical effect of the NaHCO(3) decomposition gases. PMID

  12. Respirable crystalline silica exposures during asphalt pavement milling at eleven highway construction sites.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Duane R; Shulman, Stanley A; Echt, Alan S

    2016-07-01

    Asphalt pavement milling machines use a rotating cutter drum to remove the deteriorated road surface for recycling. The removal of the road surface has the potential to release respirable crystalline silica, to which workers can be exposed. This article describes an evaluation of respirable crystalline silica exposures to the operator and ground worker from two different half-lane and larger asphalt pavement milling machines that had ventilation dust controls and water-sprays designed and installed by the manufacturers. Manufacturer A completed milling for 11 days at 4 highway construction sites in Wisconsin, and Manufacturer B completed milling for 10 days at 7 highway construction sites in Indiana. To evaluate the dust controls, full-shift personal breathing zone air samples were collected from an operator and ground worker during the course of normal employee work activities of asphalt pavement milling at 11 different sites. Forty-two personal breathing zone air samples were collected over 21 days (sampling on an operator and ground worker each day). All samples were below 50 µg/m(3) for respirable crystalline silica, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended exposure limit. The geometric mean personal breathing zone air sample was 6.2 µg/m(3) for the operator and 6.1 µg/m(3) for the ground worker for the Manufacturer A milling machine. The geometric mean personal breathing zone air sample was 4.2 µg/m(3) for the operator and 9.0 µg/m(3) for the ground worker for the Manufacturer B milling machine. In addition, upper 95% confidence limits for the mean exposure for each occupation were well below 50 µg/m(3) for both studies. The silica content in the bulk asphalt material being milled ranged from 7-23% silica for roads milled by Manufacturer A and from 5-12% silica for roads milled by Manufacturer B. The results indicate that engineering controls consisting of ventilation controls in combination with water-sprays are

  13. Development of an Image-based Multi-Scale Finite Element Approach to Predict Fatigue Damage in Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Amir

    Image-based simulation of complex materials is a very important tool for understanding their mechanical behavior and an effective tool for successful design of composite materials. In this thesis an image-based multi-scale finite element approach is developed to predict the mechanical properties of asphalt mixtures. In this approach the "up-scaling" and homogenization of each scale to the next is critically designed to improve accuracy. In addition to this multi-scale efficiency, this study introduces an approach for consideration of particle contacts at each of the scales in which mineral particles exist. One of the most important pavement distresses which seriously affects the pavement performance is fatigue cracking. As this cracking generally takes place in the binder phase of the asphalt mixture, the binder fatigue behavior is assumed to be one of the main factors influencing the overall pavement fatigue performance. It is also known that aggregate gradation, mixture volumetric properties, and filler type and concentration can affect damage initiation and progression in the asphalt mixtures. This study was conducted to develop a tool to characterize the damage properties of the asphalt mixtures at all scales. In the present study the Viscoelastic continuum damage model is implemented into the well-known finite element software ABAQUS via the user material subroutine (UMAT) in order to simulate the state of damage in the binder phase under the repeated uniaxial sinusoidal loading. The inputs are based on the experimentally derived measurements for the binder properties. For the scales of mastic and mortar, the artificially 2-Dimensional images of mastic and mortar scales were generated and used to characterize the properties of those scales. Finally, the 2D scanned images of asphalt mixtures are used to study the asphalt mixture fatigue behavior under loading. In order to validate the proposed model, the experimental test results and the simulation results were

  14. Attempted DNA extraction from a Rancho La Brea Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi): prospects for ancient DNA from asphalt deposits

    PubMed Central

    Gold, David A; Robinson, Jacqueline; Farrell, Aisling B; Harris, John M; Thalmann, Olaf; Jacobs, David K

    2014-01-01

    Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphalt-mediated inhibition. In an attempt to test these hypotheses, a recently recovered Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) skeleton with an unusual pattern of asphalt impregnation was studied. Ultimately, none of the bone samples tested successfully amplified M. columbi DNA. Our work suggests that reagents typically used to remove asphalt from ancient samples also inhibit DNA extraction. Ultimately, we conclude that the probability of recovering ancient DNA from fossils in asphalt deposits is strongly (perhaps fatally) hindered by the organic compounds that permeate the bones and that at the Rancho La Brea tar pits, environmental conditions might not have been ideal for the general preservation of genetic material. PMID:24634719

  15. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J.

    1996-06-01

    About 285 million tires are discarded every year; less than 100 million are currently being recycled, with the rest being placed in landfills and other waste sites. A solution to reduce the littering of the environment is to use ground tire rubber in road construction. Currently, about 27 million tons of asphalt are used each year in road construction and maintenance of the country`s 2 million miles of roads. If all of the waste tire rubber could be combined with asphalt in road construction, it would displace less than 6% of the total asphalt used each year, yet could save about 60 trillion Btus annually. Purpose of this project is to provide data needed to optimize the performance of rubber-asphalt concretes. The first phase is to develop asphalts and recycling agents tailored for compatibility with ground tire rubber. Chapter 2 presents results on Laboratory Testing and Evaluation: fractionate asphalt material, reblending for aromatic asphalts, verifying optimal curing parameters, aging of blends, and measuring ductilities of asphalt-rubber binders. Chapter 3 focuses on Evaluating Mixture Characteristics (modified binders). Chapter 4 covers Adhesion Test Development (water susceptibility is also covered). The final chapter focuses on the Performance/Economic Update and Commercialization Plan.

  16. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  17. Development of an Eastern Shale Oil Residue as an Asphalt Additive - Subtask 2.5: Topical report, February 1, 1994-February 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility is being conducted. An eastern shale oil residue having a viscosity of 1.30 Pa`s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. In addition, blends of the eastern shale oil residue and the petroleum-derived asphalts are being coated onto three different aggregates that are known to be susceptible to water stripping. The oxidative age hardening portion of this study is not complete at this time. To date, information has been obtained on the unaged samples and two of the aged petroleum-derived asphalts (AAD-1 and AAK-1). When complete, this data will include rheological data on the unaged, RTFO-aged, and the RTFO/PAV-aged samples and infrared data on the unaged and RTFO/PAV-aged samples. With respect to the rheological data, asphalt AAD-1 meets the specifications of a PG 58 asphalt while asphalt AAK-1 does not. In the latter case this indicates that AAK-1 is more appropriately evaluated at a higher temperature range. The infrared spectroscopic data obtained for the eastern shale oil residue show that it contains appreciable amounts of carbonyl and sulfoxide compound types, 0.22 absorbance units and 0. 27 moles/L, respectively. Thus, upon the addition of this residue to the three petroleum-derived asphalts the blends contain increased amounts of these functional groups relative to the petroleum-derived asphalts. This has been observed with other additives and is not considered detrimental. In addition, the data that has been collected to date indicate that the moisture susceptibility of blends of eastern shale oil residue and asphalt AAK-1 are somewhat improved when coated onto Lithonia granite.

  18. Biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes allow life as we know it to exist. They form cells and enable separation between the inside and outside of an organism, controlling by means of their selective permeability which substances enter and leave. By allowing gradients of ions to be created across them, membranes also enable living organisms to generate energy. In addition, they control the flow of messages between cells by sending, receiving and processing information in the form of chemical and electrical signals. This essay summarizes the structure and function of membranes and the proteins within them, and describes their role in trafficking and transport, and their involvement in health and disease. Techniques for studying membranes are also discussed. PMID:26504250

  19. Membranous nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels (most often statins) may be recommended. A low-salt diet may ... of membranous nephropathy Your symptoms get worse or don't go away You develop new symptoms You have ...

  20. Asphalt Flows on Chapopote, a Knoll in the Campeche Bay, Southern Gulf of Mexico - new Results From ROV Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, M.; Bohrmann, G.; Sahling, H.; MacDonald, I. R.; Escobar Briones, E. G.

    2007-05-01

    During the German expeditions SO174 in 2003 and M67 in 2006 swath mapping was carried out in the salt diapir province in the Campeche Bay. The seafloor morphology in the north of the area is dominated by elongated hills, called knolls. Asphalts have been discovered at two of the 400 m high knolls during video surveys, but more findings are likely. During M67 dives with the ROV QUEST were carried out at one of the knolls, named "Chapopote", in about 3000 m water depth. Chapopote has a caldera-like central depression with a rim that is depressed in the north and south. The distribution of asphalts is patchy, with a major field south-east of the central depression and several smaller areas some hundred meters apart from each other at the rim. Asphalts cover about 0.5 km2. The main field appears to be the most recent outflow of asphalt. The flow pattern of this asphalt is ropy with little signs for degradation. At the other fields the asphalts are degraded to blocks without visible flow structures and are covered with hemipelagic sediments. Based on detailed observations, we put an earlier model by Hovland et al., EOS, 86, 42, 2006, in question. This model proposes supercritical water transporting hydrocarbons leading to the expulsion of warm or hot asphalts at the seafloor. Alternatively, we favour the view that cold hydrocarbons flew out at several locations at Chapopote. In a subsequent alteration process, the hydrocarbons lose the more volatile components leading to the observed residue of asphalts on top of the sediments. We found evidence of seepage at Chapopote: outflow of gas bubbles, occurrence of gas hydrates and release of oil while sampling. At one site, we observed a package of individual flows stacked on top of each other. This structure suggests that the expelled hydrocarbons, can flow into the water as a viscous fluid, which is positive buoyant. During the alteration the flows get heavier and lay down at the sediments and partly keep on flowing

  1. Damage detection and artificial healing of asphalt concrete after trafficking with a load simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M.; Arraigada, M.; Partl, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    Artificial healing of asphalt concrete by induction heating requires the addition of electrically conductive and/or magnetic materials into the asphalt mixture. Hence, bitumen can be heated up by an alternating electromagnetic field, decreasing therefore its viscosity and allowing it to flow for closing cracks and recover bonding among the mineral aggregates. In this work, a recent performance oriented study of this innovative approach to prove the feasibility of the healing concept at large scale is presented. This work was focused on the analysis of 1.8 m long test slabs damaged by the Model Mobile Load Simulator MMLS3. It is known that visible cracks cannot be completely healed by this technique and therefore, recovery of the mechanical performance is not significant. For this reason, inductive heating must be applied not later than the initiation of micro-cracks to allow them to be promptly closed avoiding their propagation. In order to monitor the damage level of a number of the test slabs during the loading phase, a digital image correlation system was used in this work. This optical method allowed us to see the accumulated damage as well as to select the right moment to accomplish the healing process. In addition, this method was useful to confirm that the strength was recovered after a healing process and hence, an increase of life of the asphalt pavement might be obtained. Finally, it was demonstrated that healing by induction heating can be a feasible alternative for maintenance purposes when used before irreversible damage of the pavement.

  2. Use of plastic waste (poly-ethylene terephthalate) in asphalt concrete mixture as aggregate replacement.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Abolfazl; Ganjidoust, Hossein; Maghanaki, Amir Abedin

    2005-08-01

    One of the environmental issues in most regions of Iran is the large number of bottles made from poly-ethylene terephthalate (PET) deposited in domestic wastes and landfills. Due to the high volume of these bottles, more than 1 million m3 landfill space is needed for disposal every year. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the possibility of using PET waste in asphalt concrete mixes as aggregate replacement (Plastiphalt) to reduce the environmental effects of PET disposal. For this purpose the mechanical properties of plastiphalt mixes were compared with control samples. This study focused on the parameters of Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient (stability-to-flow ratio) and density. The waste PET used in this study was in the form of granules of about 3 mm diameter which would replace (by volume) a portion of the mineral coarse aggregates of an equal size (2.36-4.75 mm). In all prepared mixes the determined 6.6% optimum bitumen content was used. In this investigation, five different percentages of coarse aggregate replacement were used. The results showed that the aggregate replacement of 20% by volume with PET granules would result in a reduction of 2.8% in bulk compacted mix density. The value of flow in the plastiphalt mix was lower than that of the control samples. The results also showed that when PET was used as partial aggregate replacement, the corresponding Marshall stability and Marshall quotient were almost the same as for the control samples. According to most of specification requirement, these results introduce an asphalt mix that has properties that makes it suitable for practical use and furthermore, the recycling of PET for asphalt concrete roads helps alleviate an environmental problem and saves energy. PMID:16200982

  3. Generation of urban road dust from anti-skid and asphalt concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Tervahattu, Heikki; Kupiainen, Kaarle J; Räisänen, Mika; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto

    2006-04-30

    Road dust forms an important component of airborne particulate matter in urban areas. In many winter cities the use of anti-skid aggregates and studded tires enhance the generation of mineral particles. The abrasion particles dominate the PM10 during springtime when the material deposited in snow is resuspended. This paper summarizes the results from three test series performed in a test facility to assess the factors that affect the generation of abrasion components of road dust. Concentrations, mass size distribution and composition of the particles were studied. Over 90% of the particles were aluminosilicates from either anti-skid or asphalt concrete aggregates. Mineral particles were observed mainly in the PM10 fraction, the fine fraction being 12% and submicron size being 6% of PM10 mass. The PM10 concentrations increased as a function of the amount of anti-skid aggregate dispersed. The use of anti-skid aggregate increased substantially the amount of PM10 originated from the asphalt concrete. It was concluded that anti-skid aggregate grains contribute to pavement wear. The particle size distribution of the anti-skid aggregates had great impact on PM10 emissions which were additionally enhanced by studded tires, modal composition, and texture of anti-skid aggregates. The results emphasize the interaction of tires, anti-skid aggregate, and asphalt concrete pavement in the production of dust emissions. They all must be taken into account when measures to reduce road dust are considered. The winter maintenance and springtime cleaning must be performed properly with methods which are efficient in reducing PM10 dust. PMID:16426748

  4. Investigation of Primary Causes of Load-Related Cracking in Asphalt Concrete Pavement in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hong Joon

    This dissertation presents causes of cracking in asphalt concrete pavement in North Carolina through field investigation and laboratory experiments with field extracted material. North Carolina is experiencing higher than anticipated rates of fatigue cracking compared to other state. These higher than expected rates could be reflective of the national trends in mix design practice or could be caused by structural pavement failures. The problems associated with premature cracking in North Carolina pavements point to the need to evaluate the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) mixes, processes, and measures to ensure that these factors properly balance the goals of preventing cracking and minimizing permanent deformation. Without solid data from in-service pavements, any conclusions regarding the causes of these failures might be pure conjecture. Accordingly, this research examines material properties through laboratory experiments using field-extracted materials and investigates in situ pavements and pavement structure. In order to assess condition of existing pavement, alligator cracking index (ACI) was developed. The asphalt content in the top layer that exhibits top-down cracking or bottom-up cracking has a proportional relationship to ACI values. The air void content in a bottom layer that exhibits top-down cracking or bottom-up cracking shows an inverse proportional relationship to ACI values. These observations reflect reasonable results. A comparison between ACI and asphalt film thickness values does not produce noteworthy findings, but somewhat reasonable results are evident once the range of comparison is narrowed down. Thicker film thicknesses show higher ACI values. From field core visual observations, road widening is identified as a major cause of longitudinal cracking. Regions with observed layer interface separation tend to have low ACI values. Through tensile strain simulation based on actual field conditions, it is observed that

  5. Recycled asphalt pavement as a base and sub-base material

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, M.H.; Gucunski, N.; Papp, W.J. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory and field investigations were conducted to evaluate the use of recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in roadway base and sub-base applications. The laboratory resilient modulus test results showed RAP has comparable strength with dense graded aggregate base and sub-base material used in the state of New Jersey. Using the spectral-analysis-of-the-surface-waves method (SASW), the field testing program evaluated the elastic modulus of the RAP base in the field and verified the laboratory results. The field test results showed higher modulus and stiffness for RAP than the dense graded aggregate base normally used in state of New Jersey.

  6. Computational microstructure modeling of asphalt mixtures subjected to rate-dependent fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragao, Francisco Thiago Sacramento

    2011-12-01

    Computational microstructure models have been actively pursued by the pavement mechanics community as a promising and advantageous alternative to limited analytical and semi-empirical modeling approaches. The primary goal of this research is to develop a computational microstructure modeling framework that will eventually allow researchers and practitioners of the pavement mechanics community to evaluate the effects of constituents and mix design characteristics (some of the key factors directly affecting the quality of the pavement structures) on the mechanical responses of asphalt mixtures. To that end, the mixtures are modeled as heterogeneous materials with inelastic mechanical behavior. To account for the complex geometric characteristics of the heterogeneous mixtures, an image treatment process is used to generate finite element meshes that closely reproduce the geometric characteristics of aggregate particles (size, shape, and volume fraction) that are distributed within a fine aggregate asphaltic matrix (FAM). These two mixture components, i.e., aggregate particles and FAM, are modeled, respectively, as isotropic linear elastic and isotropic linear viscoelastic materials and the material properties required as inputs for the computational model are obtained from simple and expedited laboratory tests. In addition to the consideration of the complex geometric characteristics and inelastic behavior of the mixtures, this study uses the cohesive zone model to simulate fracture as a gradual and rate-dependent phenomenon in which the initiation and propagation of discrete cracks take place in different locations of the mixture microstructure. Rate-dependent cohesive zone fracture properties are obtained using a procedure that combines laboratory tests of semi-circular bending specimens of the FAM and their numerical simulations. To address the rate-dependent fracture characteristics of the FAM phase, a rate-dependent cohesive zone model is developed and

  7. Impact, thermal, and shock sensitivity of molten TNT and of asphalt-contaminated molten TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Mainiero, R.J.; Miron, Y.; Kwak, S.S.W.; Kopera, L.H.; Wheeler, J.Q.

    1996-12-01

    The research reported here was part of an effort to evaluate the safety of a process to recover TNT from MK-9 depth bombs by the autoclave meltout process. In this process the depth bombs are heated to 121 C so that the TNT will melt and run into a vat. Unfortunately, asphalt lining the inside surface of the bomb also melts and flows out with the TNT. Testing was conducted on molten TNT and molten TNT contaminated with 2 pct asphalt at 90, 100, 110, 120, 125, and 130 C. In the liquid drop test apparatus with a 2-kg weight, the molten TNT yielded a 50 pct probability of initiation at a drop height of 6.5 cm at 110 C, decreasing to 4.5 cm at 130 C. Asphalt-contaminated TNT was somewhat less impact-sensitive than pure TNT at temperatures of 110 to 125 C, but became more sensitive at 130 C. There is a 50 pct probability of initiation at a drop height of 7.8 cm at 110 C, decreasing to 3.3 cm at 130 C. In the card gap test, the molten TNT detonated at high velocity for a gap of 0.25 inches at 90 to 125 C and detonated at high velocity for a gap of 0.5 inches at 130 C. For gaps of 0.5 to 3 inches at 90 to 125 C and 0.75 inches to 3 inches at 130 C, the TNT did not detonate at high velocity but produced a violent explosion that caused significant damage to the test fixture. The thermal analysis test results showed that when asphalt is present in TNT, it greatly accelerates the exothermic decomposition of TNT, starting at temperatures near 200 C. It appears that at relatively low shock stimulus levels, the molten TNT may be undergoing a low velocity detonation, wherein the shock wave traveling through the gap test pipe cavitates the molten TNT, greatly increasing its sensitivity. These results are crucial for assuring continued safety in recovering TNT from munitions through the autoclave meltout process.

  8. Synthesis and Properties of a Clean and Sustainable Deicing Additive for Asphalt Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chao; Yu, Jianying; Zhao, Zhijie; Dai, Jing; Fu, Jingyi; Zhao, Meiling; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A clean and sustainable deicing additive was prepared via the adsorption of acetate anions (Ac-) by magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) calcined layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-CLDH). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrums proved that Ac- had intercalated into LDH structure. X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the intercalation spacing and platelet thickness of Mg and Al layered double hydroxide containing Ac- anions (Mg/Al-Ac- LDH) had been enlarged due to substitution of divalent CO32- anions by a larger quantity of monovalent Ac– anions. Differential scanning calorimetry tests testified that the insoluble Mg2/Al-Ac- LDH evidently decreased the freeze point (FP) of water to -10.68°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the Ac- were strongly confined by the metal layers of LDHs. FP test of asphalt mixtures confirmed that Mg/Al-Ac- LDHs reduced FP to -5.5°C. Immersion test results indicated that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH had a good deicing durability and Ac- did not released from asphalt mixture. Snow melting observation was conducted further testified that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH melted snow or ice sustainably. PMID:25625279

  9. Thickness and air voids measurement on asphalt concrete pavements using ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sharad Raj

    Layer thickness and air voids are important parameters in quality assurance of newly paved hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements. A non-destructive testing (NDT) technique was used to collect layer thickness information. The thicknesses estimated by the technique were compared with core thicknesses. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) system with air coupled antennas was used for on-site pavement data collection. Two application softwares - RADAN and ROAD DOCTOR - were used to process the field data for estimating layer thicknesses and air voids along the scanned pavements. 150 mm diameter cores taken from random locations on the pavements were tested in the laboratory to determine layer thickness and air voids. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare thicknesses and generate a regression equation relating air voids and dielectric constant of the pavement material. No significant differences were found between thickness estimates from RADAN and ROAD DOCTOR softwares when compared to the core measurements. However, RADAN and ROAD DOCTOR results are marginally significantly different from each other. ROAD DOCTOR software was used to generate air voids for the pavements scanned. Laboratory results from cores were utilized to determine calibration factors for the air voids -- dielectric equation. A relationship between air voids and dielectric constant is presented. It is concluded that GPR system with air coupled antennas used alongside a reduced core testing has a potential for quality control of newly paved hot mixed asphalt pavements.

  10. Optical Characterization of Temperature- and Composition-Dependent Microstructure in Asphalt Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, Adam; Nazmus, Sakib; Bhasin, Amit; Downer, Michael

    We introduce noncontact optical microscopy and optical scattering to characterize asphalt binder microstructure at temperatures ranging from 15 to 85°C for two compositionally different asphalt binders. We benchmark optical measurements against rheometric measurements of the magnitude of the temperature-dependent bulk complex shear modulus | G* (T) | . The main findings are: (1) Elongated (5 x 1 μm), striped microstructures (known from AFM studies as ''bees'' because they resemble bumble-bees) are resolved optically, found to reside primarily at the surface, and do not reappear immediately after a single heating-cooling cycle. (2) Smaller (1 μm2) microstructures with no observable internal structure (hereafter dubbed ``ants''), are found to reside primarily in the bulk, to persist after multiple thermal cycles and to scatter light strongly. Optical scattering from ''ants'' decreases to zero with heating from 15 to 65°C, but recovers completely upon cooling back to 15°C, albeit with distinct hysteresis. (3) Rheometric measurements of | G* (T) | reveal hysteresis that closely resembles that observed by optical scatter, suggesting that thermally-driven changes in microstructure volume fraction cause corresponding changes in | G* (T) | .

  11. Synthesis and properties of a clean and sustainable deicing additive for asphalt mixture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Yu, Jianying; Zhao, Zhijie; Dai, Jing; Fu, Jingyi; Zhao, Meiling; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A clean and sustainable deicing additive was prepared via the adsorption of acetate anions (Ac-) by magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) calcined layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-CLDH). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrums proved that Ac- had intercalated into LDH structure. X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the intercalation spacing and platelet thickness of Mg and Al layered double hydroxide containing Ac- anions (Mg/Al-Ac- LDH) had been enlarged due to substitution of divalent CO32- anions by a larger quantity of monovalent Ac- anions. Differential scanning calorimetry tests testified that the insoluble Mg2/Al-Ac- LDH evidently decreased the freeze point (FP) of water to -10.68°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the Ac- were strongly confined by the metal layers of LDHs. FP test of asphalt mixtures confirmed that Mg/Al-Ac- LDHs reduced FP to -5.5°C. Immersion test results indicated that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH had a good deicing durability and Ac- did not released from asphalt mixture. Snow melting observation was conducted further testified that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH melted snow or ice sustainably. PMID:25625279

  12. Optical characterization of temperature- and composition-dependent microstructure in asphalt binders.

    PubMed

    Ramm, A; Sakib, N; Bhasin, A; Downer, M C

    2016-06-01

    We introduce noncontact optical microscopy and optical scattering to characterize asphalt binder microstructure at temperatures ranging from 15°C to 85°C for two compositionally different asphalt binders. We benchmark optical measurements against rheometric measurements of the magnitude of the temperature-dependent bulk complex shear modulus |G*(T)|. The main findings are: (1) Elongated (∼5 × 1 μm), striped microstructures (known from AFM studies as 'bees' because they resemble bumble-bees) are resolved optically, found to reside primarily at the surface and do not reappear immediately after a single heating-cooling cycle. (2) Smaller (∼1 μm(2) ) microstructures with no observable internal structure (hereafter dubbed 'ants'), are found to reside primarily in the bulk, to persist after multiple thermal cycles and to scatter light strongly. Optical scattering from 'ants' decreases to zero with heating from 15°C to 65°C, but recovers completely upon cooling back to 15°C, albeit with distinct hysteresis. (3) Rheometric measurements of |G*(T)| reveal hysteresis that closely resembles that observed by optical scatter, suggesting that thermally driven changes in microstructure volume fraction cause corresponding changes in |G*(T)|. PMID:26594842

  13. Research on fatigue cracking growth parameters in asphaltic mixtures using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, D.; Lopes, R. T.; Motta, L. M. G.

    2004-01-01

    Distress of asphalt concrete pavement due to repeated bending from traffic loads has been a well-recognized problem in Brazil. If it is assumed that fatigue cracking growth is governed by the conditions at the crack tip, and that the crack tip conditions can be characterized by the stress intensity factor, then fatigue cracking growth as a function of stress intensity range Δ K can be determined. Computed tomography technique is used to detect crack evolution in asphaltic mixtures which were submitted to fatigue tests. Fatigue tests under conditions of controlled stress were carried out using diametral compression equipment and repeat loading. The aim of this work is imaging several specimens at different stages of the fatigue tests. In preliminary studies it was noted that the trajectory of a crack was influenced by the existence of voids in the originally unloaded specimens. Cracks would first be observed in the central region of a specimen, propagating in the direction of the extremities. Analyzing the graphics, that represent the fatigue cracking growth (d c/d N) as a function of stress intensity factor (Δ K), it is noticed that the curve has practically shown the same behavior for all specimens at the same level of the static tension rupture stress. The experimental values obtained for the constants A and n (of the Paris-Erdogan Law) present good agreement with the results obtained by Liang and Zhou.

  14. Rubber-like Quasi-thermosetting Polyetheramine-cured Epoxy Asphalt Composites Capable of Being Opened to Traffic Immediately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yang; Wu, Qiang; Jin, Rui; Yu, Pengfei; Cheng, Jixiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the facile preparation, mechanical performance and linear viscoelasticity of polyetheramine-cured rubber-like epoxy asphalt composites (EACs) with different asphalt contents. Compared with previous EACs prepared via complex chemical reactions and time-consuming high-temperature curing, the EACs reported here were obtained by using a compatible, bi-functional polyetheramine and a simple physical co-blend process, which make the EACs feasibly scalable for production at a lower cost. The EACs were cured for 1 h at 160 °C and 3 d at 60 °C therefore, these composites can be opened to traffic immediately. The EACs have a much greater temperature stability than common thermoplastic polymer-modified asphalt composites from -30 °C to 120 °C, but their complex shear moduli at higher temperatures slightly decrease instead of remaining constant when temperatures are greater than 80 °C, especially for the higher asphalt content composites; that is, these composites are quasi-thermosetting. Wicket plots illustrate that the EACs reported here are thermorheological simple materials, and the master curves are constructed and well-fitted by generalized logistic sigmoidal model functions. This research provides a facile, low-cost method for the preparation of polyetheramine-cured EACs that can be opened to traffic immediately, and the concept of quasi-thermosetting may facilitate the development of cheaper EACs for advanced applications.

  15. Methane and carbon monoxide emissions from asphalt pavement: Measurements and estimates of their important to global budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, S.C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Zimmerman, P.R.; Cicerone, R.J. ); Lowe, D.C. )

    1990-08-20

    The authors measured emissions of methane from asphalt surfaces used in pavement for roadways. Maximum emissions were 22 mg/m{sup 2}/hr for 1- to 4-week-old pavement during maximum sunlight intensity. Emissions were much smaller at low sunlight intensity and dropped off to negligible amounts at night. Smaller emissions were observed for asphalt pavement of 2.5 to 3 years approximate age under similar conditions. Comparison measurements of carbon monoxide emissions resulted in maximum emissions of about 2.6 mg/m{sup 2}hr for 1-week-old pavement. These findings indicate that emissions of CH{sub 4} and CO are a function of both sunlight and temperature. Based on these results, methane emissions from asphalt pavement cannot be a significant source of atmospheric methane as compared to other identified methane sources. Therefore, although asphalt methane emissions are a form of fossil fuel methane, they cannot explain the relatively high fraction of {sup 14}C-depleted methane in the atmosphere.

  16. 77 FR 50608 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Hampshire; Hot Mix Asphalt Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Pollution,'' Part Env-A 1207 ``Asphalt Plants'' into the New Hampshire State Implementation Plan (67 FR... Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an...); Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August...

  17. Rubber-like Quasi-thermosetting Polyetheramine-cured Epoxy Asphalt Composites Capable of Being Opened to Traffic Immediately.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang; Wu, Qiang; Jin, Rui; Yu, Pengfei; Cheng, Jixiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the facile preparation, mechanical performance and linear viscoelasticity of polyetheramine-cured rubber-like epoxy asphalt composites (EACs) with different asphalt contents. Compared with previous EACs prepared via complex chemical reactions and time-consuming high-temperature curing, the EACs reported here were obtained by using a compatible, bi-functional polyetheramine and a simple physical co-blend process, which make the EACs feasibly scalable for production at a lower cost. The EACs were cured for 1 h at 160 °C and 3 d at 60 °C; therefore, these composites can be opened to traffic immediately. The EACs have a much greater temperature stability than common thermoplastic polymer-modified asphalt composites from -30 °C to 120 °C, but their complex shear moduli at higher temperatures slightly decrease instead of remaining constant when temperatures are greater than 80 °C, especially for the higher asphalt content composites; that is, these composites are quasi-thermosetting. Wicket plots illustrate that the EACs reported here are thermorheological simple materials, and the master curves are constructed and well-fitted by generalized logistic sigmoidal model functions. This research provides a facile, low-cost method for the preparation of polyetheramine-cured EACs that can be opened to traffic immediately, and the concept of quasi-thermosetting may facilitate the development of cheaper EACs for advanced applications. PMID:26733315

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF EMISSIONS FROM ASPHALT FORMULATIONS WITH AND WITHOUT CRUMB-RUBBER MODIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    INVESTIGATION OF THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF EMISSIONS FROM ASPHALT FORMULATIONS WITH AND WITHOUT CRUMB-RUBBER MODIFICATION

    Larry D. Olsen', Virginia S. Houk2, Sarah H. Warren2, Larry D. Claxton2, Kevin W. Hanley', Aubrey K. Miller3, Gregory A Burr', Daniel Almaguer', Grego...

  19. Advanced self-healing asphalt composites in the pavement performance field: mechanisms at the nano level and new repairing methodologies.

    PubMed

    Agzenai, Yahya; Pozuelo, Javier; Sanz, Javier; Perez, Ignacio; Baselga, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to give a global view of this field of research, in this mini-review we highlight the most recent publications and patents focusing on modified asphalt pavements that contain certain reinforcing nanoparticles which impart desirable thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. In response to the increasing cost of asphalt binder and road maintenance, there is a need to look for alternative technologies and new asphalt composites, able to self-repair, for preserving and renewing the existing pavements. First, we will focus on the self-healing property of asphalt, the evidences that support that healing takes place immediately after the contact between the faces of a crack, and how the amount of healing can be measured in both the laboratory and the field. Next we review the hypothetical mechanisms of healing to understand the material behaviour and establish models to quantify the damage-healing process. Thereafter, we outline different technologies, nanotechnologies and methodologies used for self-healing paying particular attention to embedded micro-capsules, new nano-materials like carbon nanotubes and nano-fibres, ionomers, and microwave and induction heating processes. PMID:25479339

  20. Rubber-like Quasi-thermosetting Polyetheramine-cured Epoxy Asphalt Composites Capable of Being Opened to Traffic Immediately

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yang; Wu, Qiang; Jin, Rui; Yu, Pengfei; Cheng, Jixiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the facile preparation, mechanical performance and linear viscoelasticity of polyetheramine-cured rubber-like epoxy asphalt composites (EACs) with different asphalt contents. Compared with previous EACs prepared via complex chemical reactions and time-consuming high-temperature curing, the EACs reported here were obtained by using a compatible, bi-functional polyetheramine and a simple physical co-blend process, which make the EACs feasibly scalable for production at a lower cost. The EACs were cured for 1 h at 160 °C and 3 d at 60 °C; therefore, these composites can be opened to traffic immediately. The EACs have a much greater temperature stability than common thermoplastic polymer-modified asphalt composites from −30 °C to 120 °C, but their complex shear moduli at higher temperatures slightly decrease instead of remaining constant when temperatures are greater than 80 °C, especially for the higher asphalt content composites; that is, these composites are quasi-thermosetting. Wicket plots illustrate that the EACs reported here are thermorheological simple materials, and the master curves are constructed and well-fitted by generalized logistic sigmoidal model functions. This research provides a facile, low-cost method for the preparation of polyetheramine-cured EACs that can be opened to traffic immediately, and the concept of quasi-thermosetting may facilitate the development of cheaper EACs for advanced applications. PMID:26733315

  1. Linear viscoelastic limits of asphalt concrete at low and intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yusuf A.

    The purpose of this dissertation is to demonstrate the hypothesis that a region at which the behavior of asphalt concrete can be represented as a linear viscoelastic material can be determined at low and intermediate temperatures considering the stresses and strains typically developed in the pavements under traffic loading. Six mixtures containing different aggregate gradations and nominal maximum aggregate sizes varying from 12.5 to 37.5 mm were used in this study. The asphalt binder grade was the same for all mixtures. The mixtures were compacted to 7 +/- 1% air voids, using the Superpave Gyratory Compactor. Tests were conducted at low temperatures (-20°C and -10°C), using the indirect tensile test machine, and at intermediate temperatures (4°C and 20°C), using the Superpave shear machine. To determine the linear viscoelastic range of asphalt concrete, a relaxation test for 150 s, followed by a creep test for another 150 s, was conducted at 150 and 200 microstrains (1 microstrain = 1 x 10-6), at -20°C, and at 150 and 300 microstrains, at -10°C. A creep test for 200 s, followed by a recovery test for another 200 s, was conducted at stress levels up to 800 kPa at 4°C and up to 500 kPa at 20°C. At -20°C and -10°C, the behavior of the mixtures was linear viscoelastic at 200 and 300 microstrains, respectively. At intermediate temperatures (4°C and 20°C), an envelope defining the linear and nonlinear region in terms of stress as a function of shear creep compliance was constructed for all the mixtures. For creep tests conducted at 20°C, it was discovered that the commonly used protocol to verify the proportionality condition of linear viscoelastic behavior was unable to detect the appearance of nonlinear behavior at certain imposed shear stress levels. Said nonlinear behavior was easily detected, however, when checking the satisfaction of the superposition condition. The envelope constructed for determining when the material becomes nonlinear should be

  2. Effect of X-ray Line Spectra Profile Fitting with Pearson VII, Pseudo-Voigt and Generalized Fermi Functions on Asphalt Binder Aromaticity and Crystallite Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebresellasie, K.; Shirokoff, J.; Lewis, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray line spectra profile fitting using Pearson VII, pseudo-Voigt and generalized Fermi functions was performed on asphalt binders prior to the calculation of aromaticity and crystallite size parameters. The effects of these functions on the results are presented and discussed in terms of the peak profile fit parameters, the uncertainties in calculated values that can arise owing to peak shape, peak features in the pattern and crystallite size according to the asphalt models (Yen, modified Yen or Yen-Mullins) and theories. Interpretation of these results is important in terms of evaluating the performance of asphalt binders widely used in the application of transportation systems (roads, highways, airports).

  3. Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. October 1973-November 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for October 1973-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt-pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (Contains 110 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  4. Membrane magic

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2005-09-01

    The Kansas Power and Light Co.'s La Cyne generating station has found success with membrane filtration water pretreatment technology. The article recounts the process followed in late 2004 to install a Pall Aria 4 microfilter in Unit 1 makeup water system at the plant to produce cleaner water for reverse osmosis feed. 2 figs., 2 photos.

  5. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Pauul J. Tikalsky

    2004-10-31

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  6. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Tikalsky, Paul J.; Bahia, Hussain U.; Deng, An; Snyder, Thomas

    2004-10-15

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  7. Greenhouse gases generated from the anaerobic biodegradation of natural offshore asphalt seepages in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Wong, Florence L.; Dartnell, Peter; Sliter, Ray W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant offshore asphaltic deposits with active seepage occur in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore southern California. The composition and isotopic signatures of gases sampled from the oil and gas seeps reveal that the coexisting oil in the shallow subsurface is anaerobically biodegraded, generating CO2 with secondary CH4 production. Biomineralization can result in the consumption of as much as 60% by weight of the original oil, with 13C enrichment of CO2. Analyses of gas emitted from asphaltic accumulations or seeps on the seafloor indicate up to 11% CO2 with 13C enrichment reaching +24.8‰. Methane concentrations range from less than 30% up to 98% with isotopic compositions of –34.9 to –66.1‰. Higher molecular weight hydrocarbon gases are present in strongly varying concentrations reflecting both oil-associated gas and biodegradation; propane is preferentially biodegraded, resulting in an enriched 13C isotopic composition as enriched as –19.5‰. Assuming the 132 million barrels of asphaltic residues on the seafloor represent ~40% of the original oil volume and mass, the estimated gas generated is 5.0×1010 kg (~76×109 m3) CH4 and/or 1.4×1011 kg CO2 over the lifetime of seepage needed to produce the volume of these deposits. Geologic relationships and oil weathering inferences suggest the deposits are of early Holocene age or even younger. Assuming an age of ~1,000 years, annual fluxes are on the order of 5.0×107 kg (~76×106 m3) and/or 1.4×108 kg for CH4 and CO2, respectively. The daily volumetric emission rate (2.1×105 m3) is comparable to current CH4 emission from Coal Oil Point seeps (1.5×105 m3/day), and may be a significant source of both CH4 and CO2 to the atmosphere provided that the gas can be transported through the water column.

  8. Cancer risk in asphalt workers and roofers: review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Partanen, T; Boffetta, P

    1994-12-01

    Twenty epidemiologic studies have described cancer risk in asphalt workers and roofers in various countries. A current concern for these workers is the potential carcinogenicity posed by inhalation of bitumen fumes or dermal exposure to bitumens. Bitumens are chemically different from many carcinogenic coal-tar based materials. Both have been employed in road paving and waterproofing. We examined and combined the results of the epidemiologic studies conducted on asphalt workers and roofers. We examined the cancer risk separately in three broad job categories: 1) roofers (exposed to bitumen fumes and previously often to coal-tar fumes); 2) highway maintenance workers (HMWs) and road pavers (exposed to bitumen fumes as well as possibly coal-tar fumes previously); and 3) miscellaneous and unspecified bitumen/asphalt workers. In roofers, an increased risk was suggested for cancers of the lung (aggregated relative risk 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.5-2.1), stomach (1.7, 1.1-2.5), nonmelanoma skin (4.0, 0.8-12), and leukemia (1.7, 0.9-2.9). Some of the excesses may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from coal-tar products. The aggregated relative risks in road pavers and HMWs were consistently lower than in roofers for cancers of the lung (0.9, 0.8-1.0), stomach (1.1, 0.8-1.5), bladder (1.2, 0.7-1.8), skin (2.2, 1.2-3.7), and leukemias (1.3, 0.9-1.8). Their risk of skin cancer was significantly increased, based on one study. Miscellaneous and unspecified workers had a significant excess (1.5, 1.2-1.8) of lung cancer. The data were poorly focused to address the carcinogenicity of bitumen fumes, as contrasted with tar-derived exposures. For the prospect of shedding more light on the bitumen-cancer controversy, the feasibility of a powerful multicenter cohort is currently being studied by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). PMID:7892824

  9. [Membranous nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Mercadal, Lucile

    2013-12-01

    Membranous nephropathy is characterized by immune complex deposits on the outer side of the glomerular basement membrane. Activation of complement and of oxidation lead to basement membrane lesions. The most frequent form is idiopathic. At 5 and 10 years, renal survival is around 90 and 65% respectively. A prognostic model based on proteinuria, level and duration, progression of renal failure in a few months can refine prognosis. The urinary excretion of C5b-9, β2 and α1 microglobuline and IgG are strong predictors of outcome. Symptomatic treatment is based on anticoagulation in case of nephrotic syndrome, angiotensin conversion enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and statins. Immunosuppressive therapy should be discussed for patients having a high risk of progression. Corticoids alone has no indication. Treatment should include a simultaneous association or more often alternating corticoids and alkylant agent for a minimum of 6 months. Adrenocorticoid stimulating hormone and steroids plus mycophenolate mofetil may be equally effective. Steroids plus alkylant decrease the risk of end stage renal failure. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus decrease proteinuria but are associated with a high risk of recurrence at time of withdrawal and are nephrotoxic. Rituximab evaluated on open studies needs further evaluations to define its use. PMID:24315535

  10. Intercalation of p-methycinnamic acid anion into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide to improve UV aging resistance of asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Dai, Jing; Yu, Jianying; Yin, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A UV absorber, p-methycinnamic acid (PMCA), was intercalated into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) by calcination recovery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the PMCA anions completely replaced the CO32- anions in the interlayer galleries of Zn-Al-LDH containing PMCA anions (Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH). X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the interlayer distance increased from 0.78 nm to 1.82 nm after the substitution of PMCA anions for CO32- anions. The similar diffraction angles of the CO32- anion-containing Zn-Al-LDH (Zn-Al-CO32--LDH) and the Zn-Al-CO32--LDH/styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt implied that the asphalt molecules do not enter into the LDH interlayer galleries to form separated-phase structures. The different diffraction angles of Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt indicated that the asphalt molecules penetrated into the LDH interlayer galleries to form an expanded-phase structure. UV-Vis absorbance analyses showed that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH was better able to block UV light due to the synergistic effects of PMCA and Zn-Al-LDH. Conventional physical tests and atomic force microscopy images of the SBS modified asphalt, Zn-Al-CO32--LDH/SBS modified asphalt and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt before and after UV aging indicated that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH improved the UV aging resistance of SBS modified asphalts.

  11. Evaluation of ASTM test method D 4867, effect of moisture on asphalt concrete paving mixtures. Final report, May 1995--May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, K.D.

    1998-09-01

    The moisture sensitivities of 21 dense-graded asphalt pavements were predicted in 1987 using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Test Method D 4867, Effect of Moisture on Asphalt Concrete Paving Mixtures. Tests were performed on cores taken from the pavements. The air-void levels of the cores varied from pavement to pavement. In 1995 and 1996, cores were again taken from the pavements to ascertain whether the test method correctly predicted performance. Pavement distress surveys were also performed.

  12. Intercalation of p-methycinnamic acid anion into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide to improve UV aging resistance of asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chao; Dai, Jing; Yu, Jianying; Yin, Jian

    2015-02-15

    A UV absorber, p-methycinnamic acid (PMCA), was intercalated into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) by calcination recovery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the PMCA anions completely replaced the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anions in the interlayer galleries of Zn-Al-LDH containing PMCA anions (Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH). X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the interlayer distance increased from 0.78 nm to 1.82 nm after the substitution of PMCA anions for CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anions. The similar diffraction angles of the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anion-containing Zn-Al-LDH (Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH) and the Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH/styrene–butadiene–styrene (SBS) modified asphalt implied that the asphalt molecules do not enter into the LDH interlayer galleries to form separated-phase structures. The different diffraction angles of Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt indicated that the asphalt molecules penetrated into the LDH interlayer galleries to form an expanded-phase structure. UV-Vis absorbance analyses showed that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH was better able to block UV light due to the synergistic effects of PMCA and Zn-Al-LDH. Conventional physical tests and atomic force microscopy images of the SBS modified asphalt, Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH/SBS modified asphalt and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt before and after UV aging indicated that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH improved the UV aging resistance of SBS modified asphalts.

  13. Element content of Xanthoparmelia scabrosa growing on asphalt in urban and rural New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wright, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Xanthoparmelia scabrosa is a foliose lichen that grows abundantly on pedestrian and automobile asphalt in New Zealand, which are considered inhospitable habitats for lichens. Samples were collected at eight localities ranging from urban streets to very rural roads and analyzed for 28 chemical elements in order to determine elemental chemistry and to test hypotheses about tolerance mechanisms. Anthropogenic elements (Cu, Pb, and Zn) decreased significantly from urban to rural areas, while nutritional elements (K, P, and S) increased. Samples from urban areas contained 10% calcium. Sulfur was elevated at both urban and rural sites, possibly due to pollution in the former site and higher levels of sulfur-containing scabrosin esters at the rural sites. The ability of this lichen to accumulate high levels of Cu, Pb and Zn may make it useful as a remediation tool.

  14. Skid resistance performance of asphalt wearing courses with electric arc furnace slag aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kehagia, Fotini

    2009-05-01

    Metallurgical slags are by-products of the iron and steel industry and are subdivided into blast furnace slag and steel slag according to the different steel-producing processes. In Greece, slags are mostly produced from steelmaking using the electric arc furnace process, and subsequently are either disposed in a random way or utilized by the cement industry. Steel slag has been recently used, worldwide, as hard aggregates in wearing courses in order to improve the skidding resistance of asphalt pavements. At the Highway Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki research has been carried out in the field of steel slags, and especially in electric arc furnace (EAF) slag, to evaluate their possible use in highway engineering. In this paper, the recent results of anti-skidding performance of steel slag aggregates in highway pavements are presented. PMID:19423603

  15. Recycling crumb rubber modified asphalt pavements (revised). Final research report, September 1992-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Crockford, W.W.; Makunike, D.; Davison, R.R.; Scullion, T.; Billiter, T.C.

    1995-07-01

    There has been concern that the legislative mandate to use waste rubber in paving applications will result in a severe environmental problem when it becomes necessary to recycle these pavements. If successful recycling is possible, the long term performance of these pavements becomes a concern. The results of this study indicate that it is possible to recycle this material. However, some techniques for conventional asphalt mixture design, material processing, and construction must be modified to ensure this success, and some techniques may not be appropriate when waste rubber is present in the mixture to be recycled. Many of the results presented in this study are based on experiences in Tyler and San Antonio, Texas, where two of the earliest crumb rubber recycling operations in the United States have transpired.

  16. Use of shredded tires in the subbase layer of asphalt pavements

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, W.J. Jr.; Maher, M.H.; Baker, R.F.

    1997-12-31

    Research was conducted on the use of shredded scrap tires for use in the subbase layer of asphalt pavements. Mixtures of shredded scrap tires with virgin soil provide a means of recycling unwanted tires and conserving a finite supply of virgin soil. The mechanistic procedure for the design of pavement systems requires resilient modulus values. Plastic and elastic strains were measured using external LVDT`s and internal proximity sensors. Resilient modulus measurements were conducted on cohesionless soils mixed with various amounts of shredded tire chips. The performance f the shredded tire mixture is compared to that of the naturally occurring virgin soil used in subbase applications in New Jersey. A number of experimental issues are discussed such as: method of compaction, optimum ratio of shredded tire chips to soil, optimum size and gradation of shredded tire chips, and strength testing using California Bearing Ratio.

  17. A study of sound absorption by street canyon boundaries and asphalt rubber concrete pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, Graeme Robert

    A sound field model, based on a classical diffusion equation, is extended to account for sound absorption in a diffusion parameter used to model sound energy in a narrow street canyon. The model accounts for a single sound absorption coefficient, separate accommodation coefficients and a combination of separate absorption and accommodation coefficients from parallel canyon walls. The new expressions are compared to the original formula through numerical simulations to reveal the effect of absorption on sound diffusion. The newly established analytical formulae demonstrate satisfactory agreement with their predecessor under perfect reflection. As well, the influence of the extended diffusion parameter on normalized sound pressure levels in a narrow street canyon is in agreement with experimental data. The diffusion parameters are used to model sound energy density in a street canyon as a function of the sound absorption coefficient of the street canyon walls. The acoustic and material properties of conventional and asphalt rubber concrete (ARC) pavement are also studied to assess how the crumb rubber content influences sound absorption in street canyons. The porosity and absolute permeability of compacted specimens of asphalt rubber concrete are measured and compared to their normal and random incidence sound absorption coefficients as a function of crumb rubber content in the modified binder. Nonlinear trends are found between the sound absorption coefficients, porosity and absolute permeability of the compacted specimens and the percentage of crumb rubber in the modified binders. The cross-sectional areas of the air voids on the surfaces of the compacted specimens are measured using digital image processing techniques and a linear relationship is obtained between the average void area and crumb rubber content. The measured material properties are used to construct an empirical formula relating the average porosity, normal incidence noise reduction coefficients and

  18. Lipid membranes for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kukol, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of membrane proteins requires the setup of an accurate representation of lipid bilayers. This chapter describes the setup of a lipid bilayer system from scratch using generally available tools, starting with a definition of the lipid molecule POPE, generation of a lipid bilayer, energy minimization, MD simulation, and data analysis. The data analysis includes the calculation of area and volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, self-diffusion constant, and the electron density profile. PMID:25330959

  19. Omniphobic Membrane for Robust Membrane Distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, SH; Nejati, S; Boo, C; Hu, YX; Osuji, CO; Ehmelech, M

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we fabricate an omniphobic microporous membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a hydrophilic glass fiber membrane with silica nanoparticles followed by surface fluorination and polymer coating. The modified glass fiber membrane exhibits an anti-wetting property not only against water but also against low surface tension organic solvents that easily wet a hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane that is commonly used in MD applications. By comparing the performance of the PTFE and omniphobic membranes in direct contact MD experiments in the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), we show that SDS wets the hydrophobic PTFE membrane but not the omniphobic membrane. Our results suggest that omniphobic membranes are critical for MD applications with feed waters containing surface active species, such as oil and gas produced water, to prevent membrane pore wetting.

  20. Asphalt saturation of roofing felt on the felt machine: Phase I. Progress report, October 1978-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.A.; Walker, R.T.; Smith, W.F.

    1980-02-01

    The asphalt roofing industry manufactures approximately 10 million tons of product annually. This requires an estimated 40 trillion Btu's in process heat and 4 million tons of asphalt having a fuel value of 140 trillion Btu's. Energy savings in a number of areas appear possible. As an initial investigation, pilot equipment was installed on a commercial felt machine to determine whether saturation on the felt machine was feasible and whether energy savings would result. Work to date has demonstrated a process by which adequate saturation levels can be achieved. Energy savings are estimated at 3.7 trillion Btu's per year on an industry-wide basis. Further investigation requires evaluation of finished product and demonstration of the process on a commercial basis.

  1. Recycled brake linings as partial aggregate substitute in asphalt paving. Construction and final report. Report for July 1992-August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.; Sukley, R.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the performance of asphalt containing various percentages of brake lining as an aggregate, and compare its performance to that of normal asphalt containing natural aggregate. This project is an effort to explore alternate ways to use waste product. Four test section of FB-2 Modified mix containing brake lining materials were placed in July 1992 along with one control section on SR 3022 in Mercer county. To date all sections are performing satisfactory, and Brake linings should be recommended as a viable partial replacement of aggregate in bituminous materials. This study only considered the performance of only off-spec brake linings, therefore, any performance data or enviromental effects of placement of used brake material should be addressed.

  2. Site sampling and treatability studies for demonstration of WasteChem's asphalt encapsulation technology under EPA's SITE program

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, J.; Tsadwa, S.; Wills, N.; Evans, M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents a sampling approach that was used to determine whether there were adequate quantities and concentrations of wastes at the Woodland Township Route 532 Site for demonstration of the asphalt encapsulation technology. This paper also presents the result of a bench-scale treatability study on wastes from this site. The preliminary sampling and analysis confirmed most of the types of organic and inorganic contaminants found at the Woodland Township Route 532 site during the remedial investigation (RI). However, the contamination levels varied over relatively short distances across the site from some contaminants. The bench-scale treatability study indicated that, when compared with concentrations in the untreated waste, WasteChem's asphalt encapsulation technology reduced semivolatile organic compound concentrations in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure extracts of treated wastes. The study also indicated that metals concentrations in the TCLP extracts were lower in the treated wastes than the untreated wastes in some samples and higher in others.

  3. Asphalt saturation of roofing felt on the felt machine. Final report. Progress report, January 1980-July 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, W.J.; Davis, D.A.; Smith, W.F

    1981-01-01

    The asphalt roofing industry manufactures approximately 10 million tons of product annually. This requires an estimated 40 trillion Btu's in process heat and 4 million tons of asphalt having a fuel value of 140 trillion Btu's. Pilot equipment was installed on a commercial felt machine to determine whether saturation on the felt machine was feasible and whether energy savings would result. A process was demonstrated by which adequate saturation levels can be achieved. Energy savings are estimated at 6.3 trillion Btu's per year on an industry-wide basis. An economic study with consideration of the rapid industry conversion from organic felt to the less energy-intensive glass mat-based roofing precluded further process scale-up and plans for commercialization.

  4. Study of the petroleum schedules thermal cleaning process from asphalt, ressin and paraffin deposits using low- temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samigullin, A. D.; Galiakbarov, A. T.; Galiakbarov, R. T.

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum industry uses large amount of pumping and compression pipes. Carrying out the whole range of repair works requires cleaning of the pipe inner surface from deposits which appeared in it during operation [1]. The task of asphalt, resin and paraffin deposits control remains one of the most essential for the branch. The article deals with thermal method and device for asphalt, resin and paraffin deposits removal from pumping and compression pipes inner surface, describes and provides the device application scope for cleaning the pumping and compression pipes inner surface. To deal with borehole equipment and pipe systems waxing problem various deposit prevention and removal methods are used, including mechanical, thermal, chemical, combined and nonconventional methods.

  5. Characterization and design of asphalt mixtures with asphaltites from Boyacá for use in low traffic volume roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique-Espindola, R.

    2013-11-01

    The high availability of asphaltites in Boyacá and their low cost make this material a viable alternative for low traffic road paving; nevertheless, the traditional way in which this material is used generates, in cases, pavements with deficient behavior. This investigation, presents the results of the mixture design using asphaltites from the municipality of Pesca-Boyacá as well as coarse and fine aggregates produced in the region, 70-80 asphalt cement and slow-break asphalt emulsion. Working formulas for dense mixing in hot and cold and particularly MDF-2 and MDC-2 are presented from the characterization information; as benchmarks to define technical viability for use in low- traffic volume roads, according to NT1 regulation from INVIAS. The mixture design was performed according to the procedures defined in the RAMCODES and MARSHALL methodologies.

  6. Massive asphalt deposits, oil seepage, and gas venting support abundant chemosynthetic communities at the Campeche Knolls, southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahling, Heiko; Borowski, Christian; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Gaytán-Caballero, Adriana; Hsu, Chieh-Wei; Loher, Markus; MacDonald, Ian; Marcon, Yann; Pape, Thomas; Römer, Miriam; Rubin-Blum, Maxim; Schubotz, Florence; Smrzka, Daniel; Wegener, Gunter; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Hydrocarbon seepage is a widespread process at the continental margins of the Gulf of Mexico. We used a multidisciplinary approach, including multibeam mapping and visual seafloor observations with different underwater vehicles to study the extent and character of complex hydrocarbon seepage in the Bay of Campeche, southern Gulf of Mexico. Our observations showed that seafloor asphalt deposits previously only known from the Chapopote Knoll also occur at numerous other knolls and ridges in water depths from 1230 to 3150 m. In particular the deeper sites (Chapopopte and Mictlan knolls) were characterized by asphalt deposits accompanied by extrusion of liquid oil in form of whips or sheets, and in some places (Tsanyao Yang, Mictlan, and Chapopote knolls) by gas emission and the presence of gas hydrates in addition. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of gaseous hydrocarbons suggest their primarily thermogenic origin. Relatively fresh asphalt structures were settled by chemosynthetic communities including bacterial mats and vestimentiferan tube worms, whereas older flows appeared largely inert and devoid of corals and anemones at the deep sites. The gas hydrates at Tsanyao Yang and Mictlan Knolls were covered by a 5-to-10 cm-thick reaction zone composed of authigenic carbonates, detritus, and microbial mats, and were densely colonized by 1-2 m-long tube worms, bivalves, snails, and shrimps. This study increased knowledge on the occurrences and dimensions of asphalt fields and associated gas hydrates at the Campeche Knolls. The extent of all discovered seepage structure areas indicates that emission of complex hydrocarbons is a widespread, thus important feature of the southern Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of intact polar lipids reveal complex carbon flow patterns among hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities at the Chapopote asphalt volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Seepage of asphalt forms the basis of a cold seep system at 3000 m water depth at the Chapopote Knoll in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Anaerobic microbial communities are stimulated in the oil-impregnated sediments as evidenced by the presence of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) derived from archaea and Bacteria at depths up to 7 m below the seafloor. Detailed investigation of stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C) of alkyl and acyl moieties derived from a range of IPL precursors with distinct polar head groups resolved the complexity of carbon metabolisms and utilization of diverse carbon sources by uncultured microbial communities. In surface sediments most of the polar lipid-derived fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG) head groups could be tentatively assigned to autotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, with a relatively small proportion involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Derivatives of phosphatidyl-( N)-methylethanolamine (PME) were abundant and could be predominantly assigned to heterotrophic oil-degrading bacteria. Archaeal IPLs with phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic glyceroldibiphytanylglyceroltetraethers (GDGTs) were assigned to methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-2 and ANME-1 cluster, respectively, whereas δ 13C values of phosphate-based archaeols and mixed phosphate-based and diglycosidic GDGTs point to methanogenic archaea. At a 7 m deep sulfate-methane transition zone that is linked to the upward movement of gas-laden petroleum, a distinct increase in abundance of archaeal IPLs such as phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic archaeol and GDGTs is observed; their δ 13C values are consistent with their origin from both methanotrophic and methanogenic archaea. This study reveals previously hidden, highly complex patterns in the carbon-flow of versatile microbial communities involved in the degradation of heavy oil including hydrocarbon gases

  8. Experimental determination of the minimum onset temperature of runaway reaction from a radioactive salt disposal in asphalt.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Rui; Sun, Jin-Hua; Koseki, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kazutoshi

    2005-04-11

    In order to clarify the reason for the most hazardous explosion in the history of the Japanese nuclear power development by a radioactive salt disposal in asphalt, an adiabatic process was developed using a Dewar vessel to minimize the temperature difference between the reactants and the surroundings. By this means, the heat evolution from a reaction which is readily lost can be detected at a lower temperature imitating the accidental condition. A series of ambient temperature-tracking Dewar experiments on asphalt salt mixtures were conducted under different initial ambient temperatures, such as 230, 210, 190, and 170 degrees C, respectively. As a result, it was observed that from 190 degrees C the sample's temperature rose until a runaway reaction occurred. The minimum onset temperature for the runaway reaction of the asphalt salt mixture was determined to be 190 degrees C, which is close to the initial temperature of approximately 180 degrees C, the same temperature as the real accident. This implies that at near this operational temperature, initial faint chemical reactions may occur and lead to further rapid reactions if heat is accumulated at this stage. PMID:15811664

  9. Determining the Stability of Asphalt Concrete at Varying Temperatures and Exposure Times Using Destructive and Non-Destructive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgan, Ercan

    This study examined the effect of varying temperatures and varying exposure times on the stability of asphalt concrete using destructive and non-destructive methods. The study also looked at the relationship between destructive and non-destructive methods. In order to investigate the stability according to exposure time and environment temperature, exposure times of 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6 h and temperatures of 30, 40 and 50°C were selected. The results showed that at the environment temperature of 17°C the stability of the asphalt core samples decreased by 40.16% at 30°C after 1.5 h and 62.39% after 6 h. At 40°C the decrease was 74.31% after 1.5 and 78.10% after 6 h. At 50°C the stability of the asphalt decreased by 83.22% after 1.5 h and 88.66% after 6 h. The results also pointed to a moderate negative relationship (R = -0.533) between second ultrasound and stability indicating that non-destructive ultrasound method can be used to predict stability.

  10. Numerical modeling of inelastic structures at loading of steady state rolling. Thermo-mechanical asphalt pavement computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Ines; Hartung, Felix; Kaliske, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to gain a deeper knowledge of the interactions in the coupled tire-pavement-system, e.g. for the future design of durable pavement structures, the paper presents recent results of research in the field of theoretical-numerical asphalt pavement modeling at material and structural level, whereby the focus is on a realistic and numerically efficient computation of pavements under rolling tire load by using the finite element method based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation. Inelastic material descriptions are included into the ALE frame efficiently by a recently developed unsplit history update procedure. New is also the implementation of a viscoelastic cohesive zone model into the ALE pavement formulation to describe the interaction of the single pavement layers. The viscoelastic cohesive zone model is further extended to account for the normal pressure dependent shear behavior of the bonding layer. Another novelty is that thermo-mechanical effects are taken into account by a coupling of the mechanical ALE pavement computation to a transient thermal computation of the pavement cross-section to obtain the varying temperature distributions of the pavement due to climatic impact. Then, each ALE pavement simulation considers the temperature dependent asphalt material model that includes elastic, viscous and plastic behavior at finite strains and the temperature dependent viscoelastic cohesive zone formulation. The temperature dependent material parameters of the asphalt layers and the interfacial layers are fitted to experimental data. Results of coupled tire-pavement computations are presented to demonstrate potential fields of application.

  11. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The efforts on the synthesis of polymer anion redox membranes were mainly concentrated in two areas, membrane development and membrane fabrication. Membrane development covered the preparation and evaluation of experimental membranes systems with improved resistance stability and/or lower permeability. Membrane fabrication covered the laboratory scale production of prime candidate membranes in quantities of up to two hundred and sizes up to 18 inches x 18 inches (46 cm x 46 cm). These small (10 in x 11 in) and medium sized membranes were mainly for assembly into multicell units. Improvements in processing procedures and techniques for preparing such membrane sets lifted yields to over 90 percent.

  12. Selecting a Roof Membrane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Larry W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers a brief synopsis of the unique characteristics of the following roof membranes: (1) built-up roofing; (2) elastoplastic membranes; (3) modified bitumen membranes; (4) liquid applied membranes; and (5) metal roofing. A chart compares the characteristics of the raw membranes only. (MLF)

  13. Magnetic Membrane System

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; ; Lucas, Matthew S.

    2004-12-30

    The present invention provides a membrane with magnetic particles. In one embodiment the membrane is created by mixing particles in a non-magnetic base. The membrane may act as an actuator, a sensor, a pump, a valve, or other device. A magnet is operatively connected to the membrane. The magnet acts on and changes the shape of the membrane.

  14. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing.

  15. Investigation of antenna frequency impact on assessing voids of asphalt pavements using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, C.; Georgouli, K.; Loizos, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) technique that has been developed and improved upon over the past 30 years. The technique is frequently utilized in order to evaluate and assess pavement structures. GPR, for pavement evaluation purposes, can be described as a remote sensing system that emits a short pulse, of electromagnetic energy, into the pavement, with a central frequency varying from 10 MHz up to 2.5GHz. The two most commonly utilized setups are air-coupled and ground-coupled antenna systems. For air-coupled systems, the antennas are suspended above the pavement surface and can operate at normal traffic speeds (up to ~ 80 Km/h). The major drawback of the air-coupled antenna is that penetration depth is limited. On the other hand, for ground-coupled systems the antennas are in direct contact with the pavement surface, providing for better signal penetration into the pavement structure; however ground coupled systems can achieve only limited operational speeds. As a generalized rule, increasing the GPR central operating frequency, increases the investigation resolution, while decreasing the overall depth of investigation In the light of the above, air-coupled systems have become increasingly popular for the evaluation of the part of the pavement structure, especially for the asphalt layers, while ground-coupled systems are utilized mostly in order to gather information from the entire pavement structure (up to ~ 3 m depth). The majority of GPR pavement studies are carried out with air-coupled horn antennas, as they can be implemented at driving speeds without need for road closures. For instance, the 1 GHz air-coupled horn antenna is commonly used for the estimation of pavement layer thickness. However signals generated by horn antenna systems must have sufficient quality to allow the performance of automated signal processing and qualitative data analysis, especially when pavement data more sensitive to the analysis parameters

  16. Membrane Systems in Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with highly differentiated membrane systems. In addition to a Gram-negative-type cell envelope with plasma membrane and outer membrane separated by a periplasmic space, cyanobacteria have an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the fully functional electron transfer chains of photosynthesis and respiration reside. The presence of different membrane systems lends these cells a unique complexity among bacteria. Cyanobacteria must be able to reorganize the membranes, synthesize new membrane lipids, and properly target proteins to the correct membrane system. The outer membrane, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes each have specialized roles in the cyanobacterial cell. Understanding the organization, functionality, protein composition and dynamics of the membrane systems remains a great challenge in cyanobacterial cell biology.

  17. Organic Tracers from Asphalt in Propolis Produced by Urban Honey Bees, Apis mellifera Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Alqarni, Abdulaziz S.; Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Owayss, Ayman A.; Raweh, Hael S.; El-Mubarak, Aarif H.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2015-01-01

    Propolis is a gummy material produced by honey bees to protect their hives and currently has drawn the attention of researchers due to its broad clinical use. It has been reported, based only on observations, that honey bees also collect other non-vegetation substances such as paint or asphalt/tar to make propolis. Therefore, propolis samples were collected from bee hives in Riyadh and Al-Bahah, a natural area, Saudi Arabia to determine their compositional characteristics and possible sources of the neutral organic compounds. The samples were extracted with hexane and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that the major compounds were n-alkanes, n-alkenes, methyl n-alkanoates, long chain wax esters, triterpenoids and hopanes. The n-alkanes (ranging from C17 to C40) were significant with relative concentrations varying from 23.8 to 56.8% (mean = 44.9+9.4%) of the total extracts. Their odd carbon preference index (CPI) ranged from 3.6 to 7.7, with a maximum concentration at heptacosane indicating inputs from higher plant vegetation wax. The relative concentrations of the n-alkenes varied from 23.8 to 41.19% (mean = 35.6+5.1%), with CPI = 12.4-31.4, range from C25 to C35 and maximum at tritriacontane. Methyl n-alkanoates, ranged from C12 to C26 as acids, with concentrations from 3.11 to 33.2% (mean = 9.6+9.5%). Long chain wax esters and triterpenoids were minor. The main triterpenoids were α- and β-amyrins, amyrones and amyryl acetates. The presence of hopanes in some total extracts (up to 12.5%) indicated that the bees also collected petroleum derivatives from vicinal asphalt and used that as an additional ingredient to make propolis. Therefore, caution should be taken when considering the chemical compositions of propolis as potential sources of natural products for biological and pharmacological applications. Moreover, beekeepers should be aware of the proper source of propolis in the flight range of their bee colonies. PMID

  18. Enhanced biodegradation of asphalt in the presence of Tween surfactants, Mn(2+) and H2O2 by Pestalotiopsis sp. in liquid medium and soil.

    PubMed

    Yanto, Dede Heri Yuli; Tachibana, Sanro

    2014-05-01

    Asphalt and fractions thereof can contaminate water and soil environments. Forming as residues in distillation products in crude oil refineries, asphalts consist mostly of asphaltene instead of aliphatics, aromatics, and resins. The high asphaltene content might be responsible for the decrease in bioavailability to microorganisms and therefore reduce the biodegradability of asphalt in the environment. In this study, the effect on asphalt biodegradation by Pestalotiopsis sp. in liquid medium and soil of nonionic Tween surfactants in the presence of Mn2+ and H2O2 was examined. The degradation was enhanced by Tween 40 or Tween 80 (0.1%) in the presence of Mn2+ (1 mM) and H2O2 (0.05 mM). A Tween surfactant, Mn2+, and H2O2 can overcome bioavailability-mediated constraints and increase ligninolytic activities, particularly manganese peroxidase and laccase activities. The study is significant for the bioremediation of asphalt and/or viscous-crude oil-contaminated environments. PMID:24331036

  19. A methodology for use of digital image correlation for hot mix asphalt testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Estefany

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a relatively new technology which aids in the measurement of material properties without the need for installation of sensors. DIC is a noncontact measuring technique that requires the specimen to be marked with a random speckled pattern and to be photographed during the test. The photographs are then post-processed based on the location of the pattern throughout the test. DIC can aid in calculating properties that would otherwise be too difficult even with other measuring instruments. The objective of this thesis is to discuss the methodology and validate the use of DIC in different hot mix asphalt (HMA) tests, such as, the Overlay Tester (OT) Test, Indirect Tensile (IDT) Test, and the Semicircular Bending (SCB) Test. The DIC system provides displacements and strains in any visible surface. The properly calibrated 2-D or 3-D DIC data can be used to understand the complex stress and strain distributions and the modes of the initiation and propagation of cracks. The use of this observational method will lead to further understanding of the complex boundary conditions of the different test, and therefore, allowing it to be implemented in the analysis of other materials. The use of digital image correlation will bring insight and knowledge onto what is happening during a test.

  20. Seismic joint analysis for non-destructive testing of asphalt and concrete slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Park, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    A seismic approach is used to estimate the thickness and elastic stiffness constants of asphalt or concrete slabs. The overall concept of the approach utilizes the robustness of the multichannel seismic method. A multichannel-equivalent data set is compiled from multiple time series recorded from multiple hammer impacts at progressively different offsets from a fixed receiver. This multichannel simulation with one receiver (MSOR) replaces the true multichannel recording in a cost-effective and convenient manner. A recorded data set is first processed to evaluate the shear wave velocity through a wave field transformation, normally used in the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method, followed by a Lambwave inversion. Then, the same data set is used to evaluate compression wave velocity from a combined processing of the first-arrival picking and a linear regression. Finally, the amplitude spectra of the time series are used to evaluate the thickness by following the concepts utilized in the Impact Echo (IE) method. Due to the powerful signal extraction capabilities ensured by the multichannel processing schemes used, the entire procedure for all three evaluations can be fully automated and results can be obtained directly in the field. A field data set is used to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  1. Dielectric characterization of hot-mix asphalt at the smart road using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Loulizi, A.; Lahouar, S.

    2000-04-01

    To better interpret collected ground penetrating radar (GPR) data, a project is currently underway at the Virginia Smart Road. Twelve different flexible pavement sections and a continuously reinforced concrete rigid pavement section are incorporated in the road design. Thirty-five copper plates were placed at different layer interfaces throughout the pavement sections. The copper plates serve as a reflecting material and thus allow the determination of layers' dielectric constant over the GPR frequency range. An initial development of a method to calculate the complex dielectric constant of hot-mix asphalt over the frequency range of 750 to 1750 MHz using an air-coupled GPR system is presented. Utilizing GPR data, this method will be used to predict changes of the dielectric properties of the different SuperPaveTM mixes used at the Smart Road over time. The method is based on equating the overall reflection coefficient as obtained from the radar measurements with the calculated reflection coefficient using electromagnetic theory. The measured overall reflection coefficient is obtained by dividing the reflected frequency spectrum over the incident one. The theoretical overall reflection coefficient is obtained using the multiple reflection model. A Gauss-Newton method is then used to solve for the complex dielectric constant.

  2. Investigation of fatigue properties of granite asphalt mixtures containing hydrated lime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Huang, Xu

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study of evaluating the fatigue characteristics of granite asphalt mixtures (GAM) using different testing methods. In the study, the fatigue performances of GAM were evaluated with Superpave indirect tensile test (IDT) and four-point beam fatigue test. Specimens were conditioned by four different methods: (1) one cycle of freeze-thaw (F-T), (2) two cycles of F-T, (3) immersion in 60°C water bath for 30min (4) immersion in 60°C water bath for 48h, and contrastive analysis was made with unconditioned specimens. Investigation of moisture damage influence on the fatigue properties of GAM with and without Hydrated Lime (HL) was done. The results from this study indicated that both Superpave IDT and four-point beam fatigue test agreed with each other in ranking the fatigue property of GAM. Increasing F-T cycles or immersion time would decrease fatigue life in GAM, and the addition of HL was effective to prolong the fatigue life in GAM.

  3. Investigation of fatigue properties of granite asphalt mixtures containing hydrated lime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Huang, Xu

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study of evaluating the fatigue characteristics of granite asphalt mixtures (GAM) using different testing methods. In the study, the fatigue performances of GAM were evaluated with Superpave indirect tensile test (IDT) and four-point beam fatigue test. Specimens were conditioned by four different methods: (1) one cycle of freeze-thaw (F-T), (2) two cycles of F-T, (3) immersion in 60°C water bath for 30min (4) immersion in 60°C water bath for 48h, and contrastive analysis was made with unconditioned specimens. Investigation of moisture damage influence on the fatigue properties of GAM with and without Hydrated Lime (HL) was done. The results from this study indicated that both Superpave IDT and four-point beam fatigue test agreed with each other in ranking the fatigue property of GAM. Increasing F-T cycles or immersion time would decrease fatigue life in GAM, and the addition of HL was effective to prolong the fatigue life in GAM.

  4. Surface modification of basalt with silane coupling agent on asphalt mixture moisture damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yahong; Fang, Ying; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhu, Yinhui; Li, Wensheng; Yuan, Jianmin; Tan, Ligang; Wang, Shuangyin; Wu, Zhenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new silane coupling agent was synthesized based on γ-(methacryloyloxy) propyltrimethoxysilane (KH570). The surface of basalt rocks was modified by KH570 and the new silane coupling agent (NSCA), and the interfacial interaction between silane coupling agent and basalt was also studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the silane coupling agent molecule bound strongly with basalt rocks. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observation showed that a thin layer of coupling agent was formed on the surface of modified basalt. The boiling test and immersion Marshall test confirmed that the moisture sensitivity of basalt modified with the new silane coupling agent increased more significantly than that untreated and treated with KH570. The Retained Marshall Strength of basalt modified with the new coupling agent increased from 71.74% to 87.79% compared with untreated basalt. The results indicated that the new silane coupling agent played an important role in improving the interfacial performance between basalt and asphalt.

  5. Graphite from the University of Idaho Thermolyzed Asphalt Reaction (GUITAR): Fundamental Electrochemical Characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyan, Isaiah Owusu

    This dissertation details electrochemical characterization of GUITAR (Graphite from the University of Idaho Thermolyzed Asphalt Reaction), a new allotrope of carbon. Applications based on fundamental electrochemical properties of this material are also presented. The dissertation is presented in five chapters. Chapter one presents a summary of the discovery and physical characterizations of GUITAR and how its physical properties position it among carbon materials. In chapter two, fundamental electrochemical properties covering aqueous potential window and electron transfer kinetics with common dissolved redox couples are presented. This chapter highlights significant electrochemical differences between GUITAR and other sp2 carbon materials, notably, fast electron transfer across basal plane GUITAR, contrary to reports at basal planes of graphite and graphene electrodes. In chapter three, the concept of electron transfer facility is extended with biologically relevant molecules. GUITAR is shown to be suitable for biosensing with properties such as; facile electron transfer, low detection limit, high resistance to fouling and stability to anodic regeneration procedures. Chapter four presents further exploration of GUITAR's wide cathodic potential limits in other aqueous electrolytes and preliminary studies towards the exploitation of this property in the negative half of vanadium redox flow battery, where GUITAR-based electrodes are expected to increase coulombic efficiency and increase battery performance due to low hydrogen evolution. Chapter five concludes this dissertation with point-by-point presentation of significant discoveries that highlights GUITAR's uniqueness. This chapter also describes how the various fundamental electrochemical properties of GUITAR make it useful for various applications.

  6. Value-added utilisation of recycled concrete in hot-mix asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiik Diew; Sun, Darren Delai . E-mail: ddsun@ntu.edu.sg; Lai, Dickson

    2007-07-01

    The feasibility of partial substitution of granite aggregate in hot-mix asphalt (HMA) with waste concrete aggregate was investigated. Three hybrid HMA mixes incorporating substitutions of granite fillers/fines with 6%, 45% untreated, and 45% heat-treated concrete were evaluated by the Marshall mix design method; the optimum binder contents were found to be 5.3%, 6.5% and 7.0% of grade Pen 60/70 bitumen, respectively. All three hybrid mixes satisfied the Marshall criteria of the Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) W3B wearing course specification. The hybrid mix with 6% concrete fillers gave comparable resilient modulus and creep resistance as the conventional W3B mix, while hybrid mixes with higher concrete substitutions achieved better performance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the distinct presence of free lime in the heat-treated concrete, while the scanning electron microscope (SEM) provided an in-depth perspective of the concrete grains in the HMA matrix. The results suggest feasible use of waste concrete as partial aggregate substitution in HMA.

  7. Chemical preservation of insect cuticle from the Pleistocene asphalt deposits of California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, B. Artur; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Evershed, Richard P.; Duncan, Ian J.

    1997-06-01

    Cuticles of Coleoptera (beetles) and Orthoptera (crickets) from the Pleistocene asphalt deposits of Rancho La Brea and McKittrick in California, USA were studied by means of flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography /mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS). Commercial chitin, amino acid standards, and fresh and decayed cuticles of modern beetle and cricket were likewise investigated to allow the state of preservation of the fossil specimens to be interpreted. Insect cuticles are composed of chitin and proteins covalently cross-linked via catecholamine moieties. Pyrolysis of the fossil insects yielded all the products normally obtained from the pyrolysis of the chitin biopolymer, indicating that it has survived in a highly intact state. Proteins, on the other hand, are poorly preserved. Only phenols, indoles, and nitrobenzenes were present among the pyrolysis products, providing evidence for the preservation of tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine moieties. This demonstrates the preferential preservation of chitin in comparison with proteins, a result confirmed by scanning electron microscopy of the structure.

  8. Finite element analysis of racked vs. traditionally applied three tab, seal tab, strip shingles, and blister tests for asphalt-glass felt shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, C.G.; Kan, F.W.

    1999-07-01

    This paper compares the stresses developed by wind and by a sudden drop in temperature, using finite element analyses on three tab, self-sealing, asphalt-glass fiber felt shingles, that are rack installed (with three and four nails per shingle in alternate tiers), with the same shingles that are conventionally installed (diagonal lay-up, with four nails per shingle). From these studies, the authors concluded that the nailing pattern is not significant, as long as the shingles tabs remained sealed. The authors confirmed these conclusions using their wind tunnel and environmental chamber on commercially produced shingles. As a separate and unrelated matter, this paper also discusses the evaluation of blistered asphalt-glass fiber felt strip shingles using digital fluoroscopy, and the results of several laboratory tests that are intended to measure the blistering tendency of asphalt coated products.

  9. Composite sensor membrane

    DOEpatents

    Majumdar, Arun; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Yue, Min

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  10. Chimpanzees facing a dangerous situation: A high-traffic asphalted road in the Sebitoli area of Kibale National Park, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Cibot, Marie; Bortolamiol, Sarah; Seguya, Andrew; Krief, Sabrina

    2015-08-01

    Despite the spread of road infrastructures throughout Africa to support regional development, industry, and tourism, few studies have examined how wild animals adapt their behavior and ecology in road-forest ecotones. Indeed, while numerous studies have demonstrated chimpanzee adaptability in anthropogenic landscapes, none have examined the effects of asphalted highways on wild chimpanzee behaviors. In a 29-month survey, we assessed the dangers posed by an asphalted road crossing the Sebitoli area of Kibale National Park (Uganda). We analyzed 122 individual chimpanzee crossings. Although the asphalted road represents a substantial threat to crossing animals (89 motorized vehicles per hour use this road and individuals of six different primate species were killed in 1 year), chimpanzees took into account this risk. More than 90% of the individuals looked right and left before and while crossing. Chimpanzees crossed in small subgroups (average 2.7 subgroups of 2.1 individuals per crossing event). Whole parties crossed more rapidly when chimpanzees were more numerous in the crossing groups. The individuals most vulnerable to the dangers of road crossing (females with dependents, immature, and severely injured individuals) crossed less frequently compared with non-vulnerable individuals (lone and healthy adolescents and adults). Moreover, healthy adult males, who were the most frequent crossing individuals, led progressions more frequently when crossing the road than when climbing or descending feeding trees. Almost 20% of the individuals that crossed paid attention to conspecifics by checking on them or waiting for them while crossing. These observations are relevant for our understanding of adaptive behavior among chimpanzees in human-impacted habitats. Further investigations are needed to better evaluate the effects of busy roads on adolescent female dispersal and on their use of territories. Mitigation measures (e.g., bridges, underpasses, reduced speed limits

  11. Geologic influences on the in situ processing of tar sand at the Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposit, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sinks, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Laramie Energy Technology Center, Department of Energy, completed three in situ oil recovery field experiments, two combustion and one steamflood, in tar sand at Northwest Asphalt Ridge, Utah. Inadequate resource and site characterization prior to the field experiments contributed to process design and operation problems. The 10-acre field site is part of the Sohio Shale Oil Co. D tract located west of Vernal, Uintah County. The target zone, the middle portion of the Cretaceous Rim Rock Sandstone of the Mesaverde Group, varied from 300 to 500 feet deep. From petrographic analyses of the target zone, this portion is classified as a moderately sorted litharenite with an average visible porosity of 18%. Dominant constituents include quartz, rock fragments, chert, feldspars and clay minerals. X-ray analyses of selected core samples from the Rim Rock and Asphalt Ridge Sandstones indicate the presence of quartz, calcite, dolomite, ankerite, microcline, orthoclase, anorthite, kaolinite and muscovite. Carbonate mineral species were present only in the lower Rim Rock and Asphalt Ridge Sandstones. Reservoir characteristics of the target zone which adversely affected the field experiments include faulting at all three experiment areas, lateral and vertical heterogeneities of permeability and porosity, inadequate target zone confinement, rough surface texture of clastic grains, and oil-wet grains. Favorable target zone characteristics include high quartz content; absence of carbonates; lack of clay minerals bridging and cementing pore spaces; and sufficient porosity, initial oil saturation and overburden. Recommended geologic evaluation methods to aid in the identification of potentially suitable resources and sites for in situ oil recovery from tar sands include seismic surveys; well logging; coring and core analyses; petrographic, binocular, and scanning electron microscopy; and x-ray analyses. 54 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  12. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  13. Clogging evaluation of porous asphalt concrete cores in conjunction with medical x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Min; Hsu, Chen-Yu; Lin, Jyh-Dong

    2014-03-01

    This study was to assess the porosity of Porous Asphalt Concrete (PAC) in conjunction with a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) facility. The PAC was designed as the surface course to achieve the target porosity 18%. There were graded aggregates, soils blended with 50% of coarse sand, and crushed gravel wrapped with geotextile compacted and served as the base, subbase, and infiltration layers underneath the PAC. The test site constructed in 2004 is located in Northern of Taiwan in which the daily traffic has been light and limited. The porosity of the test track was investigated. The permeability coefficient of PAC was found severely degraded from 2.2×10-1 to 1.2×10-3 -cm/sec, after nine-year service, while the permeability below the surface course remained intact. Several field PAC cores were drilled and brought to evaluate the distribution of air voids by a medical X-ray CT nondestructively. The helical mode was set to administrate the X-ray CT scan and two cross-sectional virtual slices were exported in seconds for analyzing air voids distribution. It shows that the clogging of voids occurred merely 20mm below the surface and the porosity can reduce as much about 3%. It was also found that the roller compaction can decrease the porosity by 4%. The permeability reduction in this test site can attribute to the voids of PAC that were compacted by roller during the construction and filled by the dusts on the surface during the service.

  14. Investigation of the proposed solar-driven moisture phenomenon in asphalt shingle roofs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boudreaux, Philip; Pallin, Simon; Jackson, Roderick

    2016-01-19

    We report that unvented, sealed or conditioned attics are an energy efficiency measure to reduce the thermal load of the home and decrease the space conditioning energy consumption. This retrofit is usually done by using spray polyurethane foam underneath the roof sheathing and on the gables and soffits of an attic to provide a thermal and air barrier. Unvented attics perform well from this perspective but from a moisture perspective sometimes the unvented attic homes have high interior humidity or moisture damage to the roof. As homes become more air tight and energy efficient, an understanding of the hygrothermal dynamicsmore » of the home become more important. One proposed reason for high unvented attic humidity has been that moisture can come through the asphalt shingle roof system and increase the moisture content of the roof sheathing and attic air. This has been called solar driven moisture. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated this proposed phenomenon by examining the physical properties of a roof and the physics required for the phenomenon. Results showed that there are not favorable conditions for solar driven moisture to occur. ORNL also conducted an experimental study on an unvented attic home and compared the humidity below the roof sheathing before and after a vapor impermeable underlayment was installed. There was no statistically significant difference in absolute humidity before and after the vapor barrier was installed. Finally, the outcome of the theoretical and experimental study both suggest that solar driven moisture does not occur in any significant amount.« less

  15. Quantitative evaluation of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures in oxidized asphalt mixtures using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhe; Farace, Nicholas; Arnold, Jacob; Behnia, Behzad; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Towards developing a method capable to assess the efficiency of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures of oxidized asphalt binders towards their original, i.e., unaged values, three gyratory compacted specimens were manufactured with mixtures oven-aged for 36 hours at 135 °C. In addition, one gyratory compacted specimen manufactured using a short-term oven-aged mixture for two hours at 155 °C was used for control to simulate aging during plant production. Each of these four gyratory compacted specimens was then cut into two cylindrical specimen 5 cm thick for a total of six 36-hour oven-aged specimens and two short term aging specimens. Two specimens aged for 36 hours and the two short-term specimens were then tested using an acoustic emission approach to obtain base acoustic emission response of short-term and severely-aged specimens. The remaining four specimens oven-aged for 36 hours were then treated by spreading their top surface with rejuvenator in the amount of 10% of the binder by weight. These four specimens were then tested using the same acoustic emission approach after two, four, six, and eight weeks of dwell time. It was observed that the embrittlement temperatures of the short-term aged and severely oven-aged specimens were -25 °C and - 15 °C, respectively. It was also observed that after four weeks of dwell time, the rejuvenator-treated samples had recuperated the original embrittlement temperatures. In addition, it was also observed that the rejuvenator kept acting upon the binder after four weeks of dwell time; at eight weeks of dwell time, the specimens had an embrittlement temperature about one grade cooler than the embrittlement temperature corresponding to the short-term aged specimen.

  16. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Wood, Kurt; Skilton, Wayne; Petersheim, Jerry

    2009-11-20

    The widespread use of solar-reflective roofing materials can save energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming by cooling the roughly 20% of the urban surface that is roofed. In this study we created prototype solar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing materials using a two-layer spray coating process intended to maximize both solar reflectance and factory-line throughput. Each layer is a thin, quick-drying, pigmented latex paint based on either acrylic or a poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic blend. The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced with bare granules from 0.06 to 0.62. The second layer is a 'cool' color topcoat with weak near-infrared (NIR) absorption and/or strong NIR backscattering. Each layer dries within seconds, potentially allowing a factory line to pass first under the white spray, then under the color spray. We combined a white basecoat with monocolor topcoats in various shades of red, brown, green and blue to prepare 24 cool color prototype tiles and 24 cool color prototypes shingles. The solar reflectances of the tiles ranged from 0.26 (dark brown; CIELAB lightness value L* = 29) to 0.57 (light green; L* = 76); those of the shingles ranged from 0.18 (dark brown; L* = 26) to 0.34 (light green; L* = 68). Over half of the tiles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.40, and over half of the shingles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.25.

  17. Methanotroph outer membrane preparation.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Odd A; Berven, Frode S; Jensen, Harald B; Fjellbirkeland, Anne

    2011-01-01

    All presently known methanotrophs are gram-negative bacteria suggesting that they are surrounded by a two-layered membrane: an inner or cytoplasmic membrane and an outer membrane. In the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), separation of the two membranes has allowed studies on protein and lipid composition of the outer membrane. Its outer membrane can be isolated from purified cell envelopes by selective solubilization of the inner membranes with the detergent Triton X-100. The proteins associated with the outer membrane can further be fractionated into integral and tightly associated proteins and peripheral loosely associated proteins. We present here protocols for this fractionation and show how the proteins associated with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane can be isolated and identified by whole-cell biotin surface labeling. PMID:21419921

  18. Membrane selectivity in pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W.

    1996-06-01

    A qualitative description is presented of pervaporation which discusses the initial preferential sorption into the membrane, diffusion of liquid, phase transition from liquid to vapor phase, followed by diffusion of vapors and fast desorption from the other side of the membrane. The overall separation of each pervaporation step was calculated in terms of separation factor {alpha}. The results show that in the case of hydrophilic membranes (i.e., dense polyamide-6 membrane and ion-exchange membrane PESS-1) and water-ethanol mixtures, the phase transition step decreases the overall separation. Also, diffusion through the membrane is unfavorable to water at a low concentration range.

  19. Bacterial symbionts of Bathymodiolus mussels and Escarpia tubeworms from Chapopote, an asphalt seep in the Southern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Raggi, L; Schubotz, F; Hinrichs, K-U; Dubilier, N; Petersen, J M

    2013-07-01

    Chemosynthetic life was recently discovered at Chapopote, an asphalt hydrocarbon seep in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Preliminary morphological analyses indicated that one tubeworm and two mussel species colonize Chapopote. Our molecular analyses identified the tubeworm as Escarpia sp., and the mussels as Bathymodiolus heckerae and B. brooksi. Comparative 16S rRNA analysis and FISH showed that all three species harbour intracellular sulfur-oxidizing symbionts highly similar or identical to those found in the same host species from northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM). The mussels also harbour methane-oxidizing symbionts, and these shared highly similar to identical 16S rRNA sequences to their nGoM conspecifics. We discovered a novel symbiont in B. heckerae, which is closely related to hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria of the genus Cycloclasticus. In B. heckerae, we found key genes for the use of aromatic compounds, and its stable carbon isotope values were consistently higher than B. brooksi, indicating that the novel symbiont might use isotopically heavy aromatic hydrocarbons from the asphalt seep. This discovery is particularly intriguing because until now only methane and reduced sulfur compounds have been shown to power cold-seep chemosynthetic symbioses. The abundant hydrocarbons available at Chapopote would provide these mussel symbioses with a rich source of nutrition. PMID:23279012

  20. Evolution of the microstructure of unmodified and polymer modified asphalt binders with aging in an accelerated weathering tester.

    PubMed

    Menapace, Ilaria; Masad, Eyad

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents findings on the evolution of the surface microstructure of two asphalt binders, one unmodified and one polymer modified, directly exposed to aging agents with increasing durations. The aging is performed using an accelerated weathering tester, where ultraviolet radiation, oxygen and an increased temperature are applied to the asphalt binder surface. Ultraviolet and dark cycles, which simulated the succession of day and night, alternated during the aging process, and also the temperature varied, which corresponded to typical summer day and night temperatures registered in the state of Qatar. Direct aging of an exposed binder surface is more effective in showing microstructural modifications than previously applied protocols, which involved the heat treatment of binders previously aged with standardized methods. With the new protocol, any molecular rearrangements in the binder surface after aging induced by the heat treatment is prevented. Optical photos show the rippling and degradation of the binder surface due to aging. Microstructure images obtained by means of atomic force microscopy show gradual alteration of the surface due to aging. The original relatively flat microstructure was substituted with a profoundly different microstructure, which significantly protrudes from the surface, and is characterized by various shapes, such as rods, round structures and finally 'flower' or 'leaf' structures. PMID:27059404

  1. Measurements of the Stiffness and Thickness of the Pavement Asphalt Layer Using the Enhanced Resonance Search Method

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Nur Mustakiza; Yusoff, Nur Izzi Md.; Hardwiyono, Sentot; Mohd Nayan, Khairul Anuar

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced resonance search (ERS) is a nondestructive testing method that has been created to evaluate the quality of a pavement by means of a special instrument called the pavement integrity scanner (PiScanner). This technique can be used to assess the thickness of the road pavement structure and the profile of shear wave velocity by using the principle of surface wave and body wave propagation. In this study, the ERS technique was used to determine the actual thickness of the asphaltic pavement surface layer, while the shear wave velocities obtained were used to determine its dynamic elastic modulus. A total of fifteen locations were identified and the results were then compared with the specifications of the Malaysian PWD, MDD UKM, and IKRAM. It was found that the value of the elastic modulus of materials is between 3929 MPa and 17726 MPa. A comparison of the average thickness of the samples with the design thickness of MDD UKM showed a difference of 20 to 60%. Thickness of the asphalt surface layer followed the specifications of Malaysian PWD and MDD UKM, while some of the values of stiffness obtained are higher than the standard. PMID:25276854

  2. Ionene membrane battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moacanin, J.; Tom, H. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Ionic transport characteristics of ionenes, insoluble membranes from soluble polyelectrolyte compositions, are studied for possible application in a battery separator. Effectiveness of the thin film of separator membrane essentially determines battery lifetime.

  3. Composite zeolite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Ashley, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

  4. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  5. Supertubes and Superconducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Ruben; Miguel-Pilar, Zelin

    2007-02-09

    We show the equivalence between configurations that arise from string theory of type IIA, called supertubes, and superconducting membranes at the bosonic level. We find equilibrium and oscillating configurations for a tubular membrane carrying a current along its axis.

  6. Premature rupture of membranes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When the water breaks early, it is called premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Most women will go ... th week of pregnancy, it is called preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). The earlier your water ...

  7. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  8. Supported inorganic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

  9. Photoactive roadways: Determination of CO, NO and VOC uptake coefficients and photolabile side product yields on TiO2 treated asphalt and concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, C.; Jobson, B. T.; Haselbach, L.; Shen, S.; Chung, S. H.

    2016-08-01

    This work reports uptake coefficients and by-product yields of ozone precursors onto two photocatalytic paving materials (asphalt and concrete) treated with a commercial TiO2 surface application product. The experimental approach used a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and allowed for testing large samples with the same surface morphology encountered with real urban surfaces. The measured uptake coefficient (γgeo) and surface resistances are useful for parametrizing dry deposition velocities in air quality model evaluation of the impact of photoactive surfaces on urban air chemistry. At 46% relative humidity, the surface resistance to NO uptake was ∼1 s cm-1 for concrete and ∼2 s cm-1 for a freshly coated older roadway asphalt sample. HONO and NO2 were detected as side products from NO uptake to asphalt, with NO2 molar yields on the order of 20% and HONO molar yields ranging between 14 and 33%. For concrete samples, the NO2 molar yields increased with the increase of water vapor, ranging from 1% to 35% and HONO was not detected as a by-product. Uptake of monoaromatic VOCs to the asphalt sample set displayed a dependence on the compound vapor pressure, and was influenced by competitive adsorption from less volatile VOCs. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were detected as byproducts, with molar yields ranging from 5 to 32%.

  10. The effects of free and bonded sulfur both in the presence and absence of vulcanization accelerators on the rheological, technological, aging, and thermal stability of asphalts

    SciTech Connect

    Onabajo, A.; Kopsch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Rheological and technological experiments have been carried out on sulfur-modified asphalts in the temperature range of 353 K to 453 K over a wide range of shear rates (0-4800 sec/sup -1/). The results indicated that the activation energy of the viscous flow increased with increasing amount of bonded sulfur. The irreversible shear degradation observed in sulfur-modified asphalts is caused by the high shear forces which rupture the aggregated molecules. Thermogravimetric analysis and aging experiments on asphalts and their sulfurized products, containing varying amounts of free sulfur (0-5.5 wt.-%) and vulcanization accelerators (0.5-2.5 wt.-%), have shown that mixes containing vulcanization accelerators have higher thermal stabilities and are more resistant to thermal and non-thermal aging than the unaccelerated asphalt-sulfur mixed prepared at the same or higher temperatures. The changes in the rheological and physical properties of the mixes with time is not only explained by the changes in the physical state of unreacted free sulfur, that is, from plastic to crystalline state (physical process), but also attributable to the effect of chemical reactions.

  11. Applicability of the DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) aggregate degradation test to determine moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixes. Final report, June 1986-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Heinicke, J.J.; Vinson, T.S.; Wilson, J.E.

    1987-06-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the dimethyl sulfoxide accelerated weathering test (DMSO test) to predict moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. Asphalt-concrete specimens were fabricated using aggregates from three quarries. The specimens were conditioned using vacuum saturation and a series of five freeze/thaw cycles. The resilient modulus (M{sub r}) was obtained before and after each conditioning cycle and the Index of Retained Resilient Modulus (IRM{sub r}) was determined. The results indicate the DMSO test may be used to identify the potential for moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. However, no correlation was determined between the DMSO test results and the IRM{sub r} or fatigue life test results. The strain and temperature dependencies of the M{sub r} were determined for a dense-graded asphalt-concrete mixture. It was concluded that constant stress testing may result in a misinterpretation of the IRM{sub r} and tests conducted within the currently accepted temperature range may result in a plus or minus 20% deviation in the IRM{sub r}. In an accompanying analytical program, the effect of diametral test boundary conditions on the measured value of M{sub r} was evaluated using two- and three-dimensional finite element models. The results indicate that the resilient modulus diametral test is adequately represented by elastic theory and an assumed plane stress condition.

  12. Soil, water, and streambed quality at a demolished asphalt plant, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    A number of potentially hazardous chemicals were used at an asphalt plant on the Fort Bragg U.S. Army Reservation near Fayetteville, North Carolina. This plant was demolished in the late 1960's. Samples collected from soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediment were tested for the presence of contaminants. The sediment immediately underlying the demolished asphalt plant site consists mainly of sands, silts, and clayey sands with interbedded clay occurring at various depths. About 12 inches of rainfall per year infiltrate the unconfined surficial aquifer. The water table in this area is about 233 to 243 feet above sea level. Local ground water moves laterally, mainly towards the north- to-northwest at a rate of about 35 feet per year. where it discharges to Tank Creek, Little River, or one of their tributaries. A series of confining clays separate the surficial aquifer from the underlying upper Cape Fear aquifer. These clays help retard vertical migration of constituents dissolved in ground water. The saprolite-bedrock aquifer lies below the upper Cape Fear aquifer. In general ground water in the seven monitoring wells screened in the upper and lower part of the surficial aquifer did not contain detectable concentrations of chemicals related to past asphalt-plant activities. A small number of chemicals that were assumed to be unrelated to the asphalt plant were present in some of the study area monitoring wells. Ground water in four wells contained concentrations of organochlorine pesticides. Of these pesticides, concentrations of gamma-benzene hexachloride (lindane) (maximum of 0.76 micrograms per liter) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 0.2 micrograms per liter in two wells. In addition, one well contained a trichloroethane concentration (7.7 micrograms per liter) that is assumed to be unrelated to demolished asphalt-plant operations, but exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum

  13. Composite fuel cell membranes

    DOEpatents

    Plowman, Keith R.; Rehg, Timothy J.; Davis, Larry W.; Carl, William P.; Cisar, Alan J.; Eastland, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

  14. Composite fuel cell membranes

    DOEpatents

    Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

    1997-08-05

    A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

  15. Meniscus membranes for separations

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  16. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  17. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1992-07-07

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  18. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  19. Polyphosphazene semipermeable membranes

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Charles A.; McCaffrey, Robert R.; Cummings, Daniel G.; Grey, Alan E.; Jessup, Janine S.; McAtee, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    A semipermeable, inorganic membrane is disclosed; the membrane is prepared from a phosphazene polymer and, by the selective substitution of the constituent groups bound to the phosphorous in the polymer structure, the selective passage of fluid from a feedstream can be controlled. Resistance to high temperatures and harsh chemical environments is observed in the use of the phosphazene polymers as semipermeable membranes.

  20. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  1. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  2. Stable sulfur and carbon isotope investigations of pore-water and solid-phase compounds in sediments of the Chapopote Asphalt Volcano, southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, T.; Bruechert, V.; Pape, T.; Schubotz, F.; Kasten, S.

    2007-05-01

    During R/V Meteor cruise M67 2a/b (March-April 2006) to the Asphalt Volcanoes of the southern Gulf of Mexico two gravity cores were retrieved from the central depression of the Chapopote Knoll which contained viscous oil/asphalt a few meters below the sediment surface. Also several push cores were taken with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) QUEST at sites where oil/asphalt reached closely below the sediment surface. From these cores solid-phase and pore-water samples were taken for on-board and subsequent shore-based analyses. Together with a core taken from a background site which is not influenced by asphalt/oil seepage these sediment and pore water samples are currently subject to detailed analyses of (1) the stable sulfur isotopic composition of both dissolved (sulfate and sulfide) and solid-phase (iron monosulfides, pyrite) sulfur compounds, and (2) the composition and stable carbon isotopic signatures of hydrocarbon gases. The major aims of these investigations are to identify whether and to which extent the upward migration of oil, asphalt and gas (1) stimulates biogeochemical processes and turn-over rates, and (2) influences the stable sulfur isotopic signatures of both dissolved and solid phase sulfur compounds. Furthermore, we seek to determine the potential of these - possibly unusual - stable sulfur isotopic signals of solid-phase sulfides to reconstruct hydrocarbon seepage in older geological records and to elucidate how the composition and the stable carbon isotopic signatures of the hydrocarbon gases are altered by the action of typical chemosynthetic communities thriving at these sites.

  3. Non-destructive assessment of Hot Mix Asphalt density with a Step Frequency Radar - Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, Cyrille; Beaucamp, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    The density of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) layers is a key parameter for assessing newly paved roads. It allows the quality control and ensures the time performance of the road layers. The standard methods for measuring the in-place HMA density are destructive and based on cores testing. Knowing the specific gravity of the HMA (data provided by builder), the bulk density can be determined in the laboratory either by weighting cores methods or by measuring the absorption ratio of gamma rays through road samples. Non destructive (ND) methods are highly needed in order to gain time and to avoid the strong constraints due to the nuclear gauges use. The Step Frequency Radar (SFR) is an electromagnetic method based on wave propagation in matter, similar in its principle to the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). It can use wide band and higher frequencies than GPR, allowing a thinner spatial resolution, but with a lower speed of acquisition. It is used in the present work as a tool providing the dielectric constant of HMA. Recent results in the laboratory have shown that the density can be relied on HMA dielectric constant with the use of a dielectric model (Complex Refractive Index model, or CRI model) taking into account the volume concentration and the dielectric constant of each HMA component. In this approach, the knowledge of the rock dielectric constant that composes the main part of HMA is required. If not, the in-place measurements can be calibrated according to one or more core drillings and the previous approach is still available. The main objective of this paper is to apply the methodology developed in the laboratory on a new HMA layer (case study located on A13 highway, nearby the city of Cagny, Normandie, France) for assessing the HMA density. The SFR system is composed of a vector network analyser sweeping a large frequency band [1.4 GHz - 20 GHz] and an ultra wide band antenna placed above the HMA surface. The whole system is pc-controlled and embedded in a

  4. Development of a simplified asphalt mix stability procedure for use in Superpave volumetric mix design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihab Hussein Fahmy

    Over the last five decades, two common test methods (Marshall and Hveem) have evolved for the design of asphaltic mixes. These design methods have been historically found to be generally reliable and reasonable for most application in design. However, premature distress in many flexible pavements suggests that these empirical methods of design do not guarantee a stable mix. Recently, many studies have been carried out in order to develop a rational mix design procedure that accounts for both the mix volumetric properties as well as fundamental engineering properties. Among those is the Superpave design procedure, which was originally divided into three, hierarchical levels termed the volumetric mix design (level I), the abbreviated mix design (level II), and the full mix design (level III). In the volumetric design, the entire mix design process is based upon the volumetric properties and does not include a test method to evaluate the stability/strength of the mix. Although both the abbreviated level and the full level of design included test methods that considered the engineering properties in a complete and a comprehensive manner; they required the purchase of very expensive equipment and a large number of samples to be tested. The objective of this research was to develop a new rational "fundamental" mix strength (stability) test for the design of dense graded mixes to overcome the limitations of the Hveem and Marshall empirical methods and to fill the gaps and major deficiencies in the current Superpave volumetric mix design. The new procedure is based upon the Superpave volumetric design (level I) but is augmented by the simple, but fundamental mix strength (stability) test. Such a test is now currently absent in the existing Superpave approach. The new procedure introduces the flow time as a fundamental engineering design criterion in the mix design. This parameter is defined as the time (in seconds) at which plastic flow in a mix occurs under creep loading

  5. Tracking Membrane Protein Association in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reffay, Myriam; Gambin, Yann; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Phan, Gilles; Taulier, Nicolas; Ducruix, Arnaud; Hodges, Robert S.; Urbach, Wladimir

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue. We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well. After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 Å, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the bilayers. We

  6. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  7. Separation membrane development

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.W.

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  8. Membrane Flotation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Dorothee A; Ott, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Many postitive-stranded RNA viruses, such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV), highjack cellular membranes, including the Golgi, ER, mitchondria, lipid droplets, and utilize them for replication of their RNA genome or assembly of new virions. By investigating how viral proteins associate with cellular membranes we will better understand the roles of cellular membranes in the viral life cycle. Our lab has focused specifically on the role of lipid droplets and lipid-rich membranes in the life cycle of HCV. To analyze the role of lipid-rich membranes in HCV RNA replication, we utilized a membrane flotation assay based on an 10–20–30% iodixanol density gradient developed by Yeaman et al. (2001). This gradient results in a linear increase in density over almost the entire length of the gradient, and membrane particles are separated in the gradient based on their buoyant characteristics. To preserve membranes in the lysate, cells are broken mechanically in a buffer lacking detergent. The cell lysate is loaded on the bottom of the gradient, overlaid with the gradient, and membranes float up as the iodixanol gradient self-generates. The lipid content of membranes and the concentration of associated proteins will determine the separation of different membranes within the gradient. After centrifugation, fractions can be sampled from the top of the gradient and analyzed using standard SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis for proteins of interest.

  9. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  10. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  11. Electrochemical Studies of Graphene-like materials Synthesized by the Thermolyzed Asphalt Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuqun

    Developing a facile and cost effective synthetic method for producing graphene materials has been an attractive research topic in several disciplines. Chapter 3 demenstrates sheets of multilayered graphene-like paper materials more than 10 cm2 in area were synthesized in the "Thermolyzed Asphalt Reaction (TAR)". TAR is processed within open containers at 650 °C under atmospheric pressure without the need to exclude oxygen, which is the lowest reported temperature for chemical vapor deposition of graphene-based materials. It was found that multilayered graphene-like materials can be grown on amorphous substrates without catalysts. In chapter 4, further studies of the TAR mechanism have allowed sulfur to be identified as an important co-factor in multilayer graphene-like materials formation. Graphene-like material was produced from simple precursors such as elemental sulfur and cyclohexanol. A proposed scheme illustrates sulfur's role in the growth of graphene-like material based on thermogravimetric analyses. We hypothesize that elemental sulfur is involved with the dehydration/dehydrogenation and eventual crosslinking of cyclohexanol between 100-140 °C. In the range of 240-400 °C further dehydrogenation steps occur yielding an unidentified intermediate with a sharp Raman peak at 1450 cm-1 At 550 °C graphene-like Raman D and G bands appear along with the 1450 cm band of the intermediate. At 600 °C and higher temperatures, the intermediate peak is lost with only bands characteristic of graphene-like material being seen in the spectrum of the material synthesized from the University of Idaho Thermolyzed Asphalt Reaction (GUITAR). Sulfur as a key co-factor for GUITAR synthesis is reinforced by results found with other hydrocarbons. Other organics succeeded or failed in GUITAR formation based on melting and boiling considerations. The failure of the compounds with a boiling point below -89°C, melting point above 300°C is reasoned with the volatility of the

  12. Polymers at membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenich, Markus

    2000-11-01

    The surface of biological cells consists of a lipid membrane and a large amount of various proteins and polymers, which are embedded in the membrane or attached to it. We investigate how membranes are influenced by polymers, which are anchored to the membrane by one end. The entropic pressure exerted by the polymer induces a curvature, which bends the membrane away from the polymer. The resulting membrane shape profile is a cone in the vicinity of the anchor segment and a catenoid far away from it. The perturbative calculations are confirmed by Monte-Carlo simulations. An additional attractive interaction between polymer and membrane reduces the entropically induced curvature. In the limit of strong adsorption, the polymer is localized directly on the membrane surface and does not induce any pressure, i.e. the membrane curvature vanishes. If the polymer is not anchored directly on the membrane surface, but in a non-vanishing anchoring distance, the membrane bends towards the polymer for strong adsorption. In the last part of the thesis, we study membranes under the influence of non-anchored polymers in solution. In the limit of pure steric interactions between the membrane and free polymers, the membrane curves towards the polymers (in contrast to the case of anchored polymers). In the limit of strong adsorption the membrane bends away from the polymers. Die Oberfläche biologischer Zellen besteht aus einer Lipidmembran und einer Vielzahl von Proteinen und Polymeren, die in die Membran eingebaut sind. Die Beeinflussung der Membran durch Polymere, die mit einem Ende an der Membran verankert sind, wird im Rahmen dieser Arbeit anhand eines vereinfachten biomimetischen Systems studiert. Der entropische Druck, den das Polymer durch Stöße auf die Membran ausübt, führt dazu, dass sich die Membran vom Polymer weg krümmt. Die resultierende Membranform ist ein Kegel in der Nähe des Ankers und ein Katenoid in grossem Abstand vom Ankerpunkt. Monte Carlo-Simulationen best

  13. Membrane with supported internal passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia (Inventor); Salinas, Carlos E. (Inventor); Cisar, Alan J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides an improved proton exchange membrane for use in electrochemical cells having internal passages parallel to the membrane surface comprising permanent tubes preferably placed at the ends of the fluid passages. The invention also provides an apparatus and process for making the membrane, membrane and electrode assemblies fabricated using the membrane, and the application of the membrane and electrode assemblies to a variety of devices, both electrochemical and otherwise. The passages in the membrane extend from one edge of the membrane to another and allow fluid flow through the membrane and give access directly to the membrane.

  14. Asphalt overlay design methods for rigid pavements considering rutting, reflection cracking, and fatigue cracking. Research report September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.H.; Liu, C.; Dossey, T.; McCullough, B.F.

    1998-10-01

    An asphalt concrete pavement (ACP) overlay over a rigid pavement represents a viable rehabilitation strategy. It can provide good serviceability at an initial construction cost that is substantially less than that of a rigid overlay rehabilitation. In addition, ACP overlays require less construction time, which can reduce user costs during construction. However, it may not be the most economical solution for long-term rehabilitation. Because of their relatively short service life, ACP overlays may require maintenance sooner than rigid overlays. And one of the more critical distresses that effectively determine the life span of the structure is reflection cracking. This report investigates alternative strategies that seek to prevent reflection cracking on ACP overlays.

  15. 2D and 3D Ground Penetrating Radar monitoring of a reinforced concrete asphalt plate affected by mechanical deformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, M.; Dumoulin, J.; Loperte, A.; Rizzo, E.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    The main facility of Hydrogeosite Laboratory of the Italian National Research Council (Marsico Nuovo, CNR) is a 3m x 7m x 10m reinforced concrete pool filled by siliceous sand designed for hydrologic experiments. One of its peculiarities is the possibility to vary the water table depth by using a proper hydraulic system [1]. In the framework of the FP7 ISTIMES project (Integrated System for Transport Infrastructure surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing), a 3m x 3m layered structure has been purposely built and placed in the pool of the Hydrogeosite Laboratory with the aim to carry out a long term monitoring, by using jointly several electromagnetic sensing technologies, during two different phases simulating the rising of the water table and a mechanical solicitation. Several layers composed the structure from the top to the bottom, such as: 5 cm of asphalt; 5-10 cm of reinforced concrete; 20-25 cm of conglomerate, 55 cm of sand. Moreover, in the sand layer, three (metallic and plastic) pipes of different size were buried to simulate utilities. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys were performed by using a the GSSI SIR 3000 system equipped with 400 MHz and 1500 MHz central frequency antennas. Surveys carried out by means of 400 MHz antenna allowed to detect and localize the three pipes (one in plastic and two in metal) and to investigate the effects of the sand water content on their radar signature. Surveys carried out by using 1500 MHz antenna were focused to characterize the shallower layers of the structure. The Hydrogeosite experiment consisted in following stages: • Arising of a water table by infiltration from the bottom; • Water gravity infiltration condescendingly; • Infiltration by peristaltic pump in the very shallow layers of the structure; • Water table drawdown; • Mechanical structure deformation; • Asphalt plate restoration after mechanical solicitation. After each stage a series of GPR surveys was performed. Moreover

  16. Poxvirus Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  17. Poxvirus membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  18. Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo; Morisato, Atsushi

    1998-01-13

    A separation membrane useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is chosen from the group consisting of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R.sub.2 is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) ›PMP!. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations.

  19. Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, I.; Morisato, Atsushi

    1998-01-13

    A separation membrane is described which is useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula shown in the accompanying diagram, wherein R{sub 1} is chosen from the group consisting of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R{sub 2} is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP]. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations. 4 figs.

  20. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S.; Hodgdon, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of NAS 3-20108 was the development and evaluation of improved anion selective membranes useful as efficient separators in a redox power storage cell system being constructed. The program was divided into three parts, (a) optimization of the selected candidate membrane systems, (b) investigation of alternative membrane/polymer systems, and (c) characterization of candidate membranes. The major synthesis effort was aimed at improving and optimizing as far as possible each candidate system with respect to three critical membrane properties essential for good redox cell performance. Substantial improvements were made in 5 candidate membrane systems. The critical synthesis variables of cross-link density, monomer ratio, and solvent composition were examined over a wide range. In addition, eight alternative polymer systems were investigated, two of which attained candidate status. Three other alternatives showed potential but required further research and development. Each candidate system was optimized for selectivity.

  1. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O'Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  2. Stormwater quality of spring-summer-fall effluent from three partial-infiltration permeable pavement systems and conventional asphalt pavement.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer; Bradford, Andrea; Van Seters, Tim

    2014-06-15

    This study examined the spring, summer and fall water quality performance of three partial-infiltration permeable pavement (PP) systems and a conventional asphalt pavement in Ontario. The study, conducted between 2010 and 2012, compared the water quality of effluent from two Interlocking Permeable Concrete Pavements (AquaPave(®) and Eco-Optiloc(®)) and a Hydromedia(®) Pervious Concrete pavement with runoff from an Asphalt control pavement. The usage of permeable pavements can mitigate the impact of urbanization on receiving surface water systems through quantity control and stormwater treatment. The PP systems provided excellent stormwater treatment for petroleum hydrocarbons, total suspended solids, metals (copper, iron, manganese and zinc) and nutrients (total-nitrogen and total-phosphorus) by reducing event mean concentrations (EMC) as well as total pollutant loadings. The PPs significantly reduced the concentration and loading of ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3), nitrite (NO2(-)) and organic-nitrogen (Org-N) but increased the concentration and loading of nitrate (NO3(-)). The PP systems had mixed performances for the treatment of phosphate (PO4(3-)). The PP systems increased the concentration of sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) but EMCs remained well below recommended levels for drinking water quality. Relative to the observed runoff, winter road salt was released more slowly from the PP systems resulting in elevated spring and early-summer Cl and Na concentrations in effluent. PP materials were found to introduce dissolved solids into the infiltrating stormwater. The release of these pollutants was verified by additional laboratory scale testing of the individual pavement and aggregate materials at the University of Guelph. Pollutant concentrations were greatest during the first few months after construction and declined rapidly over the course of the study. PMID:24681366

  3. Meta-analysis of lung cancer in asphalt roofing and paving workers with external adjustment for confounding by coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Fayerweather, W.E.

    2007-07-01

    The study's objectives were to update Partanen's and Boffetta's 1994 meta-analysis of lung cancer among roofing and paving asphalt workers and explore the role of coal tar in explaining the statistical heterogeneity among these studies. Information retrieval strategies and eligibility criteria were defined for identifying the epidemiologic studies to be included in the analysis. The relative risk ratio (RR) for lung cancer was selected as the effect measure of interest. Coal tar bias factors were developed and used to externally adjust each eligible study's published RR for confounding by coal tar. The meta-Relative Risk (meta-RR) and its variance were estimated by general variance-based methods. Heterogeneity of the RRs was assessed by heterogeneity chi-square and I{sup 2} tests. The results from this update were similar to those in Partanen's and Boffetta's original meta-analysis. Although the meta-RRs for the roofers and the pavers were no longer statistically significantly different from one another, significant heterogeneity remained within each of the coal tar-adjusted sectors. Meta-analysis of non-experimental epidemiologic studies is subject to significant uncertainties as is externally correcting studies for confounding. Given these uncertainties, the specific quantitative estimates in this (or any similar) analysis must be viewed with caution. Nevertheless, this analysis provides support for the hypothesis proposed by several major reviewers that confounding by coal tar-related PAH exposures may explain most or all of the lung cancer risks found in the epidemiologic literature on asphalt roofing and paving workers.

  4. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.; Alexander, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    Two polymer ion exchange membranes were synthesized to fulfill the needs of both electrical resistivity and anolyte/catholyte separation for utility load leveling utilizing the DOE/NASA mixed electrolyte REDOX battery. Both membranes were shown to meet mixed electrolyte utility load leveling criteria. Several modifications of an anion exchange membrane failed to meet utility load leveling REDOX battery criteria using the unmixed electrolyte REDOX cell.

  5. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.; Alexander, S. S.

    1984-07-01

    Two polymer ion exchange membranes were synthesized to fulfill the needs of both electrical resistivity and anolyte/catholyte separation for utility load leveling utilizing the DOE/NASA mixed electrolyte REDOX battery. Both membranes were shown to meet mixed electrolyte utility load leveling criteria. Several modifications of an anion exchange membrane failed to meet utility load leveling REDOX battery criteria using the unmixed electrolyte REDOX cell.

  6. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Obligin, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional groups. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  7. Polyarylether composition and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Hung, Joyce; Brunelle, Daniel Joseph; Harmon, Marianne Elisabeth; Moore, David Roger; Stone, Joshua James; Zhou, Hongyi; Suriano, Joseph Anthony

    2010-11-09

    A composition including a polyarylether copolymer is provided. The copolymer includes a polyarylether backbone; and a sulfonated oligomeric group bonded to the polyarylether suitable for use as a cation conducting membrane. Method of bonding a sulfonated oligomeric group to the polyarylether backbone to form a polyarylether copolymer. The membrane may be formed from the polyarylether copolymer composition. The chain length of the sulfonated oligomeric group may be controlled to affect or control the ion conductivity of the membrane.

  8. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.T.; Obligin, A.S.

    1989-10-31

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional group. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  9. Inferring strength and deformation properties of hot mix asphalt layers from the GPR signal: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    , of both the different strength provision of each layer composing the hot mix asphalt pavement structure, and of the attenuation occurring to electromagnetic waves during their in-depth propagation. Promising results are achieved by matching modelled and measured elastic modulus data. This continuous statistically-based model enables to consider the whole set of information related to each single depth, in order to provide a more comprehensive prediction of the strength and deformation behavior of such a complex multi-layered medium. Amongst some further developments to be tackled in the near future, a model improvement could be reached through laboratory activities under controlled conditions and by adopting several frequency bandwidths suited for purposes. In addition, the perspective to compare electromagnetic data with mechanical measurements retrieved continuously, i.e., by means of specifically equipped lorries, could pave the way to considerable enhancements in this field of research. Acknowledgements - This work has benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

  10. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs. PMID:26360742

  11. Biomolecular membrane protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Bolla, Jani; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2012-07-01

    Integral membrane proteins comprise approximately 30% of the sequenced genomes, and there is an immediate need for their high-resolution structural information. Currently, the most reliable approach to obtain these structures is X-ray crystallography. However, obtaining crystals of membrane proteins that diffract to high resolution appears to be quite challenging, and remains a major obstacle in structural determination. This brief review summarizes a variety of methodologies for use in crystallizing these membrane proteins. Hopefully, by introducing the available methods, techniques, and providing a general understanding of membrane proteins, a rational decision can be made about now to crystallize these complex materials.

  12. Plant cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, L.; Douce, R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Cells, Protoplasts, Vacuoles and Liposomes; Tonoplasts; Nuclei, Endolplasmic Reticulum, and Plasma Membrane; Peroxisomes; Plastids; Teneral Physical and Biochemical Methods; and Mitochondira.

  13. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  14. Membrane Tension Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An electrostrictive polymer actuator comprises an electrostrictive polymer with a tailorable Poisson's ratio. The electrostrictive polymer is electroded on its upper and lower surfaces and bonded to an upper material layer. The assembly is rolled tightly and capped at its ends. In a membrane structure having a membrane, a supporting frame and a plurality of threads connecting the membrane to the frame, an actuator can be integrated into one or more of the plurality of threads. The electrostrictive polymer actuator displaces along its longitudinal axis, thereby affecting movement of the membrane surface.

  15. Gas separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  16. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  17. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis and fabrication of polymeric anion permselective membranes for redox systems are discussed. Variations of the prime candidate anion membrane formulation to achieve better resistance and/or lower permeability were explored. Processing parameters were evaluated to lower cost and fabricate larger sizes. The processing techniques to produce more membranes per batch were successfully integrated with the fabrication of larger membranes. Membranes of about 107 cm x 51 cm were made in excellent yield. Several measurements were made on the larger sample membranes. Among the data developed were water transport and transference numbers for these prime candidate membranes at 20 C. Other work done on this system included characterization of a number of specimens of candidate membranes which had been returned after service lives of up to sixteen months. Work with new polymer constituents, with new N.P.'s, catalysts and backing fabrics is discussed. Some work was also done to evaluate other proportions of the ingredients of the prime candidate system. The adoption of a flow selectivity test at elevated temperature was explored.

  18. Membrane in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Galeotti, T.; Cittadini, A.; Neri, G.; Scarpa, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on membranes in cancer cells. Topics covered include Oncogenies, hormones, and free-radical processes in malignant transformation in vitro and Superoxide onion may trigger DNA strand breaks in human granulorytes by acting as a membrane target.

  19. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  20. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.