Science.gov

Sample records for airborne alpha activity

  1. Gross alpha, gross beta activities and gamma emitting radionuclides composition of airborne particulate samples in an oceanic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, F.; Hernández-Armas, J.; Catalán, A.; Fernández-Aldecoa, J. C.; Karlsson, L.

    The radiometric compositions of airborne particulate samples, collected weekly during a 4 years period (1 January 2000 till 31 December 2003) at a site located 310 m a.s.l. in Tenerife (Canary Islands), are analysed in this paper. To do this, measurements of gross alpha, gross beta, 7Be, 210Pb, 228Ac, 226Ra, 212Pb, 214Pb, 208Tl, 214Bi, 235U, 40K, 131I and 137Cs concentrations were carried out in 376 cellulose and polypropylene filters. The time variations of the different radionuclides concentrations have been discussed in relation with various meteorological factors and the mean values have been compared to those published in recent literature for other sites located at the same altitude but different latitudes. The weekly activities of 7Be correlated linearly with the 210Pb activities ( R=0.59). In disagreement with other published studies, the 7Be activities did not correlate ( R=-0.05) with the temperature and maximum values were not found during summer season. The gross beta activities showed correlations with the gross alpha ( R=0.72) and 210Pb activities ( R=0.52), but not with the 7Be ( R=0.16). The anthropogenic radionuclide 131I, emitted from a nearby hospital, was detected slightly above detection limits (1.73×10 -6 Bq m -3) in 88 of the 210 weeks of measurement considered in this work. 137Cs was detected in 31 of those weeks. The 4-year average calculated for 7Be and 210Pb were 3 and 0.3 mBq m -3, respectively. These values are lower than those expected for a site at comparable latitude and altitude. In general, the radionuclides which appeared most frequently in the airborne particulate filters ( 7Be, 210Pb, 212Pb and 40K), did not correlate significantly with any of the meteorological parameters considered: rainfall, temperature, pressure, relative humidity, visibility, wind speed and direction. Therefore, no predictive model could be established with the available data as it has been done for continental sites. The long-range transport of aerosols

  2. Sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors for detection of airborne sup 239 Pu

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Amaro, C.R.

    1992-07-01

    Results of measurements of the sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu are presented. Four commercially available alpha CAMs (Kurz model 8311, Merlin Gerin Edgar, RADeCO model 452, and Victoreen model 758) and a prototype alpha CAM currently in use at Argonne National Laboratory- West (ANL-W) were tested sampling natural ambient air and laboratory-generated atmospheres laden with either blank dust or dust containing nCi/g concentrations of {sup 239}Pu. Cumulative alpha spectra were stored at 30 or 60 minute intervals during each sampling and were subsequently analyzed using three different commonly used alpha spectrum analysis algorithms. The effect of airborne dust concentration and sample filter porosity on detector resolution and sensitivity for airborne {sup 239}Pu are described.

  3. Sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Amaro, C.R.

    1992-07-01

    Results of measurements of the sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu are presented. Four commercially available alpha CAMs (Kurz model 8311, Merlin Gerin Edgar, RADeCO model 452, and Victoreen model 758) and a prototype alpha CAM currently in use at Argonne National Laboratory- West (ANL-W) were tested sampling natural ambient air and laboratory-generated atmospheres laden with either blank dust or dust containing nCi/g concentrations of {sup 239}Pu. Cumulative alpha spectra were stored at 30 or 60 minute intervals during each sampling and were subsequently analyzed using three different commonly used alpha spectrum analysis algorithms. The effect of airborne dust concentration and sample filter porosity on detector resolution and sensitivity for airborne {sup 239}Pu are described.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Nerolidol and its derivatives against airborne microbes and further biological activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nerolidol and its derivatives, namely cis-nerolidol, O-methyl-nerolidol, O-ethyl-nerolidol, (-)-alpha-bisabolol, trans,trans-farnesol and its main natural source Cabreuva essential oil, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against airborne microbes and antifungal properties against plant pat...

  5. Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Veatch, B.D.

    1994-06-01

    In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

  6. Development of a real-time monitor for airborne alpha emissions. First quarter report, TTP AL 142003

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, R.E.; Fowler, M.M.

    1994-02-01

    This is the first quarterly report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 for TTP AL 142003, Development of a Real-Time Monitor for Airborne Alpha Emissions. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is developing a new technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of incinerator stacks for low levels of airborne alpha activity. While initially developed for incinerators, this new technology may well find other applications in continuous air monitoring, process monitoring, and monitoring during remediation activities. Referred to as the Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System (LVFTDS), this technology responds directly to the need for fast responding, high sensitivity effluent monitoring systems. With DOE EM-50 funding, LANL has fabricated a bench-top proof of concept detector system and is conducting tests to evaluate its performance. A second- generation prototype is being designed, based on requirements driven by potential field test sites. An industrial partner is being solicited to license the technology. Field trials of a full-scale detector system are planned for FY 95. Accomplishments during the first quarter of FY 94 are chronicled in this report, including budgetary data. A schedule for the remainder of the fiscal year is also provided.

  7. Binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha to activated forms of human plasma alpha 2 macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, G. K.; LaMarre, J.; Rosendal, S.; Gonias, S. L.; Hayes, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that human plasma alpha 2 macroglobulin (alpha 2M) is a latent binding glycoprotein for human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Human recombinant 125I-TNF-alpha was incubated for 2 hours (37 degrees C) with purified native alpha 2M and with alpha 2M that was modified by reaction with methylamine or various proteinases. 125I-TNF-alpha/alpha 2M complexes were detected by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after autoradiography or by liquid chromatography on Superose-6. 125I-TNF-alpha bound strongly but noncovalently to alpha 2M-plasmin and alpha 2M-methylamine. There was minimal binding of 125I-TNF-alpha to native alpha 2M, alpha 2M-trypsin, or alpha 2M-thrombin. A 10(6) molar excess of porcine heparin did not reduce the binding of 125I-TNF-alpha to alpha 2M-methylamine or alpha 2M-plasmin. alpha 2M-plasmin or alpha 2M-methylamine added to human plasma or serum preferentially bound 125I-TNF-alpha in the presence of native alpha 2M. 125I-TNF-alpha also bound to 'fast' alpha-macroglobulins in methylamine-reacted human, rat, mouse, swine, equine, and bovine plasma. However, TNF-alpha, preincubated with either alpha 2M-plasmin or alpha 2M-methylamine, remained a potent necrogen for cultured L929 cells. Purified 125I-TNF-alpha/alpha 2M-plasmin complex injected intravenously in CD-1 mice rapidly cleared from the circulation, unless the alpha 2M-receptor pathway was blocked by coinjection of excess alpha 2M-trypsin. These findings demonstrate that alpha 2M is a latent plasmin-activated binding glycoprotein for TNF-alpha and that TNF-alpha/alpha 2M-plasmin complexes can be removed from the circulation by the alpha 2M-receptor pathway. This suggests that alpha 2M may be an important regulator of the activity and distribution of TNF-alpha in vivo. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:1704186

  8. Active-passive airborne ocean color measurement. II - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Yungel, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Reported here for the first time is the use of a single airborne instrument to make concurrent measurements of oceanic chlorophyll concentration by (1) laser-induced fluorescence, (2) passive upwelling radiance, and (3) solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence. Results from field experiments conducted with the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) in the New York Bight demonstrate the capability of a single active-passive instrument to perform new and potentially important ocean color studies related to (1) active lidar validation of passive ocean color in-water algorithms, (2) chlorophyll a in vivo fluorescence yield variability, (3) calibration of active multichannel lidar systems, (4) effect of sea state on passive and active ocean color measurements, (5) laser/solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence investigations, and (6) subsequent improvement of satellite-borne ocean color scanners. For validation and comparison purposes a separate passive ocean color sensor was also flown along with the new active-passive sensor during these initial field trials.

  9. Monitoring human and vehicle activities using airborne video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Ross; Shekhar, Chandra S.; Burns, B.; Chellappa, Rama; Bolles, Robert C.; Davis, Larry S.

    2000-05-01

    Ongoing work in Activity Monitoring (AM) for the Airborne Video Surveillance (AVS) project is described. The goal for AM is to recognize activities of interest involving humans and vehicles using airborne video. AM consists of three major components: (1) moving object detection, tracking, and classification; (2) image to site-model registration; (3) activity recognition. Detecting and tracking humans and vehicles form airborne video is a challenging problem due to image noise, low GSD, poor contrast, motion parallax, motion blur, and camera blur, and camera jitter. We use frame-to- frame affine-warping stabilization and temporally integrated intensity differences to detect independent motion. Moving objects are initially tracked using nearest-neighbor correspondence, followed by a greedy method that favors long track lengths and assumes locally constant velocity. Object classification is based on object size, velocity, and periodicity of motion. Site-model registration uses GPS information and camera/airplane orientations to provide an initial geolocation with +/- 100m accuracy at an elevation of 1000m. A semi-automatic procedure is utilized to improve the accuracy to +/- 5m. The activity recognition component uses the geolocated tracked objects and the site-model to detect pre-specified activities, such as people entering a forbidden area and a group of vehicles leaving a staging area.

  10. Lucid dreaming and alpha activity: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, R D; Hunt, H T; Tyson, P D; Lucescu, M L; Jeakins, D B

    1982-12-01

    10 good dream recallers spent 2 nights in the sleep lab during which they were awakened 4 times per night from REM sleep, twice during their highest alpha activity in REM, and twice during low REM alpha. 5 were given alpha feedback training prior to sleep onset. Arousals from high alpha REM sleep yielded significantly higher lucidity ratings. Alpha feedback had no effect upon lucidity or REM alpha levels. Similarities between lucid dreams and meditative phenomena are discussed. PMID:7162915

  11. Airborne antituberculosis activity of Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil.

    PubMed

    Ramos Alvarenga, René F; Wan, Baojie; Inui, Taichi; Franzblau, Scott G; Pauli, Guido F; Jaki, Birgit U

    2014-03-28

    The rapid emergence of multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) has created a pressing public health problem, which mostly affects regions with HIV/AIDS prevalence and represents a new constraint in the already challenging disease management of tuberculosis (TB). The present work responds to the need to reduce the number of contagious MDR/XRD-TB patients, protect their immediate environment, and interrupt the rapid spread by laying the groundwork for an inhalation therapy based on anti-TB-active constituents of the essential oil (EO) of Eucalyptus citriodora. In order to address the metabolomic complexity of EO constituents and active principles in botanicals, this study applied biochemometrics, a 3-D analytical approach that involves high-resolution CCC fractionation, GC-MS analysis, bioactivity measurements, and chemometric analysis. Thus, 32 airborne anti-TB-active compounds were identified in E. citriodora EO: the monoterpenes citronellol (1), linalool (3), isopulegol (5), and α-terpineol (7) and the sesquiterpenoids spathulenol (11), β-eudesmol (23), and τ-cadinol (25). The impact of the interaction of multiple components in EOs was studied using various artificial mixtures (AMxs) of the active monoterpenes 1, 2, and 5 and the inactive eucalyptol (33). Both neat 1 and the AMx containing 1, 2, and 33 showed airborne TB inhibition of >90%, while the major E. citriodora EO component, 2, was only weakly active, at 18% inhibition. PMID:24641242

  12. Phosphorylation-independent stimulation of DNA topoisomerase II alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Saijo, M; Tanaka, M; Enomoto, T

    1996-05-01

    It has been suggested that casein kinase II phosphorylates DNA topoisomerase II alpha (topo II alpha) in mouse FM3A cells, by comparison of phosphopeptide maps of topo II alpha labeled in intact cells and of topo II alpha phosphorylated by various kinases in vitro. The phosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by casein kinase II, which attached a maximum of two phosphate groups per topo II alpha molecule, had no effect on the activity of topo II alpha. Dephosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by potato acid phosphatase, which almost completely dephosphorylated the topo II alpha, did not reduce the activity of topo II alpha. The incubation itself, regardless of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation status, stimulated the enzyme activity in both reactions. Topo II alpha activity was stimulated by incubation in a medium containing low concentrations of glycerol but not in that containing high concentrations of glycerol, such as the 50% in which purified topo II alpha is stored. The stimulation of topo II alpha activity by incubation was dependent on the concentration of topo II alpha, requiring a relatively high concentration of topo II alpha. PMID:8631919

  13. Miniature Neutron-Alpha Activation Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar; Holloway, James Paul; He, Zhong; Goldsten, John

    2002-10-01

    We are developing a miniature neutron-alpha activation spectrometer for in-situ analysis of chem-bio samples, including rocks, fines, ices, and drill cores, suitable for a lander or Rover platform for Mars or outer-planet missions. In the neutron-activation mode, penetrating analysis will be performed of the whole sample using a γ spectrometer and in the α-activation mode, the sample surface will be analyzed using Rutherford-backscatter and x-ray spectrometers. Novel in our approach is the development of a switchable radioactive neutron source and a small high-resolution γ detector. The detectors and electronics will benefit from remote unattended operation capabilities resulting from our NEAR XGRS heritage and recent development of a Ge γ detector for MESSENGER. Much of the technology used in this instrument can be adapted to portable or unattended terrestrial applications for detection of explosives, chemical toxins, nuclear weapons, and contraband.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuguo; Tanaka, Naoki . E-mail: naopi@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Nakajima, Takero; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-08-11

    Hepatic peroxisome proliferation, increases in the numerical and volume density of peroxisomes, is believed to be closely related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) activation; however, it remains unknown whether peroxisome proliferation depends absolutely on this activation. To verify occurrence of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation, fenofibrate treatment was used, which was expected to significantly enhance PPAR{alpha} dependence in the assay system. Surprisingly, a novel type of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation and enlargement was uncovered in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. The increased expression of dynamin-like protein 1, but not peroxisome biogenesis factor 11{alpha}, might be associated with the PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation at least in part.

  15. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  16. Characterization of the airborne activity confinement system prefilter material

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Monson, P.R.

    1992-05-01

    A general concern with assessing the effects of postulated severe accidents is predicting and preventing the release of radioactive isotopes to the environment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor. Unless the confinement systems are breached in an accident the Airborne Activity Confinement System forces all of the internal air through the filter compartments. Proper modeling of the radioactivity released to the environment requires knowledge of the filtering characteristics of the demisters, the HEPA`s, and the charcoal beds. An investigation of the mass loading characteristics for a range of particle sizes was performed under the direction of Vince Novick of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in connection with the restart of the K reactor. Both solid and liquid aerosols were used to challenge sample prefilter and HEPA filters. The results of the ANL investigation are reported in this document.

  17. Characterization of the airborne activity confinement system prefilter material

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Monson, P.R.

    1992-05-01

    A general concern with assessing the effects of postulated severe accidents is predicting and preventing the release of radioactive isotopes to the environment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor. Unless the confinement systems are breached in an accident the Airborne Activity Confinement System forces all of the internal air through the filter compartments. Proper modeling of the radioactivity released to the environment requires knowledge of the filtering characteristics of the demisters, the HEPA's, and the charcoal beds. An investigation of the mass loading characteristics for a range of particle sizes was performed under the direction of Vince Novick of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in connection with the restart of the K reactor. Both solid and liquid aerosols were used to challenge sample prefilter and HEPA filters. The results of the ANL investigation are reported in this document.

  18. Rapid identification and analysis of airborne plutonium using a combination of alpha spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Dennis E; Steed, Amber C; Sobus, Jon; Stetzenbach, Klaus; Lindley, Kaz; Hodge, Vernon F

    2003-10-01

    Recent wildland fires near two U.S. nuclear facilities point to a need to rapidly identify the presence of airborne plutonium during incidents involving the potential release of radioactive materials. Laboratory turn-around times also need to be shortened for critical samples collected in the earliest stages of radiological emergencies. This note discusses preliminary investigations designed to address both these problems. The methods under review are same day high-resolution alpha spectroscopy to screen air filter samples for the presence of plutonium and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to perform sensitive plutonium analyses. Thus far, using modified alpha spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to reliably identify the approximately 5.2 MeV emission of 239Pu on surrogate samples (air filters artificially spiked with plutonium after collection) even though the primary alpha-particle emissions of plutonium are, as expected, superimposed against a natural alpha radiation background dominated by short-lived radon and thoron progeny (approximately 6-9 MeV). Several processing methods were tested to prepare samples for analysis and shorten laboratory turn-around time. The most promising technique was acid-leaching of air filter samples using a commercial open-vessel microwave digestion system. Samples prepared in this way were analyzed by both alpha spectroscopy (as a thin-layer iron hydroxide co-precipitate) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The detection levels achieved for 239Pu--approximately 1 mBq m(-3) for alpha spectroscopy screening, and, < 0.1 mBq m(-3) for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis--are consistent with derived emergency response levels based on EPA's Protective Action Guides, and samples can be evaluated in 36 to 72 h. Further, if samples can be returned to a fixed-laboratory and processed immediately, results from mass spectrometry could be available in as little as 24 h. When fully implemented

  19. Multi-mode multistatics for passive/active airborne surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrodnik, Robert F.

    1986-07-01

    The increasing performance demands for air surveillance assets, as well as the necessity for continued surveillance operations in the presence of enemy jamming anti-radiation missile (ARM) attacks, have increased interest in passive surveillance, in particular multi-mode passive/active multistatic sensing. The use of noncooperative radiation as illuminators of opportunity combined with passive surveillance electromagnetic support measurement (ESM) sensors opens new horizons to multistatic surveillance from a passive airborne platform. Research and field tests have been conducted on ESM augmented bistatics as well as noncooperative multistatics which support the development of airborne multi-mode passive surveillance technology. This work has been conducted under such programs as the Bistatic Enhanced Altimeter Detection (BEAD) and the noncooperative multistatic Passive Coherent Location (PCL). Both BEAD and PCL technology directly support the receiver, signal processing and target location/tracking operations necessary for passive surveillance. The demonstrated technologies for EM interference rejection and multistatic multi-target tracking and location under PCL provide a promising performance bench mark for passive surveillance in the presence of a complex electromagnetic environment. Passive receiver intercept performance under BEAD has provided a receiver design baseline for both look-down and look-up surveillance applications. The technologies under development in BEAD and PCL are presented along with the field test results and the sensor concepts. In particular, spin-off data such as bistatic look-down clutter, noise-floor limitation of noncooperative multistatics and sensitivity limitations set by passive surveillance using signal intercept techniques and illuminators of opportunity are provided.

  20. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:7497089

  1. Reduced Variability of Auditory Alpha Activity in Chronic Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Kreuzer, Peter M.; Vielsmeier, Veronika; Poeppl, Timm B.; Langguth, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is characterized by the conscious perception of a phantom sound which is usually more prominent under silence. Resting state recordings without any auditory stimulation demonstrated a decrease of cortical alpha activity in temporal areas of subjects with an ongoing tinnitus perception. This is often interpreted as an indicator for enhanced excitability of the auditory cortex in tinnitus. In this study we want to further investigate this effect by analysing the moment-to-moment variability of the alpha activity in temporal areas. Magnetoencephalographic resting state recordings of 21 tinnitus subjects and 21 healthy controls were analysed with respect to the mean and the variability of spectral power in the alpha frequency band over temporal areas. A significant decrease of auditory alpha activity was detected for the low alpha frequency band (8–10 Hz) but not for the upper alpha band (10–12 Hz). Furthermore, we found a significant decrease of alpha variability for the tinnitus group. This result was significant for the lower alpha frequency range and not significant for the upper alpha frequencies. Tinnitus subjects with a longer history of tinnitus showed less variability of their auditory alpha activity which might be an indicator for reduced adaptability of the auditory cortex in chronic tinnitus. PMID:24967106

  2. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  3. Neutron activation analysis of airborne thorium liberated during welding operations

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, D.C.; Robinson, L.; Janjovic, J.T.

    1996-02-01

    Typically, reactive metals such as aluminum are welded using a thoriated tungsten welding electrode which is attached to a source of argon gas such that the local atmosphere around the weld is inert. The metal is heated by the arc formed between the electrode and the grounded component to be welded. During this process, some of the electrode is vaporized in the arc and is potentially liberated to the surrounding air. This situation may result in a hazardous airborne thorium level. Because the electrode is consumed during welding, the electrode tip must be repeatedly dressed by grinding the tip to a fine point so that the optimal welding conditions are maintained. These grinding activities may also release thorium to the air. Data generated in the 1950s suggested that these electrodes posed no significant health hazard and seemed to justify their exemption from licensing requirements for source material. Since that time, other studies have been performed and present conflicting results as to the level of risk. Values both above and below the health protection limit in use in the United States, have been reported in the literature recently. This study is being undertaken to provide additional data which may be useful in evaluating both the chemical toxicity risk and radiological dose assessment criteria associated with thoriated tungsten welding operations.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of nerolidol and its derivatives against airborne microbes and further biological activities.

    PubMed

    Krist, Sabine; Banovac, Daniel; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Gochev, Velizar K; Wanner, Jürgen; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Nerolidol and its derivatives, namely cis-nerolidol, O-methyl-nerolidol, O-ethyl-nerolidol, (-)-α-bisabolol, trans,trans-farnesol and its main natural source cabreuva essential oil, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against airborne microbes and antifungal properties against plant pathogens. Among the tested compounds, α-bisabolol was the most effective antimicrobial agent and trans,trans-farnesol showed the best antifungal activity. PMID:25920237

  5. A novel self-guided approach to alpha activity training.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Geert J M; Denissen, Ad J M; Jäger, Mark; Vernon, David; Dekker, Marian K J; Mihajlović, Vojkan; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2012-03-01

    Fifty healthy participants took part in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in which they were either given auditory alpha activity (8-12Hz) training (N=18), random beta training (N=12), or no training at all (N=20). A novel wireless electrode system was used for training without instructions, involving water-based electrodes mounted in an audio headset. Training was applied approximately at central electrodes. Post-training measurement using a conventional full-cap EEG system revealed a 10% increase in alpha activity at posterior sites compared to pre-training levels, when using the conventional index of alpha activity and a non-linear regression fit intended to model individual alpha frequency. This statistically significant increase was present only in the group that received the alpha training, and remained evident at a 3 month follow-up session, especially under eyes open conditions where an additional 10% increase was found. In an exit interview, approximately twice as many participants in the alpha training group (53%) mentioned that the training was relaxing, compared to those in either the beta (20%) or no training (21%) control groups. Behavioural measures of stress and relaxation were indicative of effects of alpha activity training but failed to reach statistical significance. These results are discussed in terms of a lack of statistical power. Overall, results suggest that self-guided alpha activity training using this novel system is feasible and represents a step forward in the ease of instrumental conditioning of brain rhythms. PMID:22119661

  6. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  7. Transcriptional activity of the human pseudogene psi alpha globin compared with alpha globin, its functional gene counterpart.

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, E; Proudfoot, N J

    1983-01-01

    Transcriptional analysis of the human pseudogene psi alpha globin has revealed the following features: (1) The promoter with a 23 bp deletion between the CCAAT and ATA boxes is functional both in vitro and in vivo, 3 fold and 10 fold less efficient, respectively, than alpha. (2) Both the psi alpha and alpha globin gene promoters are active in the absence of transcriptional enhancers, either a gene-encoded or viral enhancer. (3) The mutated poly(A) addition signal in psi alpha (AATGAA) appears to be completely nonfunctional. This result provides an explanation for the absence of psi alpha transcripts in human erythroid cells. Images PMID:6316269

  8. TEST PROCEDURE FOR GROSS ALPHA PARTICLE ACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER: INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATIVE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gross alpha activity values were calculated with four different alpha emitting radionuclide standard counting efficiencies to see which standard was best for gross alpha activity determinations. Thorium-230, a pure alpha emitter, appeared to be the best standard for gross alpha c...

  9. Low-valent niobium-mediated double activation of C-F/C-H bonds: fluorene synthesis from o-arylated alpha,alpha,alpha-trifluorotoluene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fuchibe, Kohei; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2006-02-01

    By the treatment of 0.3 molar amount of NbCl5 and LiAlH4, o-arylated alpha,alpha,alpha-trifluorotoluenes afforded fluorene derivatives in good yields. C-F bonds of the CF3 group and the neighboring ortho C-H bond were doubly activated to give the coupling products. PMID:16448098

  10. Gamma power is phase-locked to posterior alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Daria; Hermes, Dora; Jensen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations in various frequency bands have been reported in numerous studies in both humans and animals. While it is obvious that these oscillations play an important role in cognitive processing, it remains unclear how oscillations in various frequency bands interact. In this study we have investigated phase to power locking in MEG activity of healthy human subjects at rest with their eyes closed. To examine cross-frequency coupling, we have computed coherence between the time course of the power in a given frequency band and the signal itself within every channel. The time-course of the power was calculated using a sliding tapered time window followed by a Fourier transform. Our findings show that high-frequency gamma power (30-70 Hz) is phase-locked to alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) in the ongoing MEG signals. The topography of the coupling was similar to the topography of the alpha power and was strongest over occipital areas. Interestingly, gamma activity per se was not evident in the power spectra and only became detectable when studied in relation to the alpha phase. Intracranial data from an epileptic subject confirmed these findings albeit there was slowing in both the alpha and gamma band. A tentative explanation for this phenomenon is that the visual system is inhibited during most of the alpha cycle whereas a burst of gamma activity at a specific alpha phase (e.g. at troughs) reflects a window of excitability. PMID:19098986

  11. EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS BEFORE AND DURING AND O&M ACTIVITY: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current lack of information regarding the impact of O&M activities on the potential for asbestos exposure to building staff and occupants prompted this study. This report presents a statistical evaluation of airborne asbestos data collected before and during an O&M activity i...

  12. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  13. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  14. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  15. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  16. Effect of chemicals on fungal alpha-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, F S; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 8 growth regulators at concentrations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 ppm on the activity of fungal (Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris) alpha-amylase was studied. Indol acetic acid (IAA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 2% and 7% at 1,000 ppm. The other 6 growth regulators, indol butyric acid (IBA), gibberellic acid, cumarin, cycocel (CCC), atonik-G and kylar, did not inhibit but stimulated alpha-amylase activity (0 to 9%) at 1,000 ppm. All growth regulators studied inhibited alpha-amylase activity at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm concentration except kylar. The effect of organic acids and formaldehyde at 0.01, 0.005, and 0.001 M was studied. Acetic acid stimulated alpha-amylase at all concentrations, but formic acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid and citric acid inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 91, 100, 100 and 79%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.01 M, while by 31, 100, 15 and 20%, respectively, at 0.005 M. Formaldehyde induced 7, 3 and 2% inhibition at 0.01, 0.005 and 0.001 M, respectively. At 0.01 M either sorbitol or fructose inhibited alpha-amylase by 8%, Maltose 7%, sucrose 6%, phenol, glucose and galactose each by 5%, ethanol, glycerol, arabinose and sodium benzoate each by 4%, isopropanol and mannitol 1%, but methanol and ammonium citrate dibasic did not inhibit alpha-amylase. The results indicate that CuCl2, SnCl2, AgNO3 and Fe2(SO4)3 were the strongest inhibitors, followed by Cd(C2H3O2), HgCl2, Na2-EDTA, Na2HPO4, and CaCl2 in decreasing order. NaCl, NaBr and Mn SO4 did not inhibit alpha-amylase at concentrations from 10 mM to 0.01 mM. PMID:2515680

  17. Activity of (-)alpha-bisabolol against Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Morales-Yuste, M; Morillas-Márquez, F; Martín-Sánchez, J; Valero-López, A; Navarro-Moll, M C

    2010-03-01

    Many of the drugs used to treat leishmaniasis are associated with numerous adverse effects. Agents of natural origin have shown activity against different parasites. With this background, an in vitro study was conducted on the activity of (-)alpha-bisabolol, the principal component of Chamomilla recutita essential oil, against Leishmania infantum promastigotes, the main species responsible for human leishmaniasis in Spain. At the two highest concentrations tested (1000 and 500mug/ml), (-)alpha-bisabolol and pentamidine (control agent) achieved 100% inhibition of L. infantum promastigote. These in vitro data can be considered promising in support of the therapeutic use of (-)alpha-bisabolol preparations to treat leishmaniasis caused by L. infantum species. PMID:19577452

  18. Somatosensory Anticipatory Alpha Activity Increases to Suppress Distracting Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haegens, Saskia; Luther, Lisa; Jensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Effective processing of sensory input in daily life requires attentional selection and amplification of relevant input and, just as importantly, attenuation of irrelevant information. It has been proposed that top-down modulation of oscillatory alpha band activity (8-14 Hz) serves to allocate resources to various regions, depending on task…

  19. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities of new steroidal antedrugs: [16alpha,17alpha-d] Isoxazoline and [16alpha,17alpha-d]-3'-hydroxy-iminoformyl isoxazoline derivatives of prednisolone and 9alpha-fluoroprednisolone.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan-K; Ko, Dong-H; You, Z; Khan, M Omar F; Lee, Henry J

    2006-03-01

    A series of new anti-inflammatory steroidal antedrugs with C-16,17-isoxazoline ring system were synthesized and their pharmacological activities were evaluated. We reported earlier that these compounds are promising antedrugs based on the results of 5-day rat croton oil ear edema assay. In the present study, most of these compounds showed high binding affinities to the glucocorticoid receptor of liver cytosol. 21-acetyloxy-9alpha-fluoro-11beta-hydroxy-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d] isoxazoline (FP-ISO-21AC) and 11beta,21-dihydroxy-9alpha-fluoro-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d] isoxazoline (FP-ISO-21OH) were found 5.0-, 5.3-fold more potent than prednisolone, respectively. Inhibitory effects of the antedrugs on the nitric oxide (NO) production were assessed using LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. All these steroidal antedrugs exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of NO production, but their relative potencies were lower than prednisolone. In vitro metabolism study in rat plasma showed that FP-ISO-21AC and 21-acetyloxy-9alpha-fluoro-11beta-hydroxy-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d]-3'-hydroxyiminoformyl isoxazoline (FP-OXIM-21AC) were hydrolyzed rapidly, with the half-lives of 2.1 and 4.2 min, respectively. The half-lives of FP-ISO-21OH and 11beta,21-dihydroxy-9alpha-fluoro-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d]-3'-hydroxyiminoformyl isoxazoline (FP-OXIM-21OH) were 92.2 and 110.2 min, respectively. PMID:16309722

  20. alpha-Tocopheryl phosphate – an active lipid mediator?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol, alphaT) derivative, alpha-tocopheryl phosphate (alphaTP), is detectable in small amounts in plasma, tissues, and cultured cells. Studies done in vitro and in vivo suggest that alphaT can become phosphorylated and alphaTP dephosphorylated, suggesting the existence of ...

  1. Scanning L-Band Active Passive (SLAP) - Recent Results from an Airborne Simulator for SMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP) is a recently-developed NASA airborne instrument specially tailored to simulate the new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite instrument suite. SLAP conducted its first test flights in December, 2013 and participated in its first science campaign-the IPHEX ground validation campaign of the GPM mission-in May, 2014. This paper will present results from additional test flights and science observations scheduled for 2015.

  2. Alpha-band EEG activity in perceptual learning

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Brett C.; Visscher, Kristina M.; Le Dantec, Christophe C.; Seitz, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    In studies of perceptual learning (PL), subjects are typically highly trained across many sessions to achieve perceptual benefits on the stimuli in those tasks. There is currently significant debate regarding what sources of brain plasticity underlie these PL-based learning improvements. Here we investigate the hypothesis that PL, among other mechanisms, leads to task automaticity, especially in the presence of the trained stimuli. To investigate this hypothesis, we trained participants for eight sessions to find an oriented target in a field of near-oriented distractors and examined alpha-band activity, which modulates with attention to visual stimuli, as a possible measure of automaticity. Alpha-band activity was acquired via electroencephalogram (EEG), before and after training, as participants performed the task with trained and untrained stimuli. Results show that participants underwent significant learning in this task (as assessed by threshold, accuracy, and reaction time improvements) and that alpha power increased during the pre-stimulus period and then underwent greater desynchronization at the time of stimulus presentation following training. However, these changes in alpha-band activity were not specific to the trained stimuli, with similar patterns of posttraining alpha power for trained and untrained stimuli. These data are consistent with the view that participants were more efficient at focusing resources at the time of stimulus presentation and are consistent with a greater automaticity of task performance. These findings have implications for PL, as transfer effects from trained to untrained stimuli may partially depend on differential effort of the individual at the time of stimulus processing. PMID:26370167

  3. HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha Are Differentially Activated in Distinct Cell Populations in Retinal Ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, Freya M.; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Smith, Alexander J.; Lange, Clemens; Duran, Yanai; Harten, Sarah; Shukla, Deepa; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W. B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypoxia plays a key role in ischaemic and neovascular disorders of the retina. Cellular responses to oxygen are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) that are stabilised in hypoxia and induce the expression of a diverse range of genes. The purpose of this study was to define the cellular specificities of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha in retinal ischaemia, and to determine their correlation with the pattern of retinal hypoxia and the expression profiles of induced molecular mediators. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the tissue distribution of retinal hypoxia during oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in mice using the bio-reductive drug pimonidazole. We measured the levels of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha proteins by Western blotting and determined their cellular distribution by immunohistochemistry during the development of OIR. We measured the temporal expression profiles of two downstream mediators, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and erythropoietin (Epo) by ELISA. Pimonidazole labelling was evident specifically in the inner retina. Labelling peaked at 2 hours after the onset of hypoxia and gradually declined thereafter. Marked binding to Müller glia was evident during the early hypoxic stages of OIR. Both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha protein levels were significantly increased during retinal hypoxia but were evident in distinct cellular distributions; HIF-1alpha stabilisation was evident in neuronal cells throughout the inner retinal layers whereas HIF-2alpha was restricted to Müller glia and astrocytes. Hypoxia and HIF-alpha stabilisation in the retina were closely followed by upregulated expression of the downstream mediators VEGF and EPO. Conclusions/Significance Both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha are activated in close correlation with retinal hypoxia but have contrasting cell specificities, consistent with differential roles in retinal ischaemia. Our findings suggest that HIF-2alpha activation plays a key role in

  4. Diabetes or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist increases mitochondrial thioesterase I activity in heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) is a transcriptional regulator of the expression of mitochondrial thioesterase I (MTE-I) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), which are induced in the heart at the mRNA level in response to diabetes. Little is known about the regulation of pr...

  5. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  6. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, Charles V.; Killian, E. Wayne; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.; Randolph, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector.

  7. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  8. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  9. Activating STAT3 Alpha for Promoting Healing of Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Greg

    2008-01-01

    A method of promoting healing of injured or diseased neurons involves pharmacological activation of the STAT3 alpha protein. Usually, injured or diseased neurons heal incompletely or not at all for two reasons: (1) they are susceptible to apoptosis (cell death); and (2) they fail to engage in axogenesis that is, they fail to re-extend their axons to their original targets (e.g., muscles or other neurons) because of insufficiency of compounds, denoted neurotrophic factors, needed to stimulate such extension. The present method (see figure) of treatment takes advantage of prior research findings to the effect that the STAT3 alpha protein has anti-apoptotic and pro-axogenic properties.

  10. A species of human alpha interferon that lacks the ability to boost human natural killer activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ortaldo, J R; Herberman, R B; Harvey, C; Osheroff, P; Pan, Y C; Kelder, B; Pestka, S

    1984-01-01

    Most species of recombinant leukocyte interferons (IFN-alpha A, -alpha B, -alpha C, -alpha D, -alpha F, -alpha I, and -alpha K) were capable of boosting human natural killer (NK) activity after a 2-hr treatment of cells at a concentration of 1-80 units/ml. In contrast, recombinant human IFN-alpha J was found to be incapable of augmenting NK activity after exposure of cells for 2 hr to concentrations as high as 10,000 units/ml. This inability of IFN-alpha J to boost NK activity was not complete because, after exposure of cells to a high concentration of IFN-alpha J (10,000 units/ml) for 18 hr, boosting of cytolysis was observed. IFN-alpha J appeared to interact with receptors for IFN on NK cells since it was found to interfere with the boosting of NK activity by other species of IFN-alpha. In contrast to its deficient ability to augment NK activity, IFN-alpha J has potent antiviral and antiproliferative activities. Such extensive dissociation of these biological activities has not been observed previously with any other natural or recombinant IFN species. Thus, this IFN species may be useful for evaluating the relative importance of various biological activities on the therapeutic effects of IFN, for understanding structure-function relationships, and for determining the biochemical pathways related to the various biological effects of IFN. PMID:6589637

  11. The crystal structure of a TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} complex at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution : implications for modulation of T cell activation and memory.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xiong, Y.; Naidenko, O. V.; Liu, J.-H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Kronenberg, M.; Cheroutre, H.; Reinherz, E. L.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; La Jolla Inst. of Allergy and Immunology

    2003-02-01

    TL is a nonclassical MHC class I molecule that modulates T cell activation through relatively high-affinity interaction with CD8{alpha}{alpha}. To investigate how the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} interaction influences TCR signaling, we characterized the structure of the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} complex using X-ray crystallography. Unlike antigen-presenting molecules, the TL antigen-binding groove is occluded by specific conformational changes. This feature eliminates antigen presentation, severely hampers direct TCR recognition, and prevents TL from participating in the TCR activation complex. At the same time, the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} interaction is strengthened through subtle structure changes in the TL {alpha}3 domain. Thus, TL functions to sequester and redirect CD8{alpha}{alpha} away from the TCR, modifying lck-dependent signaling.

  12. Cortical alpha activity predicts the confidence in an impending action

    PubMed Central

    Kubanek, Jan; Hill, N. Jeremy; Snyder, Lawrence H.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2015-01-01

    When we make a decision, we experience a degree of confidence that our choice may lead to a desirable outcome. Recent studies in animals have probed the subjective aspects of the choice confidence using confidence-reporting tasks. These studies showed that estimates of the choice confidence substantially modulate neural activity in multiple regions of the brain. Building on these findings, we investigated the neural representation of the confidence in a choice in humans who explicitly reported the confidence in their choice. Subjects performed a perceptual decision task in which they decided between choosing a button press or a saccade while we recorded EEG activity. Following each choice, subjects indicated whether they were sure or unsure about the choice. We found that alpha activity strongly encodes a subject's confidence level in a forthcoming button press choice. The neural effect of the subjects' confidence was independent of the reaction time and independent of the sensory input modeled as a decision variable. Furthermore, the effect is not due to a general cognitive state, such as reward expectation, because the effect was specifically observed during button press choices and not during saccade choices. The neural effect of the confidence in the ensuing button press choice was strong enough that we could predict, from independent single trial neural signals, whether a subject was going to be sure or unsure of an ensuing button press choice. In sum, alpha activity in human cortex provides a window into the commitment to make a hand movement. PMID:26283892

  13. DNA-binding activity of TNF-{alpha} inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, T. Suganuma, M.; Oka, K.; Fujiki, H.

    2007-11-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) inducing protein (Tip{alpha}) is a carcinogenic factor secreted from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), mediated through both enhanced expression of TNF-{alpha} and chemokine genes and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Since Tip{alpha} enters gastric cancer cells, the Tip{alpha} binding molecules in the cells should be investigated. The direct DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was observed by pull down assay using single- and double-stranded genomic DNA cellulose. The surface plasmon resonance assay, indicating an association between Tip{alpha} and DNA, revealed that the affinity of Tip{alpha} for (dGdC)10 is 2400 times stronger than that of del-Tip{alpha}, an inactive Tip{alpha}. This suggests a strong correlation between DNA-binding activity and carcinogenic activity of Tip{alpha}. And the DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was first demonstrated with a molecule secreted from H. pylori.

  14. High-activity barley alpha-amylase by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dominic W S; Batt, Sarah B; Lee, Charles C; Robertson, George H

    2004-10-01

    Barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 was cloned into and constitutively secreted by Saccharomyces cervisiae. The gene coding for the wild-type enzyme was subjected to directed evolution. Libraries of mutants were screened by halo formation on starch agar plates, followed by high-throughput liquid assay using dye-labeled starch as the substrate. The concentration of recombinant enzyme in the culture supernatant was determined by immunodetection, and used for the calculation of specific activity. After three rounds of directed evolution, one mutant (Mu322) showed 1000 times the total activity and 20 times the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme produced by the same yeast expression system. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of this mutant with the wild type revealed five substitutions: Q44H, R303K and F325Y in domain A, and T94A and R128Q in domain B. Two of these mutations. Q44H and R303K, result in amino acids highly conserved in cereal alpha-amylases. R303K and F325Y are located in the raw starch-binding fragment of the enzyme molecule. PMID:15635937

  15. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, C.R.; Adams, J.R.; Bounds, J.A.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination.

  16. Minimal Determinants for Binding Activated G alpha from the Structure of a G alpha i1-Peptide Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston,C.; Lobanova, E.; Shavkunov, A.; Low, J.; Ramer, J.; Blasesius, R.; Fredericks, Z.; willard, F.; Kuhlman, B.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    G-Proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state, serving as molecular switches that coordinate cellular signaling. We recently used phage display to identify a series of peptides that bind G{alpha}subunits in a nucleotide-dependent manner [Johnston, C. A., Willard, F. S., Jezyk, M. R., Fredericks, Z., Bodor, E. T., Jones, M. B., Blaesius, R., Watts, V. J., Harden, T. K., Sondek, J., Ramer, J. K., and Siderovski, D. P. (2005) Structure 13, 1069-1080]. Here we describe the structural features and functions of KB-1753, a peptide that binds selectively to GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}}- and GTP{gamma}S-bound states of G{alpha}{sup i} subunits. KB-1753 blocks interaction of G{alpha}{sub transducin} with its effector, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and inhibits transducin-mediated activation of cGMP degradation. Additionally, KB-1753 interferes with RGS protein binding and resultant GAP activity. A fluorescent KB-1753 variant was found to act as a sensor for activated G{alpha} in vitro. The crystal structure of KB-1753 bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}-GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}} reveals binding to a conserved hydrophobic groove between switch II and 3 helices and, along with supporting biochemical data and previous structural analyses, supports the notion that this is the site of effector interactions for G{alpha}i subunits.

  17. Stress affects salivary alpha-Amylase activity in bonobos.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Verena; Deschner, Tobias; Möstl, Erich; Selzer, Dieter; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2012-01-18

    Salivary alpha-Amylase (sAA) is a starch digesting enzyme. In addition to its function in the context of nutrition, sAA has also turned out to be useful for monitoring sympathetic nervous system activity. Recent studies on humans have found a relationship between intra-individual changes in sAA activity and physical and psychological stress. In studies on primates and other vertebrates, non-invasive monitoring of short-term stress responses is usually based on measurements of cortisol levels, which are indicative of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity. The few studies that have used both cortisol levels and sAA activity indicate that these two markers may respond differently and independently to different types of stress such that variation in the degree of the activation of different stress response systems might reflect alternative coping mechanisms or individual traits. Here, we present the first data on intra- and inter-individual variation of sAA activity in captive bonobos and compare the results with information from other ape species and humans. Our results indicate that sAA activity in the bonobo samples was significantly lower than in the human samples but within the range of other great ape species. In addition, sAA activity was significantly higher in samples collected at times when subjects had been exposed to stressors (judged by changes in behavioral patterns and cortisol levels) than in samples collected at other times. Our results indicate that bonobos possess functioning sAA and, as in other species, sAA activity is influenced by autonomic nervous system activity. Monitoring sAA activity could therefore be a useful tool for evaluating stress in bonobos. PMID:21945369

  18. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  19. Mutagenic activity and chemical analysis of airborne particulates collected in Pisa (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Vellosi, R.; Fiorio, R.; Rosellini, D.; Bronzetti, G. ); Vannucchi, C.; Ciacchini, G.; Giaconi, V. ); Bianchi, F. )

    1994-03-01

    In the last few years there has been much concern about the problem connected to the exposure to mutagens present in the environment of industrialized countries. Particularly, the mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter has been studied by many investigators and correlated with elevated lung cancer mortality rates. In most cases the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome test has been used for these studies. This short-term test, which is the most validated among the short-term genotoxicity tests, provides an important indication on the carcinogenic potential of environmental pollutants. That are complex mixtures containing a wide variety of compounds potentially capable of causing additive, antagonistic or synergistic genotoxic response in living organisms. Several studies have suggested that diverse factors, such as traffic and meteorological conditions, could affect the levels of pollutants in the air. In our work, we have investigated three different areas in Pisa, where the intensity and the kind of the road traffic were different. Airborne particles have been collected during a year and the genotoxic activity has been studied using TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Gross alpha and beta activities in tap waters in Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Damla, N; Cevik, U; Karahan, G; Kobya, A I

    2006-02-01

    Gross alpha and gross beta activities were determined for 27 different tap water samples collected from Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey. The instrumentation used to count the gross alpha and gross beta activities was a alpha/beta counter of the low background multiple detector type with 10 sample detectors (Berthold LB770). The obtained results showed that natural activity concentrations of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in tap water samples did not exceed WHO and ITS recommended levels. Concentrations ranging from 0.2 mBq/l to 15 mBq/l and from 25.2 mBq/l to 264.4 mBq/l were observed for the gross alpha and gross beta activities, respectively. For all samples the gross beta activities were higher than the corresponding gross alpha activities. PMID:16084570

  1. Synthesis and in vitro activity of some epimeric 20 alpha-hydroxy, 20-oxime and aziridine pregnene derivatives as inhibitors of human 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17,20-lyase and 5 alpha-reductase.

    PubMed

    Ling, Y Z; Li, J S; Kato, K; Liu, Y; Wang, X; Klus, G T; Marat, K; Nnane, I P; Brodie, A M

    1998-10-01

    Some epimeric 20-hydroxy, 20-oxime, 16 alpha, 17 alpha-, 17,20- and 20,21-aziridine derivatives of progesterone were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17,20-lyase (P450(17) alpha) and 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-R). The reduction of 16-dehydropregenolone acetate (3a) was reinvestigated. NaBH4 in the presence of CeCl3 gave better stereo-selectivity for 20 beta-ol [20 alpha/20 beta-OH (4 alpha/4 beta) = 1/2.7] than LTBAH or the Meerwein-Pondroff method reported; reduction with Zn in HOAc formed exclusively 20 alpha-ol (4 alpha b). The 20 alpha- and 20 beta-hydroxy-4,16-pregnadien-3-one (9 alpha) and (9 beta) were synthesized from the alcohols 4 alpha b and 4 beta b. Several 20-oxime pregnadienes and 16 alpha, 17 alpha-, 17,20- and 20,21-aziridinyl-5-pregnene derivatives were also synthesized. LiAlH4 reduction of the 16-en-20-oxime (12b) yielded 20 (R)-(13a) and 20(S)-17 alpha,20-aziridine (13b) and 20(R)-17 beta,20-aziridine (14a). Several compounds inhibited the human P450(17) alpha with greater potency than ketoconzole. The 5 alpha-R enzyme assay showed that while (9 alpha) did not have any activity, (9 beta) and (3b) were potent 5 alpha-reductase (IC50 = 21 and 31 nM) inhibitors with activities similar to finasteride. The 20-oximes (17a) and (17b) were potent dual inhibitors for both 5 alpha-R (IC50 = 63 and 115 nM, compared to 33 nM for finasteride) and P450(17) alpha (IC50 = 43 and 25 nM, compared to 78 nM for ketoconazole). PMID:9839000

  2. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  3. Biological activity profiles of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2, D3, D4, D7, and 24-epi-1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, N; Nakagawa, K; Kawamoto, Y; Tachibana, Y; Hayashi, T; Ozono, K; Okano, T

    1999-04-01

    We have synthesized several 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1alpha,25(OH)2D] derivatives and evaluated their biological activity in terms of their binding affinity for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), antiproliferative or differentiation-inducing effects on human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells, and transcriptional activity on a rat 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase gene promoter, including two vitamin D-responsive elements (VDREs), and human osteocalcin gene promoter, including a VDRE in transfected human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. Furthermore, human VDR- or retinoic acid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha)-mediated luciferase activities of the derivatives were also measured by a one-hybrid system in human epitheloid carcinoma, cervix HeLa cells and African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Binding affinity for VDR, bone-resorbing activity, antiproliferative and cell-differentiating effects, transactivation potencies on target genes and VDR- or RXR alpha-mediated gene regulations of 1alpha,25(OH)2D2 and 1alpha,25(OH)2D4 were almost comparable to the effects of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 while 24-epi-1alpha,25(OH)2D2 and 1alpha,25(OH)2D7 were much less active than 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 in these respects. This is the first report concerning biological assessment of 1alpha,25(OH)2D2, 1alpha,25(OH)2D3, 1alpha,25(OH)2D4, 24-epi-1alpha,25(OH)2D2 and 1alpha,25(OH)2D7 at the molecular level, especially with regards to the structural differences at the 24R- or 24S-methyl group and a double bond between carbons 22 and 23 in the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)2D derivatives. PMID:10328556

  4. Characterization of airborne ice-nucleation-active bacteria and bacterial fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Sahyoun, Maher; Finster, Kai; Hartmann, Susan; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Stratmann, Frank; Wex, Heike; Clauss, Tina; Nielsen, Niels Woetmann; Sørensen, Jens Havskov; Korsholm, Ulrik Smith; Wick, Lukas Y.; Karlson, Ulrich Gosewinkel

    2015-05-01

    Some bacteria have the unique capacity of synthesising ice-nucleation-active (INA) proteins and exposing them at their outer membrane surface. As INA bacteria enter the atmosphere, they may impact the formation of clouds and precipitation. We studied members of airborne bacterial communities for their capacity to catalyse ice formation and we report on the excretion of INA proteins by airborne Pseudomonas sp. We also observed for the first time that INA biological fragments <220 nm were present in precipitation samples (199 and 482 INA fragments per L of precipitation), which confirms the presence of submicron INA biological fragments in the atmosphere. During 14 precipitation events, strains affiliated with the genus Pseudomonas, which are known to carry ina genes, were dominant. A screening for INA properties revealed that ∼12% of the cultivable bacteria caused ice formation at ≤-7 °C. They had likely been emitted to the atmosphere from terrestrial surfaces, e.g. by convective transport. We tested the ability of isolated INA strains to produce outer membrane vesicles and found that two isolates could do so. However, only very few INA vesicles were released per INA cell. Thus, the source of the submicron INA proteinaceous particles that we detected in the atmosphere remains to be elucidated.

  5. ATLAS: an airborne active linescan system for high-resolution topographic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willetts, David V.; Kightley, Peter J.; Mole, S. G.; Pearson, Guy N.; Pearson, P.; Coffey, Adrian S.; Stokes, Tim J.; Tapster, Paul R.; Westwood, M.

    2004-12-01

    High resolution ground mapping is of interest for survey and management of long linear features such as roads, railways and pipelines, and for georeferencing of areas such as flood plains for hydrological purposes. ATLAS (Airborne Topographic Laser System) is an active linescan system operating at the eyesafe wavelength of 1.5μm. Built for airborne survey, it is currently certified for use on a Twin Squirrel helicopter for operation from low levels to heights above 500 feet allowing commercial survey in built up areas. The system operates at a pulse repetition frequency of 56kHz with a line completed in 15ms, giving 36 points/m2 at the surface at the design flight speed. At each point the range to the ground is measured together with the scan angle of the system. This data is combined with a system attitude measurement from an integrated inertial navigation system and with system position derived from differential GPS data aboard the platform. A recording system captures the data with a synchronised time-stamp to enable post-processed reconstruction of a cloud of data points that will give a three-dimensional representation of the terrain, allowing the points to be located with respect to absolute Earth referenced coordinates to a precision of 5cm in three axes. This paper summarises the design, harmonisation, evaluation and performance of the system, and shows examples of survey data.

  6. Suppression of integrin activation by the membrane-distal sequence of the integrin alphaIIb cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed Central

    Yamanouchi, Jun; Hato, Takaaki; Tamura, Tatsushiro; Fujita, Shigeru

    2004-01-01

    Integrin cytoplasmic tails regulate integrin activation including an increase in integrin affinity for ligands. Although there is ample evidence that the membrane-proximal regions of the alpha and beta tails interact with each other to maintain integrins in a low-affinity state, little is known about the role of the membrane-distal region of the alpha tail in regulation of integrin activation. We report a critical sequence for regulation of integrin activation in the membrane-distal region of the alphaIIb tail. Alanine substitution of the RPP residues in the alphaIIb tail rendered alphaIIbbeta3 constitutively active in a metabolic energy-dependent manner. Although an alphaIIb/alpha6Abeta3 chimaeric integrin, in which the alphaIIb tail was replaced by the alpha6A tail, was in an energy-dependent active state to bind soluble ligands, introduction of the RPP sequence into the alpha6A tail inhibited binding of an activation-dependent antibody PAC1. In alphaIIb/alpha6Abeta3, deleting the TSDA sequence from the alpha6A tail or single amino acid substitutions of the TSDA residues inhibited alphaIIb/alpha6Abeta3 activation and replacing the membrane-distal region of the alphaIIb tail with TSDA rendered alphaIIbbeta3 active, suggesting a stimulatory role of TSDA in energy-dependent integrin activation. However, adding TSDA to the alphaIIb tail containing the RPP sequence of the membrane-distal region failed to activate alphaIIbbeta3. These results suggest that the RPP sequence after the GFFKR motif of the alphaIIb tail suppresses energy-dependent alphaIIbbeta3 activation. These findings provide a molecular basis for the regulation of energy-dependent integrin activation by alpha subunit tails. PMID:14723599

  7. In vitro transcriptional activation by a metabolic intermediate: activation by Leu3 depends on alpha-isopropylmalate.

    PubMed

    Sze, J Y; Woontner, M; Jaehning, J A; Kohlhaw, G B

    1992-11-13

    In the absence of the leucine biosynthetic precursor alpha-isopropylmalate (alpha-IPM), the yeast LEU3 protein (Leu3p) binds DNA and acts as a transcriptional repressor in an in vitro extract. Addition of alpha-IPM resulted in a dramatic increase in Leu3p-dependent transcription. The presence of alpha-IPM was also required for Leu3p to compete effectively with another transcriptional activator, GAL4/VP16, for limiting transcription factors. Therefore, the addition of alpha-IPM appears to convert a transcriptional repressor into an activator. This represents an example in eukaryotes of direct transcriptional regulation by a small effector molecule. PMID:1439822

  8. GW8510 Increases Insulin Expression in Pancreatic Alpha Cells through Activation of p53 Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Kubicek, Stefan; Vetere, Amedeo; He, Kaihui Hu; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Expression of insulin in terminally differentiated non-beta cell types in the pancreas could be important to treating type-1 diabetes. Previous findings led us to hypothesize involvement of kinase inhibition in induction of insulin expression in pancreatic alpha cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Alpha (αTC1.6) cells and human islets were treated with GW8510 and other small-molecule inhibitors for up to 5 days. Alpha cells were assessed for gene- and protein-expression levels, cell-cycle status, promoter occupancy status by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and p53-dependent transcriptional activity. GW8510, a putative CDK2 inhibitor, up-regulated insulin expression in mouse alpha cells and enhanced insulin secretion in dissociated human islets. Gene-expression profiling and gene-set enrichment analysis of GW8510-treated alpha cells suggested up-regulation of the p53 pathway. Accordingly, the compound increased p53 transcriptional activity and expression levels of p53 transcriptional targets. A predicted p53 response element in the promoter region of the mouse Ins2 gene was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Further, inhibition of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase activities suppressed insulin induction by GW8510. Conclusions/Significance The induction of Ins2 by GW8510 occurred through p53 in a JNK- and p38-dependent manner. These results implicate p53 activity in modulation of Ins2 expression levels in pancreatic alpha cells, and point to a potential approach toward using small molecules to generate insulin in an alternative cell type. PMID:22242153

  9. Honey Bees (Apis mellifera, L.) as Active Samplers of Airborne Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Caprio, Emilio; Pellecchia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are bioindicators of environmental pollution levels. During their wide-ranging foraging activity, these hymenopterans are exposed to pollutants, thus becoming a useful tool to trace the environmental contaminants as heavy metals, pesticides, radionuclides and volatile organic compounds. In the present work we demonstrate that bees can also be used as active samplers of airborne particulate matter. Worker bees were collected from hives located in a polluted postmining area in South West Sardinia (Italy) that is also exposed to dust emissions from industrial plants. The area is included in an official list of sites of national interest for environmental remediation, and has been characterized for the effects of pollutants on the health of the resident population. The head, wings, hind legs and alimentary canal of the bees were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The analyses pointed to specific morphological and chemical features of the particulate, and resulted into the identification of three categories of particles: industry -, postmining -, and soil –derived. With the exception of the gut, all the analyzed body districts displayed inorganic particles, mostly concentrated in specific areas of the body (i.e. along the costal margin of the fore wings, the medial plane of the head, and the inner surface of the hind legs). The role of both past mining activities and the industrial activity close to the study area as sources of the particulate matter is also discussed. We conclude that honey bees are able to collect samples of the main airborne particles emitted from different sources, therefore could be an ideal tool for monitoring such a kind of pollutants. PMID:26147982

  10. Honey Bees (Apis mellifera, L.) as Active Samplers of Airborne Particulate Matter.

    PubMed

    Negri, Ilaria; Mavris, Christian; Di Prisco, Gennaro; Caprio, Emilio; Pellecchia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are bioindicators of environmental pollution levels. During their wide-ranging foraging activity, these hymenopterans are exposed to pollutants, thus becoming a useful tool to trace the environmental contaminants as heavy metals, pesticides, radionuclides and volatile organic compounds. In the present work we demonstrate that bees can also be used as active samplers of airborne particulate matter. Worker bees were collected from hives located in a polluted postmining area in South West Sardinia (Italy) that is also exposed to dust emissions from industrial plants. The area is included in an official list of sites of national interest for environmental remediation, and has been characterized for the effects of pollutants on the health of the resident population. The head, wings, hind legs and alimentary canal of the bees were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The analyses pointed to specific morphological and chemical features of the particulate, and resulted into the identification of three categories of particles: industry-, postmining-, and soil-derived. With the exception of the gut, all the analyzed body districts displayed inorganic particles, mostly concentrated in specific areas of the body (i.e. along the costal margin of the fore wings, the medial plane of the head, and the inner surface of the hind legs). The role of both past mining activities and the industrial activity close to the study area as sources of the particulate matter is also discussed. We conclude that honey bees are able to collect samples of the main airborne particles emitted from different sources, therefore could be an ideal tool for monitoring such a kind of pollutants. PMID:26147982

  11. SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN HEPATIC PEROXISOMAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES CORRESPONDS WITH DIMINISHED LEVELS OF RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA, BUT NOT PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aging is associated with alterations in hepatic peroxisomal metabolism and susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenecity produced by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa). Mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Howev...

  12. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) [alpha]-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, J.J.; Hunt, D.C.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the [alpha]-amylases of mammals and insects. This [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]Al) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M[sub r]) 15,000 to 18,000. The authors report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, they found that antibodies to [alpha]Al recognize large (M[sub r] 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical [alpha]Al processing products (M[sub r] 15,000-18,000). [alpha]Al activity was found in all extracts that had the typical [alpha]Al processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, they made a mutant [alpha]Al in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-[alpha]Al when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-[alpha]Al was separated from mature [alpha]Al by gel filtration, pro-[alpha]Al was found not to have [alpha]-amylase inhibitory activity. The authors interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. They suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformation constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Pueyo, J J; Hunt, D C; Chrispeels, M J

    1993-01-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the alpha-amylases of mammals and insects. This alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M(r)) 15,000 to 18,000. We report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, we found that antibodies to alpha AI recognize large (M(r) 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical alpha AI processing products (M(r) 15,000-18,000). Alpha AI activity was found in all extracts that had the typical alpha AI processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, we made a mutant alpha AI in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-alpha AI when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-alpha AI was separated from mature alpha AI by gel filtration, pro-alpha AI was found not to have alpha-amylase inhibitory activity. We interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. We suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformational constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. PMID:8310064

  14. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  15. Spatial correspondence of brain alpha activity component in fMRI and EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jeong-Won; Kim, Sung-Heon; Singh, Manbir

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a new approach to investigate the spatial correlation of brain alpha activity in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). To avoid potential problems of simultaneous fMRI and EEG acquisitions in imaging brain alpha activity, data from each modality were acquired separately under a "three conditions" setup where one of the conditions involved closing eyes and relaxing, thus making it conducive to generation of alpha activity. The other two conditions -- eyes open in a lighted room or engaged in a mental arithmetic task, were designed to attenuate alpha activity. Using the Mixture Density Independent Component Analysis (MD-ICA) that incorporates flexible non-linearity functions into the conventional ICA framework, we could identify the spatiotemporal components of fMRI activations and EEG activities associated with the alpha rhythm. The sources of the individual EEG alpha activity component were localized by a Maximum Entropy (ME) method that solves an inverse problem in the framework of a classical four-sphere head model. The resulting dipole sources of EEG alpha activity were spatially transformed to 3D MRIs of the subject and compared to fMRI ICA-determined alpha activity maps.

  16. Hydrolytic activity of alpha-galactosidases against deoxy derivatives of p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside.

    PubMed

    Hakamata, W; Nishio, T; Oku, T

    2000-02-11

    The four possible monodeoxy derivatives of p-nitrophenyl (PNP) alpha-D-galactopyranoside were synthesized, and hydrolytic activities of the alpha-galactosidase of green coffee bean, Mortierella vinacea and Aspergillus niger against them were elucidated. The 2- and 6-deoxy substrates were hydrolyzed by the enzymes from green coffee bean and M. vinacea, while they scarcely acted on the 3- and 4-deoxy compounds. On the other hand, A. niger alpha-galactosidase hydrolyzed only the 2-deoxy compound in these deoxy substrates, and the activity was very high. These results indicate that the presence of two hydroxyl groups (OH-3 and -4) is essential for the compounds to act as substrates for the enzymes of green coffee bean and M. vinacea, while the three hydroxyl groups (OH-3, -4, and -6) are necessary for the activity of the A. niger enzyme. The kinetic parameters (K(m) and Vmax) of the enzymes for the hydrolysis of PNP alpha-D-galactopyranoside and its deoxy derivatives were obtained from kinetic studies. PMID:10702877

  17. Alpha-Amylase Activity in Blood Increases after Pharmacological, But Not Psychological, Activation of the Adrenergic System

    PubMed Central

    Nater, Urs M.; La Marca, Roberto; Erni, Katja; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Alpha-amylase in both blood and saliva has been used as a diagnostic parameter. While studies examining alpha-amylase activity in saliva have shown that it is sensitive to physiological and psychological challenge of the adrenergic system, no challenge studies have attempted to elucidate the role of the adrenergic system in alpha-amylase activity in blood. We set out to examine the impact of psychological and pharmacological challenge on alpha-amylase in blood in two separate studies. Methods In study 1, healthy subjects were examined in a placebo-controlled, double-blind paradigm using yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenergic antagonist. In study 2, subjects were examined in a standardized rest-controlled psychosocial stress protocol. Alpha-amylase activity in blood was repeatedly measured in both studies. Results Results of study 1 showed that alpha-amylase in blood is subject to stronger increases after injection of yohimbine compared to placebo. In study 2, results showed that there was no significant effect of psychological stress compared to rest. Conclusions Alpha-amylase in blood increases after pharmacological activation of the adrenergic pathways suggesting that sympathetic receptors are responsible for these changes. Psychological stress, however, does not seem to have an impact on alpha-amylase in blood. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying activity changes in alpha-amylase in blood in healthy individuals. PMID:26110636

  18. Binding of receptor-recognized forms of alpha2-macroglobulin to the alpha2-macroglobulin signaling receptor activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Misra, U K; Pizzo, S V

    1998-05-29

    Ligation of the alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) signaling receptor by receptor-recognized forms of alpha2M (alpha2M*) initiates mitogenesis secondary to increased intracellular Ca2+. We report here that ligation of the alpha2M signaling receptor also causes a 1. 5-2.5-fold increase in wortmannin-sensitive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity as measured by the quantitation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 formation was alpha2M* concentration-dependent with a maximal response at approximately 50 pM ligand concentration. The peak formation of PIP3 occurred at 10 min of incubation. The alpha2M receptor binding fragment mutant K1370R which binds to the alpha2M signaling receptor activating the signaling cascade, increased PIP3 formation by 2-fold. The mutant K1374A, which binds very poorly to the alpha2M signaling receptor, did not cause any increase in PIP3 formation. alpha2M*-induced DNA synthesis was inhibited by wortmannin. 1, 2Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acetoxymethylester a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, drastically reduced alpha2M*-induced increases in PIP3 formation. We conclude that PI3K is involved in alpha2M*-induced mitogenesis in macrophages and intracellular Ca2+ plays a role in PI3K activation. PMID:9593670

  19. Synthetic method and biological activities of cis-fused alpha-methylene gamma-lactones.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yohsuke; Shimoma, Fumito; Ando, Masayoshi

    2003-06-01

    A reliable method was developed for the synthesis of cis-fused alpha-methylene gamma-lactones via alpha-methyl gamma-lactones. Bromination of alpha-methyl gamma-lactones with LDA/CBr(4) or TMSOTf/PTAB and successive dehydrobromination with DBU or TBAF of the resulting alpha-bromo-alpha-methyl gamma-lactones gave the desired alpha-methylene gamma-lactones in high yield. This method was successfully applied to the synthesis of biologically active compounds. alpha-Methylene gamma-lactone derivatives 1c, 2c, 4c, and 17 showed cell growth inhibitory activity to P388 lymphocytic leukemia. They also showed significant activities to crop diseases. Thus, alpha-methylene gamma-lactone 1c showed preventive activity in controlling scab of apple caused by Venturia inaequalis. alpha-Methylene gamma-lactones 2c, 4c, 17, and 18 also showed significant preventive activities in controlling damping off of cucumber caused by Pythium aphanidermatum. PMID:12828467

  20. Functional characterization of alpha-synuclein protein with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Moon, Jeong Chan; Shin, Su Young; Son, Hyosuk; Jung, Young Jun; Kim, Nam-Hong; Kim, Young-Min; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jung Ro

    2016-09-16

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn), a small (14 kDa) protein associated with Parkinson's disease, is abundant in human neural tissues. α-Syn plays an important role in maintaining a supply of synaptic vesicles in presynaptic terminals; however, the mechanism by which it performs this function are not well understood. In addition, there is a correlation between α-Syn over-expression and upregulation of an innate immune response. Given the growing body of literature surrounding antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the brain, and the similarities between α-Syn and a previously characterized AMP, Amyloid-β, we set out to investigate if α-Syn shares AMP-like properties. Here we demonstrate that α-Syn exhibits antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we demonstrate a role for α-Syn in inhibiting various pathogenic fungal strains such as Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Rhizoctonia solani. We also analyzed localizations of recombinant α-Syn protein in E. coli and Candida albicans. These results suggest that in addition to α-Syn's role in neurotransmitter release, it appears to be a natural AMP. PMID:27520375

  1. Inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus-mediated capping of CD21/CR2 by alpha interferon (IFN-alpha): immediate antiviral activity of IFN-alpha during the early phase of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Delcayre, A X; Lotz, M; Lernhardt, W

    1993-01-01

    Early events of human B-lymphocyte infection by Epstein-Barr virus involve the virus binding to CD21, capping, and subsequent internalization of the virus-receptor complex. We show here that alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) inhibits the capping of Epstein-Barr virus-CD21 complexes. Synthetic peptides with the CD21 binding motif of IFN-alpha mimic IFN-alpha activity, suggesting that this effect may be mediated by IFN-alpha-CD21 interaction. Our findings demonstrate a novel and immediate mechanism of IFN-alpha action. PMID:8386282

  2. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) suppresses postprandial lipidemia through fatty acid oxidation in enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rino; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Murota, Kaeko; Yamada, Yuko; Niiya, Saori; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Murakami, Yoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased oxygen consumption rate and CO{sub 2} production and decreased secretion of triglyceride and ApoB from Caco-2 cells. {yields} Orally administration of bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and CO{sub 2} production in small intestinal epithelial cells. {yields} Treatment with bezafibrate decreased postprandial serum concentration of triglyceride after oral injection of olive oil in mice. {yields} It suggested that intestinal lipid metabolism regulated by PPAR{alpha} activation suppresses postprandial lipidemia. -- Abstract: Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} which regulates lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues such as the liver and skeletal muscle, decreases circulating lipid levels, thus improving hyperlipidemia under fasting conditions. Recently, postprandial serum lipid levels have been found to correlate more closely to cardiovascular diseases than fasting levels, although fasting hyperlipidemia is considered an important risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of PPAR{alpha} activation on postprandial lipidemia has not been clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of PPAR{alpha} activation in enterocytes on lipid secretion and postprandial lipidemia. In Caco-2 enterocytes, bezafibrate, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, and acyl-CoA synthase, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and suppressed secretion levels of both triglycerides and apolipoprotein B into the basolateral side. In vivo experiments revealed that feeding high-fat-diet containing bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and

  3. 6 alpha-Fluoro- and 6 alpha,9 alpha-difluoro-11 beta,21-dihydroxy-16 alpha,17 alpha-propylmethylenedioxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione: synthesis and evaluation of activity and kinetics of their C-22 epimers.

    PubMed

    Thalén, B A; Axelsson, B I; Andersson, P H; Brattsand, R L; Nylander, B; Wickström, L I

    1998-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticosteroids cannot be separated from their adverse effects at the receptor level. However, modification of the pharmacokinetics through structural alterations could provide steroids with a better therapeutic index than those currently used. Thus, new 16 alpha,17 alpha-acetals between butyraldehyde and 6 alpha-fluoro- or 6 alpha,9 alpha-difluoro-16 alpha-hydroxycortisol were synthesized and studied. Acetalization of the corresponding 16 alpha,17 alpha-diols or transacetalization of their 16 alpha,17 alpha-acetonides in dioxane produced mixtures of C-22 epimers, which were resolved by preparative chromatography. Alternatively, an efficient method was used to produce the 22R-epimer stereoselectively through performing the acetalization and transacetalization in a hydrocarbon with an inert material present. The C-22 configuration of (22R)-6 alpha,9 alpha-difluoro-11 beta,21-dihydroxy-16 alpha,17 alpha-propylmethylenedioxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione was unambiguously established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The present compounds, especially the 22R-epimer just mentioned, bind to the rat thymus glucocorticoid receptor with high potency. The C-22 epimers of the 6 alpha,9 alpha-difluoro derivatives showed a 10-fold higher biotransformation rate than the budesonide 22R-epimer when incubated with human liver S9 subcellular fraction. The high receptor affinity in combination with the high biotransformation rate indicates that (22R)-6 alpha,9 alpha-difluoro-11 beta,21-dihydroxy-16 alpha,17 alpha-propylmethylenedioxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione may be an improved 16 alpha,17 alpha-acetal glucocorticosteroid for therapy of inflammatory diseases, in which the mucous membranes are involved, such as those in the intestinal tract as well in the respiratory tract. PMID:9437793

  4. Interferon-alpha stimulates production of interleukin-10 in activated CD4+ T cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Aman, M J; Tretter, T; Eisenbeis, I; Bug, G; Decker, T; Aulitzky, W E; Tilg, H; Huber, C; Peschel, C

    1996-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and protein synthesis in human monocytes and CD4+ T cells. In mononuclear cells, IFN-alpha induced expression of IL-10 mRNA and further enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IL-10 expression. In purified monocytes, a strong expression of IL-10 mRNA induced by LPS was not further enhanced by IFN-alpha. In highly purified CD4+ T cells, IFN-alpha upregulated IL-10 mRNA upon activation with phytohemagglutinin and phorbol myristate acetate. In purified monocytes, an effect of IFN-alpha on IL-10 protein synthesis was dependent on costimulation with LPS. Maximal stimulation of IL-10 protein by IFN-alpha was seen after prolonged incubation periods of 48 to 96 hours, whereas IFN-gamma reduced IL-10 production in the early incubation period. Similar effects of IFN-alpha were observed in CD4+ T cells activated with CD3 and CD28 monoclonal antibodies. Addition of IFN-alpha caused an increase of IL-10 in culture supernatants of activated T-helper cells of more than 100% after 96 hours of incubation. In contrast, other cytokines, including IFN-gamma and IL-4, had no influence on IL-10 secretion stimulated by CD3 and CD28 in CD4+ T cells. In serum samples of IFN-alpha-treated individuals, we failed to detect an influence of cytokine treatment on IL-10 serum levels, confirming the requirement of additional activating signals for IFN-alpha-mediated effects on IL-10 synthesis. In conclusion, IFN-alpha enhances the late induction of IL-10, which physiologically occurs upon stimulation of monocytes and T cells. Biologically, this effect might enhance the negative-feedback mechanism ascribed to IL-10, which limits inflammatory reactions. PMID:8639843

  5. Phosphorylation regulates the water channel activity of the seed-specific aquaporin alpha-TIP.

    PubMed

    Maurel, C; Kado, R T; Guern, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1995-07-01

    The vacuolar membrane protein alpha-TIP is a seed-specific protein of the Major Intrinsic Protein family. Expression of alpha-TIP in Xenopus oocytes conferred a 4- to 8-fold increase in the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the oocyte plasma membrane, showing that alpha-TIP forms water channels and is thus a new aquaporin. alpha-TIP has three putative phosphorylation sites on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99), one of which (Ser7) has been shown to be phosphorylated. We present several lines of evidence that the activity of this aquaporin is regulated by phosphorylation. First, mutation of the putative phosphorylation sites in alpha-TIP (Ser7Ala, Ser23Ala and Ser99Ala) reduced the apparent water transport activity of alpha-TIP in oocytes, suggesting that phosphorylation of alpha-TIP occurs in the oocytes and participates in the control of water channel activity. Second, exposure of oocytes to the cAMP agonists 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which stimulate endogenous protein kinase A (PKA), increased the water transport activity of alpha-TIP by 80-100% after 60 min. That the protein can be phosphorylated by PKA was demonstrated by phosphorylating alpha-TIP in isolated oocyte membranes with the bovine PKA catalytic subunit. Third, the integrity of the three sites at positions 7, 23 and 99 was necessary for the cAMP-dependent increase in the Pf of oocytes expressing alpha-TIP, as well as for in vitro phosphorylation of alpha-TIP. These findings demonstrate that the alpha-TIP water channel can be modulated via phosphorylation of Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7542585

  6. Activation of two new alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferase activities in Chinese hamster ovary cells by 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, B; Stanley, P

    1991-01-01

    Several mammalian alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferases (alpha[1,3]Fuc-T) that synthesize carbohydrates containing alpha(1,3)fucosylated lactosamine units have been identified. Although Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells do not express alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity, the rare mutants LEC11 and LEC12, isolated after mutagenesis or DNA transfection, each express an alpha(1,3)Fuc-T that may be distinguished by several criteria. Two new CHO mutants possessing alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity (LEC29 and LEC30) have now been isolated after treatment of a CHO cell population with 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), ethylnitrosourea (ENU), or 5-AzaC followed by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Like LEC12, both mutants possess an N-ethylmaleimide-resistant alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity that can utilize a variety of acceptors and both express the Lewis X (Lex) determinant (Gal beta[1,4](Fuc alpha[1,3])GlcNAc beta 1)) but not the sialyl alpha(2,3)Lex determinant on cell-surface carbohydrates. However, LEC29 and LEC30 may be distinguished from LEC11 and LEC12, as well as from each other, on the basis of their unique patterns of lectin resistance and their abilities to bind the VIM-2 monoclonal antibody that recognizes carbohydrates terminating in NeuNAc alpha(2,3)Gal beta(1,4)GlcNAc beta(1,3)Gal beta(1,4)(Fuc alpha[1,3])GlcNAc beta and also by the different in vitro substrate specificities and kinetic properties of their respective alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activities. The combined data provide good evidence that the LEC29 and LEC30 alpha(1,3)Fuc-Ts are novel transferases encoded by distinct gene products. PMID:1724918

  7. Expression of human. alpha. sub 2 -macroglobulin cDNA in baby hamster kidney fibroblasts: Secretion of high levels of active. alpha. sub 2 -macroglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, E.; Mortensen, S.B. ); Kristensen, T.; Sottrup-Jensen, L. ); Petersen, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Human {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin ({alpha}{sub 2}M) is a unique 720-kDa proteinase inhibitor with a broad specificity. Unlike most other proteinase inhibitors, it does not inhibit proteolytic activity by blocking the active site of the proteinase. During complex formation with a proteinase {alpha}{sub 2}M entraps the proteinase molecule in a reaction that involves large conformational changes in {alpha}{sub 2}M. The authors describe the molecular cloning of {alpha}{sub 2}M cDNA from the human hepatoblastoma cell line HepG2. The cDNA was subcloned under control of the adenovirus major late promoter in a mammalian expression vector and introduced into the baby hamster kidney (BHK) cell line. Transformed clones were isolated and tested for production of human {alpha}{sub 2}M with a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Human recombinant {alpha}{sub 2}M (r{alpha}{sub 2}M), secreted and purified form isolated transfected BHK cell lines, was structurally and functionally compared to {alpha}{sub 2}M purified from human serum. The results show that r{alpha}{sub 2}M was secreted from the BHK cells as an active proteinase-binding tetramer with functional thiol esters. Cleavage reactions of r{alpha}{sub 2}M with methylamine and trypsin showed that the recombinant product, which was correctly processed at the N-terminus, exhibited molecular characteristics similar to those of the human serum derived reference.

  8. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-07-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error.

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase kinase: detection with recombinant AMPK alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; O'Donnell, John B; Hammet, Andrew; Stapleton, David; Habinowski, Susan A; Means, Anthony R; Kemp, Bruce E; Witters, Lee A

    2002-05-10

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase important for the responses to metabolic stress. It consists of a catalytic alpha subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma, and is regulated both by the allosteric action of AMP and by phosphorylation of the alpha and beta subunits catalyzed by AMPKK(s) and autophosphorylation. The Thr172 site on the alpha subunit has been previously characterized as an activating phosphorylation site. Using bacterially expressed AMPK alpha1 subunit proteins, we have explored the role of Thr172-directed AMPKKs in alpha subunit regulation. Recombinant alpha1 subunit proteins, representing the N-terminus, have been expressed as maltose binding protein (MBP) 6x His fusion proteins and purified to homogeneity by Ni(2+) chromatography. Both wild-type alpha1(1-312) and alpha1(1-312)T172D are inactive when expressed in bacteria, but the former can be fully phosphorylated (1 mol/mol) on Thr172 and activated by a surrogate AMPKK, CaMKKbeta. The corresponding AMPKalpha1(1-392), an alpha construct containing its autoinhibitory sequence, can be similarly phosphorylated, but it remains inactive. In an insulinoma cell line, either low glucose or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) treatment leads to activation and T172 phosphorylation of endogenous AMPK. Under the same conditions of cell incubation, we have identified an AMPKK activity that both phosphorylates and activates the recombinant alpha1(1-312), but this Thr172-directed AMPKK activity is unaltered by low glucose or AICAR, indicating that it is constitutively active. PMID:12051742

  10. Dynamic peripheral visual performance relates to alpha activity in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenya; Migotina, Daria; Wan, Feng; Lou, Chin Ian; Rodrigues, João; Semedo, João; Vai, Mang I; Pereira, Jose Gomes; Melicio, Fernando; Da Rosa, Agostinho C

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the relationship between the alpha activity and the central visual ability, in which the visual ability is usually assessed through static stimuli. Besides static circumstance, however in the real environment there are often dynamic changes and the peripheral visual ability in a dynamic environment (i.e., dynamic peripheral visual ability) is important for all people. So far, no work has reported whether there is a relationship between the dynamic peripheral visual ability and the alpha activity. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate their relationship. Sixty-two soccer players performed a newly designed peripheral vision task in which the visual stimuli were dynamic, while their EEG signals were recorded from Cz, O1, and O2 locations. The relationship between the dynamic peripheral visual performance and the alpha activity was examined by the percentage-bend correlation test. The results indicated no significant correlation between the dynamic peripheral visual performance and the alpha amplitudes in the eyes-open and eyes-closed resting condition. However, it was not the case for the alpha activity during the peripheral vision task: the dynamic peripheral visual performance showed significant positive inter-individual correlations with the amplitudes in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) and the individual alpha band (IAB) during the peripheral vision task. A potential application of this finding is to improve the dynamic peripheral visual performance by up-regulating alpha activity using neuromodulation techniques. PMID:25426058

  11. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation. PMID:12062184

  12. Biologically active monoiodinated alpha-MSH derivatives for receptor binding studies using human melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, A.N.; Verin, V.J.; Solca, F.; Siegrist, W.; Kueenlin, C.B.; Bagutti, C.; Stutz, S.; Girard, J. , University Hospital, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    Three different monoiodinated radioligands of alpha-MSH (alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) were compared in a binding assay with human D10 melanoma cells: (Tyr(125I)2)-alpha-MSH, (Tyr(125I)2,NIe4)-alpha-MSH, and (Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7)-alpha-MSH. They were prepared either by the classical chloramine T method or by the Enzymobead method. A simple and rapid purification scheme was developed consisting of a primary separation on reversed-phase C18 silica cartridges immediately after the iodination, followed by HPLC purification before each binding experiment. Biological testing of the three radioligands showed that they all retained high melanotropic activity in the B16 melanin assay and the Anolis melanophore assay. However, in human D10 melanoma cells, (Tyr(125I)2,NIe4)-alpha-MSH led to a high degree of non-specific binding to the cells which could not be displaced by excess alpha-MSH and only partially by (NIe4)-alpha-MSH. The (Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7)-alpha-MSH tracer gave similar results but with a much lower proportion of non-specific binding. On the other hand, (Tyr(125I)2)-alpha-MSH proved to be an excellent radioligand whose non-specific binding to the D10 cells was not higher than 20% of the total binding.

  13. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline. PMID:20030735

  14. Frontal Alpha EEG Asymmetry Before and After Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Jackie K.; Hoxha, Denada; Chihade, Dietta; Pflieger, Mark E.; Rosebrock, Laina; Cacioppo, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Mid-frontal and mid-lateral (F3/F4 and F7/F8) EEG asymmetry has been associated with motivation and affect. We examined alpha EEG asymmetry in depressed and healthy participants before and after Behavioral Activation treatment for depression; examined the association between alpha EEG asymmetry and motivational systems and affect; and evaluated the utility of alpha EEG asymmetry in predicting remission. Methods Depressed (n = 37) and healthy participants (n = 35) were assessed before and after treatment using a clinical interview, a task to measure baseline EEG, and questionnaires of behavioral activation and inhibition, avoidance, and affect. Results Alpha EEG asymmetry was significantly higher in depressed than healthy participants at pre-treatment, positively correlated with negative affect and behavioral inhibition, and inversely correlated with lower behavioral activation sensitivity. Conclusions Heightened alpha EEG asymmetry in depressed participants was significantly associated with increased behavioral inhibition and negative emotion and was independent of clinical remission. PMID:24674708

  15. Exposure to airborne metals and particulate matter and risk for youth adjudicated for criminal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Erin N.; Chen, Aimin; Ryan, Patrick; Succop, Paul; Wright, John; Dietrich, Kim N.

    2011-11-15

    Antisocial behavior is a product of multiple interacting sociohereditary variables, yet there is increasing evidence that metal exposure, particularly, manganese and lead, play a role in its epigenesis. Other metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury, and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, such as fine particulate matter ({<=}2.5 {mu}m) have been associated with neurological deficits, yet largely unexplored with respect to their relationship with delinquent behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ecological relationship between county-wide reported airborne emissions of air metals, particulate matter, and youth adjudicated for criminal activity. Metal exposure data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency AirData. Population statistics were obtained from the United States Census 2000 and adjudication data was obtained from the Courts of Common Pleases from each Ohio County. Simple correlations were calculated with the percentage of adjudications, all covariates, and estimated metal air emissions. Separate negative binomial regression models for each pollutant were used to provide an estimated risk ratio of pollutant emissions on the risk of adjudication for all Ohio counties adjusting for urban-rural residence, percentage of African Americans, median family income, percentage of family below poverty, percentage of high school graduation in 25 years and older populations, and population density. Metal emissions and PM in 1999 were all correlated with adjudication rate (2003-2005 average). Metal emissions were associated with slightly higher risk of adjudication, with about 3-4% increased risk per natural log unit of metal emission except chromium. The associations achieved statistical significance for manganese and mercury. The particulate matter {<=}2.5 and {<=}10 {mu}m emissions had a higher risk estimate, with 12% and 19% increase per natural log unit emission, respectively, and also achieved statistical

  16. Mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin affects its chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Ecroyd, Heath; Meehan, Sarah; Horwitz, Joseph; Aquilina, J Andrew; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V; Macphee, Cait E; Carver, John A

    2007-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin is a member of the sHsp (small heat-shock protein) family that prevents misfolded target proteins from aggregating and precipitating. Phosphorylation at three serine residues (Ser19, Ser45 and Ser59) is a major post-translational modification that occurs to alphaB-crystallin. In the present study, we produced recombinant proteins designed to mimic phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin by incorporating a negative charge at these sites. We employed these mimics to undertake a mechanistic and structural investigation of the effect of phosphorylation on the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin to protect against two types of protein misfolding, i.e. amorphous aggregation and amyloid fibril assembly. We show that mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin results in more efficient chaperone activity against both heat-induced and reduction-induced amorphous aggregation of target proteins. Mimick-ing phosphorylation increased the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin against one amyloid-forming target protein (kappa-casein), but decreased it against another (ccbeta-Trp peptide). We observed that both target protein identity and solution (buffer) conditions are critical factors in determining the relative chaperone ability of wild-type and phosphorylated alphaB-crystallins. The present study provides evidence for the regulation of the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin by phosphorylation and indicates that this may play an important role in alleviating the pathogenic effects associated with protein conformational diseases. PMID:16928191

  17. Prostaglandin F/sub 2. cap alpha. activates phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5HT) activate a phosphoinositide-(PI) specific phospholipase C in rat aorta by interaction with ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors and 5HT/sub 2/ receptor, respectively. They have subsequently noted that angiotensin II and vasopressin as well activate PI hydrolysis in the tissue. The most active agent they have thus far investigated is prostaglandin F/sub 2..cap alpha../ (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../). Rat aortic rings were pre-labelled with (/sup 3/H)-inositol and then, in the presence of 10 mM LiCl, exposed to various doses of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../. (/sup 3/H)-inositol monophosphate was the quantified by anion-exchange chromatography. After a 60 min incubation, PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ caused a 10-15 fold increase over basal at maximal concentrations (0.1-1.0 mM). An EC/sub 50/ for PI hydrolysis was between 0.1-1.0 ..mu..M. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ caused maximal aortic contraction at 10 ..mu..M. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../-induced PI hydrolysis, was inhibited by phorbol esters. These results suggest that PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../, similar to 5HT, NE, vasopressin and angiotensin II, causes vasoconstriction by activation of PI hydrolysis.

  18. TRIM5{alpha} association with cytoplasmic bodies is not required for antiretroviral activity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Byeongwoon; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Park, Do Hyun; Rogers, Thomas; Stremlau, Matthew; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-12-20

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM5{alpha}, restricts infection by particular retroviruses. Many TRIM proteins form cytoplasmic bodies of unknown function. We investigated the relationship between cytoplasmic body formation and the structure and antiretroviral activity of TRIM5{alpha}. In addition to diffuse cytoplasmic staining, the TRIM5{alpha} proteins from several primate species were located in cytoplasmic bodies of different sizes; by contrast, TRIM5{alpha} from spider monkeys did not form cytoplasmic bodies. Despite these differences, all of the TRIM5{alpha} proteins exhibited the ability to restrict infection by particular retroviruses. Treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor, resulted in disappearance or reduction of the TRIM5{alpha}-associated cytoplasmic bodies, yet exerted little effect on the restriction of retroviral infection. Studies of green fluorescent protein-TRIM5{alpha} fusion proteins indicated that no TRIM5{alpha} domain is specifically required for association with cytoplasmic bodies. Apparently, the formation of cytoplasmic bodies is not required for the antiretroviral activity of TRIM5{alpha}.

  19. Alpha contamination assessment for D&D activities: Technology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Conaway, J.G.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    Instruments based on the principle of Long-Range Alpha Detection (LRAD) detect the ions created in ambient air by Ionizing radiation, particularly alpha radiation, interacting with air molecules. Using either an electrostatic field or forced convection, these ions can be transported to a detection grid where the ions produce a small current that is measured with a sensitive electrometer. LRAD-based instruments can give separate, simultaneous measurements of alpha-emitting solids and inert radioactive gases such as radon. LRAD-based instruments assess surface contamination on an entire object or large surface area in a single, rapid measurement, including relatively inaccessible areas such as interior surfaces of pipes and process equipment. The LRAD concept is well proven and has been developed into a range of different radiation detection devices. This paper presents an overview of the technology, while several associated papers explore specific applications in greater detail.

  20. Airborne Active and Passive L-Band Observations in Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Chazanoff, S.; Jackson, T. J.; McNairn, H.; Bullock, P.; Wiseman, G.; Berg, A. A.; Magagi, R.; Njoku, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in October 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Merging of active and passive L-band observations of the mission will enable unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrieval. For pre-launch algorithm development and validation the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a field campaign named as SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June-July, 2012. The main objective of SMAPVEX12 was acquisition of data record that features long-time series with varying soil moisture and vegetation conditions (for testing the application of time-series approach) over aerial domain of multiple parallel lines (for spatial disaggregation studies). The coincident active and passive L-band data were acquired using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS), which is an airborne radiometer and radar developed for testing L-band retrieval algorithms. For SMAPVEX12 PALS was installed on a Twin Otter aircraft. The flight plan included flights at two altitudes. The higher altitude was used to map the whole experiment domain and the lower altitude was used to obtain measurements over a specific set of field sites. The spatial resolution (and swath) of the radar and radiometer from low altitude was about 600 m and from high altitude about 1500 m. The PALS acquisitions were complemented with high resolution (~10 m) L-band SAR measurements carried out by UAVSAR instrument on-board G-III aircraft. The campaign ran from June 7 until July 19. The PALS instrument conducted 17 brightness temperature and backscatter measurement flights and the UAVSAR conducted 14 backscatter measurement flights. The airborne data acquisition was supported by

  1. Cytosolic PLA2(alpha) activation in Purkinje neurons and its role in AMPA-receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Masato; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Murayama, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Takao

    2008-09-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) selectively releases arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and has been proposed to be involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD), a form of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. This enzyme requires two events for its full activation: Ca(2+)-dependent translocation from the cytosol to organelle membranes in order to access phospholipids as substrates, and phosphorylation by several kinases. However, the subcellular distribution and activation of cPLA(2)alpha in Purkinje cells and the role of arachidonic acid in cerebellar LTD have not been fully elucidated. In cultured Purkinje cells, stimulation of AMPA receptors, but not metabotropic glutamate receptors, triggered translocation of cPLA(2)alpha to the somatic and dendritic Golgi compartments. This translocation required Ca(2+) influx through P-type Ca(2+) channels. AMPA plus PMA, a chemical method for inducing LTD, released arachidonic acid via phosphorylation of cPLA(2)alpha. AMPA plus PMA induced a decrease in surface GluR2 for more than 2 hours. Interestingly, this reduction was occluded by a cPLA(2)alpha-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, PMA plus arachidonic acid caused the prolonged internalization of GluR2 without activating AMPA receptors. These results suggest that cPLA(2)alpha regulates the persistent decrease in the expression of AMPA receptors, underscoring the role of cPLA(2)alpha in cerebellar LTD. PMID:18713832

  2. EEG Alpha and Beta Activity in Normal and Deaf Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Manjula; And Others

    Electroencephalogram and task performance data were collected from three groups of young adult males: profoundly deaf Ss who signed from an early age, profoundly deaf Ss who only used oral (speech and speedreading) methods of communication, and normal hearing Ss. Alpha and Beta brain wave patterns over the Wernicke's area were compared across…

  3. Effect of alpha-actinin on actin structure. Actin ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Goll, D E; Robson, R M

    1981-08-28

    Alpha-Actinin increases the ATPase activity of actin by up to 84%, depending un pH, divalent cations present and the added Mg2+: ATP ratio. Dithiothreitol decreases actin ATPase activity approx. 20% but does not reduce the ability of alpha-actinin to increase actin ATP activity. Increasing amounts of added alpha-actinin up to 1 mos alpha-actinin to 49 mol actin cause in increasing increment in actin ATPase activity, but adding alpha-actinin beyond 1 mol alpha-actinin to 49 mol actin elicits only small additional increments in activity. Actin ATPase activity ranges from approx 100 nmol Pi/mg actin per h (4.3 mol Pi/mol actin per h) at high levels (10 mM) of ATP in the presence of lower amounts (1 mM) of added mg2+ to approx. 12.5 nmol Pi/mg actin per h (0.52 mol Pi/mol actin per h) at high pH (8.5) or at low levels (0.5-1.0 mM) of ATP in the presence of higher amounts (10 mM) of added Mg2+ ATp uncomplexed with Mg2+ inhibits the ability of alpha-actinin to increase F-actin ATPase activity. Activities with different divalent cations showed that the actin ATPase in these studies, which was 1/100 as great as Mg2+-modified actomyosin ATPase activity, was not due to trace amounts of myosin contaminating the actin preparations. The results are consistent with the concept that alpha-actinin can alter the structure of actin monomers. PMID:6456018

  4. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  5. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure. PMID:24730680

  6. A novel type of thermostable alpha-D-glucosidase from Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus exhibiting maltodextrinohydrolase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, B; Lottspeich, F; Ritter, J; Bronnenmeier, K

    1997-01-01

    An alpha-glucosidase with the ability to attack polymeric substrates was purified to homogeneity from culture supernatants of Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus DSM 567. The enzyme is apparently a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. Maximal activity is observed between pH5 and 7 at 75 degrees C. The alpha-glucosidase is active towards p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucoside, maltose, malto-oligosaccharides, starch and pullulan. Highest activity is displayed towards the disaccharide maltose. In addition to glucose, maltohexaose and maltoheptaose can be detected as the initial products of starch hydrolysis. After short incubations of pullulan, glucose is found as the only product. At high substrate concentrations, maltose and malto-oligosaccharide, but not glucose, are used as acceptors for glucosyl-transfer. These findings indicate that the T. thermohydrosulfuricus enzyme represents a novel type of alpha-glucosidase exhibiting maltase, glucohydrolase and 'maltodextrinohydrolase' activity. PMID:9371718

  7. AMPK activation regulates apoptosis, adipogenesis, and lipolysis by eIF2{alpha} in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dagon, Yossi; Avraham, Yosefa; Berry, Elliot M. . E-mail: Berry@md.huji.ac.il

    2006-02-03

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic master switch regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, AMPK has been implicated in the control of adipose tissue content. Yet, the nature of this action is controversial. We examined the effect on F442a adipocytes of the AMPK activator-AICAR. Activation of AMPK induced dose-dependent apoptotic cell death, inhibition of lipolysis, and downregulatation key adipogenic genes, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR{gamma}) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP{alpha}). We have identified the {alpha}-subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2{alpha}) as a target gene which is phosphorylated following AICAR treatment. Such phosphorylation is one of the best-characterized mechanisms for downregulating protein synthesis. 2-Aminopurine (2-AP), an inhibitor of eIF2{alpha} kinases, could overcome the apoptotic effect of AICAR, abolishing the reduction of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha} and the lipolytic properties of AMPK. Thus, AMPK may diminish adiposity via reduction of fat cell number through eIF2{alpha}-dependent translation shutdown.

  8. alpha-Glycosidase inhibitory activity of hexagalloylglucose from the galls of Quercus infectoria.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J K; Kong, T W; Baek, N I; Pyun, Y R

    2000-04-01

    Hexagalloylglucose (3-O-digalloyl-1,2,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-beta-D- glucose), which was isolated from the methanol extract of the galls of Quercus infectoria, significantly inhibited alpha-glycosidases such as sucrase, maltase and isomaltase. Its inhibitory activity was comparable to acarbose being used as a hypoglycemic agent, while the inhibitory activity on alpha-amylase was approximately 10 times lower than that of acarbose. The results indicate that, when compared to acarbose, hexagalloylglucose might reduce the side effects by reducing inhibition of alpha-amylase. PMID:10821056

  9. Influence of source composition and particle energy on the determination of gross alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Timón, A Fernández; Vargas, M Jurado; Sánchez, A B Ruano; Pérez, J de la Torre; Sánchez, A Martín

    2013-12-01

    The influence of different source compositions and α-particle energies on the detection efficiency of a gas-flow proportional counter was examined using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Efficiency variation with alpha-particle energy was very marked, being less significant with the substrate composition. These results show that the determination of gross alpha activity in an unknown sample must be carried out very carefully in order to give a correct estimation of its activity. PMID:24184741

  10. Transcriptional co-activator PGC-1 alpha drives the formation of slow-twitch muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiandie; Wu, Hai; Tarr, Paul T; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Wu, Zhidan; Boss, Olivier; Michael, Laura F; Puigserver, Pere; Isotani, Eiji; Olson, Eric N; Lowell, Bradford B; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2002-08-15

    The biochemical basis for the regulation of fibre-type determination in skeletal muscle is not well understood. In addition to the expression of particular myofibrillar proteins, type I (slow-twitch) fibres are much higher in mitochondrial content and are more dependent on oxidative metabolism than type II (fast-twitch) fibres. We have previously identified a transcriptional co-activator, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator-1 (PGC-1 alpha), which is expressed in several tissues including brown fat and skeletal muscle, and that activates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. We show here that PGC-1 alpha is expressed preferentially in muscle enriched in type I fibres. When PGC-1 alpha is expressed at physiological levels in transgenic mice driven by a muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter, a fibre type conversion is observed: muscles normally rich in type II fibres are redder and activate genes of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. Notably, putative type II muscles from PGC-1 alpha transgenic mice also express proteins characteristic of type I fibres, such as troponin I (slow) and myoglobin, and show a much greater resistance to electrically stimulated fatigue. Using fibre-type-specific promoters, we show in cultured muscle cells that PGC-1 alpha activates transcription in cooperation with Mef2 proteins and serves as a target for calcineurin signalling, which has been implicated in slow fibre gene expression. These data indicate that PGC-1 alpha is a principal factor regulating muscle fibre type determination. PMID:12181572

  11. Cooperative interaction of hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha ) and Ets-1 in the transcriptional activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (Flk-1).

    PubMed

    Elvert, Gerd; Kappel, Andreas; Heidenreich, Regina; Englmeier, Ursula; Lanz, Stephan; Acker, Till; Rauter, Manuel; Plate, Karl; Sieweke, Michael; Breier, Georg; Flamme, Ingo

    2003-02-28

    Interactions between Ets family members and a variety of other transcription factors serve important functions during development and differentiation processes, e.g. in the hematopoietic system. Here we show that the endothelial basic helix-loop-helix PAS domain transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha) (but not its close relative HIF-1alpha), cooperates with Ets-1 in activating transcription of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-2) gene (Flk-1). The receptor tyrosine kinase Flk-1 is indispensable for angiogenesis, and its expression is closely regulated during development. Consistent with the hypothesis that HIF-2alpha controls the expression of Flk-1 in vivo, we show here that HIF-2alpha and Flk-1 are co-regulated in postnatal mouse brain capillaries. A tandem HIF-2alpha/Ets binding site was identified within the Flk-1 promoter that acted as a strong enhancer element. Based on the analysis of transgenic mouse embryos, these motifs are essential for endothelial cell-specific reporter gene expression. A single HIF-2alpha/Ets element conferred strong cooperative induction by HIF-2alpha and Ets-1 when fused to a heterologous promoter and was most active in endothelial cells. The physical interaction of HIF-2alpha with Ets-1 was demonstrated and localized to the HIF-2alpha carboxyl terminus and the autoinhibitory exon VII domain of Ets-1, respectively. The deletion of the DNA binding and carboxyl-terminal transactivation domains of HIF-2alpha, respectively, created dominant negative mutants that suppressed transactivation by the wild type protein and failed to synergize with Ets-1. These results suggest that the interaction between HIF-2alpha and endothelial Ets factors is required for the full transcriptional activation of Flk-1 in endothelial cells and may therefore represent a future target for the manipulation of angiogenesis. PMID:12464608

  12. Short term integrative meditation improves resting alpha activity and stroop performance.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yaxin; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Tang, Rongxiang; Posner, Michael I

    2014-12-01

    Our previous research showed that short term meditation training reduces the time to resolve conflict in the flanker task. Studies also show that resting alpha increases with long term meditation practice. The aim of this study is to determine whether short term meditation training both increases resting alpha activity and reduces the time to resolve conflict in the Stroop task and whether these two effects are related. Forty-three Chinese undergraduates were randomly assigned an experiment group given 5 days meditation training using integrative body-mind training (IBMT) and a relaxation training control. After training, only the IBMT group showed decreased conflict reaction time (RT), and increased resting mean alpha power. Moreover, the higher the enhancement of resting alpha power, the stronger the improvement of conflict RT. The results indicate that short term meditation diffusely enhances alpha and improves the ability to deal with conflict and moreover these two effects are positively related. PMID:25253652

  13. The peptide LSARLAF causes platelet secretion and aggregation by directly activating the integrin alphaIIbbeta3.

    PubMed Central

    Derrick, J M; Taylor, D B; Loudon, R G; Gartner, T K

    1997-01-01

    A novel peptide (designed to bind to alphaIIbbeta3) caused platelet aggregation and aggregation-independent secretion of the contents of alpha-granules in an alphaIIbbeta3-dependent fashion. The agonist peptide induced secretion in the presence of prostaglandin E1. In cell-free assays, alphaIIbbeta3 bound specifically to immobilized agonist peptide and the peptide enhanced the binding of fibrinogen to immobilized alphaIIbbeta3. The agonist peptide apparently activates alphaIIbbeta3 by directly inducing a conformational change in the receptor. This change activates the platelets and causes secretion in a manner independent of fibrinogen binding. PMID:9230107

  14. The periplasmic alpha-carbonic anhydrase activity of Helicobacter pylori is essential for acid acclimation.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Moshfegh, Amiel P; Sachs, George; Scott, David R

    2005-01-01

    The role of the periplasmic alpha-carbonic anhydrase (alpha-CA) (HP1186) in acid acclimation of Helicobacter pylori was investigated. Urease and urea influx through UreI have been shown to be essential for gastric colonization and for acid survival in vitro. Intrabacterial urease generation of NH3 has a major role in regulation of periplasmic pH and inner membrane potential under acidic conditions, allowing adequate bioenergetics for survival and growth. Since alpha-CA catalyzes the conversion of CO2 to HCO3-, the role of CO2 in periplasmic buffering was studied using an alpha-CA deletion mutant and the CA inhibitor acetazolamide. Western analysis confirmed that alpha-CA was bound to the inner membrane. Immunoblots and PCR confirmed the absence of the enzyme and the gene in the alpha-CA knockout. In the mutant or in the presence of acetazolamide, there was an approximately 3 log10 decrease in acid survival. In acid, absence of alpha-CA activity decreased membrane integrity, as observed using membrane-permeant and -impermeant fluorescent DNA dyes. The increase in membrane potential and cytoplasmic buffering following urea addition to wild-type organisms in acid was absent in the alpha-CA knockout mutant and in the presence of acetazolamide, although UreI and urease remained fully functional. At low pH, the elevation of cytoplasmic and periplasmic pH with urea was abolished in the absence of alpha-CA activity. Hence, buffering of the periplasm to a pH consistent with viability depends not only on NH3 efflux from the cytoplasm but also on the conversion of CO2, produced by urease, to HCO3- by the periplasmic alpha-CA. PMID:15629943

  15. Retinoic acid activates human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene through binding of RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer to a novel retinoic acid response element in the promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Fang; Liu Yan; Liu Li; Wu Kailang; Wei Wei; Zhu Ying . E-mail: yingzhu@whu.edu.cn; Wu Jianguo . E-mail: wu9988@vip.sina.com

    2007-04-06

    Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) catalyzes nitric oxide (NO) which has a significant effect on tumor suppression and cancer therapy. Here we revealed the detailed molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of hiNOS expression induced by retinoic acid (RA). We showed that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer was important in hiNOS promoter activation, hiNOS protein expression, and NO production. Serial deletion and site-directed mutation analysis revealed two half-sites of retinoic acid response element (RARE) spaced by 5 bp located at -172 to -156 in the hiNOS promoter. EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} directly bound to this RARE of hiNOS promoter. Our results suggested the identification of a novel RARE in the hiNOS promoter and the roles of the nuclear receptors (RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha}) in the induction of hiNOS by RA.

  16. Ginsenoside Rf, a component of ginseng, regulates lipoprotein metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunghee; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yoon, Michung . E-mail: yoon60@mokwon.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    We investigated whether ginseng regulates lipoprotein metabolism by altering peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})-mediated pathways, using a PPAR{alpha}-null mouse model. Administration of ginseng extract, ginsenosides, and ginsenoside Rf (Rf) to wild-type mice not only significantly increased basal levels of hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and C-III mRNA compared with wild-type controls, but also substantially reversed the reductions in mRNA levels of apo A-I and C-III expected following treatment with the potent PPAR{alpha} ligand Wy14,643. In contrast, no effect was detected in the PPAR{alpha}-null mice. Testing of eight main ginsenosides on PPAR{alpha} reporter gene expression indicated that Rf was responsible for the effects of ginseng on lipoprotein metabolism. Furthermore, the inhibition of PPAR{alpha}-dependent transactivation by Rf seems to occur at the level of DNA binding. These results demonstrate that ginseng component Rf regulates apo A-I and C-III mRNA and the actions of Rf on lipoprotein metabolism are mediated via interactions with PPAR{alpha}.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) {beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Tomoshige; Manoli, Irini; Kelkar, Sujata; Wang, Yonghong; Su, Yan A.; Chrousos, George P.

    2009-04-17

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces C-terminal GR{beta} and GR{alpha} isoforms through alternative use of specific exons 9{beta} and {alpha}, respectively. We explored the transcriptional activity of GR{beta} on endogenous genes by developing HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-GR{beta} or EGFP. Microarray analyses revealed that GR{beta} had intrinsic gene-specific transcriptional activity, regulating mRNA expression of a large number of genes negatively or positively. Majority of GR{beta}-responsive genes was distinct from those modulated by GR{alpha}, while GR{beta} and GR{alpha} mutually modulated each other's transcriptional activity in a subpopulation of genes. We did not observe in HCT116 cells nuclear translocation of GR{beta} and activation of this receptor by RU 486, a synthetic steroid previously reported to bind GR{beta} and to induce nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that GR{beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent, gene-specific transcriptional activity, in addition to its previously reported dominant negative effect on GR{alpha}-induced transactivation of GRE-driven promoters.

  18. Integrated Active Fire Retrievals and Biomass Burning Emissions Using Complementary Near-Coincident Ground, Airborne and Spaceborne Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellicott, Evan; Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Ottmar, Roger D.; Clements, Craig; Hall, Dianne; Ambrosia, Vincent; Kremens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ground, airborne and spaceborne data were collected for a 450 ha prescribed fire implemented on 18 October 2011 at the Henry W. Coe State Park in California. The integration of various data elements allowed near coincident active fire retrievals to be estimated. The Autonomous Modular Sensor-Wildfire (AMS) airborne multispectral imaging system was used as a bridge between ground and spaceborne data sets providing high quality reference information to support satellite fire retrieval error analyses and fire emissions estimates. We found excellent agreement between peak fire radiant heat flux data (less than 1% error) derived from near-coincident ground radiometers and AMS. Both MODIS and GOES imager active fire products were negatively influenced by the presence of thick smoke, which was misclassified as cloud by their algorithms, leading to the omission of fire pixels beneath the smoke, and resulting in the underestimation of their retrieved fire radiative power (FRP) values for the burn plot, compared to the reference airborne data. Agreement between airborne and spaceborne FRP data improved significantly after correction for omission errors and atmospheric attenuation, resulting in as low as 5 difference between AquaMODIS and AMS. Use of in situ fuel and fire energy estimates in combination with a collection of AMS, MODIS, and GOES FRP retrievals provided a fuel consumption factor of 0.261 kg per MJ, total energy release of 14.5 x 10(exp 6) MJ, and total fuel consumption of 3.8 x 10(exp 6) kg. Fire emissions were calculated using two separate techniques, resulting in as low as 15 difference for various species

  19. Role of methionine in the active site of alpha-galactosidase from Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed Central

    Kachurin, A M; Golubev, A M; Geisow, M M; Veselkina, O S; Isaeva-Ivanova, L S; Neustroev, K N

    1995-01-01

    alpha-Galactosidase from Trichoderma reesei when treated with H2O2 shows a 12-fold increase in activity towards p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside. A similar effect is produced by the treatment of alpha-galactosidase with other non-specific oxidants: NaIO4, KMnO4 and K4S4O8. In addition to the increase in activity, the Michaelis constant rises from 0.2 to 1.4 mM, the temperature coefficient decreases by a factor of 1.5 and the pH-activity curve falls off sharply with increasing pH. Galactose (a competitive inhibitor of alpha-galactosidase; Ki 0.09 mM for the native enzyme at pH 4.4) effectively inhibits oxidative activation of the enzyme, because the observed activity changes are related to oxidation of the catalytically important methionine in the active site. NMR measurements and amino acid analysis show that oxidation to methionine sulphoxide of one of five methionines is sufficient to activate alpha-galactosidase. Binding of galactose prevents this. Oxidative activation does not lead to conversion of other H2O2-sensitive amino acid residues, such as histidine, tyrosine, tryptophan and cysteine. The catalytically important cysteine thiol group is quantitatively titrated after protein oxidative activation. Further oxidation of methionines (up to four of five residues) can be achieved by increasing the oxidation time and/or by prior denaturation of the protein. Obviously, a methionine located in the active site of alpha-galactosidase is more accessible. The oxidative-activation phenomenon can be explained by a conformational change in the active site as a result of conversion of non-polar methionine into polar methionine sulphoxide. Images Figure 10 PMID:8948456

  20. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  1. Differences in EEG Alpha Activity between Gifted and Non-Identified Individuals: Insights into Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert

    1997-01-01

    This study examined differences in electroencephalography (EEG) alpha activity between gifted and nongifted Slovenian student-teachers (N=17 each). Gifted students showed greater left hemisphere activation than nongifted subjects in relaxed states, but lower activation during problem solving. The same pattern was observed in overall hemispheric…

  2. Active heterodimers are formed from human DNA topoisomerase II alpha and II beta isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Biersack, H; Jensen, S; Gromova, I; Nielsen, I S; Westergaard, O; Andersen, A H

    1996-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a nuclear enzyme essential for chromosome dynamics and DNA metabolism. In mammalian cells, two genetically and biochemically distinct topoisomerase II forms exist, which are designated topoisomerase II alpha and topoisomerase II beta. In our studies of human topoisomerase II, we have found that a substantial fraction of the enzyme exists as alpha/beta heterodimers in HeLa cells. The ability to form heterodimers was verified when human topoisomerases II alpha and II beta were coexpressed in yeast and investigated in a dimerization assay. Analysis of purified heterodimers shows that these enzymes maintain topoisomerase II specific catalytic activities. The natural existence of an active heterodimeric subclass of topoisomerase II merits attention whenever topoisomerases II alpha and II beta function, localization, and cell cycle regulation are investigated. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8710863

  3. Alpha1-antichymotrypsin activity correlates with and may modulate matrix metalloproteinase-9 in human acute wounds.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Matthew J; Han, Yuan-Ping; Garner, Warren L

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a central role in many physiologic processes including acute and the chronic wounds. MMP-9 is not routinely expressed in healthy tissues but is promptly expressed as a proenzyme and converted into active enzyme after tissue injury. The mechanisms involved, including the activators and inhibitors for this enzyme in human tissue remain largely obscure. We recently identified alpha1-antichymotrypsin (alpha1-ACT), an acute phase factor, as a potent inhibitor controlling activation of pro-MMP-9 by human skin. The aim of this study is to establish the clinical relevance of the inhibitor in cutaneous wound healing. Fluids from acute burn blisters and conditioned media from skin explants of burn patients were analyzed. We observed that the presence pro-MMP-9 and its activation correlated with the proximity to and degree of injury. Early after trauma, massive levels of wound alpha1-ACT were associated with an absence of pro-MMP-9 activation. Conversely, the active MMP-9 occurs simultaneously with inactivation of alpha1-ACT. Our results suggest a role for alpha1-ACT as a physiologic inhibitor of MMP-9 activation in human wound healing. PMID:19660051

  4. The topography of alpha-band activity tracks the content of spatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joshua J; Sutterer, David W; Serences, John T; Vogel, Edward K; Awh, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is a system for the online storage of information. An emerging view is that neuronal oscillations coordinate the cellular assemblies that code the content of WM. In line with this view, previous work has demonstrated that oscillatory activity in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) plays a role in WM maintenance, but the exact contributions of this activity have remained unclear. Here, we used an inverted spatial encoding model in combination with electroencephalography (EEG) to test whether the topographic distribution of alpha-band activity tracks spatial representations held in WM. Participants in three experiments performed spatial WM tasks that required them to remember the precise angular location of a sample stimulus for 1,000-1,750 ms. Across all three experiments, we found that the topographic distribution of alpha-band activity tracked the specific location that was held in WM. Evoked (i.e., activity phase-locked to stimulus onset) and total (i.e., activity regardless of phase) power across a range of low-frequency bands transiently tracked the location of the sample stimulus following stimulus onset. However, only total power in the alpha band tracked the content of spatial WM throughout the memory delay period, which enabled reconstruction of location-selective channel tuning functions (CTFs). These findings demonstrate that alpha-band activity is directly related to the coding of spatial representations held in WM and provide a promising method for tracking the content of this online memory system. PMID:26467522

  5. Comparison in different species of biliary bilirubin-IX alpha conjugates with the activities of hepatic and renal bilirubin-IX alpha-uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, J; Van de Vijver, M; Michiels, R; Heirwegh, K P

    1977-01-01

    The bilrubin-IXalpha conjugates in bile and the activities of bilirubin-IX alpha--UDP-glycosyltransferases in liver and kidney were determined for ten species of mammals and for the chicken. 1. In the mammalian species, bilirubin-IX alpha glucuronide was the predominant bile pigment. Excretion of neutral glycosides was unimportant, except in the cat, the mouse, the rabbit and the dog, where glucose and xylose represented 12--41% of total conjugating groups bound to bilirubin-IX alpha. In chicken bile, glucoside and glucuronide conjugates were of equal importance. They probably represent only a small fraction of the total bile pigment. 2. The transferase activities in liver showed pronounced species variation. This was also apparent with regard to activation by digitonin, pH optimum and relative activities of transferases acting on either UDP-glucuronic acid or neutral UDP-sugars. 3. Man, the dog, the cat and the rat excrete bilirubin-IX alpha largely as diconjugated derivatives. In general, diconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha could also be synthesized in vitro with liver homogenate, bilirubin-IX alpha and UDP-sugar. In contrast, for the other species examined, bilirubin pigments consisted predominantly of monoconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha. Synthesis in vitro with UDP-glucuronic acid, UDP-glucose or UDP-xylose as the sugar donor led exclusively to the formation of monoconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha. 4. The transferase activities in the kidney were restricted to the cortex and were important only for the rat and the dog. No activity at all could be detected for several species, including man. 5. Comparison of the transferase activities in liver with reported values of the maximal rate of excretion in bile suggests a close linkage between conjugation and biliary secretion of bilirubin-IX alpha. PMID:407905

  6. Impairments in Background and Event-Related Alpha-Band Oscillatory Activity in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Ilana Y.; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Studies show that patients with schizophrenia exhibit impaired responses to sensory stimuli, especially at the early stages of neural processing. In particular, patients’ alpha-band (8–14 Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) and visual P1 event-related potential (ERP) component tend to be significantly reduced, with P1 ERP deficits greater for visual stimuli biased towards the magnocellular system. In healthy controls, studies show that pre-stimulus alpha (background alpha) plays a pivotal role in sensory processing and behavior, largely by shaping the neural responses to incoming stimuli. Here, we address whether patients’ ERD and P1 deficits stem from impairments in pre-stimulus alpha mechanisms. To address this question we recorded electrophysiological activity in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls while they engaged in a visual discrimination task with low, medium, and high contrast stimuli. The results revealed a significant decrease in patients’ ERDs, which was largely driven by reductions in pre-stimulus alpha. These reductions were most prominent in right-hemispheric areas. We also observed a systematic relationship between pre-stimulus alpha and the P1 component across different contrast levels. However, this relationship was only observed in healthy controls. Taken together, these findings highlight a substantial anomaly in patients’ amplitude-based alpha background activity over visual areas. The results provide further support that pre-stimulus alpha activity plays an active role in perception by modulating the neural responses to incoming sensory inputs, a mechanism that seems to be compromised in schizophrenia. PMID:24646909

  7. NOx production by lightning in Hector: first airborne measurements during SCOUT-O3/ACTIVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Roiger, A.; Stock, P.; Minikin, A.; Höller, H.; Schmidt, K.; Betz, H.-D.; Allen, G.; Viciani, S.; Ulanovsky, A.; Ravegnani, F.; Brunner, D.

    2009-07-01

    During the SCOUT-O3/ACTIVE field phase in November-December 2005 airborne in situ measurements were performed inside and in the vicinity of thunderstorms over northern Australia with several research aircraft (German Falcon, Russian M55 Geophysica, and British Dornier-228). Here a case study from 19 November is presented in large detail on the basis of airborne trace gas measurements (NO, NOy, CO, O3) and stroke measurements from the German LIghtning Location NETwork (LINET), set up in the vicinity of Darwin during the field campaign. The anvil outflow from three different types of thunderstorms was probed by the Falcon aircraft: 1) a continental thunderstorm developing in a tropical airmass near Darwin, 2) a mesoscale convective system (MCS) developing within the tropical maritime continent (Tiwi Islands) known as Hector, and 3) a continental thunderstorm developing in a subtropical airmass ~200 km south of Darwin. For the first time detailed measurements of NO were performed in the Hector outflow. The highest NO mixing ratios were observed in Hector with peaks up to 7 nmol mol-1 in the main anvil outflow at ~11.5-12.5 km altitude. The mean NOx (=NO+NO2) mixing ratios during these penetrations (~100 km width) varied between 2.2 and 2.5 nmol mol-1. The NOx contribution from the boundary layer (BL), transported upward with the convection, to total anvil-NOx was found to be minor (<10%). On the basis of Falcon measurements, the mass flux of lightning-produced NOx (LNOx) in the well-developed Hector system was estimated to 0.6-0.7 kg(N) s-1. The highest average stroke rate of the probed thunderstorms was observed in the Hector system with 0.2 strokes s-1 (here only strokes with peak currents ≥10 kA contributing to LNOx were considered). The LNOx mass flux and the stroke rate were combined to estimate the LNOx production rate in the different thunderstorm types. For a better comparison with other studies, LINET strokes were scaled with Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS

  8. NOx production by lightning in Hector: first airborne measurements during SCOUT-O3/ACTIVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Roiger, A.; Stock, P.; Minikin, A.; Höller, H.; Schmidt, K.; Betz, H.-D.; Allen, G.; Viciani, S.; Ulanovsky, A.; Ravegnani, F.; Brunner, D.

    2009-11-01

    During the SCOUT-O3/ACTIVE field phase in November-December 2005, airborne in situ measurements were performed inside and in the vicinity of thunderstorms over northern Australia with several research aircraft (German Falcon, Russian M55 Geophysica, and British Dornier-228. Here a case study from 19 November is presented in detail on the basis of airborne trace gas measurements (NO, NOy, CO, O3) and stroke measurements from the German LIghtning Location NETwork (LINET), set up in the vicinity of Darwin during the field campaign. The anvil outflow from three different types of thunderstorms was probed by the Falcon aircraft: (1) a continental thunderstorm developing in a tropical airmass near Darwin, (2) a mesoscale convective system (MCS), known as Hector, developing within the tropical maritime continent (Tiwi Islands), and (3) a continental thunderstorm developing in a subtropical airmass ~200 km south of Darwin. For the first time detailed measurements of NO were performed in the Hector outflow. The highest NO mixing ratios were observed in Hector with peaks up to 7 nmol mol-1 in the main anvil outflow at ~11.5-12.5 km altitude. The mean NOx (=NO+NO2) mixing ratios during these penetrations (~100 km width) varied between 2.2 and 2.5 nmol mol-1. The NOx contribution from the boundary layer (BL), transported upward with the convection, to total anvil-NOx was found to be minor (<10%). On the basis of Falcon measurements, the mass flux of lightning-produced NOx (LNOx) in the well-developed Hector system was estimated to 0.6-0.7 kg(N) s-1. The highest average stroke rate of the probed thunderstorms was observed in the Hector system with 0.2 strokes s-1 (here only strokes with peak currents ≥10 kA contributing to LNOx were considered). The LNOx mass flux and the stroke rate were combined to estimate the LNOx production rate in the different thunderstorm types. For a better comparison with other studies, LINET strokes were scaled with Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS

  9. Modulation of the chaperone-like activity of bovine alpha-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Clark, J I; Huang, Q L

    1996-12-24

    The effects of pantethine, glutathione, and selected chemical reagents on the anti-aggregation activity of alpha-crystallin was evaluated. Protein aggregation was monitored by light scattering of solutions of denatured beta L-crystallin or alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ratios of beta L-crystallin/alpha-crystallin and ADH/alpha-crystallin were adjusted so that partial inhibition of protein aggregation at 60 degrees C or 37 degrees C, respectively, was observed and modulation of the chaperone action of alpha-crystallin could be evaluated easily with selected endogenous metabolites. Enhancement of the anti-aggregation activity in the beta L-crystallin assay was strongest with pantethine, which appeared to interact with alpha-crystallin. Enhancement of the anti-aggregation activity in the ADH assay was strongest with glutathione which appeared to interact with ADH. The results indicated that the products of common metabolic pathways can modulate the chaperone-like effects of alpha-crystallin on protein aggregation. PMID:8986785

  10. Gamma Activity Coupled to Alpha Phase as a Mechanism for Top-Down Controlled Gating

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Mathilde; Jensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between neural oscillations in different frequency bands has been proposed to coordinate neural processing. In particular, gamma power coupled to alpha phase is proposed to reflect gating of information in the visual system but the existence of such a mechanism remains untested. Here, we recorded ongoing brain activity using magnetoencephalography in subjects who performed a modified Sternberg working memory task in which distractors were presented in the retention interval. During the anticipatory pre-distractor period, we show that the phase of alpha oscillations was coupled with the power of high (80-120Hz) gamma band activity, i.e. gamma power consistently was lower at the trough than at the peak of the alpha cycle (9-12Hz). We further show that high alpha power was associated with weaker gamma power at the trough of the alpha cycle. This result is in line with alpha activity in sensory region implementing a mechanism of pulsed inhibition silencing neuronal firing every ~100 ms. PMID:26039691

  11. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. PMID:26773821

  12. Airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture during FIFE: Activities and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    Soil moisture measurements were obtained during the summer of 1987 and 1989 near Manhattan, Kansas, using the National Weather Service (NWS) airborne gamma radiation system. A network of 24 flight lines were established over the research area. Airborne surveys were flown daily during two intensive field campaigns. The data collected was sufficient to modify the NWS standard operational method for estimating soil moisture for the Field Experiment (FIFE) flight lines. The average root mean square error of the soil moisture estimates for shorter FIFE flight lines was found to be 2.5 percent, compared with a reported value of 3.9 percent for NWS flight lines. Techniques were developed to compute soil moisture estimates for portions of the flight lines. Results of comparisons of the airborne gamma radiation soil moisture estimates with those obtained using the NASA Pushbroom Microwave Radiation (PBMR) system and hydrological model are presented. The airborne soil moisture measurements, and real averages computed using all remotely sensed and ground data, have been in support of the research of the many FIFE investigators whose overall goal was the upscale integration of models and the application of satellite remote sensing.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  14. Cefoperazone prevents the inactivation of alpha(1)-antitrypsin by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Arduino, N; Bertolotto, M; Ottonello, L

    1999-09-01

    At sites of neutrophilic inflammation, tissue injury by neutrophil elastase is favored by phagocyte-induced hypochlorous acid-dependent inactivation of the natural elastase inhibitor alpha(1)-antitrypsin. In the present study, cefoperazone prevented alpha(1)-antitrypsin inactivation by neutrophils and reduced the recovery of hypochlorous acid from these cells. Moreover, the antibiotic reduced the free elastase activity in a neutrophil suspension supplemented with alpha(1)-antitrypsin without affecting the cells' ability to release elastase. These data suggest that the drug inactivates hypochlorous acid before its reaction with alpha(1)-antitrypsin, thereby permitting the antiprotease-mediated blockade of released elastase. In conclusion, cefoperazone appears to have the potential for limiting elastase-antielastase imbalances, attenuating the related tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:10471586

  15. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  16. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase activities to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digestion of starch requires activities provided by 6 interactive small intestinal enzymes. Two of these are luminal endo-glucosidases named alpha-amylases. Four are exo-glucosidases bound to the luminal surface of enterocytes. These mucosal activities were identified as 4 different maltases. Two ma...

  17. Biological activities of 2alpha-substituted analogues of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in transcriptional regulation and human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Nakagawa, Kimie; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Kittaka, Atsushi; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Konno, Katsuhiro; Takayama, Hiroaki; Ozono, Keiichi; Okano, Toshio

    2006-11-01

    Biological activities of 2alpha-substituted 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 analogues were evaluated in vitro. Their binding affinity was examined with calf thymus cytosolic vitamin D receptor (VDR) and rat plasma vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). In addition, the transcriptional activity of the analogues was measured using a rat 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase gene promoter, a human osteocalcin gene promoter, and VDR-GAL4 system. This study investigated the biological activities of 2alpha-substituted analogues in comparison with 2beta-substitued analogues at the molecular level, with regard to the structural differences of alkyl, hydroxyalkyl, hydroxyalkoxy substituents at the 2-position of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:17077522

  18. Metabolism of 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 by cytochrome P450scc to biologically active 1alpha,20-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Tuckey, Robert C; Janjetovic, Zorica; Li, Wei; Nguyen, Minh N; Zmijewski, Michal A; Zjawiony, Jordan; Slominski, Andrzej

    2008-12-01

    Cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) metabolizes vitamin D3 to 20-hydroxyvitamin D3 as the major product, with subsequent production of dihydroxy and trihydroxy derivatives. The aim of this study was to determine whether cytochrome P450scc could metabolize 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 and whether products were biologically active. The major product of 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 metabolism by P450scc was identified by mass spectrometry and NMR as 1alpha,20-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Mass spectrometry of minor metabolites revealed the production of another dihydroxyvitamin D3 derivative, two trihydroxy-metabolites made via 1alpha,20-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and a tetrahydroxyvitamin D3 derivative. The Km for 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 determined for P450scc incorporated into phospholipid vesicles was 1.4 mol substrate/mol phospholipid, half that observed for vitamin D3. The kcat was 3.0 mol/min/mol P450scc, 6-fold lower than that for vitamin D3. 1alpha,20-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibited DNA synthesis by human epidermal HaCaT keratinocytes propagated in culture, in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, with a potency similar to that of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. 1alpha,20-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (10 microM) enhanced CYP24 mRNA levels in HaCaT keratinocytes but the potency was much lower than that reported for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. We conclude that the presence of the 1-hydroxyl group in vitamin D3 does not alter the major site of hydroxylation by P450scc which, as for vitamin D3, is at C20. The major product, 1alpha,20-dihydroxyvitamin D3, displays biological activity on keratinocytes and therefore might be useful pharmacologically. PMID:19000766

  19. Active Trafficking of Alpha 1 Antitrypsin across the Lung Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, Angelia D.; Brown, Mary Beth; Santos-Falcon, Nieves; Rush, Natalia I.; Oueini, Houssam; Oberle, Amber J.; Bolanis, Esther; Fragoso, Miryam A.; Petrusca, Daniela N.; Serban, Karina A.; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Presson Jr., Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The homeostatic lung protective effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) may require the transport of circulating proteinase inhibitor across an intact lung endothelial barrier. We hypothesized that uninjured pulmonary endothelial cells transport A1AT to lung epithelial cells. Purified human A1AT was rapidly taken up by confluent primary rat pulmonary endothelial cell monolayers, was secreted extracellularly, both apically and basolaterally, and was taken up by adjacent rat lung epithelial cells co-cultured on polarized transwells. Similarly, polarized primary human lung epithelial cells took up basolaterally-, but not apically-supplied A1AT, followed by apical secretion. Evidence of A1AT transcytosis across lung microcirculation was confirmed in vivo by two-photon intravital microscopy in mice. Time-lapse confocal microscopy indicated that A1AT co-localized with Golgi in the endothelium whilst inhibition of the classical secretory pathway with tunicamycin significantly increased intracellular retention of A1AT. However, inhibition of Golgi secretion promoted non-classical A1AT secretion, associated with microparticle release. Polymerized A1AT or A1AT supplied to endothelial cells exposed to soluble cigarette smoke extract had decreased transcytosis. These results suggest previously unappreciated pathways of A1AT bidirectional uptake and secretion from lung endothelial cells towards the alveolar epithelium and airspaces. A1AT trafficking may determine its functional bioavailablity in the lung, which could be impaired in individuals exposed to smoking or in those with A1AT deficiency. PMID:24743137

  20. Alternative catalytic anions differentially modulate human alpha-amylase activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Maurus, Robert; Begum, Anjuman; Williams, Leslie K; Fredriksen, Jason R; Zhang, Ran; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2008-03-18

    A mechanistic study of the essential allosteric activation of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by chloride ion has been conducted by exploring a wide range of anion substitutions through kinetic and structural experiments. Surprisingly, kinetic studies indicate that the majority of these alternative anions can induce some level of enzymatic activity despite very different atomic geometries, sizes, and polyatomic natures. These data and subsequent structural studies attest to the remarkable plasticity of the chloride binding site, even though earlier structural studies of wild-type human pancreatic alpha-amylase suggested this site would likely be restricted to chloride binding. Notably, no apparent relationship is observed between anion binding affinity and relative activity, emphasizing the complexity of the relationship between chloride binding parameters and the activation mechanism that facilitates catalysis. Of the anions studied, particularly intriguing in terms of observed trends in substrate kinetics and their novel atomic compositions were the nitrite, nitrate, and azide anions, the latter of which was found to enhance the relative activity of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by nearly 5-fold. Structural studies have provided considerable insight into the nature of the interactions formed in the chloride binding site by the nitrite and nitrate anions. To probe the role such interactions play in allosteric activation, further structural analyses were conducted in the presence of acarbose, which served as a sensitive reporter molecule of the catalytic ability of these modified enzymes to carry out its expected rearrangement by human pancreatic alpha-amylase. These studies show that the largest anion of this group, nitrate, can comfortably fit in the chloride binding pocket, making all the necessary hydrogen bonds. Further, this anion has nearly the same ability to activate human pancreatic alpha-amylase and leads to the production of the same acarbose product

  1. Assessment of fecal bacteria with bile acid 7 alpha-dehydroxylating activity for the presence of bai-like genes.

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, K C; Takamine, F; LaVoie, C P; Mallonee, D H; Hylemon, P B

    1997-01-01

    Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 has several bile acid-inducible (bai) genes which encode enzymes in the bile acid 7 alpha-dehydroxylation (7 alpha DeOH) pathway. Twelve 7 alpha DeOH-positive intestinal bacterial strains were assayed for 7 alpha DeOH activity, and 13 strains were tested for hybridization with bai genes. Cholic acid 7 alpha DeOH activity varied greatly (> 100-fold) among these strains. Southern blot experiments showed that DNA prepared from 7 of 13 strains hybridized with at least one of the bai genes from Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708. PMID:9055436

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of retinoic acid receptor-alpha in human breast tumors: retinoic acid receptor-alpha expression correlates with proliferative activity.

    PubMed Central

    van der Leede, B. M.; Geertzema, J.; Vroom, T. M.; Décimo, D.; Lutz, Y.; van der Saag, P. T.; van der Burg, B.

    1996-01-01

    Retinoids are known to prevent mammary carcinogenesis in rodents and inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Previously we demonstrated that retinoid inhibition of proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines is largely mediated by retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-alpha. In this study we describe for the first time the histological distribution of RAR-alpha in 33 breast lesion specimens as determined by immunostaining with RAR-alpha antibody. Nuclear staining was observed in tumor tissue and normal portions of the breast samples. Connective tissue exhibited relative uniform staining, whereas a wide range of RAR-alpha expression was found in the epithelial tumor cells. RAR-alpha protein was expressed at significantly higher levels in tumors with greater proliferative activity as determined by immunostaining with Ki-67 antibody. This suggests that RAR-alpha expression may be altered with tumor progression. Although a positive correlation between RAR-alpha mRNA levels and estrogen receptor status of breast tumors has previously been documented, we did not find such a relationship at the protein level. As RAR-alpha plays a major role in retinoid-mediated growth inhibition of human breast cancer cell in vitro, our findings suggest that patients with highly proliferating tumors could be responsive to retinoid independently of their responsiveness to (anti)-estrogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8669476

  3. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Han, Xiang Hua; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Hak-Ju; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening with approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.

  4. [Effect of adrenal stress on activity of proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in rats].

    PubMed

    Samokhina, L M; Kaliman, P A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of adrenal stress on the proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activities in blood serum and cytosols of the rat organs were investigated. The reliable change was marked only in the alpha-1-PI level research of lung tissue cytosol. The proteolysis suppression was revealed in the heart and kidney tissue, while the proteolysis activation was revealed in serum and less in the lung tissue cytosol. Changes in proteinase level in the myocardium and kidney tissue play the primary role in respect to those of the other research liquids under study. PMID:7747353

  5. Cross-inhibitory activity of cereal protein inhibitors against alpha-amylases and xylanases.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Ana I; Faulds, Craig B; Svensson, Birte; Bartolomé, Begoña; Williamson, Gary; Juge, Nathalie

    2003-08-21

    The purification and characterisation of a xylanase inhibitor (XIP-I) from wheat was reported previously. In our current work, XIP-I is also demonstrated to have the capacity to inhibit the two barley alpha-amylase isozymes (AMY1 and AMY2). XIP-I completely inhibited the activity of AMY1 and AMY2 towards insoluble Blue Starch and a soluble hepta-oligosaccharide derivative. A ternary complex was formed between insoluble starch, a catalytically inactive mutant of AMY1 (D180A), and XIP-I, suggesting that the substrate-XIP-I interaction is necessary for inhibition of barley alpha-amylases. K(i) values for alpha-amylase inhibition, however, could not be calculated due to the nonlinear nature of the inhibition pattern. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance and gel electrophoresis did not indicate interaction between XIP-I and the alpha-amylases. The inhibition was abolished by CaCl(2), indicating that the driving force for the interaction is different from that of complexation between the barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) and AMY2. This is the first report of a proteinaceous inhibitor of AMY1. BASI, in addition, was demonstrated to partially inhibit the endo-1,4-beta-D-xylanase from Aspergillus niger (XylA) of glycoside hydrolase family 11. Taken together, the data demonstrate for the first time the dual target enzyme specificity of BASI and XIP-I inhibitors for xylanase and alpha-amylase. PMID:12922177

  6. Low-intensity contraction activates the alpha1-isoform of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Taro; Tanaka, Satsuki; Ebihara, Ken; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Sato, Kenji; Fushiki, Tohru; Nakao, Kazuwa; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses two catalytic subunits, alpha1 and alpha2, of the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has been implicated in contraction-stimulated glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction activates the alpha2-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha2), but this activation may occur with or without activation of the alpha1-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha1), suggesting that AMPKalpha2 is the major isoform responsible for contraction-induced metabolic events in skeletal muscle. We report for the first time that AMPKalpha1, but not AMPKalpha2, can be activated in contracting skeletal muscle. Rat epitrochlearis muscles were isolated and incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing pyruvate. In muscles stimulated to contract at a frequency of 1 and 2 Hz during the last 2 min of incubation, AMPKalpha1 activity increased twofold and AMPKalpha2 activity remained unchanged. Muscle stimulation did not change the muscle AMP concentration or the AMP-to-ATP ratio. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of Thr(172) of the alpha-subunit, the primary activation site. Muscle stimulation increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, and the rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport. In contrast, increasing the frequency (>or=5 Hz) or duration (>or=5 min) of contraction activated AMPKalpha1 and AMPKalpha2 and increased AMP concentration and the AMP/ATP ratio. These results suggest that 1) AMPKalpha1 is the predominant isoform activated by AMP-independent phosphorylation in low-intensity contracting muscle, 2) AMPKalpha2 is activated by an AMP-dependent mechanism in high-intensity contracting muscle, and 3) activation of each isoform enhances glucose transport and ACC phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. PMID:16249251

  7. TNF-alpha released by comigrating monocytes promotes transendothelial migration of activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Green, D M; Trial, J; Birdsall, H H

    1998-09-01

    We investigated mechanisms that increase motility and transendothelial trafficking of activated lymphocytes. Freshly isolated lymphocytes stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 for 2 h migrate into polymerized collagen in 1.99+/-0.25-fold greater numbers and across confluent endothelial monolayers in 4.8+/-0.5-fold greater numbers compared with leukocytes incubated with non-specific IgG. Activated lymphocytes form clusters with monocytes, and their increased motility was dependent on the presence of comigrating monocytes. Five lines of evidence support the idea that monocytes modulate lymphocyte motility through the release of TNF-alpha: 1) flow-cytometric analyses, using highly specific and avid mAbs to probe permeabilized whole blood leukocytes, showed that >80% of circulating monocytes contain intracellular TNF-alpha, whereas <5% contain IL-1 and none contain IL-6; 2) stimulation with immobilized anti-CD3 that was intended to activate lymphocytes also induced monocytes to release increased quantities of TNF-alpha; 3) rTNF-alpha, added in doses of 1 to 20 pg/ml to purified anti-CD3-stimulated lymphocytes, reproduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the motility-enhancing effect of adding monocytes; 4) the transient increase in the expression of TNF R-I on CD3-activated T lymphocytes parallels their transiently increased motility; and 5) addition of anti-TNF-alpha, anti-TNF R-I, anti-TNF R-II, or soluble TNF R-I decreased the motility of stimulated lymphocytes. These results suggest that T lymphocyte stimulation via the CD3-TCR complex signals nearby monocytes to release TNF-alpha, which feeds back on the lymphocytes to increase their locomotor activity. PMID:9725247

  8. Filamin A negatively regulates the transcriptional activity of p73{alpha} in the cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Joo; Park, Jong-Sup; Um, Soo-Jong

    2007-11-03

    The transcription regulator p73{alpha} is structurally different from p53 in that it possesses a unique C-terminal domain, which has been implicated in transcriptional repression. To dissect the mechanism of repression by this domain, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a HeLa cDNA library using residues 487-636 of p73{alpha} as bait and isolated a cDNA clone encoding the C-terminal portion (residues 2210-2647) of filamin A, a 280-kDa actin-binding protein. Additional yeast two-hybrid assays indicated that filamin A specifically interacts with the p73{alpha} C-terminus, which is lacking in p53 and p73{beta}. The interaction was confirmed by GST pull-down assays in vitro and by immunoprecipitation analysis in vivo. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that p73{alpha} remained in the cytoplasm in A7 melanoma cells stably expressing filamin A, whereas it was localized in the nucleus of filamin A-deficient M2 cells. Deletion of the C-terminus of p73{alpha} (residues 487-636) resulted in nuclear localization in both cell types. Consistent with our interaction data, transient co-expression of filamin A resulted in the down-regulation of p73{alpha}, but not of p53, transcriptional activity on various p53-responsive promoters. Taken together, our data suggest that p73{alpha} is sequestered in the cytoplasm by filamin A, thereby inhibiting its transcriptional activity.

  9. 20-alpha-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from pseudopregnant rat ovary: obtention and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    De La Llosa-Hermier, M P; Nocart, M; Paly, J; Hermier, C

    1992-12-01

    The enzyme 20-alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20-alpha-HSD) was purified from pseudopregnant rat ovaries and used as antigen for the development of a monoclonal antibody by the hybridoma technique. Spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with purified 20-alpha-HSD were fused with SP2/0 mouse myeloma cells. Among the colonies of hybrid cells, one (designated mAb-HSD 11) was found to be secreting antibodies (IgM) able to inhibit 20-alpha-HSD activity. The antibody-secreting hybridome was amplified by ascitic fluid production and the monoclonal antibody purified by Bakerbond ABx procedure. Purified mAb-HSD 11 was able to inhibit 20-alpha-HSD activity in a dose-dependent manner. Studies of Michaelis constants of 20-alpha-HSD indicate that this monoclonal antibody increases the Km for 20-alpha-dihydroprogesterone and decreases the Vmax. PMID:1292619

  10. Structure-based protein engineering for alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of plant defensin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ku-Feng; Lee, Tian-Ren; Tsai, Ping-Hsing; Hsu, Ming-Pin; Chen, Ching-San; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2007-08-01

    The structure of a novel plant defensin isolated from the seeds of the mung bean, Vigna radiate, has been determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of VrD2, the V. radiate plant defensin 2 protein, comprises an alpha-helix and one triple-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet stabilized by four disulfide bonds. This protein exhibits neither insecticidal activity nor alpha-amylase inhibitory activity in spite of showing a similar global fold to that of VrD1, an insecticidal plant defensin that has been suggested to function by inhibiting insect alpha-amylase. Our previous study proposed that loop L3 of plant defensins is important for this inhibition. Structural analyses and surface charge comparisons of VrD1 and VrD2 revealed that the charged residues of L3 correlate with the observed difference in inhibitory activities of these proteins. A VrD2 chimera that was produced by transferring the proposed functional loop of VrD1 onto the structurally equivalent loop of VrD2 supported this hypothesis. The VrD2 chimera, which differs by only five residues compared with VrD2, showed obvious activity against Tenebrio molitor alpha-amylase. These results clarify the mode of alpha-amylase inhibition of plant defensins and also represent a possible approach for engineering novel alpha-amylase inhibitors. Plant defensins are important constituents of the innate immune system of plants, and thus the application of protein engineering to this protein family may provide an efficient method for protecting against crop losses. PMID:17444520

  11. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  12. Cross-talk between receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and alpha1b-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Medina, L; Vázquez-Prado, J; García-Sáinz, J A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on the phosphorylation and function of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors transfected into Rat-1 fibroblasts was studied. EGF and PDGF increased the phosphorylation of these adrenoceptors. The effect of EGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1478 and that of PDGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1296, inhibitors of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activities of the receptors for these growth factors. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, blocked the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF but not that induced by PDGF. Inhibition of protein kinase C blocked the adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF and PDGF. The ability of noradrenaline to increase [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding in membrane preparations was used as an index of the functional coupling of the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors and G-proteins. Noradrenaline-stimulated [(35)S]GTP[S] binding was markedly decreased in membranes from cells pretreated with EGF or PDGF. Our data indicate that: (i) activation of EGF and PDGF receptors induces phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors, (ii) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is involved in the EGF response, but does not seem to play a major role in the action of PDGF, (iii) protein kinase C mediates this action of both growth factors and (iv) the phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors induced by EGF and PDGF is associated with adrenoceptor desensitization. PMID:10947955

  13. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings. PMID:18435418

  14. Insecticidal activity of an alpha-amylase inhibitor-like protein resembling a putative precursor of alpha-amylase inhibitor in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, M; Yamada, T; Kaga, A

    1999-06-15

    alpha-Amylase inhibitor (alphaAI) in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., protects seeds from insect pests such as the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) and the azuki bean weevil (C. chinensis). Cultivars which lack alphaAI still show resistance to both bruchids. These cultivars have a glycoprotein that reacts with anti-alphaAI-1 antibodies. The glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 29 kDa (Gp29) was purified and the encoding gene was isolated. The primary structure of Gp29 is the same as alpha-amylase inhibitor-like protein (AIL) from which the encoding gene has already been isolated. AIL resembles a putative precursor of alphaAI, even though it does not form the active inhibitor. However, AIL has some inhibitory effect on the growth of C. maculatus but not C. chinensis. The presence of AIL alone is insufficient to explain the bruchid resistance of common bean cultivars lacking alpha-AI. Common bean seeds appear to contain several factors responsible for the bruchid resistance. PMID:10366733

  15. EGF AND TGF-{alpha} motogenic activities are mediated by the EGF receptor via distinct matrix-dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ian R.; Schor, Ana M.; Schor, Seth L. . E-mail: s.l.schor@dundee.ac.uk

    2007-02-15

    EGF and TGF-{alpha} induce an equipotent stimulation of fibroblast migration and proliferation. In spite of their homologous structure and ligation by the same receptor (EGFR), we report that their respective motogenic activities are mediated by different signal transduction intermediates, with p70{sup S6K} participating in EGF signalling and phospholipase C{gamma} in TGF-{alpha} signalling. We additionally demonstrate that EGF and TGF-{alpha} motogenic activities may be resolved into two stages: (a) cell 'activation' by a transient exposure to either cytokine, and (b) the subsequent 'manifestation' of an enhanced migratory phenotype in the absence of cytokine. The cell activation and manifestation stages for each cytokine are mediated by distinct matrix-dependent mechanisms: motogenetic activation by EGF requires the concomitant functionality of EGFR and the hyaluronan receptor CD44, whereas activation by TGF-{alpha} requires EGFR and integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Manifestation of elevated migration no longer requires the continued presence of exogenous cytokine and functional EGFR but does require the above mentioned matrix receptors, as well as their respective ligands, i.e., hyaluronan in the case of EGF, and vitronectin in the case of TGF-{alpha}. In contrast, the mitogenic activities of EGF and TGF-{alpha} are independent of CD44 and {alpha}v{beta}3 functionality. These results demonstrate clear qualitative differences between EGF and TGF-{alpha} pathways and highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in regulating cytokine bioactivity.

  16. DHEA metabolites activate estrogen receptors alpha and beta

    PubMed Central

    Michael Miller, Kristy K.; Al-Rayyan, Numan; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Ripp, Sharon L.; Klinge, Carolyn M.; Prough, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels were reported to associate with increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, but some carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumor studies question this claim. The purpose of this study was to determine how DHEA and its metabolites affect estrogen receptors α or β (ERα or ERβ) -regulated gene transcription and cell proliferation. In transiently transfected HEK-293 cells, androstenediol, DHEA, and DHEA-S activated ERα. In ERβ transfected HepG2 cells, androstenedione, DHEA, androstenediol, and 7-oxo DHEA stimulated reporter activity. ER antagonists ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, general P450 inhibitor miconazole, and aromatase inhibitor exemestane inhibited activation by DHEA or metabolites in transfected cells. ERβ-selective antagonist R,R-THC (R,R-cis-diethyl tetrahydrochrysene) inhibited DHEA and DHEA metabolite transcriptional activity in ERβ-transfected cells. Expression of endogenous estrogen-regulated genes: pS2, progesterone receptor, cathepsin D1, and nuclear respiratory factor-1 was increased by DHEA and its metabolites in an ER-subtype, gene, and cell-specific manner. DHEA metabolites, but not DHEA, competed with 17β-estradiol for ERα and ERβ binding and stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation, demonstrating that DHEA metabolites interact directly with ERα and ERβ in vitro, modulating estrogen target genes in vivo. PMID:23123738

  17. Activation of alpha6-containing GABAA receptors by pentobarbital occurs through a different mechanism than activation by GABA.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew T; Fisher, Janet L

    2010-03-01

    The GABA(A) receptors are ligand-gated chloride channels which are the targets for many clinically used sedatives, including the barbiturates. The barbiturate pentobarbital acts through multiple sites on the GABA(A) receptor. At low concentrations (muM), it acts as a positive allosteric modulator while at higher concentrations it can directly activate the receptor. This agonist action is influenced by the subunit composition of the receptor, and pentobarbital is a more effective agonist than GABA only at receptors containing an alpha6 subunit. The conformational change that translates GABA binding into channel opening is known to involve a lysine residue located in an extracellular domain between the 2nd and 3rd transmembrane domains. Mutations of this residue disrupt activation of the channel by GABA and have been linked to inherited epilepsy. Pentobarbital binds to the receptor at a different agonist site than GABA, but could use a common signal transduction mechanism to gate the channel. To address this question, we compared the effect of a mutating the homologous lysine residue in the alpha1 or alpha6 subunits (K278 or K277, respectively) to methionine on direct activation of recombinant GABA(A) receptors by GABA or pentobarbital. We found that this mutation reduced GABA sensitivity for both alpha1 and alpha6 subunits, but affected pentobarbital sensitivity only for the alpha1 subunit. This suggests that pentobarbital acts through a distinct signal transduction pathway at the alpha6 subunit, which may account for its greater efficacy compared to GABA at receptors containing this subunit. PMID:20109529

  18. Human alpha-thrombin inhibition by the active site titrant N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azalysine p-nitrophenyl ester: a comparative kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Nardini, M; Pesce, A; Rizzi, M; Casale, E; Ferraccioli, R; Balliano, G; Milla, P; Ascenzi, P; Bolognesi, M

    1996-05-24

    Kinetics for the hydrolysis of the chromogenic active site titrant N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azalysine p-nitrophenyl ester (Dmc-azaLys-ONp) catalyzed by bovine beta-trypsin, bovine alpha-thrombin, human alpha-thrombin, human Lys77-plasmin, human urinary kallikrein, the M(r) 33,000 and M(r) 54,000 species of human urokinase, as well as by porcine pancreatic beta-kallikrein-A and B have been obtained between pH 6.0 and 8.0, at 21.0 degrees C. Moreover, the three dimensional structure of the human alpha-thrombin-(hirugen).Dmc-azaLys acyl.enzyme complex has been analyzed and refined by X-ray crystallography at 2.0 A resolution (R-factor = 0.168). As observed for bovine beta-trypsin, the acylating inhibitor molecule is covalently bound to the Ser195 catalytic residue, filling the human alpha-thrombin S1 primary specificity subsite with its lysyl side-group. However, the carbonyl group of the scissile human alpha-thrombin.Dmc-azaLys acyl bond does not occupy properly the oxyanion binding hole. At variance from the bovine beta-trypsin.Dmc-azaLys acyl.enzyme structure, a second, not covalently bound, inhibitor molecule, partly shielded by the 60-insertion loop of human alpha-thrombin, is contacting the enzyme "aryl-binding site". PMID:8637015

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha polymorphisms and postprandial lipemia in healthy men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that plays a key role in lipid and glucose homeostasis. This study evaluated whether variants of PPARA are associated with postprandial lipemia. Subjects were given a single fat load comprised of 60% ...

  20. Activation of AMPK alpha and gamma-isoform complexes in the intact ischemic rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in modulating cellular metabolic processes. AMPK, a serine-threonine kinase, is a heterotrimeric complex of catalytic alpha-subunits and regulatory beta- and gamma-subunits with multiple isoforms. Mutations in the cardiac gamma(2)-isoform have bee...

  1. Structural basis of UDP-galactose binding by alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase (alpha3GT): role of negative charge on aspartic acid 316 in structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Tumbale, Percy; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K Ravi

    2008-08-19

    alpha-1,3-Galactosyltransferase (alpha3GT) catalyzes the transfer of galactose from UDP-galactose to form an alpha 1-3 link with beta-linked galactosides; it is part of a family of homologous retaining glycosyltransferases that includes the histo-blood group A and B glycosyltransferases, Forssman glycolipid synthase, iGb3 synthase, and some uncharacterized prokaryotic glycosyltransferases. In mammals, the presence or absence of active forms of these enzymes results in antigenic differences between individuals and species that modulate the interplay between the immune system and pathogens. The catalytic mechanism of alpha3GT is controversial, but the structure of an enzyme complex with the donor substrate could illuminate both this and the basis of donor substrate specificity. We report here the structure of the complex of a low-activity mutant alpha3GT with UDP-galactose (UDP-gal) exhibiting a bent configuration stabilized by interactions of the galactose with multiple residues in the enzyme including those in a highly conserved region (His315 to Ser318). Analysis of the properties of mutants containing substitutions for these residues shows that catalytic activity is strongly affected by His315 and Asp316. The negative charge of Asp316 is crucial for catalytic activity, and structural studies of two mutants show that its interaction with Arg202 is needed for an active site structure that facilitates the binding of UDP-gal in a catalytically competent conformation. PMID:18651752

  2. Modular organization and development activity of an Arabidopsis thaliana EF-1 alpha gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Axelos, M; Bardet, C; Atanassova, R; Chaubet, N; Lescure, B

    1993-04-01

    The activity of the Arabidopsis thalana A1 EF-1 alpha gene promoter was analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. The 5' upstream sequence of the A1 gene and several promoter deletions were fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) coding region. Promoter activity was monitored by quantitative and histochemical assays of GUS activity. The results show that the A1 promoter exhibits a modular organization. Sequences both upstream and downstream relative to the transcription initiation site are involved in quantitative and tissue-specific expression during vegetative growth. One upstream element may be involved in the activation of expression in meristematic tissues; the downstream region, corresponding to an intron within the 5' non-coding region (5'IVS), is important for expression in roots; both upstream and downstream sequences are required for expression in leaves, suggesting combinatorial properties of EF-1 alpha cis-regulatory elements. This notion of specific combinatorial regulation is reinforced by the results of transient expression experiments in transfected Arabidopsis protoplasts. The deletion of the 5'IVS has much more effect on expression when the promoter activity is under the control of A1 EF-1 alpha upstream sequences than when these upstream sequences were replaced by the 35S enhancer. Similarly, a synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to an A1 EF-1 alpha upstream cis-acting element (the TEF1 box), is able to restore partially the original activity when fused to a TEF1-less EF1-alpha promoter but has no significant effect when fused to an enhancer-less 35S promoter. PMID:8492811

  3. Stimulation of NSF ATPase activity by alpha-SNAP is required for SNARE complex disassembly and exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R J; Morgan, A; Burgoyne, R D

    1997-11-17

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and alpha-SNAP play key roles in vesicular traffic through the secretory pathway. In this study, NH2- and COOH-terminal truncation mutants of alpha-SNAP were assayed for ability to bind NSF and stimulate its ATPase activity. Deletion of up to 160 NH2-terminal amino acids had little effect on the ability of alpha-SNAP to stimulate the ATPase activity of NSF. However, deletion of as few as 10 COOH-terminal amino acids resulted in a marked decrease. Both NH2-terminal (1-160) and COOH-terminal (160-295) fragments of alpha-SNAP were able to bind to NSF, suggesting that alpha-SNAP contains distinct NH2- and COOH-terminal binding sites for NSF. Sequence alignment of known SNAPs revealed only leucine 294 to be conserved in the final 10 amino acids of alpha-SNAP. Mutation of leucine 294 to alanine (alpha-SNAP(L294A)) resulted in a decrease in the ability to stimulate NSF ATPase activity but had no effect on the ability of this mutant to bind NSF. alpha-SNAP (1-285) and alpha-SNAP (L294A) were unable to stimulate Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in permeabilized chromaffin cells. In addition, alpha-SNAP (1-285), and alpha-SNAP (L294A) were able to inhibit the stimulation of exocytosis by exogenous alpha-SNAP. alpha-SNAP, alpha-SNAP (1-285), and alpha-SNAP (L294A) were all able to become incorporated into a 20S complex and recruit NSF. In the presence of MgATP, alpha-SNAP (1-285) and alpha-SNAP (L294A) were unable to fully disassemble the 20S complex and did not allow vesicle-associated membrane protein dissociation to any greater level than seen in control incubations. These findings imply that alpha-SNAP stimulation of NSF ATPase activity may be required for 20S complex disassembly and for the alpha-SNAP stimulation of exocytosis. PMID:9362506

  4. Clostridium perfringens alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase blood group A2-degrading activity.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsin-Yeh; Smith, Daniel

    2003-04-01

    Enzymic modification of type A(2) erythrocyte membranes with Clostridium perfringens alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was investigated. An ELISA demonstrated hydrolysis of type A(2) epitopes under conditions of red-blood-cell collection and storage. The enzyme hydrolysed the terminal N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine from the blood type A(2) antigen, producing H antigen, blood group O, which is universally compatible in the ABO system. The enzyme was active in common red-cell preservative solutions at pH 6.4-7.0, at 4 degrees C, at ionic strengths found in stored red cell units and in the presence of type A plasma. These data imply that the C. perfringens alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase might be added directly to packed A(2) red-blood-cell units for enzymic conversion to blood type O. Further studies are warranted. PMID:12630904

  5. Structure-activity relationships of alpha-conotoxins targeting neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Millard, Emma L; Daly, Norelle L; Craik, David J

    2004-06-01

    alpha-Conotoxins that target the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor have a range of potential therapeutic applications and are valuable probes for examining receptor subtype selectivity. The three-dimensional structures of about half of the known neuronal specific alpha-conotoxins have now been determined and have a consensus fold containing a helical region braced by two conserved disulfide bonds. These disulfide bonds define the two-loop framework characteristic for alpha-conotoxins, CCX(m)CX(n)C, where loop 1 comprises four residues (m = 4) and loop 2 between three and seven residues (n = 3, 6 or 7). Structural studies, particularly using NMR spectroscopy have provided an insight into the role and spatial location of residues implicated in receptor binding and biological activity. PMID:15182347

  6. Mindfulness-of-breathing exercise modulates EEG alpha activity during cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Bing-Canar, Hanaan; Pizzuto, Jacquelyne; Compton, Rebecca J

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated whether engaging in a mindful breathing exercise would affect EEG oscillatory activity associated with self-monitoring processes, based on the notion that mindfulness enhances attentional awareness. Participants were assigned to either an audio exercise in mindful breathing or an audio control condition, and then completed a Stroop task while EEG was recorded. The primary EEG measure of interest was error-related alpha suppression (ERAS), an index of self-monitoring in which alpha power is reduced, suggesting mental engagement, following errors compared to correct responses. Participants in the mindful-breathing condition showed increased alpha power during the listening exercise and enhanced ERAS during the subsequent Stroop task. These results indicate enhanced error-monitoring among those in the mindful-breathing group. PMID:27245493

  7. Synergistic activation of NF-kappaB by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Jono, Hirofumi; Han, Jiahuai; Lim, David J; Li, Jian-Dong

    2004-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important human pathogen causing otitis media in children and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. Like most other bacterial infections, NTHi infections are also characterized by inflammation, which is mainly mediated by cytokines and chemokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Among a variety of transcription regulators, NF-kappaB has been shown to play a critical role in regulating the expression of large numbers of genes encoding inflammatory mediators. In review of the current studies on NF-kappaB regulation, most of them have focused on investigating how NF-kappaB is activated by a single inducer at a time. However, in bacteria-induced inflammation in vivo, multiple inducers including both exogenous and endogenous mediators are present simultaneously. A key issue that has yet to be addressed is whether the exogenous inducers such as NTHi and the endogenous factors such as TNF-alpha activate NF-kappaB in a synergistic manner. We show that NTHi and TNF-alpha, when present together, synergistically induce NF-kappaB activation via two distinct signaling pathways: NF-kappaB translocation-dependent and -independent pathways. The NF-kappaB translocation-dependent pathway involves NF-kappaB-inducing kinase-IkappaB kinase beta/gamma-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, whereas the NF-kappaB translocation-independent pathway involves mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase kinase 1-dependent activation of MAPK kinase 3/6-p38 MAPK pathway. In addition, the same signaling pathways are also involved in synergistic induction of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-8. These studies should deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the combinatorial regulation of inflammation and lead to development of therapeutic strategies for NTHi-induced infections. PMID:14993593

  8. Interaction of disintegrins with the alpha IIb beta 3 receptor on resting and activated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    McLane, M A; Kowalska, M A; Silver, L; Shattil, S J; Niewiarowski, S

    1994-01-01

    Viper venom disintegrins contain the RGD/KGD motif. They inhibit platelet aggregation and cell adhesion, but show structural and functional heterogeneity. We investigated the interaction of four prototypic disintegrins with alpha IIb beta 3 expressed on the surface of resting and activated platelets. The binding affinity (Kd) of 125I-albolabrin, 125I-echistatin, 125I-bitistatin and 125I-eristostatin toward resting platelets was 294, 153, 48 and 18 nM respectively. The Kd value for albolabrin decreased 3-fold and 6-fold after ADP- or thrombin-induced activation. The Kd values for bitistatin and echistatin also decreased with ADP, but there was no further decrease with thrombin. In contrast, eristostatin bound with the same high affinity to resting and activated platelets. The pattern of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-eristostatin and FITC-albolabrin binding to resting and activated platelets was consistent with observations using radiolabelled material. Eristostatin showed faster and more irreversible binding to platelets, and greater potency compared with albolabrin in inducing conformational neo-epitopes in beta 3. The anti-alpha IIb beta 3 monoclonal antibody OP-G2 that is RGD-dependent inhibited disintegrin binding to activated platelets more strongly than binding to resting platelets and it inhibited the binding to platelets of albolabrin more strongly than eristostatin. The specificity of disintegrin interaction with alpha IIb beta 3 was confirmed by demonstrating cross-linking of these peptides to alpha IIb beta 3 on normal platelets, but not to thrombasthenic platelets deficient in alpha IIb beta 3. Images Figure 6 PMID:8042985

  9. Type III interferon (IFN-lambda) antagonizes the antiviral activity of interferon-alpha in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bordi, L; Lalle, E; Lapa, D; Caglioti, C; Quartu, S; Capobianchi, M R; Castilletti, C

    2013-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-lambda) are the most recently discovered members of IFN family. Synergism between different IFN types is well established, but for type I and type III IFNs no conclusive evidence has been reported so far. Possible synergism/antagonism between IFN-alpha and IFN-lambda in the inhibition of virus replication (EMCV, WNV lineage 1 and 2, CHIKV and HSV-1), and in the activation of intracellular pathways of IFN response (MxA and 2'-5' OAS) was evaluated in different cell lines (Vero E6, A549 and Wish cells). The antiviral potency of IFN-lambda1 and -l2 was lower than that of IFN-alpha. When IFN-alpha and -lambda were used together, the Combination Index (CI) for virus inhibition was greater than 1 virtually for all virus/host cell systems, indicating antagonistic effect. Antagonism between IFN-alpha and -l was also observed for the induction of mRNA for both MxA and 2'-5'OAS. Elucidating the interplay between IFN-alpha and -lambda may help to better understand innate defence mechanisms against viral infections, including the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence of IL-28B polymorphisms in the response to HCV and other viral infections. PMID:24382181

  10. Alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression Upregulates Fibroblast Contractile Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Boris; Celetta, Giuseppe; Tomasek, James J.; Gabbiani, Giulio; Chaponnier, Christine

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate whether α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) plays a role in fibroblast contractility, we first compared the contractile activity of rat subcutaneous fibroblasts (SCFs), expressing low levels of α-SMA, with that of lung fibroblasts (LFs), expressing high levels of α-SMA, with the use of silicone substrates of different stiffness degrees. On medium stiffness substrates the percentage of cells producing wrinkles was similar to that of α-SMA–positive cells in each fibroblast population. On high stiffness substrates, wrinkle production was limited to a subpopulation of LFs very positive for α-SMA. In a second approach, we measured the isotonic contraction of SCF- and LF-populated attached collagen lattices. SCFs exhibited 41% diameter reduction compared with 63% by LFs. TGFβ1 increased α-SMA expression and lattice contraction by SCFs to the levels of LFs; TGFβ-antagonizing agents reduced α-SMA expression and lattice contraction by LFs to the level of SCFs. Finally, 3T3 fibroblasts transiently or permanently transfected with α-SMA cDNA exhibited a significantly higher lattice contraction compared with wild-type 3T3 fibroblasts or to fibroblasts transfected with α-cardiac and β- or γ-cytoplasmic actin. This took place in the absence of any change in smooth muscle or nonmuscle myosin heavy-chain expression. Our results indicate that an increased α-SMA expression is sufficient to enhance fibroblast contractile activity. PMID:11553712

  11. Dual effects of alpha-arbutin on monophenolase and diphenolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Wu, Yang; Liu, Youting; Chen, Yiming; Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of α-arbutin on the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase were investigated. The results showed that α-arbutin inhibited monophenolase activity but it activated diphenolase activity. For monophenolase activity, IC50 value was 4.5 mmol · L(-1) and 4.18 mmol · L(-1) of α-arbutin could extend the lag time from 40.5 s to 167.3 s. Alpha- arbutin is proposed to be regarded as a triphenolic substrate by the enzyme during catalyzation, leading to the suicide inactivation of the active site of tyrosinase. For diphenolase activity, α-arbutin acted as an activator and its activation mechanism was mixed type activation. To reveal such activation, it should be mainly refered to the conformational changes in tyrosinase caused by the interaction of α-arbutin with residues located at the entrance to the active site, and the decrease of the effect of suicide inactivation. PMID:25303458

  12. Quantification of different human alpha interferon subtypes and pegylated interferon activities by measuring MxA promoter activation.

    PubMed

    François, Catherine; Bernard, Isabelle; Castelain, Sandrine; Charleston, Bryan; Fray, Martin D; Capiod, Jean-Claude; Duverlie, Gilles

    2005-09-01

    Alpha interferons (alpha-IFNs) are potent biologically active proteins synthesized and secreted by somatic cells during viral infection. Quantification of alpha-IFN concentrations in biological samples is used for diagnosis. More recently, recombinant IFNs have been used as antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory therapeutic agents, and particularly for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. For this purpose, IFN has recently been coupled to polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve the pharmacokinetic properties. The measure of alpha-IFN in biological samples from treated patients could be useful to ensure compliance to therapy and the true IFN activity in relation to viral decay during follow-up. In particular, it could be used to monitor the PEG-IFN concentration in patients treated for hepatitis C virus infection. The most frequently used test is a bioassay based on the antiviral property of the IFN, but the assay is not highly reproducible. Here, we present a reporter test based on MxA promoter activation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression (Mx-CAT). MxA is an antiviral protein induced and tightly regulated by alpha-IFN. The Mx-CAT assay showed good reproducibility of 15% and was suitable to quantify PEG-IFN and numerous other alpha-IFN subtypes as well, despite a differential MxA promoter activation in relation with the subtype. A good correlation was obtained with the reporter assay and a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on samples from treated patients. This test could be useful for monitoring IFN therapy of chronically infected hepatitis C virus-infected patients treated with the standard IFN, PEG-IFN, and probably forthcoming recombinant IFNs. PMID:16127052

  13. General Subject 1. Report to ICUMSA on the determination of commercial alpha-amylase activity by a spectrophotometric method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A report is given on a new industrial method for the determination of the activity or strength of commercial alpha-amylase at a sugarcane factory or refinery, as well as a recommendation. At the present time, the activities or strengths of commercial alpha-amylases cannot be directly compared becau...

  14. Determination of airborne cadmium in environmental tobacco smoke by instrumental neutron activation analysis with a compton suppression system.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Larson, S; Wu, D

    1993-06-01

    Concentrations of cadmium, a toxic trace element, were measured in the indoor air of several public places where environmental tobacco smoke was present. Particulate-phase cadmium concentrations were determined by analyzing air filter samples using epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis in conjunction with a Compton suppression gamma-ray detection system, in which the detection limit for cadmium was reduced to a few nanograms per filter. A cascade impactor and a personal filter sampler were used to collect the indoor suspended particulate matter for size-fractionated mass as well as total mass, respectively. Results show that where environmental tobacco smoke is present, cadmium concentrations are significantly higher than background and that about 80% of the cadmium found in indoor airborne particulate matter is associated with particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 1.8 microns. In one instance, airborne cadmium concentrations in a music club were found to be 38 ng/m, which is at least 30 times higher than background. PMID:8328669

  15. Delineating and Defining the Boundaries of an Active Landslide in the Rainforest of Puerto Rico Using a Combination of Airborne and Terrestrial LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Joyce, J.; Phillips, D. A.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.

    2013-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is a remote sensing technique that uses light, often using pulses from a laser to measure the distance to a target. Both terrestrial and airborne based LIDAR techniques have been frequently used to map landslides. Airborne LIDAR has the advantage of identifying large scarps of landslides covered by tree canopies and is widely applied in identifying historical and current active landslides hidden in forested areas. However, because landslides naturally have relatively small vertical surface deformation in the foot area, it is practically difficult to identify the margins of landslide foot area with the limited spatial resolution (few decimeters) of airborne LIDAR. Alternatively, ground-based LIDAR can achieve resolution of several centimeters and also has the advantages of being portable, repeatable, and less costly. Thus ground based LIDAR can be used to identify small deformations in landslide foot areas by differencing repeated Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys. This study demonstrates a method of identifying the superficial boundaries as well as the bottom boundary (sliding plane) of an active landslide in National Rainforest Park, Puerto Rico, USA, using the combination of ground based and airborne LIDAR data. The method of combining terrestrial and airborne LIDAR data can be used to study landslides in other regions. This study indicates that intensity and density of laser point clouds are remarkably useful in identifying superficial boundaries of landslides.

  16. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  17. The activation mechanism of alpha1beta2gamma2S and alpha3beta3gamma2S GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Angelo; Harrison, Neil L

    2010-01-01

    The alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha3beta3gamma2 are two isoforms of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor that are widely distributed in the brain. Both are found at synapses, for example in the thalamus, where they mediate distinctly different inhibitory postsynaptic current profiles, particularly with respect to decay time. The two isoforms were expressed in HEK293 cells, and single-channel activity was recorded from outside-out patches. The kinetic characteristics of both isoforms were investigated by analyzing single-channel currents over a wide range of GABA concentrations. Alpha1beta2gamma2 channels exhibited briefer active periods than alpha3beta3gamma2 channels over the entire range of agonist concentrations and had lower intraburst open probabilities at subsaturating concentrations. Activation mechanisms were constructed by fitting postulated schemes to data recorded at saturating and subsaturating GABA concentrations simultaneously. Reaction mechanisms were ranked according to log-likelihood values and how accurately they simulated ensemble currents. The highest ranked mechanism for both channels consisted of two sequential binding steps, followed by three conducting and three nonconducting configurations. The equilibrium dissociation constant for GABA at alpha3beta3gamma2 channels was approximately 2.6 microM compared with approximately 19 microM for alpha1beta2gamma2 channels, suggesting that GABA binds to the alpha3beta3gamma2 channels with higher affinity. A notable feature of the mechanism was that two consecutive doubly liganded shut states preceded all three open configurations. The lifetime of the third shut state was briefer for the alpha3beta3gamma2 channels. The longer active periods, higher affinity, and preference for conducting states are consistent with the slower decay of inhibitory currents at synapses that contain alpha3beta3gamma2 channels. The reaction mechanism we describe here may also be appropriate for the analysis of other

  18. Impaired coactivator activity of the Gly{sub 482} variant of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) on mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yon-Sik; Hong, Jung-Man; Lim, Sunny; Ko, Kyung Soo; Pak, Youngmi Kim . E-mail: ymkimpak@amc.seoul.kr

    2006-06-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may cause diabetes or insulin resistance. Peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) coactivator-1 {alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) increases mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) resulting in mitochondrial DNA content increase. An association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), G1444A(Gly482Ser), of PGC-1{alpha} coding region and insulin resistance has been reported in some ethnic groups. In this study, we investigated whether a change of glycine to serine at codon 482 of PGC-1{alpha} affected the Tfam promoter activity. The cDNA of PGC-1{alpha} variant bearing either glycine or serine at 482 codon was transfected into Chang human hepatocyte cells. The PGC-1{alpha} protein bearing glycine had impaired coactivator activity on Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase. We analyzed the PGC-1{alpha} genotype G1444A and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number from 229 Korean leukocyte genomic DNAs. Subjects with Gly/Gly had a 20% lower amount of peripheral blood mtDNA than did subjects with Gly/Ser and Ser/Ser (p < 0.05). No correlation was observed between diabetic parameters and PGC-1{alpha} genotypes in Koreans. These results suggest that PGC-1{alpha} variants with Gly/Gly at 482nd amino acid may impair the Tfam transcription, a regulatory function of mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional mtDNA replication.

  19. The use of the long-range alpha detector (LRAD) for alpha emission surveys at active and inactive firing sites

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, C.F.V.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Garner, S.E.; Walter, K.J.

    1994-03-01

    Surveys were carried out at five different firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure residual alpha emissions in earth contaminated with natural and depleted uranium. This contamination is caused by controlled experimental explosions during testing of the non fissile components of nuclear weapons. Two conclusions were reached: the first is that post shot clearing of the experimental areas is effective at removing contamination and the second is that the diminution of alpha emissions due to aging is small.

  20. Fast skeletal muscle troponin I is a co-activator of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yuping; Chen Bin; Chen Jian; Lou Guiyu; Chen Shiuan; Zhou Dujin

    2008-05-16

    ERR{alpha} (estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. To further our understanding of the detailed molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by ERR{alpha}, we searched for ERR{alpha}-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system by screening a human mammary gland cDNA expression library with the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERR{alpha} as the 'bait'. Fast skeletal muscle troponin I (TNNI2), along with several known nuclear receptor co-activators, were isolated. We demonstrated that TNNI2 localizes to the cell nucleus and interacts with ERR{alpha} in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. GST pull-down assays also revealed that TNNI2 interacts directly with ERR{alpha}. Through luciferase reporter gene assays, TNNI2 was found to enhance the transactivity of ERR{alpha}. Combining mutagenesis and yeast two-hybrid assays, we mapped the ERR{alpha}-interacting domain on TNNI2 to a region encompassing amino acids 1-128. These findings reveal a new function for TNNI2 as a co-activator of ERR{alpha}.

  1. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by plasmid expressed alphaMSH peptide.

    PubMed

    Etemad-Moghadam, Bijan; Chen, Hongmin; Yin, Peng; Aziz, Nazneen; Hedley, Mary Lynne

    2002-04-01

    Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (alphaMSH) is a neuroimmunomodulatory peptide with remarkable anti-inflammatory properties. Daily or twice daily administration of the peptide reduces the symptoms of several inflammatory animal disease models and the peptide has demonstrated safety in human trials. Unfortunately, the pharmacokinetics of peptide delivery are not favorable from the pharmaceutical perspective. For this reason, plasmid-based vectors were created that constitutively express the immunomodulatory peptide. The fusion constructs encode the 13 amino acids of alphaMSH in frame with the first domain of serum albumin, separated by a linker and furin cleavage sites. The fusion proteins were expressed and processed in human fetal kidney (293) cells. Supernatant from B16/F10 cells transfected with the constructs stimulated secretion of melanin from melanocytes. Furthermore, transfected cytoskeletal muscle (Sol8) cells secreted bioactive alphaMSH that reduced NF-kappaB-mediated transcriptional activation of a luciferase reporter gene. The activity of these vectors provides tools and the impetus for testing the constructs in several animal models of chronic inflammation. PMID:11960637

  2. Sounds elicit relative left frontal alpha activity in 2-month-old infants

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Xu, Lin; Li, Mingyan; Shao, Jie; Zhao, Zhengyan; Lamm, Connie; Fox, Nathan A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    As one kind of sounds, human voices are important for language acquisition and human-infant relations. Human voices have positive effects on infants, e.g., soothe infants and evoke an infant's smile. Increased left relative to right frontal alpha activity as assessed by the electroencephalogram (EEG) is considered to reflect approach-related emotions. In the present study, we recorded the EEG in thirty-eight 2-month-old infants during a baseline period and then while they listened to sounds, i.e., human voices. Infants displayed increased relative left frontal alpha activity in response to sounds compared to the baseline condition. These results suggest that sounds can elicit relative left frontal activity in young infants, and that this approach-related emotion presents early in life. PMID:25242501

  3. Structural requirements of position A alpha-157 in fibrinogen for the fibrin-induced rate enhancement of the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Schielen, J G; Adams, H P; Voskuilen, M; Tesser, G J; Nieuwenhuizen, W

    1991-01-01

    The sequence fibrinogen-A alpha-(148-160) can mimic part of the fibrin-induced rate enhancement of the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator. Previously we have reported that the lysine residue at position A alpha-157 is crucial. During our further investigations on A alpha-157 we found that lysine at position A alpha-157 may be replaced by glutamic acid. This unexpected finding prompted us to re-investigate the requirements of this position. We prepared analogues of A alpha-(148-160) in which the lysine residue at position A alpha-157 was replaced by lysine derivatives (acetyl-lysine, benzyloxycarbonyl-lysine and methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonyl-lysine), acidic residues (aspartic acid and glutamic acid), basic residues (arginine and ornithine), polar residues (glutamine and methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonylornithine), apolar residues (alanine, valine, norleucine and glutamic acid 4-nitrobenzyl ester) and glycine. These analogues were tested for their stimulatory activity. When aspartic acid, glutamic acid 4-nitrobenzyl ester or norleucine is present at position A alpha-157 in A alpha-(148-160) virtually all stimulatory capacity is lost. With valine at position A alpha-157 the stimulatory activity is marginal. None of the other replacements at position A alpha-157 caused loss of rate-enhancing properties. From these results we conclude that for the rate-enhancing effect of A alpha-(148-160) the side chain of the amino acid residue at position A alpha-157 must fulfill certain requirements: there must be one (as in alanine) or no (as in glycine) carbon atom in the side chain, or at least two carbon atoms and a polar group (charged or uncharged) to which a rather bulky group (such as the benzyloxycarbonyl group) or a polar group (such as the methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonyl group) may be attached. The highest activity [even higher than native A alpha-(148-160)] was obtained with ornithine, methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonylornithine or

  4. Changes in alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase activity in peel and pulp of banana (Musa sp.) fruits during ripening and softening.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jun-Ping; Su, Jing; Li, Xue-Ping; Chen, Wei-Xin

    2007-04-01

    Arabinose is one of the most dynamic cell wall glycosyl residues released during fruit ripening, alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase (alpha-Arab) are major glycosidases that may remove arabinose units from fruit cell wall polysaccharides. To find out whether alpha-Arab plays important roles in banana fruit softening, the enzyme activities in peel and pulp, fruit firmness, respiration rate and ethylene release rate were assayed during banana softening. The results showed that alpha-Arab activities in banana pulp and peel increased slightly at the beginning of storage and reached their maxima when the fruit firmness decreased drastically, alpha-Arab activity increased by more than ten folds in both pulp and peel during ripening and alpha-Arab activities were higher in pulp than in peel. Treatment of banana fruits with ethylene absorbent postponed the time of reaching of its maxima of respiration and ethylene, enhanced the firmness of pup and decreased alpha-Arab activity in the peel and pulp. These results suggest that alpha-Arab induced the decrease of fruit firmness and played an important role in banana fruit softening, and its activity was regulated by ethylene. PMID:17452798

  5. Immunotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate and the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferators, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), are environmentally widespread and persistent and multiple toxicities have been reported in experimental animals and humans. These compounds trigger biological activity via activation of the alpha isotype of pero...

  6. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) in leishmaniasis. II. TNF-alpha-induced macrophage leishmanicidal activity is mediated by nitric oxide from L-arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Li, Y; Millott, S

    1990-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages from CBA mice incubated with recombinant murine tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) are effective in killing the protozoa parasite Leishmania major in vitro. The leishmanicidal activity is directly correlated with the level of nitrite (NO2-) in the culture supernatants. The killing of intracellular parasites can be completely inhibited by L-NG-monomethyl arginine (L-NMMA), a specific inhibitor of the L-arginine:nitric oxide (NO) pathway. The level of NO2-, which is also a measurement of NO production, in the culture supernatant of TNF-alpha-activated macrophages can be progressively decreased to basal level with increasing concentrations of L-NMMA, but not with its D-enantiomer, D-NMMA. These data demonstrate that NO is an important effector mechanism in the TNF-alpha-induced macrophage killing of intracellular protozoa. PMID:2279740

  7. Spatial and temporal relationships of electrocorticographic alpha and gamma activity during auditory processing.

    PubMed

    Potes, Cristhian; Brunner, Peter; Gunduz, Aysegul; Knight, Robert T; Schalk, Gerwin

    2014-08-15

    Neuroimaging approaches have implicated multiple brain sites in musical perception, including the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus and adjacent perisylvian areas. However, the detailed spatial and temporal relationship of neural signals that support auditory processing is largely unknown. In this study, we applied a novel inter-subject analysis approach to electrophysiological signals recorded from the surface of the brain (electrocorticography (ECoG)) in ten human subjects. This approach allowed us to reliably identify those ECoG features that were related to the processing of a complex auditory stimulus (i.e., continuous piece of music) and to investigate their spatial, temporal, and causal relationships. Our results identified stimulus-related modulations in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and high gamma (70-110 Hz) bands at neuroanatomical locations implicated in auditory processing. Specifically, we identified stimulus-related ECoG modulations in the alpha band in areas adjacent to primary auditory cortex, which are known to receive afferent auditory projections from the thalamus (80 of a total of 15,107 tested sites). In contrast, we identified stimulus-related ECoG modulations in the high gamma band not only in areas close to primary auditory cortex but also in other perisylvian areas known to be involved in higher-order auditory processing, and in superior premotor cortex (412/15,107 sites). Across all implicated areas, modulations in the high gamma band preceded those in the alpha band by 280 ms, and activity in the high gamma band causally predicted alpha activity, but not vice versa (Granger causality, p<1e(-8)). Additionally, detailed analyses using Granger causality identified causal relationships of high gamma activity between distinct locations in early auditory pathways within superior temporal gyrus (STG) and posterior STG, between posterior STG and inferior frontal cortex, and between STG and premotor cortex. Evidence suggests that these

  8. Alpha-thujone (the active component of absinthe): gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor modulation and metabolic detoxification.

    PubMed

    Höld, K M; Sirisoma, N S; Ikeda, T; Narahashi, T; Casida, J E

    2000-04-11

    Alpha-thujone is the toxic agent in absinthe, a liqueur popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries that has adverse health effects. It is also the active ingredient of wormwood oil and some other herbal medicines and is reported to have antinociceptive, insecticidal, and anthelmintic activity. This study elucidates the mechanism of alpha-thujone neurotoxicity and identifies its major metabolites and their role in the poisoning process. Four observations establish that alpha-thujone is a modulator of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor. First, the poisoning signs (and their alleviation by diazepam and phenobarbital) in mice are similar to those of the classical antagonist picrotoxinin. Second, a strain of Drosophila specifically resistant to chloride channel blockers is also tolerant to alpha-thujone. Third, alpha-thujone is a competitive inhibitor of [(3)H]ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate binding to mouse brain membranes. Most definitively, GABA-induced peak currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons are suppressed by alpha-thujone with complete reversal after washout. alpha-Thujone is quickly metabolized in vitro by mouse liver microsomes with NADPH (cytochrome P450) forming 7-hydroxy-alpha-thujone as the major product plus five minor ones (4-hydroxy-alpha-thujone, 4-hydroxy-beta-thujone, two other hydroxythujones, and 7,8-dehydro-alpha-thujone), several of which also are detected in the brain of mice treated i.p. with alpha-thujone. The major 7-hydroxy metabolite attains much higher brain levels than alpha-thujone but is less toxic to mice and Drosophila and less potent in the binding assay. The other metabolites assayed are also detoxification products. Thus, alpha-thujone in absinthe and herbal medicines is a rapid-acting and readily detoxified modulator of the GABA-gated chloride channel. PMID:10725394

  9. Separation of functional domains for the alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 hydrolytic activities of a Bacillus amylopullulanase by limited proteolysis with papain.

    PubMed

    Ara, K; Igarashi, K; Hagihara, H; Sawada, K; Kobayashi, T; Ito, S

    1996-04-01

    An amylopullulanase (APase) from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. KSM-1378 hydrolyzes both alpha-1,6 linkages in pullulan and alpha-1,4 linkages in other polysaccharides, each maximally active at an alkaline pH, to generate oligosaccharides. We analyzed proteolytic fragments that were produced by exposing pure APase to various proteases, to identify its catalytic domain(s). The intact, pure 210-kDa APase was partially digested with papain for a short time, yielding simultaneously two smaller non-overlapping active fragments, designated amylose-hydrolyzing fragment (AHF114, 114 kDa) and pullulan-hydrolyzing fragment (PHF102, 102 kda). The two truncated protein fragments, each containing a single catalytic domain, were purified to homogeneity. The purified AHF114 and PHF102 had similar enzymatic properties to the amylase and pullulanase activities, respectively, of intact APase. The partial amino-terminal sequences of APase and AHF114 were both Glu-Thr-Gly-Asp-Lys-Arg-Ile-Glu-Phe-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Arg-Pro and that of PHF102 was Thr-Val-Pro-Leu-Ala-Leu-Val-Ser-Gly-Glu-Val-Leu-Ser-Asp-Lsy-Leu. These results were direct evidence that the alpha-1,6 and alpha-1,4 hydrolytic activities were associated with two different active sites in this novel enzyme. Our alkaline APase is obviously a "biheaded enzyme". PMID:8829530

  10. Phase I Rinal Report: Ultra-Low Background Alpha Activity Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, W.K.

    2005-07-22

    signal processor we easily distinguish between these two risetimes and thereby count only alpha particles emitted by the sample. Alpha particles emitted from the sample tray are absorbed in the rear of the sample, so the tray's emissivity does not contribute to the background either. Extensions of the method to the counter's sidewalls similarly allow us to reject alpha particles emitted from the sidewalls. We can thus able obtain background rates over a factor of 1000 lower than in conventional instruments without active background rejection. Extending this principle to count at the 0.00001 alpha/cm{sup 2}/hour, level encounters difficulties because there will typically be only 2.4 alpha particles per square meter per day. Since about 6 counts are required to measure activity at the 95% confidence level, large sample areas are required to make measurements in reasonable times. Unfortunately, increasing the counter's anode area to a square meter raises its capacitance so much that the preamplifier noise levels swamp the alpha particle signals and make counting impossible. In this SBIR we worked to solve this dilemma by segmenting the single large area electrode into several smaller, lower capacitance electrodes that could still detect the alpha particles reliably. Each electrode would have its own electronic and we would capture signals from all of them in coincidence (since an alpha track might well deposit charge on more than one electrode), a technique in which XIA is experienced. Therefore, in Phase I we worked to show proof of principle by subdividing our original 1,800 cm{sup 2} electrode into 4 square segments, each 625 cm{sup 2} and demonstrating that signal noise on individual channels reduced as expected. Because the Phase II counter with a 1 m{sup 2} segmented anode would require 16 segments plus a segmented guard as well, we also designed low cost signal processing electronics to instrument it in Phase II. Our Phase I effort met our major proof of principle

  11. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Pamela K.; Woods, Courtney G.; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-03-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

  12. A comparative study of the activation of protein kinase C alpha by different diacylglycerol isomers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Piñera, P; Micol, V; Corbalán-García, S; Gómez-Fernández, J C

    1999-02-01

    The lipid activation of protein kinase C alpha (PKC alpha) has been studied by comparing the activation capacity of different 1, 2-diacylglycerols and 1,3-diacylglycerols incorporated into mixed micelles or vesicles. Unsaturated 1,2-diacylglycerols were, in general, more potent activators than saturated ones when 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (POPS)/Triton X-100 mixed micelles and pure POPS vesicles were used. In contrast, these differences were not observed when 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/POPS (4:1, molar ratio) vesicles were used. Diacylglycerols bearing short fatty acyl chains showed a very high activation capacity, however, the capacity was less in mixed micelles. Furthermore, 1, 2-diacylglycerols had a considerably higher activating capacity than 1,3-diacylglycerols in POPS/Triton X-100 mixed micelles and in POPC/POPS vesicles. However, the differences between the two types of diacylglycerols were smaller when pure POPS vesicles were used. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that POPC/POPS membrane samples containing diacylglycerols had endothermic transitions in the presence of 200 microM Ca2+ and 5 mM Mg2+. Transitions were not detected when using pure POPS vesicles due to the formation of dehydrated phases as demonstrated by FTIR (Fourier-transform infrared) spectroscopy. PKC alpha binding studies, performed by differential centrifugation in the presence of 200 microM Ca2+ and 5 mM Mg2+, showed that 1,2-sn-dioleoylglycerol (1, 2-DOG) was more effective than 1,3-dioleoylglycerol (1,3-DOG) in promoting binding to POPC/POPS vesicles. However, when pure POPS vesicles were used, PKC alpha was able to bind to membranes containing either 1,2-DOG or 1,3-DOG to the same extent. PMID:9895281

  13. Intercomparison of activity size distributions of thoron progeny by alpha- and gamma-counting methods.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Yu, C C; Tu, K W

    1994-01-01

    It is difficult to calibrate sampling devices using radon or thoron progeny or particles measuring 1-4 nm; therefore, an interlaboratory comparison is important to verify the performance of graded diffusion batteries for the activity size distributions of the "unattached" progeny. This paper describes the results of an interlaboratory comparison of 220Rn progeny size distributions using graded diffusion batteries by alpha- and gamma-counting methods with different data inversion schemes. Graded diffusion batteries designed at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute and at the Environmental Measurement Laboratory were used in the study. Screens and backup filters from the Environmental Measurement Laboratory-graded diffusion batteries were counted simultaneously in alpha counters for total alpha activities, and those of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute-graded diffusion batteries were counted in a gamma detector for gamma activities from 212Pb. Because of the different counting methods and data analysis procedures used, this interlaboratory study of 220Rn progeny allows a more rigorous way of testing instrument performance. 212Pb particles generated in well-controlled environments of oxygen, nitrogen, or oxygen with 1 ppm of nitrogen oxide were measured. In general, good agreement in activity size distributions was obtained from these two methods. Some differences observed in individual size spectra were attributable to the data inversion programs used in each laboratory. When the data were analyzed by the same computer program, most differences disappeared. PMID:8253581

  14. Brain correlates underlying creative thinking: EEG alpha activity in professional vs. novice dancers.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Graif, Barbara; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2009-07-01

    Neuroscientific research on creativity has revealed valuable insights into possible brain correlates underlying this complex mental ability domain. However, most of the studies investigated brain activity during the performance of comparatively simple (verbal) type of tasks and the majority of studies focused on samples of the normal population. In this study we investigate EEG activity in professional dancers (n=15) who have attained a high level of expertise in this domain. This group was compared with a group of novices (n=17) who have only basic experience in dancing and completed no comprehensive training in this field. The EEG was recorded during performance of two different dancing imagery tasks which differed with respect to creative demands. In the first task participants were instructed to mentally perform a dance which should be as unique and original as possible (improvisation dance). In the waltz task they were asked to imagine dancing the waltz, a standard dance which involves a sequence of monotonous steps (lower creative demands). In addition, brain activity was also measured during performance of the Alternative Uses test. We observed evidence that during the generation of alternative uses professional dancers show stronger alpha synchronization in posterior parietal brain regions than novice dancers. During improvisation dance, professional dancers exhibited more right-hemispheric alpha synchronization than the group of novices did, while during imagining dancing the waltz no significant group differences emerged. The findings complement and extend existing findings on the relationship between EEG alpha activity and creative thinking. PMID:19269335

  15. 5-Azacytidine treatment of HA-A melanoma cells induces Sp1 activity and concomitant transforming growth factor alpha expression.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, T H; Paterson, A J; Grant, J H; Meluch, A A; Kudlow, J E

    1992-01-01

    Evidence indicates DNA methylation as a part of the regulatory machinery controlling mammalian gene expression. The human melanoma cell line HA-A expresses low levels of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha). TGF-alpha mRNA accumulated, however, in response to DNA demethylation induced by a nucleoside analog, 5-azacytidine (5-azaC). The importance of DNA methylation in the TGF-alpha promoter region was examined by a transient transfection assay with luciferase reporter plasmids containing a portion of the TGF-alpha promoter. 5-azaC treatment of HA-A cells before the transfection caused a significant increase in the luciferase activity. Since input plasmids were confirmed to remain unmethylated, DNA demethylation of the TGF-alpha promoter itself does not account for the observed increase in TGF-alpha mRNA. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, enhanced formation of protein-TGF-alpha promoter complex was detected in response to 5-azaC treatment. This 5-azaC-induced complex was shown to contain the transcription factor Sp1 by the following criteria: the protein-DNA complex formed on the TGF-alpha promoter contained immunoreactive Sp1; the mobility of the complex in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay was similar to that formed by recombinant Sp1; and DNase I footprinting analysis demonstrated that the 5-azaC-induced complex produced a footprint on the TGF-alpha promoter identical to that of authentic Sp1. These observations suggest that 5-azaC induces TGF-alpha expression by augmenting the Sp1 activity. However, neither the Sp1 mRNA nor its protein was induced by 5-azaC. These results suggest that in HA-A cells, TGF-alpha expression is down-modulated by DNA methylation. In addition, this process may involve the specific regulation of Sp1 activity without altering the amount of the transcription factor. Images PMID:1380648

  16. Scanning L-Band Active Passive (SLAP)—FLIGHT Results from a New Airborne Simulator for Smap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Faulkner, T.; Wu, A.; Patel, H.

    2014-12-01

    1. Introduction and BackgroundThis paper introduces a new NASA airborne instrument, the Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP), which is specially tailored to simulate SMAP. 2. Description of SLAPSLAP has both passive (radiometer) and active (radar) microwave L-band imaging capabilities. The radiometer observes at 1.4 GHz using duplicate front end hardware from the SMAP satellite radiometer. It also includes a duplicate of the digital backend development unit for SMAP, thus the novel Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection and mitigation features and algorithms for SMAP are duplicated with very high fidelity in SLAP. The digital backend provides 4-Stokes polarization capability. The real-aperture radar operates in the 1215-1300 MHz band with quad-pol capability. Radar and radiometer share one antenna via diplexers that are spare units from the Aquarius satellite instrument. 3. Flight ResultsSLAP's initial flights were conducted in Dec 2013 over the eastern shore of Maryland and successfully demonstrated radiometer imaging over 2 full SMAP 36x36 km grid cells at 1km resolution within 3 hrs, easily meeting the SMAP post-launch cal/val airborne mapping requirements. A second flight on the same day also demonstrated SLAP's quick-turn abilities and high-resolution/wide-swath capabilities with 200m resolution across a 1500m swath from 2000 ft AGL. Additional flights were conducted as part of the GPM iPHEX campaign in May, 2014. 4. ConclusionThis paper presents flight data and imagery, as well as details of the radiometer and radar performance and calibration. The paper will also describe the mission performance achievable on the King Air and other platforms.

  17. Alpha-amylase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activity of Marine Green Algae and its Possible Role in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, P. S.; Suthindhiran, K.; Jayasri, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In the continuing search for safe and efficient antidiabetic drug, marine algae become important source which provide several compounds of immense therapeutic potential. Alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and antioxidant compounds are known to manage diabetes and have received much attention recently. In the present study, four green algae (Chaetomorpha aerea, Enteromorpha intestinalis, Chlorodesmis, and Cladophora rupestris) were chosen to evaluate alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitory, and antioxidant activity in vitro. Materials and Methods: The phytochemical constituents of all the extracts were qualitatively determined. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by inhibitory potential of extracts against alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase by spectrophotometric assays. Antioxidant activity was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and nitric oxide scavenging assay. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was carried out to determine the major compound responsible for its antidiabetic action. Results: Among the various extracts screened, chloroform extract of C. aerea (IC50 − 408.9 μg/ml) and methanol extract of Chlorodesmis (IC50 − 147.6 μg/ml) showed effective inhibition against alpha-amylase. The extracts were also evaluated for alpha-glucosidase inhibition, and no observed activity was found. Methanol extract of C. rupestris showed notable free radical scavenging activity (IC50 – 666.3 μg/ml), followed by H2O2 (34%) and nitric oxide (49%). Further, chemical profiling by GC-MS revealed the presence of major bioactive compounds. Phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) and z, z-6,28-heptatriactontadien-2-one were predominantly found in the methanol extract of C. rupestris and chloroform extract of C. aerea. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that the selected algae exhibit notable alpha-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activity. Therefore, characterization of active compounds and its in vivo

  18. Monitoring airborne fungal spores in an experimental indoor environment to evaluate sampling methods and the effects of human activity on air sampling.

    PubMed Central

    Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1993-01-01

    Aerobiological monitoring was conducted in an experimental room to aid in the development of standardized sampling protocols for airborne microorganisms in the indoor environment. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the relative efficiencies of selected sampling methods for the retrieval of airborne fungal spores and to determine the effect of human activity on air sampling. Dry aerosols containing known concentrations of Penicillium chrysogenum spores were generated, and air samples were taken by using Andersen six-stage, Surface Air System, Burkard, and depositional samplers. The Andersen and Burkard samplers retrieved the highest numbers of spores compared with the measurement standard, an aerodynamic particle sizer located inside the room. Data from paired samplers demonstrated that the Andersen sampler had the highest levels of sensitivity and repeatability. With a carpet as the source of P. chrysogenum spores, the effects of human activity (walking or vacuuming near the sampling site) on air sampling were also examined. Air samples were taken under undisturbed conditions and after human activity in the room. Human activity resulted in retrieval of significantly higher concentrations of airborne spores. Surface sampling of the carpet revealed moderate to heavy contamination despite relatively low airborne counts. Therefore, in certain situations, air sampling without concomitant surface sampling may not adequately reflect the level of microbial contamination in indoor environments. PMID:8439150

  19. A role for 5alpha-reductase activity in the development of male homosexuality?

    PubMed

    Alias, A G

    2004-12-01

    Higher body hair with lower mesmorphism ratings were observed in Caucasian homosexual men compared with the general male population, reflecting elevated 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) activity, and higher dihydrotestosterone-to-testosterone (DHT-to-T) ratio, in sharp contrast to 46,XY 5alphaR 2 deficiency subjects, who are often born with ambiguous, or female genitalia, but tend to grow up to be muscular, heterosexual men with very little body hair, or beard. One study also showed them scoring around dull normal IQs. A greater prevalence of liberal body hair growth in men with higher IQs and/or educational levels was also observed in several samples. The exceptions to this statistical trend are too unsettling, however. Nevertheless, the results of a number of published studies, including one showing higher DHT-to-T ratio in homosexual men, done with different objectives over a span of 80 years, together strongly support these findings. Furthermore, in an animal model, "cognitive-enhancing effects" of "5alpha-reduced androgen [metabolites]" were recently demonstrated. PMID:15677419

  20. Discovery of an Oxybenzylglycine Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Alpha Selective

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Kennedy, L; Shi, Y; Tao, S; Ye, X; Chen, S; Wang, Y; Hernandez, A; Wang, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    An 1,3-oxybenzylglycine based compound 2 (BMS-687453) was discovered to be a potent and selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, with an EC{sub 50} of 10 nM for human PPAR{alpha} and {approx}410-fold selectivity vs human PPAR{gamma} in PPAR-GAL4 transactivation assays. Similar potencies and selectivity were also observed in the full length receptor co-transfection assays. Compound 2 has negligible cross-reactivity against a panel of human nuclear hormone receptors including PPAR{delta}. Compound 2 demonstrated an excellent pharmacological and safety profile in preclinical studies and thus was chosen as a development candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The X-ray cocrystal structures of the early lead compound 12 and compound 2 in complex with PPAR{alpha} ligand binding domain (LBD) were determined. The role of the crystal structure of compound 12 with PPAR{alpha} in the development of the SAR that ultimately resulted in the discovery of compound 2 is discussed.

  1. Structural Basis for Iloprost as a Dual Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor [alpha/delta] Agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Lihua; Lin, Shengchen; Rong, Hui; Zheng, Songyang; Jin, Shikan; Wang, Rui; Li, Yong

    2012-03-15

    Iloprost is a prostacyclin analog that has been used to treat many vascular conditions. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors with various important biological effects such as metabolic and cardiovascular physiology. Here, we report the crystal structures of the PPAR{alpha} ligand-binding domain and PPAR{delta} ligand-binding domain bound to iloprost, thus providing unambiguous evidence for the direct interaction between iloprost and PPARs and a structural basis for the recognition of PPAR{alpha}/{delta} by this prostacyclin analog. In addition to conserved contacts for all PPAR{alpha} ligands, iloprost also initiates several specific interactions with PPARs using its unique structural groups. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal strong functional correlations of the iloprost-PPAR{alpha}/{delta} interactions as well as the molecular basis of PPAR subtype selectivity toward iloprost ligand. As such, the structural mechanism may provide a more rational template for designing novel compounds targeting PPARs with more favorable pharmacologic impact based on existing iloprost drugs.

  2. Rational design of alpha-conotoxin analogues targeting alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: improved antagonistic activity by incorporation of proline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Armishaw, Christopher; Jensen, Anders A; Balle, Thomas; Clark, Richard J; Harpsøe, Kasper; Skonberg, Christian; Liljefors, Tommy; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2009-04-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that belong to the superfamily of Cys loop receptors. Valuable insight into the orthosteric ligand binding to nAChRs in recent years has been obtained from the crystal structures of acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) that share significant sequence homology with the amino-terminal domains of the nAChRs. alpha-Conotoxins, which are isolated from the venom of carnivorous marine snails, selectively inhibit the signaling of neuronal nAChR subtypes. Co-crystal structures of alpha-conotoxins in complex with AChBP show that the side chain of a highly conserved proline residue in these toxins is oriented toward the hydrophobic binding pocket in the AChBP but does not have direct interactions with this pocket. In this study, we have designed and synthesized analogues of alpha-conotoxins ImI and PnIA[A10L], by introducing a range of substituents on the Pro(6) residue in these toxins to probe the importance of this residue for their binding to the nAChRs. Pharmacological characterization of the toxin analogues at the alpha(7) nAChR shows that although polar and charged groups on Pro(6) result in analogues with significantly reduced antagonistic activities, analogues with aromatic and hydrophobic substituents in the Pro(6) position exhibit moderate activity at the receptor. Interestingly, introduction of a 5-(R)-phenyl substituent at Pro(6) in alpha-conotoxin ImI gives rise to a conotoxin analogue with a significantly higher binding affinity and antagonistic activity at the alpha(7) nAChR than those exhibited by the native conotoxin. PMID:19131337

  3. Dissociation of TNF-alpha cytotoxic and proinflammatory activities by p55 receptor- and p75 receptor-selective TNF-alpha mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, J A; Smith, W B; Gamble, J R; Van Ostade, X; Vandenabeele, P; Tavernier, J; Fiers, W; Vadas, M A; Lopez, A F

    1994-01-01

    Human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a pleiotropic cytokine capable of killing mammalian tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and of enhancing the proinflammatory activity of leucocytes and endothelium, the latter effects limiting its usage as an antitumour agent in humans. Using TNF-alpha mutants with a selective capacity to bind to the TNF p55 receptor (TNFR55) or to the p75 receptor (TNFR75) we show here that these two major activities of TNF-alpha can be dissociated. The TNFR55-selective mutants (R32W, E146K and R32W-S86T) which bind poorly to TNFR75 displayed similar potency to wild-type TNF in causing cytotoxicity of a human laryngeal carcinoma-derived cell line (HEp-2) and cytostasis in a human leukaemic cell line (U937). However, these TNFR55-selective mutants exhibited lower proinflammatory activity than wild-type TNF. Specifically, TNF-alpha's priming of human neutrophils for superoxide production and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, platelet-activating factor synthesis and adhesion to endothelium were reduced by up to 170-fold. Activation of human endothelial cell functions represented by human umbilical venular endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesiveness for neutrophils, E-selectin expression, neutrophil transmigration and IL-8 secretion were also reduced by up to 280-fold. On the other hand, D143F, a TNFR75-selective mutant tested either alone or in combination with TNFR55-selective mutants, did not stimulate these activities despite being able to cause cytokine production in TNFR75-transfected PC60 cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7509279

  4. alpha 2-adrenoreceptors profile modulation. 2. Biphenyline analogues as tools for selective activation of the alpha 2C-subtype.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Francesco; Ghelfi, Francesca; Giannella, Mario; Piergentili, Alessandro; Pigini, Maria; Quaglia, Wilma; Vesprini, Cristian; Crassous, Pierre-Antoine; Paris, Hervé; Carrieri, Antonio

    2004-12-01

    A series of derivatives structurally related to biphenyline (3) was designed with the aim to modulate selectivity toward the alpha(2)-AR subtypes. The results obtained demonstrated that the presence of a correctly oriented function with positive electronic effect (+sigma) in portion X of the ligands is an important factor for significant alpha(2C)-subtype selectivity (imidazolines 5, 13, 16, and 19). Homology modeling and docking studies support experimental data and highlight the crucial role for the hydrogen bond between the pyridine nitrogen in position 3 of 5 and the NH-indole ring of Trp6.48, which is favorably oriented in the alpha(2C)-subtype, only. PMID:15566287

  5. Characterization of Tank 48H Samples for Alpha Activity and Actinide Isotopics

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Coleman, C.J.; Hay, M.S.

    1995-12-04

    This document reports the total alpha activity and actinide isotopic results for samples taken from Tank 48H prior to the addition of sodium tetraphenylborate and MST in Batch {number_sign}1 of the ITP process. This information used to determine the quantity of MST for Batch {number_sign}1 of the ITP process and the total actinide content in the tank for dose calculations.

  6. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors in patients on active surveillance: do the benefits outweigh the risk?

    PubMed

    Al Edwan, Ghazi; Fleshner, Neil

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a slow, progressive disease. Prostate specific antigen testing, screening, and aggressive case identification has made PCa the most frequently diagnosed cancer. Concerns regarding overdiagnosis and overtreatment flourish on a large scale. In order to avoid overtreatment for those in whom therapeutic intervention is not required, active surveillance for eligible patients with the use of 5-alpha reductase can be considered a safe and a promising approach to delay the progression of the disease with minimal side effects. PMID:23579402

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of antiinflammatory activities of a series of corticosteroid 17 alpha-esters containing a functional group.

    PubMed

    Ueno, H; Maruyama, A; Miyake, M; Nakao, E; Nakao, K; Umezu, K; Nitta, I

    1991-08-01

    A series of 21-desoxy-21-chlorocorticosteroids that contain a functionalized ester group at 17 alpha has been prepared and examined to separate their systemic activity from topical antiinflammatory activity. Introduction of the functionalized ester group at 17 alpha was carried out by an acid-catalyzed formation of cyclic ortho esters with 17 alpha,21-hydroxyl groups of corticosteroids and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis. As for the functional group, chloro, methoxy, acetoxy, cyano, cyclopropyl, or alkoxycarbonyl group was introduced at the terminal carbon atom of the 17 alpha-alkanoate group. The topical antiinflammatory activity and systemic activity of these compounds were examined and found to be significantly dependent on the functionalities in the 17 alpha-esters. Among these derivatives, a series of 17 alpha-(alkoxycarbonyl)alkanoates (17 alpha-OCO(CH2)nCOOR) showed an excellent separation of the systemic activity from topical activity. The effects of the number of methylene groups (n) and of the alkyl groups of the ester (R) on either topical or systemic activity of the corticosteroid derivatives were also investigated. PMID:1875343

  8. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  9. New evidence of similarity between human and plant steroid metabolism: 5alpha-reductase activity in Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Fabiana; Danza, Giovanna; Guarna, Antonio; Cini, Nicoletta; Racchi, Milvia Luisa; Serio, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of steroid hormones in humans is well known, and the metabolic pathway and mechanisms of action are almost completely elucidated. The role of plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids, is less known, but an increasing amount of data on brassinosteroid biosynthesis is showing unexpected similarities between human and plant steroid metabolic pathways. Here we focus our attention on the enzyme 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) for which a plant ortholog of the mammalian system, DET2, was recently described in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that campestenone, the natural substrate of DET2, is reduced to 5alpha-campestanone by both human 5alphaR isozymes but with different affinities. Solanum malacoxylon, which is a calcinogenic plant very active in the biosynthesis of vitamin D-like molecules and sterols, was used to study 5alphaR activity. Leaves and calli were chosen as examples of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues, respectively. Two separate 5alphaR activities were found in calli and leaves of Solanum using campestenone as substrate. The use of progesterone allowed the detection of both activities in calli. Support for the existence of two 5alphaR isozymes in S. malacoxylon was provided by the differential actions of inhibitors of the human 5alphaR in calli and leaves. The evidence for the presence of two isozymes in different plant tissues extends the analogies between plant and mammalian steroid metabolic pathways. PMID:12488348

  10. Deficiency in Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform genes alters spatial learning, motor activity, and anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Amy E; Williams, Michael T; Schaefer, Tori L; Bohanan, Cynthia S; Neumann, Jon C; Behbehani, Michael M; Vorhees, Charles V; Lingrel, Jerry B

    2007-01-17

    Several disorders have been associated with mutations in Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, familial hemiplegic migraine type-2), as well as reduction in Na,K-ATPase content (depression and Alzheimer's disease), thereby raising the issue of whether haploinsufficiency or altered enzymatic function contribute to disease etiology. Three isoforms are expressed in the brain: the alpha1 isoform is found in many cell types, the alpha2 isoform is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, and the alpha3 isoform is exclusively expressed in neurons. Here we show that mice heterozygous for the alpha2 isoform display increased anxiety-related behavior, reduced locomotor activity, and impaired spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Mice heterozygous for the alpha3 isoform displayed spatial learning and memory deficits unrelated to differences in cued learning in the Morris maze, increased locomotor activity, an increased locomotor response to methamphetamine, and a 40% reduction in hippocampal NMDA receptor expression. In contrast, heterozygous alpha1 isoform mice showed increased locomotor response to methamphetamine and increased basal and stimulated corticosterone in plasma. The learning and memory deficits observed in the alpha2 and alpha3 heterozygous mice reveal the Na,K-ATPase to be an important factor in the functioning of pathways associated with spatial learning. The neurobehavioral changes seen in heterozygous mice suggest that these mouse models may be useful in future investigations of the associated human CNS disorders. PMID:17234593

  11. Correlation between phosphatidylinositol labeling and contraction in rabbit aorta: effect of alpha-1 adrenergic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Uc, M.; Hong, E.; Garcia-Sainz, J.A.

    1982-07-01

    Activation of rabbit aortic strips with alpha adrenergic agonists increased the labeling (with (/sup 32/P)Pi) of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidic acid and contracted the vascular preparations in dose-related fashion. Epinephrine, norepinephrine and methoxamine produced maximal effects, whereas clonidine behaved as partial agonist and B-HT 933 (2-amino-6-ethyl-4,5,7,8-tetrahydro-6H-oxazole-(5,4-d) azepin dihydrochloride) was almost without activity in the two experimental models used. Phenylephrine was a full agonist in producing contraction, but failed to elicit the maximal increase in PI labeling. The EC50 values to produce contraction of aortic strips were lower for all agonists than those required to increase the incorporation of radioactive phosphate into PI, but there was a good correlation between the two sets of data. The increased PI labeling and contraction of aortic strips induced by epinephrine were antagonized by prazosin and yohimbine in dose-related fashion, but the first alpha blocker was about three orders of magnitude more potent than the second in antagonizing the two effects. The present results indicate that both stimulation of PI labeling and contraction are mediated through activation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors in rabbit aorta.

  12. Sight restoration after congenital blindness does not reinstate alpha oscillatory activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Davide; Troje, Nikolaus F; Ley, Pia; Hense, Marlene; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Röder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain development is characterized by sensitive periods during which experience must be available to allow for the full development of neural circuits and associated behavior. Yet, only few neural markers of sensitive period plasticity in humans are known. Here we employed electroencephalographic recordings in a unique sample of twelve humans who had been blind from birth and regained sight through cataract surgery between four months and 16 years of age. Two additional control groups were tested: a group of visually impaired individuals without a history of total congenital blindness and a group of typically sighted individuals. The EEG was recorded while participants performed a visual discrimination task involving intact and scrambled biological motion stimuli. Posterior alpha and theta oscillations were evaluated. The three groups showed indistinguishable behavioral performance and in all groups evoked theta activity varied with biological motion processing. By contrast, alpha oscillatory activity was significantly reduced only in individuals with a history of congenital cataracts. These data document on the one hand brain mechanisms of functional recovery (related to theta oscillations) and on the other hand, for the first time, a sensitive period for the development of alpha oscillatory activity in humans. PMID:27080158

  13. Sight restoration after congenital blindness does not reinstate alpha oscillatory activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bottari, Davide; Troje, Nikolaus F.; Ley, Pia; Hense, Marlene; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Röder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain development is characterized by sensitive periods during which experience must be available to allow for the full development of neural circuits and associated behavior. Yet, only few neural markers of sensitive period plasticity in humans are known. Here we employed electroencephalographic recordings in a unique sample of twelve humans who had been blind from birth and regained sight through cataract surgery between four months and 16 years of age. Two additional control groups were tested: a group of visually impaired individuals without a history of total congenital blindness and a group of typically sighted individuals. The EEG was recorded while participants performed a visual discrimination task involving intact and scrambled biological motion stimuli. Posterior alpha and theta oscillations were evaluated. The three groups showed indistinguishable behavioral performance and in all groups evoked theta activity varied with biological motion processing. By contrast, alpha oscillatory activity was significantly reduced only in individuals with a history of congenital cataracts. These data document on the one hand brain mechanisms of functional recovery (related to theta oscillations) and on the other hand, for the first time, a sensitive period for the development of alpha oscillatory activity in humans. PMID:27080158

  14. Airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-06-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  15. The core-specific lysosomal alpha(1-6)-mannosidase activity depends on aspartamidohydrolase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Haeuw, J F; Grard, T; Alonso, C; Strecker, G; Michalski, J C

    1994-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the core-specific rat liver lysosomal alpha(1-6)-mannosidase was investigated using mannosylated oligosaccharides and glycoasparagines. Hydrolysis of Man(alpha 1-6) linkage hydrolysis was demonstrated to follow the action of endoglycosidases, namely aspartyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and endo-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. The results are discussed with respect to the nature of the carbohydrate materials stored in the tissues and excreted in the urine from patients suffering from aspartylglucosaminuria and fucosidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8110182

  16. Destruction of problematic airborne contaminants by hydrogen reduction using a Catalytically Active, Regenerable Sorbent (CARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, John O.; Akse, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermally regenerable sorbent beds were demonstrated to be a highly efficient means for removal of toxic airborne trace organic contaminants aboard spacecraft. The utilization of the intrinsic weight savings available through this technology was not realized since many of the contaminants desorbed during thermal regeneration are poisons to the catalytic oxidizer or form highly toxic oxidation by-products in the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS). Included in this class of compounds are nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, and halogen containing organics. The catalytic reduction of these problematic contaminants using hydrogen at low temperatures (200-300 C) offers an attractive route for their destruction since the by-products of such reactions, hydrocarbons and inorganic gases, are easily removed by existing technology. In addition, the catalytic oxidizer can be operated more efficiently due to the absence of potential poisons, and any posttreatment beds can be reduced in size. The incorporation of the catalyst within the sorbent bed further improves the system's efficiency. The demonstration of this technology provides the basis for an efficient regenerable TCCS for future NASA missions and can be used in more conventional settings to efficiently remove environmental pollutants.

  17. Interleukin 10 inhibits macrophage microbicidal activity by blocking the endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor alpha required as a costimulatory factor for interferon gamma-induced activation.

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, I P; Wynn, T A; Sher, A; James, S L

    1992-01-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) inhibits interferon gamma-induced macrophage activation for cytotoxicity against larvae of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni by suppressing production of the toxic effector molecule nitric oxide (NO). In this study, the mechanism of IL-10 action was identified as inhibition of endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by interferon gamma-activated macrophages. TNF-alpha appears to serve as a cofactor for interferon gamma-mediated activation, since both schistosomulum killing and NO production were inhibited by anti-TNF-alpha antibody, whereas TNF-alpha alone was unable to stimulate these macrophage functions. IL-10 blocked TNF-alpha production by interferon gamma-treated macrophages at the levels of both protein and mRNA synthesis. Addition of exogenous TNF-alpha reversed IL-10-mediated suppression of macrophage cytotoxic activity as well as NO production. Likewise, addition of a macrophage-triggering agent (bacterial lipopolysaccharide or muramyl dipeptide), which induced the production of TNF-alpha, also reversed the suppressive effect of IL-10 on cytotoxic function. In contrast to IL-10, two other cytokines, IL-4 and transforming growth factor beta, which also inhibit macrophage activation for schistosomulum killing and NO production, did not substantially suppress endogenous TNF-alpha production. These results, therefore, describe a separate pathway by which macrophage microbicidal function is inhibited by the down-regulatory cytokine IL-10. Images PMID:1528880

  18. PITBUL: a physics-based modeling package for imaging and tracking of airborne targets for HEL applications including active illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zandt, Noah R.; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    Aimpoint acquisition and maintenance is critical to high energy laser (HEL) system performance. This study demonstrates the development by the AFIT/CDE of a physics-based modeling package, PITBUL, for tracking airborne targets for HEL applications, including atmospheric and sensor effects and active illumination, which is a focus of this work. High-resolution simulated imagery of the 3D airborne target in-flight as seen from the laser position is generated using the HELSEEM model, and includes solar illumination, laser illumination, and thermal emission. Both CW and pulsed laser illumination are modeled, including the effects of illuminator scintillation, atmospheric backscatter, and speckle, which are treated at a first-principles level. Realistic vertical profiles of molecular and aerosol absorption and scattering, as well as optical turbulence, are generated using AFIT/CDE's Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) model. The spatially and temporally varying effects of turbulence are calculated and applied via a fast-running wave optical method known as light tunneling. Sensor effects, for example blur, sampling, read-out noise, and random photon arrival, are applied to the imagery. Track algorithms, including centroid and Fitts correlation, as a part of a closed loop tracker are applied to the degraded imagery and scored, to provide an estimate of overall system performance. To gauge performance of a laser system against a UAV target, tracking results are presented as a function of signal to noise ratio. Additionally, validation efforts to date involving comparisons between simulated and experimental tracking of UAVs are presented.

  19. Regulation of the human SLC25A20 expression by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in human hepatoblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, Keisuke; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Inada, Hirohiko; Yamasaki, Daisuke; The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 ; Ishimoto, Kenji; Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 ; Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Doi, Takefumi; The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871; Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871

    2009-11-20

    Solute carrier family 25, member 20 (SLC25A20) is a key molecule that transfers acylcarnitine esters in exchange for free carnitine across the mitochondrial membrane in the mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays an important role in the regulation of {beta}-oxidation. We previously established tetracycline-regulated human cell line that can be induced to express PPAR{alpha} and found that PPAR{alpha} induces the SLC25A20 expression. In this study, we analyzed the promoter region of the human slc25a20 gene and showed that PPAR{alpha} regulates the expression of human SLC25A20 via the peroxisome proliferator responsive element.

  20. GATA-1 modulates the chromatin structure and activity of the chicken alpha-globin 3' enhancer.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2008-01-01

    Long-distance regulatory elements and local chromatin structure are critical for proper regulation of gene expression. Here we characterize the chromatin conformation of the chicken alpha-globin silencer-enhancer elements located 3' of the domain. We found a characteristic and erythrocyte-specific structure between the previously defined silencer and the enhancer, defined by two nuclease hypersensitive sites, which appear when the enhancer is active during erythroid differentiation. Fine mapping of these sites demonstrates the absence of a positioned nucleosome and the association of GATA-1. Functional analyses of episomal vectors, as well as stably integrated constructs, revealed that GATA-1 plays a major role in defining both the chromatin structure and the enhancer activity. We detected a progressive enrichment of histone acetylation on critical enhancer nuclear factor binding sites, in correlation with the formation of an apparent nucleosome-free region. On the basis of these results, we propose that the local chromatin structure of the chicken alpha-globin enhancer plays a central role in its capacity to differentially regulate alpha-globin gene expression during erythroid differentiation and development. PMID:17984219

  1. Effect of salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell-derived alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase on the bioactivity of macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Takashi; Uematsu, Takashi; Yamaoka, Minoru; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) produced by human salivary gland adenocarcinoma (SGA) cells on the bioactivity of macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). High exo-alpha-NaGalase activity was detected in the SGA cell line HSG. HSG alpha-NaGalase had both exo- and endo-enzyme activities, cleaving the Gal-GalNAc and GalNAc residues linked to Thr/Ser but not releasing the [NeuAc2-6]GalNac residue. Furthermore, GcMAF enzymatically prepared from the Gc protein enhanced the superoxide-generation capacity and phagocytic activity of monocytes/macrophages. However, GcMAF treated with purified alpha-NaGalase did not exhibit these effects. Thus, HSG possesses the capacity to produce larger quantities of alpha-NaGalase, which inactivates GcMAF produced from Gc protein, resulting in reduced phagocytic activity and superoxide-generation capacity of monocytes/macrophages. The present data strongly suggest that HSG alpha-NaGalase acts as an immunodeficiency factor in cancer patients. PMID:14767536

  2. Structural and Biochemical Basis for the Binding Selectivity of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor [gamma] to PGC-1[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Martynowski, Dariusz; Xu, H. Eric

    2008-07-23

    The functional interaction between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and its coactivator PGC-1{alpha} is crucial for the normal physiology of PPAR{gamma} and its pharmacological response to antidiabetic treatment with rosiglitazone. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding domain bound to rosiglitazone and to a large PGC-1{alpha} fragment that contains two LXXLL-related motifs. The structure reveals critical contacts mediated through the first LXXLL motif of PGC-1{alpha} and the PPAR{gamma} coactivator binding site. Through a combination of biochemical and structural studies, we demonstrate that the first LXXLL motif is the most potent among all nuclear receptor coactivator motifs tested, and only this motif of the two LXXLL-related motifs in PGC-1{alpha} is capable of binding to PPAR{gamma}. Our studies reveal that the strong interaction of PGC-1{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} is mediated through both hydrophobic and specific polar interactions. Mutations within the context of the full-length PGC-1{alpha} indicate that the first PGC-1{alpha} motif is necessary and sufficient for PGC-1{alpha} to coactivate PPAR{gamma} in the presence or absence of rosiglitazone. These results provide a molecular basis for specific recruitment and functional interplay between PPAR{gamma} and PGC-1{alpha} in glucose homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation.

  3. Alpha-D-galactosylation of surface fucoglycoconjugate(s) upon stimulation/activation of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petryniak, J

    1992-04-01

    Murine resident macrophages express, on their surface, carbohydrate epitopes which undergo changes during their stimulation/activation as monitored by binding of 125I labelled Evonymus europaea and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 lectins. Treatment of the stimulated macrophages with coffee bean alpha-galactosidase abolished binding of the GS I-B4 isolectin and changed the binding pattern of the Evonymus lectin. The affinity (Ka) of Evonymus lectin for alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages decreased approximately 23-fold, from 1.25 x 10(8) M-1 to 5.5 x 10(6) M-1. Subsequent digestion of alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages with alpha-L-fucosidase from Trichomonas foetus, further reduced binding of Evonymus lectin. Resident macrophages showed the same pattern of Evonymus lectin binding, with the same affinity, as alpha-galactosidase-treated, stimulated macrophages. These results, together with a consideration of the carbohydrate binding specificity of the Evonymus lectin which, in the absence of alpha-D-galactosyl groups, requires alpha-L-fucosyl groups for binding, indicate the presence, on resident macrophages, of glycoconjugates with terminal alpha-L-fucosyl residues. It is also concluded that during macrophage stimulation/activation alpha-D-galactosyl residues are added to this glycoconjugate and that they form part of the receptor for Evonymus lectin. The same glycoconjugate(s) is/are also expressed on the activated macrophage IC-21 cell line which exhibits the same characteristics as that of stimulated peritoneal macrophages, i.e., it contains alpha-D-galactosyl end groups and is resistant to the action of trypsin. Both lectins were also specifically bound to Corynaebacterium parvum activated macrophages. PMID:1344714

  4. Centaurin-alpha 1, an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 GTPase activating protein, inhibits beta 2-adrenoceptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Joanna; Mundell, Stuart J; Yun, Hongruo; Kelly, Eamonn; Venkateswarlu, Kanamarlapudi

    2005-06-01

    The small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) has recently been implicated in the internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. We have recently identified centaurin alpha(1) as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for ARF6. In the current study, we characterized the effects of centaurin alpha(1) on the agonist-induced internalization of the beta(2)-adrenoceptor transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as confocal imaging of cells, we found that expression of centaurin alpha(1) strongly inhibited the isoproterenol-induced internalization of beta(2)-adrenoceptor. On the other hand, expression of functionally inactive versions of centaurin alpha(1), including an R49C mutant, which has no catalytic activity, and a double pleckstrin homology (PH) mutant (DM; R148C/R273C), which has mutations in both the PH domains of centaurin alpha(1), rendering it unable to translocate to the cell membrane, were unable to inhibit beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. In addition, a constitutively active version of ARF6, ARF6Q67L, reversed the ability of centaurin alpha(1) to inhibit beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. Finally, expression of centaurin alpha(1) also inhibited the agonist-induced internalization of beta(2)-adrenoceptor endogenously expressed in HEK 293 cells, whereas the R49C and DM mutant versions of centaurin alpha(1) had no effect. Together, these data indicate that by acting as an ARF6 GAP, centaurin alpha(1) is able to switch off ARF6 and so inhibit its ability to mediate beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. Thus, ARF6 GAPs, such as centaurin alpha(1), are likely to play a crucial role in GPCR trafficking by modulating the activity of ARF6. PMID:15778454

  5. Detailed correlation of type III radio bursts with H alpha activity. I - Active region of 22 May 1970.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Pasachoff, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Comparison of observations of type III impulsive radio bursts made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory with high-spatial-resolution cinematographic observations taken at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. Use of the log-periodic radio interferometer makes it possible to localize the radio emission uniquely. This study concentrates on the particularly active region close to the limb on May 22, 1970. Sixteen of the 17 groups were associated with some H alpha activity, 11 of them with the start of such activity.

  6. Active site titration of bovine beta-trypsin by N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-aza-lysine p-nitrophenyl ester: kinetic and crystallographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sartori, P; Djinovic Carugo, K; Ferraccioli, R; Balliano, G; Milla, P; Ascenzi, P; Bolognesi, M

    1995-01-16

    Kinetics of bovine beta-trypsin (trypsin) with the N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-aza-lysine p-nitrophenyl ester (Dmc-azaLys-ONp) was obtained at pH 6.2 and 21.0 degrees C. Dmc-azaLys-ONp shows the characteristics of an optimal active site titrant in that it (i) gives titrations in a short time, (ii) is a stable and soluble compound with a stoichiometric reaction that is easily and directly detectable, and (iii) allows titrations over a wide range of enzyme concentration. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure of the trypsin.N alpha-(N,N-dimet hylcarbamoyl)-alpha-aza-lysine acyl.enzyme adduct has been solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.0 A resolution (R = 0.145). The Dmc-azaLys moiety of the active site titrant is sited in the serine proteinase reaction center, and is covalently linked to the OG atom of the Ser195 catalytic residue. PMID:7821429

  7. Effects of particle size and velocity on burial depth of airborne particles in glass fiber filters

    SciTech Connect

    Higby, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    Air sampling for particulate radioactive material involves collecting airborne particles on a filter and then determining the amount of radioactivity collected per unit volume of air drawn through the filter. The amount of radioactivity collected is frequently determined by directly measuring the radiation emitted from the particles collected on the filter. Counting losses caused by the particle becoming buried in the filter matrix may cause concentrations of airborne particulate radioactive materials to be underestimated by as much as 50%. Furthermore, the dose calculation for inhaled radionuclides will also be affected. The present study was designed to evaluate the extent to which particle size and sampling velocity influence burial depth in glass-fiber filters. Aerosols of high-fired /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ were collected at various sampling velocities on glass-fiber filters. The fraction of alpha counts lost due to burial was determined as the ratio of activity detected by direct alpha count to the quantity determined by photon spectrometry. The results show that burial of airborne particles collected on glass-fiber filters appears to be a weak function of sampling velocity and particle size. Counting losses ranged from 0 to 25%. A correction that assumes losses of 10 to 15% would ensure that the concentration of airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides would not be underestimated when glass-fiber filters are used. 32 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  8. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown. PMID:23406937

  9. Quantification of activity by alpha-camera imaging and small-scale dosimetry within ovarian carcinoma micrometastases treated with targeted alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Chouin, N; Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Albertsson, P; Bäck, T

    2012-12-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) a promising treatment for small, residual, and micrometastatic diseases has questionable efficacy against malignant lesions larger than the α-particle range, and likely requires favorable intratumoral activity distribution. Here, we characterized and quantified the activity distribution of an alpha-particle emitter radiolabelled antibody within >100-µm micrometastases in a murine ovarian carcinoma model. Nude mice bearing ovarian micrometastases were injected intra-peritoneally with 211At-MX35 (total injected activity 6 MBq, specific activity 650 MBq/mg). Animals were sacrificed at several time points, and peritoneal samples were excised and prepared for alpha-camera imaging. Spatial and temporal activity distributions within micrometastases were derived and used for small-scale dosimetry. We observed two activity distribution patterns: uniform distribution and high stable uptake (>100% IA/g at all time points) in micrometastases with no visible stromal compartment, and radial distribution (high activity on the edge and poor uptake in the core) in tumor cell lobules surrounded by fibroblasts. Activity distributions over time were characterized by a peak (140% IA/g at 4 h) in the outer tumor layer and a sharp drop beyond a depth of 50 µm. Small-scale dosimetry was performed on a multi-cellular micrometastasis model, using time-integrated activities derived from the experimental data. With injected activity of 400 kBq, tumors exhibiting uniform activity distribution received <25 Gy (EUD=13 Gy), whereas tumors presenting radial activity distribution received mean absorbed doses of <8 Gy (EUD=5 Gy). These results provide new insight into important aspects of TAT, and may explain why micrometastases >100 µm might not be effectively treated by the examined regimen. PMID:23358400

  10. Integrin alpha1beta1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor activation by controlling peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent caveolin-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiwu; Whiting, Carrie; Borza, Corina; Hu, Wen; Mont, Stacey; Bulus, Nada; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2010-06-01

    Integrin alpha1beta1 negatively regulates the generation of profibrotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation; however, the mechanism by which it does this is unknown. In this study, we show that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a scaffolding protein that binds integrins and controls growth factor receptor signaling, participates in integrin alpha1beta1-mediated EGFR activation. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells (MCs) have reduced Cav-1 levels, and reexpression of the integrin alpha1 subunit increases Cav-1 levels, decreases EGFR activation, and reduces ROS production. Downregulation of Cav-1 in wild-type MCs increases EGFR phosphorylation and ROS synthesis, while overexpression of Cav-1 in the integrin alpha1-null MCs decreases EGFR-mediated ROS production. We further show that integrin alpha1-null MCs have increased levels of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which leads to reduced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a transcription factor that positively regulates Cav-1 expression. Moreover, activation of PPARgamma or inhibition of ERK increases Cav-1 levels in the integrin alpha1-null MCs. Finally, we show that glomeruli of integrin alpha1-null mice have reduced levels of Cav-1 and activated PPARgamma but increased levels of phosphorylated EGFR both at baseline and following injury. Thus, integrin alpha1beta1 negatively regulates EGFR activation by positively controlling Cav-1 levels, and the ERK/PPARgamma axis plays a key role in regulating integrin alpha1beta1-dependent Cav-1 expression and consequent EGFR-mediated ROS production. PMID:20368353

  11. Identification of a mutation affecting an alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, J O

    1979-10-01

    A mutation affecting alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity has been shown to be cotransducible with ilv gene cluster. The transaminase deficiency results in conditional isoleucine auxotrophy in the presence of alanine. PMID:396446

  12. Potentiation of mitomycin C and porfiromycin antitumor activity in solid tumor models by recombinant human interleukin 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Braunschweiger, P G; Jones, S A; Johnson, C S; Furmanski, P

    1991-10-15

    The time- and dose-dependent effects of recombinant human interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) on the antitumor activity of mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PORF) were studied in RIF-1 and Panc02 solid tumor model systems. IL-1 alpha produced dose-dependent sensitization of clonogenic RIF-1 tumor cells to MMC in vivo. IL-1 alpha chemosensitization was highly schedule dependent, and the most efficacious schedules produced dose-modifying factors of 3.6 and 5.1 for MMC and PORF, respectively. More than additive clonogenic cell kill after IL-1 alpha-chemotherapy combinations reflected increased cellular sensitivity to MMC and PORF. The combinations also produced marked decreases in the yield of viable tumor cells, suggesting that the bioreductive drugs may have also potentiated the microvascular injury and ischemia produced by IL-1 alpha. Dexamethasone inhibited and ketoconazole, an inhibitor of corticosterone biosynthesis, enhanced IL-1 alpha-mediated chemosensitization in these models. IL-1 alpha mediated chemosensitization to MMC, and PORF was also demonstrated by tumor growth inhibition in the RIF-1 model and increased survival of mice in the spontaneously metastasizing Panc02 system. Chemosensitization of bone marrow spleen colony-forming units was not seen. IL-1 alpha (1000 units/ml) had no effect on MMC and PORF cytotoxicity in RIF-1 and PORF cell lines in vitro. The results indicate that the tumor-specific IL-1 alpha-induced pathophysiologies can sensitize solid tumors to agents which are preferentially activated, retained, and cytotoxic to cells under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that strategies combining bioreductively activated hypoxic cell cytotoxins and biological agents might offer efficacious alternatives or adjuvants to conventional combination approaches. PMID:1913664

  13. Alpha-amylase inhibitory activity and phytochemical study of Zhumeria majdae Rech. f. and Wendelbo

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafie, Behnaz; Mokhber-Dezfouli, Najmeh; Manayi, Azadeh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Ajani, Yousef; Gohari, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Zhumeria majdae (Lamiaceae) is an endemic species growing in the South parts of Iran especially Hormozgan province. The plant is so-called Mohrekhosh locally and widely used for medicinal purposes including stomachache and dysmenorrhea. Objective: In order to separation and identification of the main flavonoid glycosides of the plant (aerial parts including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits were used) and evaluation of its alpha-amylase inhibitory (AAI) activity, methanolic extract was prepared and fractionated to botanolic portion. Materials and Methods: Isolation of the main compounds of the butanol extract of the plant have been performed using different column chromatography methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography (C18 column) and Sephadex LH-20 as well. The isolated compounds were identified by Hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance and Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and comparison with those reported in previous literature. Moreover, inhibitory activity of the butanolic extract of the plant against alpha-amylase enzyme was examined in different concentrations (15–30 mg/mL), where acarbose used as a positive control. Results: Three flavonoid glycosides: Linarin (1), hispidulin-7-O-(4-O-acetyl-rutinoside) (2), hispidulin-7-O-rutinoside (3) were successfully identified in the extract. The activity of alpha amylase enzyme was dose-dependently suppressed by the butanol extract. The extract exhibited the highest inhibition at 30 mg/mL toward enzyme (77.9 ± 2.1%), while acarbose inhibited the enzyme at 20 mg/mL by 73.9 ± 1.9%. The inhibitory concentrations of 50% for the extract and acarbose were calculated at 24.5 ± 2.1 and 6.6 ± 3.1 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: Z. majdae contains glycosylated flavones and could be a good candidate for anti-diabetic evaluations in animal and clinical trials due to possessing AAI activity. PMID:26692743

  14. A comparison of the antagonistic activities of tamsulosin and terazosin against human vascular alpha1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Ohmori, M; Kitoh, Y; Sugimoto, K; Fujimura, A

    1999-07-01

    Tamsulosin, a selective alpha1A-adrenoceptor antagonist, and terazosin, a non-selective one, are effective for the treatment of urinary disturbance due to benign prostatic hypertrophy. In the present study, their alpha1-adrenoceptor-blocking effects on blood vessels, which may cause orthostatic hypotension, were investigated in 10 healthy males. After the subjects took orally 0.2 mg of tamsulosin, 1 mg of terazosin or a lactate capsule as the control in a randomized cross-over fashion, their finger tip vasoconstrictor response to cold stimulation and vasoconstrictor response of the dorsal hand vein to increasing doses of phenylephrine were examined. The finger tip vasoconstrictor response was significantly reduced and the infusion rate of phenylephrine producing a half-maximal constriction was significantly increased by terazosin, but tamsulosin had no significant effect on these parameters. These data suggest that the usual dose of tamsulosin exerts little alpha1-adrenoceptor-blocking activity on blood vessels, and orthostatic episodes might be mild, if any, during the treatment with tamsulosin. PMID:10461765

  15. Modulatory role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors in conductance arteries.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Gisbert, Regina; Noguera, Maria Antonia; Ivorra, Maria Dolores; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2002-02-01

    A constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors in iliac and proximal, distal, and small mesenteric rat arteries was studied. The increase in resting tone (IRT) that evidences it was observed only in iliac and proximal mesenteric and was inhibited by prazosin (pIC(50) = 9.57), 5-methylurapidil (pIC(50) = 7.61), and BMY 7378 (pIC(50) = 8.77). Chloroethylchlonidine (100 micromol/l) did not affect IRT, but when added before the other antagonists it blocked their effect. The potency shown by BMY 7378 confirms the alpha(1D)-subtype as responsible for IRT. BMY 7378 displayed greater inhibition of adrenergic responses in iliac (pIC(50) = 7.57 +/- 0.11) and proximal mesenteric arteries (pIC(50) = 8.05 +/- 0.2) than in distal (pIC(50) = 6.94 +/- 0.13) or small mesenteric arteries (pIC(50) = 6.30 +/- 0.14), which confirms the functional role of the alpha(1D)-adrenoceptor in iliac and proximal mesenteric arteries. This subtype prevents abrupt changes in iliac and proximal mesenteric artery caliber when the agonist disappears, and this modulatory role is evidenced by the slower decay in the response to norepinephrine after removal. PMID:11788394

  16. OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-11-02

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

  17. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  18. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  19. Dual Effects of Alpha-Arbutin on Monophenolase and Diphenolase Activities of Mushroom Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liang; Wu, Yang; Liu, Youting; Chen, Yiming; Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of α-arbutin on the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase were investigated. The results showed that α-arbutin inhibited monophenolase activity but it activated diphenolase activity. For monophenolase activity, IC50 value was 4.5 mmol·L−1 and 4.18 mmol·L−1 of α-arbutin could extend the lag time from 40.5 s to 167.3 s. Alpha- arbutin is proposed to be regarded as a triphenolic substrate by the enzyme during catalyzation, leading to the suicide inactivation of the active site of tyrosinase. For diphenolase activity, α-arbutin acted as an activator and its activation mechanism was mixed type activation. To reveal such activation, it should be mainly refered to the conformational changes in tyrosinase caused by the interaction of α-arbutin with residues located at the entrance to the active site, and the decrease of the effect of suicide inactivation. PMID:25303458

  20. Improved activity and modulated action pattern obtained by random mutagenesis at the fourth beta-alpha loop involved in substrate binding to the catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel domain of barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Matsui, I; Svensson, B

    1997-09-01

    The functionality of the sequence Arg183-Gly184-Tyr185 of the substrate binding fourth beta-alpha loop in the (beta/alpha)8-barrel of barley alpha-amylase isozyme 1 (AMY1) was studied by random mutagenesis. A motif of polar Gly184 hydrophobic residues was present in active mutants, selected by starch plate screening of yeast transformants. Gly184 was important, probably due to the carbonyl group binding to Ca2+ and the spatial proximity of Phe181. Mutation of both flanking residues as in Ser183-Gly184-Met185 (SGM-) and TGL-AMY1 decreased the Ca2+ affinity. SGM-AMY1 has 2-fold increased activity for amylose but reduced activity on maltooligosaccharides, whereas KGY-AMY1 has up to 3-fold elevated activity toward the oligosaccharides. TGL-AMY1 has modest activity on all substrates. Shifted action pattern on maltooligosaccharides for NGY-, SGM-, and TGL-AMY1 support that Arg183 in wild type is located at subsites +1 and +2, accommodating two sugar rings toward the reducing end from the site of cleavage. In the crystal structure of barley alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2), Lys182 (equivalent to AMY1 Arg183) is hydrogen-bonded with sugar OH-3 in subsite +2. Higher Ki app for acarbose inhibition of KGY-AMY1 and parent AMY1 compared with the other mutants suggests favorable substrate interactions for Arg/Lys183. KGY-AMY1 was not inhibited by the AMY2-specific proteinaceous barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, although Lys182 of AMY2 is salt-linked to the inhibitor. PMID:9278396

  1. Tat-APE1/ref-1 protein inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced endothelial cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yun Jeong; Lee, Ji Young; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Kwon Ho; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2008-03-28

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved both in DNA base excision repair and redox regulation. In this study we evaluated the protective role of Tat-mediated APE1/ref-1 transduction on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-activated endothelial activation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. To construct Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein, human full length of APE1/ref-1 was fused with Tat-protein transduction domain. Purified Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein efficiently transduced cultured endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner and reached maximum expression at 1 h after incubation. Transduced Tat-APE1/ref-1 showed inhibitory activity on the TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in cultured endothelial cells. These results suggest Tat-APE1/ref-1 might be useful to reduce vascular endothelial activation or vascular inflammatory disorders.

  2. Pathogenic significance of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity found in the hemagglutinin of influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro

    2005-04-01

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The precursor activity of serum Gc protein was reduced in all influenza virus-infected patients. These patient sera contained alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) that deglycosylates Gc protein. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, thus it loses the MAF precursor activity, leading to immunosuppression. An influenza virus stock contained a large amount of Nagalase activity. A sucrose gradient centrifugation analysis of the virus stock showed that the profile of Nagalase activity corresponds to that of hemagglutinating activity. When these gradient fractions were treated with 0.01% trypsin for 30 min, the Nagalase activity of each fraction increased significantly, suggesting that the Nagalase activity resides on an outer envelope protein of the influenza virion and is enhanced by the proteolytic process. After disruption of influenza virions with sodium deoxycholate, fractionation of the envelope proteins with mannose-specific lectin affinity column along with electrophoretic analysis of the Nagalase peak fraction revealed that Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the hemagglutinin (HA). Cloned HA protein exhibited Nagalase activity only if treated with trypsin. Since both fusion capacity and Nagalase activity of HA protein are expressed by proteolytic cleavage, Nagalase activity appears to be an enzymatic basis for the fusion process. Thus, Nagalase plays dual roles in regulating both infectivity and immunosuppression. PMID:15848273

  3. Serine proteinase inhibition by the active site titrant N alpha-(N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azaornithine p-nitrophenyl ester. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, P; Balliano, G; Gallina, C; Polticelli, F; Bolognesi, M

    2000-02-01

    Kinetics for the hydrolysis of the chromogenic active-site titrant N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azaornithine p-nitrophenyl ester (Dmc-azaOrn-ONp) catalysed by bovine beta-trypsin, bovine alpha-thrombin, bovine Factor Xa, human alpha-thrombin, human Factor Xa, human Lys77-plasmin, human urinary kallikrein, Mr 33 000 and Mr 54 000 species of human urokinase, porcine pancreatic beta-kallikrein-A and -B and Ancrod (the coagulating serine proteinase from the Malayan pit viper Agkistrodon rhodostoma venom) have been obtained between pH 6.0 and 8.0, at 21.0 degrees C, and analysed in parallel with those for the enzymatic cleavage of N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azalysine p-nitrophenyl ester (Dmc-azaLys-ONp). The enzyme kinetics are consistent with the minimum three-step catalytic mechanism of serine proteinases, the rate-limiting step being represented by the deacylation process. Bovine beta-trypsin kinetics are modulated by the acid-base equilibrium of the His57 catalytic residue (pKa approximately 6.9). Dmc-azaOrn-ONp and Dmc-azaLys-ONp bind stoichiometrically to the serine proteinase active site, and allow the reliable determination of the active enzyme concentration between 1.0 x 10-6 M and 3.0 x 10-4 M. The affinity and the reactivity for Dmc-azaOrn-ONp (expressed by Ks and k+2/Ks, respectively) of the serine proteinases considered are much lower than those for Dmc-azaLys-ONp. The very different affinity and reactivity properties for Dmc-azaOrn-ONp and Dmc-azaLys-ONp have been related to the different size of the ornithine/lysine side chains, and to the ensuing different positioning of the active-site titrants upon binding to the enzyme catalytic centre (i.e. to P1-S1 recognition). These data represent the first detailed comparative investigation on the catalytic properties of serine proteinases towards an ornithine derivative (i. e. Dmc-azaOrn-ONp). PMID:10672036

  4. Characteristics of chemical binding to alpha 2u-globulin in vitro--evaluating structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Borghoff, S.J.; Miller, A.B.; Bowen, J.P.; Swenberg, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    alpha 2u-Globulin (alpha 2u) has been shown to accumulate in the kidneys of male rats treated with 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP). 2,4,4-Trimethyl-2-pentanol (TMP-2-OH), a metabolite of TMP, is found reversibly bound to alpha 2u isolated from the kidneys of these treated rats. The objectives of the following study were to characterize the ability of (3H)TMP-2-OH to bind to alpha 2u in vitro and to determine whether other compounds that cause this protein to accumulate have the same binding characteristics. Although compounds that have been shown to cause the accumulation of alpha 2u in male rat kidneys compete in vitro with (3H)TMP-2-OH for binding to alpha 2u, they do so to varying degrees. The binding affinity (Kd) of the (3H)TMP-2-OH-alpha 2u complex was calculated to be on the order of 10(-7) M. The inhibition constant values (Ki) determined for d-limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and 2,5-dichlorophenol were all in the range 10(-4) M, whereas the Ki values for isophorone, 2,4,4- or 2,2,4-trimethyl-1-pentanol, and d-limonene oxide were determined to be in the range 10(-6) and 10(-7) M, respectively. TMP and 2,4,4- and 2,2,4-trimethylpentanoic acid did not compete for binding. This suggests that other factors, besides binding, are involved in the accumulation of alpha 2u. In this study the ability of a chemical to bind to alpha 2u was used as a measure of biological activity to assess structure-activity relationships among the chemicals tested and known to cause the accumulation of alpha 2u. The results so far suggest that binding is dependent on both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding.

  5. Uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and enhanced cyanide toxicity are mediated by PPAR{alpha} activation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Prabhakaran, K.; Zhang, L.; Leavesley, H.B.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2007-08-15

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) is an inner mitochondrial membrane proton carrier that modulates mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}) and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. We have shown that up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) agonist, enhances cyanide cytotoxicity. The pathway by which Wy14,643 up-regulates UCP-2 was determined in a dopaminergic cell line (N27 cells). Since dopaminergic mesencephalic cells are a primary brain target of cyanide, the N27 immortalized mesencephalic cell was used in this study. Wy14,643 produced a concentration- and time-dependent up-regulation of UCP-2 that was linked to enhanced cyanide-induced cell death. MK886 (PPAR{alpha} antagonist) or PPAR{alpha} knock-down by RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited PPAR{alpha} activity as shown by the peroxisome proliferator response element-luciferase reporter assay, but only partially decreased up-regulation of UCP-2. The role of oxidative stress as an alternative pathway to UCP-2 up-regulation was determined. Wy14,643 induced a rapid surge of ROS generation and loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester (GSH-EE) or pre-treatment with vitamin E attenuated up-regulation of UCP-2. On the other hand, RNAi knockdown of PPAR{alpha} did not alter ROS generation, suggesting a PPAR{alpha}-independent component to the response. Co-treatment with PPAR{alpha}-RNAi and GSH-EE blocked both the up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643 and the cyanide-induced cell death. It was concluded that a PPAR{alpha}-mediated pathway and an oxidative stress pathway independent of PPAR{alpha} mediate the up-regulation of UCP-2 and subsequent increased vulnerability to cyanide-induced cytotoxicity.

  6. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC ACTIVATION OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR-ALPHA OR HIGH-FAT FEEDING IN A RAT INFARCT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intracardiac accumulation of lipid and related intermediates (e.g., ceramide) is associated with cardiac dysfunction and may contribute to the progression of heart failure (HF). Overexpression of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) increases intramyocellula...

  7. TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial alterations in human T cells requires FADD and caspase-8 activation but not RIP and caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Sung, Bokyung; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-09-15

    Although much is known about how TNF-alpha induces apoptosis in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, little is known about how it induces apoptosis without these inhibitors. In this report we investigated temporal sequence of events induced by TNF-alpha in the absence of protein synthesis. Regardless of whether we measured the effects by plasma membrane phosphotidylserine accumulation, by DNA strand breaks, or activation of caspases, significant changes were observed only between 12-24 h of TNF-alpha treatment. One of the earliest changes observed after TNF-alpha treatment was mitochondrial swelling at 10 min; followed by cytochrome c and Smac release at 10-30 min, and then heterochromatin clumping occurred at 60 min. While genetic deletion of receptor-interaction protein (RIP) had no effect on TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial damage, deletion of Fas-associated death domain (FADD) abolished the TNF-induced mitochondrial swelling. Since pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk abolished the TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes, z-DEVD-fmk, an inhibitor of caspase-3 had no effect, suggesting that TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes or cytochrome c and Smac release requires caspase-8 but not caspase-3 activation. Overall, our results indicated that mitochondrial changes are early events in TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis and that these mitochondrial changes require recruitment of FADD and caspase-8 activation, but not caspase-3 activation or RIP recruitment. PMID:20136500

  8. Paxillin binding to the alpha 4 integrin subunit stimulates LFA-1 (integrin alpha L beta 2)-dependent T cell migration by augmenting the activation of focal adhesion kinase/proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2.

    PubMed

    Rose, David M; Liu, Shouchun; Woodside, Darren G; Han, Jaewon; Schlaepfer, David D; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2003-06-15

    Engagement of very late Ag-4 (integrin alpha(4)beta(1)) by ligands such as VCAM-1 markedly stimulates leukocyte migration mediated by LFA-1 (integrin alpha(L)beta(2)). This form of integrin trans-regulation in T cells requires the binding of paxillin to the alpha(4) integrin cytoplasmic domain. This conclusion is based on the abolition of trans-regulation in Jurkat T cells by an alpha(4) mutation (alpha(4)(Y991A)) that disrupts paxillin binding. Furthermore, cellular expression of an alpha(4)-binding fragment of paxillin that blocks the alpha(4)-paxillin interaction, selectively blocked VCAM-1 stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent cell migration. The alpha(4)-paxillin association mediates trans-regulation by enhancing the activation of tyrosine kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and/or proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2), based on two lines of evidence. First, disruption of the paxillin-binding site in the alpha(4) tail resulted in much less alpha(4)beta(1)-mediated phosphorylation of Pyk2 and FAK. Second, transfection with cDNAs encoding C-terminal fragments of Pyk2 and FAK, which block the function of the intact kinases, blocked alpha(4)beta(1) stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent migration. These results define a proximal protein-protein interaction of an integrin cytoplasmic domain required for trans-regulation between integrins, and establish that augmented activation of Pyk2 and/or FAK is an immediate signaling event required for the trans-regulation of integrin alpha(L)beta(2) by alpha(4)beta(1). PMID:12794117

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-04-18

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPAR{alpha} activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPAR{alpha} inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPAR{alpha}. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPAR{alpha}.

  10. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor regulates cell surface plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Sakthivel, R; Kniss, D; Graham, C H; Strickland, D K; McCrae, K R

    1998-11-27

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP/alpha2MR) mediates the internalization of numerous ligands, including prourokinase (pro-UK) and complexes between two-chain urokinase (tc-u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1). It has been suggested that through its ability to internalize these ligands, LRP/alpha2MR may regulate the expression of plasminogen activator activity on cell surfaces; this hypothesis, however, has not been experimentally confirmed. To address this issue, we assessed the ability of LRP/alpha2MR to regulate plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells, which express both LRP/alpha2MR and the urokinase receptor (uPAR). Trophoblasts internalized and degraded exogenous 125I-pro-UK (primarily following its conversion to tc-u-PA and incorporation into tc-u-PA.PAI complexes) in an LRP/alpha2MR-dependent manner, which was inhibited by the LRP/alpha2MR receptor-associated protein. Receptor-associated protein also caused a approximately 50% reduction in cell surface plasminogen activator activity and delayed the regeneration of unoccupied uPAR by cells on which uPAR were initially saturated with pro-UK. Identical effects were caused by anti-LRP/alpha2MR antibodies. These results demonstrate that LRP/alpha2MR promotes the expression of cell surface plasminogen activator activity on trophoblasts by facilitating the clearance of tc-u-PA.PAI complexes and regeneration of unoccupied cell surface uPAR. PMID:9822706

  11. Highly Potent, Water Soluble Benzimidazole Antagonist for Activated (alpha)4(beta)1 Integrin

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R D; Andrei, M; Lau, E Y; Lightstone, F C; Liu, R; Lam, K S; Kurth, M J

    2007-08-29

    The cell surface receptor {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} integrin, activated constitutively in lymphoma, can be targeted with the bisaryl urea peptidomimetic antagonist 1 (LLP2A). However, concerns on its preliminary pharmacokinetic (PK) profile provided an impetus to change the pharmacophore from a bisaryl urea to a 2-arylaminobenzimidazole moiety resulting in improved solubility while maintaining picomolar potency [5 (KLCA4); IC{sub 50} = 305 pM]. With exceptional solubility, this finding has potential for improving PK to help diagnose and treat lymphomas.

  12. The biological activity of 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase in the spinal cord regulates thermal and mechanical pain thresholds after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Laurence; Venard, Christine; Schaeffer, Véronique; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2008-04-01

    Identification of cellular targets pertinent for the development of effective therapies against pathological pain constitutes a difficult challenge. We combined several approaches to show that 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR), abundantly expressed in the spinal cord (SC), is a key target, the modulation of which markedly affects nociception. 3alpha-HSOR catalyzes the biosynthesis and oxidation of 3alpha,5alpha-reduced neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP), which stimulates GABA(A) receptors. Intrathecal injection of Provera (pharmacological inhibitor of 3alpha-HSOR activity) in naive rat SC decreased thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds assessed with behavioral methods. In contrast, pain thresholds were dose-dependently increased by 3alpha,5alpha-THP. In animals subjected to sciatic nerve injury-evoked neuropathic pain, molecular and biochemical experiments revealed an up-regulation of 3alpha-HSOR reductive activity in the SC. Enhancement of 3alpha,5alpha-THP concentration in the SC induced analgesia in neuropathic rats while Provera exacerbated their pathological state. Possibilities are opened for chronic pain control with drugs modulating 3alpha-HSOR activity in nerve cells. PMID:18291663

  13. Polycystin-1 promotes PKC{alpha}-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation in kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Banzi, Manuela; Aguiari, Gianluca; Trimi, Viky; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Witzgall, Ralph; Rizzuto, Rosario; Senno, Laura del . E-mail: sen@unife.it

    2006-11-17

    Polycystin-1 (PC1), the PKD1 gene product, is a membrane receptor which regulates many cell functions, including cell proliferation and apoptosis, both typically increased in cyst lining cells in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Here we show that PC1 upregulates the NF-{kappa}B signalling pathway in kidney cells to prevent cell death. Human embryonic kidney cell lines (HEK293{sup CTT}), stably expressing a PC1 cytoplasmic terminal tail (CTT), presented increased NF-{kappa}B nuclear levels and NF-{kappa}B-mediated luciferase promoter activity. This, consistently, was reduced in HEK293 cells in which the endogenous PC1 was depleted by RNA interference. CTT-dependent NF-{kappa}B promoter activation was mediated by PKC{alpha} because it was blocked by its specific inhibitor Ro-320432. Furthermore, it was observed that apoptosis, which was increased in PC1-depleted cells, was reduced in HEK293{sup CTT} cells and in porcine kidney LtTA cells expressing a doxycycline-regulated CTT. Staurosporine, a PKC inhibitor, and parthenolide, a NF-{kappa}B inhibitor, significantly reduced the CTT-dependent antiapoptotic effect. These data reveal, therefore, a novel pathway by which polycystin-1 activates a PKC{alpha}-mediated NF-{kappa}B signalling and cell survival.

  14. How to produce high specific activity tin-117m using alpha particle beam.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Essayan, M; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2016-09-01

    Tin-117m is an interesting radionuclide for both diagnosis and therapy, thanks to the gamma-ray and electron emissions, respectively, resulting from its decay to tin-117g. The high specific activity of tin-117m is required in many medical applications, and it can be obtained using a high energy alpha particle beam and a cadmium target. The experiments performed at the ARRONAX cyclotron (Nantes, France) using an alpha particle beam delivered at 67.4MeV provide a measurement of the excitation function of the Cd-nat(α,x)Sn-117m reaction and the produced contaminants. The Cd-116(α,3n)Sn-117m production cross section has been deduced from these experimental results using natural cadmium. Both production yield and specific activity as a function of the projectile energy have been calculated. These informations help to optimize the irradiation conditions to produce tin-117m with the required specific activity using α particles with a cadmium target. PMID:27344526

  15. Faecal alpha-1-antitrypsin and excretion of 111indium granulocytes in assessment of disease activity in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, W; Becker, W; Mössner, J; Koch, W; Reiners, C

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal protein loss in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases may be easily determined by measurement of alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) stool concentration and alpha 1-AT clearance. Both parameters were significantly raised in 36 and 34 patients respectively with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, compared with eight patients with non-inflammatory bowel diseases, or 19 healthy volunteers. There was wide range of overlap between active and inactive inflammatory disease. Contrary to serum alpha 1-AT, faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT did not correlate with ESR, serum-albumin, orosomucoid, and two indices of disease activity. A comparison of alpha 1-AT faecal excretion and clearance with the faecal excretion of 111In labelled granulocytes in 27 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, showed no correlation between the intestinal protein loss and this highly specific marker of intestinal inflammation. Enteric protein loss expressed by faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT does not depend on mucosal inflammation only, but may be influenced by other factors. PMID:3495470

  16. Activity of alpha-1, 4-glucosidase in furazolidone-induced glycogenosis.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, C M; Salam, A; Caldwell, R; Jankus, E F

    1978-01-01

    Furazolidone (FZ) at 700 and 800 p.p.m. was added to feed mixtures fed turkey poults two and three weeks posthatching, respectively, to induce acute experimental cardiomyopathy. Poults in the control pen received the same ration but without FZ. From EKG data obtained at 2, 4, and 5 weeks of age, control unaffected and experimental affected poults were selected for sacrifice. Poults were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and appropriate samples of hepatic tissue were removed for assays of activity of alpha-1, 4-glucosidase. Results indicate that enzyme activity in affected FZ-treated poults is similar to that in unaffected control poults. Lack of significant differences in activity of this lysosomal enzyme suggests that FZ-induced glycogenosis may be related to the adult form of idiopathic generalized glucogenosis, the etiology of which remains unidentified. PMID:353772

  17. Synthesis, antifeedant activity against Coleoptera and 3D QSAR study of alpha-asarone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Łozowicka, B; Kaczyński, P; Magdziarz, T; Dubis, A T

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a set of 56 compounds representing structural derivatives of naturally occurring alpha-asarone as an antifeedants against stored product pests Sitophilus granarius L., Trogoderma granarium Ev., and Tribolium confusum Duv., were subjected to the 3D QSAR studies. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) for 56 compounds, including 15 newly synthesized, were performed using comparative molecular field analysis s-CoMFA and SOM-CoMSA techniques. QSAR was conducted based on a combination of biological activity (against Coleoptera larvae and beetles) and various geometrical, topological, quantum-mechanical, electronic, and chromatographic descriptors. The CoMSA formalism coupled with IVE (CoMSA-IVE) allowed us to obtain highly predictive models for Trogoderma granarium Ev. larvae. We have found that this novel method indicates a clear molecular basis for activity and lipophilicity. This investigation will facilitate optimization of the design of new potential antifeedants. PMID:24601760

  18. PPAR{alpha} gene expression is up-regulated by LXR and PXR activators in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Jun; Satoh, Shin-ichi; Kita, Mariko; Nakahara, Mayuko; Hachimura, Satoshi; Miyata, Masaaki; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2008-07-11

    LXR, PXR, and PPAR{alpha} are members of a nuclear receptor family which regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Here, we show the administration of T0901317 stimulates PPAR{alpha} gene expression in the small intestine but not in the liver of both normal and FXR-null mice. The administration of LXR specific ligand GW3965, or PXR specific ligand PCN has the same effect, indicating that ligand-dependent activation of LXR and PXR, but not FXR, is responsible for the increased gene expression of PPAR{alpha} in the mouse small intestine.

  19. The liver-enriched transcription factor CREBH is nutritionally regulated and activated by fatty acids and PPAR{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, Hirosuke; Ishii, Kiyo-aki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Mikami, Motoki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yabe, Sachiko; Furusawa, Mika; Kumadaki, Shin; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2010-01-08

    To elucidate the physiological role of CREBH, the hepatic mRNA and protein levels of CREBH were estimated in various feeding states of wild and obesity mice. In the fast state, the expression of CREBH mRNA and nuclear protein were high and profoundly suppressed by refeeding in the wild-type mice. In ob/ob mice, the refeeding suppression was impaired. The diet studies suggested that CREBH expression was activated by fatty acids. CREBH mRNA levels in the mouse primary hepatocytes were elevated by addition of the palmitate, oleate and eicosapenonate. It was also induced by PPAR{alpha} agonist and repressed by PPAR{alpha} antagonist. Luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that the CREBH promoter activity was induced by fatty acids and co-expression of PPAR{alpha}. Deletion studies identified the PPRE for PPAR{alpha} activation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay confirmed that PPAR{alpha} directly binds to the PPRE. Activation of CREBH at fasting through fatty acids and PPAR{alpha} suggest that CREBH is involved in nutritional regulation.

  20. Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Activities at UNAVCO: From GeoEarthScope to INTERFACE and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.

    2009-05-01

    UNAVCO leads and supports airborne and terrestrial laser scanning (ALS and TLS) activities in support of a wide range of earth science applications. UNAVCO acquired nearly 6,000 km2 of high resolution ALS data as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the National Science Foundation. GeoEarthScope ALS targets in most cases were 1- to 2-km wide corridors centered along active faults including the San Andreas, Hayward, Calaveras, Maacama, Green Valley, Little Salmon, Elsinore, San Cayetano, Garlock, Calico, Lenwood, Blackwater, Helendale, Panamint Valley, Ash Hill, Owens Valley, Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley, Wasatch, Teton, Denali and Totschunda faults. Acquisitions were planned and conducted based on community recommendations with respect to target identification and data collection practices. Particular care was taken to ensure the highest data quality possible within scope and budget, with special considerations given to effective ground point density and geodetic control. Data products are freely available from http://opentopography.org. TLS projects include numerous investigations in polar regions, such as the first TLS survey of the lava lake at Mount Erebus, Antarctica, in January 2009, and activities related to INTERFACE (INTERdisciplinary alliance for digital Field data ACquisition and Exploration), a Collaborative project currently funded by NSF and managed at UNAVCO which includes specialized TLS data processing and visualization software tools developed specifically for geoscience applications. We will present an overview of ALS and TLS project highlights; resources for data collection, accessibility and analysis; and potential use of these data for scientific research and as a framework for future endeavors.

  1. Effect of TNF{alpha} on activities of different promoters of human apolipoprotein A-I gene

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Sergey V.; Mogilenko, Denis A.; Shavva, Vladimir S.; Dizhe, Ella B.; Ignatovich, Irina A.; Perevozchikov, Andrej P.

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF{alpha} stimulates the distal alternative promoter of human apoA-I gene. {yields} TNF{alpha} acts by weakening of promoter competition within apoA-I gene (promoter switching). {yields} MEK1/2 and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs take part in apoA-I promoter switching. -- Abstract: Human apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is a major structural and functional protein component of high-density lipoproteins. The expression of the apolipoprotein A-I gene (apoA-I) in hepatocytes is repressed by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta} and TNF{alpha}. Recently, two novel additional (alternative) promoters for human apoA-I gene have been identified. Nothing is known about the role of alternative promoters in TNF{alpha}-mediated downregulation of apoA-I gene. In this article we report for the first time about the different effects of TNF{alpha} on two alternative promoters of human apoA-I gene. Stimulation of HepG2 cells by TNF{alpha} leads to activation of the distal alternative apoA-I promoter and downregulation of the proximal alternative and the canonical apoA-I promoters. This effect is mediated by weakening of the promoter competition within human apoA-I 5'-regulatory region (apoA-I promoter switching) in the cells treated by TNF{alpha}. The MEK1/2-ERK1/2 cascade and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs are important for TNF{alpha}-mediated apoA-I promoter switching.

  2. Effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist (bezafibrate) on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection in rats.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rahul; Asad, Mohammed; Hrishikeshavan, H Jagannath; Prasad, Satya

    2007-06-01

    The effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection was evaluated using five different models of gastric ulcers: acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers, pylorus ligation, ethanol-induced, indomethacin-induced and ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric ulcers. Bezafibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist was administered at two different doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneanally. Both doses of bezafibrate showed significant antiulcer effect in ethanol-induced, indomethacin-induced and pylorus ligation-induced gastric ulcers. Bezafibrate increased healing of ulcer in acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer model. Both doses were also effective in preventing gastric lesions induced by ischemia-reperfusion. It was concluded that PPAR-alpha activation increases healing of gastric ulcers and also prevents development of gastric ulcers in rats. PMID:17521298

  3. Oscillatory brain activity in the alpha range is modulated by the content of word-prompted mental imagery

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Felix; Hamuni, Gilava; Miskovic, Vladimir; Lang, Peter J.; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Mental imagery is a fundamental cognitive process of interest to basic scientists and clinical researchers. This study examined large-scale oscillatory brain activity in the alpha band (8–12 Hz) during language-driven mental imagery using dense-array EEG. Three experiments demonstrated relative increases in alpha amplitude (1) during imagery prompted by words compared to fixation without imagery instruction, (2) during imagery of word content compared to imagery of geometric shapes, and (3) during imagery of emotionally evocative words compared to imagery of less emotionally arousing content. Alpha increases for semantically loaded imagery were observed in parieto-occipital regions, sustained throughout the imagery period. Findings imply that alpha oscillations index active memory and internal cognitive processing, reflecting neural communication in cortical networks representing motor, semantic, and perceptual aspects of the imagined scene. PMID:25616004

  4. Spores of most common airborne fungi reveal no ice nucleation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pummer, B. G.; Atanasova, L.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.; Druzhinina, I. S.; Grothe, H.

    2013-06-01

    Fungal spores are ubiquitous biological aerosols, which are considered to show ice nucleation (IN) activity. In this study the respective IN activity was tested in oil emulsion in the immersion freezing mode. The focus was laid on species of economical, ecological or sanitary significance. For the first time, not only common moulds, but also edible mushrooms (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) were investigated, as they contribute massively to the total amount of fungal spores in the atmosphere. Only Fusarium avenaceum showed freezing events at low subzero-temperatures, while the other investigated fungal spores showed no significant IN activity. Furthermore, we selected a set of fungal strains from different sites and exposed them to occasional freezing stress during cultivation. Although the total protein expression was altered by this treatment, it had no significant impact on the IN activity.

  5. Physical-chemical and microbiological characterization, and mutagenic activity of airborne PM sampled in a biomass-fueled electrical production facility.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Corey A; Lemieux, Christine L; Long, Alexandra S; Kystol, Jørgen; Vogel, Ulla; White, Paul A; Madsen, Anne Mette

    2011-05-01

    Biomass combustion is used in heating and electric power generation in many areas of the world. Airborne particulate matter (PM) is released when biomass is brought to a facility, stored, and combusted. Occupational exposure to airborne PM within biomass-fueled facilities may lead to health problems. In March and August of 2006, airborne PM was collected from a biomass-fueled facility located in Denmark. In addition, source-specific PM was generated from straw and wood pellets using a rotating drum. The PM was analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, microbial components, mutagenic activity, and ability to generate highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) in cell-free aqueous suspensions. PM collected from the boiler room and the biomass storage hall had higher levels of mutagenic activity, PAHs and metals, and a higher hROS generating potential than the source specific PM. The mutagenic activity was generally more potent without S9 activation, and on the metabolically enhanced strain YG1041, relative to TA98. Significant correlations were found between mutagenicity on YG1041 (without S9) and PAH concentration and mutagenicity on YG1041 (with S9) and hROS generating ability. PM collected in March was more toxic than PM collected in August. Overall, airborne PM collected from the facility, especially that from the boiler room, were more toxic than PM generated from straw and wood chips. The results suggest that exposure to combustion PM in a biomass-fueled facility, which likely includes PM from biomass combustion as well as internal combustion vehicles, may contribute to an elevated risk of adverse health effects. PMID:20872826

  6. Characterization of the ice nucleation activity of an airborne Penicillium species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanova, Petya; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Franc, Gary D.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous both on and above the Earth. Several bacterial and fungal spe-cies are the focus of atmospheric studies due to their ability to trigger ice formation at high subzero temperatures. Thus, they have potential to modify cloud albedo, lifetime and precipita-tion, and ultimately the hydrological cycle. Several fungal strains have already been identified as possessing ice nucleation (IN) activity, and recent studies have shown that IN active fungi are present in the cultivable community of air and soil samples [1, 2]. However, the abundance, diversity, and sources of fungal ice nuclei in the atmosphere are still poorly characterized. In this study, fungal colonies obtained from air samples were screened for IN activity in the droplet-freezing assay described in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al., 2015 [2]. Out of 128 tested iso-lates, two were found to catalyze ice formation at temperatures up to -4°C. By DNA analysis, both isolates were classified as Penicillium spp. The freezing activity of both was further char-acterized after different filtration, heat, and enzymatic treatments in the temperature range from ‑4°C to ‑15°C. Preliminary results show that a proteinaceous compound is responsible for the IN activity. Furthermore, ongoing experiments indicate that the activity is associated only with the hyphae. [1] Huffman, et al. (2013): Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 6151-6164. [2] Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. (2015): Biogeosciences, 12: 1057-1071.

  7. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Takács, M. P.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the natTi(α,x)51Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with Eα = 20.7 and Eα = 51.25 MeV, Iα = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the 72,73,75Se, 71,72,74,76,78As, and 69Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  8. Molecular Basis of Prodrug Activation by Human Valacyclovirase, an [alpha]-Amino Acid Ester Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Longsheng; Xu, Zhaohui; Zhou, Jiahai; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2008-07-08

    Chemical modification to improve biopharmaceutical properties, especially oral absorption and bioavailability, is a common strategy employed by pharmaceutical chemists. The approach often employs a simple structural modification and utilizes ubiquitous endogenous esterases as activation enzymes, although such enzymes are often unidentified. This report describes the crystal structure and specificity of a novel activating enzyme for valacyclovir and valganciclovir. Our structural insights show that human valacyclovirase has a unique binding mode and specificity for amino acid esters. Biochemical data demonstrate that the enzyme hydrolyzes esters of {alpha}-amino acids exclusively and displays a broad specificity spectrum for the aminoacyl moiety similar to tricorn-interacting aminopeptidase F1. Crystal structures of the enzyme, two mechanistic mutants, and a complex with a product analogue, when combined with biochemical analysis, reveal the key determinants for substrate recognition; that is, a flexible and mostly hydrophobic acyl pocket, a localized negative electrostatic potential, a large open leaving group-accommodating groove, and a pivotal acidic residue, Asp-123, after the nucleophile Ser-122. This is the first time that a residue immediately after the nucleophile has been found to have its side chain directed into the substrate binding pocket and play an essential role in substrate discrimination in serine hydrolases. These results as well as a phylogenetic analysis establish that the enzyme functions as a specific {alpha}-amino acid ester hydrolase. Valacyclovirase is a valuable target for amino acid ester prodrug-based oral drug delivery enhancement strategies.

  9. Coupling of a signal response domain in I kappa B alpha to multiple pathways for NF-kappa B activation.

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, J A; Scherer, D C; McKinsey, T A; Hall, S M; Qi, X; Lee, W Y; Ballard, D W

    1995-01-01

    The eukaryotic transcription factor NF-kappa B plays a central role in the induced expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and in many aspects of the genetic program mediating normal T-cell activation and growth. The nuclear activity of NF-kappa B is tightly regulated from the cytoplasmic compartment by an inhibitory subunit called I kappa B alpha. This cytoplasmic inhibitor is rapidly phosphorylated and degraded in response to a diverse set of NF-kappa B-inducing agents, including T-cell mitogens, proinflammatory cytokines, and viral transactivators such as the Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. To explore these I kappa B alpha-dependent mechanisms for NF-kappa B induction, we identified novel mutants of I kappa B alpha that uncouple its inhibitory and signal-transducing functions in human T lymphocytes. Specifically, removal of the N-terminal 36 amino acids of I kappa B alpha failed to disrupt its ability to form latent complexes with NF-kappa B in the cytoplasm. However, this deletion mutation prevented the induced phosphorylation, degradative loss, and functional release of I kappa B alpha from NF-kappa B in Tax-expressing cells. Alanine substitutions introduced at two serine residues positioned within this N-terminal regulatory region of I kappa B alpha also yielded constitutive repressors that escaped from Tax-induced turnover and that potently inhibited immune activation pathways for NF-kappa B induction, including those initiated from antigen and cytokine receptors. In contrast, introduction of a phosphoserine mimetic at these sites rectified this functional defect, a finding consistent with a causal linkage between the phosphorylation status and proteolytic stability of this cytoplasmic inhibitor. Together, these in vivo studies define a critical signal response domain in I kappa B alpha that coordinately controls the biologic activities of I kappa B alpha and NF-kappa B in response to viral and immune stimuli. PMID:7739562

  10. alpha-Amylase inhibitory activity of some Malaysian plants used to treat diabetes; with particular reference to Phyllanthus amarus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hasenah; Houghton, P J; Soumyanath, Amala

    2006-10-11

    Extracts of six selected Malaysian plants with a reputation of usefulness in treating diabetes were examined for alpha-amylase inhibition using an in vitro model. Inhibitory activity studied by two different protocols (with and without pre-incubation) showed that Phyllanthus amarus hexane extract had alpha-amylase inhibitory properties. Hexane and dichloromethane extracts of Anacardium occidentale, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Averrhoa bilimbiPithecellobium jiringa and Parkia speciosa were not active when tested without pre-incubation. Extraction and fractionation of Phyllanthus amarus hexane extract led to the isolation of dotriacontanyl docosanoate, triacontanol and a mixture of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. Dotriacontanyl docosanoate and the mixture of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid are reported from this plant species for the first time. All compounds were tested in the alpha-amylase inhibition assay and the results revealed that the oleanolic acid and ursolic acid (2:1) mixture was a potent alpha-amylase inhibitor with IC(50)=2.01 microg/ml (4.41 microM) and that it contributes significantly to the alpha-amylase inhibition activity of the extract. Three pure pentacyclic triterpenoids, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid and lupeol were shown to inhibit alpha-amylase. PMID:16678367

  11. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-{alpha} in hepatitis-B-virus X protein-mediated MDR1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hyo-Kyung; Han, Chang Yeob; Cheon, Eun-Pa; Lee, Jaewon; Kang, Keon Wook . E-mail: kwkang@chosun.ac.kr

    2007-06-01

    The transition from chemotherapy-responsive cancer cells to chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells is mainly accompanied by the increased expression of multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1). We found that hepatitis-B-virus X protein (HBx) increases the transcriptional activity and protein level of MDR1 in a hepatoma cell line, H4IIE. In addition, HBx overexpression made H4IIE cells more resistant to verapamil-uptake. HBx stabilized hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and induced the nuclear translocation of C/EBP{beta}. Reporter gene analyses showed that HBx increased the reporter activity in the cells transfected with the reporter containing MDR1 gene promoter. Moreover, the luciferase reporter gene activity was significantly inhibited by HIF-1{alpha} siRNA but not by overexpression of C/EBP dominant negative mutant. These results imply that HBx increases the MDR1 transporter activity through the transcriptional activation of the MDR1 gene with HIF-1{alpha} activation, and suggest HIF-1{alpha} for the therapeutic target of HBV-mediated chemoresistance.

  12. The relationship between the level of salivary alpha amylase activity and pain severity in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Jazaeri, Mina; Babaei, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of dental pain severity is very challenging in dentistry. Previous studies have suggested that elevated salivary alpha amylase may contribute to increased physical stresses. There is a close association between salivary alpha amylase and plasma norepinephrine under stressful physical conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pain severity and salivary alpha amylase levels in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods Thirty-six patients (20 females and 16 males) with severe tooth pain due to symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were selected. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was used to assess the pain severity in each patient. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected, and the level of alpha amylase activity was assessed by the spectrophotometric method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13. Results The level of alpha amylase was significantly increased in the saliva in association with pain severity assessed by VAS. The salivary alpha amylase was also elevated with increased age and in males. Conclusions There was a significant correlation between the VAS pain scale and salivary alpha amylase level, which indicates this biomarker may be a good index for the objective assessment of pain intensity. PMID:24010080

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha control of lipid and glucose metabolism in human white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribet, Carole; Montastier, Emilie; Valle, Carine; Bezaire, Véronic; Mazzucotelli, Anne; Mairal, Aline; Viguerie, Nathalie; Langin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)alpha in human white adipocyte metabolism and at comparing PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma actions in these cells. Primary cultures of human fat cells were treated with the PPAR alpha agonist GW7647 or the PPAR gamma agonist rosiglitazone. Changes in gene expression were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot and metabolic studies were performed to identify the biological effects elicited by PPAR agonist treatments. GW7647 induced an up-regulation of beta-oxidation gene expression and increased palmitate oxidation. Unexpectedly, glycolysis was strongly reduced at transcriptional and functional levels by GW7647 leading to a decrease in pyruvate and lactate production. Glucose oxidation was decreased. Triglyceride esterification and de novo lipogenesis were inhibited by the PPAR alpha agonist. GW7647-induced alterations were abolished by a treatment with a PPAR alpha antagonist. Small interfering RNA-mediated extinction of PPAR alpha gene expression in hMADS adipocytes attenuated GW7647 induction of palmitate oxidation. Rosiglitazone had no major impact on glycolysis and beta-oxidation. Altogether these results show that PPAR alpha can selectively up-regulate beta-oxidation and decrease glucose utilization in human white adipocytes. PMID:19887568

  14. AN H{alpha} NUCLEAR SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN THE E0 ACTIVE GALAXY Arp 102B

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi, Kambiz; Axon, David J.; Kharb, Preeti; Robinson, Andrew; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Marconi, Alessandro; Maciejewski, Witold; Capetti, Alessandro E-mail: djasps@rit.edu E-mail: pxksps@cis.rit.edu E-mail: marconi@arcetri.astro.it E-mail: capetti@to.astro.it

    2011-08-01

    We report the discovery of a two-armed mini-spiral structure within the inner kiloparsec of the E0 LINER/Seyfert 1 galaxy Arp 102B. The arms are observed in H{alpha} emission and located east and west of the nucleus, extending up to {approx}1 kpc from it. We use narrow-band imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, in combination with archival Very Large Array radio images at 3.6 and 6 cm to investigate the origin of the nuclear spiral. From the H{alpha} luminosity of the spiral, we obtain an ionized gas mass of the order of 10{sup 6} solar masses. One possibility is that the nuclear spiral represents a gas inflow triggered by a recent accretion event which has replenished the accretion disk, giving rise to the double-peaked emission-line profiles characteristic of Arp 102B. However, the radio images show a one-sided curved jet which correlates with the eastern spiral arm observed in the H{alpha} image. A published milliarcsecond radio image also shows a one-sided structure at position angle {approx}40{sup 0}, approximately aligned with the inner part of the eastern spiral arm. The absence of a radio counterpart to the western spiral arm is tentatively interpreted as indicating that the jet is relativistic, with an estimated speed of 0.45c. Estimates of the jet kinetic energy and the ionizing luminosity of the active nucleus indicate that both are capable of ionizing the gas along the spiral arms. We conclude that, although the gas in the nuclear region may have originated in an accretion event, the mini spiral is most likely the result of a jet-cloud interaction rather than an inflowing stream.

  15. Immunologically active (1-->3)-(1-->4)-alpha-D-glucan from Cetraria islandica.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, E S; Ingolfsdottir, K; Barsett, H; Paulsen, B S; Jurcic, K; Wagner, H

    1999-03-01

    A polysaccharide, Ci-3, resembling isolichenan except with a much higher degree of polymerization, has been isolated from the water extract, as well as from the alkali extract, of the lichen Cetraria islandica (L.) using ethanol fractionation, dialysis, ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The mean M(r) of Ci-3 was determined to be 2000 kD, compared to 6-8 kD reported for isolichenan. The structure of Ci-3 was elucidated and found to be composed of (1-->3)- and (1-->4)-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl units in the ratio of 2:1, using methanolysis, methylation analysis, optical rotation and NMR spectroscopy. The immunomodulating activity of Ci-3 was tested in an in vitro phagocytosis assay and anti-complementary, and proved to be active in both tests. PMID:10228609

  16. Active/passive scanning. [airborne multispectral laser scanners for agricultural and water resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodfill, J. R.; Thomson, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the design, construction, and applications of an active/passive multispectral scanner combining lasers with conventional passive remote sensors. An application investigation was first undertaken to identify remote sensing applications where active/passive scanners (APS) would provide improvement over current means. Calibration techniques and instrument sensitivity are evaluated to provide predictions of the APS's capability to meet user needs. A preliminary instrument design was developed from the initial conceptual scheme. A design review settled the issues of worthwhile applications, calibration approach, hardware design, and laser complement. Next, a detailed mechanical design was drafted and construction of the APS commenced. The completed APS was tested and calibrated in the laboratory, then installed in a C-47 aircraft and ground tested. Several flight tests completed the test program.

  17. Spores of many common airborne fungi reveal no ice nucleation activity in oil immersion freezing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pummer, B. G.; Atanasova, L.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.; Druzhinina, I. S.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Grothe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Fungal spores are ubiquitous biological aerosols, which are considered to act as ice nuclei. In this study the ice nucleation (IN) activity of spores harvested from 29 fungal strains belonging to 21 different species was tested in the immersion freezing mode by microscopic observation of water-in-oil emulsions. Spores of 8 of these strains were also investigated in a microdroplet freezing array instrument. The focus was laid on species of economical, ecological or sanitary significance. Besides common molds (Ascomycota), some representatives of the widespread group of mushrooms (Basidiomycota) were also investigated. Fusarium avenaceum was the only sample showing IN activity at relatively high temperatures (about 264 K), while the other investigated fungal spores showed no freezing above 248 K. Many of the samples indeed froze at homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures (about 237 K). In combination with other studies, this suggests that only a limited number of species may act as atmospheric ice nuclei. This would be analogous to what is already known for the bacterial ice nuclei. Apart from that, we selected a set of fungal strains from different sites and exposed them to occasional freezing stress during their cultivation. This was in order to test if the exposure to a cold environment encourages the expression of ice nuclei during growth as a way of adaptation. Although the total protein expression was altered by this treatment, it had no significant impact on the IN activity.

  18. Comparison of alpha-amylase activity in larval stages of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebionidae).

    PubMed

    Bandani, A R; Balvasi, A

    2006-01-01

    Flour beetles attack stored grain products such as flour, cereals, meal, dried pet food, dried flowers and even dried museum specimens and other foods in the house. Stored-product insects cause tremendous losses by lowering weight, germination rate, nutritional value and grain grade. These beetles are of the most important pests of stored products in the home and grocery stores. The adult female may live for as long as two years, depositing 300 to 400 eggs. The life cycle requires one to four months when temperatures are favorable. Several methods could be used to control this insect including synthetic insecticides, biological control, physical control and transgenic plant carrying gene of interest. Chemical controls are discouraged due to pesticide residue in the commodities and resistance in insects. The study of insect digestive enzymes seems to make sense in the realization that the gut is the major interface between the insect and its environment. Hence, an understanding of digestive enzyme function is essential when developing methods of insect control such as the use of enzyme inhibitors and transgenic plants to control insect pests. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to get a good understanding from enzyme composition of different larval stages of the insect and finally characterize amylase which is the key enzyme in digestive system of this insect. For alpha-amylase study whole larvae were homogenized in 0.02 M phosphate buffer at pH 7.2. The homogenates were separately transferred to a 1.5 ml of centrifuge tubes and centrifuged at 15000xg for 20 min at 4degrees C. The supernatants were used as enzyme source in assays. alpha-Amylase activity was assayed by the dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) procedure using 1% soluble starch (Merck) as substrate. The results show that enzyme activity (OD) in the first, second, third and fourth larval stages were 0.5, 1.15, 1.35 and 1.362, respectively. There are significant differences in amylase activity in

  19. Biochemical properties of the stimulatory activity of DNA polymerase alpha by the hyper-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Masaharu

    2002-06-01

    Previously, my colleagues and I have reported that the immunopurified hyper-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (ppRb) stimulates the activity of DNA polymerase alpha. I describe here the biochemical characteristics of this stimulatory activity. DNA polymerase alpha-stimulatory activity of ppRb was most remarkable when using activated DNA as a template-primer, rather than using poly(dT)-(rA)(10), poly(dA)-(dT)(12-18), and so on. Kinetic analysis showed that there was no significant difference in K(m) value for deoxyribonucleotides of DNA polymerase alpha in the presence of ppRb. Adding ppRb resulted in the overcoming pause site on the template, but did not affect the rate of misincorporation of incorrect deoxyribonucleotides. By adding ppRb, the optimal concentration of template-primer was shifted to a higher region, but not using M13 singly primed DNA. The ppRb seemed to assist the process that DNA polymerase alpha changed its conformation resulting in appropriate enzyme activity. These results suggest that ppRb affects both template-primer and DNA polymerase alpha and makes appropriate circumstances for the enzyme reaction. PMID:12049795

  20. TNF-{alpha} promotes cell survival through stimulation of K{sup +} channel and NF{kappa}B activity in corneal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ling; Reinach, Peter; Lu, Luo . E-mail: lluou@ucla.edu

    2005-11-15

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-{alpha}) in various cell types induces either cell death or mitogenesis through different signaling pathways. In the present study, we determined in human corneal epithelial cells how TNF-{alpha} also promotes cell survival. Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells were cultured in DMEM/F-12 medium containing 10% FBS. TNF-{alpha} stimulation induced activation of a voltage-gated K{sup +} channel detected by measuring single channel activity using patch clamp techniques. The effect of TNF-{alpha} on downstream events included NF{kappa}B nuclear translocation and increases in DNA binding activities, but did not elicit ERK, JNK, or p38 limb signaling activation. TNF-{alpha} induced increases in p21 expression resulting in partial cell cycle attenuation in the G{sub 1} phase. Cell cycle progression was also mapped by flow cytometer analysis. Blockade of TNF-{alpha}-induced K{sup +} channel activity effectively prevented NF{kappa}B nuclear translocation and binding to DNA, diminishing the cell-survival protective effect of TNF-{alpha}. In conclusion, TNF-{alpha} promotes survival of HCE cells through sequential stimulation of K{sup +} channel and NF{kappa}B activities. This response to TNF-{alpha} is dependent on stimulating K{sup +} channel activity because following suppression of K{sup +} channel activity TNF-{alpha} failed to activate NF{kappa}B nuclear translocation and binding to nuclear DNA.

  1. PTH-related protein upregulates integrin {alpha}6{beta}4 expression and activates Akt in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Xiaoli; Falzon, Miriam . E-mail: mfalzon@utmb.edu

    2006-11-15

    Breast cancer is the most common carcinoma that metastasizes to bone. Tumor-produced parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a known stimulator of osteoclastic bone resorption, is a major mediator of the osteolytic process in breast cancer. We have previously shown that PTHrP increases breast cancer cell proliferation, survival, migration, and pro-invasive integrin {alpha}6{beta}4 expression. To determine the role of integrin {alpha}6{beta}4 in these PTHrP-mediated effects, we utilized two strategies to modulate expression of the {alpha}6 and {beta}4 subunits in parental and PTHrP-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells: overexpression of {alpha}6{beta}4 by transfection with constructs encoding the {alpha}6 and {beta}4 subunits, and suppression of endogenous {alpha}6{beta}4 expression by transfection with siRNAs targeting these subunits. We now show that the effects of PTHrP are mediated via upregulation of integrin {alpha}6{beta}4 expression. We also show that integrin {alpha}6{beta}4 expression is modulated at the mRNA level, indicating a transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional mechanism of action for PTHrP. PTHrP expression also increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt, with a consequent increase in the levels of phosphorylated (inactive) glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). The role of PTHrP in breast cancer growth and metastasis may thus be mediated via upregulation of integrin {alpha}6{beta}4 expression and Akt activation, with consequent inactivation of GSK-3.

  2. Cofilin 1 activation prevents the defects in axon elongation and guidance induced by extracellular alpha-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Tilve, Sharada; Difato, Francesco; Chieregatti, Evelina

    2015-01-01

    Impaired adult neurogenesis and axon traumatic injury participate in the severity of neurodegenerative diseases. Alpha-synuclein, a cytosolic protein involved in Parkinson’s disease, may be released from neurons, suggesting a role for excess secreted alpha-synuclein in the onset and spread of the pathology. Here we provide evidence that long term exposure of young neurons to extracellular alpha-synuclein hampers axon elongation and growth cone turning. We show that actin turnover and the rate of movement of actin waves along the axon are altered, due to alpha-synuclein-induced inactivation of cofilin. Upon laser disruption of microfilaments, healing of axons is favored by the increased phosphorylation of cofilin, however, at later time points; the defect in neurite extension prevails, being lost the regulation of cofilin activity. Importantly, overexpression of the active form of cofilin in neurons exposed to alpha-synuclein is able to restore the movement of actin waves, physiological axon elongation and growth cone turning. Our study reveals the molecular basis of alpha-synuclein-driven deficits in growth and migration of newborn neurons, and in elongation and regeneration of adult neurons. PMID:26558842

  3. n-3 Fatty acids preserve insulin sensitivity in vivo in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Neschen, Susanne; Morino, Katsutaro; Dong, Jianying; Wang-Fischer, Yanlin; Cline, Gary W; Romanelli, Anthony J; Rossbacher, Jörg C; Moore, Irene K; Regittnig, Werner; Munoz, David S; Kim, Jung H; Shulman, Gerald I

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that n-3 fatty acids, abundant in fish oil, protect against high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation and a subsequent decrease in intracellular lipid abundance. To directly test this hypothesis, we fed PPAR-alpha null and wild-type mice for 2 weeks with isocaloric high-fat diets containing 27% fat from either safflower oil or safflower oil with an 8% fish oil replacement (fish oil diet). In both genotypes the safflower oil diet blunted insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production (P < 0.02 vs. genotype control) and PEPCK gene expression. Feeding wild-type mice a fish oil diet restored hepatic insulin sensitivity (hepatic glucose production [HGP], P < 0.002 vs. wild-type mice fed safflower oil), whereas in contrast, in PPAR-alpha null mice failed to counteract hepatic insulin resistance (HGP, P = NS vs. PPAR-alpha null safflower oil-fed mice). In PPAR-alpha null mice fed the fish oil diet, safflower oil plus fish oil, hepatic insulin resistance was dissociated from increases in hepatic triacylglycerol and acyl-CoA but accompanied by a more than threefold increase in hepatic diacylglycerol concentration (P < 0.0001 vs. genotype control). These data support the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acids protect from high-fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance in a PPAR-alpha-and diacylglycerol-dependent manner. PMID:17251275

  4. The effects of L-theanine on alpha-band oscillatory brain activity during a visuo-spatial attention task.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Kelly, Simon P; Montesi, Jennifer L; Foxe, John J

    2009-06-01

    Background/Objectives Ingestion of the non-proteinic amino acid L-theanine (gamma-glutamylethylamide) has been shown to influence oscillatory brain activity in the alpha band (8-14 Hz) in humans during resting electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings and also during cognitive task performance. We have previously shown that ingestion of a 250-mg dose of L-theanine significantly reduced tonic (background) alpha power during a demanding intersensory (auditory-visual) attentional cueing task. Further, cue-related phasic changes in alpha power, indexing the shorter-term anticipatory biasing of attention between modalities, were stronger on L-theanine compared to placebo. This form of cue-contingent phasic alpha activity is also known to index attentional biasing within visual space. Specifically, when a relevant location is pre-cued, anticipatory alpha power increases contralateral to the location to be ignored. Here we investigate whether the effects of L-theanine on tonic and phasic alpha activity, found previously during intersensory attentional deployment, occur also during a visuospatial task. Subjects/Methods 168-channel EEG data were recorded from thirteen neurologically normal individuals while engaged in a highly demanding visuo-spatial attention task. Participants underwent testing on two separate days, ingesting either a 250-mg colorless and tasteless solution of L-theanine mixed with water, or a water-based solution placebo on each day in counterbalanced order. We compared the alpha-band activity when subjects ingested L-Theanine vs. Placebo. Results We found a significant reduction in tonic alpha for the L-theanine treatment compared to placebo, which was accompanied by a shift in scalp topography, indicative of treatment-related changes in the neural generators of oscillatory alpha activity. However, L-theanine did not measurably affect cue-related anticipatory alpha effects. Conclusions This pattern of results implies that L-theanine plays a more general

  5. Special Form Testing of Sealed Source Encapsulation for High-Alpha-Activity Actinide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Oscar A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States all transportation of radioactive material is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Beginning in 2008 a new type of sealed-source encapsulation package was developed and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These packages contain high-alpha-activity actinides and are regulated and transported in accordance with the requirements for DOT Class 7 hazardous material. The DOT provides specific regulations pertaining to special form encapsulation designs. The special form designation indicates that the encapsulated radioactive contents have a very low probability of dispersion even when subjected to significant structural events. The special form designs have been shown to simplify the delivery, transport, acceptance, and receipt processes. It is intended for these sealed-source encapsulations to be shipped to various facilities making it very advantageous for them to be certified as special form. To this end, DOT Certificates of Competent Authority (CoCAs) have been sought for the design suitable for containing high-alpha-activity actinide materials. This design consists of the high-alpha-activity material encapsulated within a triangular zirconia canister, referred to as a ZipCan, tile that is then enclosed by a spherical shell. The spherical shell design, with ZipCan tile inside, was tested for compliance with the special form regulations found in 49 CFR 173.469. The spherical enclosure was subjected to 9-m impact, 1 m percussion, and 10-minute thermal tests at the Packaging Evaluation Facility located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN USA and operated by ORNL. Before and after each test, the test units were subjected to a helium leak check and a bubble test. The ZipCan tiles and core were also subjected to the tests required for ISO 2919:2012(E), including a Class IV impact test and heat test and subsequently subjected to helium leakage rate tests [49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i)]. The impact

  6. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  7. Active moss biomonitoring of small-scale spatial distribution of airborne major and trace elements in the Belgrade urban area.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Gordana; Aničić Urošević, Mira; Razumenić, Ivana; Goryainova, Zoya; Frontasyeva, Marina; Tomašević, Milica; Popović, Aleksandar

    2013-08-01

    In urban environments, human exposure to air pollutants is expected to be significantly increased, especially near busy traffic streets, street canyons, tunnels, etc. where urban topography and microclimate may additionally cause poor air conditions giving rise to pollution hotspots. As a practical and cost-effective approach, active moss biomonitoring survey of some major and trace element air pollution was performed in the Belgrade street canyons and city tunnel in 2011 with the aim to evaluate possibility of using Sphagnum girgensohnii moss bags for investigation of the small-scale vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of the elements. In five street canyons, the moss bags were hung at heights of about 4, 8 and 16 m, during 10 weeks, and also, for the same time, the moss bags were exposed in the tunnel, in front of and out of it. After the exposure period, the concentrations of Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in the moss were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. According to the results, in all street canyons, the vertical distribution patterns of the moss elements concentration (Al, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn) showed statistically significant decrease from the first to the third heights of bags exposure. In the tunnel experiment, from inner to out of the tunnel, for Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K and Zn, decreasing trend of concentrations was obtained. Significantly higher concentration of the elements was pronounced for the tunnel in comparison with the street canyons. The results indicate that the use of S. girgensohnii moss bags is a simple, sensitive and inexpensive way to monitor the small-scale inner city spatial distribution of airborne major and trace element content. PMID:23430735

  8. Maltose effects on barley malt diastatic power enzyme activity and thermostability at high isothermal mashing temperature: II. Alpha-amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltose, the primary product of starch degradation during mashing, has the potential as a compatible solute to affect the activity of and increase the thermostability of barley malt alpha-amylase activity at high temperatures used in mashing and temperatures above those normally used in mashing. To ...

  9. Determination of oenothein B as the active 5-alpha-reductase-inhibiting principle of the folk medicine Epilobium parviflorum.

    PubMed

    Lesuisse, D; Berjonneau, J; Ciot, C; Devaux, P; Doucet, B; Gourvest, J F; Khemis, B; Lang, C; Legrand, R; Lowinski, M; Maquin, P; Parent, A; Schoot, B; Teutsch, G

    1996-05-01

    Several extracts from Epilobium parviflorum, a plant used in Central Europe for the treatment of prostate disorders, were evaluated in a biochemical assay with 5-alpha-reductase. The aqueous extract displaying inhibition of the enzyme was analyzed, the fraction responsible for this activity was purified, and the active compound identified as a macrocyclic tannin, oenothein B (1). PMID:8778238

  10. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging. PMID:27611371

  11. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles. PMID:7005667

  12. Airborne Measurements of Emissions from Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Activities in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Roiger, A.; Raut, J.; Rose, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Reiter, A.; Thomas, J. L.; Marelle, L.; Law, K.; Schlager, H.

    2013-12-01

    A rapid decline of Arctic sea ice is expected to promote hydrocarbon extraction in the Arctic, which in turn will increase emissions of atmospheric pollutants. To investigate impacts of different pollution sources on the Arctic atmosphere, an aircraft campaign based in northern Norway was conducted in July 2012, as a part of the EU ACCESS (Arctic Climate Change Economy and Society) project. One of the flights focused on measuring emissions from various oil/gas exploration and production facilities ~110 km south of the Arctic Circle in the Norwegian Sea. Fresh and aged (from 5 minutes to 2.5 hours old) exhaust plumes from oil/gas production platforms, drilling rigs and tankers were probed with extensive aerosol and trace gas instrumentations. It was found that different types of facilities emit plumes with distinct chemical compositions. For example, tanker plumes were characterized by high SO2 concentration and high fraction of non-volatile particles while plumes from oil/gas production platforms showed significant increase in the nucleation mode particle concentration. Drilling rigs were found to be high black carbon emitters. In addition to the fresh plumes, relatively aged plumes (1.5 - 2.5 hours old) from a facility under development were measured. Even in these aged plumes, total particle concentrations were more than 6 times higher than the background concentration. Therefore, emissions from oil and gas activities are expected to have a significant impact on local air quality and atmospheric composition. With the aid of FLEXPART-WRF (a Lagrangian dispersion model) simulations, the results of this study will be used to validate and improve current emission inventories. In the future, these improved emission inventories can be used in regional and global chemical transport models to more accurately predict future Arctic air pollution.

  13. Terpenoids with alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity from the submerged culture of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Ying, You-Min; Zhang, Lin-Yan; Zhang, Xia; Bai, Hai-Bo; Liang, Dong-E; Ma, Lie-Feng; Shan, Wei-Guang; Zhan, Zha-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Lanostane-type triterpenoids, inotolactones A and B, a drimane-type sesquiterpenoid, inotolactone C, and five known terpenoids 6β-hydroxy-trans-dihydroconfertifolin, inotodiol, 3β,22-dihydroxyanosta-7,9(11),24-triene, 3β-hydroxycinnamolide, and 17-hydroxy-ent-atisan-19-oic acid, were isolated from the submerged culture of chaga mushroom, Inonotus obliquus. Their structures were characterized by spectroscopic methods, including MS and NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopic techniques. Inotolactones A and B, examples of lanostane-type triterpenoids bearing α,β-dimethyl, α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone side chains, exhibited more potent alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities than the positive control acarbose. This finding might be related to the anti-hyperglycemic properties of the fungus and to its popular role as a diabetes treatment. In addition, a drimane-type sesquiterpenoid and an atisane-type diterpenoid were isolated from I. obliquus. PMID:25446238

  14. Electromyographical study of uterine activity in the human during labour induced by prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed

    Lopes, P; Germain, G; Breart, G; Reitano, S; Le Houezec, R; Sureau, C

    1984-01-01

    In full-term pregnant women, electrical and mechanical activity of the uterus was monitored throughout the course of labour promoted by intravenous infusion of Pg F2 alpha. The recorded potentials were mostly biphasic and characterized by their long duration ranging from 1 to 2s. A wide range of potential amplitudes (100 microV to 1.8 mV) was observed according to the various patients. Early at the beginning of labour induction, the electrical complexes firing at various uterine sites were proved to be in close relationship and also well correlated with the mechanical events. This feature remained unchanged during labour. Potential amplitudes also remained unchanged during the same period of time. Under these conditions, improvement of uterine coordination does not appear to be the mechanism by which the increase of uterine contractile strength, necessary to expel the fetus, is obtained at the end of gestation. PMID:6584391

  15. Alpha capture reaction cross section measurements on Sb isotopes by activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Fülöp, Zs; Güray, R. T.; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Török, Zs; Yalçin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range from 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the upper end of the Gamow window at a temperature of 3 GK relevant to the γ-process. The experiments were carried out at the Institute for Nuclear Research, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki). 121Sb(α,γ)125I, 121Sb(α,n)124I and 123Sb(α,n)126I reactions were measured using a HPGe detector. In this work, the 121Sb(α,n)124 cross section results and the comparison with the theoretical predictions (obtained with standard settings of the statistical model codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS) were presented.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha expression in rat liver during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Panadero, M; Herrera, E; Bocos, C

    2000-08-01

    The expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) as well as of some related genes was studied in rat liver at different stages of development (from 19-day-old fetuses to 1 month-old rats). The level of PPARalpha mRNA appeared higher in neonates than in fetuses or 1 month-old rats. Whereas the pattern for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA level was similar to that of PPARalpha, the mRNA level of both acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) and apolipoprotein CIII (apo CIII) showed diverse profiles. Western blotting analysis also revealed an increased level of PPARalpha protein in liver of suckling rats. Similarities of mRNA PEPCK and PPARalpha expression indicate a common control mechanism, where both nutritional and hormonal factors may be involved. PMID:11018288

  17. Soluble alpha-APP (sAPPalpha) regulates CDK5 expression and activity in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Daniela; Klatt, Stephan; Roch, Manfred; Konthur, Zoltan; Klose, Joachim; Willnow, Thomas E; Rohe, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests a role for soluble alpha-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPalpha) in pathomechanisms of Alzheimer disease (AD). This cleavage product of APP was identified to have neurotrophic properties. However, it remained enigmatic what proteins, targeted by sAPPalpha, might be involved in such neuroprotective actions. Here, we used high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to analyze proteome changes downstream of sAPPalpha in neurons. We present evidence that sAPPalpha regulates expression and activity of CDK5, a kinase that plays an important role in AD pathology. We also identified the cytoprotective chaperone ORP150 to be induced by sAPPalpha as part of this protective response. Finally, we present functional evidence that the sAPPalpha receptor SORLA is essential to mediate such molecular functions of sAPPalpha in neurons. PMID:23776568

  18. Supine posture inhibits cortical activity: Evidence from Delta and Alpha EEG bands.

    PubMed

    Spironelli, Chiara; Busenello, Jessica; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Past studies have shown consistent evidence that body position significantly affects brain activity, revealing that both head-down and horizontal bed-rest are associated with cortical inhibition and altered perceptual and cognitive processing. The present study investigates the effects of body position on spontaneous, open-eyes, resting-state EEG cortical activity in 32 young women randomly assigned to one of two conditions, seated position (SP) or horizontal bed rest (BR). A between-group repeated-measure experimental design was used, EEG recordings were made from 38 scalp locations, and low-frequency (delta and alpha) amplitudes of the two groups were compared in four different conditions: when both groups (a) were seated (T0), (b) assumed two different body positions (seated vs. supine conditions, immediate [T1] and 120min later [T2]), and (c) were seated again (T3). Overall, the results showed no a priori between-group differences (T0) before experimental manipulation. As expected, delta amplitude, an index of cortical inhibition in awake resting participants, was significantly increased in group BR, revealing both rapid (T1) and mid-term (T2) inhibitory effects of supine or horizontal positions. Instead, the alpha band was highly sensitive to postural transitions, perhaps due to baroreceptor intervention and, unlike the delta band, underwent habituation and decreased after a 2-h bed rest. These results indicate clear-cut differences at rest between the seated and supine positions, thus supporting the view that the role of body position in the differences found between brain metabolic methods (fMRI and PET) in which participants lie horizontally, and EEG-MEG-TMS techniques with participants in a seated position, has been largely underestimated so far. PMID:27312745

  19. Promoter activity of the 5'-flanking regions of medaka fish soluble guanylate cyclase alpha1 and beta1 subunit genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suzuki, Norio

    2002-01-01

    We examined the spatial expression pattern of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) soluble guanylate cyclase alpha(1) and beta(1) subunit genes, OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1), and characterized the 5'-flanking region required for expression of both genes by introducing various promoter-luciferase fusion-gene constructs into COS-1 cells and medaka fish embryos. The OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) gene transcripts were detected in whole brain and kidney in 7-day and 9-day embryos. Primer-extension analysis demonstrated that there were no differences among various adult organs (brain, eye, kidney, ovary and testis) in the transcription start site of the OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) genes. Neither gene contained the functional TATA box within its 5'-flanking region, and the basal promoter activity was found between nucleotides +33 and +42 in the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene and between nucleotides +146 and +155 in the OlGCS-beta(1) gene. In the assay of medaka fish embryos, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene exhibited lower promoter activity than that of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene. In the experiments on dual-luciferase fusion-gene constructs, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene connected to the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene was introduced into medaka fish embryos, and the 5'-flanking regions of both subunit genes were shown to mutually influence each other's promoter activity. PMID:11772405

  20. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in Aloe vera.

    PubMed

    Lowther, William; Lorick, Kevin; Lawrence, Susan D; Yeow, Wen-Shuz

    2012-12-01

    Methods necessary for the successful transformation and regeneration of Aloe vera were developed and used to express the human protein, interferon alpha 2 (IFNα2). IFNα2 is a secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the cellular response to viral infection. Transgenic plants were regenerated from callus cultures initiated from zygotic embryos. Expression of the IFNA2 transgene in transformed plants was confirmed by RT-PCR and IFNα2 protein was detected by immunoblot analysis. Human A549 cells treated with transgenic aloe extracts for 6 h induced expression of the interferon stimulated gene 54, indicating activation of the IFN signaling pathway. The biological activity of the aloe produced IFNα2 was assessed using an antiviral assay with A549 cells treated with extracts from both the rind and pulp fractions of the shoot and subsequently infected with the lytic encephalomyocarditis virus. The highest level of activity attributable to recombinant IFNα2 was determined to be 625 IU/mg of total soluble protein (TSP) in the rind and 2,108 IU/mg TSP in the pulp. Two daughter plants that vegetatively budded during the course of this study were also confirmed to express IFNα2. These results confirm that Aloe vera is capable of expressing a human protein with biological activity, and that a secreted protein targeting the apoplast can be detected in the pulp fraction of the plant. PMID:22528466

  1. Sequential sampling and analysis of renal hydroxylase activities of cattle given 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Littledike, E T; Engstrom, G W; Sachs, M

    1986-04-01

    A new method was developed for sequential sampling of bovine renal cortex. This method results in minimum hemorrhage and adhesions and provides sufficient renal cortex tissue for assay of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1 alpha-, 24-, and 23-hydroxylase activities. Application of this procedure in calves and pregnant cows treated with 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 is described. The success of these experiments suggests these techniques could be used to follow enzyme activities that control crucial aspects of vitamin D metabolism in normal peripartum cows and cows with milk fever or other diseases of mineral metabolism. PMID:3722540

  2. In vitro biological activities of a series of 2 beta-substituted analogues of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, N; Nakagawa, K; Kurobe, M; Ono, Y; Kubodera, N; Ozono, K; Okano, T

    2000-01-01

    Biological activities of a series of 2beta-substituted analogues of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1alpha,25(OH)2D3] were evaluated in vitro in terms of their binding affinity with regard to calf thymus cytosolic vitamin D receptor (VDR) and rat plasma vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). Additionally, reporter gene luciferase activities using either a rat 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase gene promoter, including two vitamin D-responsive elements (VDREs), in transfected rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells, or a human VDR-GAL4 modified two-hybrid system in transfected human epitheloid carcinoma, cervix HeLa cells were examined. Binding affinity for VDR, transactivation potency on the target gene and VDR-mediated gene regulation of the hydroxyalkyl and hydroxyalkoxy 2beta-substituted analogues were almost comparable to those of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3, while the alkyl and alkenyl analogues were much less active than 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. This study investigated the biological evaluation of a series of 2beta-substituted analogues at the molecular level, with regard to the structural differences of alkyl, alkenyl, hydroxyalkyl, hydroxyalkoxy, alkoxy, hydroxy and chloro substituents at the 2beta-position of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. PMID:10706413

  3. TNF-alpha, but not IL-6, stimulates plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Plomgaard, Peter; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2005-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is produced by adipose tissue, and elevated PAI-1 levels in plasma are a risk factor in the metabolic syndrome. We investigated the regulatory effects of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on PAI-1 gene induction in human adipose tissue. Twenty healthy men underwent a 3-h infusion of either recombinant human TNF-alpha (n = 8), recombinant human IL-6 (n = 6), or vehicle (n = 6). Biopsies were obtained from the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue at preinfusion, at 1, 2, and 3 h during the infusion, and at 2 h after the infusion. The mRNA expression of PAI-1 in the adipose tissue was measured using real-time PCR. The plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 reached 18 and 99 pg/ml, respectively, during the infusions. During the TNF-alpha infusion, adipose PAI-1 mRNA expression increased 2.5-fold at 1 h, 6-fold at 2 h, 9-fold at 3 h, and declined to 2-fold 2 h after the infusion stopped but did not change during IL-6 infusion and vehicle. These data demonstrate that TNF-alpha rather than IL-6 stimulates an increase in PAI-1 mRNA in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, suggesting that TNF-alpha may be involved in the pathogenesis of related metabolic disorders. PMID:15677734

  4. Relationship between lipoprotein lipase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha expression in rat liver during development.

    PubMed

    Panadero, M; Bocos, C; Herrera, E

    2006-09-01

    The present study was addressed to determine whether the high expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) in rat liver during the perinatal stage plays a role in the induction of liver lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression and activity. Parallel increases in liver mRNA PPAR-alpha and LPL activity were found in newborn rats, and after a slight decline, values remained elevated until weaning. Anticipated weaning for 3 days caused a decline in those two variables as well as in the mRNA LPL level, and a similar change was also found in liver triacylglycerol concentration. Force-feeding with Intralipid in 10-day-old rats or animals kept fasted for 5 h showed high mRNA-PPARalpha and -LPL levels as well as LPL activity with low plasma insulin and high FFA levels, whereas glucose and a combination of glucose and Intralipid produced low mRNA-PPARalpha and -LPL levels as well as LPL activity. Under these latter conditions, plasma insulin and FFA levels were high in those rats receiving the combination of glucose and Intralipid, whereas plasma FFA levels were low in those force-fed with glucose. It is proposed that the hormonal and nutritional induction of liver PPAR-alpha expression around birth and its maintained elevated level throughout suckling is responsible for the induction of liver LPL-expression and activity during suckling. PMID:17451160

  5. Effects of metals on {alpha}-amylase activity in the digestive gland of the green mussel, Perna viridis L.

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.; Teo, L.H.; Sin, Y.M.

    1996-04-01

    A number of digestive enzymes in the green mussel, Perna viridis L., have been reported, and {alpha}-amylase is believed to have a higher activity than the others. Small plankton, on which the green mussel feeds, may supply plenty of starch and glycogen. They may be an important source of nutrients for the green mussel and the ability of the latter to make good use of them depends mainly on the activities of amylase. The effect of heavy metals on amylase activity is also important as the ability of the mussel`s digestive gland to accumulate these metals is well known. High concentrations of heavy metals, especially lead, have been observed in the water around Singapore. The in vitro inhibition of some metals on the activities of digestive enzymes from the green mussel has been observed, but kinetic properties of the inhibition and the in vivo inhibition of the heavy metals on digestive enzymes are little understood. In the present study, in vitro inhibition of four metals (Pb, Cd, Zn and Hg) on the activity of {alpha}-amylase from the digestive gland of the green mussel will be compared. Their effects on the K{sub M} and V{sub max} values of {alpha}-amylase will also be compared. Finally, lead is either added to the food or water, to see how it affects the activity of {alpha}-amylase and how this effect acts in combination with starvation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Two farnesoid X receptor alpha isoforms in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) are differentially activated in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Hagey, Lee R.; Law, Sheran H.W.; Ai, Ni; Krasowski, Matthew D.; Ekins, Sean; Moore, John T.; Kollitz, Erin M.; Hinton, David E.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor alpha (FXRα, NR1H4) is activated by bile acids in multiple species including mouse, rat, and human and in this study we have identified two isoforms of Fxrα in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a small freshwater teleost. Both isoforms share a high amino acid sequence identity to mammalian FXRα (~70% in the ligand-binding domain). Fxrα1 and Fxrα2 differ within the AF1 domain due to alternative splicing at the fourth intron-exon boundary. This process results in Fxrα1 having an extended N-terminus compared to Fxrα2. A Gal4DBD-FxrαLBD fusion construct was activated by chenodeoxycholic, cholic, deoxycholic and lithocholic acids, and the synthetic agonist GW4064 in transient transactivation assays. Activation of the Gal4DBD-FxrαLBD fusion construct was enhanced by addition of PGC-1α, as demonstrated through titration assays. Surprisingly, when the full-length versions of the two Fxrα isoforms were compared in transient transfection assays, Fxrα2 was activated by C24 bile acids and GW4064, while Fxrα1 was not significantly activated by any of the compounds tested. Since the only significant difference between the full-length constructs was sequence in the AF1 domain, these experiments highlight a key functional region in the Fxrα AF1 domain. Furthermore, mammalian two-hybrid studies demonstrated the ability of Fxrα2, but not Fxrα1, to interact with PGC-1α and SRC-1, and supported our results from the transient transfection reporter gene activation assays. These data demonstrate that both mammalian and teleost FXR (Fxrα2 isoform) are activated by primary and secondary bile acids. PMID:20430454

  7. Alpha-lipoic acid: an inhibitor of secretory phospholipase A2 with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Jameel, Noor Mohamed; Shekhar, Mysore A; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S

    2006-12-14

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and its reduced form dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) are powerful antioxidants both in hydrophilic and lipophylic environments with diverse pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory activity. The mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of ALA and DHALA is not known. The present study describes the interaction of ALA and DHALA with pro-inflammatory secretory PLA(2) enzymes from inflammatory fluids and snake venoms. In vitro enzymatic inhibition of sPLA(2) from Vipera russellii, Naja naja and partially purified sPLA(2) enzymes from human ascitic fluid (HAF), human pleural fluid (HPF) and normal human serum (HS) by ALA and DHLA was studied using (14)C-oleate labeled Escherichia coli as the substrate. Biophysical interaction of ALA with sPLA(2) was studied by fluorescent spectral analysis and circular dichroism studies. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity was checked using sPLA(2) induced mouse paw edema model. ALA but not DHLA inhibited purified sPLA(2) enzymes from V. russellii, N. naja and partially purified HAF, HPF and HS in a dose dependent manner. This data indicated that ALA is critical for inhibition. IC(50) value calculated for these enzymes ranges from 0.75 to 3.0 microM. The inhibition is independent of calcium and substrate concentration. Inflammatory sPLA(2) enzymes are more sensitive to inhibition by ALA than snake venom sPLA(2) enzymes. ALA quenched the fluorescence intensity of sPLA(2) enzyme in a dose dependent manner. Apparent shift in the far UV-CD spectra of sPLA(2) with ALA indicated change in its alpha-helical confirmation and these results suggest its direct interaction with the enzyme. ALA inhibits the sPLA(2) induced mouse paw edema in a dose dependent manner and confirms the sPLA(2) inhibitory activity in vivo also. These data suggest that ALA may act as an endogenous regulator of sPLA(2) enzyme activity and suppress inflammatory reactions. PMID:17011589

  8. High-resolution topographic change detection of an active earthflow using airborne and terrestrial LiDAR, Mill Gulch, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. P.; DeLong, S.

    2011-12-01

    In landscapes where airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) exists, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can be used to update high-resolution topographic models for quantification of landscape change. At Mill Gulch in northern California, we scanned an active earthflow using TLS in 2011 that had also been imaged by ALSM in 2003 and 2007. In order to evaluate change at the sub-meter level between the ALSM and TLS data, we generated a custom, 30 cm resolution ALSM digital elevation model (DEM), employed geographic transformations to align the disparate datasets, and refined the vertical alignment using an unaltered road surface. We then conducted vegetation removal from the TLS data, gridded it to 30 cm, and produced detailed maps of topographic evolution. Previous work comparing the 2003 and 2007 ALSM data indicated that this earthflow translated blocks of material as much as 5 m/yr and that significant material was removed by the channel at the toe of the earthflow, leading to a net elevation decrease across the earthflow. Over the last four years, the earthflow has experienced overall rotational movement leading to distinct failure planes in the source area with elevations decreasing as much as 3.75 m, while the toe aggraded up to 2.5 m. Maximum translation rates in the transport zone have decreased to 3.5 m/yr and very little material was removed by the channel. Early analysis indicates a slight increase in the net volume of the earthflow and an average elevation increase of 0.05 m between 2007 and 2011. It is possible this is the result of any number of factors, including the failure of TLS to adequately measure the thalweg depth of supra-flow gullies and depths of tension fractures, higher sensitivity to grasses in TLS data, decreased material density (and concomitant volumetric increase) due to tension fracturing, the swelling of clays and increased pore water pressure in the earthflow. However, it is also reasonable that this result reflects minor systematic error

  9. The alpha-5 segment of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin: in vitro activity, ion channel formation and molecular modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, E; Bach, D; Kerr, I D; Sansom, M S; Chejanovsky, N; Shai, Y

    1994-01-01

    A peptide with a sequence corresponding to the highly conserved alpha-5 segment of the Cry delta-endotoxin family (amino acids 193-215 of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIIIA [Gazit and Shai (1993) Biochemistry 32, 3429-3436]), was investigated with respect to its interaction with insect membranes, cytotoxicity in vitro towards Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells, and its propensity to form ion channels in planar lipid membranes (PLMs). Selectively labelled analogues of alpha-5 at either the N-terminal amino acid or the epsilon-amine of its lysine, were used to monitor the interaction of the peptides with insect membranes. The fluorescent emission spectra of the 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-4-yl (NBD)-labelled alpha-5 peptides displayed a blue shift upon binding to insect (Spodoptera littoralis) mid-gut membranes, reflecting the relocation of the fluorescent probes to an environment of increased apolarity, i.e. within the lipidic constituent of the membrane. Moreover, midgut membrane-bound NBD-labelled alpha-5 peptides were protected from enzymic proteolysis. Functional characterization of alpha-5 has revealed that it is cytotoxic to Sf-9 insect cells, and that it forms ion channels in PLMs with conductances ranging from 30 to 1000 pS. A proline-substituted analogue of alpha-5 is less cytolytic and slightly more exposed to enzymic digestion. Molecular modelling utilizing simulated annealing via molecular dynamics suggests that a transbilayer pore may be formed by alpha-5 monomers that assemble to form a left-handed coiled coil of approximately parallel helices. These findings further support a role for alpha-5 in the toxic mechanism of delta-endotoxins, and assign alpha-5 as one of the transmembrane helices which form the toxic pore. The suggested role is consistent with the recent finding that cleavage of CryIVB delta-endotoxin in a loop between alpha-5 and alpha-6 is highly important for its larvicidal activity [Angsuthanasombat, Crickmore and Ellar (1993) FEMS

  10. Determination of the specific alpha activity of thick sources with a large area ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Djurasević, M; Vukanac, I; Kandić, A; Nadderd, L; Milosević, Z; Radenković, M

    2007-01-01

    A method for determining the specific alpha activity of thick sources using a large area ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector is presented. In this method a quadratic relationship between the detector response and window thickness is assumed. This method provides a quick estimation of alpha activity in the sample, so it is an indicative method. The aim of this experimental work is to approve theoretical assumption and to develop a standard routine method for absolute alpha measurements of thick contaminated environmental sources. For this purpose reference material U(3)O(8) and spiked standards of soil were used. Measurements of contaminated soil samples from south Serbia showed the practical application of this method. PMID:17383779

  11. Analysis of prepro-alpha-lytic protease expression in Escherichia coli reveals that the pro region is required for activity.

    PubMed Central

    Silen, J L; Frank, D; Fujishige, A; Bone, R; Agard, D A

    1989-01-01

    The alpha-lytic protease of Lysobacter enzymogenes was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli by fusing the promoter and signal sequence of the E. coli phoA gene to the proenzyme portion of the alpha-lytic protease gene. Following induction, active enzyme was found both within cells and in the extracellular medium, where it slowly accumulated to high levels. Use of a similar gene fusion to express the protease domain alone produced inactive enzyme, indicating that the large amino-terminal pro region is necessary for activity. The implications for protein folding are discussed. Furthermore, inactivation of the protease by mutation of the catalytic serine residue resulted in the production of a higher-molecular-weight form of the alpha-lytic protease, suggesting that the enzyme is self-processing in E. coli. Images PMID:2646278

  12. Effects of quartz, airborne particulates and fly ash fractions from a waste incinerator on elastase release by activated and nonactivated rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyas, H.; Labedzka, M.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G.

    1988-01-01

    Elastase release from cultured, activated and nonactivated rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) was investigated after stimulation by different environmentally related mineral dusts (50-1000 micrograms/10(6) cells). Eight different dusts were analyzed for element contents and grain size: one rural and three urban airborne dusts, a coarse and a fine fraction of a sieved waste incinerator fly ash, a sonicated coarse fly ash fraction, and the standard quartz dust DQ 12. The fine fly ash fraction, the sonicated coarse fly ash fraction, and the quartz dust DQ 12 enhanced elastase release by activated AM. Only one of the tested airborne dusts effected a comparable elastase release. The untreated coarse fraction of the fly ash did not cause a significant increase of extracellular elastase activities. Elastase release was dependent on particle numbers and chemical composition and correlated best with barium and tin contents. Nonactivated AM released higher elastase activities than activated AM at low-dose levels. The possible role of dust-induced elastase secretion in the pathogenesis of emphysema is discussed.

  13. Quantitation of Alpha-Glucosidase Activity Using Fluorinated Carbohydrate Array and MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyojik; Chan, Allen L; LaVallo, Vincent; Cheng, Quan

    2016-02-01

    Quantitation of alpha-glucosidase (α-GD) activity is of significance to diagnosis of many diseases including Pompe disease and type II diabetes. We report here a new method to determine α-GD activity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) in combination with carbohydrate microarray and affinity surface chemistry. Carbohydrate probes are synthesized for capture of the enzymatic reaction products and the adducts are loaded onto a fluorinated gold surface to generate an array, which is followed by characterization by MALDI-TOF-MS. The ratio of intensities is used to determine the level of activity of several enzymes. In addition, half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of acarbose and epigallocatechin gallate are also determined using this approach, and the results agree well with the reported values. This method is advantageous as compared to conventional colorimetric techniques that typically suffer matrix interference problems from samples. The use of the polyfluorinated surface has effectively suppressed the interference. PMID:26760440

  14. Compounds extracted from feverfew that have anti-secretory activity contain an alpha-methylene butyrolactone unit.

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, W A; Knight, D W; Heptinstall, S

    1986-09-01

    Extracts of feverfew inhibit secretion of granular contents from platelets and neutrophils and this may be relevant to the therapeutic value of feverfew in migraine and other conditions. In this investigation we fractionated an extract of feverfew and obtained eleven fractions with antisecretory activity. The activity. The active fractions, together with two fractions that were devoid of anti-secretory activity, were examined using 1H NMR and infrared spectroscopy. All the active fractions (but neither of the inactive fractions) contained compounds with an alpha-methylene butyrolactone unit. Five compounds that contain this unit were identified as parthenolide, 3-beta-hydroxyparthenolide, secotanapartholide A, canin and artecanin, all of which are sesquiterpene lactones. It is very likely that these and other sesquiterpene lactones that contain an alpha-methylene butyrolactone unit are responsible for the anti-secretory activity in extracts of feverfew. PMID:2877077

  15. Bak activation for apoptosis involves oligomerization of dimers via their alpha6 helices.

    PubMed

    Dewson, Grant; Kratina, Tobias; Czabotar, Peter; Day, Catherine L; Adams, Jerry M; Kluck, Ruth M

    2009-11-25

    A pivotal step toward apoptosis is oligomerization of the Bcl-2 relative Bak. We recently reported that its oligomerization initiates by insertion of an exposed BH3 domain into the groove of another Bak monomer. We now report that the resulting BH3:groove dimers can be converted to the larger oligomers that permeabilize mitochondria by an interface between alpha6 helices. Cysteine residues placed in alpha6 could be crosslinked only after apoptotic signaling. Cysteines placed at both interfaces established that the BH3:groove dimer is symmetric and that the alpha6:alpha6 interface can link these dimers into homo-oligomers containing at least 18 Bak molecules. A putative zinc-binding site in alpha6 was not required to form the alpha6:alpha6 interface, and its mutation in full-length Bak did not affect Bak conformation, oligomerization, or function. We conclude that alpha6:alpha6 interaction occurs during Bak oligomerization and proapoptotic function, but we find no evidence that zinc binding to that interface regulates apoptosis. PMID:19941828

  16. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone down-regulates CXC receptors through activation of neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Sarkar, Abira; Sreenivasan, Yashin

    2006-03-01

    Considering the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a large number of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, the regulation of IL-8-mediated biological responses is important. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a tridecapeptide, inhibits most forms of inflammation by an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we have found that alpha-MSH interacts predominantly with melanocortin-1 receptors and inhibits several IL-8-induced biological responses in macrophages and neutrophils. It down-regulated receptors for IL-8 but not for TNF, IL-4, IL-13 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in neutrophils. It down-regulated CXCR type 1 and 2 but not mRNA levels. alpha-MSH did not inhibit IL-8 binding in purified cell membrane or affinity-purified CXCR. IL-8 or anti-CXCR Ab protected against alpha-MSH-mediated inhibition of IL-8 binding. The level of neutrophil elastase, a specific serine protease, but not cathepsin G or proteinase 3 increased in alpha-MSH-treated cells, and restoration of CXCR by specific neutrophil elastase or serine protease inhibitors indicates the involvement of elastase in alpha-MSH-induced down-regulation of CXCR. These studies suggest that alpha-MSH inhibits IL-8-mediated biological responses by down-regulating CXCR through induction of serine protease and that alpha-MSH acts as a potent immunomodulator in neutrophil-driven inflammatory distress. PMID:16479540

  17. Telmisartan increases lipoprotein lipase expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi Nan; Liu, Min; Jing, Dan Qing; Mu, Yi Ming; Lu, Ju Ming; Pan, Chang Yu

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their hypotensive properties, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been shown to exert clinical antidyslipidemic effects. The mechanism underlying these ARB lipid metabolic effects remains unclear. Some ARBs, for example, telmisartan, activate peroxisome proliferator-activated activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma). We hypothesized that PPAR-gamma-activating ARBs might exert antidyslipidemic effects via PPAR-alpha. In this study, we assessed the effect of telmisartan on the expression of PPAR-alpha and lipoprotein lipase (LPL). PPAR-alpha expression was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot in HepG2 hepatocytes as well as differentiated C2C12 myocytes treated with increasing concentrations of telmisartan (0.1-10 μmol/L) for 48 h. Results showed that 1 μmol/L and 10 μmol/L telmisartan significantly increased the expression of PPAR-alpha mRNA and protein in HepG2 cells (p < 0.01). No effect was shown in differentiated C2C12 cells. Similarly, 1 µmol/L and 10 μmol/L telmisartan significantly increased the expression of LPL mRNA and protein in HepG2 cells (p < 0.01), and this increase was significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited by the PPAR-alpha-specific antagonist MK886. These results indicate that certain of the antidyslipidemic effects of telmisartan might be mediated via increased PPAR-alpha-dependent induction of LPL expression. PMID:24067162

  18. Increased Event-Related Potentials and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-Activity Associated with Intentional Actions

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Susanne; Loy, Fabian; Krause, Daniela; Schwarz, Sandra; Kiesewetter, Jan; Segmiller, Felix; Chrobok, Agnieszka I.; Keeser, Daniel; Pogarell, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Internally guided actions are defined as being purposeful, self-generated and offering choices between alternatives. Intentional actions are essential to reach individual goals. In previous empirical studies, internally guided actions were predominantly related to functional responses in frontal and parietal areas. The aim of the present study was to distinguish event-related potentials and oscillatory responses of intentional actions and externally guided actions. In addition, we compared neurobiological findings of the decision which action to perform with those referring to the decision whether or not to perform an action. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects participated in adapted go/nogo paradigms, including a voluntary selection condition allowing participants to (1) freely decide whether to press the response button or (2) to decide whether they wanted to press the response button with the right index finger or the left index finger. Results: The reaction times were increased when participants freely decided whether and how they wanted to respond compared to the go condition. Intentional processes were associated with a fronto-centrally located N2 and P3 potential. N2 and P3 amplitudes were increased during intentional actions compared to instructed responses (go). In addition, increased activity in the alpha-, beta- and gamma-frequency range was shown during voluntary behavior rather than during externally guided responses. Conclusion: These results may indicate that an additional cognitive process is needed for intentional actions compared to instructed behavior. However, the neural responses were comparatively independent of the kind of decision that was made (1) decision which action to perform; (2) decision whether or not to perform an action). Significance: The study demonstrates the importance of fronto-central alpha-, beta-, and gamma oscillations for voluntary behavior. PMID:26834680

  19. Inducible expression of mutant alpha-synuclein decreases proteasome activity and increases sensitivity to mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Engelender, S; Igarashi, S; Rao, R K; Wanner, T; Tanzi, R E; Sawa, A; L Dawson, V; Dawson, T M; Ross, C A

    2001-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Although mutations in alpha-synuclein have been identified in autosomal dominant PD, the mechanism by which dopaminergic neural cell death occurs remains unknown. Proteins encoded by two other genes in which mutations cause familial PD, parkin and UCH-L1, are involved in regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, suggesting that dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the mechanism by which these mutations cause PD. We established inducible PC12 cell lines in which wild-type or mutant alpha-synuclein can be de-repressed by removing doxycycline. Differentiated PC12 cell lines expressing mutant alpha-synuclein showed decreased activity of proteasomes without direct toxicity. Cells expressing mutant alpha-synuclein showed increased sensitivity to apoptotic cell death when treated with sub-toxic concentrations of an exogenous proteasome inhibitor. Apoptosis was accompanied by mitochondrial depolarization and elevation of caspase-3 and -9, and was blocked by cyclosporin A. These data suggest that expression of mutant alpha-synuclein results in sensitivity to impairment of proteasome activity, leading to mitochondrial abnormalities and neuronal cell death. PMID:11309365

  20. Oxidized omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil inhibit leukocyte-endothelial interactions through activation of PPAR alpha.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Ni, Heyu; Wagner, Denisa D; Plutzky, Jorge; Mayadas, Tanya N

    2002-08-15

    Omega-3 fatty acids, which are abundant in fish oil, improve the prognosis of several chronic inflammatory diseases although the mechanism for such effects remains unclear. These fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are highly polyunsaturated and readily undergo oxidation. We show that oxidized, but not native unoxidized, EPA significantly inhibited human neutrophil and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro by inhibiting endothelial adhesion receptor expression. In transcriptional coactivation assays, oxidized EPA potently activated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha), a member of the nuclear receptor family. In vivo, oxidized, but not native, EPA markedly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion to venular endothelium of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. This occurred via a PPAR alpha-dependent mechanism because oxidized EPA had no such effect in LPS-treated PPAR alpha-deficient mice. Therefore, the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids may be explained by a PPAR alpha-mediated anti-inflammatory effect of oxidized EPA. PMID:12149216

  1. alpha-MSH tripeptide analogs activate the melanocortin 1 receptor and reduce UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A; Ruwe, Andrew; Kavanagh-Starner, Renny; Kadekaro, Ana Luisa; Swope, Viki; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie; Koikov, Leonid; Knittel, James J

    2009-10-01

    One skin cancer prevention strategy that we are developing is based on synthesizing and testing melanocortin analogs that reduce and repair DNA damage resulting from exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, in addition to stimulating pigmentation. Previously, we reported the effects of tetrapeptide analogs of alpha-melanocortin (alpha-MSH) that were more potent and stable than the physiological alpha-MSH, and mimicked its photoprotective effects against UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes. Here, we report on a panel of tripeptide analogs consisting of a modified alpha-MSH core His(6)-d-Phe(7)-Arg(8), which contained different N-capping groups, C-terminal modifications, or arginine mimics. The most potent tripeptides in activating cAMP formation and tyrosinase of human melanocytes were three analogs with C-terminal modifications. The most effective C-terminal tripeptide mimicked alpha-MSH in reducing hydrogen peroxide generation and enhancing nucleotide excision repair following UV irradiation. The effects of these three analogs required functional MC1R, as they were absent in human melanocytes that expressed non-functional receptor. These results demonstrate activation of the MC1R by tripeptide melanocortin analogs. Designing small analogs for topical delivery should prove practical and efficacious for skin cancer prevention. PMID:19558415

  2. Structure-activity relationships of alphaIIb 313-320 derived peptide inhibitors of human platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Stanica, Ruxandra Maria; Benaki, Dimitra; Rodis, Foteini I; Mikros, Emmanuel; Tsoukatos, Dimokritos; Tselepis, Alexandros; Tsikaris, Vasilios

    2008-11-01

    The alphaIIbbeta3 receptor, which is the most abundant receptor on the surface of platelets, can interact with a variety of adhesive proteins including fibrinogen, fibronectin and the von Willebrand factor. Fibrinogen binding on alphaIIbbeta3 is an event essential for platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. Mapping of the fibrinogen-binding domains on alphaIIb subunit suggested the sequence 313-332 as a possible binding site. This region was restricted to sequence alphaIIb 313-320 (Y313MESRADR320) using synthetic octapeptides overlapping by six residues. The YMESRADR octapeptide inhibits ADP-stimulated human platelets aggregation and binds to immobilized fibrinogen. In this study, we used the Ala scanning methodology within the sequence 313-320 aiming to evaluate the contribution of each amino acid in inhibiting platelet aggregation. It was found that the substitution of Y313, M314, E315 or S316 by A does not affect the activity of the parent octapeptide. The-RADR-motif seems to be the most essential for the biological activity of the alphaIIb 313-320 site. The conformational analysis of the YAESRADR, YMESAADR and YMESRAAR analogs by using NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations revealed significant differences in their conformational states in DMSO-d6. PMID:18646252

  3. Minimal determinants for binding activated G-alpha from the structure of a G-alpha-i1/peptide dimer†

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Lobanova, Ekaterina S.; Shavkunov, Alexander S.; Low, Justin; Ramer, J. Kevin; Blaesius, Rainer; Fredericks, Zoey; Willard, Francis S.; Kuhlman, Brian; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Siderovski, David P.

    2008-01-01

    G-proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and active GTP-bound state, serving as molecular switches that coordinate cellular signaling. We recently used phage-display to identify a series of peptides that bind Gα subunits in a nucleotide-dependent manner [Johnston, C. A., Willard, F. S., Jezyk, M. R., Fredericks, Z., Bodor, E. T., Jones, M. B., Blaesius, R., Watts, V. J., Harden, T. K., Sondek, J., Ramer, J. K., and Siderovski, D. P. (2005) Structure 13, 1069–1080]. Here we describe the structural features and functions of KB-1753, a peptide that binds selectively to GDP·AlF4−- and GTPγS-bound states of Gαi subunits. KB-1753 blocks interaction of Gαtransducin with its effector, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and inhibits transducin-mediated activation of cGMP degradation. Additionally, KB-1753 interferes with RGS protein binding and resultant GAP activity. A fluorescent KB-1753 variant was found to act as a sensor for activated Gα in vitro. The crystal structure of KB-1753 bound to Gαi1·GDP·AlF4− reveals binding to a conserved hydrophobic groove between switch II and α3 helices, and, along with supporting biochemical data and previous structural analyses, supports the notion that this is the site of effector interactions for Gαi subunits. PMID:16981699

  4. Hypoglycemic activity of Pyrus biossieriana Buhse leaf extract and arbutin: Inhibitory effects on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Fatemeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Pouramir, Mahdi; Khadir, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The mechanism of hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities of Pyrus biossieriana Buhse leaf extract (PbBLE) and its phytochemical component arbutin, have not been well determined. The present study was performed to understand the hypoglycemic activity mechanisms of pbBLE and arbutin more clearly. Methods: In vitro enzymatic carbohydrate digestion with PbBLE and arbutin was assessed using α-amylase and α-glucosidase powders. The enzyme solutions were premixed with PbBLE and arbutin at different concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/ml). Substrate solutions and colorimetric reagents were added to the reaction. The release of glucose was determined by spectrophotometric method. Acarbose was used as the positive control. Results: The extract (10, 100 mg/ ml) completely inhibit α- amylase and α- glucosidase activities. The extract produced higher reduction of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity than arbutin. Inhibition at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, 100 mg/ml) were significantly different (p<0.05). Conclusion: Our results exhibited that both the extract and arbutin were able to suppress the enzymes strongly. PMID:24294470

  5. Differential effects of ginsenosides on NO and TNF-alpha production by LPS-activated N9 microglia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun Fu; Bi, Xiu Li; Yang, Jing Yu; Zhan, Jia Yang; Dong, Ying Xu; Wang, Jin Hui; Wang, Ji Ming; Zhang, Ruiwen; Li, Xian

    2007-03-01

    Ginsenosides, the main active components of ginseng, have been reported to exert neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system. In this report, the effects of ginsenoside-Rd and -Rb2, two protopanaxadiols, and ginsenoside-Rg1 and -Re, two protopanaxatriols, on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated N9 microglial cells were studied. All ginsenosides studied potently suppressed TNF-alpha production in LPS-activated N9 cells. Ginsenoside-Rg1 and -Re, but not ginsenoside-Rb2 and -Rd, inhibited the production of NO in LPS-activated N9 cells. Ginsenosides inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), c-Jun and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), The findings herein show that the inhibition of LPS-induced ERK1/2 and JNK activation may be a contributing factor to the main mechanisms by which ginsenosides inhibits RAW264.7. To clarify the mechanistic basis for its ability to inhibit TNF-alpha and NO induction, the effect of ginsenosides on transcription factor NF-kappaB protein level was also examined. These activities were associated with the down-regulation of inhibitor kappaB (IkappaB). These findings suggest that the inhibition of LPS-induced NO formation and TNF-alpha production in microglia by ginsenosides is due to its inhibition of NF-kappaB, which may be the mechanistic basis for the anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenosides. The significant suppressive effects of ginsenosides on proinflammatory responses of microglia implicate their therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases accompanied by microglial activation. PMID:17276889

  6. RGS12 and RGS14 GoLoco motifs are G alpha(i) interaction sites with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Kimple, R J; De Vries, L; Tronchère, H; Behe, C I; Morris, R A; Gist Farquhar, M; Siderovski, D P

    2001-08-01

    The regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase activity of heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits and are thus recognized as key modulators of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. RGS12 and RGS14 contain not only the hallmark RGS box responsible for GTPase-accelerating activity but also a single G alpha(i/o)-Loco (GoLoco) motif predicted to represent a second G alpha interaction site. Here, we describe functional characterization of the GoLoco motif regions of RGS12 and RGS14. Both regions interact exclusively with G alpha(i1), G alpha(i2), and G alpha(i3) in their GDP-bound forms. In GTP gamma S binding assays, both regions exhibit guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity, inhibiting the rate of exchange of GDP for GTP by G alpha(i1). Both regions also stabilize G alpha(i1) in its GDP-bound form, inhibiting the increase in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence stimulated by AlF(4)(-). Our results indicate that both RGS12 and RGS14 harbor two distinctly different G alpha interaction sites: a previously recognized N-terminal RGS box possessing G alpha(i/o) GAP activity and a C-terminal GoLoco region exhibiting G alpha(i) GDI activity. The presence of two, independent G alpha interaction sites suggests that RGS12 and RGS14 participate in a complex coordination of G-protein signaling beyond simple G alpha GAP activity. PMID:11387333

  7. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud ground filtering for area of an active landslide (Doren, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodić, Nenad; Cvijetinović, Željko; Milenković, Milutin; Dorninger, Peter; Mitrović, Momir

    2014-05-01

    Ground filtering of point cloud is the primary step required for Digital Terrain Model (DTM) generation. The procedure is especially interesting for forested areas, since LiDAR systems can measure terrain elevation under vegetation cover with a high level of penetration. This work analyzes the potential of ALS data ground filtering for area of an active landslide. The results of ALS filtering, for example, may improve geomorphological and motion-detection studies. ALS data was collected during flight campaign 2011 under leaf-off conditions for Doren region, Vorarlberg, Western Austria. In this area, non-ground objects are mostly low vegetation such as shrubs, small trees etc. The vegetation is more dense in lower part of the landslide where erosion is smaller. Vegetation points can be removed based on the hypothesis that these are significantly higher than their neighboring points. However, in case of steep terrain, ground points may have the same heights as vegetation points, and thus, local slope should be considered. Also, if terrain roughness increases, the classification may become even more complex. Software system OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology) was used for processing the ALS data. Labeling ground points has been made using physical and geometrical attributes (parameters) of ALS points. Also additional attributes were calculated in order to improve extraction. Since bare ground surface is usually smooth and continuous unlike vegetation, standard deviation of local elevations was used as roughness measure to differentiate these surfaces. EchoRatio (ER) was adopted as a measure of surface penetrability, while number of echoes and differentiation between echoes (EchoNumber) were also deployed in filtering. Since the ground points are measurements from bare-earth that are usually the lowest surface features in a local area, normalized height was defined as a rank of neighboring points

  8. Active Extensional Structures Discovered by the Airborne LiDAR Mapping in the Tatun Volcanic Region, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y.; Chang, K.; Chen, R.; Lee, J.; Hsieh, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Complex tectonic deformation is present in northern Taiwan where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting under the Eurasian plate and the Okinawa trough is opening to the east. The Tatun volcanic region and the Taipei metropolitan basin are considered the products resulted from such complex tectonic environment. Furthermore, contractional deformation was prevailed in the earlier stage, as evidenced by several major thrust faults truncating the Tertiary strata. However, the expected nowadays extensional deformation is not fully characterized, for example, the Shanchiao fault bounding the western Taipei basin and its northern extension into the Tatun volcanic region. Based on industrial seismic profiles, it appeared that several well developed normal faults reactivated pre-existing thrust faults offshore northern Taiwan. These normal faults likely extend into the land where the Tatun volcanics erupted through and covered on the Tertiary strata. It is our intentions to better inspect the deformational pattern existing within the Tatun volcanic region where forests dominate on the surface making field investigation difficult. In this study we apply high-resolution airborne LiDAR-derived digital terrain model to characterize possible joints, fractures, and faults in the Tatun volcanic region. The LiDAR-derived DTM was processed so that bare ground is revealed using virtual removal of forests. The derived 2-m DTM was then examined to map out topographic features possibly resulted from the linear geologic structures. We discovered clear distribution and pattern of the joints and fractures in the Tatun volcanic region for the first time. The mapped structural patterns reveal strong evidence for regional extensional deformation in northern Taiwan, especially within the Tatun volcanic region. We also uncovered branches of normal faults extending possibly from the Shanchiao fault into the Tatun volcanic region. The discovered normal fault, perhaps active, cut across flat

  9. Modulation of alpha activity in the parieto-occipital area by distractors during a visuospatial working memory task: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Ichihara-Takeda, Satoe; Yazawa, Shogo; Murahara, Takashi; Toyoshima, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Jun; Ishiguro, Masanori; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Ikeda, Nozomu; Matsuyama, Kiyoji; Funahashi, Shintaro; Nagamine, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Oscillatory brain activity is known to play an essential role in information processing in working memory. Recent studies have indicated that alpha activity (8-13 Hz) in the parieto-occipital area is strongly modulated in working memory tasks. However, the function of alpha activity in working memory is open to several interpretations, such that alpha activity may be a direct neural correlate of information processing in working memory or may reflect disengagement from information processing in other brain areas. To examine the functional contribution of alpha activity to visuospatial working memory, we introduced visuospatial distractors during a delay period and examined neural activity from the whole brain using magnetoencephalography. The strength of event-related alpha activity was estimated using the temporal spectral evolution (TSE) method. The results were as follows: (1) an increase of alpha activity during the delay period as indicated by elevated TSE curves was observed in parieto-occipital sensors in both the working memory task and a control task that did not require working memory; and (2) an increase of alpha activity during the delay period was not observed when distractors were presented, although TSE curves were constructed only from correct trials. These results indicate that the increase of alpha activity is not directly related to information processing in working memory but rather reflects the disengagement of attention from the visuospatial input. PMID:25244117

  10. Retinal complications with elevated circulating plasma C5a associated with interferon-alpha therapy for chronic active hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sugano, S; Yanagimoto, M; Suzuki, T; Sato, M; Onmura, H; Aizawa, H; Makino, H

    1994-11-01

    Retinal hemorrhage is a complication of interferon therapy of unknown pathogenesis. We report two chronic active hepatitis C patients who developed retinal hemorrhage and/or cotton wool patches during interferon-alpha therapy 4 and 12 wk after beginning treatment. At the time of the hemorrhage, plasma-activated complement 5, a known potent intravascular aggregator of granulocytes, increased to 54 ng/ml in one patient and to 29 ng/ml in the other patient. When the hemorrhage resolved, it decreased to under 5 ng/ml. Our cases suggest that complement activation occurs in patients treated with interferon-alpha and that activation of complement 5 can lead to retinal capillary infarction and retinal hemorrhage. High levels of activated complement 5 may predict retinal artery infarction or perhaps microvascular emboli in the other organs. PMID:7942735

  11. Development of the APEX experiment, preparatory activities for an airborne system supporting future space-borne imaging spectrometers in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaepman, M.

    2002-06-01

    APEX is an airborne imaging spectrometer built in the framework of ESA PRODEX (Programme développement d'expériences scientifiques) with the support of ESA EO-EP. It is based on a Swiss/Belgian initiative and designed to be an airborne simulator for the support and development of future spaceborne systems for the study of land surface processes. It will be able to contribute to the simulation, calibration, and validation of planned ESA imaging spectrometer missions (e.g., MERIS/ENVISAT, SPECTRA, etc.) in the 400 - 2500 nm region of the spectrum. APEX will foster the use of imaging spectrometer data in Europe and will support the application development for imaging spectroscopy products. The industrial consortium building the instrument is composed out of joint Swiss/Belgian industries with the support of ESA EO-EP (e.g., detectors, calibration, technical management).

  12. Synthesis and biological activity of furostanic analogues of brassinosteroids bearing the 5alpha-hydroxy-6-oxo moiety.

    PubMed

    Romero-Avila, Margarita; de Dios-Bravo, Guadalupe; Mendez-Stivalet, Jóse M; Rodríguez-Sotres, Rogelio; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2007-12-01

    Two furostanic analogues of brassinosteroids bearing the 5alpha-hydroxy-6-oxo moiety were synthesized and their biological activity studied using the bean second internode elongation test. One of the compounds produced significant stimulation at doses of 2.5 and 5ng/plant. PMID:17905389

  13. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Elshikha, Ahmed S.; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A.; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  14. Isoform-specific inhibition of ROR alpha-mediated transcriptional activation by human FOXP3.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianguang; Huang, Chunjian; Zhou, Baohua; Ziegler, Steven F

    2008-04-01

    FOXP3 is a forkhead family transcriptional repressor important for the development and function of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. In humans, FOXP3 is expressed as two isoforms, a full-length form and a smaller form lacking exon 2. These two isoforms are expressed in approximately equal amounts in circulating regulatory T cells, and are induced equally in freshly activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. Herein, we show that FOXP3 interacts with retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)alpha, and that this interaction inhibits transcriptional activation mediated by RORalpha. Full-length FOXP3, but not the isoform lacking exon 2, interacts with RORalpha, and the region of FOXP3 involved in the interaction is encoded by exon 2. Mutation of the LxxLL motif in FOXP3, located in exon 2, abolished interaction and repression by FOXP3. Additionally, the inhibition of RORalpha by FOXP3 does not require an intact forkhead domain, demonstrating a mode of FOXP3 function that is independent of DNA binding. Interestingly, expression of RORalpha in T cells leads to the expression of genes that define Th17 cells, and the expression of each of these gene was inhibited by coexpression of full-length, but not DeltaEx2, FOXP3. These data expand the possible targets of FOXP3-mediated repression and demonstrate functional differences between FOXP3 isoforms. PMID:18354202

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Activates PKC-Alpha to Invade Middle Ear Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Grati, M’hamed; Yan, Denise; Liu, Xue Z.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a group of complex inflammatory disorders affecting the middle ear which can be acute or chronic. Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a form of chronic OM characterized by tympanic membrane perforation and discharge. Despite the significant impact of CSOM on human population, it is still an understudied and unexplored research area. CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss and life-threatening central nervous system complications. Bacterial exposure especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of CSOM. Our previous studies have demonstrated that P. aeruginosa invades human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs). However, molecular mechanisms leading to bacterial invasion of HMEECs are not known. The aim of this study is to characterize the role of PKC pathway in the ability of P. aeruginosa to colonize HMEECs. We observed that otopathogenic P. aeruginosa activates the PKC pathway, specifically phosphorylation of PKC-alpha (PKC-α) in HMEECs. The ability of otopathogenic P. aeruginosa to phosphorylate PKC-α depends on bacterial OprF expression. The activation of PKC-α was associated with actin condensation. Blocking the PKC pathway attenuated the ability of bacteria to invade HMEECs and subsequent actin condensation. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that the host PKC-α pathway is involved in invasion of HMEECs by P. aeruginosa and subsequently to cause OM. Characterizing the role of the host signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of CSOM will provide novel avenues to design effective treatment modalities against the disease. PMID:26973629

  16. Berberine is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Li, Changqing; Yang, Junqing; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    Although berberine has hypolipidemic effects with a high affinity to nuclear proteins, the underlying molecular mechanism for this effect remains unclear. Here, we determine whether berberine is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), with a lipid-lowering effect. The cell-based reporter gene analysis showed that berberine selectively activates PPARalpha (EC50 =0.58 mM, Emax =102.4). The radioligand binding assay shows that berberine binds directly to the ligand-binding domain of PPARalpha (Ki=0.73 mM) with similar affinity to fenofibrate. The mRNA and protein levels of CPT-Ialpha gene from HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic rat liver are remarkably up-regulated by berberine, and this effect can be blocked by MK886, a non-competitive antagonist of PPARalpha. A comparison assay in which berberine and fenofibrate were used to treat hyperlipidaemic rats for three months shows that these drugs produce similar lipid-lowering effects, except that berberine increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol more effectively than fenofibrate. These findings provide the first evidence that berberine is a potent agonist of PPARalpha and seems to be superior to fenofibrate for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID:27100490

  17. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Elshikha, Ahmed S; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  18. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  19. Evaluation of the suitability of neural network method for prediction of uranium activity ratio in environmental alpha spectra.

    PubMed

    Einian, Mohammad Reza; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmood Reza; Ghaderi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Applying Artificial Neural Network to an alpha spectrometry system is a good idea to discriminate the composition of environmental and non-environmental materials by the estimation of the (234)U/(238)U activity ratio. Because it eliminates limitations of classical approaches by the extraction the desired information from the average of a partial uranium raw spectrum. The network was trained by an alpha spectrum library which was developed in this work. The results indicated that there was a small difference between the target values and the predictions. These results were acceptable, because the thickness of samples and the inferring elements were different in the real library. PMID:26340268

  20. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  1. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I: Identification and characterization of mutations affecting alpha-L-iduronidase activity.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chen, I-Shen; Chang, Jui-Hung; Yang, Chyau-Wen; Chin, Yi-Wen

    2002-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-L-iduronidase (IDUA). MPS I covers a broad spectrum of clinical severity ranging from severe Hurler syndrome through intermediate Hurler/Scheie syndrome to mild Scheie syndrome. Mutation screening was performed in two unrelated Taiwanese MPS I patients. A Hurler/Scheie patient had A79V (C to T transition in codon 79) in exon 2 and R619G (C to G transversion in codon 619) in exon 14. R619G has been shown to cause disease. Expression of A79V in COS-7 cells showed trace amounts of IDUA activity, demonstrating the deleterious nature of the mutation. A79V mutation did not cause a reduction in IDUA mRNA levels. The reduced level of IDUA protein suggests increased degradation of the mutant enzyme. A Hurler patient had 134del12 (in-frame deletion of codons 16-19 in signal peptide) in exon 1 and Q584X (C to T transition in codon 584) in exon 13. Transfection of COS-7 cells with Q584X did not yield active enzyme. Q584X mutation caused an apparent reduction in the IDUA mRNA level and no IDUA protein was detected. Conversely, 134del12 showed 124.6% of normal activity in transfected cells and a 77-kDa precursor protein was observed on Western blot, suggesting biologic activity of precursor IDUA without posttranslational cleavage. These findings provide further evidence of the molecular heterogeneity in mutations in MPS I. PMID:12189649

  2. Salacia oblonga root improves postprandial hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Activation of PPAR-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Hsun-Wei Huang, Tom; Peng Gang; Qian Li, George; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2006-02-01

    Salacia oblonga (SO) root is an Ayurvedic medicine with anti-diabetic and anti-obese properties. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha}, a nuclear receptor, plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of lipid metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of the water extract from the root of SO to Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity, lowered plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol (TC) levels, increased plasma high-density lipoprotein levels and reduced the liver contents of triglyceride, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and the ratio of fatty droplets to total tissue. By contrast, the extract had no effect on plasma triglyceride and TC levels in fasted ZDF rats. After olive oil administration to ZDF the extract also inhibited the increase in plasma triglyceride levels. These results suggest that SO extract improves postprandial hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis in ZDF rats. Additionally, SO treatment enhanced hepatic expression of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and acyl-CoA oxidase mRNAs in ZDF rats. In vitro, SO extract and its main component mangiferin activated PPAR-{alpha} luciferase activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and lipoprotein lipase mRNA expression and enzyme activity in THP-1 differentiated macrophages; these effects were completely suppressed by a selective PPAR-{alpha} antagonist MK-886. The findings from both in vivo and in vitro suggest that SO extract functions as a PPAR-{alpha} activator, providing a potential mechanism for improvement of postprandial hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis in diabetes and obesity.

  3. A P-loop Mutation in G[alpha] Subunits Prevents Transition to the Active State: Implications for G-protein Signaling in Fungal Pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Willard, Francis S.; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Kimple, Adam J.; Willard, Melinda D.; Naqvi, Naweed I.; Siderovski, David P.

    2012-10-23

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches integral to a panoply of different physiological responses that many organisms make to environmental cues. The switch from inactive to active G{alpha}{beta}{gamma} heterotrimer relies on nucleotide cycling by the G{alpha} subunit: exchange of GTP for GDP activates G{alpha}, whereas its intrinsic enzymatic activity catalyzes GTP hydrolysis to GDP and inorganic phosphate, thereby reverting G{alpha} to its inactive state. In several genetic studies of filamentous fungi, such as the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, a G42R mutation in the phosphate-binding loop of G{alpha} subunits is assumed to be GTPase-deficient and thus constitutively active. Here, we demonstrate that G{alpha}(G42R) mutants are not GTPase deficient, but rather incapable of achieving the activated conformation. Two crystal structure models suggest that Arg-42 prevents a typical switch region conformational change upon G{alpha}{sub i1}(G42R) binding to GDP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -} or GTP, but rotameric flexibility at this locus allows for unperturbed GTP hydrolysis. G{alpha}(G42R) mutants do not engage the active state-selective peptide KB-1753 nor RGS domains with high affinity, but instead favor interaction with G{beta}{gamma} and GoLoco motifs in any nucleotide state. The corresponding G{alpha}{sub q}(G48R) mutant is not constitutively active in cells and responds poorly to aluminum tetrafluoride activation. Comparative analyses of M. oryzae strains harboring either G42R or GTPase-deficient Q/L mutations in the G{alpha} subunits MagA or MagB illustrate functional differences in environmental cue processing and intracellular signaling outcomes between these two G{alpha} mutants, thus demonstrating the in vivo functional divergence of G42R and activating G-protein mutants.

  4. Biosynthesis of a biologically active single peptide chain containing the human common alpha and chorionic gonadotropin beta subunits in tandem.

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, T; Pixley, M R; Minami, S; Perlas, E; Ben-Menahem, D; Hsueh, A J; Boime, I

    1995-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of the gonadotropin and thyrotropin hormone family is their heterodimeric structure, consisting of a common alpha subunit and a hormone-specific beta subunit. Subunit assembly is vital to the function of these hormones: The conformation of the heterodimer is essential for controlling secretion, hormone-specific posttranslational modifications, and signal transduction. To address whether alpha and beta subunits can be synthesized as one chain and also maintain biological activity, a chimera composed of the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) beta subunit genetically fused to the alpha subunit was constructed. The resulting polypeptide hCG molecule not only was efficiently secreted but also displayed an increased biological activity in vitro and in vivo. These data show that the alpha and hCG beta subunits encoded as a single chain retain a biologically active conformation similar to that seen in the heterodimer. This approach can be used to investigate structure-function relationships of the glycoprotein hormone family that were previously not tractable because of the absolute dependence on assembly for the biological response. Moreover, other bioactive multisubunit ligands can be engineered where the combination efficiency and specificity of heterodimers and homodimers are otherwise difficult to control. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7892221

  5. Effect of heterodimer partner RXR{alpha} on PPAR{gamma} activation function-2 helix in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jianyun Chen Minghe; Stanley, Susan E.; Li, Ellen

    2008-01-04

    The structural mechanism of allosteric communication between retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its heterodimer partners remains controversial. As a first step towards addressing this question, we report a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the GW1929-bound peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) ligand-binding domain (LBD) with and without the 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA)-bound RXR{alpha} LBD. Sequence-specific {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, and {sup 13}CO resonance assignments have been established for over 95% of the 275 residues in the PPAR{gamma} LBD monomer. The {sup 1}HN, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}CO chemical shift perturbations induced by the RXR{alpha} LBD binding are located at not only the heterodimer interface that includes the C-terminal residue Y477 but also residues Y473 and K474 in the activation function-2 (AF-2) helix. This result suggests that 9cRA-bound RXR{alpha} can affect the PPAR{gamma} AF-2 helix in solution and demonstrates that NMR is a powerful new tool for studying the mechanism of allosteric ligand activation in RXR heterodimers.

  6. Formation of Raman Scattering Wings around H alpha, H beta, and Pa alpha in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Di Mille, Francesco; Angeloni, Rodolfo; Palma, Tali; Lee, Hee-Won

    2015-12-01

    Powered by a supermassive black hole with an accretion disk, the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are characterized by prominent emission lines including Balmer lines. The unification schemes of AGNs require the existence of a thick molecular torus that may hide the broad emission line region from the view of observers near the equatorial direction. In this configuration, one may expect that the far-UV radiation from the central engine can be Raman scattered by neutral hydrogen to reappear around Balmer and Paschen emission lines, which can be identified with broad wings. We produce Hα, Hβ, and Paα wings using a Monte Carlo technique to investigate their properties. The neutral scattering region is assumed to be a cylindrical torus specified by the inner and outer radii and the height. While the covering factor of the scattering region affects the overall strengths of the wings, the wing widths are primarily dependent on the neutral hydrogen column density {N}{{H} {{I}}} being roughly proportional to {N}{{H} {{I}}}1/2. In particular, with {N}{{H} {{I}}}={10}23 {{cm}}-2 the Hα wings typically show a width ∼ 2× {10}4 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We also find that Hα and Paα wing profiles are asymmetric with the red part stronger than the blue part and an opposite behavior is seen for Hβ wings.

  7. Sp1 trans-activates the murine H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2)-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Dongyu; Xu, William; Kone, Bruce C

    2009-07-01

    The H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) (HKalpha2) gene of the renal collecting duct and distal colon plays a central role in potassium and acid-base homeostasis, yet its transcriptional control remains poorly characterized. We previously demonstrated that the proximal 177 bp of its 5'-flanking region confers basal transcriptional activity in murine inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells and that NF-kappaB and CREB-1 bind this region to alter transcription. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the -144/-135 Sp element influences basal HKalpha2 gene transcription in these cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays using probes for -154/-127 revealed Sp1-containing DNA-protein complexes in nuclear extracts of mIMCD3 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated that Sp1, but not Sp3, binds to this promoter region of the HKalpha2 gene in mIMCD3 cells in vivo. HKalpha2 minimal promoter-luciferase constructs with point mutations in the -144/-135 Sp element exhibited much lower activity than the wild-type promoter in transient transfection assays. Overexpression of Sp1, but not Sp3, trans-activated an HKalpha2 proximal promoter-luciferase construct in mIMCD3 cells as well as in SL2 insect cells, which lack Sp factors. Conversely, small interfering RNA knockdown of Sp1 inhibited endogenous HKalpha2 mRNA expression, and binding of Sp1 to chromatin associated with the proximal HKalpha2 promoter without altering the binding or regulatory influence of NF-kappaB p65 or CREB-1 on the proximal HKalpha2 promoter. We conclude that Sp1 plays an important and positive role in controlling basal HKalpha2 gene expression in mIMCD3 cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19420113

  8. Pathological role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors in arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Regina; Ziani, Khalid; Miquel, Raquel; Noguera, M Antonia; Ivorra, M Dolores; Anselmi, Elsa; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2002-01-01

    1. The role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors was analysed in arteries obtained from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and controls (WKY) divided into three groups: young prehypertensive, adult hypertensive, and adult animals chronically treated with captopril (50 mg kg(-1) per day orally) in order to prevent the hypertensive state. 2. In adult SHR, a significant increase in BMY 7378 potency (not in prazosin potency) was observed in aorta, mesenteric artery, and the first and second branches of the small mesenteric arteries with respect to WKY rats. This difference was not observed in iliac and tail arteries, which suggests an increased functional role of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors only in some vessels of SHR. 3. The increase in the resting tone (IRT) observed in absence of agonist, inhibited by BMY 7378, that represents the constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors, was also significantly greater in aorta and mesenteric artery from adult SHR. 4. In young and captopril treated adult animals, no differences between strains with respect to BMY 7378 potency, or IRT were observed. 5. The increase in the functional role of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors and their constitutive activity observed in hypertension is prevented by captopril treatment. The pathological consequence of this change is the slower rate of recovery of the basal tone after removal of an adrenergic stimulus, observed in vessels from hypertensive animals that had shown an increase in the functionality of constitutively active alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors. This change was not observed in prehypertensive or captopril treated animals. PMID:11786496

  9. Activation of cAMP-protein kinase A abrogates STAT5-mediated inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor signaling by interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Pace, Thaddeus W W; Hu, Fang; Miller, Andrew H

    2011-11-01

    IFN-alpha has been found to inhibit glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function by activating janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) inflammatory signaling pathways. In contrast, through stimulation of protein kinase A (PKA), cAMP has been shown to enhance GR function and can inhibit inflammatory signaling. We therefore examined whether increased cAMP-PKA pathway activation could reverse IFN-alpha-induced inhibition of GR function and whether decreased cAMP-PKA activity might exacerbate IFN-alpha effects on the GR. Activation of cAMP by forskolin (10 μM) reversed the inhibitory effects of mIFN-alpha (1000 U/ml) on dexamethasone (DEX)-induced MMTV-luciferase activity in hippocampal HT22 cells. Forskolin treatment also blocked both IFN-alpha-induced activation of phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) and inhibitory protein-protein interactions between pSTAT5 and GR in the nucleus of HT22 cells treated with IFN-alpha and DEX. These effects of forskolin were reversed by co-administration of the PKA inhibitor, H89. Conversely, the combination of IFN-alpha and treatment with either H89 or siRNA directed against the alpha and beta catalytic subunit isoforms of PKA led to an additive inhibitory effect on DEX-induced GR activity in HT22 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibition of GR signaling by mIFN-alpha and STAT5 can be reversed by activation of cAMP-PKA pathways, whereas decreased PKA activity increases the inhibitory effect of IFN-alpha on GR function. Given decreased PKA activity found in patients with major depression, these data suggest that depressed patients may be vulnerable to cytokine effects on GR, and cAMP-PKA agonists may serve to reverse glucocorticoid resistance in patients with depression and increased inflammation. PMID:21798341

  10. Activation of estrogen receptor alpha disrupts differentiation of the reproductive organs in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Anna; Olsson, Jan A; Brunström, Björn

    2011-06-01

    Gonadal estrogen plays an important role in the differentiation of a female phenotype in birds. Exogenous compounds that interfere with estrogen signaling, for instance by binding to the estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ), are therefore potential disruptors of sexual differentiation in birds. The ERα agonist propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), the ERα antagonist methyl piperidino pyrazole (MPP) and the ERβ agonist diarylproprionitrile (DPN) were used in the present study to explore the roles of the ERs in normal and disrupted sex differentiation in the chicken embryo. Activation of ERα by PPT caused disturbed differentiation of the reproductive organs in both sexes. In male embryos, PPT caused left-side ovotestis formation and retention of the Müllerian ducts. In female embryos, PPT caused retention of the right Müllerian duct (which normally regresses) and malformation of both Müllerian ducts. PPT also induced hepatic expression of mRNA for the estrogen-regulated egg yolk protein apoVLDL II. Notably, none of these effects were observed following treatment with DPN. ERα-inactivation by MPP counteracted the action of PPT but had little effect by its own. Our results indicate that ERα plays an important role in sex differentiation of the reproductive tract in female chicken embryos and show that ERα can mediate xenoestrogen-induced disturbances of sex differentiation. PMID:21420409

  11. Investigation of activation cross-sections of alpha-induced nuclear reactions on natural cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Guinyun

    2014-08-01

    We measured production cross-sections of Sn, In, and Cd radionuclides from alpha-induced reactions on natCd from their respective threshold to 45 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation technique at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The results were compared with the earlier measurements as well as with the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2012 library based on the TALYS 1.4 code. Our measurements for the 110,113g,117mSn, 108m,108g,109g,110m,110g,111g,113m,114m,115m,116m,117m,117gIn, and 111m,115gCd radionuclides in the energy region from the threshold energy to 45 MeV are in general good agreement with the other experimental data and calculated results. The integral yields for thick target were also deduced using the measured cross-sections and the stopping power of natural cadmium target and found in agreement with the directly measured yields available in the literature. The measured cross-sections find importance in various practical applications including nuclear medicine and improvement of nuclear model calculations.

  12. Alpha-amylase inhibitory activity and sterol composition of the marine algae, Sargassum glaucescens

    PubMed Central

    Payghami, Nasrin; Jamili, Shahla; Rustaiyan, Abdolhossein; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Nikan, Marjan; Gohari, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sargassum species (phaeophyceae) are economically important brown algae in southern parts of Iran. Sargassum is mainly harvested as a row material in alginate production industries and is a source of plant foods or plant bio-stimulants even a component of animal foods. Objective: In this study, Sargassum glaucescens, collected from the seashore of Chabahar, was employed for phytochemical and biological evaluations. Materials and Methods: For that purpose, the dried algae was extracted by methanol and subjected to different chromatographic separation methods. Results: Six sterols, fucosterol (1), 24(S)-hydroxy-24-vinylcholesterol (2), 24(R)-hydroxy-24-vinylcholesterol (3), stigmasterol (4), β-sitosterol (5) and cholesterol (6) were identified by spectroscopic methods including 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and mass spectroscopy. In vitro alpha-amylase inhibitory test was performed on the methanolic extract and the results revealed a potent inhibition (IC50 = 8.9 ± 2.4 mg/mL) of the enzyme compared to acarbose as a positive control. Conclusion: Various biological activities and distribution of sterols in Sargassum genus have been critically reviewed here. The results concluded that these algae are a good candidate for further anti-diabetic investigations in animals and human. PMID:26692744

  13. Alpha-latrotoxin modulates the secretory machinery via receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wan, Qunfang; Lin, Xianguang; Zhu, Hongliang; Volynski, Kirill; Ushkaryov, Yuri; Xu, Tao

    2005-09-01

    The hypothesis whether alpha-latrotoxin (LTX) could directly regulate the secretory machinery was tested in pancreatic beta cells using combined techniques of membrane capacitance (Cm) measurement and Ca2+ uncaging. Employing ramp increase in [Ca2+]i to stimulate exocytosis, we found that LTX lowers the Ca2+ threshold required for exocytosis without affecting the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). The burst component of exocytosis in response to step-like [Ca2+]i increase generated by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ was also speeded up by LTX treatment. LTX increased the maximum rate of exocytosis compared with control responses with similar postflash [Ca2+]i and shifted the Ca2+ dependence of the exocytotic machinery toward lower Ca2+ concentrations. LTXN4C, a LTX mutant which cannot form membrane pores or penetrate through the plasma membrane but has similar affinity for the receptors as the wild-type LTX, mimicked the effect of LTX. Moreover, the effects of both LTX and LTXN4C) were independent of intracellular or extracellular Ca2+ but required extracellular Mg2+. Our data propose that LTX, by binding to the membrane receptors, sensitizes the fusion machinery to Ca2+ and, hence, may permit release at low [Ca2+]i level. This sensitization is mediated by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:16101679

  14. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle increases prostaglandin F2(alpha) synthesis and cyclooxygenase activity by a pertussis toxin sensitive mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Shansky, Janet; Solerssi, Rosa; Chromiak, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of differentiated skeletal muscle in tissue culture increases the production of prostaglandin F(sub 2(alpha)), an anabolic stimulator of myofiber growth. Within 4 h of initiating mechanical activity, the activity of cyclooxygenase, a regulatory enzyme in prostaglandin synthesis, was increased 82% (P is less than .005), and this increase was maintained for at least 24 h. Kinetic analysis of the stretch-activated cyclooxygenase indicated a two to three-fold decrease in the enzyme's K(sub m) with no change in V(sub max). The stretch-induced increase in enzymatic activity was not inhibited by cycloheximide, was independent of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin-insensitive), but was prevented by the G protein inhibitor pertussis toxin. Pertussis toxin also inhibited the stretch-induced increases in PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production, and cell growth. It is concluded that stretch of skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of the anabolic modulator PGF(sub 2(alpha)) by a G protein-dependent process which involves activation of cyclooxygenase by a posttranslational mechanism.

  15. Effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha on sexual activity of male patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xin; Zheng, Yi; Shi, Tian-Yan; Liu, Hong-Yan

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of a tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) antagonist on the sexual quality of life of male patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In this open-label study, 42 AS patients were grouped into the TNF-α antagonist treatment group and the non-TNF-α antagonist treatment group for 3 months. Clinical and laboratory indices and changes in the sexual quality of life were compared to assess the efficacy of TNF-α antagonists on sexual activity. The relationship between sexual quality and disease activity was analyzed. There were no significant differences in baseline data between the two groups. After treatment, disease activity and quality of life were improved in these two groups. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) score (1.9 ± 1.6 vs. 3.0 ± 1.3, p = 0.020), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (9 ± 7 mm/1 h vs. 18 ± 17 mm/1 h, p = 0.031), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (1.8 ± 2.1 mg/dl vs. 6.2 ± 8.5 mg/dl, p = 0.035) were significantly lower in the TNF-α antagonist treatment group than in the non-TNF-α antagonist treatment group. The extent of improvement in the quality of life was more evident in the TNF-α antagonist treatment group. The average degree of improvement in the quality of life was negatively related to the BASDAI score and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index score in the TNF-α antagonist treatment group (r = -0.497, p = 0.018; r = -0.558, p = 0.007, respectively). Sexual quality of life and disease activity are improved after treatment with TNF-α antagonists in male patients with AS. The extent of improvement in sexual quality and disease activity are positively related. PMID:25064131

  16. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activator induces renal CYP2C23 activity and protects from angiotensin II-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Muller, Dominik N; Theuer, Juergen; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Kaergel, Eva; Honeck, Horst; Park, Joon-Keun; Markovic, Marija; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Dechend, Ralf; Wellner, Maren; Kirsch, Torsten; Fiebeler, Anette; Rothe, Michael; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2004-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites are involved in the regulation of renal vascular tone and salt excretion. The epoxygenation product 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) is anti-inflammatory and inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activation. We tested the hypothesis that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-activator fenofibrate (Feno) induces CYP isoforms, AA hydroxylation, and epoxygenation activity, and protects against inflammatory organ damage. Double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) overexpressing human renin and angiotensinogen genes were treated with Feno. Feno normalized blood pressure, albuminuria, reduced nuclear factor-kappa B activity, and renal leukocyte infiltration. Renal epoxygenase activity was lower in dTGRs compared to nontransgenic rats. Feno strongly induced renal CYP2C23 protein and AA-epoxygenase activity under pathological and nonpathological conditions. In both cases, CYP2C23 was the major isoform responsible for 11,12-EET formation. Moreover, we describe a novel CYP2C23-dependent pathway leading to hydroxy-EETs (HEETs), which may serve as endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activators. The capacity to produce HEETs via CYP2C23-dependent epoxygenation of 20-HETE and CYP4A-dependent hydroxylation of EETs was reduced in dTGR kidneys and induced by Feno. These results demonstrate that Feno protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage and acts as inducer of CYP2C23-mediated epoxygenase activities. We propose that CYP-dependent EET/HEET production may serve as an anti-inflammatory control mechanism. PMID:14742258

  17. Tosylphenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibits TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis in the presence of activated NF-kappa B in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, J Y; Kim, K U; Jue, D M

    1997-01-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors such as N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) and N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) were shown to inhibit production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The proteinase inhibitors were also reported to inhibit activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) by blocking the signalling pathway for stimuli-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitory subunit (I kappa B alpha) and thus preventing its degradation. In RAW 264.7 cells TPCK and TLCK significantly suppressed LPS-induced increase in TNF-alpha mRNA, induction of nuclear kappa B-binding activity and degradation of I kappa B alpha. TPCK and TLCK effectively blocked TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis even when they were added after LPS stimulation. In these cells, however, the inhibitory modes of the two inhibitors were found to be different: while addition of TLCK suppressed I kappa B alpha degradation and reduced NF-kappa B activity, a comparable decrease in the nuclear kappa B-binding activity or in I kappa B alpha degradation was not observed in cells treated with TPCK. Our results show that TPCK inhibits LPS-induced TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis in the presence of activated NF-kappa B and suggests that mechanisms other than NF-kappa B activation are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the TNF-alpha gene. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9415036

  18. The role of 14-3-3{beta} in transcriptional activation of estrogen receptor {alpha} and its involvement in proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoonseo; Kim, Hyungjin; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Ko, Jesang

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} 14-3-3{beta} interacts with ER{alpha} and the interaction is Akt-dependent. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} regulates the transcriptional activity of ER{alpha} in a ligand-dependent manner. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} increases expressions of ER{alpha} target genes. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} increases breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The estrogen receptor (ER) functions as a transcription factor that mediates the effects of estrogen. ER{alpha}, which plays a crucial role in the development and progression of breast cancer, is activated by estrogen binding, leading to receptor phosphorylation, dimerization, and recruitment of co-activators and chaperons to the estrogen-bound receptor complex. The 14-3-3 proteins bind to target proteins via phosphorylation and influence many cellular events by altering their subcellular localization or acting as a chaperone. However, regulation of ER{alpha} expression and transactivation by the 14-3-3 proteins has not been reported. We demonstrate that 14-3-3{beta} functions as a positive regulator of ER{alpha} through a direct protein-protein interaction in an estrogen-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of 14-3-3{beta} stimulated ER{alpha}-mediated transcriptional activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Enhanced ER{alpha} transcriptional activity due to 14-3-3{beta} increased the expressions of the endogenous ER{alpha} target genes, leading to proliferation of breast cancer cells. We suggest that 14-3-3{beta} has oncogenic potential in breast cancer via binding to ER{alpha} and activation of the transcriptional activity of ER{alpha}.

  19. Whole-body in-vivo neutron activation analysis in assessing treatment of renal osteodystrophy with 1-alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol.

    PubMed

    Naik, R B; Gosling, P; Price, C P; Robinson, B H; Dabek, J T; Heath, D A; James, H M; Kanis, J A; Smith, R

    1976-07-10

    Four selected adults with different patterns of osteodystrophy receiving regular dialysis were treated with 1-alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol (1-alpha-OHD3) 0-5-2 mug/day for 10 to 12 months. In two patients, one with osteitis fibrosa and the other with osteomalacia, significant biochemical, radiological, and histological improvements occurred, and total body calcium measured by in-vivo neutron activation analysis increased. In two patients, in whom there were no increases of whole-body calcium, neither biochemical improvement nor healing of bone lesions occurred during the study; in one of these patients the effect of 1-alpha-OHD3 on bone resorption may have contributed to loss of body calcium and deterioration of bone disease. 1-alpha-OHD3 may therefore be a valuable adjunct in the treatment of only some patients with renal osteodystrophy. Whole-body in-vivo neutron activation seems to provide a sensitive and non-invasive index of early response to treatment. PMID:1276820

  20. A single gene directs synthesis of a precursor protein with beta- and alpha-amylase activities in Bacillus polymyxa.

    PubMed Central

    Uozumi, N; Sakurai, K; Sasaki, T; Takekawa, S; Yamagata, H; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1989-01-01

    The Bacillus polymyxa amylase gene comprises 3,588 nucleotides. The mature amylase comprises 1,161 amino acids with a molecular weight of 127,314. The gene appeared to be divided into two portions by the direct-repeat sequence located at almost the middle of the gene. The 5' region upstream of the direct-repeat sequence was shown to be responsible for the synthesis of beta-amylase. The 3' region downstream of the direct-repeat sequence contained four sequences homologous with those in other alpha-amylases, such as Taka-amylase A. The 48-kilodalton (kDa) amylase isolated from B. polymyxa was proven to have alpha-amylase activity. The amino acid sequences of the peptides generated from the 48-kDa amylase showed complete agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the C-terminal portion. The B. polymyxa amylase gene was therefore concluded to contain in-phase beta- and alpha-amylase-coding sequences in the 5' and 3' regions, respectively. A precursor protein, a 130-kDa amylase, directed by a plasmid, pYN520, carrying the entire amylase gene, had both beta- and alpha-amylase activities. This represents the first report of a single protein precursor in procaryotes that gives rise to two enzymes. Images PMID:2464578

  1. Triiodothyronine causes rapid reversal of alpha 1/cyclic adenosine monophosphate synergism on brown adipocyte respiration and type II deiodinase activity.

    PubMed

    Noronha, M; Raasmaja, A; Moolten, N; Larsen, P R

    1991-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that thyroid status affects the response of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to the sympathetic nervous system. For example, hypothyroidism is associated with the development of a marked synergism between alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic pathways to stimulate type II iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase activity. Hypothyroidism also attenuates the respiratory response (thermogenesis) of isolated brown adipocytes to norepinephrine. To explore the interactions of the sympathetic nervous system and thyroid status in these cells, we compared the thermogenic and 5'-deiodinase responses to adrenergic agonists in isolated brown adipocytes from hypothyroid rats during treatment with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). The fivefold synergism of alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic catecholamines to increase the deiodinase activity was progressively reduced, reaching a control euthyroid value of unity after 5 days of T3 treatment. Hypothyroidism reduced both the O2max (twofold to threefold) and increased the concentration of agonist required for 50% stimulation (10-fold) for both norepinephrine and forskolin. In hypothyroid cells, there was a twofold synergism between the alpha 1-agonist cirazoline and forskolin to increase respiration, which was blocked by prazosin and reproduced by the calcium ionophore, A23187. This synergistic effect of the alpha 1-agonist was lost within 2 days of T3 administration. These studies identify a second Ca(2+)-dependent intra-adrenergic synergism, which functions to ameliorate the reduced cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsiveness of the hypothyroid brown adipocyte. PMID:1683679

  2. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity paradigm (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  3. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  4. Hypolipidaemic and antiplatelet activity of phenoxyacetic acid derivatives related to alpha-asarone.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pastén, Ricardo; García, Rosa Virginia; Garduño, Leticia; Reyes, Elba; Labarrios, Fernando; Tamariz, Joaquín; Chamorro, Germán

    2006-10-01

    The phenoxyacetic acid derivatives 1-6 [2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetic acid (1); 2-methoxy-5-nitro-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetic acid (2); methyl 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (3); ethyl 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (4); methyl 2-methoxy-5-nitro-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (5); ethyl 2-methoxy-5-nitro-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (6)] related to alpha-asarone have been reported previously as hypolipidaemic agents in diet-induced hyperlipidaemic mice. We have aimed to expand the pharmacological profile of these derivatives by investigating their hypolipidaemic activity in rats and mice under different experimental conditions. The antiplatelet activity was tested also in-vitro from blood derived from consenting healthy volunteers. In normolipidaemic rats, compounds 2, 3 and 5 at oral doses of 40 and 80 mg kg(-1) significantly decreased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels. Moreover, analogues 3 and 5 administered to hypercholesterolaemic rats at the same doses for seven days also produced a reduction in the content of these same lipoproteins. In neither case were the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations affected. However, practically all tested compounds were found to be hypocholesterolaemic agents, and were shown to effectively lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels in Triton-induced hyperlipidaemic mice at oral doses of 50 and 100 mg kg(-1). In all tests, all animals appeared to be healthy throughout the experimental period in their therapeutic ranges. Triton-induced hypercholesterolaemic mice appeared to be a desirable model for this class of hypolipidaemic drugs. On the other hand, compounds 1, 2, 4 and 5 significantly inhibited ADP-induced aggregation in-vitro. These findings indicated that all of these compounds appeared to be promising for the treatment of human hyperlipidaemia and thrombotic diseases. PMID:17034657

  5. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model.

    PubMed

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP-MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP-MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option. PMID:24666423

  6. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model

    PubMed Central

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP–MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP–MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option. PMID:24666423

  7. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons in mouse spinal cords following 13 weeks of exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-10-01

    Cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of motoneurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn in the lumbar and cervical segments of the mouse spinal cord were assessed after long-term exposure to microgravity and compared with those of ground-based controls. Mice were housed in a mouse drawer system on the International Space Station for 13 weeks. The mice were transported to the International Space Station by the Space Shuttle Discovery and returned to Earth by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. No changes in the cell body size of motoneurons were observed in either segment after exposure to microgravity, but succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized (<300 μm(2)) gamma and medium-sized (300-700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, which have higher succinate dehydrogenase activity than large-sized (>700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, in both segments was lower than that of ground-based controls. We concluded that exposure to microgravity for longer than 3 months induced decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of both gamma and slow-type alpha motoneurons. In particular, the decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma motoneurons was observed only after long-term exposure to microgravity. PMID:23943522

  8. Psychological stress-induced changes in salivary alpha-amylase and adrenergic activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Younhee

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among salivary alpha-amylase, plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate during psychological stress. This study used a pretest-post-test experimental design with a control group, using repeated measures. A total of 33 participants was divided into the experimental group (n = 16) that underwent a college academic final test as the psychological stress and the control group (n = 17) that did not undergo the test. The levels of salivary alpha-amylase and plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured seven times and stress and anxiety were measured once and twice, respectively, as subjective stress markers. Significant changes in the level of salivary alpha-amylase were found in response to psychological stress. However, the correlations of salivary alpha-amylase with the plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were only partially found to be statistically significant. In conclusion, it was shown that salivary alpha-amylase was sensitive to stress throughout this study. Thus, salivary alpha-amylase may be used to measure stress uninvasively in both clinical settings and nursing research where the effects of stress might be scrutinized. Furthermore, the mechanisms of illnesses that are induced by stress could be explored. PMID:21210927

  9. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Therapeutic hypolipidemic agents and industrial chemicals that cause peroxisome proliferation and induce liver tumors in rodents activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Research has elucidated the cellular and molecular events by w...

  10. Comparative binding of biotinylated neurotrophins to alpha(2)-macroglobulin family of proteins: relationship between cytokine-binding and neuro-modulatory activities of the macroglobulins.

    PubMed

    Skornicka, Erin L; Shi, Xiaoqing; Koo, Peter H

    2002-02-01

    Human alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M), pregnancy zone protein (PZP), rat alpha(1)M and acute-phase rat alpha(2)M belong to the alpha(2)M gene family of proteins, which can react covalently with nucleophilic monoamines to yield monoamine-activated (MA) macroglobulins. The MA forms of human alpha(2)M, PZP and rat alpha(2)M have been demonstrated previously to inhibit various neurotrophin-promoted neuronal activities, whereas MA-alpha(1)M is neurostimulatory and all native macroglobulins are generally inactive. The mechanism of neuromodulation is unknown, but it has been postulated that MA macroglobulins might inhibit neurons via their binding and sequestration of neurotrophins. This study employed a novel biotinylation-Western blot technique to compare the neurotrophin-binding properties of the four macroglobulins, and to correlate their binding activities with their known neuro-modulatory activities. In comparison with their respective native counterparts, human and rat MA-alpha(2)M bound slightly more NGF, but significantly less BDNF or NT-3. Native human alpha(2)M and PZP in general have no neuro-modulatory activity, but native PZP bound significantly more NGF, BDNF or NT-3 than either native alpha(2)M or MA-alpha(2)M, which is neuro-inhibitory. It is known that MA-PZP is neuro-inhibitory, but it fails to bind more NGF, BDNF, or NT-3 than native PZP. MA-alpha(1)M is the only macroglobulin known to stimulate NGF-promoted neurite outgrowth, but it bound NGF with similar affinities as native alpha(1)M and rat alpha(2)M; in addition, it bound significantly less BDNF or NT-3 than native alpha(1)M. All the bindings were non-covalent and appeared specific. In conclusion, PZP and rat macroglobulins are versatile carriers of neurotrophins with diverse binding capacities, and the neurotrophin-binding property does not appear to mediate the neuro-modulatory activity of these human and rat macroglobulins. PMID:11813239

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    González, María del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Cattley, Russell C; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Fibrates are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. The acute-phase response (APR) is an important inflammatory process. One of the most important acute-phase proteins in rats is alpha2-macroglobulin (A2Mg). Whereas normal adult rats present low serum levels, pregnant rats display high amounts. Therefore, we used pregnant rats to detect the effect of fenofibrate on hepatic A2Mg expression by RT-PCR and Northern blot. Virgin rats were used as controls. The expression of other APR genes, a known fibrate-responder gene, gamma-chain fibrinogen (gamma-Fib), and one gene from the same family as A2Mg, complement component 3 (C3), were also measured in liver. In order to determine whether the fibrate-effects were mediated by PPARalpha, wild-type mice and PPARalpha-null mice were also used and treated with WY-14,643 (WY) or di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Fenofibrate depressed A2Mg expression in virgin rats, but expression was decreased more sharply in pregnant rats. Expression of C3 and gamma-Fib was diminished after treatment only in pregnant rats. On the other hand, WY, but not DEHP, reduced A2Mg and gamma-Fib expression in the livers of wild-type mice, without any effect in PPARalpha-null mice. WY or DEHP did not affect C3 expression. Therefore, A2Mg expression is modified by PPARalpha agonists not only in pregnant rats under augmented APR protein synthesis, but also in virgin rats and mice under basal conditions. Interestingly, our results also identify A2Mg as a novel PPARalpha agonist-regulated gene. PMID:19497347

  12. The p38alpha/beta MAPK functions as a molecular switch to activate the quiescent satellite cell.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nathan C; Tyner, Kristina J; Nibarger, Lisa; Stanley, Heather M; Cornelison, Dawn D W; Fedorov, Yuri V; Olwin, Bradley B

    2005-04-11

    Somatic stem cells cycle slowly or remain quiescent until required for tissue repair and maintenance. Upon muscle injury, stem cells that lie between the muscle fiber and basal lamina (satellite cells) are activated, proliferate, and eventually differentiate to repair the damaged muscle. Satellite cells in healthy muscle are quiescent, do not express MyoD family transcription factors or cell cycle regulatory genes and are insulated from the surrounding environment. Here, we report that the p38alpha/beta family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) reversibly regulates the quiescent state of the skeletal muscle satellite cell. Inhibition of p38alpha/beta MAPKs (a) promotes exit from the cell cycle, (b) prevents differentiation, and (c) insulates the cell from most external stimuli allowing the satellite cell to maintain a quiescent state. Activation of satellite cells and p38alpha/beta MAPKs occurs concomitantly, providing further support that these MAPKs function as a molecular switch for satellite cell activation. PMID:15824134

  13. Studies on the 1alpha, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like activity in a calcinogenic plant. Cestrum diurnum, in the chick.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, R H; Corradino, R A; Krook, L; Hughes, M R; Haussler, M R

    1976-04-01

    Cestrum diurnum (day-blooming jessamine) has been proposed to cause calcinosis in horses and cattle in Florida. The present studies investigated some physiological properties of the plant, using the chick as the experimental animal. The inclusion of dried leaf powder in a rachitogenic diet restored intestinal calcium-binding protein synthesis (CaBP) and increased calcium absorption in the cholecalciferol-deficient chick. The estimated level of cholecalciferol-equivalents in the dried leaf was about 30,000 to 35,000 IU/kg. Most of the activity was extractable with methanol:chloroform (2:1), indicating that the major cholecalciferol-like component in C. diurnum was different from the water soluble factor(s) in Solanum malacoxylon. The time course of effect of C. diurnum extract in rachitic chicks was similar to that ot 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol but the former had a longer lag time. The strontium fed chick, in which the kidney 25-hydroxycholecalciferol-1alpha-hydroxylase is inhibited, responded to C. diurnum extract, confirming the 1alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like character of the Cestrum factor. The extract also appeared to interact with the intestinal 1 alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol cytosol receptor although this observation is preliminary. These findings indicate that the l alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like principle in C. diurnum many cause excessive calcium and phosphate absorption leading to calcinosis. PMID:1255265

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism by ginseng.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Michung; Lee, Hyunghee; Jeong, Sunhyo; Kim, Jung-Jae; Nicol, Christopher J; Nam, Kung Woo; Kim, Moonza; Cho, Byung Goo; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2003-04-01

    1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates the expression of the key genes involved in lipid metabolism following activation of this receptor by various ligands. Ginseng, a highly valuable medicine in oriental societies, is also reported to modulate lipid metabolism, although the mechanism of its action remains unknown. In order to test our hypothesis that ginseng exerts its effects by altering PPARalpha-mediated pathways, the effects of Korean red ginseng on PPARalpha function and serum lipid profiles were investigated using in vivo and in vitro approaches. 2. In vivo administration of ginseng extract (GE) and ginsenosides (GS) not only inhibited mRNA levels of acyl-CoA oxidase, a rate-limiting enzyme for PPARalpha-mediated peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation, induced by the potent PPARalpha ligand Wy14,643 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but also inhibited the induction of PPARalpha target genes expected following treatment with Wy14,643. 3. Consistent with the in vivo data, both GE and GS caused dose-dependent decreases in the endogenous expression of a luciferase reporter gene containing the PPAR responsive element (PPRE), while GS significantly decreased the magnitude of reporter gene activation in the presence of Wy14,643. 4. Serological studies demonstrated that, compared with vehicle-treated mice, treatment with GS significantly increased serum concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Compared to groups treated with Wy14,643 alone, which significantly decreased serum triglyceride and HDL cholesterol levels versus controls, coadministration of either GE or GS with Wy14,643 modestly increased serum triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. 5. These results indicate that the effects of ginseng on serum lipid profiles may be mediated by changes in the expression of PPARalpha target genes, providing the first evidence that in vivo and in vitro treatments of ginseng

  15. Activation of Alpha Chymotrypsin by Three Phase Partitioning Is Accompanied by Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Gulam Mohmad; Mukherjee, Joyeeta; Halling, Peter James; Gupta, Munishwar Nath

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation of alpha chymotrypsin in the simultaneous presence of ammonium sulphate and t-butanol (three phase partitioning) resulted in preparations which showed self aggregation of the enzyme molecules. Precipitation with increasing amounts of ammonium sulphate led to increasing size of aggregates. While light scattering estimated the hydrodynamic diameter of these aggregates in the range of 242–1124 nm; Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) gave the value as 130–462 nm. Scanning electron microscopy and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 showed extensive aggregation in these preparations. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the aggregates had irregular shapes. All the aggregates had about 3× higher catalytic activity than the native enzyme. These aggregates did not differ in λmax of fluorescence emission which was around 340 nm. However, all the aggregates showed higher fluorescence emission intensity. Far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism also showed no significant structural changes as compared to the native molecule. Interestingly, HPLC gel filtration (on a hydroxylated silica column) gave 14 nm as the diameter for all preparations. Light scattering of preparations in the presence of 10% ethylene glycol also dissociated the aggregates to monomers of 14 nm. Both these results indicated that hydrophobic interactions were the driving force behind this aggregation. These results indicate: (1) Even without any major structural change, three phase partitioning led to protein molecules becoming highly prone to aggregation. (2) Different methods gave widely different estimates of sizes of aggregates. It was however possible to reconcile the data obtained with various approaches. (3) The nature of the gel filtration column is crucial and use of this technique for refolding and studying aggregation needs a rethink. PMID:23239966

  16. [Effect of anticancer agents on rat prostate. Evaluation of organ weight, histological finding and 5 alpha-reductase activities].

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Hosaka, M; Kitajima, N; Noguchi, K; Fujii, H; Oshima, H; Harada, M

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of anticancer chemotherapeutic antigens on rat prostate, ten kinds of anticancer agents corresponding to the dose generally used for humans were intraperitoneally injected to 63-day-old Wistar rats. The anticancer agents were administered as follows: Cyclophosphamide (CPM) was used at the dose of 8 mg/kg for 7 days. Methotrexate (MTX), actinomycin-D (ACD) and cis-platinum (CDDP), 163 micrograms/kg, 8 micrograms/kg and 833 micrograms/kg for 5 days, respectively. Nitrogen mustard (NM), bleomycin (BLM), peplomycin (PLM), adriamycin (ADM), vincristine (VCR), and vinblastine (VBL), 500 micrograms/kg, 250 micrograms/kg, 170 micrograms/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, 33 micrograms/kg and 83 micrograms/kg, twice in a week, respectively. The rats were killed on the fifth day after completion of the schedule. Then, the weight of the body, the prostate, the epididymis and the adrenal gland were measured. In addition, 5 alpha-reductase activities and histological findings in the prostate were examined. For determination of 5 alpha-reductase activities, cell-free homogenate obtained from the rat ventral prostate was incubated with C14-testosterone at 37 degrees C for 30 minutes in an atmosphere of 95% of O2 and 5% of CO2. Subsequently, the metabolites from testosterone were separated and purified with thin layer chromatography using the solvent system with benzene acetone, 4:1 (v/v). 5 alpha-Reductase activity was determined with the sum of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and androstanediol converted from testosterone and indicated as pmol product/mg protein. The 5 alpha-reductase activity was employed as a biological marker for the degree of androgenic dependency in the prostate. The results were summarized as follows. CDDP significantly reduced the weight of the body (p less than 0.001, n = 7), but not the activity of 5 alpha-reductase. NM and VBL had a specific action to reduce the weight of the prostate (p less than 0.01, n = 8) without causing loss of body weight. NM and

  17. Methyl caffeate as an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor from Solanum torvum fruits and the activity of related compounds.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Yasuyuki; Kato, Eisuke; Katsuki, Shigeki; Iida, Osamu; Hosokawa, Keizo; Kawabata, Jun

    2010-01-01

    In screening experiments for rat intestinal alpha-glucosidase (sucrase and maltase) inhibitors in 325 plants cultivated in Japan's southern island, of Tanegashima, marked inhibition against both sucrase and maltase was found in the extract of the fruit of Solanum torvum. Enzyme-assay guided fractionation of the extract led to the isolation of methyl caffeate (1) as a rat intestinal sucrase and maltase inhibitor. We examined 13 caffeoyl derivatives for sucrase- and maltase-inhibitory activities. The results showed that methyl caffeate (1) had a most favorable structure for both sucrase and maltase inhibition, except for a higher activity of methyl 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamate (14) against sucrase. Its moderate inhibitory action against alpha-glucosidase provides a prospect for antidiabetic usage of S. torvum fruit. PMID:20378981

  18. Inspection of the activator binding site for 4-alpha-glucanotransferase in porcine liver glycogen debranching enzyme with fluorogenic dextrins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eriko; Watanabe, Yumiko; Makino, Yasushi; Omichi, Kaoru

    2009-05-01

    Recently, we found that alpha-, beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins accelerated the 4-alpha-glucanotransferase action of porcine liver glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) on Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4(Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-6)Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4GlcPA (B5/84), and proposed the presence of an activator binding site in the GDE molecule. In liver cells, the structures of alpha-glucans proximal to the site GDE acts are not cyclodextrins, but glycogen and its degradation products. To estimate the structural characteristics of intrinsic activators and to inspect the features of the activator binding site, we examined the effects of four fluorogenic dextrins, (Glcalpha1-6)(m)Glcalpha1-4(Glcalpha1-4)(n)GlcPA (B5/51, m = 1, n = 3; B6/61, m = 1, n = 4; B7/71, m = 1, n = 5; G6PA, m = 0, n = 4), on the debranching of B5/84 by porcine liver GDE. The GDE 4-alpha-glucanotransferase removed the maltotriosyl residue from the maltotetraosyl branch of B5/84, producing Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4(Glcalpha1-6)Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4GlcPA (B5/81). In the presence of G6PA, the removed maltotriosyl residue was transferred to G6PA to give Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4GlcPA (G9PA). In the absence of G6PA, the removed maltotriosyl residue was transferred to water. B7/71, B6/61 and B5/51 did not undergo any changes by the GDE, but they accelerated the action of the 4-alpha-glucanotransferase in removing the maltotriosyl residue. Of the four fluorogenic dextrins examined, B6/61 most strongly accelerated the 4-alpha-glucanotransferase action. The activator binding site is likely to be a space that accommodates the structure of Glcalpha1-6Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glc. PMID:19155269

  19. Isolation and activity of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-qi; Yang, Ming-yan; Ma, Yu; Tian, Jia; Song, Ji-Rong

    2007-12-01

    An alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha-AI) was isolated from white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L) by ethanol fractional precipitation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration column chromatography. It was a homogeneity glycoprotein demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration on CL-6B. The glycoprotein contained 88.2% protein and was rich in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, leucine, threonine and serine. The carbohydrate moiety was consisted of Man, Glc, Gal and Xyl in a mole ratio of 2.42: 1.50: 1.52: 1.00. The glycan and the core protein backbone was connected by O-linkage as determined by beta-elimination reaction. The continuous oral administration of the alpha-AI (150 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) for 7 days can lower fasting blood glucose and 300 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) alpha-AI for 7 days can improve the sugar tolerance on alloxan-dependent diabetic model rats. The result showed the alpha-AI obtained from white kidney beans had good hypoglycemic effect on alloxan induced diabetic rats and may have high potential pharmaceutical value as a regulative digestive-starch degradation in patients suffering from diabetes. PMID:18338641

  20. Effect of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone on the activity and stability of alpha-amylase: a comparative study on bacterial, fungal, and mammalian enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kashani-Amin, Elaheh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Larijani, Bagher; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2015-10-01

    Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) was recently introduced as an activator of mammalian alpha-amylase. In the current study, the effect of NHDC has been investigated on bacterial and fungal alpha-amylases. Enzyme assays and kinetic analysis demonstrated the capability of NHDC to significantly activate both tested alpha-amylases. The ligand activation pattern was found to be more similar between the fungal and mammalian enzyme in comparison with the bacterial one. Further, thermostability experiments indicated a stability increase in the presence of NHDC for the bacterial enzyme. In silico (docking) test locates a putative binding site for NHDC on alpha-amylase surface in domain B. This domain shows differences in various alpha-amylase types, and the different behavior of the ligand toward the studied enzymes may be attributed to this fact. PMID:25808616

  1. Early activation of splenic macrophages by tumor necrosis factor alpha is important in determining the outcome of experimental histoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Hsieh, B A; Lee, G S; Franco, M; Hofman, F M

    1992-01-01

    Experimental infection of animals with Histoplasma capsulatum caused a massive macrophage infiltration into the spleen and induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) locally. The cytokine was also produced in vitro by peritoneal exudate macrophages exposed to a large inoculum of yeast cells. Depletion of the cytokine by injection of polyclonal sheep anti-TNF-alpha antibody was detrimental to sublethally infected mice. Fungous burdens in the spleens of TNF-alpha-depleted mice were higher than they were in the infected control mice at days 2, 7, and 9 after infection, and the antibody-treated animals succumbed to the infection. Histopathological study of spleen sections revealed that splenic macrophages were not able to control proliferation of intracellular yeasts as a result of TNF-alpha depletion. It seems that TNF-alpha plays a role in early activation of splenic macrophages which is important in controlling the outcome of an infection. Images PMID:1398934

  2. Activity of DL-alpha-Difluoromethylarginine and Polyamine Analogues against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection in a T-Cell Receptor Alpha-Deficient Mouse Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vivo effectiveness of a series of conformationally restricted polyamine analogs alone and in combination with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) towards a T-cell receptor-alpha deficient mouse model infection of Cryptosporidium parvum was tested. Polyamine analogues were constructed from ...

  3. [Antiviral activity of extracts of transgenic cichory and lettuce plants with the human interferon alpha-2b gene].

    PubMed

    Matveeva, N A; Kudriavets, Iu I; Likhova, A A; Shakhovskiĭ, A M; Bezdenezhnykh, N A; Kvasko, E Iu

    2012-01-01

    Biological activity of protein extracts from transgenic plants of chicory Cichorium intybus L. and lettuce Lactuca sativa L. with human interferon alpha2b gene was investigated against vesicular stomatitis virus. It was shown that the extracts from the hairy roots of chicory and lettuce transformed by A. rhizogenes possess the antiviral activity 1620...5400 IU/g weight, and the extracts from leaves of the plants transformed by A. tumefaciens--till 9375 IU/g weight. Dependence of plant extract biological activity on the transformation vector was shown. PMID:23342646

  4. Immobilization of lipase on epoxy activated (1-->3)-alpha-D-glucan isolated from Penicillium chrysongenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianqi; Li, Hanxiang; Nie, Kaili; Tan, Tianwei

    2006-12-01

    A water-insoluble linear (1-->3)-alpha-D-glucan was isolated from Penicillium mycelia. Three kinds of epoxy-activated microspheres of this glucan were prepared as supports for Candida sp. lipase (EC3.1.1.3) immobilization. The highest immobilization yield was 36.4%. The specific activity was 26.85 U/mg, and only 4.1% of activity was lost in comparison with the free enzyme used for immobilization. The higher thermal stability, storage stability, and reusability of the immobilized lipase make it a potential candidate for wide application. PMID:17151459

  5. Location of the alpha-amylase gene in rumen Streptococcus bovis strains distinguished by unstable amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Mareková, M; Jonecová, Z; Kmeĭ, V

    1995-01-01

    Genetic stability of amylase activity after serial subcultivation experiments with amylolytic ruminal Streptococcus bovis strains was investigated. Two strains Amy+ and Amy- were obtained. Loss of amylase activity connected with the loss of plasmid DNA was not found in these strains. The presence of the gene responsible for the amylase activity in the chromosome of these strains was revealed by hybridization of the alpha-amylase gene on pJK108 against chromosomal DNA of S. bovis and Bacillus subtilis after a complete restriction with EcoRI. PMID:8851562

  6. Improve the catalytic activity of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in decomposition of ammonium perchlorate by coating amorphous carbon on their surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yifu; Liu Xinghai; Nie Jiaorong; Yu Lei; Zhong Yalan; Huang Chi

    2011-02-15

    Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value of the designed synthetic system, respectively. The sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with diameter about 25 nm on average were encapsulated into carbon shells to fabricate a novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C) through the coating experiments. The catalytic performance of the products on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which show that {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell composites have higher catalytic activity than that of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. -- Graphical abstract: The catalytic performance of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value. {yields} A novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell structured composite) has been successfully synthesized using sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles as the cores and glucose as the source of carbon. {yields} The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which shows that these materials have high catalytic activity.

  7. Scaling and organization of electroencephalographic background activity and alpha rhythm in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Lin, D C; Sharif, A; Kwan, H C

    2006-11-01

    The coexistence of the broad-band fluctuation and alpha rhythm of the brain dynamics is studied based on the zero-crossing property of the local electroencephalographic (EEG) recording in eyes closed and eyes open. A two-component zero-crossing scenario, consisting of a broad-band fractal and narrow-band rhythm components, is assumed. Scaling is found in the power law distribution p(tau) approximately tau(-nu) of the crossing time interval tau of the broad-band fluctuation. In alpha dominant brain state, the alpha rhythm interval L also exhibits scaling in the form of power law distribution: p(L) approximately L(phi). Our main result is the relationship nu + phi approximately 3 that characterizes the organization of these two prominent features of the brain dynamics. The possible role of self-organized criticality of punctuated equilibrium in this organization is discussed. PMID:16897091

  8. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  9. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2012-09-05

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  10. Characterization of the clotting activities of structurally different forms of activated factor IX. Enzymatic properties of normal human factor IXa alpha, factor IXa beta, and activated factor IX Chapel Hill.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, M J; Breitkreutz, L; Trapp, H; Briet, E; Noyes, C M; Lundblad, R L; Roberts, H R

    1985-01-01

    Two structurally different forms of activated human Factor IX (Factor IXa alpha and IXa beta) have been previously reported to have essentially identical clotting activity in vitro. Although it has been shown that activated Factor IX Chapel Hill, an abnormal Factor IX isolated from the plasma of a patient with mild hemophilia B, and normal Factor IXa alpha are structurally very similar, the clotting activity of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill is much lower (approximately fivefold) than that of normal Factor IXa beta. In the present study we have prepared activated Factor IX by incubating human Factor IX with calcium and Russell's viper venom covalently bound to agarose. Fractionation of the activated Factor IX by high-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated the presence of both Factors IXa alpha and IXa beta. On the basis of active site concentration, determined by titration with antithrombin III, the clotting activities of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill and IXa alpha were similar, but both activities were less than 20% of the clotting activity of Factor IXa beta. Activated Factor IX activity was also measured in the absence of calcium, phospholipid, and Factor VIII, by determination of the rate of Factor X activation in the presence of polylysine. In the presence of polylysine, the rates of Factor X activation by activated Factor IX Chapel Hill, Factor IXa alpha, and Factor IXa beta were essentially identical. We conclude that the clotting activity of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill is reduced when compared with that of Factor IXa beta but essentially normal when compared with that of Factor IXa alpha. PMID:3871202

  11. Screening of dried plant seed extracts for adiponectin production activity and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitory activity on 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshinori; Okada, Mizue; Sagesaka, Yumi

    2010-09-01

    To search for dried plant seeds with potent anti-diabetes activity, we conducted a large scale screening for inhibitory activity on tumor necrosis factor-alpha and facilitating activity on adiponectin production in vitro. These activities in 3T3-L1 adipocytes were screened from ethanol extracts of 20 kinds of dried plant seed marketed in Japan. komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. perviridis), common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), qing geng cai (Brassica rapa var. chinensis), green soybean (Glycine max), spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and sugar snap pea (Pisum sativum L.) markedly enhanced adiponectin production (11.3 ~ 12.7 ng/ml) but Japanese radish (Raphanus sativus), edible burdock (Arctium lappa L.), bitter melon (Momordica charantia) and broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) did not (0.9 ~ 2.7 ng/ml). All adiponectin-production-enhancing seeds except spinach (2.7 pg/ml) and okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (6.6 pg/ml) effectively decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels (0.0 pg/ml). We further examined the effects on free radical scavenging activities in the dried seed extracts. Although scavenging activity correlated well with total phenolic content of samples, no correlation was observed with adiponectin production. These results point to the potential of dried seed extracts as a means to modify the activity of tumor necrosis factor-alpha for the adiponectin production. PMID:20717728

  12. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A.; Hutsch, J.; Krüger, F.; Sobiella, M.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K.

    2016-04-01

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of (10.9 ± 0.6) counts per day in the energy region of 1-9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  13. Casocidin-I: a casein-alpha s2 derived peptide exhibits antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Zucht, H D; Raida, M; Adermann, K; Mägert, H J; Forssmann, W G

    1995-09-25

    Here we report the isolation and characterization of an antibacterial peptide from bovine milk inhibiting the growth of Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus carnosus. The primary structure of the peptide was revealed as a 39-amino-acid-containing fragment of bovine alpha s2-casein (position 165-203) by means of Edman amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Since human milk does not contain any casein-alpha s2, these findings could explain the different influence of human and bovine milk on the gastrointestinal flora of the suckling. PMID:7556666

  14. Relating Alpha Power and Phase to Population Firing and Hemodynamic Activity Using a Thalamo-cortical Neural Mass Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Robert; Knock, Stuart; Ritter, Petra; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Oscillations are ubiquitous phenomena in the animal and human brain. Among them, the alpha rhythm in human EEG is one of the most prominent examples. However, its precise mechanisms of generation are still poorly understood. It was mainly this lack of knowledge that motivated a number of simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) – functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. This approach revealed how oscillatory neuronal signatures such as the alpha rhythm are paralleled by changes of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal. Several such studies revealed a negative correlation between the alpha rhythm and the hemodynamic BOLD signal in visual cortex and a positive correlation in the thalamus. In this study we explore the potential generative mechanisms that lead to those observations. We use a bursting capable Stefanescu-Jirsa 3D (SJ3D) neural-mass model that reproduces a wide repertoire of prominent features of local neuronal-population dynamics. We construct a thalamo-cortical network of coupled SJ3D nodes considering excitatory and inhibitory directed connections. The model suggests that an inverse correlation between cortical multi-unit activity, i.e. the firing of neuronal populations, and narrow band local field potential oscillations in the alpha band underlies the empirically observed negative correlation between alpha-rhythm power and fMRI signal in visual cortex. Furthermore the model suggests that the interplay between tonic and bursting mode in thalamus and cortex is critical for this relation. This demonstrates how biophysically meaningful modelling can generate precise and testable hypotheses about the underpinnings of large-scale neuroimaging signals. PMID:26335064

  15. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II modulates endothelial cell responses by degrading hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through interaction with PSMA7, a component of the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Tandle, Anita T.; Calvani, Maura; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Zahavi, David; Melillo, Giovanni; Libutti, Steven K.

    2009-07-01

    The majority of human tumors are angiogenesis dependent. Understanding the specific mechanisms that contribute to angiogenesis may offer the best approach to develop therapies to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is an anti-angiogenic cytokine with potent effects on endothelial cells (ECs). It inhibits EC proliferation and cord formation, and it suppresses primary and metastatic tumor growth in-vivo. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-angiogenic activity of EMAP-II. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic activity exerted by this protein on ECs. Our results demonstrate that EMAP-II binds to the cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin receptor. The cell surface binding of EMAP-II results in its internalization into the cytoplasmic compartment where it interacts with its cytoplasmic partner PSMA7, a component of the proteasome degradation pathway. This interaction increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) degradation under hypoxic conditions. The degradation results in the inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} mediated transcriptional activity as well as HIF-1{alpha} mediated angiogenic sprouting of ECs. HIF-1{alpha} plays a critical role in angiogenesis by activating a variety of angiogenic growth factors. Our results suggest that one of the major anti-angiogenic functions of EMAP-II is exerted through its inhibition of the HIF-1{alpha} activities.

  16. Tremor in Parkinson's disease patients can be induced by uncontrolled activation and uninhibited synchronization of alpha2-motoneuron firing to which alpha1-motoneuron firing synchronizes.

    PubMed

    Schalow, Giselher

    2005-12-01

    With the surface electromyography (sEMG) and the single nerve-fibre action potential recording method a mechanism is measured how rhythmic muscle contraction and tremor in Parkinson's disease patients is generated. With sEMG it could be shown that the tremor started when alpha2-motor units (FR-type) spontaneously began to fire synchronizedly oscillatory. Two possibilities of alpha2-motor unit synchronization were observed. In one case one alpha2-motor unit started to fire oscillatory and other alpha2-motor units started to fire oscillatory in synchronization with the first alpha2-motor unit. In a second case several alpha2-motor units fired oscillatory, but not in a synchronized manner. With the synchronization of the oscillatory firing alpha2-motor units again synchronizedly oscillatory firing of several alpha2-motor units appeared. When later on, several additional alpha1-motor units (FF-type) started to fire and in synchrony with the synchronizedly oscillatory firing alpha2-motor units (FR-type), rhythmic muscle contraction and tremor were observed. Visible muscle contraction and tremor stopped, when the alpha1-motor units stopped firing, which could a.o. be achieved by the patient concentrating on the tremor. The single nerve-fibre action potential recording method showed that alpha1 and alpha2-motoneurons in the cauda equine nerve roots fired oscillatory, that they could synchronize their firing and that these oscillatory firing motoneurons could build up an external loop to the periphery in the way that gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents were included in the rhythmic coordinated firing But the synchronization of oscillatory firing was only transient and the building up of an external loop to the periphery only occurred in non-Parkinson patients upon strong repetitive reflex stimulation. It is therefore concluded that in patients with Parkinson's disease there is firstly a lack of inhibition, so that motoneurons can start to fire oscillatory upon

  17. Confounding effects of anesthesia on functional activation in rodent brain: a study of halothane and alpha-chloralose anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Austin, V C; Blamire, A M; Allers, K A; Sharp, T; Styles, P; Matthews, P M; Sibson, N R

    2005-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in animal models provides a platform for more extensive investigation of drug effects and underlying physiological mechanisms than is possible in humans. However, it is usually necessary for the animal to be anesthetized. In this study, we have used a rat model of direct cortical stimulation to investigate the effects of anesthesia in rodent fMRI. Specifically, we have sought to answer two questions (i) what is the relationship between baseline neuronal activity and the BOLD response to stimulation under halothane anesthesia? And (ii) how does the BOLD response change after transferring from halothane to the commonly used anesthetic alpha-chloralose? In the first set of experiments, we found no significant differences in the amplitude of the BOLD response at the different halothane doses studied, despite electroencephalography (EEG) recordings indicating a dose-dependent reduction in baseline neuronal activity with increasing halothane levels. In the second set of experiments, a reduction in the spatial extent of the BOLD response was apparent immediately after transfer from halothane to alpha-chloralose anesthesia, although no change in the peak signal change was evident. However, several hours after transfer to alpha-chloralose, a significant increase in both the spatial extent and peak height of the BOLD response was observed, as well as an increased sensitivity to secondary cortical and subcortical activation. These findings suggest that, although alpha-chloralose anesthesia is associated with a greater BOLD response for a fixed stimulus relative to halothane, there is substantial variation in the extent and magnitude of the response over time that could introduce considerable variability in studies using this anesthetic. PMID:15588600

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonists modulate Th1 and Th2 chemokine secretion in normal thyrocytes and Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Frascerra, Silvia; Corrado, Alda; Pupilli, Cinzia; Bernini, Giampaolo; Benvenga, Salvatore; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2011-07-01

    Until now, no data are present about the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} activation on the prototype Th1 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10] (CXCL10) and Th2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] (CCL2) chemokines secretion in thyroid cells. The role of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} activation on CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion was tested in Graves' disease (GD) and control primary thyrocytes stimulated with interferon (IFN){gamma} and tumor necrosis factor (TNF){alpha}. IFN{gamma} stimulated both CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion in primary GD and control thyrocytes. TNF{alpha} alone stimulated CCL2 secretion, while had no effect on CXCL10. The combination of IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} had a synergistic effect both on CXCL10 and CCL2 chemokines in GD thyrocytes at levels comparable to those of controls. PPAR{alpha} activators inhibited the secretion of both chemokines (stimulated with IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}) at a level higher (for CXCL10, about 60-72%) than PPAR{gamma} agonists (about 25-35%), which were confirmed to inhibit CXCL10, but not CCL2. Our data show that CCL2 is modulated by IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} in GD and normal thyrocytes. Furthermore we first show that PPAR{alpha} activators inhibit the secretion of CXCL10 and CCL2 in thyrocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} may be involved in the modulation of the immune response in the thyroid.

  19. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  20. ALPHA-AMYLASE ACTIVITY IN VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF THE IONIC LIQUID, 1-BUTYL-3-METHYLIMIDAZOLIUM CHLORIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is an extremely abundant, economical and versatile industrial commodity. Many industrial uses of starch depend on hydrolyzing the polymer for the conversion of glucose and maltodextrins. Starch hydrolysis is frequently achieved by utilizing alpha-amylase, which is an endo-acting enzyme that...

  1. OZONE EFFECTS ON ALPHA-1-PROTEINASE INHIBITOR IN VIVO: BLOOD PLASMA INHIBITORY ACTIVITY IS UNCHANGED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possible oxidative inactivation of human blood plasma alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (PI) by inhaled ozone was assessed. Eleven male volunteers (non-smokers) were exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone for four hours on two consecutive days and ten control subjects were exposed to air under ...

  2. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. Alpha-Tocopherol modulates transcriptional activities that affect essential biological processes in Bovine Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-tocopherol is the major isoform of vitamin E. after nearly 100 years of research and countless publications, the physiological functions of vitamin E remain mysterious to a certain degree. Nevertheless, vitamin E is one of the most commonly used single nutrient supplements. Recent data has su...

  4. [Constituents relating to anti-oxidative and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities in Yacon aerial part extract].

    PubMed

    Terada, Sumio; Ito, Kikuo; Yoshimura, Akira; Noguchi, Naoto; Ishida, Takashi

    2006-08-01

    Hot water extract of the aerial part of Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolia, Compositae) showed potent free radical-scavenging activity and inhibitory effects on lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenate. The most potent antioxidative activity focused on the 50% MeOH-eluted fraction on DIAION HP-20 column chromatography. The structure of the major component in the fraction was identified as 2,3,5-tricaffeoylaltraric acid (TCAA) based on spectroscopic evidence. The antioxidative activity of TCAA is superior to that of natural antioxidants such as (+/-)-catechin, alpha-tocopherol, and ellagic acid, and TCAA also showed selective maltase-inhibitory activity (IC(50) 49 microg/ml). As the hypoglycemic activity of Yacon extract was described in a previous report, the present results showing that the aerial part of Yacon has strong antioxidative activity may encourage its potential use as a food supplement to prevent type II diabetes. PMID:16880725

  5. A role for mitogen-activated protein kinase in mediating activation of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit promoter by gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, M S; Misra-Press, A; Laurance, M E; Stork, P J; Maurer, R A

    1995-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor and increases the transcription of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene. We have explored the possibility that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) plays a role in mediating GnRH effects on transcription. Activation of the MAPK cascade by an expression vector for a constitutively active form of the Raf-1 kinase led to stimulation of the alpha-subunit promoter in a concentration-dependent manner. GnRH treatment was found to increase the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of MAPK and to increase MAPK activity, as determined by an immune complex kinase assay. A reporter gene assay using the MAPK-responsive, carboxy-terminal domain of the Elk1 transcription factor was also consistent with GnRH-induced activation of MAPK. Interference with the MAPK pathway by expression vectors for kinase-defective MAPKs or vectors encoding MAPK phosphatases reduced the transcription-stimulating effects of GnRH. The DNA sequences which are required for responses to GnRH include an Ets factor-binding site. An expression vector for a dominant negative form of Ets-2 was able to reduce GnRH effects on expression of the alpha-subunit gene. These findings provide evidence that GnRH treatment leads to activation of the MAPK cascade in gonadotropes and that activation of MAPK contributes to stimulation of the alpha-subunit promoter. It is likely that an Ets factor serves as a downstream transcriptional effector of MAPK in this system. PMID:7791760

  6. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activation suppresses alpha2beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through inhibition of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wang, Chau-Zen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Upregulation and overexpression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) have been implied in the regulation of kidney development and progression of cancers. Our previous studies with Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells showed that overexpression of DDR1 inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative DDR1 promoted cell spreading on collagen-coated dish. Cell spreading is an important characteristic for cell differentiation and survival. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of DDR1 in cell spreading. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of DDR1 consisting of Cdc42 that regulates the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeleton and cell spreading in MDCK cells. Cell spreading involves the organization of cytoskeleton that is mainly regulated by Rho-family GTPases. We assessed the activity of Rho-family GTPases and transfected MDCK cells with constitutively active or dominant negative GTPases, and quantified the extent of cell spreading. These results showed that DDR1 decreased the filamentous actin ratio and Rac1/Cdc42 activities, but had no effects on RhoA activity. Neither constitutively active nor dominant negative Rac1 altered DDR1-inhibited cell spreading. Constitutively active Cdc42 could rescue the DDR1-inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative Cdc42 inhibited cell spreading, indicating that DDR1-inhibited cell spreading is Cdc42 dependent. With the use of alpha(2)beta(1) integrin blocking antibody, we showed that collagen-induced Cdc42 activation was mediated by alpha(2)beta(1) integrin. Moreover, ectopic FAK expression enhanced the Cdc42 activity. Reducing FAK activity by dominant negative FAK (FRNK) markedly abolished the Cdc42 activity. These findings show that DDR1a/b activation inhibits cell spreading through suppressing alpha(2)beta(1) integrin-mediated Cdc42 activation. PMID:18780290

  7. Nanoparticles up-regulate tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and CXCL8 via reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hye-Mi; Shin, D.-M.; Song, Hwan-Moon; Yuk, Jae-Min; Lee, Zee-Won; Lee, Sang-Hee; Hwang, Song Mei; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Chang-Soo Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2009-07-15

    Evaluating the toxicity of nanoparticles is an integral aspect of basic and applied sciences, because imaging applications using traditional organic fluorophores are limited by properties such as photobleaching, spectral overlaps, and operational difficulties. This study investigated the toxicity of nanoparticles and their biological mechanisms. We found that nanoparticles, quantum dots (QDs), considerably activated the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL) 8 through reactive oxygen species (ROS)- and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)-dependent mechanisms in human primary monocytes. Nanoparticles elicited a robust activation of intracellular ROS, phosphorylation of p47phox, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activities. Blockade of ROS generation with antioxidants significantly abrogated the QD-mediated TNF-{alpha} and CXCL8 expression in monocytes. The induced ROS generation subsequently led to the activation of MAPKs, which were crucial for mRNA and protein expression of TNF-{alpha} and CXCL8. Furthermore, confocal and electron microscopy analyses showed that internalized QDs were trapped in cytoplasmic vesicles and compartmentalized inside lysosomes. Finally, several repeated intravenous injections of QDs caused an increase in neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues in vivo. These results provide novel insights into the QD-mediated chemokine induction and inflammatory toxic responses in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Biosynthesis of catalytically active rat testosterone 5. alpha. -reductase in microinjected Xenopus oocytes: Evidence for tissue-specific differences in translatable mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Farkash, Y.; Soreq, H.; Orly, J. )

    1988-08-01

    The enzyme 4-ene-3-ketosteroid-5{alpha}-oxidoreductase plays a key role in androgen-dependent target tissues, where it catalyzes the conversion of testosterone to the biologically active dihydrotestosterone. The regulation of 5{alpha}-reductase expression has not been studied at the molecular level as the enzyme is a membrane protein that is labile in cell-free homogenates. The authors developed a sensitive bioassay of the enzyme activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with rat liver and prostate mRNA. After microinjection, incubation of intact oocytes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)testosterone revealed the in ovo appearance of active 5{alpha}-reductase. Polyandenylylated RNA was fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and the enzymatic activity was shown to be encoded by a 1,600- to 2,000-base-pair fraction of hepatic poly(A){sup +} RNA. 5{alpha}-Reductase mRNA was most efficiently translated when up to 80 ng of RNA was injected per oocyte. In the injected oocytes, 5{alpha}-reductase mRNA was found to be a short-lived molecule whereas its in ovo translatable 5{alpha}-reductase protein exhibited stable enzymatic activity for over 40 hr. Moreover, the levels of translatable tissue-specific 5{alpha}-reductase mRNAs as monitored in the Xenopus oocytes correlated with the variable 5{alpha}-reductase activities in female rat liver, male rat liver, and prostate homogenates. Altogether, these results provide supporting evidence in favor of the transcriptional control of 5{alpha}-reductase expression in rat tissues.

  9. PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression possibly through PPAR{gamma} activation in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Horie, Shuichi

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression. {yields} Hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and PCG-1{alpha} are induced by a ketogenic diet. {yields} PPAR{gamma} antagonist attenuates a ketogenic diet-induced PAI-1 expression. {yields} Ketogenic diet advances the phase of circadian clock in a PPAR{alpha}-independent manner. -- Abstract: An increased level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and PAI-1 gene expression is under the control of molecular circadian clocks in mammals. We recently showed that PAI-1 expression is augmented in a phase-advanced circadian manner in mice fed with a ketogenic diet (KD). To determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in hypofibrinolytic status induced by a KD, we examined the expression profiles of PAI-1 and circadian clock genes in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice. Chronic administration of bezafibrate induced the PAI-1 gene expression in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Feeding with a KD augmented the circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA in the hearts and livers of wild-type (WT) mice as previously described. The KD-induced mRNA expression of typical PPAR{alpha} target genes such as Cyp4A10 and FGF21 was damped in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. However, plasma PAI-1 concentrations were significantly more elevated in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice in accordance with hepatic mRNA levels. These observations suggest that PPAR{alpha} activation is dispensable for KD-induced PAI-1 expression. We also found that hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, and the hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and its coactivator PCG-1{alpha} were more effectively induced in PPAR{alpha}-null, than in WT mice on a KD. Furthermore, KD-induced hepatic PAI-1 expression was significantly suppressed by supplementation with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, in both WT and PPAR{alpha

  10. Development of Rapid Radiochemical Method for Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Activity Concentration in Flowback and Produced Waters from Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the development and validation of an improved method for the Determination of Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Activity in Flowback and Produced Waters from Hydraulic Fracturing Operations (FPWHFO). Flowback and produced waters are characterized by high concentra...

  11. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  12. An alpha2,6-sialyltransferase cloned from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 shows both sialyltransferase and neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Mine, Toshiki; Katayama, Sakurako; Kajiwara, Hitomi; Tsunashima, Masako; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2010-02-01

    We cloned, expressed, and characterized a novel beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119. The protein showed 56-96% identity to the marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases classified into glycosyltransferase family 80. The sialyltransferase activity of the N-terminal truncated form of the recombinant enzyme was 1477 U/L of Escherichia coli culture. The truncated recombinant enzyme was purified as a single band by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis through 3 column chromatography steps. The enzyme had distinct activity compared with known marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases. Although alpha2,6-sialyltransferases cloned from marine bacteria, such as Photobacterium damselae strain JT0160, P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-145, and Photobacterium sp. strain JT-ISH-224, show only alpha2,6-sialyltransferase activity, the recombinant enzyme cloned from P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 showed both alpha2,6-sialyltransferase and alpha2,6-linkage-specific neuraminidase activity. Our results provide important information toward a comprehensive understanding of the bacterial sialyltransferases belonging to the group 80 glycosyltransferase family in the CAZy database. PMID:19797322

  13. alpha-lytic protease can exist in two separately stable conformations with different His57 mobilities and catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Kristin Coffman; Sudmeier, James L; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Bachovchin, William W

    2005-01-25

    alpha-Lytic protease is a bacterial serine protease widely studied as a model system of enzyme catalysis. Here we report that lyophilization induces a structural change in the enzyme that is not reversed by redissolution in water. The structural change reduces the mobility of the active-site histidine residue and the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The application of mild pressure to solutions of the altered enzyme reverses the lyophilization-induced structural change and restores the mobility of the histidine residue and the enzyme's catalytic activity. This effect of lyophilization permits a unique opportunity for investigating the relationship between histidine ring dynamics and catalytic activity. The results demonstrate that His57 in resting enzymes is more mobile than previously thought, especially when protonated. The histidine motion and its correlation to enzyme activity lend support to the reaction-driven ring flip hypothesis. PMID:15657134

  14. Analysis of the activity of alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists in rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Graaf, P. H.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. In this study, the effect of seven alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists (tamsulosin, phentolamine, prazosin, WB-4101, 5-methylurapidil, spiperone and HV723) have been examined on the contractile response to noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (PE) in rat isolated aorta. 2. NA and PE, when administered using a cumulative dosing schedule, both produced concentration-dependent contraction of aortic rings. It was possible to fit the individual concentration-effect (E/[A]) curve data to the Hill equation to provide estimates of the curve midpoint location (p[A]50 = 7.74 +/- 0.10 and 7.14 +/- 0.18), midpoint slope (nH = 0.82 +/- 0.03 and 0.99 +/- 0.10) and upper asymptote (alpha = 3.2 +/- 0.3 and 3.1 +/- 0.2 g) parameters for NA and PE, respectively. However, the Hill equation provided a better fit to the E/[A] curve data obtained with another contractile agent, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) (p[A50] = 6.09 +/- 0.08, nH = 1.49 +/- 0.09, alpha = 2.6 +/- 0.3 g), as judged by calculation of the mean sum of squares of the differences between the observed and predicted values. 3. All of the antagonists investigated produced concentration-dependent inhibition of the contractile responses of the aorta to NA and PE. Although no significant effects on the upper asymptotes of the E/[A] curves of any of the antagonists tested were detected, only tamsulosin and 5-methylurapidil did not have a significant effect on the slope (nH) of the NA and PE E/[A] curves. The other antagonists produced significant steepening of the curves obtained with NA and/or PE. 4. Notwithstanding the fact that one of the basic criteria for simple competitive antagonism at a single receptor class was not always satisfied, the individual log [A]50 values estimated in the absence and presence of antagonist within each experiment were fitted to the competitive model. The Schild plot slope parameters for the antagonism of NA and PE by phentolamine and HV723 were found to be significantly less than unity. The Schild

  15. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  16. Detoxification of alpha- and beta-Thujones (the active ingredients of absinthe): site specificity and species differences in cytochrome P450 oxidation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Höld, K M; Sirisoma, N S; Casida, J E

    2001-05-01

    Alpha- and beta-Thujones are active ingredients in the liqueur absinthe and in herbal medicines and seasonings for food and drinks. Our earlier study established that they are convulsants and have insecticidal activity, acting as noncompetitive blockers of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel, and identified 7-hydroxy-alpha-thujone as the major metabolite and 4-hydroxy-alpha- and -beta-thujones and 7,8-dehydro-alpha-thujone as minor metabolites in the mouse liver microsome-NADPH system. We report here unexpected site specificity and species differences in the metabolism of the thujone diastereomers in mouse, rat, and human liver microsomes and human recombinant P450 (P450 3A4), in orally treated mice and rats, and in Drosophila melanogaster. Major differences are apparent on comparing in vitro microsome-NADPH systems and in vivo urinary metabolites. Hydroxylation at the 2-position is observed only in mice where conjugated 2R-hydroxy-alpha-thujone is the major urinary metabolite of alpha-thujone. Hydroxylation at the 4-position gives one or both of 4-hydroxy-alpha- and -beta-thujones depending on the diastereomer and species studied with conjugated 4-hydroxy-alpha-thujone as the major urinary metabolite of alpha- and beta-thujones in rats. Hydroxylation at the 7-position of alpha- and beta-thujones is always a major pathway, but the conjugated urinary metabolite is minor except with beta-thujone in the mouse. Site specificity in glucuronidation favors excretion of 2R-hydroxy- and 4-hydroxy-alpha-thujone glucuronides rather than those of three other hydroxythujones. Two dehydro metabolites are observed from both alpha- and beta-thujones, the 7,8 in the P450 systems and the 4,10 in urine. Two types of evidence establish that P450-dependent oxidations of alpha- and beta-thujones are detoxification reactions: three P450 inhibitors block the metabolism of alpha- and beta-thujones and strongly synergize their toxicity in Drosophila; six metabolites

  17. The Atlantic Salmon MHC class II alpha and beta promoters are active in mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vestrheim, O; Lundin, M; Syed, M

    2007-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes are only constitutively expressed in certain immune response cells such as B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and other antigen presenting cells. This cell specific expression pattern and the presence of conserved regions such as the X-, X2-, Y-, and W-boxes make the MHCII promoters especially interesting as vector constructs. We tested whether the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) MHCII promoters can function in cell lines from other organisms. We found that the salmon MHCII alpha and MHCII beta promoters could drive expression of a LacZ reporter gene in adherent lymphoblast cell lines from dog (DH82) and rabbit (HybL-L). This paper shows that the promoters of Atlantic salmon MHCII alpha and beta genes can function in mammalian cell lines. PMID:17934904

  18. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone modulates activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1 and secretion of interleukin-8 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Böhm, M; Schulte, U; Kalden, H; Luger, T A

    1999-10-20

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) has evolved as a mediator of diverse biological activities in an ever-growing number of non-melanocytic cell types. One mechanism by which alpha-MSH exerts its effects is modulation of AP-1 and NF-kappa B. These two transcription factors also play an important role in fibroblasts, in extracellular matrix composition, and in cytokine expression. By use of electric mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that alpha-MSH (10(-6) to 10(-14) M) activates AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts, whereas coincubation with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) results in suppression of its activation. alpha-MSH also induces activation of NF-kappa B but does not modulate DNA binding on costimulation with IL-1 beta. Since AP-1 and NF-kappa B are key elements in controlling interleukin-8 (IL-8) transcription, human fibroblasts were treated with alpha-MSH and IL-1 beta for 24 hours, and cytokine levels in the supernatants were measured by ELISA. alpha-MSH alone had little effect, whereas coincubation with IL-1 beta led to marked downregulation of IL-8 secretion (at most 288 +/- 152 ng/mL) when compared to treatment with IL-1 beta alone (919 +/- 157 ng/mL). Our results indicate that alpha-MSH exerts modulatory effects on the activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1, and that it can regulate chemokine secretion in human dermal fibroblasts. These effects of alpha-MSH may have important regulatory functions in extracellular matrix composition, wound healing, or angiogenesis. PMID:10816661

  19. Nonstructural protein 1{alpha} subunit-based inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and suppression of interferon-{beta} production by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Song Cheng; Krell, Peter; Yoo, Dongwan

    2010-11-25

    Induction of type I interferon (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}) is an early antiviral response of the host, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been reported to downregulate the IFN response during infection in cells and pigs. We report that the PRRSV nonstructural protein 1{alpha} (Nsp1{alpha}) subunit of Nsp1 is a nuclear-cytoplasmic protein distributed to the nucleus and contains a strong suppressive activity for IFN-{beta} production that is mediated through the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling pathway. Nsp1{alpha} suppressed the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B when stimulated with dsRNA or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B suppression was RIG-I-dependent. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B activation was associated with the poor production of IFN-{beta} during PRRSV infection. The C-terminal 14 amino acids of the Nsp1{alpha} subunit were critical in maintaining immunosuppressive activity of Nsp1{alpha} for both IFN-{beta} and NF-{kappa}B, suggesting that the newly identified zinc finger configuration comprising of Met180 may be crucial for inhibitory activities. Nsp1{alpha} inhibited I{kappa}B phosphorylation and as a consequence NF-{kappa}B translocation to the nucleus was blocked, leading to the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B stimulated gene expression. Our results suggest that PRRSV Nsp1{alpha} is a multifunctional nuclear protein participating in the modulation of the host IFN system.

  20. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are given. The AOL system is described and its potential for various measurement applications including bathymetry and fluorosensing is discussed.

  1. The alpha1-fetoprotein locus is activated by a nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family.

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, L; Paré, J F; Allard, D; Hamel, D; Levesque, L; Tugwood, J D; Green, S; Bélanger, L

    1996-01-01

    The alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is located between the albumin and alpha-albumin genes and is activated by transcription factor FTF (fetoprotein transcription factor), presumed to transduce early developmental signals to the albumin gene cluster. We have identified FTF as an orphan nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family. FTF recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-TCAAGGTCA-3', the canonical recognition motif for FTZ-F1 receptors. cDNA sequence homologies indicate that rat FTF is the ortholog of mouse LRH-1 and Xenopus xFF1rA. Rodent FTF is encoded by a single-copy gene, related to the gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). The 5.2-kb FTF transcript is translated from several in-frame initiator codons into FTF isoforms (54 to 64 kDa) which appear to bind DNA as monomers, with no need for a specific ligand, similar KdS (approximately equal 3 x 10(-10) M), and similar transcriptional effects. FTF activates the AFP promoter without the use of an amino-terminal activation domain; carboxy-terminus-truncated FTF exerts strong dominant negative effects. In the AFP promoter, FTF recruits an accessory trans-activator which imparts glucocorticoid reactivity upon the AFP gene. FTF binding sites are found in the promoters of other liver-expressed genes, some encoding liver transcription factors; FTF, liver alpha1-antitrypsin promoter factor LFB2, and HNF-3beta promoter factor UF2-H3beta are probably the same factor. FTF is also abundantly expressed in the pancreas and may exert differentiation functions in endodermal sublineages, similar to SF-1 in steroidogenic tissues. HepG2 hepatoma cells seem to express a mutated form of FTF. PMID:8668203

  2. Clasp/SJ Observation of Time Variations of Lyman-Alpha Emissions in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, S.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on September 3, 2015 to investigate the solar chromosphere, and the slit-jaw (SJ) optical system took Lya images with the high time cadence of 0.6 s. By the CLASP/SJ observation, many time variations in the solar chromosphere with the time scale of <1 minute were discovered (see the poster by Kubo et al., Pa-13). We focused on an active region and investigated the short (<30 s) time variations and relation to the coronal structure observed by SDO/AIA. We compared the Ly(alpha) time variations at footpoints of coronal magnetic fields observed by AIA 211 Å (approx.2 MK) and AIA 171 Å (0.6 MK), and non-loop regions. As the result, we found the <30 s Ly(alpha) time variations had more in the footpoint regions. On the other hand, the <30 s time variations had no dependency on the temperature of the loop.

  3. Surface active molecules: preparation and properties of long chain n-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Infante, R; Dominguez, J G; Erra, P; Julia, R; Prats, M

    1984-12-01

    Synopsis A new route for the synthesis of long chain N(alpha)-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guamdine alkyl acid derivatives, with cationic or amphoteric character has been established. The general formula of these compounds is shown below. A physico-chemical and antimicrobial study of these products as a function of the alkyl ester or sodium salt (R), the straight chain length of the fatty acid residue (x) and the number of carbons between the omega-guanidine and omega-carboxyl group (n) has been investigated. The water solubility, surface tension, critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas) has been determined. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has been used to condense fatty acids and alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acids. In these conditions protection of the omega-guanidine group is not necessary. The main characteristic of this synthetic procedure is the use of very mild experimental conditions (temperature, pH) to form the amide linkage which leads to pure optical compounds in high yield in the absence of electrolytes. The results show that some structural modifications, particularly the protection of the carboxyl group, promote variations of the surfactant and antimicrobial properties. Only those molecules with the blocked carboxyl group (cationic molecules, where R = Me, Et or Pr) showed a good surfactant and antimicrobial activity. When the carboxyl group was unprotected (amphoteric molecules, where R = Na(+)) the resulting compounds were inactive. PMID:19467126

  4. Modulation of Posterior Alpha Activity by Spatial Attention Allows for Controlling A Continuous Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Horschig, Jörn M; Oosterheert, Wouter; Oostenveld, Robert; Jensen, Ole

    2015-11-01

    Here we report that the modulation of alpha activity by covert attention can be used as a control signal in an online brain-computer interface, that it is reliable, and that it is robust. Subjects were instructed to orient covert visual attention to the left or right hemifield. We decoded the direction of attention from the magnetoencephalogram by a template matching classifier and provided the classification outcome to the subject in real-time using a novel graphical user interface. Training data for the templates were obtained from a Posner-cueing task conducted just before the BCI task. Eleven subjects participated in four sessions each. Eight of the subjects achieved classification rates significantly above chance level. Subjects were able to significantly increase their performance from the first to the second session. Individual patterns of posterior alpha power remained stable throughout the four sessions and did not change with increased performance. We conclude that posterior alpha power can successfully be used as a control signal in brain-computer interfaces. We also discuss several ideas for further improving the setup and propose future research based on solid hypotheses about behavioral consequences of modulating neuronal oscillations by brain computer interfacing. PMID:25388661

  5. FIELD ACTIVITIES AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE INVESTIGATION OF WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS IN TWO HIGH ELEVATION WATERSHEDS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Park Service initiated the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) in 2002 to determine if airborne contaminants from long-range transport and/or regional sources are having an impact on remote western ecosystems, including AK. Rocky Mountain Nation...

  6. Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid inhibits tumour necrosis factor-alpha production by human leucocytes independently of cyclooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Dooper, Maaike M B W; van Riel, Boet; Graus, Yvo M F; M'Rabet, Laura

    2003-11-01

    Dietary oils (such as borage oil), which are rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), have been shown to be beneficial under inflammatory conditions. Dihomo-GLA (DGLA) is synthesized directly from GLA and forms a substrate for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, resulting in the synthesis of lipid mediators (eicosanoids). In the present study, the immunomodulatory effects of DGLA were investigated and compared with those of other relevant fatty acids. Freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured in fatty acid (100 microm)-enriched medium for 48 hr. Subsequently, cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 20 hr and the cytokine levels were measured, in supernatants, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Phospholipids were analysed by gas chromatography. Fatty acids were readily taken up, metabolized and incorporated into cellular phospholipids. Compared with the other fatty acids tested, DGLA exerted pronounced modulatory effects on cytokine production. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were reduced to 60% of control levels, whereas IL-6 levels were not affected by DGLA. Kinetic studies showed that peak levels of TNF-alpha, occurring early after LPS addition, were inhibited strongly, whereas IL-10 levels were not affected until 15 hr after stimulation. Both the reduction of cytokine levels and the decrease in arachidonic acid levels in these cells, induced by DGLA, were dose dependent, suggesting a shift in eicosanoid-subtype synthesis. However, although some DGLA-derived eicosanoids similarly reduced TNF-alpha levels, the effects of DGLA were probably not mediated by COX products, as the addition of indomethacin did not alter the effects of DGLA. In conclusion, these results suggest that DGLA affects cytokine production by human PBMC independently of COX activation. PMID:14632663

  7. Low dose alpha interferon therapy can be effective in chronic active hepatitis C. Results of a multicentre, randomised trial.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tapias, J M; Forns, X; Ampurdanés, S; Titó, L; Planas, R; Viver, J M; Acero, D; Torres, M; Mas, P; Morillas, R; Forné, M; Espinós, J; Llovet, J M; Costa, J; Olmedo, E; López-Labrador, F X; Jiménez de Anta, M T; Rodés, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is some controversy concerning the efficacy of low dose alpha interferon therapy in chronic hepatitis C. AIMS--To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with low doses of alpha interferon in chronic hepatitis C. PATIENTS--One hundred and forty one patients with anti-HCV positive chronic active hepatitis C from six hospitals were enrolled in the study. METHODS--Patients were randomised to treatment with 5 MU (group A) or 1.5 MU (group B) injections. The dose was reduced in responders from group A or increased in non-responders from group B to maintain treatment with the minimal effective dose. Patients were treated for 48 weeks and followed up for 24 additional weeks with no treatment. Normalisation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was used to evaluate response. RESULTS--A sustained response was seen in eight patients from group A (12%) and in 15 (21%) from group B. This difference was not statistically significant. Increasing the dose of interferon led to sustained response in only five of 58 patients (9%) from group B who did not respond to 1.5 MU injections. In contrast, 15 of 21 patients (71%) in whom ALT remained normal with 1.5 MU injections developed a sustained response. By multivariate analysis sustained response seemed associated with young age and was more frequent in patients with genotype 3 HCV infection. Sustained response was preceded by a rapid normalisation of ALT and was inversely related to the amount of alpha interferon necessary to maintain ALT at low values during treatment. CONCLUSIONS--Some patients with chronic hepatitis C are very sensitive to alpha interferon and can be successfully treated with low doses. Treatment with higher doses may be effective in a minority of patients who do not respond to low doses. PMID:8707096

  8. Estrogen receptor alpha activation enhances mitochondrial function and systemic metabolism in high-fat-fed ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Dale J; Minze, Laurie J; Kumar, Tanvi; Cao, Tram N; Lyon, Christopher J; Geiger, Paige C; Hsueh, Willa A; Gupte, Anisha A

    2016-09-01

    Estrogen impacts insulin action and cardiac metabolism, and menopause dramatically increases cardiometabolic risk in women. However, the mechanism(s) of cardiometabolic protection by estrogen remain incompletely understood. Here, we tested the effects of selective activation of E2 receptor alpha (ERα) on systemic metabolism, insulin action, and cardiac mitochondrial function in a mouse model of metabolic dysfunction (ovariectomy [OVX], insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and advanced age). Middle-aged (12-month-old) female low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr)(-/-) mice were subjected to OVX or sham surgery and fed "western" high-fat diet (WHFD) for 3 months. Selective ERα activation with 4,4',4″-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) (PPT), prevented weight gain, improved insulin action, and reduced visceral fat accumulation in WHFD-fed OVX mice. PPT treatment also elevated systemic metabolism, increasing oxygen consumption and core body temperature, induced expression of several metabolic genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha, and nuclear respiratory factor 1 in heart, liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, and increased cardiac mitochondrial function. Taken together, selective activation of ERα with PPT enhances metabolic effects including insulin resistance, whole body energy metabolism, and mitochondrial function in OVX mice with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27582063

  9. Brain oscillatory activity during motor preparation: effect of directional uncertainty on beta, but not alpha, frequency band

    PubMed Central

    Tzagarakis, Charidimos; West, Sarah; Pellizzer, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In time-constraint activities, such as sports, it is advantageous to be prepared to act even before knowing precisely what action will be needed. Here, we studied the relation between neural oscillations during motor preparation and amount of uncertainty about the direction of the upcoming target. Ten right-handed volunteers participated in a cued center-out task. A brief visual cue identified the region of space in which the target would appear. Three cue sizes were used to vary the amount of information about the direction of the upcoming target. The target appeared at a random location within the region indicated by the cue, and the participants moved a joystick-controlled cursor toward it. Time-frequency analyses showed phasic increases of power in low (delta/theta: <7 Hz) and high (gamma: >30 Hz) frequency-bands in relation to the onset of visual stimuli and of the motor response. More importantly in regard to motor preparation, there was a tonic reduction of power in the alpha (8–12 Hz) and beta (14–30 Hz) bands during the period between cue presentation and target onset. During motor preparation, the main source of change of power of the alpha band was localized over the contralateral sensorimotor region and both parietal cortices, whereas for the beta-band the main source was the contralateral sensorimotor region. During cue presentation, the reduction of power of the alpha-band in the occipital lobe showed a brief differentiation of condition: the wider the visual cue, the more the power of the alpha-band decreased. However, during motor preparation, only the power of the beta-band was dependent on directional uncertainty: the less the directional uncertainty, the more the power of the beta-band decreased. In conclusion, the results indicate that the power in the alpha-band is associated briefly with cue size, but is otherwise an undifferentiated indication of neural activation, whereas the power of the beta-band reflects the level of motor preparation

  10. Effect of dicarbonyl-induced browning on alpha-crystallin chaperone-like activity: physiological significance and caveats of in vitro aggregation assays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Satish; Reddy, P Yadagiri; Kumar, P Anil; Surolia, Ira; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2004-04-15

    Alpha-crystallin is a member of the small heat-shock protein family and functions like a molecular chaperone, and may thus help in maintaining the transparency of the eye lens by protecting the lens proteins from various stress conditions. Non-enzymic glycation of long-lived proteins has been implicated in several age- and diabetes-related complications, including cataract. Dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal have been identified as the predominant source for the formation of advanced glycation end-products in various tissues including the lens. We have investigated the effect of non-enzymic browning of alpha-crystallin by reactive dicarbonyls on its molecular chaperone-like function. Non-enzymic browning of bovine alpha-crystallin in vitro caused, along with altered secondary and tertiary structures, cross-linking and high-molecular-mass aggregation. Notwithstanding these structural changes, methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-modified alpha-crystallin showed enhanced anti-aggregation activity in various in vitro aggregation assays. Paradoxically, increased chaperone-like activity of modified alpha-crystallin was not associated with increased surface hydrophobicity and rather showed less 8-anilinonaphthalene-l-sulphonic acid binding. In contrast, the chaperone-like function of modified alpha-crystallin was found to be reduced in assays that monitor the prevention of enzyme inactivation by UV-B and heat. Moreover, incubation of bovine lens with methylglyoxal in organ culture resulted in cataract formation with accumulation of advanced glycation end-products and recovery of alpha-crystallin in high proportions in the insoluble fraction. Furthermore, soluble alpha-crystallin from methylglyoxal-treated lenses showed decreased chaperone-like activity. Thus, in addition to describing the effects of methylglyoxal and glyoxal on structure and chaperone-like activity, our studies also bring out an important caveat of aggregation assays in the context of the

  11. Inducible nuclear expression of newly synthesized I kappa B alpha negatively regulates DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Arenzana-Seisdedos, F; Thompson, J; Rodriguez, M S; Bachelerie, F; Thomas, D; Hay, R T

    1995-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-kappa B is exploited by many viruses, including the human immunodeficiency virus, for expression of viral genes, but its primary role appears to be in the rapid induction of cellular genes during immune and inflammatory responses. The inhibitor protein I kappa B alpha maintains NF-kappa B in an inactive form in the cytoplasms of unstimulated cells, but upon cell activation, I kappa B alpha is rapidly degraded, leading to nuclear translocation of free NF-kappa B. However, NF-kappa B-dependent transcription of the I kappa B alpha gene leads to rapid resynthesis of the I kappa B alpha protein and inhibition of NF-kappa B-dependent transcription. Here we demonstrate a new regulatory function of I kappa B alpha exerted on NF-kappa B in the nuclear compartment. Although normally found in the cytoplasm, I kappa B alpha, newly synthesized in response to tumor necrosis factor or interleukin I, is transported to the nucleus. In the nucleus I kappa B alpha associates with the p50 and p65 subunits of NF-kappa B, inhibiting DNA binding of the transcription factor. Furthermore, nuclear expression of I kappa B alpha correlates with transcription termination of transfected NF-kappa B-dependent luciferase genes. Following the appearance of I kappa B alpha in the nuclei of activated cells, a dramatic reduction in the amount of nuclear p50 occurs, suggesting that NF-kappa B-I kappa B alpha complexes are cleared from the nucleus. PMID:7739549

  12. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I subtypes. Presence of immunologically cross-reactive material and in vitro enhancement of the residual alpha-L-iduronidase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Schuchman, E H; Desnick, R J

    1988-01-01

    The enzymatic and immunologic properties of the defective residual alpha-L-iduronidase activities were investigated in fibroblast extracts from the three subtypes of mucopolysaccharidosis type I, Hurler (MPS IH), Scheie (MPS IS), and Hurler-Scheie (MPS IH-S) diseases. Using 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-L-iduronide (4MU-alpha-Id), the activities in fibroblast extracts from all three subtypes were less than 0.1% of normal. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis with monospecific rabbit anti-human alpha-L-iduronidase polyclonal antibodies, as well as immunoblots using a monoclonal antibody, revealed the presence of cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM) in extracts prepared from each subtype. When the samples were equalized for beta-hexosaminidase A activity, 38-105% of normal enzyme protein was detected. The sequential addition of cystamine, MgCl2 and pyridoxal phosphate increased the residual 4MU-alpha-Id activities in subtype extracts up to about 35% of normal mean fibroblast activity. Cystamine, MgCl2 or pyridoxal phosphate alone enhanced the residual activities two- to fourfold, whereas the sequential addition of all three compounds was required for maximal effect. Of the six B6 vitamers evaluated, only the negatively charged forms, pyridoxamine (PLN), pyridoxamine phosphate (PNP), and pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), stimulated the residual activities. The addition of dermatan sulfate or heparan sulfate to the subtype extracts, followed by treatment with the effector compounds, similarly inhibited both the normal and enhanced MPS I activities. Heat inactivation experiments confirmed the fact that the mutant iduronidase activity was reconstituted and that the observed increase in enzymatic activity was not an artifact of the fluorogenic assay. These results suggest that the presence of certain thiol reducing agents, divalent cations and negatively charged B6 vitamers can alter the conformation of the mutant alpha-L-iduronidase in vitro such that the hydrolysis of 4MU-alpha

  13. Heat shock inhibits. alpha. -amylase synthesis in barley aleurone without inhibiting the activity of endoplasmic reticulum marker enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sticher, L.; Biswas, A.K.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of heat shock on the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase and on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone were studied. Heat shock, imposed by raising the temperature of incubation from 25{degree}C to 40{degree}C for 3 hours, inhibits the accumulation of {alpha}-amylase and other proteins in the incubation medium of barley aleurone layers treated with gibberellic acid and Ca{sup 2+}. When ER is isolated from heat-shocked aleurone layers, less newly synthesized {alpha}-amylase is found associated with this membrane system. ER membranes, as indicated by the activities of NADH cytochrome c reductase and ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} transport, are not destroyed by heat stress, however. Although heat shock did not reduce the activity of ER membrane marker enzymes, it altered the buoyant density of these membranes. Whereas ER from control tissue showed a peak of marker enzyme activity at 27% to 28% sucrose (1.113-1.120 grams per cubic centimeter), ER from heat-shocked tissue peaked at 30% to 32% sucrose (1.127-1.137 grams per cubic centimeter). The synthesis of a group of proteins designated as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) was stimulated by heat shock. These HSPs were localized to different compartments of the aleurone cell. Several proteins ranging from 15 to 30 kilodaltons were found in the ER and the mitochondrial/plasma membrane fractions of heat-shocked cells, but none of the HSPs accumulated in the incubation medium of heat-shocked aleurone layers.

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-I-related regulation of procollagen I ({alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2}) by antitransforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} treatment during radiation-impaired wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Thorwarth, Michael; Roedel, Franz; Melnychenko, Ivan; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G.; Amann, Kerstin; Wehrhan, Falk

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 mediates transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1})-related signaling by stimulating collagen Type I synthesis in radiation-impaired wound healing. The regulation of {alpha}(I)-procollagen is contradictory in fibroblasts of different fibrotic lesions. It is not known whether anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment specifically inhibits {alpha}(I)-procollagen synthesis. We used an experimental wound healing study to address anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-associated influence on {alpha}(I)-procollagen synthesis. Methods and Materials: A free flap was transplanted into the preirradiated (40 Gy) or nonirradiated neck region of Wistar rats: Group 1 (n = 8) surgery alone; Group 2 (n = 14) irradiation and surgery; Group 3 (n = 8) irradiation and surgery and anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment. On the 14th postoperative day, skin samples were processed for fibroblast culture, in situ hybridization for TGF-{beta}{sub 1}, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting for PAI-1, {alpha}{sub 1}/{alpha}{sub 2}(I)-procollagen. Results: Anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} significantly reduced TGF-{beta}{sub 1} mRNA (p < 0.05) and PAI-1 expression (p < 0.05). Anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment in vivo significantly reduced {alpha}{sub 1}(I)-procollagen protein (p < 0.05) and the number of expressing cells (p < 0.05) in contrast to significantly increased (p < 0.05) {alpha}{sub 2}(I)-procollagen expression. Conclusion: These results emphasize anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis by decreasing {alpha}{sub 1}(I)-procollagen synthesis in vivo. {alpha}{sub 1}(I)-procollagen and {alpha}{sub 2}(I)-procollagen might be differentially regulated by anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment. Increased TGF-{beta} signaling in irradiated skin fibroblasts seemed to be reversible, as shown by a reduction in PAI-1 expression after anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment.

  15. Gross alpha, gross beta activities and gamma emitting radionuclides composition of rainwater samples and deposition to ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, C.; Fernández, M. C.; Gordo, E.; Cañete, S.; Pérez, M.

    2011-02-01

    The radiometric composition of bulk deposition samples, collected monthly in a 5 year period (1 January 2005 until 31 December 2009) at a site located 30 m a.s.l in Málaga (4°28' 8″W; 36° 43'40″N), are analysed in this paper. Measurement of gross alpha, gross beta, artificial and natural radionuclide activity concentrations were carried out in 60 bulk deposition samples. We analysed the time series of gross alpha, gross beta 7Be, 210Pb and 40K. The specific activities of gross alpha and gross beta measured in bulk deposition material are in the range from 0.012-0.32 and 0.045-1.81 Bq l -1 and theirs mean values are: 0.11 and 0.59 Bq l -1 respectively. The activity values of 7Be and 210Pb are in the range from 0.65-8.3 and 0.05-1.32 Bq l -1 with mean values of 2.5 and 0.41 Bq l -1 respectively. The highest specific activities of 40K in bulk deposition material were recorded in connection with high altitude Saharan dust intrusion. The time variations of the different radionuclide concentrations have been discussed in relation with various meteorological factors and the mean values have been compared to those published in recent literature for other sites located at different latitudes. To study the deposition, monthly deposition data from a funnel collector were compared from 2005 to 2009.The monthly range in deposition fluxes for gross alpha varied widely (0.40-11 Bq m -2 month -1) and the average annual deposition is 21 Bq m -2 y -1. The monthly fluxes for gross beta varied (1.3-33.8 Bq m -2 month -1) and the average annual deposition is approximately 120 Bq m -2 y -1. The total annual deposition fluxes of 210Pb varied between 64.9 and 160.8 Bq m -2 y -1 with a mean of 120 Bq m -2 y -1. The annual 7Be depositional flux varied between 432 and 1204 Bq m -2 y -1 with a mean of 676 Bq m -2 y -1. Observed seasonal variations of deposition data are explained in terms of different environmental features. The atmospheric deposition fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb were

  16. Active remote sensing of snow using NMM3D/DMRT and comparison with CLPX II airborne data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; Cline, D.W.; Yueh, S.H.

    2010-01-01

    We applied the Numerical Maxwell Model of three-dimensional simulations (NMM3D) in the Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT) to calculate backscattering coefficients. The particles' positions are computer-generated and the subsequent Foldy-Lax equations solved numerically. The phase matrix in NMM3D has significant cross-polarization, particularly when the particles are densely packed. The NMM3D model is combined with DMRT in calculating the microwave scattering by dry snow. The NMM3D/DMRT equations are solved by an iterative solution up to the second order in the case of small to moderate optical thickness. The numerical results of NMM3D/DMRT are illustrated and compared with QCA/DMRT. The QCA/DMRT and NMM3D/DMRT results are also applied to compare with data from two specific datasets from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) in Alaska and Colorado. The data are obtained at the Ku-band (13.95 GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). It is shown that the model predictions agree with the field measurements for both co-polarization and cross-polarization. For the Alaska region, the average snow depth and snow density are used as the inputs for DMRT. The grain size, selected from within the range of the ground measurements, is used as a best-fit parameter within the range. For the Colorado region, we use the Variable Infiltration Capacity Model (VIC) to obtain the input snow profiles for NMM3D/DMRT. ?? 2010 IEEE.

  17. LaaA, a novel high-active alkalophilic alpha-amylase from deep-sea bacterium Luteimonas abyssi XH031(T).

    PubMed

    Song, Qinghao; Wang, Yan; Yin, Chong; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-amylase is a kind of broadly used industrial enzymes, most of which have been exploited from terrestrial organism. Comparatively, alpha-amylase from marine environment was largely undeveloped. In this study, a novel alkalophilic alpha-amylase with high activity, Luteimonas abyssi alpha-amylase (LaaA), was cloned from deep-sea bacterium L. abyssi XH031(T) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The gene has a length of 1428bp and encodes 475 amino acids with a 35-residue signal peptide. The specific activity of LaaA reached 8881U/mg at the optimum pH 9.0, which is obvious higher than other reported alpha-amylase. This enzyme can remain active at pH levels ranging from 6.0 to 11.0 and temperatures below 45°C, retaining high activity even at low temperatures (almost 38% residual activity at 10°C). In addition, 1mM Na(+), K(+), and Mn(2+) enhanced the activity of LaaA. To investigate the function of potential active sites, R227G, D229K, E256Q/H, H327V and D328V mutants were generated, and the results suggested that Arg227, Asp229, Glu256 and Asp328 were total conserved and essential for the activity of alpha-amylase LaaA. This study shows that the alpha-amylase LaaA is an alkali-tolerant and high-active amylase with strong potential for use in detergent industry. PMID:27241296

  18. alpha-Glucosidase inhibitory activity of the methanolic extract from Tournefortia hartwegiana: an anti-hyperglycemic agent.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Andrade, R R; García-Jiménez, S; Castillo-España, P; Ramírez-Avila, G; Villalobos-Molina, R; Estrada-Soto, S

    2007-01-01

    Tournefortia hartwegiana is a Mexican medicinal plant that is used for the treatment of diabetes, diarrhea and kidney pain. In a previous investigation, the methanolic extract of Tournefortia hartwegiana (METh) showed significant hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic properties on normoglycemic and alloxanized rats. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to establish one of the possible modes of action of METh to induce anti-diabetic activity. METh (310mg/kg) effect on alpha-glucosidase activity was investigated. METh intragastric administration was conducted to determine oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), using different substrates: glucose, sucrose and maltose. The increase in plasma glucose level was significantly suppressed (P<0.05) by the extract after substrates administration. On the other hand, METh inhibited alpha-glucosidase activity in vitro, in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) of 3.16mg/mL). These results suggest that METh might exert its anti-diabetic effect by suppressing carbohydrate absorption from intestine, and thereby reducing the post-prandial increase of blood glucose. On the other hand, the bio-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of: beta-sitosterol (1), stigmasterol (2), lupeol (3), ursolic acid (4), oleanolic acid (5), saccharose (6) and myo-inositol (7), using various chromatographic techniques. PMID:16920301

  19. Regulation of diurnal variation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) activity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kovár, J; Lenícek, M; Zimolová, M; Vítek, L; Jirsa, M; Pitha, J

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key regulatory enzyme of bile acid synthesis, displays a pronounced diurnal variation. To better understand the regulation of CYP7A1 activity, three day-long examinations were carried out in 12 healthy men. The concentrations of 7alpha-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one (C4), a surrogate marker of CYP7A1 activity, bile acids (BA), insulin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol were measured in serum in 90-min intervals from 7 AM till 10 PM. To lower and to increase BA concentration during the study, the subjects received cholestyramine and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), respectively, in two examinations. No drug was used in the control examination. There was a pronounced diurnal variation of C4 concentration with a peak around 1 PM in most of the subjects. The area under the curve (AUC) of C4 concentration was five times higher and three times lower when subjects were treated with cholestyramine and CDCA, respectively. No relationship was found between AUC of C4 and AUC of BA concentration, but AUC of C4 correlated positively with that of insulin. Moreover, short-term treatment with cholestyramine resulted in about 10 % suppression of glycemia throughout the day. Our results suggest that insulin is involved in the regulation of diurnal variation of CYP7A1 activity in humans. PMID:19537927

  20. Antisense SNF1-related (SnRK1) protein kinase gene represses transient activity of an alpha-amylase (alpha-Amy2) gene promoter in cultured wheat embryos.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Sophie; McKibbin, Rowan S; Halford, Nigel G

    2003-02-01

    A DNA fragment corresponding to part of an SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1)-related protein kinase (SnRK1) transcript was amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from a wheat (Triticum aestivum) endosperm cDNA library. It was used to construct a chimaeric gene, pUasSnRKN, comprising a ubiquitin promoter, the SnRK1 PCR product in the antisense orientation and the nopaline synthase (Nos) gene terminator. This construct was used in transient gene expression experiments in cultured wheat embryos together with a series of reporter gene constructs. These included the wheat alpha amylase gene alpha-Amy2 promoter with UidA (Gus) coding region (palpha2GT), rice actin promoter with Gus (pActIDGus), ubiquitin promoter with Gus (pAHC25) and actin promoter with green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene (pAct1Is-GFP1). All of the reporter genes were found to be active when bombarded into scutellae isolated from immature grains at 25 d post-anthesis and incubated on MS medium for 24 h prior to bombardment. However, co-bombardment of palpha2GT with equimolar amounts of pUasSnRKN resulted in no detectable Gus activity, indicating that the antisense SnRK1 construct repressed the alpha-Amy2 promoter. Co-bombardment with pUasSnRKN had no effect on the activity of the other promoters used in the study. A triple bombardment with palpha2GT, pAct1Is-GFP-1 and pUasSnRKN resulted in clear green fluorescence, indicating that the bombarded cells were still viable, but no Gus activity. RT-PCR analysis showed clearly that the antisense SnRK1 gene was expressing. Northern and RT-PCR analyses confirmed that SnRK1 and both alpha-amylase genes, alpha-Amy1 and alpha-Amy2, are expressed in cultured wheat embryos harvested from grain 25 d post-anthesis. Expression of alpha-Amy1 and alpha-Amy2 was up-regulated by sugar starvation. PMID:12554717

  1. Somatic mutations in PI3K[alpha]: Structural basis for enzyme activation and drug design

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Mandelker, Diana; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  2. An experimental analysis of the contribution of 224Ra and 226Ra and progeny to the gross alpha-particle activity of water samples.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Michael F; West, Lynn E

    2008-05-01

    The gross alpha-particle activity of water samples analyzed by EPA Method 900.0 is investigated as a function of residue mass and geometry, time between sample collection and analysis, and time between sample preparation and analysis for samples containing 224Ra, 212Pb, and 226Ra. It is shown that the gross alpha-particle activity due to 224Ra and its progeny can be up to 10 times the 224Ra activity at collection time and that due to 212Pb progeny can be up to 3 times the 212Pb activity at collection time. In samples with roughly equal activities of 224Ra and 226Ra analyzed soon after collection, it is shown that the gross alpha-particle activity is approximately constant with time because the decay of 224Ra and its progeny is offset by the ingrowth of 226Ra progeny. PMID:18403967

  3. Activation of an Mg2+-dependent DNA endonuclease of avian myeloblastosis virus alpha beta DNA polymerase by in vitro proteolytic cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Grandgenett, D P; Golomb, M; Vora, A C

    1980-01-01

    Partial chymotryptic digestion of purified avian myeloblastosis virus alpha beta DNA polymerase resulted in the activation of a Mg2+-dependent DNA endonuclease activity. Incubation of the polymerase-protease mixture in the presence of super-coiled DNA and Mg2+ permitted detection of the cleaved polymerase fragment possessing DNA nicking activity. Protease digestion conditions were established permitting selective cleavage of beta to alpha, which contained DNA polymerase and RNase H activity and to a family of polypeptides ranging in size from 30,000 to 34,000 daltons. These latter beta-unique fragments were purified by polyuridylate-Sepharose 4B chromatography and were shown to contain both DNA binding and DNA endonuclease activities. We have demonstrated that this group of polymerase fragments derived by chymotryptic digestion of alpha beta DNA polymerase is similar to the in vivo-isolated avian myeloblastosis virus p32pol in size, sequence, and DNA endonuclease activity. Images PMID:6154149

  4. The effects of calpain inhibition on IkB alpha degradation after activation of PBMCs: identification of the calpain cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Schaecher, Kurt; Goust, Jean-Michel; Banik, Naren L

    2004-07-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were activated using anti-CD3/CD28 (HIT3A/CD28.2) resulting in degradation of IkB alpha, an inhibitor of NFkB, relative to unactivated cells. Degradation of IkB alpha began by 30 min and proceeded for at least 5 h. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, inhibited IkB alpha degradation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, calpain inhibition increased IkB alpha levels compared to nonactivated controls. Recombinant IkB alpha was incubated with purified porcine m-calpain in the presence of 0.1% Triton X-100, and the degradation products were monitored by SDS-PAGE and sequenced. Most of the degradation products were peptides derived from calpain, but one was derived from IkB alpha cleaved between amino acids 50 and 51 (glutamine and glutamic acid). The liberated fragment included the entire signal response domain (SRD), a region containing key serine and threonine residues necessary for phosphorylation by the IKKinase complex and sites required for ubiquitination. The results suggest that calpain plays an important role in IkB alpha degradation, a crucial event in T cell activation. PMID:15202778

  5. Silica-induced apoptosis in murine macrophage: involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Gozal, Evelyne; Ortiz, Luis A; Zou, Xiaoyan; Burow, Matthew E; Lasky, Joseph A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2002-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in silica-induced lung fibrosis. Silica exposure induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and apoptotic mechanisms have been implicated in silica-induced pathogenesis. To characterize potential relationships between these signaling events, we studied their induction in two murine macrophage cell lines. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line was more sensitive, and the IC-21 macrophage cell line more tolerant to silica exposure (0.2 or 1 mg/ml for 6 h) as evidenced by significantly higher apoptotic responses in RAW 264.7 (P < 0.05). RAW 264.7 macrophages exhibited enhanced TNF-alpha production and NF-kappaB activation in response to silica, whereas IC-21 macrophages did not produce TNF-alpha in response to silica and did not induce NF-kappaB nuclear binding. Inhibition of NF-kappaB in RAW 264.7 cells with BAY11-7082 significantly increased apoptosis while inhibiting TNF-alpha release. In addition, TNF-alpha and NF-kappaB activation, but not apoptosis, were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in both cell lines, and NF-kappaB inhibition reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha release. These data suggest that TNF-alpha induction is dependent on NF-kappaB activation in both cell lines. However, silica can induce apoptosis in murine macrophages, independently of TNF-alpha stimulation, as in IC-21 macrophages. Furthermore, NF-kappaB activation in macrophages may play dual roles, both pro- and antiapoptotic during silica injury. PMID:12091251

  6. Differential stimulation by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha isoforms of the estrogen-activated promoter of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    Calkhoven, C F; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1997-10-01

    The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins alpha and beta (C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta) are highly expressed in liver and are believed to function in maintaining the differentiated state of the hepatocytes. C/EBP alpha appears to be a critical regulator of genes involved in metabolic processes. We are interested in the roles of C/EBP in the expression of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene. This gene encodes an avian yolk protein, is induced by estrogens and is only expressed in liver. To examine the role of C/EBP in apoVLDL II expression, footprinting and electromobility-shift analysis were performed. For three of the protein-binding sites in the apoVLDL II promoter region, C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta were identified as the major DNA-binding activities. For one of the C/EBP genes, C/EBP alpha, the effect of the gene products on apoVLDL II transcription was examined. From transfection experiments we conclude that maximal estrogen-dependent activity of the apoVLDL II promoter requires the dual action of the estrogen receptor and C/EBP. The level of activity is different depending on the nature of the C/EBP alpha translational isoform transfected, the full-length C/EBP alpha polypeptide being the most active isoform and the N-terminally truncated isoform being moderately active. The present results suggest a role of C/EBP alpha translational isoform ratio in the modulation of expression of C/EBP target genes, such as those involved in metabolic processes. PMID:9363761

  7. Functional properties of the CaV1.2 calcium channel activated by calmodulin in the absence of alpha2delta subunits.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Arippa; Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Lao, Qi Zong; Soldatov, Nikolai M

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-activated CaV1.2 calcium channels require association of the pore-forming alpha1C subunit with accessory CaVbeta and alpha2delta subunits. Binding of a single calmodulin (CaM) to alpha1C supports Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI). The human CaV1.2 channel is silent in the absence of CaVbeta and/or alpha2delta. Recently, we found that coexpression of exogenous CaM (CaMex) supports plasma membrane targeting, gating facilitation and CDI of the channel in the absence of CaVbeta. Here we discovered that CaMex and its Ca2+-insensitive mutant (CaM1234) rendered active alpha1C/CaVbeta channel in the absence of alpha2delta. Coexpression of CaMex with alpha1C and beta2d in calcium-channel-free COS-1 cells recovered gating of the channel and supported CDI. Voltage-dependence of activation was shifted by approximately +40 mV to depolarization potentials. The calcium current reached maximum at +40 mV (20 mM Ca2+) and exhibited approximately 3 times slower activation and 5 times slower inactivation kinetics compared to the wild-type channel. Furthermore, both CaMex and CaM1234 accelerated recovery from inactivation and induced facilitation of the calcium current by strong depolarization prepulse, the properties absent from the human vascular/neuronal CaV1.2 channel. The data suggest a previously unknown action of CaM that in the presence of CaVbeta; translates into activation of the alpha2delta-deficient calcium channel and alteration of its properties. PMID:19106618

  8. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of 2alpha-hydroxy pentacyclic triterpene acids from the leaves of Ugni molinae.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, María C; Delporte, Carla; Backhouse, Nadine; Erazo, Silvia; Letelier, María Eugenia; Cassels, Bruce K; Silva, Ximena; Alegría, Sergio; Negrete, Rosa

    2006-08-15

    Leaf extracts of Ugni molinae Turcz. are used in the Chilean cosmetic industry on the assumption that they have decongestant, regenerative, and anti-aging properties. A bioassay-guided fractionation of this plant material showed that some extracts have potent anti-inflammatory activities. Further fractionation led to the isolation and identification of betulinic acid, a mixture of ursolic and oleanolic acids, and the 2alpha-hydroxy derivatives alphitolic, asiatic, and corosolic acids. The latter three were evaluated in vivo in the mouse ear assay for their topical anti-inflammatory activity, inducing inflammation with either arachidonic acid (AA) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA). Only corosolic acid was active in the AA assay, with similar potency to nimesulide, but all three triterpene acids inhibited TPA-induced inflammation with potencies comparable to that of indomethacin. PMID:16697209

  9. Determination of oxygen in silicon and carbide by activation with 27.2 meV alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgolenko, A. P.; Kornienko, N. D.; Lithovchenko, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Si sample was polished on one side, and on the other side Ni was applied chemically and soldered with Pb to a water cooled Cu substrate. Optical quartz standard was fixed from the other side. Si carbide samples were soldered to a substrated with In. The prepared samples were irradiated in a cyclotron with a 27.2 MeV alpha particle beam. The layers were removed from the Si and Si carbide samples by grinding and the positron activity of F-18(t sub 1/2 110 min) was measured by using a gamma, gamma coincidence spectrometer with two NaI(TI) crystals. For analysis of Si carbide, the activity decay curve of the samples was recorded to find the contribution of the positron activity of Cu-65(t sub 1/2 12.9 hr) which formed from Ni impurity on irradiation.

  10. Parallax-sensitive remapping of visual space in occipito-parietal alpha-band activity during whole-body motion.

    PubMed

    Gutteling, T P; Selen, L P J; Medendorp, W P

    2015-03-01

    Despite the constantly changing retinal image due to eye, head, and body movements, we are able to maintain a stable representation of the visual environment. Various studies on retinal image shifts caused by saccades have suggested that occipital and parietal areas correct for these perturbations by a gaze-centered remapping of the neural image. However, such a uniform, rotational, remapping mechanism cannot work during translations when objects shift on the retina in a more complex, depth-dependent fashion due to motion parallax. Here we tested whether the brain's activity patterns show parallax-sensitive remapping of remembered visual space during whole-body motion. Under continuous recording of electroencephalography (EEG), we passively translated human subjects while they had to remember the location of a world-fixed visual target, briefly presented in front of or behind the eyes' fixation point prior to the motion. Using a psychometric approach we assessed the quality of the memory update, which had to be made based on vestibular feedback and other extraretinal motion cues. All subjects showed a variable amount of parallax-sensitive updating errors, i.e., the direction of the errors depended on the depth of the target relative to fixation. The EEG recordings show a neural correlate of this parallax-sensitive remapping in the alpha-band power at occipito-parietal electrodes. At parietal electrodes, the strength of these alpha-band modulations correlated significantly with updating performance. These results suggest that alpha-band oscillatory activity reflects the time-varying updating of gaze-centered spatial information during parallax-sensitive remapping during whole-body motion. PMID:25505108

  11. TNF-alpha increases ubiquitin-conjugating activity in skeletal muscle by up-regulating UbcH2/E220k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Lecker, Stewart H.; Chen, Yuling; Waddell, Ian D.; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Reid, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    In some inflammatory diseases, TNF-alpha is thought to stimulate muscle catabolism via an NF-kappaB-dependent process that increases ubiquitin conjugation to muscle proteins. The transcriptional mechanism of this response has not been determined. Here we studied the potential role of UbcH2, a ubiquitin carrier protein and homologue of murine E220k. We find that UbcH2 is constitutively expressed by human skeletal and cardiac muscles, murine limb muscle, and cultured myotubes. TNF-alpha stimulates UbcH2 expression in mouse limb muscles in vivo and in cultured myotubes. The UbcH2 promoter region contains a functional NF-kappaB binding site; NF-kappaB binding to this sequence is increased by TNF-alpha stimulation. A dominant negative inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation blocks both UbcH2 up-regulation and the increase in ubiquitin-conjugating activity stimulated by TNF-alpha. In extracts from TNF-alpha-treated myotubes, ubiquitin-conjugating activity is limited by UbcH2 availability; activity is inhibited by an antiserum to UbcH2 or a dominant negative mutant of UbcH2 and is enhanced by wild-type UbcH2. Thus, UbcH2 up-regulation is a novel response to TNF-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle that appears to be essential for the increased ubiquitin conjugation induced by this cytokine.

  12. Implications of Lyman-alpha equivalent widths in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joseph C.; Ferland, Gary J.

    1993-01-01

    Results of photoionization calculations that examine the sensitivity of Ly-alpha emission to parameters describing the broadline clouds and incident radiation field are reported. The case of the Seyfert I galaxy NGC 5548 is considered, and good consistency is found with observed properties of the Ly-alpha zone for a cloud density of about 10 exp 11/cu cm and ratio of ionizing photon to hydrogen density near 0.2. Estimation of the cloud covering factor depends on the extrapolation of the EUV continuum. EUV cutoffs at 20 and 60 eV correspond to a range of covering factors between 0.8 and 0.5, which is larger than typically assumed in the past for luminous Seyferts. Equivalent width observations of Fairall 9 show that its continuum cannot be as soft as suggested by previous line ratio analyses and imply that its EUV continuum persists to 20 eV or more before cutting off. A method by which variability measurements can be combined with the present calculations to measure the distances to AGN, and hence the Hubble constant, is outlined.

  13. Alpha contamination assessment for D&D activities: Monitoring inside glove boxes and vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.; Bolton, R.D.; Conaway, J.G.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a new approach to glove box monitoring that involves drawing air out of one glove port through a detection grid that collects ions created in the air inside the glove box by ionizing radiation, especially alpha radiation. The charge deposited on the detection grid by the ions is measured with a sensitive electrometer. The air can be circulated back to the glove box through the other glove port, preventing contamination from leaving the glove box and detector system. Initial experiments using a mock-up constructed of sheet metal indicate that this technology provides the measurement technique needed to perform a defensible, non-invasive measurement of alpha contamination inside glove boxes destined for waste disposal. This can result in an enormous cost savings if a given glove box can be shown to fall into the catagory of Low-Level Waste rather than Trans-Uranic Waste. Considering that hundreds of glove boxes contaminated with plutonium will be taken out of service at various nuclear facilities over the next few years, the potential cost savings associated with disposal as LLW rather than TRU waste are substantial.

  14. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  15. SUB-THz AND H{alpha} ACTIVITY DURING THE PREFLARE AND MAIN PHASES OF A GOES CLASS M2 EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Gimenez de Castro, C. Guillermo; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Correia, Emilia; Fernandes, Luis Olavo; De Souza, Rodney V.; Marcon, Rogerio; White, Stephen M.; Godoy, Rodolfo; Marun, Adolfo; Pereyra, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    Radio and optical observations of the evolution of flare-associated phenomena have shown an initial and rapid burst at 0.4 THz only followed subsequently by a localized chromospheric heating producing an H{alpha} brightening with later heating of the whole active region. A major instability occurred several minutes later producing one impulsive burst at microwaves only, associated with an M2.0 GOES X-ray flare that exhibited the main H{alpha} brightening at the same site as the first flash.The possible association between long-enduring time profiles at soft X-rays, microwaves, H{alpha}, and sub-THz wavelengths is discussed. In the decay phase, the H{alpha} movie shows a disrupting magnetic arch structure ejecting dark, presumably chromospheric, material upward. The time sequence of events suggests genuine interdependent and possibly non-thermal instabilities triggering phenomena, with concurrent active region plasma heating and material ejection.

  16. Porcine circovirus type 2 induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B by I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Kwang, Jimmy; Wang Jin; Shi Lei; Yang Bing; Li Yongqing; Liu Jue

    2008-08-15

    The transcription factor NF-{kappa}B is commonly activated upon virus infection and a key player in the induction and regulation of the host immune response. The present study demonstrated for the first time that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is the primary causative agent of an emerging swine disease, postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, can activate NF-{kappa}B in PCV2-infected PK15 cells. In PCV2-infected cells, NF-{kappa}B was activated concomitantly with viral replication, which was characterized by increased DNA binding activity, translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, as well as degradation and phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} protein. We further demonstrated PCV2-induced activation of NF-{kappa}B and colocalization of p65 nuclear translocation with virus replication in cultured cells. Treatment of cells with CAPE, a selective inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, reduced virus protein expression and progeny production followed by decreasing PCV2-induced apoptotic caspase activity, indicating the involvement of this transcription factor in induction of cell death. Taken together, these data suggest that NF-{kappa}B activation is important for PCV2 replication and contributes to virus-mediated changes in host cells. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PCV2 infection.

  17. Chronic effects of an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor (Bay o 1248) on intestinal disaccharidase activity in normal and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Bustamante, S; Flores, C; Bezerra, J; Goda, T; Koldovský, O

    1987-01-01

    Bay o 1248 is a potent alpha-glycosidase inhibitor that reduces postprandial hyperglycemia when administered p.o. with sucrose or maltose. The compound binds to and competitively inhibits the alpha-disaccharidases and is also readily absorbed across the intestinal mucosa. To evaluate its effect on the activity of disaccharidases and on metabolic control, groups of obese diabetic mice (C57BLKsJ db/db) were given the drug for periods of 3, 7 and 84 days as a drug food mixture (5 or 10 mg/100 g of food). Nondiabetic mice of the same strain were dosed for 3 and 7 days. The drug did not influence body growth, food intake or fasting blood glucose. However, urine glucose excretion was significantly decreased at the higher dose in the diabetic mice. The drug had no effect on the protein content of jejunum (proximal and middle thirds) or ileum (distal third) of the small intestine. The activity of sucrase and maltase was significantly decreased in practically all segments of the small intestine in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. These changes were evident after 3 days of drug administration. Lactase was not affected by the drug. The mechanism underlying these changes, although unclear, is of significant interest and deserves further investigation. PMID:3100764

  18. Top-down control of MEG alpha-band activity in children performing Categorical N-Back Task.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Kristina T; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Bedrick, Edward J; Kerwin, Audra A; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2010-10-01

    Top-down cognitive control has been associated in adults with the prefrontal-parietal network. In children the brain mechanisms of top-down control have rarely been studied. We examined developmental differences in top-down cognitive control by monitoring event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) of alpha-band oscillatory activity (8-13 Hz) during anticipation, target detection and post-response stages of a visual working memory task. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to record brain oscillatory activity from healthy 10-year-old children and young adults performing the Categorical N-Back Task (CNBT). Neuropsychological measures assessing frontal lobe networks were also acquired. Whereas adults showed a modulation of the ERD at the anticipatory stages of CNBT and ERS at the post-response stage, children displayed only some anticipatory modulation of ERD but no ERS at the post-response stage, with alpha-band remaining at a desynchronized state. Since neuropsychological and prior neuroimaging findings indicate that the prefrontal-parietal networks are not fully developed in 10-year olds, and since the children performed as well as the adults on CNBT and yet displayed different patterns of ERD/ERS, we suggest that children may be using different top-down cognitive strategies and, hence, different, developmentally apt neuronal networks. PMID:20713071

  19. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  20. Interactions of purified transcription factors: binding of yeast MAT alpha 1 and PRTF to cell type-specific, upstream activating sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S; Ammerer, G; Richmond, T J

    1988-01-01

    Pheromone receptor transcription factor (PRTF) and MAT alpha 1 are protein transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of the alpha-specific genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have expressed MAT alpha 1 as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified it from inclusion bodies in milligram quantities. The MAT alpha 1 protein was obtained after specific cleavage of the fusion protein. Quantitative band shift electrophoresis was used to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants that describe the multicomponent binding equilibrium between the PRTF and MAT alpha 1 proteins, and alpha-specific STE3 upstream activating sequence (UAS) DNA. The dissociation constant for the complex of PRTF and the a-specific UAS of STE2 was also measured and found to be 5.9 X 10(-11) M, only three times less than that for the PRTF-STE3 UAS complex. Analyses of these complexes by DNase I footprinting demonstrate that the PRTF binding site is confined to the palindromic P-box sequence in the case of the STE3 UAS, but extends symmetrically from this central region to cover 28 bp for the STE2 UAS. When MAT alpha 1 is bound to the PRTF-STE3 complex, the region of DNA protected is enlarged to that seen for the PRTF-STE2 complex. Our results using these two purified factors in vitro suggest that PRTF has nearly the same affinity for a- and alpha-specific UAS elements and that transcriptional activation requires a particular conformational state for the PRTF-DNA complex which occurs in the PRTF-STE2 and MAT alpha 1-PRTF-STE3 complexes, but not in the PRTF-STE3 complex. Images PMID:2854061

  1. TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappa B in human osteoblastic HOS-TE85 cells is repressed in vector-averaged gravity using clinostat rotation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Kambe, F; Kurokouchi, K; Sakai, T; Ishiguro, N; Iwata, H; Koga, K; Gruener, R; Seo, H

    2000-12-01

    Effects of vector-averaged gravity on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-