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Sample records for airborne astronomy program

  1. NASA's Airborne Astronomy Program - Lessons For SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2007-07-01

    Airborne astronomy was pioneered and has evolved at NASA Ames Research Center near San Francisco, California, since 1965. Nowhere else in the world has a similar program been implemented. Its many unique features deserve description, especially for the benefit of planning the operation of SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and in particular since NASA Headquarters’ recent decision to base SOFIA operations at Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California instead of at Ames. The history of Ames’ airborne astronomy program is briefly summarized. Discussed in more detail are the operations and organization of the 21-year Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) program, which provide important lessons for SOFIA. The KAO program is our best prototype for planning effective SOFIA operations. Principal features of the KAO program which should be retained on SOFIA are: unique science, innovative new science instruments and technologies, training of young scientists, an effective education and public outreach program, flexibility, continuous improvement, and efficient operations with a lean, well integrated team. KAO program features which should be improved upon with SOFIA are: (1) a management structure that is dedicated primarily to safely maximizing scientific productivity for the resources available, headed by a scientist who is the observatory director, and (2) stimuli to assure prompt distribution and accessibility of data to the scientific community. These and other recommendations were recorded by the SOFIA Science Working Group in 1995, when the KAO was decommissioned to start work on SOFIA. Further operational and organizational factors contributing to the success of the KAO program are described. Their incorporation into SOFIA operations will help assure the success of this new airborne observatory. SOFIA is supported by NASA in the U.S. and DLR (the German Aerospace Center) in Germany.

  2. NASA Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program Evaluation Results To Date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela K.; Backman, Dana E.; Clark, Coral

    2015-08-01

    SOFIA is an airborne observatory, capable of making observations that are impossible for even the largest and highest ground-based telescopes, and inspires instrumention development.SOFIA is an 80% - 20% partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), consisting of a modified Boeing 747SP aircraft carrying a diameter of 2.5 meters (100 inches) reflecting telescope. The SOFIA aircraft is based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Building 703, in Palmdale, California. The Science Program Office and Outreach Office is located at NASA Ames Research center. SOFIA is one of the programs in NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Astrophysics Division.SOFIA will be used to study many different kinds of astronomical objects and phenomena, including star birth and death, formation of new solar systems, identification of complex molecules in space, planets, comets and asteroids in our solar system, nebulae and dust in galaxies, and ecosystems of galaxies.Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program:The SOFIA Education and Communications program exploits the unique attributes of airborne astronomy to contribute to national goals for the reform of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, and to the elevation of public scientific and technical literacy.SOFIA’s Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA) effort is a professional development program aspiring to improve teaching, inspire students, and inform the community. To date, 55 educators from 21 states; in three cohorts, Cycles 0, 1 and 2; have completed their astronomy professional development and their SOFIA science flight experience. Cycle 3 cohort of 28 educators will be completing their flight experience this fall. Evaluation has confirmed the program’s positive impact on the teacher participants, on their students, and in their communities. Teachers have incorporated content knowledge and specific components of their experience into their curricula, and have given hundreds of presentations and

  3. The "Science in the Stratosphere" Program: Developing a Role for Airborne Astronomy in Elementary Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D.; Hemenway, M.; Stryker, P.; Willis, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Science in the Stratosphere program on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) is an opportunity for selected elementary and middle school teachers from the central Texas area to participate in airborne astronomy, working with researchers on the ground and in the air. Through their experiences, the excitement of hands-on space astronomy can be conveyed to their colleagues and students. These experiences serve as a vehicle for introducing many scientific concepts, as well as the planning, instrument development, cooperation and teamwork that are essential components of scientific research. The airborne setting instills this vignette of modern astronomical research with a spirit of exploration and excitement that inspires even the youngest school children. The inaugural session of this program was held during the summer of 1992. Two school teachers with science specialization were chosen, at grade levels (K and 8) that spanned those targeted by the program. These teachers spent more than a week working with KAO visiting scientists and staff, learning about the research being done, and the operation of this remarkable observatory. Presentations based on their work were made at several science teacher workshops in the months following their trip, and curriculum development is in progress. More so than any other NASA space astronomy facility, airborne telescopes are tangible, accessible, and highly visible. As space astronomy laboratories that are highly fault tolerant, such telescopes (the KAO now, to be followed by SOFIA later) are equipped with instrumentation that is at the leading edge of technology, and thus serve well as educational flagships for modern astronomy. This program receives funds from the NASA Astrophysics AGSE program, and is sponsored by the McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas.

  4. The NASA airborne astronomy program - A perspective on its contributions to science, technology, and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.

    1992-01-01

    The publication records from NASA's airborne observatories are examined to evaluate the contribution of the airborne astronomy program to technological development and scientific/educational progress. The breadth and continuity of program is detailed with reference to its publication history, discipline representation, literature citations, and to the ability of such a program to address nonrecurring and unexpected astronomical phenomena. Community involvement in the airborne-observation program is described in terms of the number of participants, institutional affiliation, and geographic distribution. The program utilizes instruments including heterodyne and grating spectrometers, high-speed photometers, and Fabry-Perot spectrometers with wide total spectral ranges, resolutions, and numbers of channels. The potential of the program for both astronomical training and further scientific, theoretical, and applied development is underscored.

  5. The FOSTER Project: Teacher Enrichment Through Participation in NASA's Airborne Astronomy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Hull, G.; Gillespie, C., Jr.; DeVore, E.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's airborne astronomy program offers a unique opportunity for K-12 science teacher enrichment and for NASA to reach out and serve the educational community. Learning from a combination of summer workshops, curriculum supplement materials, training in Internet skills and ultimately flying on NASA's C-141 airborne observatory, the teachers are able to share the excitement of scientific discovery with their students and convey that excitement from first hand experience rather than just from reading about science in a textbook. This year the program has expanded to include teachers from the eleven western states served by NASA Ames Research Center's Educational Programs Office as well as teachers from communities from around the country where the scientist who fly on the observatory reside. Through teacher workshops and inservice presentations, the FOSTER (Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment) teachers are sharing the resources and experiences with many hundreds of other teachers. Ultimately, the students are learning first hand about the excitement of science, the scientific method in practice, the team work involved, the relevance of science to their daily lives and the importance of a firm foundation in math and science in today's technologically oriented world.

  6. The NASA Airborne Astronomy Program: A perspective on its contributions to science, technology, and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific, educational, and instrumental contributions from NASA's airborne observatories are deduced from the program's publication record (789 citations, excluding abstracts, involving 580 authors at 128 institutions in the United States and abroad between 1967-1990).

  7. SOFIA's Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors: An External Evaluation of Cycle 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) represents a partnership between NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The observatory itself is a Boeing 747 SP that has been modified to serve as the world's largest airborne research observatory. The SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA) program is a component of SOFIA's…

  8. Draft Environmental Statement For Physics and Astronomy Sounding Rocket, Balloon, and Airborne Research Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This document is a draft of an environmental impact statement, evaluating the effect on the environment of the use of sounding rockets, balloons and air borne research programs in studying the atmosphere.

  9. SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Mehlert, Dörte; Röser, Hans-Peter; Scorza, Cecilia

    2013-11-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a joint US/German project operating a 2.7 m infrared airborne telescope onboard a modified Boeing 747-SP in the stratosphere at altitudes up to 13.7 km. SOFIA covers a spectral range from 0.3 µm to 1.6 mm, with an average atmospheric transmission greater than 80%. After successfully completing its commissioning, SOFIA commenced regular astronomical observation in spring 2013, and will ramp up to more than one hundred 8 to 10 h flights per year by 2015. The observatory is expected to operate until the mid 2030s. SOFIA's initial complement of seven focal plane instruments includes broadband imagers, moderate-resolution spectrographs and high-resolution spectrometers. SOFIA also includes an elaborate program for Education and Public Outreach. We describe the SOFIA facility together with its first light instrumentation and include some of its first scientific results. In addition, the education and public outreach program is presented.

  10. The Beginnings of Airborne Astronomy, 1920 - 1930: an Historical Narrative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craine, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    The emergence of airborne astronomy in the early twentieth century is recounted. The aerial expedition to observe the solar eclipse on September 10, 1923, is described. Observation of the total solar eclipse of January 24, 1925, is discussed. The Honey Lake aerial expedition to study the solar eclipse of April 28, 1930, is also described. Four major accomplishments in airborne astronomy during the period 1920 to 1930 are listed. Airborne expeditions were undertaken at every logical opportunity, starting a continuous sequence of airborne astronomical expeditions which was to remain unbroken, except by World War II, to the present day. Although the scientific returns of the first ten years were modest, they did exist. Interest in, and support for, airborne astronomy was generated not only among astronomers but also among the public. Albert Stevens, arguably the true father of airborne astronomy, was to become interested in applying his considerable skill and experience to the airborne acquisition of astronomical data.

  11. Stressed detector arrays for airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Geis, N.; Poglitsch, A.; Rumitz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of stressed Ge:Ga detector arrays for far-infrared astronomy from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) is discussed. Researchers successfully constructed and used a three channel detector array on five flights from the KAO, and have conducted laboratory tests of a two-dimensional, 25 elements (5x5) detector array. Each element of the three element array performs as well as the researchers' best single channel detector, as do the tested elements of the 25 channel system. Some of the exciting new science possible with far-infrared detector arrays is also discussed.

  12. Airborne Astronomy Symposium on the Galactic Ecosystem: From Gas to Stars to Dust, volume 73

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R. (Editor); Davidson, Jacqueline A. (Editor); Erickson, Edwin F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This symposium was organized to review the science related to NASA's Airborne Astronomy Program on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The theme selected, 'The Galactic Ecosystem: From Gas to Stars to Dust,' was considered to capture the underlying commonality of much of the research discussed. The 8 sessions were as follows: The Interstellar Medium; The Life Cycle of the ISM in Other Galaxies; Star and Planetary System Formation; Our Planetary System: The Solar System; The Enrichment of the Interstellar Medium; The Galactic Center: A Unique Region of the Galactic Ecosystem; Instrumentation for Airborne Astronomy; KAO History and Education; and Missions and the Future of Infrared Astronomy.

  13. SOFIA: The future of airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Davidson, Jacqueline A.

    1995-01-01

    For the past 20 years, the 91 cm telescope in NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) has enabled scientists to observe infrared sources which are obscured by the earth's atmosphere at ground-based sites, and to observe transient astronomical events from anywhere in the world. To augment this capability, the United States and German Space Agencies (NASA and DARA) are collaborating in plans to replace the KAO with a 2.5 meter telescope installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft: SOFIA - The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. SOFIA's large aperture, wide wavelength coverage, mobility, accessibility, and sophisticated instruments will permit a broad range of scientific studies, some of which are described here. Its unique features complement the capabilities of other future space missions. In addition, SOFIA has important potential as a stimulus for development of new technology and as a national resource for education of K-12 teachers. If started in 1996, SOFIA will be flying in the year 2000.

  14. SOFIA: The future of airborne astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Davidson, Jacqueline A.

    For the past 20 years, the 91 cm telescope in NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) has enabled scientists to observe infrared sources which are obscured by the earth's atmosphere at ground-based sites, and to observe transient astronomical events from anywhere in the world. To augment this capability, the United States and German Space Agencies (NASA and DARA) are collaborating in plans to replace the KAO with a 2.5 meter telescope installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft: SOFIA - The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. SOFIA's large aperture, wide wavelength coverage, mobility, accessibility, and sophisticated instruments will permit a broad range of scientific studies, some of which are described here. Its unique features complement the capabilities of other future space missions. In addition, SOFIA has important potential as a stimulus for development of new technology and as a national resource for education of K-12 teachers. If started in 1996, SOFIA will be flying in the year 2000.

  15. SOFIA'S Challenge: Scheduling Airborne Astronomy Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is NASA's next generation airborne astronomical observatory, and will commence operations in 2005. The facility consists of a 747-SP modified to accommodate a 2.5 meter telescope. SOFIA is expected to fly an average of 140 science flights per year over its 20 year lifetime. Depending on the nature of the instrument used during flight, 5-15 observations per flight are expected. The SOFIA telescope is mounted aft of the wings on the port side of the aircraft and is articulated through a range of 20deg to 60deg of elevation. The telescope has minimal lateral flexibility; thus, the aircraft must turn constantly to maintain the telescope's focus on an object during observations. A significant problem in future SOFIA operations is that of scheduling flights in support of observations. Investigators are expected to propose small numbers of observations, and many observations must be grouped together to make up single flights. Flight planning for the previous generation airborne observatory, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), was done by hand; planners had to choose takeoff time, observations to perform, and decide on setup-actions (called "dead-legs") to position the aircraft prior to observing. This task frequently required between 6-8 hours to plan one flight The scope of the flight planning problem for supporting GI observations with the anticipated flight rate for SOFIA makes the manual approach for flight planning daunting. In response, we have designed an Automated Flight Planner (AFP) that accepts as input a set of requested observations, designated flight days, weather predictions and fuel limitations, and searches automatically for high-quality flight plans that satisfy all relevant aircraft and astronomer specified constraints. The AFP can generate one candidate flight plan in 5-10 minutes, of computation time, a feat beyond the capabilities of human flight planners. The rate at which the AFP can

  16. Airborne Astronomy Symposium. A symposium commemorating the tenth anniversary of operations of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr. (Editor); Erickson, E. F. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Airborne infrared astronomy is discussed with respect to observations of the solar system, stars, star formation, and the interstellar medium. Far infrared characteristics of the Milky Way, its center, and other galaxies are considered. The instrumentation associated with IR astronomy is addressed.

  17. Astronomy Program for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, David H.

    1979-01-01

    An account of a teacher's experience in presenting astronomy to 12 to 15 year olds in a summer science program is presented. Observations of planets, meteors, and the sun are the major projects which are discussed. (SA)

  18. Applying Squeaky-Wheel Optimization Schedule Airborne Astronomy Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Kuerklue, Elif

    2004-01-01

    We apply the Squeaky Wheel Optimization (SWO) algorithm to the problem of scheduling astronomy observations for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, an airborne observatory. The problem contains complex constraints relating the feasibility of an astronomical observation to the position and time at which the observation begins, telescope elevation limits, special use airspace, and available fuel. Solving the problem requires making discrete choices (e.g. selection and sequencing of observations) and continuous ones (e.g. takeoff time and setting up observations by repositioning the aircraft). The problem also includes optimization criteria such as maximizing observing time while simultaneously minimizing total flight time. Previous approaches to the problem fail to scale when accounting for all constraints. We describe how to customize SWO to solve this problem, and show that it finds better flight plans, often with less computation time, than previous approaches.

  19. Planetary astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was developed in which asteroids and two planets, namely, Saturn and Uranus, were investigated. This included: (1) asteroid spectrophotometry; (2) the nature of the Trojan asteroids; (3) an investigation to determine asteroid masses; (4) the photometry, structure, and dynamics of the rings surrounding the planet Saturn; and (5) aerosol distribution in the atmosphere of Uranus. Plans were finalized to obtain observations of the nucleus of the dying comet P/Arend-Rigaux. Further work was accomplished in asteroid data reduction. Data were entered into the TRIAD data file and a program generated classifications for over 560 different asteroids. A photoelectric area scanner was used to obtain UBV scans of the disk of the planet Saturn on several winter and spring nights in 1977. Intensity profiles show pronounced limb brightening in U, moderate limb brightening in B, and limb darkening in V. Narrow band photoelectric area-scanning photometry of the Uranus disk is also reported. Results are given.

  20. An infrared astronomer's early vision of airborne astronomy: Paul Merrill 1920

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    1995-01-01

    The first published paper by a professional, research astronomer which discussed airborne astronomy from airplanes was by Paul W. Merrill. In it he proposed some of the types of observations which might be made, looking up at astronomical objects in the sky. This paper describes Merrill's paper, his education, training and subsequent career, and a few other aspects of the early history of airborne astronomy.

  1. NASA Student Airborne Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students majoring in the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2012, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA P-3B aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program from the first four summers and discuss plans for the future.

  2. Building an Extensive Liberal Arts Astronomy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertz, James R.

    1974-01-01

    Described is an astronomy program at Moorhead State College (Minnesota) for liberal arts students. Facilities and equipment and factors related to the program's success are discussed. Suggestions to others who may want to develop such programs are given. (Author/RH)

  3. Far-Infrared Astronomy with The Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger, H.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes work made possible by NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The results of the work have appeared in over 80 papers. The publications fall in three main areas: instrumentation, observations, and analysis. Although there is considerable overlap between these categories it will be convenient to group them separately.

  4. ASTROPLANE - A European airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmovici, C. B.

    The history, goals, and design concepts of Astroplane, a proposed European airborne IR and submillimeter observatory, are discussed. The various proposals advanced since 1979 are summarized, and the need for an airborne observatory to complement ground and satellite observations and to offer European astronomers observing opportunities like those provided by the NASA KAO in the U.S. is stressed. The effects of the atmosphere on IR transmission, some typical NASA airborne results, and the observability of different atomic species (from ground, air, or satellite) are documented in tables. The importance of airborne IR observations of Halley's comet during its 1986 perihelion is shown. The Astroplane design proposed by DFVLR is described: a circular 120-cm Cassegrain telescope carried to an altitude of about 13 km by a modified Challenger CL-601 aircraft. It is found in an overall cost comparison that the DFVLR Astroplane, with a life of 20 years and 600 observing hours per year, would cost only one seventh as much per observing hour as either balloon or satellite (IRAS) observatories.

  5. Philippine Astronomy Convention 2009 Abstract: Program Offerings in Astronomy in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R. F.

    2009-03-01

    The formal academic programs in Astronomy of the Rizal Technological University are the first such programs in the Philippines. The Master of Science in Astronomy program is envisioned to provide the student with a wide range of knowledge in many areas of Astronomy, leaning towards the descriptive aspects of knowledge. The student will choose the field or research most suitable to his or her interests. Three of these researches done while enrolled in the program, and even researches completed before the student actually enrolled in the program, may be considered as his or her thesis. The program suits professionals in all persuasions who wish to study Astronomy either for professional advancement or plainly for the love of the science or for intellectual satisfaction. Non-science majors can enroll. In 2008, the RTU Graduate School decided to ladderize the MS program and the Graduate Diploma in Astronomy was designed. This program is suited for science educators, astronomy lecturers and entrepreneurs, members of astronomical societies, and plain astronomy enthusiasts who like to gain in-depth knowledge in the most important aspects of astronomy. A bachelor's degree in any field is required. The program can be finished in two semesters and one summer. If the student opts to continue in the MS in Astronomy program, all the courses he or she has earned in the Diploma will be credited. The Bachelor of Science in Astronomy Technology is an intensive baccalaureate degree program designed to prepare students to become future research scientists and technologists in the field of Astronomy. The BS in Astronomy Technology is a cross-fertilized program, integrating interrelated sciences, such as engineering, geology, remote sensing, physics, atmospheric and environmental science, biology and biochemistry, and even philosophy and entrepreneurship into the study. Thus, the B.S. in Astronomy Technology program gives the student excellent job opportunities in many fields.

  6. The Development of a 30-125 Micron Array for Airborne Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, C. G.; Dotson, J. L.; Erickson, E. F.; Farhoomand, J.; Haas, M. R.; Koerber, C. T.; Prasad, A.; Sisson, D.; Witteborn, F. C.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of a 30-125 micron Ge:Sb photoconductor array for AIRES (Airborne Infra-Red Echelle Spectrometer) is described. The prototype array is a 2x24 module which can be close-stacked to provide larger two-dimensional formats. Light is focused onto each detector using a collecting cone with a 2 mm pitch. The array is read out by two Raytheon SBRC-190 cryogenic multiplexers that also provide a CTIA (capacitive transimpedance amplifier) unit cell for each detector. We discuss our results from a test series conducted to measure the array performance and to evaluate its suitability for airborne astronomy.

  7. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  8. Astronomy sortie missions definition study. Volume 2, book 1: Astronomy sortie program technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The work performed to arrive at a baseline astronomy sortie mission concept is summarized. The material includes: (1) definition of the telescopes and arrays; (2) preliminary definition of mission and systems; (3) identification, definition, and evaluation of alternative sortie programs; (4) the recommended astronomy sortie program; and (5) the astronomy sortie program concept that was approved as a baseline for the remainder of the project.

  9. Airborne astronomy with a 150 micrometer - 500 micrometer heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-254 awarded to the University of California. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved; the spectrometer is now in routine use aboard the KAO. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micrometers line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micrometers transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of 12CO and 13CO between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron ground-state rotational line of OH, and the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+). All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6), thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  10. Airborne Astronomy with a 150 microns - 400 microns Heterodyne Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-753 awarded to the University of Colorado. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micron line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micron transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of CO-12 and CO-13 between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron and 163 micron rotational lines of OH, the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+), and the 63 micron fine structure line of neutral atomic oxygen. All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6) thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  11. Astronomy Missions In The Esa Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Fabio

    2011-09-01

    I will present an overview of the Science Programme of the European Space Agency, focusing on the astronomy missions. I will give a brief overview of missions currently in operation and under implementation, and then present the portfolio of missions currently under study as candidates for future implementation in the program. The planning and selection process will be illustrated, as well as the prospective building blocks for the future program. Missions falling under the remit of HEAD, e.g. X-ray, gamma-ray and gravitational wave missions, will be discussed in detail.

  12. Introducing the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurton, S.; Fienberg, R. T.; Fraknoi, A.; Prather, E. E.

    2013-04-01

    Newly established by the American Astronomical Society (AAS), the Astronomy Ambassadors program is designed to support early-career AAS members with training in resources and techniques for effective outreach to students and/or the public. A pilot Astronomy Ambassadors workshop will be held at the January 2013 AAS meeting. Workshop participants will learn to communicate effectively with public and school audiences; find outreach opportunities and establish ongoing partnerships with local schools, science centers, museums, parks, and/or community centers; reach audiences with personal stories, hands-on activities, and jargon-free language; identify strategies and techniques to improve their presentation skills; gain access to a menu of outreach resources that work in a variety of settings; and become part of an active community of astronomers who do outreach. Applications are welcome from advanced undergraduates (those doing research and committed to continuing in astronomy), graduate students, and postdocs and new faculty in their first two years after receipt of the PhD. We especially encourage applications from members of groups that are presently underrepresented in science.

  13. Astronomy After-School Programs: Effective Pathways to Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthi, A.; Porro, I.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss our experiences with developing and implementing two astronomy after-school programs. Afterschool Universe, formerly called the Beyond Einstein Explorers' Program, is targeted at middle school students and the Youth Astronomy Apprenticeship is directed at high school students. For the benefit of those readers interested in developing their own astronomy OST program, we summarize here how to get started, implementation challenges and lessons learned.

  14. MSFC Skylab ground-based astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Ground-Based Astronomy Program (SGAP) was conducted to enhance the data base of solar physics obtained during the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) mission flown in conjunction with the Skylab orbital station. Leading solar physicists from various observatories obtained data from the ground at the same time that orbital data were being acquired by ATM. The acquisition of corollary solar data from the ground simultaneously with the ATM orbital observations helped to provide a broader basis for understanding solar physics by increasing spectral coverage and by the use of additional sophisticated instruments of various types. This report briefly describes the individual tasks and the associated instrumentation selected for this ground-based program and contains as appendices, the final reports from the Principal Investigators.

  15. The Little Thompson Observatory's Astronomy Education Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Andrea E.

    2007-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is a community-built E/PO observatory and is a member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Annually we have approximately 5,000 visitors, which is roughly equal to the population of the small town of Berthoud, CO. This past year, we have used the funding from our NASA ROSS E/PO grant to expand our teacher workshop programs, and included the baseball-sized meteorite that landed in Berthoud three years ago. Our teacher programs have involved scientists from the Southwest Research Institute and from Fiske Planetarium at CU-Boulder. We thank the NASA ROSS E/PO program for providing this funding! We also held a Colorado Project ASTRO-GEO workshop, and the observatory continues to make high-school astronomy courses available to students from the surrounding school districts. Statewide, this year we helped support the development and construction of three new educational observatories in Colorado, located in Estes Park, Keystone, and Gunnison. The LTO is grateful to have received the recently-retired 24-inch telescope from Mount Wilson Observatory as part of the TIE program. To provide a new home for this historic telescope, we have doubled the size of the observatory and are building a second dome (all with volunteer labor). During 2008 we plan to build a custom pier and refurbish the telescope.

  16. Gravitation, Book 3. The University of Illinois Astronomy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, J. Myron; Wyatt, Stanley P., Jr.

    Presented is book three in a series of six books in the University of Illinois Astronomy Program which introduces astronomy to upper elementary and junior high school students. The causes of celestial motion are investigated and the laws that apply to all moving things in the universe are examined in detail. Topics discussed include: the basic…

  17. The Little Thompson Observatory's Astronomy Education Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Andrea E.

    2008-05-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is a community-built E/PO observatory and is a member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Annually we have approximately 5,000 visitors, which is roughly equal to the population of the small town of Berthoud, CO. In spring 2008, we offered a special training session to boost participation in the GLOBE at Night international observing program. During 2005-2007 we used the funding from our NASA ROSS E/PO grant to expand our teacher workshop programs, and included the baseball-sized meteorite that landed in Berthoud four years ago. Our teacher programs are ongoing, and include scientists from the Southwest Research Institute and from Fiske Planetarium at CU-Boulder. We thank the NASA ROSS E/PO program for providing this funding! Statewide, we are a founding member of Colorado Project ASTRO-GEO, and the observatory offers high-school astronomy courses to students from the surrounding school districts. We continue to support the development and construction of three new educational observatories in Colorado, located in Estes Park, Keystone and Gunnison. The LTO is grateful to have received the retired 24-inch telescope from Mount Wilson Observatory as part of the TIE program. To provide a new home for this historic telescope, we have doubled the size of the observatory and are building a second dome (almost all construction done with volunteer labor). During 2008 we will be building a custom pier and refurbishing the telescope.

  18. Airborne sensor integration for quick reaction programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosian, Gregory; Mason, Kenneth; Servoss, Thomas; Brower, Bernard; Pellechia, Matthew

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present an approach to integrate sensors to meet the demanding requirements of Quick Reaction Capability (QRC) airborne programs. Traditional airborne sensors are generally highly integrated and incorporate custom sensor technologies and interfaces. Custom solutions and new technologies often require significant engineering to achieve a high technology readiness level (TRL) and to meet the overall mission objective. Our approach differs from traditional approaches in that we strive to achieve an integrated solution through regular review, assessment, and identification of relevant industry "best athlete" technologies. Attention is focused on solution providers that adhere to standard interfaces and formats, incorporate non-proprietary techniques, are deemed highly-reliable/repeatable, and enable assembly production. Processes and engineering tools/methods have traditionally been applied to dozens of longer-acquisition space-based ISR programs over 50 years. We have recently leveraged these techniques to solve airborne Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) mission challenges. This presentation describes and illustrates key aspects and examples of these techniques, solving real-world airborne mission needs.

  19. National Radio Astronomy International Exchange Program (NINE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingate, Lory Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    NINE aims to create synergistic partnerships between NRAO and its US-Based NINE partner institutions and universities, with astronomy-related institutions in other countries. We seek to create a vibrant exchange of students that are interested in learning about activities associated with the radio astronomy field, and to create enduring partnerships that will help train a global, collaborative Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) knowledgeable workforce.

  20. Student-Teacher Astronomy Resource (STAR) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaboardi, M.; Humayun, M.; Dixon, P.

    2006-12-01

    Our NASA-funded E/PO program, the Student-Teacher Astronomy Resource (STAR) Program, designed around the Stardust and Genesis Missions, focuses on the reciprocal relationship between technological progress and advances in scientific understanding. We work directly with the public, teachers, classrooms, and individual school students. Both formal and informal evaluations suggest that our four-step approach to outreach has been effective. This annual program may serve as a model for the partnership between a national research institution, local scientists, and local teachers. The program has four components: 1."Space Stations" developed around the technology and science of the Genesis and Stardust Missions, are offered as child-friendly booths at the annual National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Open House. The stations allow for direct interaction between the scientists and the public (over 3000 visitors). 2. STAR teachers (15) receive training and supplies to lead their classrooms through "Technology for Studying Comets". After attending a one-day in-service at the NHMFL, teachers can bring to their students an inquiry-based space science unit about which they are knowledgeable and excited. 3. We offer "Comet Tales," an informal education experience based on the NASA classroom activity "Comet Basics," to 15 local classrooms. We visit local classrooms and engage students with inquiry about comets, sampling of Wild 2, and what scientists hope to learn from the Stardust Mission. Visits occur during the two-week "Technology for Studying Comets" unit taught by each STAR teacher. 4. The "Stellar Students" component involves 15 high-achieving students in research activities. From each classroom visited during "Comet Tales," one student is selected to visit the NHMFL for a day. Parents and teachers of the students are invited for an awards ceremony and student presentations. Evaluation consisted of focus groups, informal observation, and questionnaires. Responses

  1. Activity Based Astronomy for Primary Science Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginns, Ian

    Print materials in astronomy such as books, journals, charts, and posters are typically the sources of information for teachers and children about the moon, the sun, lunar and solar eclipses, planetary sizes, distances of planets from the sun, planetary atmospheres, and so on. This paper describes and analyzes a number of activities designed to…

  2. Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  3. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  4. Astronomy Education through the NSF GK-12 Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, A. G.

    2004-05-01

    The National Science Foundation's GK-12 program encourages graduate students in science to be active in public education at the middle school and high school levels. As a GK-12 fellow at the University of Colorado-Boulder (CU), I worked with a local 8th-grade science teacher and his students during the 2003-2004 school year. In the Boulder Valley School District, 8th-grade science covers Earth history, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. There are many special challenges for this school district and 8th-grade education in Colorado, including a large number of English as a second language (ESL) students and the administration of standardized tests during March, before students have completed much of the relevant material. As a GK-12 Fellow, my responsibilities included work with the Earth history Full Option Science System (FOSS) kit, guest lecturing, aid in hands-on exercises, and the creation of new activities and assignments. Astronomy activities accomplished through this program include sunspot viewing and a field trip to the Colorado Scale Model Solar System on the CU campus. The GK-12 program at CU will continue for at least two more years, possibly placing future GK-12 fellows who are astronomy grad students into classes that are astronomy- or physics-specific.

  5. The Lowell Observatory Navajo-Hopi Astronomy Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Bosh, A. S.; Johnson, M.; Schindler, K.

    2012-08-01

    We present an overview of the Lowell Observatory Navajo-Hopi Astronomy Outreach Program, which is modeled after the ASP's Project ASTRO (Richter & Fraknoi 1994). Since 1996, our missions have been (1) to use the inherent excitement about the night sky to help teachers get Navajo and Hopi students excited about science and education, and (2) to help teachers of Navajo and Hopi students learn about astronomy and hands-on activities so that they will be better able to incorporate astronomy in their classrooms. Lowell astronomers pair up for a school year with an elementary or middle school (5th-8th grade) teacher and make numerous visits to their teachers' classes, partnering with the educators in leading discussions linked with hands-on activities. Lowell staff also work with educators and amateur astronomers to offer evening star parties that involve the family members of the students as well as the general community. Toward the end of the school year, teachers bring their classes to Lowell Observatory. The classes spend some time exploring the Steele Visitor Center and participating in tours and programs. They also voyage to Lowell's research facility in the evening to observe at two of Lowell's research telescopes. Furthermore, we offer biennial teacher workshops in Flagstaff to provide teachers with tools, curricula materials, and personalized training so that they are able to include astronomy in their classrooms. We also work with tribal educators to incorporate traditional astronomical knowledge. Funding for the program comes from many different sources.

  6. Space astronomy and astrophysics program by CSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurin, Denis; Ouellet, Alain; Dupuis, Jean; Chicoine, Ruth-Ann

    2014-07-01

    Canada became actively engaged in space astronomy in the 1990s by contributing two fine guidance sensors to the FUSE Far-UV mission (NASA 1999-2008). In the same period, Canada contributed to ODIN's infrared instrument (ESA 2001-2006) and correlators for VSOP (JAXA 1997-2005). In early 2000, Canada developed its own space telescope, Micro-variability and Observations of STars (MOST), a 15-cm telescope on a microsatellite, operating since 2003, and more recently contributed to the realization of the BRITE nanosatellites constellation. Canada also provided hardware to the European Space Agency's Herschel HIFI instrument and simulators to the SPIRE instrument and data analysis tools for Planck. More recently the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) delivered detector units for the UVIT instrument on board the Indian Space Research Organisation's (ISRO) ASTROSAT. The CSA's most important contribution to a space astronomy mission to date is the Fine Guidance Senor (FGS) and Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) instrument to NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. The CSA is currently building the laser metrology system for JAXA's ASTRO-H hard X-ray telescope. Canadian astronomers contributed to several high profile stratospheric balloon projects investigating the CMB and the CSA recently established a balloon launch facility. As expressed in Canada's new Space Policy Framework announced in February 2014, Canada remains committed to future space exploration endeavors. The policy aims at ensure that Canada is a sought-after partner in the international space exploration missions that serve Canada's national interests; and continuing to invest in the development of Canadian contributions in the form of advanced systems and optical instruments. In the longer term, through consultations and in keeping the Canadian astronomical community's proposed Long Range Plan, the CSA is exploring possibilities to contributions to important missions such as WFIRST, SPICA and Athena

  7. An undergraduate program for astronomy in México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Alfaro, Hector; Migenes, Victor

    Astronomy in Mexico has an ancient tradition, reinforced during the XXth century by groups working in theoretical and observational astronomy. During the 90s, the Great Millimeter Telescope (a single 50-m antenna) has been approved, and a 6-m infrared telescope is under study. Graduate and undergraduate programs must be improved to prepare future Mexican and Latin American astronomers to take advantage of these facilities. To meet the challenge, two traditional Mexican programs (Instituto de Astronomia-UNAM and Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica-INAOE) are updating their graduate programs for. Similarly, the Departamento de Astronomia de la Universidad de Guanajuato is joining physicists in the first undergraduate program in Mexico in Physics and Engineering with an option in Astrophysics. This will prepare students so that they can choose between industry, academia or national laboratories, either in Physics or Astronomy. Jobs in academia have been scarce; many students had to give up their goals after one or two postdoctoral positions. Graduate and undergraduate programs must adjust, by broadening the scope of present programs so that students are better prepared for other job opportunities. We present a BSc program designed by astronomers and physicists to try to address some of these concerns and prepare the students for either continuing with graduate studies or finding employment in an ever-changing job market.

  8. A Status Report on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, Richard Tresch; Fraknoi, Andrew; Gurton, Suzanne; Hurst, Anna; Schatz, Dennis L.

    2014-06-01

    The American Astronomical Society, in partnership with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), has launched a series of professional-development workshops and a community of practice designed to improve early-career astronomers’ ability to communicate effectively with students and the public. Called AAS Astronomy Ambassadors, the program provides training and mentoring for young astronomers, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty; it also provides them access to resources and a network of contacts within the astronomy education and public outreach (EPO) community. Ambassadors are provided with a library of outreach activities and resource materials suitable for a range of venues and audiences. For much of this library we are using resources developed by organizations such as the ASP, the Pacific Science Center, and the Center for Astronomy Education for other outreach programs, though some resources have been created by one of us (AF) specifically for this program. After a period of evaluation and revision, the program’s “Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education” (MOOSE) is now posted on the AAS website at http://aas.org/outreach/moose-menu-outreach-opportunities-science-education.The first two Astronomy Ambassadors workshops were held at AAS meetings in January 2013 and January 2014; each served 30 young astronomers chosen from about twice that many applicants. Web-based follow-up activities are being provided through a website at the ASP designed to keep cohorts of educators trained in their programs in touch with one another. The AAS is exploring ways to fund additional workshops at future winter meetings; suggestions are most welcome. Meanwhile, the Astronomy Ambassadors trained to date have logged more than 150 outreach events, reaching many thousands of children and adults across the U.S. and Canada.

  9. ASTRONOMY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON ASTRONOMY ESTABLISHES (1) UNDERSTANDINGS AND ATTITUDES, (2) SKILLS, AND (3) CONCEPTS TO BE GAINED IN THE STUDY. THE OVERVIEW EXPLAINS THE ORGANIZATION AND OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIT. TOPICAL DIVISIONS ARE (1) THE EARTH, (2) THE MOON, (3) THE SUN, (4) THE SOLAR SYSTEM, (5) THE STARS, (6) THE UNIVERSE, AND (7) SPACE…

  10. An Update on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, Richard T.; Gurton, S.; Fraknoi, A.; Prather, E. E.; Hurst, A.; Schatz, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    The American Astronomical Society, partnering with organizations active in science education and public outreach (EPO), has launched a series of professional-development workshops and a community of practice designed to help improve early-career astronomers’ ability to effectively communicate with students and the public. Called Astronomy Ambassadors, the program provides mentoring and training experiences for young astronomers, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty; it also provides access to resources and a network of contacts within the astronomy EPO community. By learning how to implement effective education and outreach strategies, Astronomy Ambassadors become better teachers, better presenters at meetings, and better representatives of our science to the public and to government. And because young astronomers are a more diverse group than those who currently do the majority of outreach, they help the astronomical community present a more multicultural and gender-balanced face to the public, enabling members of underserved groups to see themselves as scientists. Ambassadors are provided with a large library of outreach activities and materials that are suitable for a range of venues and audiences and that will grow with time. For much of this library we are using resources developed by organizations such as the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Pacific Science Center, and the Center for Astronomy Education for other outreach programs, though some resources have been created by one of us (AF) specifically for this program. The first Astronomy Ambassadors workshop was held at the 221st meeting of the AAS in January 2013 and served 30 young astronomers chosen from more than 75 applicants. Incorporating feedback from workshop participants and lessons learned from the reports they’ve submitted after conducting their own outreach events, we are now planning the second annual workshop to be held 4-5 January 2014 at the 223rd AAS meeting in

  11. Youth for Astronomy & Engineering Program: Engaging Local Families and Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Tania; Eisenhamer, B.; Ryer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Youth for Astronomy and Engineering (YAE) is a program in the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach. It is designed to engage the local community in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This is accomplished through a series of yearly events such as astronomy and engineering clubs for students, family nights, and professional development for local educators. These events leverage SMD mission science to expose participants to the latest science discoveries (Hubble), new developments in space technology (James Webb), STEM career information, and activities that are representative of the work done by individuals in the astronomical and engineering fields. The YAE program helps provide a progression of opportunities for audiences by attracting and identifying highly-engaged individuals for participation in more intensive experiences. It also helps increase our impact by creating a network for piloting E/PO products and initiatives at the local level before nationwide release. This poster will highlight the YAE program.

  12. NASA's Astronomy Education Program: Reaching Diverse Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, Denise Anne; Hertz, Paul; Meinke, Bonnie

    2015-08-01

    An overview will be given of the rich programs developed by NASA to inject the science from it's Astrophysics missions into STEM activities targeted to diverse audiences. For example, Astro4Girls was started as a pilot program during IYA2009. This program partners NASA astrophysics education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed hands-on education activities for girls and their families, and has been executed across the country. School curricula and NASA websites have been translated in Spanish; Braille books have been developed for the visually impaired; programs have been developed for the hearing impaired. Special effort has been made to reach underrepresented minorities. Audiences include students, teachers, and the general public through formal and informal education settings, social media and other outlets. NASA Astrophysics education providers include teams embedded in its space flight missions; professionals selected though peer reviewed programs; as well as the Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Education forum. Representative examples will be presented to demonstrate the reach of NASA education programs, as well as an evaluation of the effectiveness of these programs.

  13. Developing an Astronomy Program at the Crownpoint Institute of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gino, M. C.

    2004-12-01

    The Crownpoint Institute of Technology (CIT) is a tribal college located on the eastern edge of the Navajo Nation in northwestern New Mexico. Historically CIT is a technical college which grants AAS degrees and certificates in a number of vocational and technical fields. CIT is in the process of seeking higher learning articulation and accreditation, and has received "Candidacy Status" from the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Institutions of Higher Education. To meet the demands placed upon the college as it steps into its role as an institution of higher learning, CIT is dedicated to broadening its curriculum with programs that encourage math, science and technology, and to increasing the number of courses that advance knowledge in both Navajo and Western society by enhancing both laboratory and educational technologies. The introduction of astronomy into the science curriculum advances CIT's goals in all of these areas, and presents a unique opportunity to incorporate traditional Navajo scientific knowledge into a technically advanced science program. In this poster we outline the development of the astronomy program, which has started with the inclusion of the first astronomy course into the science curriculum and the acquisition of two small telescope systems for K-14 student use and public outreach, and will continue through the construction of a campus observatory capable of supporting an undergraduate research program. It is our expectation that through the introduction of astronomy into the curriculum, CIT will advance its goals of increasing science and technology educational opportunities for its students and training the next generation of Navajo science and technology professionals, while maintaining an awareness of the needs of the Navajo Nation and a sensitivity to Navajo cultural values and protocols.

  14. Evaluation of a College Freshman Diversity Research Program in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremmel, Michael J.; Garner, S. M.; Schmidt, S. J.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Agol, E.

    2014-01-01

    Graduate students in the astronomy department at the University of Washington began the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) after recognizing that underrepresented students in STEM fields are not well retained after their transition from high school. Pre-MAP is a research and mentoring program that begins with a keystone seminar where they learn astronomical research techniques that they apply to research projects conducted in small groups. Students also receive one-on-one mentoring and peer support for the duration of the academic year and beyond. Successful Pre-MAP students have declared astronomy and physics majors, expanded their research projects beyond the fall quarter, presented posters at the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium, and received research fellowships and summer internships. Here we examine the success of the program in attracting underrepresented minorities and in facilitating better STEM retention and academic performance among incoming UW students. We use the University of Washington Student Database to study both the performance of Pre-MAP students and the overall UW student body over the past 8 years. We show that Pre-MAP students are generally more diverse than the overall UW population and also come in with a variety of different math backgrounds, which we show to be an important factor on STEM performance for the overall UW population. We find that that Pre-MAP students are both more academically successful and more likely to graduate in STEM fields than their UW peers, regardless of initial math placement.

  15. Airborne laser program revolutionizing airpower for the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Tyle T.; Simon, Albert J.

    1998-09-01

    The Airborne Laser is an Air Force Major Defense Acquisition Program to develop and field an airborne high energy laser weapon system to provide speed-of-light lethal defense against hostile theater ballistic missiles in the boost phase. The Air Force believes the Airborne Laser has the potential to revolutionize air warfare. The advanced technologies being introduced by the Airborne Laser presents new and unique challenges for acquisition, operations, and supportability. This paper provides a program overview, and will cover the threat, system description, technology maturity, and acquisition strategy. The Airborne Laser program successfully passed through its Milestone 1 Defense Acquisition Board decision to proceed from Concept Design into Program Definition and Risk Reduction phase, to design, build, integrate, and conduct a lethal airborne demonstration against a boosting missile in 2002. Upon a successful lethal demonstration, the program will then proceed into Engineering and Manufacturing Development and Production. Initial Operation Capability will be in 2006 with three aircraft, and Full Operational Capability will be in 2008 with seven aircraft.

  16. Astronomy research at the Aerospace Corporation. [research projects - NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulikas, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    This report reviews the astronomy research carried out at The Aerospace Corporation during 1974. The report describes the activities of the San Fernando Observatory, the research in millimeter wave radio astronomy as well as the space astronomy research.

  17. Solar x ray astronomy rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics were studied of the solar corona through the imaging of large scale coronal structures with AS&E High Resolution Soft X ray Imaging Solar Sounding Rocket Payload. The proposal for this program outlined a plan of research based on the construction of a high sensitivity X ray telescope from the optical and electronic components of the previous flight of this payload (36.038CS). Specifically, the X ray sensitive CCD camera was to be placed in the prime focus of the grazing incidence X ray mirror. The improved quantum efficiency of the CCD detector (over the film which had previously been used) allows quantitative measurements of temperature and emission measure in regions of low x ray emission such as helmet streamers beyond 1.2 solar radii or coronal holes. Furthermore, the improved sensitivity of the CCD allows short exposures of bright objects to study unexplored temporal regimes of active region loop evolution.

  18. Programming Wireless Handheld Devices for Applications in Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiardja, R.; Saranathan, V.; Guidry, M.

    2002-12-01

    Wireless technology implemented with handheld devices has attractive features because of the potential to access large amounts of data and the prospect of on-the-fly computational analysis from a device that can be carried in a shirt pocket. We shall describe applications of such technology to the general paradigm of making digital wireless connections from the field to upload information and queries to network servers, executing (potentially complex) data analysis and/or database operations on fast network computers, and returning real-time information from this analysis to the handheld device in the field. As illustration, we shall describe several client/server programs that we have written for applications in teaching introductory astronomy. For example, one program allows static and dynamic properties of astronomical objects to be accessed in a remote observation laboratory setting using a digital cell phone or PDA. Another implements interactive quizzing over a cell phone or PDA using a 700-question introductory astronomy quiz database, thus permitting students to study for astronomy quizzes in any environment in which they have a few free minutes and a digital cell phone or wireless PDA. The presentation will include hands-on demonstrations with real devices.

  19. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of radiological airborne emissions. This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to written requirements.

  20. The Hubble Education Program's Tactile Astronomy: Making the Universe Touchable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Mutchler, M.; Cordes, K.; Weaver, D.; Ryer, H.

    2011-01-01

    Tactile Astronomy supports the Hubble Education Program's efforts in bringing the wonders of the universe to everyone, regardless of their visual ability. This new section of the Amazing Space Website features "Images of the Month;" a collection of the latest Hubble images that can be printed in a tactile format. The images are specifically designed to be downloaded and printed on a thermal paper expansion machine, thus allowing the visually impaired to feel what they cannot see. In addition, there is a "special projects" section that currently features the limited-edition Tactile Carina Nebula booklet and accompanying materials, such as background text about the Carina Nebula and an audio tour. The opening of Tactile Astronomy is in celebration of Hubble's 20th anniversary and features the 20th anniversary image of a small portion of the Carina Nebula. New tactile images and additional projects will continue to be added to the site.

  1. High Energy Astronomy Observatory star tracker search program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a control system to accommodate the scientific payload of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) is discussed. One of the critical elements of the system is the star tracker subsystem, which defines an accurate three-axis attitude reference. A digital computer program has been developed to evaluate the ability of a particular star tracker configuration to meet the requirements for attitude reference at various vehicle orientations. Used in conjuction with an adequate star catalog, the computer program provides information on availability of stars for each tracker and on the ability of the system to maintain three-axis attitude reference throughout a representative sequence of vehicle orientations.

  2. Social Media Programs at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance Elaine; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    Observatories and other science research organizations want to share their research and activities with the public. The last several years, social media has become and increasingly important venue for communicating information about observatory activities, research and education and public outreach.The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) uses a wide variety of social media to communicate with different audiences. NOAO is active on social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest. Our social media accounts include those for the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory and our dark skies conservation program Globe at Night.Our social media programs have a variety of audiences. NOAO uses social media to announce and promote NOAO sponsored meetings, observatory news and proposal deadlines to the professional astronomical community. Social media accounts are used to disseminate NOAO press releases, images from the observatory and other science using data from NOAO telescopes.Social media is important in our Education and Public Outreach programs (EPO). Globe at Night has very active facebook and twitter accounts encouraging people to become involved in preserving dark skies. Social media plays a role in recruiting teachers for professional development workshops such as Project Astro.NOAO produces monthly podcasts for the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast featuring interviews with NOAO astronomers. Each podcast highlights the science of an NOAO astronomer, an NOAO operated telescope or instrument, or an NOAO program. A separate series of podcasts is produced for NOAO’s Dark Skies Education programs. All the podcasts are archived at 365daysofastronomy.org.

  3. Dreamtime astronomy: development of a new indigenous program at Sydney Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Geoffrey; Stephenson, Toner; Hamacher, Duane W.

    2014-07-01

    The Australian National Curriculum promotes Indigenous culture in school education programs. To foster a broader appreciation of cultural astronomy, to utilise the unique astronomical heritage of the site, and to develop an educational program within the framework of the National Curriculum, Sydney Observatory launched Dreamtime Astronomy - a program incorporating Australian Indigenous culture, astronomy, and Sydney's astronomical history and heritage. This paper reviews the development and implementation of this program and discusses modifications following an evaluation that was conducted by schools.

  4. PROGRAM ASPECT - FOR REMOTE SENSING OF AIRBORNE PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SAFEGUARD program is a multi-sensor program for the detection and imaging of chemical plumes and vapors. The system is composed of an airborne sensor suite including an infrared line scanner and a high-speed fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Both systems are integrat...

  5. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; US IYA Dark Skies Working Group

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's cultural and natural heritage. More than 1/5 of the world population, 2/3 of the United States population and 1/2 of the European Union population have already lost naked-eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1) Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2) Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3) Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4) Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5) Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The poster will provide an update, describe how people can continue to participate, and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  6. Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.M.

    1993-07-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

  7. How Create an Astronomy Outreach Program to Bring Astronomy to Thousands of People at Outdoor Concerts Astronomy Festivals, or Tourist Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald

    2015-08-01

    I describe how to create an astronomy program for thousands of people at outdoor concerts based on my $308,000 NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program (60 events 2009 - 2013), and the Astronomy Festival on the National Mall (AFNM, 10,000 people/yr).MAUS reached 50,000 music lovers at local parks and at the Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Ravinia, or Tanglewood Music Festivals with classical, folk, pop/rock, opera, Caribbean, or county-western concerts assisted by astronomy clubs. Yo-Yo-Ma, the Chicago and Boston Symphony Orchestras, Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Tony Orlando, and Wilco performed at these events. AFNM was started in 2010 with co-sponsorship by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. MAUS and AFMN combine solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; large posters/banners; hands-on activities, imaging with a cell phone mount; citizen science activities; hand-outs; and teacher info packet. Representatives from scientific institutions participated. Tyco Brahe, Johannes Kepler, and Caroline Herschel made guest appearances.MAUS reached underserved groups and attracted large crowds. Young kids participated in this family learning experience-often the first time they looked through a telescope. While < 50% of the participants took part in a science activity in the past year, they found MAUS enjoyable and understandable; learned about astronomy; wanted to learn more; and increased their interest in science (ave. rating 3.6/4). MAUS is effective in promoting science education!Lessons learned: plan early; create partnerships with parks, concert organizers, and astronomy clubs; test equipment; have backup equipment; create professional displays; select the best location to obtain a largest number of participants; use social media/www sites to promote the events; use many telescopes for multiple targets; project a live image or video; select equipment that is easy to

  8. Reflections on the Radio Astronomy Explorer program of the 1960s and 70s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) program of the late 1960s and early 1970s is, to date, the only totally dedicated radio astronomy mission to have flown. However, only some of the prelaunch goals were achieved due to the unexpectedly high levels of interference from the earth in the form of both naturally occurring and man-made noise. Some important lessons in receiver design were learned which could and should be applied to any future radio astronomy missions.

  9. Summer Program in Planetary Science and Astronomy for Gifted and Talented High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. P.; Fetters, J.; West, K.; Frazee, P.

    2002-03-01

    The Summer Science and Mathematics Program (SS&MP) is an 8-week program in planetary science and astronomy for gifted and talented high school students. Students undertake research projects, which include current topics in planetary science.

  10. NASA's Student Airborne Research Program (2009-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for rising senior undergraduates majoring in any of the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2013, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. Several students will present the results of their research in science sessions at this meeting. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program over the past five summers and plans for the future.

  11. Astronomy for a Better World: IAU OAD Task Force-1 Programs for Advancing Astronomy Education and Research in Universities in Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward; Kolenberg, Katrien

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the IAU Commission 46 and Office for Astronomy Development (OAD) programs that support advancing Astronomy education and research primarily in universities in developing countries. The bulk of these operational activities will be coordinated through the OAD's newly installed Task Force 1. We outline current (and future) IAU/OAD Task Force-1 programs that promote the development of University-level Astronomy at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Among current programs discussed are the past and future expanded activities of the International School for Young Astronomers (ISYA) and the Teaching Astronomy for Development (TAD) programs. The primary role of the ISYA program is the organization of a three week School for students for typically M.Sc. and Ph.D students. The ISYA is a very successful program that will now be offered more frequently through the generous support of the Kavli Foundation. The IAU/TAD program provides aid and resources for the development of teaching, education and research in Astronomy. The TAD program is dedicated to assist countries that have little or no astronomical activity, but that wish to develop or enhance Astronomy education. Over the last ten years, the ISYA and TAD programs have supported programs in Africa, Asia, Central America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, South East and West Asia, and South America. Several examples are given. Several new programs being considered by OAD Task Force-1 are also discussed. Other possible programs being considered are the introduction of modular Astronomy courses into the university curricula (or improve present courses) as well as providing access to ``remote learning`` courses and Virtual Astronomy labs in developing countries. Another possible new program would support visits of astronomers from technically advanced countries to spend their sabbatical leaves teaching and advising University Astronomy programs in developing countries. Suggestions for new Task Force -1

  12. The Universe in Motion, Book 2. Guidebook. The University of Illinois Astronomy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, J. Myron; Wyatt, Stanley P., Jr.

    Presented is book two in a series of six books in the University of Illinois Astronomy Program which introduces astronomy to upper elementary and junior high school students. This guidebook is concerned with how celestial bodies move in space and how these motions are observed by astronomers. Topics discussed include: a study of the daily motion…

  13. The Message of Starlight, Book 4. The University of Illinois Astronomy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, J. Myron; Wyatt, Stanley P., Jr.

    Presented is book four in a series of six books in the University of Illinois Astronomy Program which introduces astronomy to upper elementary and junior high school students. This document terms the analysis of light as an essential clue to understanding astronomical phenomena. Topics discussed include: thm behavior of light; the wave model and…

  14. Assess program: Interactive data management systems for airborne research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, R. M.; Reller, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Two data systems were developed for use in airborne research. Both have distributed intelligence and are programmed for interactive support among computers and with human operators. The C-141 system (ADAMS) performs flight planning and telescope control functions in addition to its primary role of data acquisition; the CV-990 system (ADDAS) performs data management functions in support of many research experiments operating concurrently. Each system is arranged for maximum reliability in the first priority function, precision data acquisition.

  15. Recommended Priorities for NASA's Gamma Ray Astronomy Program 1999-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carol, Ladd

    1999-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Astronomy Program Working Group (GRAPWG) recommends priorities for the NASA Gamma-Ray Astronomy Program. The highest priority science topic is nuclear astrophysics and sites of gamma ray line emission. Other high priority topics are gamma ray bursts, hard x-ray emission from accreting black holes and neutron stars, the Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT), the High-resolution Spectroscopic Imager (HSI), and the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The recommendations include special consideration for technology development, TeV astronomy, the ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) program, the International Space Station, optical telescope support, and data analysis and theory.

  16. Astronomy Education Programs at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Katie; de Messieres, G.; Edson, S.

    2014-01-01

    Astronomy educators present the range of astronomy education programming available at the National Air and Space Museum, including the following. In the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory, visitors use telescopes and other scientific equipment to observe and discuss the Sun, Venus, and other celestial sights in an unstructured, inquiry-based environment. At Discovery Stations throughout the Museum, staff and volunteers engage visitors in hands-on exploration of a wide range of artifacts and teaching materials. Astronomy-related Discovery Stations include Cosmic Survey, an exploration of gravitational lensing using a rubber sheet, spectroscopy using discharge tubes, and several others. Astronomy lectures in the planetarium or IMAX theater, featuring researchers as the speakers, include a full evening of activities: a custom pre-lecture Discovery Station, a handout to help visitors explore the topic in more depth, and evening stargazing at the Public Observatory. Astronomy educators present planetarium shows, including star tours and explorations of recent science news. During Astronomy Chat, an astronomy researcher engages visitors in an informal conversation about science. The goal is to make the public feel welcome in the environment of professional research and to give busy scientists a convenient outreach opportunity. Astronomy educators also recruit, train, and coordinate a corps of volunteers who contribute their efforts to the programming above. The volunteer program has grown significantly since the Public Observatory was built in 2009.

  17. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of airborne emissions. The Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions requirements are defined in National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1991a). Reporting of the emissions to the US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE-RL 1988). This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to the requirements of QAMS-004/80, Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (EPA 1983). Title 40 CFR Part 61, Appendix B, Method 114, Quality Assurance Methods (EPA 1991b) specifies the quality assurance requirements and that a program plan should be prepared to meet the requirements of this regulation. This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies NESHAP responsibilities and how the Westinghouse Hanford Company Environmental, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division will verify that the methods are properly implemented.

  18. Infrared Submillimeter and Radio Astronomy Research and Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2000-01-01

    This program entitled "Infrared Submillimeter and Radio Astronomy Research and Analysis Program" with NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC) was proposed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) to cover three years. Due to funding constraints only the first year installment of $18,436 was funded, but this funding was spread out over two years to try to maximize the benefit to the program. During the tenure of this contact, the investigators at the SAO, Drs. Wesley A. Traub and Nathaniel P. Carleton, worked with the investigators at ARC, Drs. Jesse Bregman and Fred Wittebom, on the following three main areas: 1. Rapid scanning SAO and ARC collaborated on purchasing and constructing a Rapid Scan Platform for the delay arm of the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) interferometer on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. The Rapid Scan Platform was tested and improved by the addition of stiffening plates which eliminated a very small but noticeable bending of the metal platform at the micro-meter level. 2. Star tracking Bregman and Wittebom conducted a study of the IOTA CCD-based star tracker system, by constructing a device to simulate star motion having a specified frequency and amplitude of motion, and by examining the response of the tracker to this simulated star input. 3. Fringe tracking. ARC, and in particular Dr. Robert Mah, developed a fringe-packet tracking algorithm, based on data that Bregman and Witteborn obtained on IOTA. The algorithm was tested in the laboratory at ARC, and found to work well for both strong and weak fringes.

  19. Reaching Non-Traditional and Under-Served Communities through Global Astronomy Month Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Global Astronomy Month (GAM), organized each year by Astronomers Without Borders (AWB), has become the world's largest annual celebration of astronomy. Launched as a follow-up to the unprecedented success of the 100 Hours of Astronomy Cornerstone Project of IYA2009, GAM quickly attracted not only traditional partners in astronomy and space science outreach, but also unusual partners from very different fields. GAM's third annual edition, GAM2012, included worldwide programs for the sight-impaired, astronomy in the arts, and other non-traditional programs. The special planetarium program, OPTICKS, combined elements such as Moonbounce (sending images to the Moon and back) and artistic elements in a unique presentation of the heavens. Programs were developed to present the heavens to the sight-impaired as well. The Cosmic Concert, in which a new musical piece is composed each year, combined with background images of celestial objects, and presented during GAM, has become an annual event. Several astronomy themed art video projects were presented online. AWB's Astropoetry Blog held a very successful contest during GAM2012 that attracted more than 70 entries from 17 countries. Students were engaged by participation in special GAM campaigns of the International Asteroid Search Campaign. AWB and GAM have both developed into platforms where innovative programs can develop, and interdisciplinary collaborations can flourish. As AWB's largest program, GAM brings the audience and resources that provide a boost for these new types of programs. Examples, lessons learned, new projects, and plans for the future of AWB and GAM will be presented.

  20. Airborne Science Program: Observing Platforms for Earth Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Airborne Science Program and the platforms used for conducting investigations for the Earth System Science. Included is a chart that shows some of the aircraft and the operational altitude and the endurance of the aircraft, views of the Dryden Aircraft Operation Facility, and some of the current aircraft that the facility operates, and the varieties of missions that are flown and the type of instrumentation. Also included is a chart showing the attributes of the various aircraft (i.e., duration, weight for a payload, maximum altitude, airspeed and range) for comparison

  1. Innovative Research Program: Supershields for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, Charles J.

    2000-01-01

    The supershield project evaluated the importance of novel shield configurations for suppressing neutron induced background in new classes of gamma-ray detectors such as CZT. The basic concept was to use a two-part shield. The outer shield material heavily moderates the incoming neutron spectrum. This moderated neutron beam is then more easily absorbed by the inner material, which is an efficient neutron absorber. This approach is, in principle, more efficient than that in previous attempts to make neutron shields. These previous attempts involved biatomic, monlithic shields (eg. LiH) in which the shield consisted of a single material but with two types of atoms - one for moderating and one for absorbing. The problem with this type of monolithic shield is that moderating neutrons, without the efficient absorption of them, leads to the leakage into the detector of neutrons with a low energy component (approx. 10-100 KeV). These energy neutrons are particularly problematic for many types of detectors. The project was roughly divided into phases. In the first phase we attempted to carefully define the neutron source function incident on any space instrument. This is essential since the design of any shield depends on the shape of the incident neutron spectrum. We found that approximations commonly used in gamma-ray astronomy for photon background is inadequate. In addition, we found that secondary neutrons produced in any passive shield, and dominated by inelastic neutron scattering, are far more important than background due to neutron activation. The second phase of our work involved design of supershield geometries (one and three dimensional) in order to compare different shield configurations and materials for their effectiveness as neutron shields. Moreover we wanted to compare these supershields with previous neutron shields to confirm the performance differences between the supershield (two material) and monolithic (one material) designs and to understand the

  2. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the U.S. International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; U. S. IYA Dark Skies Working Group

    2009-01-01

    The loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource is a growing concern. It impacts not only astronomical research, but also our ecology, health, safety, economics and energy conservation. For this reason, "Dark Skies are a Universal Resource” is one of seven primary themes of the U.S. International Year of Astronomy program in 2009. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved in a variety of dark skies-related programs. To reach this goal, activities have been developed that: 1) Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking, Second Life) 2) Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Astronomy Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy Nights) 3) Organize an event in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4) Involve citizen-scientists in unaided-eye and digital-meter star counting programs, as well as RFI monitoring (e.g., GLOBE at Night and Quiet Skies) and 5) Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security (e.g., the Dark Skies Toolkit, Good Neighbor Lighting, Earth Hour, National Dark Skies Week, traveling exhibits and a 6-minute video tutorial). To deliver these programs, strategic networks have been established with astronomy clubs (ASP's Night Sky Network's astronomy clubs and the Astronomical League), science and nature centers (Astronomy from the Ground Up and the Association of Science and Technology), educational programs (Project ASTRO and GLOBE) and the International Dark-sky Association. The poster will describe the "know-how” and the means for people to become community advocates in promoting Dark Skies programs as public events at their home institutions. For more information, visit http://astronomy2009

  3. StarTeach Astronomy Education: Building a Comprehensive Educational Outreach Program for K-12 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welser, L. A.; Bennum, D. H.

    2000-12-01

    The StarTeach project is a unique tool designed to generate excitement and enthusiasm about astronomy for elementary, middle, and high school students. The program was created out of the realization that astronomy is a subject with the potential to introduce children to many other branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, and geology. The development of StarTeach involves three main phases. First, CCD images of various astronomical objects, such as planets, nebulae, and galaxies, were taken. Next, the StarTeach web site (http://www.physics.unr.edu/grad/welser/astro) was created to present the CCD images. Features include pages on the solar system, deep sky, and the universe, which are complemented by Hubble and NASA photographs. Also included are a set of on-line quizzes about astronomy and links to astronomy education sites on the web. The final part of the StarTeach program involves presenting the material to third and eighth grade classes using power point slide shows and the StarTeach web site. The main goals of the StarTeach project are to strengthen the astronomy curriculum at local Reno schools, to facilitate an interactive scientific learning environment where students can expand and test their knowledge of science, and to generate enthusiasm for astronomy and science in general. This work was partially funded by a DOE EPSCoR University of Nevada, Reno Undergraduate Research Grant.

  4. Astronomy satellites in the U.S. program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucremanne, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO) series demonstrated that necessary thermal control systems and high pointing stability are feasible on astronomical satellites. A geosynchronous International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) is being planned by the US, UK, and ESRO for stellar spectroscopy. High Energy Astronomy Observatories, HEAO-A B, and C, will concentrate on stellar X-ray objects, cosmic ray physics, and gamma ray astronomy. A Shuttle-compatible Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) is planned for studying solar flares and flare related phenomena during the next solar maximum. Now in the instrumentation definition stage is the Large Space Telescope (LST), to provide higher resolution and sensitivity, larger wavelength range (from ultraviolet to far infrared), and higher time resolution than ground-based telescopes.

  5. The National Astronomy Consortium Summer Student Research Program at NRAO-Socorro: Year 2 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Perez, Laura M.; Arancibia, Demian; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    I will present a summary of the program structure used for the second year of hosting a summer student research cohort of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. The NAC is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. I will describe the research, professional development, and inclusivity goals of the program, and show how these were used to create a weekly syllabus for the summer. I will also highlight several unique aspects of this program, including the recruitment of remote mentors for students to better balance the gender and racial diversity of available role models for the students, as well as the hosting of a contemporaneous series of visiting diversity speakers. Finally, I will discuss structures for continuing to engage, interact with, and mentor students in the academic year following the summer program. A goal of this work going forward is to be able to make instructional and organizational materials from this program available to other sites interested in joining the NAC or hosting similar programs at their own institution.

  6. A Program for a National Information System For Physics and Astronomy 1971-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Physics, New York, NY. Information Div.

    The current status of the National Information System for Physics and Astronomy which is being implemented by the information Division of the American Institute of Physics is reported in this issue of a series of annual reports on the program. The goals of the system, their relative priorities and the over-all strategy by which they are to be…

  7. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center program in gamma-ray burst astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The research program in gamma-ray burst astronomy at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center is described. Large-area scintillation detector arrays have been flown on high-altitude balloons, and an array is being developed for the Gamma-Ray Observatory. The design of these detectors is described along with results obtained from previous balloon flights.

  8. Astronomy Beat: A New Project to Record and Present the "Behind the Scenes" Story of Astronomical Projects and Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, J.; Fraknoi, A.; Proudfit, L.

    2012-08-01

    We report on a relatively new project at the ASP that captures the spirit of astronomy research and astronomy outreach projects while the key players are still alive. Every two weeks, the Society publishes an "Astronomy Beat" column, explaining new developments and new ideas. At first, only members of the ASP can see them, but with time, more of the columns are being made available on the Web and through the educational programs of the Society.

  9. The Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) and Our NSF CCLI Phase-III Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program: Our Community-Based Model for Astronomy Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, G.; Impey, C. D.; Prather, E.; Lee, K.

    2011-09-01

    The Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) has been devoted to improving teaching and learning in Astro 101 by creating research-validated curriculum and assessment instruments for use in Astro 101 and by providing Astro 101 instructors professional development opportunities to increase their pedagogical content, knowledge, and instructional skills at implementing these curricula and assessment materials. To create sustainability and further expand this work, CAE, in collaboration with other national leaders in astronomy education and research, developed the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program. The primary goals of CATS are to: 1) increase the number of Astro 101 instructors conducting fundamental research in astronomy education; 2) increase the amount of research-validated curriculum and assessment instruments available for use in Astro 101; and 3) increase the number of people prepared to develop and conduct their own CAE Teaching Excellence Workshops. Following are descriptions of our primary research projects.

  10. The UCI COSMOS Astronomy & Astrophysics Program for Talented High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Kuzio de Naray, R.

    2010-01-01

    The COSMOS program is a month-long, residential, summer program for talented high school students held at four University of California campuses (Davis, Irvine, Santa Cruz, and San Diego). Since the program's inception in 2000, we have offered the Astronomy & Astrophysics Cluster in the UCI COSMOS program. Our high school students take classes and laboratories in astronomy & astrophysics and complete a research project in small groups under the supervision of faculty and teaching assistants. Students take data for their research projects with telescopes at the UCI Observatory or use data that we already have obtained at other observatories in the course of our research. In this poster, we discuss the curriculum, the research projects, highlighting one of the newest labs we developed involving measuring dark matter with galaxy rotation curves, and discuss many of the lessons we have learn working with these talented students over the past 10 years.

  11. The Astronomy Master's Program at the University of Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, J. D.; Spangler, S. R.

    1997-12-01

    We describe the Master of Science degree in astronomy offered by the University of Iowa. From 1984 until the present, 20 such degrees have been awarded. Of those receiving this degree, 7 went on to receive a Ph.D. at Iowa or elsewhere, and an additional 2 are presently senior doctoral students. The remaining 11 used the M.S. as a terminal degree and sought employment. Positions obtained by the latter students include teaching positions at junior colleges, work at educational and research institutions such as planetariums, and technical positions with industry. We consider the Master's degree as a substantive degree in itself, either as an important milepost in pursuit of a Ph.D., or as a terminal degree preparing a student for scientific or technical employment. Degrees always include a thesis project, which in about half the cases results in a paper in a refereed journal (e.g. Ap.J. 295, 134; Ap.J. 318, 852; Ap.J. 430, 824). We have recently encouraged another option for the thesis project, which consists of development of hardware or software instrumentation for our automated optical telescopes or small radio telescope. Such a thesis project does not result in a published journal paper, but provides experience which could be useful for acquiring industrial employment.

  12. Preservice Teachers' First Experiences Teaching Astronomy: Challenges in Designing and Implementing Inquiry-Based Astronomy Instruction for Elementary Students in After School Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    This study examined preservice teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in designing astronomy investigations for children. Fifteen pairs of preservice teachers taught groups of children in after school programs once a week for five weeks; their assignment was to guide the children in a multi-day inquiry investigation about astronomy. Pre- and post-program content assessments and five lesson plans from each pair were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach to understand the successes and challenges in developing PCK by new teachers in this domain. Findings suggest that while most preservice teachers were able to implement inquiry investigations in elementary astronomy topics, many also struggled to successfully connect a scientific question to an explanation based on evidence. A correlation between the teachers' content knowledge and the sophistication of their investigation plan was found.

  13. Sustainable Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, C.; Goetz, J.; Johnson, T.

    2011-09-01

    Through our International Year of Astronomy outreach effort, we established a sustainable astronomy program and curriculum in the Northfield, Minnesota community. Carleton College offers monthly open houses at Goodsell Observatory and donated its recently "retire" observing equipment to local schools. While public evenings continue to be popular, the donated equipment was underutilized due to a lack of trained student observing assistants. With sponsorship from NASA's IYA Student Ambassador program, the sustainable astronomy project began in 2009 to generate greater interest in astronomy and train middle school and high school students as observing assistants. Carleton physics majors developed curricular materials and instituted regular outreach programs for grades 6-12. The Northfield High School Astronomy Club was created, and Carleton undergraduates taught high school students how to use telescopes and do CCD imaging. During the summer of 2009, Carleton students began the Young Astronomers Summer Experience (YASE) program for middle school students and offered a two-week, astronomy-rich observing and imaging experience at Goodsell Observatory. In concert with NASA's Summer of Innovation initiative, the YASE program was offered again in 2010 and engaged a new group of local middle school students in hands-on scientific experiments and observing opportunities. Members of the high school astronomy club now volunteer as observing assistants in the community and graduates of the YASE programs are eager to continue observing as members of a public service astronomy club when they enter the Northfield High School. These projects are training future scientists and will sustain the public's interest in astronomy long after the end of IYA 2009.

  14. Building on the International Year of Astronomy: The Dark Skies Awareness Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    The International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) offered opportunities to create exemplary educational programs in astronomy, such as those through the cornerstone project, Dark Skies Awareness (DSA). The preservation of dark skies is important for many reasons including astronomy, energy conservation, wildlife conservation, and even human health. Light pollution is a growing concern, yet it is one of the easiest global environmental problems citizen scientists can address on a local level. The Dark Skies workshop imparted the skills necessary for participants to lead activities at their home institution for conserving dark skies. Workshop participants experienced the hands-on activities, which are suitable for use in a variety of settings including museums, science centers, planetariums, schools, university outreach efforts, and astronomy club events. Participants were immersed in activities that illustrate proper lighting, light pollution's effects on wildlife, and how to measure the darkness of your skies. Several citizen science projects were highlighted, including GLOBE at Night, the Great World Wide Star Count, and How Many Stars. These programs enlist the help of students and the general public to collect data on the night sky conditions in their community and contribute to a worldwide database on light pollution. The data can be analyzed using various online tools. A CD of activities, a light shielding demonstration, a book, a two DVD set with a planetarium show, and many other resources are included in a Dark Skies Education Kit, which workshop participants received at the close of the workshop.

  15. Dark Skies are a Universal Resource: Programs Planned for the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; US IYA Dark Skies Working Group

    2008-05-01

    The dark night sky is a natural resource that is being lost by much of the world's population. This loss is a growing, serious issue that impacts not only astronomical research, but also human health, ecology, safety, economics and energy conservation. One of the themes of the US Node targeted for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) is "Dark Skies are a Universal Resource". The goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved locally in a variety of dark skies-related events. To reach this goal, activities are being developed that: 1) Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking) 2) Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Teaching Sites, Astronomy Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy Nights) 3) Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4) Involve citizen-scientists in unaided-eye and digital-meter star counting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?” and the Great World Wide Star Count) and 5) Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security (e.g., The Great Switch Out, Earth Hour, National Dark Skies Week, traveling exhibits and a 6-minute video tutorial on lighting issues). To deliver these programs, strategic networks have been established with the ASP's Night Sky Network's astronomy clubs, Astronomy from the Ground Up's science and nature centers and the Project and Family ASTRO programs, as well as the International Dark-Sky Association, GLOBE and the Astronomical League, among others. The poster presentation will outline the activities being developed, the plans for funding, implementation, marketing and the connections to the global cornerstone IYA project, "Dark Skies Awareness".

  16. The CAMPARE Program:A New Model Promoting Minority Participation in Astronomy Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, C. D.; Bieging, J. H.; Phillips, C. B.; Tieu, J.; Povich, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) program represents a new and innovative kind of research program for undergraduates: one that can effectively carry out the goal of recruiting qualified minority and female students to participate in Astronomy and Planetary Science research opportunities, while mentoring them in a way to maximize the chance that these students will persist in obtaining their undergraduate degrees in STEM fields, and potentially go on to obtain their PhDs or pursue careers in those fields. The members of CAMPARE comprise a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and four major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, and JPL/Caltech). Most undergraduate research programs focus on a single research institution. By having multiple institutions, we significantly broaden the opportunities for students, both in terms of breadth of research topics and geographical location.

  17. The Role of Minority Serving Institutions and REU Programs for Enhancing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, K. G.

    2002-12-01

    In this Special Session we will highlight the important role of Minority Serving Institutions in preparing future minority astronomers. Minority Serving Institutions include Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), and Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). We will also stress the role that REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) programs can have in enhancing diversity in astronomy. The session will feature a panel of invited speakers from Minority Serving Institutions and REU programs who will present viewpoints, strategies, and discussion on processes that encourage and mentor individuals who elect to pursue science-related careers including astronomy and astrophysics. Specific objectives for the Session include: Report to the AAS membership on the important role played by Minority Serving Institutions, where these institutions are, the populations they serve; Introduce the AAS membership to representatives from various Minority Serving Institutions, including an HBCU, an HSI, a TCU, and a community college, and to representatives from REU programs; Provide an opportunity for representatives from these institutions to describe their role in preparing minority undergraduates in the sciences, how their programs bridge to PhD-granting programs in astronomy, and ways they suggest for the AAS to help enhance these bridges; Provide an opportunity for AAS members to dialogue with these representatives, hopefully resulting in specific ``action items" that will serve to strengthen partnerships with Minority Serving Institutions.

  18. SWUIS-A: A Versatile, Low-Cost UV/VIS/IR Imaging System for Airborne Astronomy and Aeronomy Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System - Airborne) system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, an aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipment. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60 Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful for occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V = 10.5 in <1 sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like "payload specialist" capability to "close-the-loop" in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually-guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer

  19. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  20. IYA Programs Can Benefit from Evaluation, Research, and Publication in Astronomy Education Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.; Wolff, S.; Friedman, A.

    2008-11-01

    All over the world, astronomers and educators are planning outreach programs to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy in 2009. Large amounts of money and energy will be spent on a range of programs, some extensions of existing work, others quite new. Before embarking on IYA, we should probably ask ourselves: what will remain of all this effort in 2010 and beyond? A way to ensure that IYA leaves a legacy is to do formative and summative evaluation, conduct educational research, and publish the results. Evaluating informal science education programs, such as many of the IYA initiatives, is harder than evaluating classroom work, but recently NSF has sponsored the compilation of a new manual for just the sorts of programs IYA will include. In this poster, we present a resource guide for those wishing to do evaluation research for astronomy outreach. We also discuss the potential role of the online journal Astronomy Education Review in preserving and disseminating the lessons learned during and after IYA.

  1. IYA Programs Can Benefit from Evaluation, Research, and Publication in Astronomy Education Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, Andrew; Wolff, S.; Friedman, A.

    2008-05-01

    All over the world, astronomers and educator are planning outreach programs to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy in 2009. Large amount of money and energy will be spent on a range of programs, some extensions of existing work, others quite new. Before embarking on IYA, we should probably ask ourselves: what will remain of all this effort in 2010 and beyond? One way to ensure that IYA leaves a legacy is to do formative and summative evaluation, conduct research, and publish the results. Evaluating informal science education programs is harder than evaluating classroom work, but recently NSF has sponsored the compilation of a new manual for just the sorts of programs IYA will include. In this poster, we will present a resource guide for those wishing to do evaluation research for astronomy outreach. We will also discuss the potential role of the on-line journal Astronomy Education Review in preserving and disseminating the lessons learned during and after IYA. A handout of resources will be available and will also be put on line at the journal site: http://aer.noao.edu

  2. The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program at the University of Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, D.; Agüeros, M. A.; Covey, K. R.; Tavarez, M.; Agol, E.

    2005-12-01

    The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) is a new program housed in the University of Washington Astronomy Department. Pre-MAP is designed for entering UW students who are interested in math and science and who are traditionally underrepresented in astronomy (women, African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Southeast Asians, Pacific Islanders, and first-generation college students). The program introduces students to astronomical research techniques and guides them in applying these techniques to projects that involve the use of cutting-edge facilities and/or data available to UW astronomers. Every Pre-MAP student also receives one-on-one mentoring and peer support for at least the duration of the academic year, and has an opportunity to continue or expand their research project. In addition to describing Pre-MAP, we discuss recruitment strategies, curriculum development, and long-term funding ideas for the program. Pre-MAP is made possible in part by a two-year grant from the University of Washington's Diversity Appraisal Implementation Fund.

  3. Training Young Astronomers in EPO: An Update on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.; Fienberg, R. T.; Gurton, S.; Schmitt, A. H.; Schatz, D.; Prather, E. E.

    2014-07-01

    The American Astronomical Society, with organizations active in EPO, has launched professional-development workshops and a community of practice to help improve early-career astronomers' ability to communicate effectively. Called “Astronomy Ambassadors,” the program provides mentoring and training for participants, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty. By learning to implement effective EPO strategies, Ambassadors become better teachers, meeting presenters, and representatives of our science to the public and government. Because young astronomers are a more diverse group than those who now do most outreach, they help the astronomy community present a more multicultural and gender-balanced face to the public, enabling underserved groups to see themselves as scientists. Ambassadors are given a library of outreach activities and materials, including many developed by cooperating organizations such as the ASP, plus some that have been created by Andrew Fraknoi specifically for this program.

  4. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  5. Solar Astronomy as a Means to Promote Authentic Science Research in a Teacher Professional Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. E.; Croft, S.; Pompea, S. M.; Plymate, C.; McCarthy, D.

    2003-12-01

    Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is an NSF-funded Teacher Enhancement Program hosted by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) in Tucson, AZ. Consistent with national priorities in education, TLRBSE seeks to retain and renew middle and high school science teachers. Within the exciting context of astronomy, TLRBSE integrates the best pedagogical practices of Research Based Science Education with the process of mentoring. One means by which participants are provided training in astronomy content, pedagogy, image processing, research and leadership skills is through a 15-week distance-learning course and an in-residence, two-week institute at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the National Solar Observatory (NSO). Throughout the program, teachers work with professional astronomers and education specialists. At the in-situ, two-week institute, teachers are the researchers on one of four research projects, including solar astronomy. Preparation for the solar project dictates much of the design of the program (e.g., development and feasibility testing of the observing program, the reduction and analysis software, the preparatory documents for the teachers). The program design of the solar project is centered on teachers experiencing the scientific process. Initially through a staff-facilitated guided inquiry and then on their own as a team, the teachers propose a research question and discuss alternative hypotheses. They operate the solar telescope and take, calibrate, reduce and analyze the data. Teachers interpret and report results to their peers and pundits. Ultimately the observing experience and knowledge gained by the teachers is transferred to the classroom, where students learn science by doing science. Staff astronomers and education specialists provide continuing support with the goal of sustaining a professional learning community that outlives the research experience. Further observing experience is available during the

  6. The Goddard program of gamma-ray transient astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Goddard program of gamma-ray burst studies is briefly reviewed. The past results, present status and future expectations are outlined regarding our endeavors using experiments on balloons. IMP-6 and IMP-7, OGO-3, ISEE-1 and ISEE-3, Helios-2, Solar Maximum Mission, the Einstein Observatory, Solar Polar and the Gamma Ray Observatory, and with the interplanetary gamma-ray burst networks, to which some of these spacecraft sensors contribute. Additional emphasis is given to the recent discovery of a new type of gamma-ray transient, detected on 5 March, 1979.

  7. Promoting Dark Skies Awareness Programs Beyond the International Year of Astronomy 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Dark Skies Working Group

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of dark skies is a growing global concern, yet it is one of the easiest environmental problems people can address on local levels. For this reason, the goal of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs. These programs provide resources on light pollution for new technologies like a presence in Second Life and podcasts, for local thematic events at national parks and observatory open houses, for international thematic events like International Dark Skies Week and Earth Hour, for a program in the arts like an international photo contest, for global citizen-science programs that measure night sky brightness worldwide, and for educational materials like a kit with a light shielding demonstration. These programs have been successfully used around the world during IYA2009 to raise awareness of the effects of light pollution on public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy. The poster will provide an update, take a look ahead at the project's sustainability, and describe how people can be involved in the future. Information about the programs is at www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  8. Keeping the Stars in Our Eyes: Global Astronomy Month's Dark Skies Awareness Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Global Astronomy Month's Dark Skies Awareness Working Group

    2012-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy provided opportunities to experience the beauty of the night sky. Every April since IYA2009, Global Astronomy Month (GAM) carried on the activities with new ones. Its goal is to bring astronomy enthusiasts together to celebrate astronomy and the beauty of observing the sky. Dark Skies Awareness (DSA) is a major program of GAM. Its main "take away" message focuses on reasons and methods for preserving the night sky. With half of the world's population living in cities, many people never experience the wonderment of a pristinely dark sky. "Light pollution” is obscuring people's long-standing natural heritage to view stars. Poorly-aimed and unshielded outdoor lights are the cause of most of the light pollution. They waste more than $2 billion (17 billion kilowatt-hours) of energy in the United States each year. Under unpolluted skies we ought to see more than a couple thousand stars, yet we see less than a hundred from many cities. A number of dark skies events and activities to promote public awareness on how to save energy and save our night sky were held worldwide during GAM2011 and will be held during GAM2012: · International Earth & Sky Photo Contest, April 1-22 · GLOBE at Night, which measures local levels of light pollution over a 10 day period, April 11-20 · International Dark Sky Week, April 14-20 · World Night in Defense of Starlight, April 20 · Dark Sky Rangers, designed to involve young people in preventing light pollution · One Star at a Time, creating accessible public spaces for viewing a dark night sky · Dark Skies Awareness 10 minute audio podcasts and poetry GAM 2012 DSA programs will be presented in terms of lessons learned and plans ahead to redress a disappearing natural heritage-our dark night sky.

  9. Astronomy Students Learn to Think Big.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Presents background information related to astronomy for high school students. Discusses the differences between astronomy and astrophysics, and the employment of the astronomy graduates. Lists degree programs in astronomy and related subjects in an appendix. (YP)

  10. NASA International Year of Astronomy 2009 Programs: Impacts and Future Plans (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, H.; Smith, D.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The opportunity offered by the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009 to increase the exposure of the public and students to NASA discoveries in astronomy resulted in several innovative programs which have reached audiences far and wide. Some examples of the impact of these programs and building on the success of these programs beyond 2009 will be discussed in this talk. The spectacular success of the traveling exhibit of NASA images to public libraries around the country prompted NASA to extend it to include more libraries. As a part of the IYA Cornerstone project From Earth To The Universe, NASA images were displayed at non-traditional sites such as airports, parks, and music festivals, exposing them to an audience which would otherwise have been unaware of them. The NASA IYA Student Ambassadors engaged undergraduate and graduate students throughout the U.S. in outreach programs they created to spread NASA astronomy to their local communities. NASA’s Afterschool Universe provided IYA training to community-based organizations, while pre-launch teacher workshops associated with the Kepler and WISE missions were designed to engage educators in the science of these missions. IYA activities have been associated with several missions launched this year. These include the Hubble Servicing Mission 4, Kepler, Herschel/Planck, LCROSS. NASA’sIYA website and Go Observe! feature remain popular. The associated IYA Discovery Guides and Observing with NASA MicroObservatory activities have guided the public and students to perform their own observations of the night sky and to interpret them. NASA intends to work with its Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOF) to develop a strategy to take forward the best of its IYA2009 plans forward so as to build on the momentum generated by IYA2009 and continue to keep the public and students engaged in the scientific exploration of the universe.

  11. Research on Haystack radiometer, 20-24 GHz maser, and radio astronomy programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    During the first half of 1973, the Haystack antenna was utilized 76% of the time. Of this useful time, 72% was devoted to radio astronomy observing, 5% was spent on radar-related research and 23% went into maintenance and system improvements. Twenty-eight new radio astronomy programs were accepted, eight of which were completed during the period. One new radar program, topographic observations of Mars, was started in June and will be completed early in 1974. Fourteen programs continued from the previous period were also defined as complete. As of 1 July, 28 ratio observing programs were in a continuing status on the Haystack books. Four radar projects were also continuing. The 20-24 GHz maser development described in the preceding report progressed very well during an on-antenna test phase which began early in the year, but which terminated unfortunately in June with the complete loss of gain in the maser. Investigation of this problem is in progress. During this on-antenna test phase, the most sensitive water vapor observing capability which has yet become available was demonstrated.

  12. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  13. The Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) and Our NSF CCLI Phase-III Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program: A Year-Three Update on Our Community-Based Model for Astronomy Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Impey, C. D.; Prather, E. E.; Lee, K. M.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    The Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) has been devoted to improving teaching & learning in Astro 101 by creating research-validated curriculum & assessment instruments for use in Astro 101 & by providing Astro 101 instructors professional development opportunities to increase their pedagogical content knowledge & instructional skills at implementing these curricula & assessment materials. To create sustainability and further expand this work, CAE, in collaboration with other national leaders in astronomy education & research, developed the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program. The primary goals of CATS are to: 1) increase the number of Astro 101 instructors conducting fundamental research in astronomy education; 2) increase the amount of research-validated curriculum and assessment instruments available for use in Astro 101; and 3) increase the number of people prepared to develop and conduct their own CAE Teaching Excellence Workshops. Our year-three research updates include a longitudinal look at professional development and expanded professional development opportunities; new instructional tools and curriculum; learning gains related to Citizen Science and cosmology; and an expanded look at our LSCI study. To learn more about our CAE/CATS project, visit this and the other posters in our session. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. In addition, we would like to thank Michael Greene and JPL's NASA Exoplanet Public Engagement Program (EXEP) for their continued support.

  14. Beyond Outreach: Expanding the UCI Astronomy Outreach Program to New Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, T. A.; Mauzy-Melitz, D. K.; Hood, M. A.

    2010-08-01

    The Astronomy Outreach Program at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) has three major components: (1) tours of the UCI Observatory and visits to local K-12 classrooms that bring hands-on activities and telescopes into the local schools, (2) an annual Teacher's Workshop in Astronomy & Astrophysics, and (3) Visitor Nights at the Observatory for the general public that include lectures on astrophysics topics and star gazing with our telescopes. Here we describe the results of our year long partnership with Grade 3-12 teachers to expand the tour and classroom visit portion of our program. We developed curricula and survey tools for Grades 3, 5, and high school that addresses specific California State Science Content Standards and amplify the impact of our outreach visits to their classrooms and their tours of the UCI Observatory. We describe the lessons and hands-on activities developed for the curricula, report on the results of pre- and post-testing of the students to judge how much they learned and whether or not their attitudes about science have changed, and report on teachers' responses to the program. Many of the lessons and activities we developed are available on our website.

  15. Programming The Universe: Stellarium Scripting As An Inquiry Tool In Introductory College Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baleisis, Audra; Dokter, E.; Magee, M.

    2007-12-01

    In Fall 2007, staff from Flandrau Science Center, Astronomy 101 students at Pima Community College, and their instructor collaborated in a unique education program. Using Stellarium, a free, open-source planetarium software package that can be scripted, small groups of students designed their own 2-5 minute planetarium presentation as an end of the semester project. These mini-shows were screened in the planetarium theatre at Flandrau Science Center during a public show. This poster describes the design of this program, the specific assignments and experiences that helped students successfully progress toward their goal, and lessons learned. In the process of developing their shows, students had to utilize a large range of skill sets and knowledge, such as team building, communication, organization, and critical thinking, as well as creativity. Although there exists software that might simplify the process of creating a presentation for a planetarium by providing preset functions, our decision to use Stellarium scripting was intentional. Specifically, we believe that the process of scripting a show (both conceptually and algorithmically), encouraged students to investigate the topic they were presenting more deeply. We hope to be able to repeat this program with future Astronomy 101 classes.

  16. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2005-12-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel

  17. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel

  18. Innovation in Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Ros, Rosa M.; Pasachoff, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. General Strategies for Effective Teaching: Introduction; 1. Main objectives of SpS2; 2. Learning astronomy by doing astronomy; 3. Hands-on Universe-Europe; 4. Life on Earth in the atmosphere of the Sun; 5. A model of teaching astronomy to pre-service teachers; 6. How to teach, learn about, and enjoy astronomy; 7. Clickers: a new teaching tool of exceptional promise; 8. Educational opportunities in pro-am collaboration; 9. Teaching history of astronomy to second-year engineering students; 10. Teaching the evolution of stellar and Milky Way concepts through the ages; 11. Educational efforts of the International Astronomical Union; 12. Astronomy in culture; 13. Light pollution: a tool for astronomy education; 14. Astronomy by distance learning; 15. Edible astronomy demonstrations; 16. Amateur astronomers as public outreach partners; 17. Does the Sun rotate around Earth or Earth rotate around the Sun?; 18. Using sounds and sonifications for astronomy outreach; 19. Teaching astronomy and the crisis in science education; 20. Astronomy for all as part of a general education; Poster abstracts; Part II. Connecting Astronomy with the Public: Introduction; 21. A status report from the Division XII working group; 22. Outreach using media; 23. Astronomy podcasting; 24. IAU's communication strategy, hands-on science communication, and the communication of the planet definition discussion; 25. Getting a word in edgeways: the survival of discourse in audiovisual astronomy; 26. Critical evaluation of the new Hall of Astronomy; 27. Revitalizing astronomy teaching through research on student understanding; Poster abstracts; Part III. Effective Use of Instruction and Information Technology: Introduction; 28. ESO's astronomy education program; 29. U.S. student astronomy research and remote observing projects; 30. Global network of autonomous observatories dedicated to student research; 31. Remote telescopes in education: report of an Australian study; 32. Visualizing

  19. Innovation in Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Ros, Rosa M.; Pasachoff, Naomi

    2008-07-01

    Preface; Part I. General Strategies for Effective Teaching: Introduction; 1. Main objectives of SpS2; 2. Learning astronomy by doing astronomy; 3. Hands-on Universe-Europe; 4. Life on Earth in the atmosphere of the Sun; 5. A model of teaching astronomy to pre-service teachers; 6. How to teach, learn about, and enjoy astronomy; 7. Clickers: a new teaching tool of exceptional promise; 8. Educational opportunities in pro-am collaboration; 9. Teaching history of astronomy to second-year engineering students; 10. Teaching the evolution of stellar and Milky Way concepts through the ages; 11. Educational efforts of the International Astronomical Union; 12. Astronomy in culture; 13. Light pollution: a tool for astronomy education; 14. Astronomy by distance learning; 15. Edible astronomy demonstrations; 16. Amateur astronomers as public outreach partners; 17. Does the Sun rotate around Earth or Earth rotate around the Sun?; 18. Using sounds and sonifications for astronomy outreach; 19. Teaching astronomy and the crisis in science education; 20. Astronomy for all as part of a general education; Poster abstracts; Part II. Connecting Astronomy with the Public: Introduction; 21. A status report from the Division XII working group; 22. Outreach using media; 23. Astronomy podcasting; 24. IAU's communication strategy, hands-on science communication, and the communication of the planet definition discussion; 25. Getting a word in edgeways: the survival of discourse in audiovisual astronomy; 26. Critical evaluation of the new Hall of Astronomy; 27. Revitalizing astronomy teaching through research on student understanding; Poster abstracts; Part III. Effective Use of Instruction and Information Technology: Introduction; 28. ESO's astronomy education program; 29. U.S. student astronomy research and remote observing projects; 30. Global network of autonomous observatories dedicated to student research; 31. Remote telescopes in education: report of an Australian study; 32. Visualizing

  20. The UCI COSMOS Astronomy and Astrophysics Cluster: A Summer Program for Talented High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, T. A.

    2013-04-01

    COSMOS is a month-long, summer residential program in science and engineering for high school students held each year at four University of California (UC) campuses. Its goals are to expand the scientific horizons of our most talented students by exposing them to exciting fields of research and encouraging them to pursue STEM careers. Students live on campus and choose to study one of seven or eight different subject areas called “clusters.” We run the extremely successful Astronomy & Astrophysics Cluster at UC Irvine (UCI). Over four weeks, students take lecture courses in astrophysics, perform computer lab experiments, and complete a research project conducted in a small group under the supervision of a faculty member or teaching assistant (TA). Here we discuss our curriculum, lessons learned, and quantify student outcomes. We find that putting on a summer program for high school students is highly rewarding for the students as well as the faculty and graduate students.

  1. Astronomy Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubin, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    Various microcomputer-generated astronomy graphs are presented, including those of constellations and planetary motions. Graphs were produced on a computer-driver plotter and then reproduced for class use. Copies of the programs that produced the graphs are available from the author. (Author/JN)

  2. REPORT OF THE NAEB STUDY ON THE PROPOSED EXPANSION OF THE MIDWEST PROGRAM ON AIRBORNE TELEVISION INSTRUCTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRONSON, VERNON; AND OTHERS

    A TECHNICAL REPORT WAS PREPARED COVERING THE IMPACT OF AIRBORNE TELEVISION TRANSMISSION ON LAND-BASED UHF TELEVISION ASSIGNMENT PLANS. THE REPORT RELATED TO THE PROPOSED EXPANSION PLANS OF THE MIDWEST PROGRAM ON AIRBORNE TELEVISION INSTRUCTION (MPATI). EARLIER STUDIES BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS (NAEB) HAD LED TO THE…

  3. Airborne gravimetry data sparse reconstruction via L1-norm convex quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Peng; Wu, Mei-Ping; Tang, Gang

    2015-06-01

    In practice, airborne gravimetry is a sub-Nyquist sampling method because of the restrictions imposed by national boundaries, financial cost, and database size. In this study, we analyze the sparsity of airborne gravimetry data by using the discrete Fourier transform and propose a reconstruction method based on the theory of compressed sensing for large-scale gravity anomaly data. Consequently, the reconstruction of the gravity anomaly data is transformed to a L1-norm convex quadratic programming problem. We combine the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm (PCG) and the improved interior-point method (IPM) to solve the convex quadratic programming problem. Furthermore, a flight test was carried out with the homegrown strapdown airborne gravimeter SGA-WZ. Subsequently, we reconstructed the gravity anomaly data of the flight test, and then, we compared the proposed method with the linear interpolation method, which is commonly used in airborne gravimetry. The test results show that the PCG-IPM algorithm can be used to reconstruct large-scale gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and more effectiveness than the linear interpolation method.

  4. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy: Involvement, Outcomes and Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of dark skies is a growing global concern, yet it is one of the easiest environmental problems people can address on local levels. For this reason, the goal of the IYA Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs. These programs provide resources on light pollution for new technologies like a presence in Second Life and podcasts, for local thematic events at national parks and observatory open houses, for international thematic events like International Dark Skies Week and Earth Hour, for a program in the arts like an international photo contest, for global citizen-science programs that measure night sky brightness worldwide, and for educational materials like a kit with a light shielding demonstration. These programs have been successfully used around the world during IYA to raise awareness of the effects of light pollution on public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy. The presentation will provide an update, take a look ahead at the project's sustainability, and describe how people can be involved in the future. Information about the programs is at www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  5. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  6. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  7. Design of a Teacher Professional Development Program for International Collaborative Astronomy Research in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Seguel, J.; Sparks, R.; Opazo, L.; Walker, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    We have designed (but not yet implemented) a program where five US teachers will team with five Chilean teachers to conduct high-quality astronomical research in Chile that can be brought back to their classrooms and shared with their students. This project will introduce US teachers to four research projects at the Observatorio Cruz del Sur, one the largest municipal observatories in South America. The program would operate over the course of a year or more, with a month of observing and conducting research in Chile. The observatory is located in the small town of Combarbalá (Limari Province, IV Región de Coquimbo) in a region rich in archeological, historical, and cultural heritage. Teachers will use high-sensitivity digital detectors to take data through telescopes and with cameras as part of four research projects- light pollution research, digital photography of dark large areas of the sky using wide angle cameras, asteroid photometry, and exoplanet photometric studies. The project partners the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (Tucson, Arizona and La Serena, Chile), the Municipality of the town of Combarbalá, the National Observatory of Chile/University of Chile, and REUNA, an internet communication alliance that serves Chilean universities and observatories. Since the US teachers will have their astronomy classes running while they are in Chile, the teachers will be communicating with their classes on a regular basis. The teachers will also be providing long-term access to southern sky data for other teachers and students in the US while establishing the basis for long-term collaborative research. We expect the program to establish long-term international research collaborations among US and Chilean teachers and students.

  8. Overview of the University of Washington's Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Daryl; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2015-01-01

    The fraction of science PhDs awarded to women, African American, Latino, and other minority students is currently far smaller than the fraction of the general population that these groups constitute (NSF 06-320, NSF 04-317). The future of Physics and Astronomy in the United States depends on recruiting and retaining these students in STEM majors and careers (Norman et al., 2009). The greatest obstacles for persistence in science reported by students are loss of interest, intimidation, poor advising, and lack of acceptance (Seymour & Hewitt, 1997). In 2005, a group of University of Washington graduate students created the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) to connect incoming undergraduate students to authentic research experiences as a means of recruiting and retaining them in STEM. Pre-MAP was one of only 13 initiatives supported by the President's Diversity Appraisal Implementation Fund and has proved to be one of its greatest success stories. At its core is a 10-week seminar in which undergraduates learn astronomical research techniques (e.g., computing, data analysis, documentation, statistics, and literature review) and apply them to projects conducted in small groups, under the supervision of faculty and postdocs. Now in its tenth year, Pre-MAP has engaged more than 100 undergraduates — its ongoing success has made it a model for similar programs at UW and other universities.I will outline the beginnings, funding streams, and structure of this long-running diversity program. The Pre-MAP sessions that follow will highlight our best practices and lessons learned, and feature first-hand accounts from several of our fantastic Pre-MAP alumni.

  9. The National Astronomy Consortium: Lessons learned from a program to support underrepresented students in pursuing STEM careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Brisbin, Drew; Boyd, Patricia T.; Benjamin, Robert A.; NAC Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. Students are also given an opportunity to apply for a second year in this program, often at a different site. In addition to providing research and professional experience, the NAC also seeks to strengthen ties between the majority and minority-serving institutions in order to better serve these students throughout their careers. I will report on lessons learned from the second year of hosting a cohort at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. I will discuss the program structure during and after the summer, mentoring challenges, and ways that these challenges were addressed, including organizing a series of guest speakers and connecting students with a broader community of remote mentors.

  10. Users guide for an Airborne Windshear Doppler Radar Simulation (AWDRS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.

    1990-01-01

    A description is provided of the Airborne Windshear Doppler Radar Simulation (AWDRS) program developed for NASA-Langley by the Research Triangle Institute. The radar simulation program is a comprehensive calculation of the signal characteristics and expected outputs of an airborne coherent pulsed Doppler radar system viewing a low level microburst along or near the approach path of the aircraft. The detailed nature of the simulation permits the quick evaluation of proposed trade-offs in radar system parameters and the evaluation of the performance of proposed configurations in various microburst/clutter environments. The simulation also provides a test bed for various proposed signal processing techniques for minimizing the effects of noise, phase jitter, and ground clutter and maximizing the useful information derived for avoidance of microburst windshear by aircraft.

  11. An interactive lake survey program. [airborne multispectral sensor image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development and operation of the interactive lake survey program developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Environmental Protection Agency. The program makes it possible to locate, isolate, and store any number of water bodies on the basis of a given digital image. The stored information may be used to generate statistical analyses of each body of water including the lake surface area and the shoreline perimeter. The hardware includes a 360/65 host computer, a Ramtek G100B display controller, and a trackball cursor. The system is illustrated by the LAKELOC operation as it would be applied to a Landsat scene, noting the FARINA and STATUS programs. The water detection algorithm, which increases the accuracy with which water and land data may be separated, is discussed.

  12. The Educational Function of an Astronomy Research Experience for Undergraduates Program as Described by Female Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    The long-running REU-program is tacitly intended to increase retention and provide "an important educational experience" for undergraduates, particularly women, minorities and underrepresented groups. This longitudinal, two-stage study was designed to explore the ways in which the REU acted as an educational experience for 51 women in the field of astronomy. Stage-1 consisted of an ex post facto analysis of data collected over 8 years, including multiple interviews with each participant during their REU, annual open-ended alumni surveys, faculty interviews, and extensive field notes. Four themes emerged, related to developing understandings of the nature of professional scientific work, the scientific process, the culture of academia, and an understanding of the "self." Analysis provided an initial theory that was used to design the Stage-2 interview protocol. In Stage-2, over 10 hours of interviews were conducted with 8 participants selected for their potential to disconfirm the initial theory. Results indicate that the REU provided a limited impact in terms of participants’ knowledge of professional astronomy as a largely computer-based endeavor. The REU did not provide a substantive educational experience related to the nature of scientific work, the scientific process, the culture of academia, participants' conceptions about themselves as situated in science, or other aspects of the "self,” were limited. Instead, the data suggests that these women began the REU with pre-existing and remarkably strong conceptions in these areas, and that the REU did not functional to alter those states. These conceptions were frequently associated with other mentors/scientist interactions, from middle school into the undergraduate years. Instructors and family members also served as crucial forces in shaping highly developed, stable science identities. Sustained relationships with mentors were particularly transformational. These findings motivate an ongoing research agenda

  13. SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) with Telescope Configuration Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) with Telescope Configuration Changes Artwork. Concepts: Based on 18 Years of Experience of Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) Operation, Characteristics, Operations and Science

  14. Briefing to University of Porto on NASA Airborne Science Program and Ames UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    NASA Ames is exploring a partnership with the University of Portugal to jointly develop and test new autonomous vehicle technologies. As part of the discussions I will be briefing the University of Portugal faculty on the NASA Airborne Science Program (ASP) and associated activities at NASA Ames Research Center. The presentation will communicate the requirements that drive the program, the assets available to NASA researchers, and discuss research projects that have used unmanned aircraft systems including MIZOPEX, Surprise Valley, and Florida Keys Coral Reef assessment. Other topics will include the SIERRA and Dragon Eye UAV projects operated at Ames.

  15. Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences for Teachers: the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L.; NITARP Team

    2011-12-01

    Since 2004, we have provided authentic astronomy research experiences for teachers using professional astronomical data. (The program used to be called the Spitzer Teacher Program for Teachers and Students, and in 2009 was renamed NITARP--NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program.) We partner small groups of teachers with a mentor astronomer, the team does research, writes up a poster, and presents it at the major annual meeting for professional US astronomers, the American Astronomical Society (winter meeting). The teachers incorporate this research experience into their classroom, and their experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. This program, to the best of our knowledge, is completely unique in the following three ways: (1) Each team does original research using real astronomical data, not canned labs or reproductions of previously done research. (2) Each team writes up the results of their research and presents it at an AAS meeting. Each team also presents the educational results of their experience. (3) The 'products' of the program are primarily the scientific results, as opposed to curriculum packets. The teachers in the program involve students at their school and incorporate the experience into their teaching in a way that works for them, their environment, and their local/state standards. The educators in the program are selected from a nationwide annual application process, and they get three trips, all reasonable expenses paid. First, they attend a winter AAS meeting to get their bearings as attendees of the largest professional astronomy meetings in the world. We sponsor a kickoff workshop specifically for the NITARP educators on the day before the AAS meeting starts. After the meeting, they work remotely with their team to write a proposal, as well as read background literature. In the summer (at a time convenient to all team members), the educators plus up to two students per teacher come

  16. Infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick; Houck, James; Bally, John; Becklin, Eric; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Draine, Bruce; Frogel, Jay; Gatley, Ian; Gehrz, Robert; Hildebrand, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The decade of 1990's presents an opportunity to address fundamental astrophysical issues through observations at IR wavelengths made possible by technological and scientific advances during the last decade. The major elements of recommended program are: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the IR Optimized 8-m Telescope (IRO), a detector and instrumentation program, the SubMilliMeter Mission (SMMM), the 2 Microns All Sky Survey (2MASS), a sound infrastructure, and technology development programs. Also presented are: perspective, science opportunities, technical overview, project recommendations, future directions, and infrastructure.

  17. NASA's Student Airborne Research Program as a model for effective professional development experience in Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, S. L.; Kudela, R. M.; Clinton, N. E.; Atkins, N.; Austerberry, D.; Johnson, M.; McGonigle, J.; McIntosh, K.; O'Shea, J. J.; Shirshikova, Z.; Singer, N.; Snow, A.; Woods, R.; Schaller, E.; Shetter, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    With over half of the current earth and space science workforce expected to retire within the next 15 years, NASA has responded by cultivating young minds through programs such as the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP). SARP is a competitive internship that introduces upper-level undergraduates and early graduate students to Earth System Science research and NASA's Airborne Science Program. The program serves as a model for recruitment of very high caliber students into the scientific workforce. Its uniqueness derives from total vertical integration of hands-on experience at every stage of airborne science: aircraft instrumentation, flight planning, mission participation, field-work, analysis, and reporting of results in a competitive environment. At the conclusion of the program, students presented their work to NASA administrators, faculty, mentors, and the other participants with the incentive of being selected as best talk and earning a trip to the fall AGU meeting to present their work at the NASA booth. We hope lessons learned can inform the decisions of scientists at the highest levels seeking to broaden the appeal of research. In 2011, SARP was divided into three disciplinary themes: Oceanography, Land Use, and Atmospheric Chemistry. Each research group was mentored by an upper-level graduate student who was supervised by an expert faculty member. A coordinator managed the program and was supervised by a senior research scientist/administrator. The program is a model of knowledge transfer among the several levels of research: agency administration to the program coordinator, established scientific experts to the research mentors, and the research mentors to the pre-career student participants. The outcomes from this program include mission planning and institutional knowledge transfer from administrators and expert scientists to the coordinator and research mentors; personnel and project management from the coordinator and expert scientists to the

  18. The Effects of Authentic Science Research on High School Students Engaged in an Independent Astronomy Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, Michael; Gutierrez, E.; Niedbalec, A.; Sprow, H.; Linahan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Four high school students were engaged in an independent research project searching for young stellar objects in Rho Ophiuchus (L1688). Students used the Spitzer Heritage Archive to obtain data under the guidance of their science teacher. The goal of this research project was to expose students to authentic scientific research, something that can rarely be recreated in the classroom. Compared to the linear path of the science classroom, this project allowed students to develop critical thinking skills which resulted in a deeper understanding of astronomy. Additionally, this project allowed for the spread of scientific research by making posters and giving scientific presentations. This program also exposed students to possible careers and future learning in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. This work was based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, obtained from the NASA/ IPAC Infrared Science Archive, both of which are operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. The educational function of an astronomy REU program as described by participating women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Stephanie Jean

    The long-running REU-program is tacitly intended to increase retention and provide "an important educational experience" for undergraduates, particularly women, minorities and underrepresented groups. This longitudinal, two-stage study was designed to explore the ways in which REUs acted as educational experiences for 51 women in the field of astronomy, in an attempt to develop a theory of experience related to the REU. Stage-1 consisted of an ex post facto analysis of data collected over 8 years, including multiple interviews with each participant during their REU, annual open-ended alumni surveys, faculty interviews, and extensive field notes. All data were analyzed using a theoretical framework of continuity and interaction, in a search for transformative experiences. Four findings emerged, related to developing understandings of the nature of professional scientific work, the scientific process, the culture of academia, and an understanding of the "self." Analysis provided an initial theory that was used to design the Stage-2 interview protocol. In Stage-2, over 10 hours of interviews were conducted with 8 participants selected for their potential to disconfirm the initial theory. Results indicate that the REU provided a limited impact in terms of participants' knowledge of professional astronomy as a largely computer-based endeavor. The REU did not provide a substantive educational experience related to the nature of scientific work, the scientific process, the culture of academia, participants' conceptions about themselves as situated in science, or other aspects of the "self". Instead, the data suggests that these women began the REU with pre-existing and remarkably strong conceptions in these areas, and that the REU did not function to alter those states. These conceptions were frequently associated with other mentors/scientist interactions, from middle school into the undergraduate years. Instructors and family members also served as crucial forces in

  20. Development Programs and Activities for Southeast Asia Regional Office of Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insiri, Wichan

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, since the establishment of SEA-ROAD in 2012, the office has seen an exponential progress as it has proved to be one of the prominent regional hubs for IAU-OAD. Recent activities over the past years ranging from Winter and Summer Schools Trainings to Astronomy Technology Transfer Camp for high school students to Internship at NARIT are some examples of what promises to be a good sign of progressive leap in astronomy for the entire region. SEA-ROAD will continue to make an impact on astronomy education, popularization and public outreach as the office is vital and imperative to the capacity building of astronomy of the entire region.

  1. First German Astronomy Ambassadors Fly On SOFIA

    NASA Video Gallery

    Two German educators, Wolfgang Vieser and Jörg Trebs, were the first to represent their country as SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors. They flew aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared...

  2. The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP): What Makes a Great First Research Project?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Breanna A.; Schwieterman, Edward; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2016-01-01

    The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington has been providing incoming students with the opportunity to work on research projects in astronomy and astrobiology almost as soon as they step on campus. These projects, which are developed by graduate students, post-docs, and faculty members, must be accessible to students with limited formal education in astronomy and physics and only ~5 weeks of instruction in computer programming. Projects must be simple enough to be completed within ~6 weeks, but challenging enough to yield interesting outcomes that will encourage students to continue working on research even after the first quarter seminar is over. In this talk, I will identify the challenges and goals associated with designing a 6-week, introductory research project for new undergraduates. I will then discuss some of the most successful outcomes of recent Pre-MAP projects, which have included publications, presentations by Pre-MAP students at conferences, press releases, and observing proposals.

  3. Astronomy in the City for Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa Maria; García, Beatriz

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy is part of our culture. Astronomy cannot be isolated in a classroom, it has to be integrated in the normal life of teachers and students. “Astronomy in the city” is an important part of NASE (Network for Astronomy School Education). In each NASE course we introduce a “working group session” chaired by a local expert in cultural astronomy. The chair introduces several examples of astronomy in their city and after that, the participants have the opportunity to discuss and mention several similar examples. After this session all participants visit one or two sites proposed and introduced by the chair.After more than 5 years using this method we visited and discovered several examples of astronomy in the city:• Astronomy in ancient typical cloths• Archeological temples oriented according the Sun rise or set.• Petroglyphs with astronomical meaning.• Astronomy in monuments.• Sundials.• Oriented Colonial churches• Astronomy in SouvenirsIn any case, teachers and students discover that Astronomy is part of their everyday life. They can take into account the Sun's path when they park their car or when they take a bus "what is the best part in order to be seat in the shadow during the journey?" The result is motivation to go with “open eyes” when they are in the street and they try to get more and more information about their surroundings.The most significant characteristic of NASE is that the ”Local NASE Working Group” (LWG) in each country continues with astronomy activities using our materials and new materials created by them. These LWG are integrated by 6 to 8 teachers and professors that participated actively in NASE courses. They maintains alive the program and increases the number of students which can learn through our didactical proposal. There are more than 25 LWG that teach and organize activities on astronomy (education and/or communication) in about 20 countries.In summary, one of the main activities is to introduce local

  4. The Origin of the UCSD X-ray Astronomy Program - A Personal Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    I was a graduate student in the late 1950’s at the University of Minnesota in the Cosmic Ray Group under Prof. John R. Winckler. He had a project monitoring Cosmic ray time variations from an extensive series of balloon flights using simple detectors during the International Geophysical Year 1957-58. During the 20 March 1958 flight, a short 18 sec. burst of high energy radiation was observed simultaneously with a class II Solar flare. From the ratio of the Geiger counter rate to the energy loss in the ionization chamber, it was determined this radiation was likely hard X-rays or low-energy gamma rays and not energetic particles. Further analysis using information from other concurrent observations indicated the X-rays were likely due to Bremsstrahlung from energetic electrons accelerated in the solar flare magnetic field; these same electrons produced radio emissions. This first detection of extra-terrestrial X- or gamma rays showed the importance of non-thermal processes in Astrophysical phenomena. Winckler and I were interested by the possibility of non-solar hard X-rays. While completing my thesis on a Cosmic ray topic, I initiated a balloon program to develop more sensitive collimated low-background scintillation counters. This led to a proposal to the newly formed NASA to place an exploratory instrument on the 1st Orbiting Solar Observatory launched 7 March 1962. In August that year, I assumed a tenure-track position at UCSD; the data analysis of OSO-1 and the balloon program were transferred to UCSD to initiate the X-ray Astronomy program. The discovery of Cosmic X-ray sources in the 1-10 Kev range on a rocket flight in June 1962 by Giacconi and colleagues gave impetus to the UCSD activities. It seemed evident cosmic X-ray sources could be detected above 20 Kev using high-flying balloons. Early results included measurements of the 50 million K gas in SCO X-1, and the X-ray continuum from the Crab Nebula characterized by a power-law dN/dE ~ E-2.2. The

  5. Journey of Ethiopia Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belay Tessema, Solomon

    2015-08-01

    Ancient astronomy had contributed away for the modern development of astronomy. The history of astronomy development in Ethiopian was liked with different beliefs and culture of the society. The Ethiopians were the first who invented the science of stars, and gave names to the planets, not at random and without meaning, but descriptive of the qualities which they conceived them to possess; and it was from them that this art passed, still in an imperfect state, to the Egyptians. Even though, Ethiopian’s contributions for astronomy in the world were immense but the journey of modern astronomy is still in the infant stage. The modern astronomy and space program in Ethiopia was started in 2004 in well organized form from three individuals to the public. In the past eleven years of journey of astronomy development in Ethiopia was the most challenging from national to international level. After strong struggle of a few committed individuals for the past eleven years the development of astronomy is completely changed from dark age to bright age. This paper will try to address the details of journey of astronomy in Ethiopia.

  6. The IDL astronomy user's library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    IDL (Interactive Data Language) is a commercial programming, plotting, and image display language, which is widely used in astronomy. The IDL Astronomy User's Library is a central repository of over 400 astronomy-related IDL procedures accessible via anonymous FTP. The author will overview the use of IDL within the astronomical community and discuss recent enhancements at the IDL astronomy library. These enhancements include a fairly complete I/O package for FITS images and tables, an image deconvolution package and an image mosaic package, and access to IDL Open Windows/Motif widgets interface. The IDL Astronomy Library is funded by NASA through the Astrophysics Software and Research Aids Program.

  7. Elementary astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, J.

    2006-08-01

    In developing nations such as Mexico, basic science education has scarcely improved. There are multiple reasons for this problem; they include poor teacher training and curricula that are not challenging for students. I shall suggest ways in which astronomy can be used to improve basic education, it is so attractive that it can be employed to teach how to read and write, learn a second language, mathematics, physics, as well as geography. If third world nations do not teach science in an adequate way, they will be in serious problems when they will try to achieve a better standard of living for their population. I shall also address informal education, it is by this means that most adults learn and keep up to date with subjects that are not their specialty. If we provide good outreach programs in developing nations we can aid adult training; astronomy is ideal since it is particularly multidisciplinary. In particular radio and television programs are useful for popularization since they reach such wide audiences.

  8. A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

  9. Astronomy in Research-Based Science Education (A-RBSE): A Review of a Decade of Professional Development Programs in Support of Teacher and Student Research at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Garmany, C. D.; Walker, C. E.; Croft, S. K.

    2006-12-01

    We will review the evolution of the Research Based Science Education (RBSE) and Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science (TLRBSE) programs at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory over the last eleven years. The program has evolved from an NSF-funded program in teacher enhancement to an observatory-supported core education initiative. The present manifestation of our program is an umbrella of programs designed to aid teachers in doing research with astronomical data archives, small telescopes, large research-grade telescopes, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The professional development program has addressed basic questions on the nature of research, best techniques to bring it into the classroom, the value of authentic research, and the mix of on-line versus in- person professional development. The current program is used to test new models of teacher professional development that for outreach programs for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope program, the Thirty-Meter Telescope program, and the National Virtual Observatory program. We will describe a variety of lessons learned (and relearned) and try to describe best practices in promoting teacher and student research. The TLRBSE Program has been funded by the National Science Foundation under ESI 0101982, funded through the AURA/NSF Cooperative Agreement AST-9613615. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  10. The NASA/NSERC Student Airborne Research Program Land Focus Group - a Paid Training Program in Multi-Disciplinary STEM Research for Terrestrial Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefauver, S. C.; Ustin, S.; Davey, S. W.; Furey, B. J.; Gartner, A.; Kurzweil, D.; Siebach, K. L.; Slawsky, L.; Snyder, E.; Trammell, J.; Young, J.; Schaller, E.; Shetter, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Suborbital Education and Research Center (NSERC) is a unique six week multidisciplinary paid training program which directly integrates students into the forefront of airborne remote sensing science. Students were briefly trained with one week of lectures and laboratory exercises and then immediately incorporated into ongoing research projects which benefit from access to the DC-8 airborne platform and the MODIS-ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) sensor. Students were split into three major topical categories of Land, Ocean, and Air for the data collection and project portions of the program. This poster details the techniques and structure used for the student integration into ongoing research, professional development, hypothesis building and results as developed by the professor and mentor of the Land focus group. Upon assignment to the Land group, students were issued official research field protocols and split into four field specialty groups with additional specialty reading assignments. In the field each group spent more time in their respective specialty, but also participated in all field techniques through pairings with UC Davis research team members using midday rotations. After the field campaign, each specialty group then gave summary presentations on the techniques, preliminary results, and significance to overall group objectives of their specialty. Then students were required to submit project proposals within the bounds of Land airborne remote sensing science and encouraging, but not requiring the use of the field campaign data. These proposals are then reviewed by the professor and mentor and students are met with one by one to discuss the skills of each student and objectives of the proposed research project. The students then work under the supervision of the mentor and benefit again from professor feedback in a formal

  11. Astronomy Olympiad: An Initiative To Promote Astronomy Education In Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Suresh

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents National Astronomy Olympiad Program as a new initiative towards the development of astronomy education in Nepal by Nepal Astronomical Society (NASO).Innovoative components of the olympiad programs designed by NASO to engage both scince and non-science backgound people will be discussed in detail. It will discuss the first National Astronomy Olympiad 2014 and Second National Astronomy Olympiad 2015 in details. It will also present crowd funding, its effectiveness to outreach as well as collecting funds from around the world will be presented in brief. Proposed module of astronomy olympiad to promote astronnomy in the countries without formal astronomy education in high school like Nepal,will be presented in dedail. Possible strategry to strengthen such programs in developing nations and role of IAU to promote such educational program will be explored in detail.

  12. Electronic Multi-beam Radio Astronomy Concept: Embrace a Demonstrator for the European SKA Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardenne, A.; Wilkinson, P. N.; Patel, P. D.; Vaate, J. G. Bij

    2004-06-01

    ASTRON has demonstrated the capabilities of a 4 m2, dense phased array antenna (Bij de Vaate et al., 2002) for radio astronomy, as part of the Thousand Element Array project (ThEA). Although it proved the principle, a definitive answer related to the viability of the dense phased array approach for the SKA could not be given, due to the limited collecting area of the array considered. A larger demonstrator has therefore been defined, known as “Electronic Multi-Beam Radio Astronomy Concept”, EMBRACE, which will have an area of 625 m2, operate in the band 0.4 1.550 GHz and have at least two independent and steerable beams. With this collecting area EMBRACE can function as a radio astronomy instrument whose sensitivity is comparable to that of a 25-m diameter dish. The collecting area also represents a significant percentage area (˜10%) of an individual SKA “station.” This paper presents the plans for the realisation of the EMBRACE demonstrator.

  13. Airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-06-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  14. Early Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Hugh

    The earliest investigations that can be called scientific are concerned with the sky: they are the beginnings of astronomy. Many early civilizations produced astronomical texts, and several cultures that left no written records left monuments and artifacts-ranging from rock paintings to Stonehenge-that show a clear interest in astronomy. Civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, India and Greece had highly developed astronomies, and the astronomy of the Mayas was by no means negligible. Greek astronomy, as developed by the medieval Arab philosophers, evolved into the astronomy of Copernicus. This displaced the earth from the central stationary position that almost all earlier astronomies had assumed. Soon thereafter, in the first decades of the seventeenth century, Kepler found the true shape of the planetary orbits and Galileo introduced the telescope for astronomical observations.

  15. Astronomy in Chile Education Ambassadors Program' Gives On-site Experience to Build Knowledge and Enhance Impact: Success of Inaugural Class and Plans for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Charles E.; Spuck, Timothy; ACEAP 2015 Team

    2016-01-01

    A collation of leading U.S. astronomy organizations and observatories selected its first class of educators who traveled to Chile in June/July 2015 as part of the Astronomy in Chile Educator Ambassadors Program (ACEAP). Chosen from a pool of more than 50 applicants, this inaugural group of nine amateur astronomers, planetarium personnel, and astronomy educators toured the major U.S.-funded astronomy facilities in Chile. While there, each ACEAP Ambassador received an in-depth, behind-the-scenes learning experience on the instruments, science, and research coming out of some of the world's most productive and advanced astronomy observatories. In addition, participants learned essential communication skills to help share these exciting experiences with others. Participants also experienced Chilean culture and society, as well as the astrotourism industry that has emerged in Chile.The ultimate goal of this program is to have each ambassador share their experiences as broadly as possible with students and the public across the United States.A first report of the program's inaugural year will be presented as well as the long-term impacts that have already emerged and are in development.

  16. The Council On Undergraduate Research Division of Physics and Astronomy Distributed REU Program: Outcomes from the First Year of the Pilot Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, John C.; Jackson, Michael; Mateja, John

    2015-01-01

    Virtual collaborations are a feature of modern research groups. As such, the Council on Undergraduate Research Division of Physics and Astronomy developed a distributed REU pilot program. Projects in physics and astronomy spanned theoretical, experimental, and computational areas. Funding for the REU brought students from across the country to work with research groups at partner institutions. Students were selected from institutions with fewer opportunities for research, with a focus on students from smaller universities or community colleges. Faculty and students at the host institutions collaborated virtually during the summer, attending seminars and discussions via web conferencing. Interactions among the students in the six-campus REU cohort took place on-line with the experience culminating in an in-person meeting at Central Washington University that included presentations on the students' work. We present the outcome of the first year of this NSF-funded work, seeking to leverage the collective experience of faculty mentors across a spectrum of physics and astronomy projects. We will review some of the assessment data from the first year of the project, and present the benefits and challenges to such virtual collaborations.

  17. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  18. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-09-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  19. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.; Proctor, A.

    2001-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed, and maintained at the University of Maryland, for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 91 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of the explosion, crater size, magnitude of the planetquake generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Planetary and Satellite Data Calculators: These tools allow the user to easily calculate physical data for all of the planets or satellites simultaneously, making comparison very easy. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  20. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: ANIMATED ORBITS OF PLANETS AND MOONS: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. SOLAR SYSTEM COLLISIONS: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. SCIENTIFIC NOTATION: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. ORBITAL SIMULATIONS: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. ASTRONOMY WORKSHOP BULLETIN BOARD: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  1. Astronomy Landscape in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemaungani, Takalani

    2015-01-01

    The vision for astronomy in Africa is embedded in the African Space Policy of the African Union in early 2014. The vision is about positioning Africa as an emerging hub for astronomy sciences and facilities. Africa recognized the need to take advantage of its natural resource, the geographical advantage of the clear southern skies and pristine sites for astronomy. The Pan African University (PAU) initiative also presents an opportunity as a post-graduate training and research network of university nodes in five regions of Africa and supported by the African Union. The Southern African node based in South Africa concentrates on space sciences which also includes astronomy. The PAU aims to provide the opportunity for advanced graduate training and postgraduate research to high-performing African students. Objectives also include promoting mobility of students and teachers and harmonizing programs and degrees.A number of astronomy initiatives have burgeoned in the Southern African region and these include the Southern Africa Largest Optical Telescope (SALT), HESS (High Energy Stereoscopic System), the SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and the AVN (African Very Long Baseline Interferometer Network). There is a growing appetite for astronomy sciences in Africa. In East Africa, the astronomy community is well organized and is growing - the East African Astronomical society (EAAS) held its successful fourth annual conference since 2010 on 30 June to 04 July 2014 at the University of Rwanda. Centred around the 'Role of Astronomy in Socio-Economic Transformation,' this conference aimed at strengthening capacity building in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science in general, while providing a forum for astronomers from the region to train young and upcoming scientists.

  2. Exoplanet Research at a Southwestern Urban High School: Lessons Learned from the Tucson High Astronomy Club Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Zachary T.; Pompea, Stephen M.; Tucson High Astronomy Research Club

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of introducing talented youth to research astronomy projects related to the study of exoplanets. We present the results of students' development of their identities as scientist, their interest in the STEM field as a career, and their knowledge retention through individual surveys. The design of the student interaction was to have weekly after-school club meetings where basic material would be taught to aid the students addressing the research problems themselves by planning observations, observing, and ultimately reducing the data of observations of their selected exoplanets. The after-school club was composed of 12 students of varying backgrounds attending the urban TucsonMagnet High School. The program is ongoing and began September 2013.

  3. Primary Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  4. Intermediate Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  5. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  6. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  7. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Gulkis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio astronomy operations during the first quarter of 1981 are reported. Results of the use of a low noise maser are presented, as well as updates in DSN support of experiments sanctioned by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel.

  8. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Niell, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the DSN in support of Radio and Radar Astronomy Operations during September through December 1980 are described. Emphasis is on a report of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel: that of VLBI observations of the energetic galactic object SS-433.

  9. The U.S. Program for the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009): Outcomes, Lessons Learned, and Legacy Projects (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbell, D.

    2009-12-01

    The United States conducted an active and wide-ranging program for IYA2009, thanks largely to support from the American Astronomical Society, the National Science Foundation, and NASA. The U.S. effort included leadership of several international “cornerstone” projects, including the Galileoscope telescope kit, the “From Earth to the Universe” image exhibition, Dark-Skies Awareness, and a variety of creative New Media activities, such as a daily podcast (“365 Days of Astronomy”) and a virtual island in Second Life. In addition, U.S. astronomy educators and outreach professionals played major roles in IYA2009 cornerstone projects designed to promote greater gender equity in astronomy (“She is An Astronomer”); to provide the best astronomy resources for formal education (the Galileo Teacher Training Program); and to conduct global weekend-long celebrations of astronomy involving star parties, several live Webcasts, and special events (“100 Hours of Astronomy” and “Galilean Nights”). NASA led special projects to provide large astronomy images to science centers across the nation, and sent comprehensive exhibits on the major themes of modern astronomy to dozens of libraries in small and medium-sized cities, based on competitive proposals for community impact (“Visions of the Universe”). Underpinning all of these efforts was a variety of methods for informing and engaging the large community of U.S. amateur astronomers, and active communication with our colleagues in Canada, Puerto Rico and Mexico. This talk will review the outcomes and major success stories from the year, discuss several lessons learned that could be useful for pending efforts such as the 2011 International Year of Chemistry, and provide a look ahead for IYA2009 projects and resources that are expected to continue to be active in 2010 and beyond.

  10. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) science rationale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Jacqueline A.; Erickson, Edwin F.

    1989-01-01

    SOFIA, a proposed 3-meter class telescope in a Boeing 747 aircraft, would have the ability to make astronomical observations over a wavelength range from 0.3 microns to 1.6mm. Relative to the KAO (Kuiper Airborne Observatory) the larger telescope on SOFIA would provide a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity for compact sources and a factor of 3 improvement in (diffraction-limited) angular resolution at wavelengths beyond 30 microns. In addition, SOFIA will retain the major features of the KAO which have made the airborne astronomy program so successful. Among these are continuous in-flight access to focal plane instruments while flying at or above 41,000 ft altitude; pointing stability of 0.2 arcseconds; and mobility and scheduling flexibility to accommodate targets of opportunity such as comets, eclipses, occultations, and novae.

  11. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Gehrz, R. D.; Roellig, T. L.

    2012-10-01

    The joint U.S. and German Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a program to develop and operate a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747SP, has obtained first science with the FORCAST camera in the 5 to 40 micron spectral region and the GREAT heterodyne spectrometer in the 130 to 240 micron spectral region. We briefly review the characteristics and status of the observatory. Spectacular science results on regions of star formation will be discussed. The FORCAST images show several discoveries and the potential for determining how massive stars form in our Galaxy. The GREAT heterodyne spectrometer has made mapping observations of the [C II] line at 158 microns, high J CO lines, and other molecular lines including SH. The HIPO high speed photometer and the high speed camera FDC were used to observe the 2011 June 23 UT stellar occultation by Pluto.

  12. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harlan J.

    1991-01-01

    Lunar-based astronomy offers major prospects for solar system research in the coming century. In addition to active advocacy of both ground-based and Lunar-based astronomy, a workshop on the value of asteroids as a resource for man is being organized. The following subject areas are also covered: (1) astrophysics from the Moon (composition and structure of planetary atmospheres); (2) a decade of cost-reduction in Very Large Telescopes (the SST as prototype of special-purpose telescopes); and (3) a plan for development of lunar astronomy.

  13. Reports of planetary astronomy, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A collection is presented of summaries designed to provide information about scientific research projects conducted in the Planetary Astronomy Program in 1990 and 1991, and to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned scientists and interested persons in universities, government, and industry. Highlights of recent accomplishments in planetary astronomy are included.

  14. The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program at the University of Washington: Increasing Diversity Through Research Experiences and Mentoring Since 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students in the astronomy department at the University of Washington began the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) after recognizing that underrepresented students in STEM fields are not well retained after their transition from high school. Pre-MAP is a research and mentoring program that begins with a keystone seminar. First year students enroll in the Pre-MAP seminar to learn astronomical research techniques that they apply to research projects conducted in small groups. Students also receive one-on-one mentoring and peer support for the duration of the academic year and beyond. They are incorporated early into the department by attending Astronomy Department events and Pre-MAP field trips. Successful Pre-MAP students have declared astronomy and physics majors, expanded their research projects beyond the fall quarter, presented posters at the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium, and received research fellowships and summer internships. In this talk, we will discuss how we identified the issues that Pre-MAP was designed to address, what we've learned after six years of Pre-MAP, and share statistical results from a long-term quantitative comparison evaluation.

  15. Discovering astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of basic astronomical knowledge is presented with attention to the structure and dynamics of the stars and planets. Also dealt with are techniques of astronomical measurement, e.g., stellar spectrometry, radio astronomy, star catalogs, etc. Basic physical principles as they pertain to astronomy are reviewed, including the nature of light, gravitation, and electromagnetism. Finally, stellar evolution and cosmology are discussed with reference to the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe.

  16. Astronomy Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, A.; Madsen, C.

    2003-07-01

    Astronomers communicate all the time, with colleagues of course, but also with managers and administrators, with decision makers and takers, with social representatives, with the news media, and with the society at large. Education is naturally part of the process. Astronomy communication must take into account several specificities: the astronomy community is rather compact and well organized world-wide; astronomy has penetrated the general public remarkably well with an extensive network of associations and organizations of aficionados all over the world. Also, as a result of the huge amount of data accumulated and by necessity for their extensive international collaborations, astronomers have pioneered the development of distributed resources, electronic communications and networks coupled to advanced methodologies and technologies, often much before they become of common world-wide usage. This book is filling up a gap in the astronomy-related literature by providing a set of chapters not only of direct interest to astronomy communication, but also well beyond it. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy nor in communication techniques while providing specific detailed information, as well as plenty of pointers and bibliographic elements. This book will be very useful for researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as for students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1345-0

  17. Rescuing Middle School Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.; Janney, D.

    2010-12-01

    There is a crisis in education at the middle school level (Spellings, 2006). Recent studies point to large disparities in middle school performance in schools with high minority populations. The largest disparities exist in areas of math and science. Astronomy has a universal appeal for K-12 students but is rarely taught at the middle school level. When it is taught at all it is usually taught in isolation with few references in other classes such as other sciences (e.g. physics, biology, and chemistry), math, history, geography, music, art, or English. The problem is greatest in our most challenged school districts. With scores in reading and math below national averages in these schools and with most state achievement tests ignoring subjects like astronomy, there is little room in the school day to teach about the world outside our atmosphere. Add to this the exceedingly minimal training and education in astronomy that most middle school teachers have and it is a rare school that includes any astronomy teaching at all. In this presentation, we show how to develop and offer an astronomy education training program for middle school teachers encompassing a wide range of educational disciplines that are frequently taught at the middle school level. The prototype for this program was developed and launched in two of the most challenged and diverse school systems in the country; D.C. Public Schools, and Montgomery County (MD) Public Schools.

  18. Creating Virtual Labs To Teach Middle School Astronomy Principles: The NASA Connect Education Program Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Al; Halpin, David; Smith, Todd

    This paper presents a case study analyzing the instructional design process and interactive World Wide Web product developed by instructional technology graduate students at Virginia Tech to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) CONNECT distance education program. The NASA CONNECT program is described, and the various…

  19. American Minorities in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Jill S.; Hafer, Abigail A.

    1995-01-01

    A collection of articles that address the question of why minorities are still underrepresented in science after years of civil rights legislation and affirmative action. A variety of programs aimed at increasing minorities and women in the field of astronomy and other sciences are discussed. Personal accounts are also provided. (LZ)

  20. Promoting Inclusivity in STEM through Active Recruiting and Mentoring: The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Binder, Breanna A.; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2016-01-01

    The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) is a research and mentoring program for entering undergraduate students offered by the University of Washington Astronomy Department since 2005. The primary goal of Pre-MAP is to recruit and retain students from groups traditionally underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through early exposure to guided research projects. The Pre-MAP seminar is the core component of the program and offers instruction in computing skills, data manipulation, science writing, statistical analysis, and scientific speaking and presentation skills. Students choose research projects proposed by faculty, post-docs and graduate students in areas related to astrophysics, planetary science, and astrobiology. Pre-MAP has been successful in retaining underrepresented students in STEM fields relative to the broader UW population, and we've found these students are more likely to graduate and excel academically than their peers. As of fall 2015, more than one hundred students have taken the Pre-MAP seminar, and both internal and external evaluations have shown that all groups of participating students report an increased interest in astronomy and science careers at the end of the seminar. This talk will provide an overview of the program and the structure of the core seminar. In particular, the talk will focus on additions and revisions to the seminar course over the last few years, such as the introduction of a public speaking coach, career and internship modules, and the formalization of external lab tours.

  1. GLOBE at Night: a Dark Skies Awareness Citizen-Science Program for the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2009-01-01

    The loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource is a growing concern. It impacts not only astronomical research, but also health, ecology, safety, economics and energy conservation. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a theme of the US International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved in a variety of dark skies-related programs. As one means to reach this goal, the presentation will introduce participants to the star-hunting program, GLOBE at Night. Over the last 3 years, GLOBE at Night has successfully run two-week campaigns every spring, during which a total of 20,000 observations have been submitted from 100 countries. For IYA 2009, GLOBE at Night will take place March 16-28. During the campaign period, the GLOBE at Night program has students and the general public, as citizen-scientists, take data on light pollution levels by comparing observations with stellar maps of limiting magnitudes toward the constellation, Orion. For more precise measurements, citizen-scientists can use digital sky brightness meters. Measurements are submitted on-line from around the globe and within a few weeks a world map showing results is available. Measurements can then be compared with data from previous years, Earth at Night satellite data and population density data. Information will be available on how to participate in GLOBE at Night, as well as on how to jump-start GLOBE at Night locally through the use of well-developed instructional materials and kits, should participants decide to become GLOBE at Night community leaders. Visit http://www.globe.gov/GaN/ for more details.

  2. Our Attempts in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanichai, Yupa

    During the last decade of twentieth century astronomical articles in Thai scientific magazines were out of date. Interacting galaxies blackholes and other celestial objects beyond solar system were hardly found. While a pocket book for deep space was purposefully written by a lecturer a website of astronomy for Thais was planned by the cooperation of two computer programmers. An obseravatory with 600-mm reflector was the first attempt by a Thai engineer. The product of the first 150-mm reflector Dosonian made in Thailand is sold in low price. Future optical programs are now being planned to be made by Thais. These people have recently worked together to develope astronomy in Thailand.

  3. Easy PC Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffett-Smith, Peter

    1996-11-01

    Easy PC Astronomy is the perfect book for everyone who wants to make easy and accurate astronomical calculations. The author supplies a simple but powerful script language called AstroScript on a disk, ready to use on any IBM PC-type computer. Equipped with this software, readers can compute complex but interesting astronomical results within minutes: from the time of moonrise or moonset anywhere in the world on any date, to the display of a lunar or solar eclipse on the computer screen--all within a few minutes of opening the book! The Sky Graphics feature of the software displays a detailed image of the sky as seen from any point on earth--at any time in the future or past--showing the constellations, planets, and a host of other features. Readers need no expert knowledge of astronomy, math or programming; the author provides full details of the calculations and formulas, which the reader can absorb or ignore as desired, and a comprehensive glossary of astronomical terms. Easy PC Astronomy is of immediate practical use to beginning and advanced amateur astronomers, students at all levels, science teachers, and research astronomers. Peter Duffett-Smith is at the Cavendish Laboratory of the University of Cambridge and is the author of Astronomy with Your Personal Computer (Cambridge University Press, 1990) and Practical Astronomy with Your Calculator (Cambridge University Press, 1989).

  4. SOFIA Project: SOFIA-Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Ting

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the SOFIA project is shown. The topics include: 1) Aircraft Information; 2) Major Components of SOFIA; 3) Aircraft External View; 4) Airborne Observatory Layout; 5) Telescope Assembly; 6) Uncoated Primary Mirror; 7) Airborne Astronomy; 8) Requirements & Specifications; 9) Technical Challenges; 10) Observatory Operation; and 11) SOFIA Flight Test.

  5. Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences for Teachers: The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.; Squires, G.; Nitarp Team

    2012-08-01

    How many times have you gotten a question from the general public, or read a news story, and concluded that "they just don't understand how real science works?" One really good way to get the word out about how science works is to have more people experience the process of scientific research. Since 2004, the way we have chosen to do this is to provide authentic research experiences for teachers using real data (the program used to be called the Spitzer Teacher Program for Teachers and Students, which in 2009 was rechristened the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, or NITARP). We partner small groups of teachers with a mentor astronomer, they do research as a team, write up a poster, and present it at an American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting. The teachers incorporate this experience into their classroom, and their experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. This program differs from other similar programs in several important ways. First, each team works on an original, unique project. There are no canned labs here! Second, each team presents their results in posters at the AAS, in science sessions (not outreach sessions). The posters are distributed throughout the meeting, in amongst other researchers' work; the participants are not "given a free pass" because they are teachers. Finally, the "product" of this project is the scientific result, not any sort of curriculum packet. The teachers adapt their project to their classroom environment, and we change the way they think about science and scientists.

  6. Minoan Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Mary; Henriksson, Göran

    Of the three great cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean — the Babylonian, Egyptian, and Minoan — we have considerable knowledge of the astronomy of the first two through their documents (see relevant sections of this Handbook). Very little written material, however, has survived from Minoan Crete, but the evidence of other impressive archaeological discoveries implies that the inhabitants were on a par with their neighbors and had made similar advances in astronomy. In lieu of written sources, we have used the methods of archaeoastronomy to recover as much as possible about Minoan astronomy. In short, these are measuring the orientations of walls and their opposite horizons at a representative selection of monuments, analyzing the measurements statistically, and comparing the results with digital reconstruction of the positions of significant celestial bodies for the time when the walls were built.

  7. X-Ray Spectroscopic Laboratory Experiments in Support of the X-Ray Astronomy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    Our program is to perform a series of laboratory investigations designed to resolved significant atomic physics uncertainties that limit the interpretation of cosmic X-ray spectra. Specific goals include a quantitative characterization of Fe L-shell spectra; the development of new techniques to simulate Maxwellian plasmas using an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT); and the measurement of dielectronic recombination rates for photoionized gas. New atomic calculations have also been carried out in parallel with the laboratory investigations.

  8. Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences for Teachers: the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, Luisa M.; Gorjian, V.; Squires, G.; NITARP Team

    2011-01-01

    How many times have you gotten a question from the general public, or read a news story, and concluded that "they just don't understand how real science works"? One really good way to get the word out about how science works is to have more people experience the process of scientific research. The way we have chosen to do this, since 2004, is to provide authentic research experiences for teachers using Spitzer data. (The program used to be called the Spitzer Teacher Program for Teachers and Students, and in 2009 was rechristened NITARP, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program.) We partner small groups of teachers with a mentor astronomer, they do research as a team, write up a poster, and present it at an AAS meeting. The teachers incorporate this experience into their classroom, and their experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing 100s of students per teacher. Four different teams from the 2010 class of NITARP teachers are presenting scientific and educational results at this AAS meeting; please look for them!

  9. Early Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Hugh

    The earliest investigations that we can relate to what is now science are observations of the sky: Astronomy. The earliest written records of every civilization we know of - from China, Egypt, the Tigris-Euphrates and Indus valleys, Central America, the Andes, and so forth - all contain at least some astronomical texts. There are in addition monuments and artifacts that show a clear interest in astronomy, such as Stonehenge and rock paintings, from cultures that left no written records. The interest in celestial phenomena contributed to the development of Babylonian arithmetic and Greek geometry.

  10. The Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE): An Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Instrument Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Global measurement of tropospheric winds is a key measurement for understanding atmospheric dynamics and improving numerical weather prediction. Global wind profiles remain a high priority for the operational weather community and also for a variety of research applications including studies of the global hydrologic cycle and transport studies of aerosols and trace species. In addition to space based winds, a high altitude airborne system flown on UAV or other advanced platforms would be of great interest for studying mesoscale dynamics and hurricanes. The Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE) project was selected in 2005 by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office as part of the Instrument Incubator Program. TWiLiTE will leverage significant research and development investments in key technologies made in the past several years. The primary focus will be on integrating these sub-systems into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57, so that the nadir viewing lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. TWiLiTE is a collaboration involving scientists and technologists from NASA Goddard, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab and industry partners Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. NASA Goddard and it's partners have been at the forefront in the development of key lidar technologies (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a fixture spaceborne tropospheric wind system. The completed system will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 h to the surface with 250 m vertical

  11. Astronomy Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Astronomy Adventures." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1)…

  12. Lithuanian Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudzius, J.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    Lithuanian folklore, archaic calendars and terminology show that Lithuanians were interested in astronomy from ancient times. A lot of celestial bodies have names of Lithuanian origin that are not related to widely accepted ancient Greek mythology. For example, the Milky Way is named `Pauksciu Takas' (literally the way of birds), the constellation of the Great Bear `Didieji Grizulo Ratai' (literal...

  13. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  14. International Astronomical Search Collaboration: An Online Student-Based Discovery Program in Astronomy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennypacker, C.; Miller, P.

    2009-12-01

    The past 15 years has seen the development of affordable small telescopes, advanced digital cameras, high speed Internet access, and widely-available image analysis software. With these tools it is possible to provide student programs where they make original astronomical discoveries. High school aged students, even younger, have discovered Main Belt asteroids (MBA), near-Earth objects (NEO), comets, supernovae, and Kuiper Belt objects (KBO). Student-based discovery is truly an innovative way to generate enthusiasm for learning science. The International Astronomical Search Collaboration (IASC = “Isaac”) is an online program where high school and college students make original MBA discoveries and important NEO observations. MBA discoveries are reported to the Minor Planet Center (Harvard) and International Astronomical Union. The NEO observations are included as part of the NASA Near-Earth Object Program (JPL). Provided at no cost to participating schools, IASC is centered at Hardin-Simmons University (Abilene, TX). It is a collaboration of the University, Lawrence Hall of Science (University of California, Berkeley), Astronomical Research Institute (ARI; Charleston, IL), Global Hands-On Universe Association (Portugal),and Astrometrica (Austria). Started in Fall 2006, IASC has reached 135 schools in 14 countries. There are 9 campaigns per year, each with 15 schools and lasting 45 days. Students have discovered 150 MBAs and made > 1,000 NEO observations. One notable discovery was 2009 BD81, discovered by two high school teachers and a graduate student at the Bulgarian Academy of Science. This object, about the size of 3 football fields, crosses Earth’s orbit and poses a serious impact risk. Each night with clear skies and no Moon, the ARI Observatory uses its 24" and 32" prime focus telescopes to take images along the ecliptic. Three images are taken of the same field of view (FOV) over a period of 30 minutes. These are bundled together and placed online at

  15. The Relationship between Preservice Science Teachers' Attitude toward Astronomy and Their Understanding of Basic Astronomy Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bektasli, Behzat

    2016-01-01

    Turkish preservice science teachers have been taking a two-credit astronomy class during the last semester of their undergraduate program since 2010. The current study aims to investigate the relationship between preservice science teachers' astronomy misconceptions and their attitudes toward astronomy. Preservice science teachers were given an…

  16. Bringing Students To Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gilbert

    2013-05-01

    The Telescopes In Education (TIE) Program was the pioneer in robotic astronomy. The first users came online in the spring of 1993. The TIE program was dedicated to K-14 students with the hope of inspiring them to develop a greater appreciation for math, science, and engineering through their participation in astronomy. The program was very successful through 2005 when NASA felt there were enough robotic telescopes in the community to support the students into the future. During the 12 years of supported operations, TIE had over one hundred thousand student operations. TIE then started working with Universities in Australia to help move their students towards careers in the sciences and engineering. We discovered that students in the middle schools were the ones that should be focused on, to successfully bring them into the sciences and engineering. We have crafted a system that should be very successful in this endeavor.

  17. Results from a West Tennessee Outreach Program in Physics/Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkal, Cahit

    2004-11-01

    I will report on the results from The Summer Science Institute, an outreach program in physics for 6-9th grade teachers, offered in West Tennessee with funds from Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC). I observed that physics, the most underrepresented discipline in the K-12 curriculum in Tennessee, is also the most sought after experience by teachers. In particular, physics - although included in the curriculum standards is either neglected completely or receives little attention. There has been a consensus, at least amongst some educators, on a new movement that is put forth by the Nobel Laureate Leon Ledermanfootnote[2]``Revolution in Science Education: Put Physics First,'' Leon Lederman, Physics Today, Vol. 55, (November 2002) that physics should be taught before chemistry and biology. Furthermore, many middle school teachers seem to be better trained to teach in the life sciences rather than in the physical sciences. An inquiry based five-day workshop using research based hands-on activities has made numerous teachers aware of the need and the benefits of teaching physics first in the curriculum.

  18. Solar maximum mission: Ground support programs at the Harvard Radio Astronomy Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, A.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the spectral characteristics of solar radio bursts were made with new dynamic spectrum analyzers of high sensitivity and high reliability, over the frequency range 25-580 MHz. The observations also covered the maximum period of the current solar cycle and the period of international cooperative programs designated as the Solar Maximum Year. Radio data on shock waves generated by solar flares were combined with optical data on coronal transients, taken with equipment on the SMM and other satellites, and then incorporated into computer models for the outward passage of fast-mode MHD shocks through the solar corona. The MHD models are non-linear, time-dependent and for the most recent models, quasi-three-dimensional. They examine the global response of the corona for different types of input pulses (thermal, magnetic, etc.) and for different magnetic topologies (for example, open and closed fields). Data on coronal shocks and high-velocity material ejected from solar flares have been interpreted in terms of a model consisting of three main velocity regimes.

  19. A Successful 2 Year Astronomy Program for the Hatch, New Mexico School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K.; Burns, J.

    1994-12-01

    We report on a recently completed two year outreach program to the Hatch, New Mexico middle and elementary school science teachers. Our project was funded in part by a NASA supplemental grant for researchers (CORRECT TITLE?). In August 1992, we organized an intensive 2 day educational workshop with 10 science teachers. During this workshop we mixed hands-on experimentation and demonstrations with lecture sessions on basic astronomical concepts. We provided the teachers with over \\$1000 dollars of educational equipment, including a small telescope. Throughout the following school year, we scheduled night time observing sessions, special lectures and field trips for the teachers' students. The second year we selected 6 of the most motivated teachers and had them participate in a 4 day ``live-in'' astronomical research session at the Apache Point Observatory, near Sunspot, New Mexico. During this session the teachers reduced real astronomical data, ``discovered'' stellar evolution, had tours of both APO and the National Solar Observatory and several lecture sessions on the evolution of stars. The main project of the workshop was construction of H-R diagrams for an open cluster and a globular cluster. The teachers measured magnitudes, calculated colors, constructed the H-R diagrams and compared their diagrams to theoretical cluster diagrams. They were quite surprised to find the significant difference between the two clusters, and happily discovered that the differences could be explained by a difference in age. We then had the teachers develop and write lesson plans appropriate for the grade level they teach. The lesson plans were to deal with the material they had learned during the 4 day workshop and focus on explanation of stellar evolution. We have made these lesson plans available to all science teachers in the southern New Mexico region by depositing them in the NASA Space Grant Consortium's teachers resource center.

  20. Strategic Plans for the Future of Solar Physics: a community discussion of the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program Roadmap and the NAS Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Solar Astronomy section)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, K.; Knoelker, M.

    1999-05-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connections Program is currently revising its Roadmap, the long-range plan for science goals, technology development, and missions between 2000 and 2040. From the interior dynamics of the Sun, to the interactions of plasma, fields, and radiation in the photosphere and solar atmosphere, to the heating and structure of the corona, to the acceleration, structure, and evolution of the solar wind, to the interactions of the heliosphere with the interstellar medium, to the processes of solar, stellar, and solar system evolution - progress in each of these domains will help us understand how the Sun impacts our home in space. The Roadmap Committee is seeking to refine and extend the SEC's vision and identify the milestone missions for the future. During this session, an outline of the current draft Roadmap will be presented, and further community involvement will be solicited to ensure the strongest possible concensus on the revised Roadmap. The National Academy of Sciences' Space Science Board has appointed a committee to perform a Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics, which is surveying the field of space- and ground-based astronomy and astrophysics, recommending priorities for the most important new initiatives of the decade 2000-2010. The prioritization delivered by the earlier Decadal Surveys has played an important role in guiding the funding agencies in setting their priorities for astronomy and astrophysics. Therefore it will be of crucial importance for solar physics to contribute a strong case for its own set of future projects to be incorpoprated into the survey. The solar physics of the next decade will be characterized by its increasing societal relevance in the context of the National Space Weather Program and related issues, as well as its classical importance as a ``base" for many astrophysical questions. The presentation and subsequent discussion at the Chicago meeting is intended to solicit further community input, to achieve

  1. Promoting Diversity in STEM through Active Recruiting and Mentoring: The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Binder, Breanna; Tremmel, Michael; Garofali, Kristen; Agol, Eric; Meadows, Victoria

    2015-11-01

    The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) is a research and mentoring program for underclassmen and transfer students offered by the University of Washington Astronomy Department since 2005. The primary goal of Pre-MAP is to recruit and retain students from groups traditionally underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through early exposure to research. The Pre-MAP seminar is the core component of the program and offers instruction in computing skills, data manipulation, science writing, statistical analysis, and scientific speaking and presentation skills. Students choose research projects proposed by faculty, post-docs and graduate students in areas related to astrophysics, planetary science, and astrobiology. Pre-MAP has been successful in retaining underrepresented students in STEM fields relative to the broader UW population, and we've found these students are more likely to graduate and excel academically than their peers. As of spring 2015, more than one hundred students have taken the Pre-MAP seminar, and both internal and external evaluations have shown that all groups of participating students report an increased interest in astronomy and science careers at the end of the seminar. Several former Pre-MAP students have obtained or are pursuing doctoral and master’s degrees in STEM fields; many more work at NASA centers, teaching colleges, or as engineers or data analysts. Pre- MAP student research has produced dozens of publications in peer-reviewed research journals. This talk will provide an overview of the program: the structure of the seminar, examples of projects completed by students, cohort-building activities outside the seminar, funding sources, recruitment strategies, and the aggregate demographic and achievement data of our students. It is our hope that similar programs may be adopted successfully at other institutions.

  2. A Three-Year Program of Micro- and Nano-System Technology Development for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, Claude R.

    1997-01-01

    For many years the work at MIT aimed at the development of new concepts and technologies for space experiments in high-energy astrophysics, but not explicitly supported by flight programs, has been supported. This work has yielded new devices and techniques for X-ray astronomy, primarily low-noise, deep-depletion charge-coupled devices (CCDS) for spectrally-resolved X-ray imaging, and high-performance transmission gratings for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. Among the most significant recent achievements have been the development by G. Ricker and associates of the X-ray CCD camera flying on ASCA, and currently in development for AXAF and Astro-E, and the development by C. Canizares and associates of thick, 200 nm-period transmission gratings employing the phenomenon of phase shifting for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy up to energies of 8- 1 0 keV that is essential for the operation of the AXAF High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS). Through the current SR&T grant, the latter technology is now being extended successfully to the fabrication of 100 nm-period transmission gratings, which have twice the dispersion of the AXAF gratings. We note that, among other outcomes, the modest investments of past SR&T Grants at MIT resulted in the development of the key technologies for fully one-half of the scientific instrumentation on AXAF. In addition, NASA flight programs that have benefited from previous SR&T support at MIT include the SAS 3 X-ray Observatory, which carried the first rotation modulation collimator, the Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory, the CCD cameras on ASCA and planned for Astro-E, the High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), the Solar EUV Monitor on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the Medium Energy Neutral Atom imager (MENA) on the Image for Magnetopause-to-aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission, and the recently-approved Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS

  3. Grassroots Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.

    Congress has a large impact on the amount and quality of astronomical research that takes place in the United States. By funding NASA and NSF, as well as other agencies such as the Department of Education and the Department of Defense, the Federal Government enables U.S. astronomers to perform cutting edge research. However, Congress makes decisions based on input from citizens. It the citizens are silent on an issue, Congress does not know it exists. Last summer the U.S.amatuer community rallied in support of professional research, resulting in a healthy budget for both NASA and NSF astronomy research. I will present a summary of how the funding process works and how and why amateurs can and should help ensure continued research funding for U.S. astronomy.

  4. Astronomy in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, Patricia

    Since the installation of the Observatorio Cagigal in Caracas, astronomy in Venezuela has developed steadily, and, in the last few decades, has been strong. Both theoretical and observational astronomy now flourish in Venezuela. A research group, Grupo de Astrofísica (GA) at the Universidad de Los Andes (ULA) in Mérida, started with few members but now has increased its numbers and undergone many transformations, promoting the creation of the Grupo de Astrofísica Teórica (CAT), and with other collaborators initiated the creation of a graduate study program (that offers master's and doctor's degrees) in the Postgrado de Física Fundamental of ULA. With the financial support of domestic Science Foundations such as CONICIT, CDCHT, Fundacite, and individual and collective grants, many research projects have been started and many others are planned. Venezuelan astronomy has benefitted from the interest of researchers in other countries, who have helped to improve our scientific output and instrumentation. With the important collaboration of national and foreign institutions, astronomy is becoming one of the strongest disciplines of the next decade in Venezuela.

  5. Relativistic astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimishin, I. A.

    The ideas of special and general relativity are discussed in relation to astronomy, in particular, problems concerning blackholes and models of the universe. Such problems as the redshift in the spectra of galaxies, the nature of quasars, and the possible relationships between the microcosm and the macrocosm are also treated. Special attention is given to problems of topology and the three-dimensionality of the universe.

  6. Astronomy Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Software Bisque's TheSky, SkyPro and Remote Astronomy Software incorporate technology developed for the Hubble Space Telescope. TheSky and SkyPro work together to orchestrate locating, identifying and acquiring images of deep sky objects. With all three systems, the user can directly control computer-driven telescopes and charge coupled device (CCD) cameras through serial ports. Through the systems, astronomers and students can remotely operate a telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory Institute.

  7. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  8. Chaco astronomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín López, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    This presentation discusses the result of 18 years of ethnographic and ethnohistorical studies on Chaco astronomies. The main features of the systems of astronomical knowledge of the Chaco Aboriginal groups will be discussed. In particular we will discuss the relevance of the Milky Way, the role of the visibility of the Pleiades, the ways in which the celestial space is represented, the constitution of astronomical orientations in geographic space, etc. We also address a key feature of their vision of the cosmos: the universe is seen by these groups as a socio-cosmos, where humans and non-humans are related. These are therefore actually socio-cosmologies. We will link this to the theories of Chaco Aboriginal groups about power and political relations.We will discuss how the study of Aboriginal astronomies must be performed along with the studies about astronomies of Creole people and European migrants, as well as anthropological studies about the science teaching in the formal education system and by the mass media. In this form we will discuss the relevance of a very complex system of interethnic relations for the conformation of these astronomical representations and practices.We will also discuss the general methodological implications of this case for the ethnoastronomy studies. In particular we will talk about the advantages of a study of regional scope and about the key importance of put in contact the ethnoastronomy with contemporary issues in social sciences.We also analyze the importance of ethnoastronomy studies in relation to studies of sociology of science, especially astronomy. We also study the potential impact on improving formal and informal science curricula and in shaping effective policies to protect the tangible and intangible astronomical heritage in a context of respect for the rights of Aboriginal groups.

  9. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  10. Communicating Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, P.; Barrosa, Mariana

    2007-08-01

    Science Communication plays a crucial role in education and in the public understanding of science. It shortens the distance between scientific research, the school and the general public. Astronomy has a privileged position in the process of science communication since it embraces different areas of knowledge such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology and biology. It is capable of attracting a vast audience and is a powerful tool for science popularization. Nowadays, science must compete with many other subjects for a place in the media and in the public's attention. This paradigm has raised the standards and demands for science communication and pushed it into professionalism. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) is one of the biggest challenges for astronomy communication. There are two key elements in the communication strategy that are often forgotten: detailed description of objectives and goals and evaluation of the results. They are in opposite poles of the communication strategy, but must both be taken into account from the beginning of any activity. In this paper we will present some guidelines that can be helpful in the initial planning of outreach activities, as well as the evaluation of its results.

  11. Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mampaso, A.; Prieto, M.; Sánchez, F.

    2004-01-01

    What do we understand of the birth and death of stars? What is the nature of the tiny dust grains that permeate our Galaxy and other galaxies? And how likely is the existence of brown dwarfs, extrasolar planets or other sub-stellar mass objects? These are just a few of the questions that can now be addressed in a new era of infrared observations. IR astronomy has been revolutionised over the past few years by the widespread availability of large, very sensitive IR arrays and the success of IR satellites (IRAS in particular). Several IR space missions due for launch over the next few years promise an exciting future too. For these reasons, the IV Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics was dedicated to this burgeoning field. Its primary goal was to introduce graduate students and researchers from other areas to the important new observations and physical ideas that are emerging in this wide-ranging field of research. Lectures from nine leading researchers, renowned for their teaching abilities, are gathered in this volume. These nine chapters provide an excellent introduction as well as a thorough and up-to-date review of developments - essential reading for graduate students entering IR astronomy, and professionals from other areas who realise the importance that IR astronomy may have on their research.

  12. Humanising Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, S.

    2008-06-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that aims to expose underprivileged children (in the age group 4-10) to the inspirational aspects of astronomy. We are currently at the stage of developing materials that will be utilised in a diverse range of environments. This paper explores UNAWE's particular approach to developing tools which includes not only indigenous and folkloric astronomical knowledge, but also the culture of transmission of such knowledge. A specific understanding and explanation of the Universe, the Sun, Moon and stars is present in every culture and can be found contained in its history, legends and belief systems. By consciously embracing different ways of knowing the Universe and not uniquely the rational model, UNAWE places the humanising potential of astronomy at the centre of its purpose. Whilst inspiring curiosity, pride and a sense of ownership in one's own cultural identity, such an approach also exposes children to the diversity of other peoples and their cultures as well as the unifying aspects of our common scientific heritage. The means of creating and delivering the astronomy programme are as relevant to the desired educational outcomes as the content. The challenge in the design of materials is to communicate this stimulating message to the very young. Respect for alternative values systems, the need for dialogue and community participation, and where possible the production of materials using local resources is emphasised. This paper touches recent experiences liaising with communities in India, South Africa, Tunisia, Venezuela and Colombia.

  13. Mars Navigator: An Interactive Multimedia Program about Mars, Aerospace Engineering, Astronomy, and the JPL Mars Missions. [CD-ROM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramoll, Kurt

    This CD-ROM introduces basic astronomy and aerospace engineering by examining the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor missions to Mars. It contains numerous animations and narrations in addition to detailed graphics and text. Six interactive laboratories are included to help understand topics such as the…

  14. NASA's initiative to develop education through astronomy (IDEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Jeffrey O.; Morrow, Cherilynn A.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a progressive program in science education called the Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy (IDEA). IDEA represents a commitment by the Astrophysics Division of NASA Headquarters to pre-collegiate and public learning. The program enlists the full participation of research astronomers in taking advantage of the natural appeal of astronomy and the unique features of space astrophysics missions to generate valuable learning experiences and scientifically accurate and educationally effective products for students, teachers and citizens. One of the premier projects is called Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment (FOSTER) - a program to fly teachers aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory during actual research missions. IDEA is managed by a visiting scientist with extensive educational background (each of the authors have served in this role), and the program is unique within NASA science divisions for having a full time scientist devoted to education. IDEA recognizes that the rapidly shifting social and political landscape has caused a fundamental change in how science is expected to contribute to society. It is in the enlightened self-interest of all research scientists to respond to the challenge of connecting forefront research to basic educational needs. IDEA is exploring the avenues needed to facilitate these connections, including supplementing research grants for educational purposes.

  15. Astronomy Education: Undergraduate Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumford, G. S.

    1996-12-01

    While programs in the 100 or so colleges and universities that offer an undergraduate concentration in astronomy and/or astrophysics appear to be in about their best shape ever, in an era of static financing keep in mind that administrations may shift scarce resources away from majors in our field to prospective humanists and artists, politicians and captains of industry, or social workers and counselors. Some thoughts on how to mitigate this situation will be given.

  16. College Astronomy Teaching Excellence Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.; Bennett, M.; Greene, W. M.; Pompea, S.; Prather, E. E.

    2003-12-01

    As part of the education and public outreach efforts of the NASA JPL Navigator, SIRTF Mission and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, astronomy educators affiliated with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona are conducting a series of two- and three-day teaching excellence workshops for college faculty. These workshops are being held in conjunction with professional society meetings, such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, and through the infrastructure of the National Science Foundation's Summer Chautauqua Workshop program. This three-day, interactive teaching excellence workshop focuses on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses and construct effective course syllabi reflecting the ASTRO 101 goals publicized by the AAS. To improve instruction, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. Texts provided at the workshop are: (i) Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching, Slater and Adams, Prentice Hall, 2002; (ii) Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy, Pompea, Brooks Cole, 2000; and (iii) Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, Adams, Prather, & Slater, Prentice Hall, 2002.

  17. Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, George B.

    1982-01-01

    Following a discussion of scientific opportunities for astronomy (galaxies and the universe, stars, and planets/life/intelligence), four programs recommended by the National Academy of Sciences' Astronomy Survey Committee are described, indicating areas that must be strengthened before undertaking the programs. Ongoing projects are also…

  18. Planetary astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Hartmann, W. K.

    1978-01-01

    Observations and analyses of asteroids, Trojans and cometary nuclei are presented. Spectrophotometry was used to observe the cometary nuclei. The spectra are plotted as a function of semimajor axis and eccentricity. Trojans and other asteroids at great solar distances show a variety of spectra, many of them quite red despite the low measured albedoes for many of these asteroids. The asteroid spectra are grouped according to diameter and taxonomic class.

  19. Planetary astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Visual photometric function data for Saturn's rings were analyzed in terms of elementary anisotropic scattering radiative transfer models which involve the Henyey-Greenstein function. Limits were placed on the combinations of single scattering albedo, and backscattering directivity, which are permitted by observation. Particles with lunar-like scattering properties were excluded by the analysis. Results are consistent with the ring particles being more-or-less pure, and spherical, conglomerates of H2O frost. Multicolor (5500 A-7600 A), narrow band (100 A), area scanning photometry was used to study the wavelength variation in the optical appearance of Uranus. Limb brightening was detected in two CH4 bands, i.e. 6190A and 7300A. Spectrophotometric observations and analysis of the asteroids and Raman spectroscopy of the atmosphere of Uranus are also briefly discussed.

  20. The airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven; Schall, Harold; Shattuck, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the current program status.

  1. Handling Qualities Flight Testing of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Scott T.; Strovers, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne infrared astronomy has a long successful history, albeit relatively unknown outside of the astronomy community. A major problem with ground based infrared astronomy is the absorption and scatter of infrared energy by water in the atmosphere. Observing the universe from above 40,000 ft puts the observation platform above 99% of the water vapor in the atmosphere, thereby addressing this problem at a fraction of the cost of space based systems. The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft is the most ambitious foray into the field of airborne infrared astronomy in history. Using a 747SP (The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) aircraft modified with a 2.5m telescope located in the aft section of the fuselage, the SOFIA endeavors to provide views of the universe never before possible and at a fraction of the cost of space based systems. The modification to the airplane includes moveable doors and aperture that expose the telescope assembly. The telescope assembly is aimed and stabilized using a multitude of on board systems. This modification has the potential to cause aerodynamic anomalies that could induce undesired forces either at the cavity itself or indirectly due to interference with the empennage, both of which could cause handling qualities issues. As a result, an extensive analysis and flight test program was conducted from December 2009 through March 2011. Several methods, including a Lower Order Equivalent Systems analysis and pilot assessment, were used to ascertain the effects of the modification. The SOFIA modification was found to cause no adverse handling qualities effects and the aircraft was cleared for operational use. This paper discusses the history and modification to the aircraft, development of test procedures and analysis, results of testing and analysis, lessons learned for future projects and justification for operational certification.

  2. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-10-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested in large university survey courses, as well as smaller classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. It has also been used in High School and Junior High School science classes. Below are some tools in the Astronomy Workshop. Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Planetary Calculators (New!): Calculate a simple formula, e.g. the escape velocity, simultaneously for all planets and moons in the Solar System. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Build Your Own Solar System (New!): Choose the masses of up to four planets, and their orbital sizes and shapes, and explore the prospects for life in your creation. Astronomical Distances: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  3. Learning Astronomy by Doing Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2006-08-01

    In the modern science curriculum, students should learn science knowledge or "facts"; they should develop science skills, strategies, and habits of mind; they should understand the applications of science to technology, society, and the environment; and they should cultivate appropriate attitudes toward science. While science knowledge may be taught through traditional lecture-and-textbook methods, theories of learning (and extensive experience) show that other aspects of the curriculum are best taught by doing science -- not just hands-on activities, but "minds-on" engagement. That means more than the usual "cookbook" activities in which students use a predetermined procedure to achieve a predetermined result. The activities should be "authentic"; they should mirror the actual scientific process. In this presentation, I will describe several ways to include science processes within astronomy courses at the middle school, high school, and introductory university level. Among other things, I will discuss: topics that reflect cultural diversity and "the nature of science"; strategies for developing science process skills through projects and other practical work; activities based on those developed and carried out by amateur astronomers; topics and activities suitable for technical-level courses (we refer to them as "applied" in my province); projects for astronomy clubs and science fairs; and topics that expose students to astronomy research within lecture courses.

  4. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidouche, M.; Young, E.; Marcum, P.; Krabbe, A.

    2010-12-01

    We present one of the new generations of observatories, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This is an airborne observatory consisting of a 2.7-m telescope mounted on a modified Boeing B747-SP airplane. Flying at an up to 45,000 ft (14 km) altitude, SOFIA will observe above more than 99 percent of the Earth's atmospheric water vapor allowing observations in the normally obscured far-infrared. We outline the observatory capabilities and goals. The first-generation science instruments flying on board SOFIA and their main astronomical goals are also presented.

  5. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, David; Hunten, Donald; Ahearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Black, David; Brown, Robert A.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cochran, Anita L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Depater, Imke

    1991-01-01

    The authors profile the field of astronomy, identify some of the key scientific questions that can be addressed during the decade of the 1990's, and recommend several facilities that are critically important for answering these questions. Scientific opportunities for the 1990' are discussed. Areas discussed include protoplanetary disks, an inventory of the solar system, primitive material in the solar system, the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, planetary rings and ring dynamics, the composition and structure of the atmospheres of giant planets, the volcanoes of IO, and the mineralogy of the Martian surface. Critical technology developments, proposed projects and facilities, and recommendations for research and facilities are discussed.

  6. Astronomy stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenson, Rhoda

    2015-03-01

    For many years I have taught physics and astronomy courses to liberal arts students. I have found most of my students to be intelligent and diligent, but not anxious to study science. They typically take the class only because their degree requires a science course. Many arrive having already decided they will not be able to do the math or understand the scientific concepts, and have essentially built a wall between themselves and science. In the 1990s, in an effort to help break down that wall, as part of an NSF-supported course, "The Evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life," I began using creative writing assignments.

  7. Characterizing Air Masses in the Lower Troposphere (< 2 km) during the 2011 Student Airborne Program (SARP) Mission in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Elder, C.; Kauffman, E. J.; Weathers, E.; Thomas, E.; Johnson, E.; Turrentine, H.; Saad, K.; Nighelli, K.; Burns, M.; Heath, N.; Shetter, R. E.; Schaller, E.; Webster, A.; Buzay, E.; Peterson, J.; Simpson, I. J.; Rowland, F. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    During the NASA Student Airborne Program (SARP) mission, high frequency whole air sampling during a missed-approach to Los Angeles International airport (LAX) provided air mass signatures collected in close proximity to their urban and oceanic sources. Each whole air sample was analyzed for 80 halocarbons, hydrocarbons and organic nitrates. Unlike other airborne missions, high frequency whole air sampling of about 70 samples collected over a 20 minute period (15 second fill per sample) during a 150 km flight path at low altitude (< 2 km) provided a more detailed profile of the Los Angeles air shed than has been previously accomplished. Correlations between CH3I, CHBr3, and MeONO2 (marine tracers) versus C2Cl4 and HCFC-22 (anthropogenic tracers) were used to distinguish between purely marine air and air influenced by emissions from Los Angeles (Figure 1). Of the 80 C1-C10 volatile organic compounds that were measured, 60 were elevated in air from the Los Angeles air shed. These included C1-C10 alkanes, C6-C8 aromatics, C2-C3 alkenes, halons, HCFCs, HFCs, CH3CCl3, chlorinated solvents (e.g., C2Cl4, CHCl3, CH2Cl2), and organic nitrates. Marine species emitted in this region of the Pacific were found to include MeONO2, EtONO2, CH2Br2, CHBr3, CH3I and DMS. Note that the C3 organic nitrates were not enhanced in the marine influenced air, and instead they are attributed to urban photochemistry. Overall, high-frequency and low-altitude whole air sampling during the LAX missed-approach clearly distinguished urban and oceanic sources and allowed a detailed chemical signature for Los Angeles air to be determined.

  8. Computers in Astronomy: Astronomy on an Apple Macintosh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley, John E.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a review of computer programs written for the Apple Macintosh computer that teach astronomy. Reviews general programs, along with some which deal more specifically with sky travel, star charting, the solar system, Halley's Comet, and stargazing. Includes the name and address of each producer. (TW)

  9. Graduate Astronomy Education in the Early Days of Lick Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses Lick Observatory's (University of California) early graduate students and graduate program in astronomy. The history of the Lick Observatory and famous astronomy professors and astronomers associated with the Lick Observatory are also discussed. (DS)

  10. Astronomy in the classroom—Young Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesakkers, K.

    2013-01-01

    This article showcases my astronomy outreach program, drawing on the enthusiasm my Utrecht professors have passed on to me. It shows how I bring children and their teachers in contact with astronomy and scientific thinking.

  11. Aviation System Capacity Program Terminal Area Productivity Project: Ground and Airborne Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giulianetti, Demo J.

    2001-01-01

    Ground and airborne technologies were developed in the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) project for increasing throughput at major airports by safely maintaining good-weather operating capacity during bad weather. Methods were demonstrated for accurately predicting vortices to prevent wake-turbulence encounters and to reduce in-trail separation requirements for aircraft approaching the same runway for landing. Technology was demonstrated that safely enabled independent simultaneous approaches in poor weather conditions to parallel runways spaced less than 3,400 ft apart. Guidance, control, and situation-awareness systems were developed to reduce congestion in airport surface operations resulting from the increased throughput, particularly during night and instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). These systems decreased runway occupancy time by safely and smoothly decelerating the aircraft, increasing taxi speed, and safely steering the aircraft off the runway. Simulations were performed in which optimal trajectories were determined by air traffic control (ATC) and communicated to flight crews by means of Center TRACON Automation System/Flight Management System (CTASFMS) automation to reduce flight delays, increase throughput, and ensure flight safety.

  12. Julia and Python in Astronomy: Better Together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbary, Kyle

    2016-03-01

    Astronomers love Python because it is open source, easy to learn, and has a tremendous ecosystem for scientific computing. The Julia programming language has many of those same characteristics. In this talk, I'll discuss the use of Julia in astronomy and the growing ecosystem of astronomy packages, particularly those managed by the JuliaAstro organization (http://JuliaAstro.github.io). Most importantly, I will highlight some areas ripe for collaboration between Python and Julia developers in astronomy.

  13. Planetary Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1998-01-01

    This 1-year project was an augmentation grant to my NASA Planetary Astronomy grant. With the awarded funding, we accomplished the following tasks: (1) Conducted two NVK imaging runs in conjunction with the ILAW (International Lunar Atmosphere Week) Observing Campaigns in 1995 and 1997. In the first run, we obtained repeated imaging sequences of lunar Na D-line emission to better quantify the temporal variations detected in earlier runs. In the second run we obtained extremely high resolution (R=960.000) Na line profiles using the 4m AAT in Australia. These data are being analyzed under our new 3-year Planetary Astronomy grant. (2) Reduced, analyzed, and published our March 1995 spectroscopic dataset to detect (or set stringent upper limits on) Rb. Cs, Mg. Al. Fe, Ba, Ba. OH, and several other species. These results were reported in a talk at the LPSC and in two papers: (1) A Spectroscopic Survey of Metallic Abundances in the Lunar Atmosphere. and (2) A Search for Magnesium in the Lunar Atmosphere. Both reprints are attached. Wrote up an extensive, invited Reviews of Geophysics review article on advances in the study of the lunar atmosphere. This 70-page article, which is expected to appear in print in 1999, is also attached.

  14. Astronomy on a Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-05-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 3,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

  15. Astronomy on a Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-09-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 15,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

  16. Astronomers Without Borders: A Global Astronomy Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, M.

    2011-10-01

    Astronomers Without Borders (AWB) brings together astronomy enthusiasts of all types - amateur astronomers, educators, professionals and "armchair" astronomers for a variety of online and physicalworld programs. The AWB web site provides social networking and a base for online programs that engage people worldwide in astronomy activities that transcend geopolitical and cultural borders. There is universal interest in astronomy, which has been present in all cultures throughout recorded history. Astronomy is also among the most accessible of sciences with the natural laboratory of the sky being available to people worldwide. There are few other interests for which people widely separated geographically can engage in activities involving the same objects. AWB builds on those advantages to bring people together. AWB also provides a platform where projects can reach a global audience. AWB also provides unique opportunities for multidisciplinary collaboration in EPO programs. Several programs including The World at Night, Global Astronomy Month and others will be described along with lessons learned.

  17. Reports of planetary astronomy - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahe, Jurgen (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication provides information about currently funded scientific research projects conducted in the Planetary Astronomy Program during 1991, and consists of two main sections. The first section gives a summary of research objectives, past accomplishments, and projected future investigations, as submitted by each principal investigator. In the second section, recent scientifically significant accomplishments within the Program are highlighted.

  18. Detector Arrays For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Paper describes status of program for developing integrated infrared detectors for astronomy. Program covers variety of detectors, including extrinsic silicon, extrinsic germanium, and indium antimonide devices with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Paper notes for arrays to reach background noise limit in cryogenic telescope, continued reductions in readout noise and dark current needed.

  19. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2010-08-01

    Bring telescopes to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is a three-year NASA-funded astronomy outreach program at community parks during and after music concerts and outdoor family events—such as a Halloween Stars-Spooky Garden Walk. While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this program targets a completely different audience: music lovers who are attending summer concerts held in community parks. These music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. This program includes solar observing before the concerts, telescope observations including a live image projection system, an astronomical video presentation, and astronomy banners/posters. Approximately 500-16,000 people attended each event and 25% to 50% of the people at each event participated in the astronomy program. This program also reached underrepresented and underserved groups (women, minorities, older adults). The target audience (Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York) is 2,900,000 people, which is larger than combined population of Atlanta, Boston, Denver, Minneapolis, and San Francisco. Although eleven events were planned in 2009, two were canceled due to rain and our largest event, the NY Philharmonic in the Park (attended by 67,000 people in 2008), was cancelled for financial reasons. Our largest event in 2009 was the Tanglewood Music Festival, Lenox MA, attended by 16,000 people where over 5000 people participated in astronomy activities. The Amateur Observers' Society of New York assisted with the NY concerts and the Springfield STARS astronomy club assisted at Tanglewood. In 2009 over 15,000 people participated in astronomy

  20. Astronomy Education and Popularization in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanackovic, O.

    2013-05-01

    Astronomy education at all levels (elementary and secondary schools, universities) in Serbia is reviewed. The attempts to introduce astronomy as an elective course in elementary schools and to reintroduce astronomy as a separate subject in secondary schools are discussed. The role of the Petnica Science Center is briefly described, as well as the participation of the Serbian team in the International Astronomy Olympiads. A special emphasis is put on recent changes introduced in the accredited study programs at all five Serbian state universities. The research projects performed in two main astronomical institutions in Serbia are outlined. The numerous amateur astronomical societies in Serbia are presented and their growing activities summarized.

  1. Innovative Technology for Teaching Introductory Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidry, Mike

    The application of state-of-the-art technology (primarily Java and Flash MX Actionscript on the client side and Java PHP PERL XML and SQL databasing on the server side) to the teaching of introductory astronomy will be discussed. A completely online syllabus in introductory astronomy built around more than 350 interactive animations called ""Online Journey through Astronomy"" and a new set of 20 online virtual laboratories in astronomy that we are currently developing will be used as illustration. In addition to demonstration of the technology our experience using these technologies to teach introductory astronomy to thousands of students in settings ranging from traditional classrooms to full distance learning will be summarized. Recent experiments using Java and vector graphics programming of handheld devices (Personal Digital Assistants and cell phones) with wireless wide-area connectivity for applications in astronomy education will also be described.

  2. "Yondering" IYA: How the Astronomical Society of the Pacific is Adapting its International Year of Astronomy Programs for the Long Haul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, J. G.

    2011-09-01

    The International Year of Astronomy in 2009, the 400th anniversary of the year Galileo peeped at the heavens with his new telescope, is history. But 2010 is the 400th anniversary of the year he published, and we are now into "Beyond IYA" territory, as things developed for or during IYA are adapted for longer-term use as legacy products and programs. The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is continuing three of its IYA efforts in this regard. This article describes how the ASP's IYA Discovery Guides (online packages of theme- and object-based educational materials), Cosmic Clearinghouse (a website with a wide variety of links to good educational materials), and Galileo Teacher Training Program (a teacher workshop using Galileo's iconic observations to teach the process of science) are being adapted for ongoing availability "over yonder," well beyond the horizon of IYA.

  3. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  4. Astronomy Books of 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercury, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides annotated listing of books in 16 areas: (1) amateur astromony; (2) children's books; (3) comets; (4) cosmology; (5) education in astronomy; (6) general astronomy; (7) history of astronomy; (8) life in the universe; (9) miscellaneous; (10) physics and astronomy; (11) pseudo-science; (12) space exploration; (13) stars and stellar evolution;…

  5. TeachAstronomy.com - Digitizing Astronomy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; Impey, C. D.; Austin, C.; Patikkal, A.; Paul, M.; Ganesan, N.

    2013-06-01

    Teach Astronomy—a new, free online resource—can be used as a teaching tool in non-science major introductory college level astronomy courses, and as a reference guide for casual learners and hobbyists. Digital content available on Teach Astronomy includes: a comprehensive introductory astronomy textbook by Chris Impey, Wikipedia astronomy articles, images from Astronomy Picture of the Day archives and (new) AstroPix database, two to three minute topical video clips by Chris Impey, podcasts from 365 Days of Astronomy archives, and an RSS feed of astronomy news from Science Daily. Teach Astronomy features an original technology called the Wikimap to cluster, display, and navigate site search results. Development of Teach Astronomy was motivated by steep increases in textbook prices, the rapid adoption of digital resources by students and the public, and the modern capabilities of digital technology. This past spring semester Teach Astronomy was used as content supplement to lectures in a massive, open, online course (MOOC) taught by Chris Impey. Usage of Teach Astronomy has been steadily growing since its initial release in August of 2012. The site has users in all corners of the country and is being used as a primary teaching tool in at least four states.

  6. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Davidson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    SOFIA, (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) is a planned 2.5 meter telescope to be installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft and operated at altitudes from 41,000 to 46,000 feet. It will permit routine measurement of infrared radiation inaccessible from the ground-based sites, and observation of astronomical objects and transient events from anywhere in the world. The concept is based on 18 years of experience with NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), which SOFIA would replace.

  7. NAOJ's activities on Astronomy for Development: Aiding Astronomy Education in Developing Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, K.; Yoshida, F.

    2015-03-01

    We summarize NAOJ's efforts to promote astronomy in developing nations. The Office of International Relations, collaborations with the Office of Public Outreach at NAOJ and with the East Asia Core Observatories Association (EACOA), has engaged children, students and educators about astronomy development in the Asia-Pacific region. In particular, we introduce ``You are Galileo!`` project, which is a very well received astronomy education program for children. We also report on a continuing effort by the Japanese Government in support of astronomy programs in the developing nations.

  8. The side-looking airborne radar program of the US Geological Survey ( Appalachian Mountains).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    SLAR images are being analysed by the USGS to support mapping of geologic structures in the folded and thrust-faulted Appalachian Mountains, geological hazard appraisal, and monitoring of foliage cover for use in geological research. Four examples of SLAR imagery acquired during the 1982 flight program are illustrated and discussed.-R.House

  9. Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Phase A: System concept description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infrared astronomers have made significant discoveries using the NASA/Ames Research Center C-141 Kuiper airborne Observatory (KAO) with its 0.91-meter telescope. The need for a 3-meter class airborne observatory has been established to improve astronomy data gathering capability. The new system envisioned by NASA and the international community of astronomers will be known as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The platform of choice for SOFIA is a modified Boeing 747SP. SOFIA is viewed as a logical progression from the KAO. Potentially, a 3-meter telescope operating at the altitude achievable by the 747SP aircraft can be 11 times more sensitive than the KAO, can have 3.3 times better angular resolution, and will allow observations of compact sources in a volume of space up to 36 times that of the KAO. The KAO has enabled detection of about 15 percent of the far infrared IRAS survey point-sources; SOFIA should be able to detect them all. This document presents the results of in-house ARC and contracted concept definition studies for SOFIA. Using the ARC-based Kuiper Airborne Observatory as a basis for both SOFIA design and operations concepts, the SOFIA system concept has been developed with a view toward demonstrating mission and technical feasibility, and preparing preliminary cost estimates. The reference concept developed is not intended to represent final design, and should be treated accordingly. The most important products of this study, other than demonstration of system feasibility, are the understanding of system trade-offs and the development of confidence in the technology base that exists to move forward with a program leading to implementation of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).

  10. Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Phase A: System concept description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Infrared astronomers have made significant discoveries using the NASA/Ames Research Center C-141 Kuiper airborne Observatory (KAO) with its 0.91-meter telescope. The need for a 3-meter class airborne observatory has been established to improve astronomy data gathering capability. The new system envisioned by NASA and the international community of astronomers will be known as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The platform of choice for SOFIA is a modified Boeing 747SP. SOFIA is viewed as a logical progression from the KAO. Potentially, a 3-meter telescope operating at the altitude achievable by the 747SP aircraft can be 11 times more sensitive than the KAO, can have 3.3 times better angular resolution, and will allow observations of compact sources in a volume of space up to 36 times that of the KAO. The KAO has enabled detection of about 15 percent of the far infrared IRAS survey point-sources; SOFIA should be able to detect them all. This document presents the results of in-house ARC and contracted concept definition studies for SOFIA. Using the ARC-based Kuiper Airborne Observatory as a basis for both SOFIA design and operations concepts, the SOFIA system concept has been developed with a view toward demonstrating mission and technical feasibility, and preparing preliminary cost estimates. The reference concept developed is not intended to represent final design, and should be treated accordingly. The most important products of this study, other than demonstration of system feasibility, are the understanding of system trade-offs and the development of confidence in the technology base that exists to move forward with a program leading to implementation of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).

  11. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2008-11-01

    Bring telescope to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is a public astronomy outreach program at community parks during and after free summer music concerts and outdoor movie nights. This project also includes daytime activities because there are some afternoon concerts and daylight children's concerts, and observations using remotely operated telescopes in cloudy weather. While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this program targets a completely different audience---music lovers who are attending free summer concerts held in community parks. The music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party will be exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. This program will permit the entire community to participate in telescope observations and view astronomical video information to enhance the public appreciation of astronomy. This program will also reach underrepresented and underserved groups (women, minorities, older adults). The population base for the initial target audience (Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York) is 2,500,000. My partners are the Amateur Observers' Society of New York (AOS) and the Towns of Oyster Bay, Hempstead, North Hempstead, and Huntington. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is program that should continue beyond the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) and can be expanded into a national program.

  12. Joint NASA/USAF Airborne Field Mill Program - Operation and safety considerations during flights of a Lear 28 airplane in adverse weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Bruce D.; Phillips, Michael R.; Maier, Launa M.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA Langley Research Center Learjet 28 research airplane was flown in various adverse weather conditions in the vicinity of the NASA Kennedy Space Center from 1990-1992 to measure airborne electric fields during the Joint NASA/USAF Airborne Field Mill Program. The objective of this program was to characterize the electrical activity in various weather phenomena common to the NASA-Kennedy area in order to refine Launch Commit Criteria for natural and triggered lightning. The purpose of the program was to safely relax the existing launch commit criteria, thereby increasing launch availability and reducing the chance for weather holds and delays. This paper discusses the operational conduct of the flight test, including environmental/safety considerations, aircraft instrumentation and modification, test limitations, flight procedures, and the procedures and responsibilities of the personnel in the ground station. Airborne field mill data were collected for all the Launch Commit Criteria during two summer and two winter deployments. These data are now being analyzed.

  13. Astronomy Education Challenges in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Beshara Morcos, Abd

    2015-08-01

    One of the major challenges in Egypt is the quality of education. Egypt has made significant progress towards achieving the Education for All and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Many associations and committees as education reform program and education support programs did high efforts in supporting scientific thinking through the scientific clubs. The current state of astronomical education in Egypt has been developed. Astronomy became a part in both science and geography courses of primary, preparatory and secondary stages. Nowadays the Egyptian National Committee for Astronomy, put on its shoulders the responsibility of revising of astronomy parts in the education courses, beside preparation of some training programs for teachers of different stages of educations, in collaboration with ministry of education. General lectures program has been prepared and started in public places , schools and universities. Many TV and Radio programs aiming to spread astronomical culture were presented. In the university stage new astronomy departments are established and astrophysics courses are imbedded in physics courses even in some private universities.

  14. Neutrino astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    Current knowledge and proposed experiments in the field of neutrino astronomy are reviewed, with particular emphasis on expected sources and existing and proposed detectors for intermediate-energy (10 to 50 MeV) and ultrahigh energy (greater than 10 GeV) neutrinos. Following a brief discussion of the counting rate obtained in the solar neutrino experiment of Davis (1978) and possible statistical sources for the discrepancy between the expected and observed rates, consideration is given to the physics of neutrino ejection in stellar gravitational collapse and sources of high-energy proton collisions giving rise to ultrahigh energy neutrinos. The capabilities of operating Cerenkov detectors at the Homestake Gold Mine, the Mt. Blanc Tunnel and in the Soviet Caucasus are considered in relation to the detection of gravitational collapse in the center of the galaxy, and it is pointed out that neutrino detectors offer a more reliable means of detecting collapses in the Galaxy than do gravitational wave detectors. The possibility of using Cerenkov detectors for ultrahigh energy neutrino detection is also indicated, and applications of large neutrino detectors such as the proposed DUMAND array to measure the lifetime of the proton are discussed.

  15. Increasing Diversity at the PhD Level in Astronomy: The Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan; Holley-Bockelmann, K.; Berlind, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    We briefly review the current status of underrepresented minorities in the physical sciences: The underrepresentation of Black-, Hispanic-, and Native-Americans is an order of magnitude problem. We then describe the Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge program as a successful model for effective partnerships with minority-serving institutions toward addressing this problem. Since 2004 the program has admitted 60 students, 54 of them underrepresented minorities (60% female), with a retention rate of 92%. The program leads the nation in master’s degrees in physics for African Americans, is one of the top ten producers of physics master’s degrees among all US citizens in general, and has become the nation’s top producer of underrepresented minority PhDs in physics, astronomy, and materials science. We summarize the main features of the program including two of its core strategies: (1) partnering a minority-serving institution and a major research university through collaborative research, and (2) using the master’s degree as a deliberate stepping stone to the PhD. We also specifically discuss one of the emerging core theories of the program: the concept of properly identifying students with 'unrealized or unrecognized potential'. We discuss our methods to recognize and select for unrealized potential during the admissions process, and how we cultivate that unrealized potential toward development of successful scientists and leaders.

  16. Problems and Projects from Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Describes activities to stimulate school astronomy programs. Topics include: counting stars; the Earth's centripetal force; defining astronomical time; three types of sundials; perceptions of star brightness; sunspots and solar radiation; stellar spectroscopy; number-crunching and the molecular structure of the atmosphere; the Earth-Moon common…

  17. Reports of planetary astronomy, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This is a compilation of abstracts of reports from Principal Investigators funded through NASA's Planetary Astronomy Office. It provides a summarization of work conducted in this program in 1989. Each report contains a brief statement on the strategy of investigation and lists significant accomplishments within the area of the author's funded grant or contract, plans for future work, and publications.

  18. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  19. The Construction (Using Multi-Media Techniques) of Certain Modules of a Programmed Course in Astronomy-Space Sciences for NASA Personnel of The Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collagan, Robert B.

    This paper describes the development of a self-instructional multi-media course in astronomy-space sciences for non-technical NASA personnel. The course consists of a variety of programed materials including slides, films, film-loops, filmstrips video-tapes and audio-tapes, on concepts of time, space, and matter in our solar system and galaxy.…

  20. Global Astronomy Month: Astronomy around the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMonigal, C.; Simmons, M.

    2015-09-01

    For six years Global Astronomy Month has taken place each April, growing into a wide-ranging and diverse array of programmes comprising the world's largest worldwide, annual celebration of astronomy. Innovative programmes developed through partnerships, along with the availability of this novel platform, have allowed an expansion of what the month has to offer. Beginning with familiar observing programmes that engage amateur astronomers, programmes have become increasingly inclusive, extending to non-astronomy fields inspired by space. This article explores the development of Global Astronomy Month, the lessons learnt and how the project has provided a stage for expanding existing programmes and testing new ideas.

  1. The Airborne Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-09-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  2. An Airborne Parachute Compartment Test Bed for the Orion Parachute Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James W.; Romero, Leah M.

    2013-01-01

    The test program developing parachutes for the Orion/MPCV includes drop tests with parachutes deployed from an Orion-like parachute compartment at a wide range of dynamic pressures. Aircraft and altitude constraints precluded the use of an Orion boilerplate capsule for several test points. Therefore, a dart-shaped test vehicle with a hi-fidelity mock-up of the Orion parachute compartment has been developed. The available aircraft options imposed constraints on the test vehicle development and concept of operations. Delivery of this test vehicle to the desired velocity, altitude, and orientation required for the test is a di cult problem involving multiple engineering disciplines. This paper describes the development of the test technique. The engineering challenges include extraction from an aircraft, reposition of the extraction parachute, and mid-air separation of two vehicles, neither of which has an active attitude control system. The desired separation behavior is achieved by precisely controlling the release point using on-board monitoring of the motion. The design of the test vehicle is also described. The trajectory simulations and other analyses used to develop this technique and predict the behavior of the test vehicle are reviewed in detail. The application of the technique on several successful drop tests is summarized.

  3. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Provides a bibliography of materials which deal with astronomy and: (1) science fiction; (2) poetry; (3) general fiction; (4) music; (5) psychology; and (6) the law. Also cites two general references on interdisciplinary approaches with astronomy topics. (JN)

  4. Astronomy Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    As a Jet Propulsion Laboratory astronomer, John D. Callahan developed a computer program called Multimission Interactive Planner (MIP) to help astronomers analyze scientific and optical data collected on the Voyager's Grand Tour. The commercial version of the program called XonVu is published by XonTech, Inc. Callahan has since developed two more advanced programs based on MIP technology, Grand Tour and Jovian Traveler, which simulate Voyager and Giotto missions. The software allows astronomers and space novices to view the objects seen by the spacecraft, manipulating perspective, distance and field of vision.

  5. Dyslexia and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneps, Matthew H.; Greenhill, L. J.; Rose, L. T.

    2007-12-01

    Dyslexia is a hereditary neurological disability that impairs reading. It is believed that anywhere from 5% to 20% of all people in the US may have dyslexia to a greater or lesser degree. Though dyslexia is common, it is a "silent disability" in the sense that it is not easy to tell which individuals suffer from dyslexia and which do not. There is a substantial body of evidence to suggest that people with dyslexia tend to do well in science. For example, Baruj Benacerraf, a Nobel laureate in medicine, is among those whose impairments have been documented and studied. Given that dyslexia was not diagnosed in schools prior to the late 1970's, many established science researchers may have dyslexia and be unaware of their impairment. Therefore, it would not be surprising to find that substantial numbers of scientists working in the fields of astronomy and astrophysics have dyslexia, and yet be unaware of the effects this disability has had on their research. A recently proposed theory by the authors suggests that there may be specific neurological reasons why those with dyslexia may be predisposed to science, and predicts that dyslexia may be associated with enhanced abilities for certain types of visual processing, with special implications for image processing. Our study, funded by the NSF, investigates this hypothesis in the context of astronomy and astrophysics. We expect this work will uncover and document challenges faced by scientists with dyslexia, but perhaps more importantly, lead to an understanding of the strengths these scientists bring to research. The program will serve as a clearing-house of information for scientists and students with dyslexia, and begin to provide mentoring for young people with dyslexia interested in astronomy. Scientists who have reason to believe they may have dyslexia are encouraged to contact the authors.

  6. Nontechnical Astronomy Books of 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercury, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 126 reviews. Categories include amateur astronomy, children's books, computers and astronomy, cosmic rays, cosmology, education in astronomy, galaxies, general astronomy, history of astronomy, life in the universe, physics and astronomy, pseudoscience, quasars and active galaxies, reference, solar system, space exploration, stars and…

  7. Early infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, James

    2009-07-01

    I present a short history of infrared astronomy, from the first scientific approaches of the ‘radiant heat’ in the seventeenth century to the 1970's, the time when space infrared astronomy was developing very rapidly. The beginning of millimeter and submillimeter astronomy is also covered. As the progress of infrared astronomy was strongly dependent on detectors, some details are given on their development.

  8. Astronomy Patch Day: An Interactive Astronomy Experience for Girl Scouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierman, K. A.; McCarthy, D. W.; Schutz, K.

    2005-12-01

    To help encourage a new generation of women in science, we have created Astronomy Patch Day for the Sahuaro Girl Scout Council in Tucson, Arizona. This all-day event is an interactive experience for Girl Scouts ages 5-18 to learn about astronomical concepts and women in astronomy. Our first Astronomy Patch Day, held on March 19, 2005, in conjunction with the Sahuaro Council's annual Science, Math, and Related Technologies (SMART) program, was very successful, reaching about 150-200 girls and their leaders. Individual troops rotated every half hour among our six activity booths: Earth-Moon, Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, Universe, and Ask an Astronomer, which were staffed by trained Girl Scout Leaders as well as faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and graduate students from Steward Observatory. To earn a patch, younger girls (ages 5-12) had to complete activities at three booths and older girls had to complete all six activities. Positive feedback for this event was received from both the girls and leaders. We plan to hold Astronomy Patch Day annually, possibly with different and/or additional activities in future years. K. Knierman is supported by an Arizona/NASA Space Grant Fellowship. This outreach program is supported by NIRCam/JWST E/PO.

  9. Reports of planetary astronomy, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This is a compilation of abstracts of reports from Principal Investigators funded through NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program, Office of Space Science and Applications. The purpose is to provide a document which succinctly summarizes work conducted in this program for 1985. Each report contains a brief statement on the strategy of investigation and lists significant accomplishments within the area of the author's funded grant or contract, plans for future work, and publications.

  10. Reports of planetary astronomy, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A compilation of abstracts of reports from Principal Investigators funded through NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program, Office of Space Science and Applications, is presented. The purpose is to provide a document which succinctly summarizes work conducted in this program for 1986. Each report contains a brief statement on the strategy of investigation and lists significant accomplishments within the area of the author's funded grant or contract, plans for future work, and publications.

  11. Astronomy in Modern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eker, Zeki; Demircan, Osman, Kirbiyik, Halil; Bilir, Selcuk

    2013-01-01

    Present-day astronomy and its development in the recent history of Turkey are described. Current astronomy education in modern-day Turkish Republic from primary to high schools, including modern-day university education is discussed. Astronomical and space research together with the existing observatories and present-day Turkish astronomy in the global state is presented.

  12. The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE): Partnering Students to Astronomy at the University of Arizona's Astronomy Camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldivar, Hector; McCarthy, D.; Rudolph, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) is an NSF-funded partnership between the Astronomy Program at Cal Poly Pomona and the University of Arizona Steward Observatory designed to promote participation of underrepresented minorities, including women, in astronomy research and education. By means of this program, Cal Poly Pomona undergraduates that are either Physics majors or minors are qualified to participate in the program alongside graduate students from the University of Arizona as a camp counselor at the University of Arizona's Astronomy Camp, one of the elite astronomy programs worldwide. Students that participate in the CAMPARE program are granted an opportunity to work in a hands-on environment by teaching astronomy to students from all over the world in a highly structured environment. The CAMPARE student selected for this program in Summer 2011 worked under the supervision of Dr. Don McCarthy, professor at the University of Arizona and Astronomy Camp director for over 20 years, learning to lead a group of students through daily activities and ensure that the students are learning to their maximum potential. Through this experience, the CAMPARE student learned to capture students’ interest in astronomy and was introduced to real life teaching, which has helped prepare him for future experiences to come. We acknowledge the NSF for funding under Award No. AST-0847170, a PAARE Grant for the Calfornia-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE).

  13. Astronomy Science Fair Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittichová, J.; Kadooka, M.-A.; Meech, K. J.

    2004-12-01

    ``Extrasolar Planet Transit", ``Lightcurve of a Variable Star", and ``Retrograde Motion of Mars" are some of the titles of high school students' projects entered in the Hawaii State Science Fair. TOPS (Toward Other Planetary Systems) teachers who participated in the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy summer outreach program under the direction of professor Karen J. Meech mentored their students. After attending the 3-week National Science Foundation Institute for several summers since 1999, these teachers in the summer of 2003 were trained to do observing plans to obtain images from telescopes, use image processing software MIRA for photometry, and produce light curves of variable stars and extrasolar planet transits. Others used the software ``Astrometrica" to do astrometry of Kuiper Belt Objects. Using Compaq laptop computers on long term loan, our teachers mentored students for astronomy projects during the 2003-2004 school year. These students made observing plans for images from the 31inch Lowell Telescope in Arizona and/or from the 2.2m University of Hawaii Telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. Learning about filters, exposure time, magnitude, frequency of taking CCD images, and ephemeris required many iterations between students, teachers, and astronomers and graduate students who were assisting. Poor weather conditions and other frustrations exposed the students to the realities of research. However, they were rewarded with projects that impressed the judges and that will be described.

  14. Challenges in Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Greve, Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Astronomy is an attractive subject for education. It deals with fascination of the unknown and the unreachable, yet is uses tools, concepts and insights from various fundamental sciences such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology. Because of this it can be well used for introducing sciences to young people and to raise their interest in further studies in that direction. It is also an interesting subject for teaching as its different aspects (observation techniques, theory, data sampling and analysis, modelling,?) offer various didactical approaches towards different levels of pupils, students and different backgrounds. And it gives great opportunities to teach and demonstrate the essence of scientific research, through tutorials and projects. In this paper we discuss some of the challenges education in general, and astronomy in particular, faces in the coming decades, given the major geophysical and technological changes that can be deducted from our present knowledge. This defines a general, but very important background in terms of educational needs at various levels, and in geographical distribution of future efforts of the astronomical community. Special emphasis will be given to creative approaches to teaching, to strategies that are successful (such as the use of tutorials with element from computer games), and to initiatives complementary to the regular educational system. The programs developed by the IAU will be briefly highlighted.

  15. Mayan Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Mayas of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Honduras developed an urban civilization in the tropical rain forests. In their cities are many monuments, mainly stone, which contain accounts of their rulers' families, conquests, sacrifices, rituals and building programs. These are integrated into an elaborate calendrical system, which gives dates to the day. We also have pottery, painted with elabora...

  16. Interactive Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jean K.

    1997-01-01

    Presents guiding principles for developing interactive lessons for the World Wide Web. Describes "Amazing Space: Education Online from the Hubble Space Telescope", a program where students study spectacular Hubble Space Telescope images of stars and star-forming regions to learn about the life cycle of stars and the creation of atoms. (JRH)

  17. Astronomy and Politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, John M.

    The relationship between astronomy and politics is a complex but important part of understanding the practice of astronomy throughout history. This chapter explores some of the ways that astronomy, astrology, and politics have interacted, placing particular focus on the way that astronomy and astrology have been used for political purposes by both people in power and people who wish to influence a ruler's policy. Also discussed are the effects that politics has had on the development of astronomy and, in particular, upon the recording and preservation of astronomical knowledge.

  18. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  19. Measurement of ozone and water vapor by Airbus in-service aircraft: The MOZAIC airborne program, An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenco, Alain; Thouret, ValéRie; NéDéLec, Philippe; Smit, Herman; Helten, Manfred; Kley, Dieter; Karcher, Fernand; Simon, Pascal; Law, Kathy; Pyle, John; Poschmann, Georg; von Wrede, Rainer; Hume, Chris; Cook, Tim

    1998-10-01

    Tentative estimates, using three-dimensional chemistry and transport models, have suggested small ozone increases in the upper troposphere resulting from current aircraft emissions, but have also concluded to significant deficiencies in today's models and to the need to improve them through comparison with extended data sets. The Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) program was initiated in 1993 by European scientists, aircraft manufacturers, and airlines to collect experimental data. Its goal is to help understand the atmosphere and how it is changing under the influence of human activity, with particular interest in the effects of aircraft. MOZAIC consists of automatic and regular measurements of ozone and water vapor by five long range passenger airliners flying all over the world. The aim is not to detect direct effects of aircraft emissions on the ozone budget inside the air traffic corridors but to build a large database of measurements to allow studies of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, and hence to validate global chemistry transport models. MOZAIC data provide, in particular, detailed ozone and water vapor climatologies at 9-12 km where subsonic aircraft emit most of their exhaust and which is a very critical domain (e.g., radiatively and stratosphere/troposphere exchanges) still imperfectly described in existing models. This will be valuable to improve knowledge about the processes occuring in the upper troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere, and the model treatment of near tropopause chemistry and transport. During MOZAIC I (January 1993-September 1996), fully automatic devices were developed, installed aboard five commercial Airbus A340s, and flown in normal airline service. A second phase, MOZAIC II, started in October 1996 with the aim of continuing the O3 and H2O measurements and doing a feasibility study of new airborne devices (CO, NOy). Between September 1994 and December 1997, 7500

  20. Astronomy Education with Movement and Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.

    2006-08-01

    This paper will address the development of two multi-sensory approaches to astronomy education: 1) Kinesthetic Astronomy - an innovative series of lessons for 6th grade through adult learners that teach basic astronomical concepts through choreographed bodily movements; and 2) AstroJazz - a novel planetarium or auditorium-based public education program that blends live jazz music with astronomical imagery and dramatic insights into the wonders of our universe. The paper will discuss results from field testing these approaches.

  1. BoF - Python in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, P. E.

    This BoF will be chaired by Paul Barrett and will begin with an introduction to Python in astronomy, be followed by reports of current Python projects, and conclude with a discussion about the current state of Python in astronomy. The introduction will give a brief overview of the language, highlighting modules, resources, and aspects of the language that are important to scientific programming and astronomical data analysis. The closing discussion will provide an opportunity for questions and comments.

  2. Building Bridges to Diversity in Graduate Physics & Astronomy: The Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan G.

    2006-12-01

    We describe the Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge program as a successful model for effective partnerships with minority-serving institutions toward significantly broadening the participation of underrepresented groups in the physical sciences. The program couples targeted recruitment with active retention strategies, and is built upon a clearly defined structure that is flexible enough to address individual student needs while maintaining clearly communicated baseline standards for student performance. A key precept of the program’s philosophy is to eliminate passivity in student mentoring; students are deliberately groomed to successfully transition into the PhD program through active involvement in research experiences with future PhD advisers, coursework that demonstrates competency in core PhD subject areas, and frequent interactions with joint mentoring committees. This approach allows student progress and performance to be monitored and evaluated in a more holistic manner than usually afforded by limited metrics such as standardized tests. Since its inception in 2004, the program has attracted a total of 18 underrepresented students, with a retention rate of 90%. Recent research indicates that minority students are nearly twice as likely as non-minority students to seek a Masters degree en route to the PhD. In essence, the Bridge program described here builds upon this increasingly important pathway, with a dedicated mentoring process designed to ensure that the Masters-to-PhD transition is a successful one.

  3. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  4. Astronomy for African development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevindran

    2011-06-01

    In recent years there have been a number of efforts across Africa to develop the field of astronomy as well as to reap benefit from astronomy for African people. This presentation will discuss the case of the SALT (Southern African Large Telescope) Collateral Benefits Programme (SCBP) which was set up to ensure societal benefit from astronomy. With African society as the target, the SCBP has embarked on various projects from school level education to public understanding of science to socio-economic development, the latter mainly being felt in the rural communities surrounding the South African Astronomical Observatory (home to SALT). A development plan for ``Astronomy in Africa'' will also be discussed. This plan has been drawn up with input from all over Africa and themed ``Astronomy for Education''. The Africa case stands as a good example for the IYA cornerstone project ``Developing Astronomy Globally'' which focuses on developing regions.

  5. Armenian Cultural Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to this sphere, particularly international organizations were established, conferences are held and journals are published. Armenia is also rich in cultural astronomy. The present paper focuses on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation.

  6. Astronomy in New York State: Competence and Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, H. John

    Reported is a survey of astronomy programs in the educational and research institutions in New York State. This report shows that astronomy in New York State is highly diversified; both public and private supported institutions have strong, excellent programs. Many institutions with strong physics departments see the value of growing interaction…

  7. Radio Astronomy: A Strong Link between Undergraduate Education and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratap, Preethi; Salah, Joseph E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a successful pilot program to develop and test a program that facilitates the linking of undergraduate research and education through radio astronomy. Based on the pilot experiences, students everywhere should be able to exploit the opportunity to strengthen their education through practical research using radio astronomy. (Author/SAH)

  8. Astronomy in Indian Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, V. B.

    Tradition of astronomy in India goes back to ancient times. Many festivals and rituals are associated with astronomical phenomena. Indian children start learning rudiments of astronomy from primary classes. But primary teachers are not equipped to handle this subject so not much learning actually takes place. The first serious interface with astronomy occurs when children reach class X when they are 15 years old. Till last year astronomy was there in class XII also but it has now been dropped. This is a serious setback for the study of astronomy. In class X astronomy forms part of general science. Since children at this stage are not proficient in physics and mathematics the subject remains descriptive though there are useful activities for children to do. However the teachers are not equipped to handle this subject and there is no help in the form of visual material. So the subject remains neglected. The Indian astronomical community can help by training teachers and providing visual material. It must also urge authorities to reintroduce astronomy in class XII if astronomy is to flourish in India. Moreover India needs to network with developing countries share experiences with them and evolve a strategy that promotes astronomy.

  9. X-Ray Spectroscopic Laboratory Experiments In Support of the NASA X-Ray Astronomy Flight Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Steven M.; Savin, D. W.; Gu, M. F.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Liedahl, D. A.; Brown, G.; Utter, S.

    1998-01-01

    During the 1997 performance period, our work focused on the L-shell X-ray emission from highly charged iron ions in the 10-18 A region. Details of our accomplishments in 1997 are presented in the following. We start by describing the laboratory measurements made and their impact on the X-ray flight program and conclude by an overview of new instrumental capabilities developed for uses in the coming year.

  10. Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerantzis, Nikolaos; Mitrouda, Aikaterini; Reizopoulou, Ioanna; Sidiropoulou, Eirini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    On November 9th, 2015, three didactical hours were dedicated to Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities (http://wp.me/p6Hte2-1I). Our students and their teachers formed three groups and in rotation, were engaged with the following activities: (a) viewing unique images of the Cosmos in the mobile planetarium STARLAB (http://www.planitario.gr/tholos-starlab-classic-standard.html), (b) watching the following videos: Journey to the end of the universe (https://youtu.be/Ufl_Nwbl8xs), Rosetta update (https://youtu.be/nQ9ivd7wv30), The Solar System (https://youtu.be/d66dsagrTa0), Ambition the film (https://youtu.be/H08tGjXNHO4) in the school's library. Students and teachers were informed about our solar system, the Rosetta mission, the universe, etc. and (c) tactile activities such as Meet our home and Meet our neighbors (http://astroedu.iau.org, http://nuclio.org/astroneighbours/resources) and the creation of planets' 3D models (Geology-Geography A' Class Student's book, pg.15). With the activities above we had the pleasure to join the Cosmic Light Edu Kit / International Year of Light 2015 program. After our Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities, we did a "small" research: our students had to fill an evaluation about their educational gains and the results can be found here http://wp.me/p6Hte2-2q. Moreover, we discussed about Big Ideas of Science (http://wp.me/p3oRiZ-dm) and through the "big" impact of the Rosetta mission & the infinity of our universe, we print posters with relevant topics and place them to the classrooms. We thank Rosa Doran (Nuclio - President of the Executive Council) for her continuous assistance and support on innovative science teaching proposals. She is an inspiration.

  11. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becklin, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The joint U.S. and German Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747SP, is now fully operational with cameras and spectrometers in the 1 to 240 micron region. It will be one of the major observatories for the next 20 years to observe the local ISM in this spectral region. We will give a brief overview of the SOFIA observatory, telescope, instrumentation and recent science. Future observing opportunities and participation in future instrument developments, over the lifetime of the SOFIA observatory will be discussed.

  12. Astronomy at the Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roten, Robert; Constantin, A.; Christensen, E.; Dick, E.; Lapolla, J.; Nutter, A.; Corcoran, J.; DiDomenico, N.; Eskridge, B.; Saikin, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present here an energetic grass-roots outreach program run entirely by undergraduate physics and astronomy majors at James Madison University. Our "Team Awestronomy" takes Astronomy out to the Market, literally. Once a month, for eight months during the academic year, the group sets up a “scientific corner” at the Harrisonburg Farmers Market, offering people the chance to meet with astrophysicists (in the making) and discuss science. Our group members wear t-shirts with simple messages like “Ask me about the Sun,” “...about Black Holes and Mega-Masers” or “...about Big Bang” that initiate the dialog. We help our audience with observations of solar activity through our department’s Coronado telescope equipped with a safe H-alpha filter, sunspotters, and the incredibly simple yet durable and accurate handheld (Project Star) spectrometers, and invite them to the free Saturday Planetarium shows and the star parties hosted by our department on the JMU campus. The team is also prepared with a suite of fun activities aimed particularly at K-5 kids, e.g., building (and eating, after investigating out-gassing properties of) ”dirty comets,” making craters (in pans with flour or sand) and testing how different types of impactors (pebbles, ping-pong balls or even crumpled aluminum foil) affect crater formation, and demonstrations of shock wave created in supernova explosions. The main goals of this outreach program are: 1) to illustrate to people of all ages that science is a fun, creative, and exciting process; 2) to empower people to be curious and to ask questions; 3) to demonstrate that science is a viable career path chosen by many diverse individuals; and 4) to nurture a sense of wonder and awe for the Universe. While this outreach program is aimed at a very general audience, of an extremely wide range, we expect to produce a significant impact on K-12 students in general and in particular on the home-schooled kids. There is a relatively high

  13. Enhancing Undergraduate Research Experience with Observational Astronomy: One Aspect of the NSF CSULA/JPL CURE REU Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Gillam, S.; Lotozinski, J.; Holt, D.; Genov, I.

    2009-05-01

    Aligned with NASA's educational goals to engage and identify future scientists and engineers, the California State University Los Angeles (CSULA)/JPL Consortium for Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) program provides opportunities for minority and women undergraduates to actively participate in research at the jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). CURE is a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Site funded for the last ten years by the National Science Foundation. The interaction between mentors and students allows the students to appreciate and translate classroom lessons to hands-on experience. In many cases, it provides the undergraduate with their first realization that they can be part of the scientific and technical workforce. A typical research experience available to CURE interns is our remote ground-based observations of Jovian planets project. Those selected for this program are immediately immersed in all aspects of data acquisition and analysis. The students are engaged in discussions related to the observations and involved in all aspects of research from data acquisition to presentations at scientific meetings such as Division of Planetary Sciences, JWSM, American Astronomical Society and Southern California Conference on Undergraduate Research (SCCUR). Recent observations were focused on the global upheaval on Jupiter and Saturn's closing rings as it approaches equinox. Projects of recent CURE interns involved with these observations are presented. The projects completed by the students are used as training materials for subsequent interns. The CURE REU site is unique among internship programs nationally in fostering long-term (up to three years) working relationships between students and JPL mentors. This allows JPLers to complete a wider range of research projects and help to nurture the next generation of scientists and engineers. As mentors, we are engaged in identifying different approaches to develop the potential of future astronomers

  14. Education with Infrared Astronomy and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemphill, Rosa; Blackwell, J. A.; Herrold, A.; Petroff, E.

    2007-12-01

    We present education and outreach results using our experiences involving the Spitzer Space Telescope project, Star Formation in High Redshift Clusters with Spitzer. The project is a collaboration between the Spitzer Science Center and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measured star formation rates in three galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts. Six teachers were chosen for the program, each with an interest and involvement in astronomy education. From this project, lesson plans, public outreach, lectures and demonstrations were generated which better the understanding of infrared astronomy, multiwavelength astronomy, galaxy and star formation, and cosmology. The teacher mentors are Dr. Gregory Rudnick (NOAO), Dr. Rose Finn (Siena College), and Dr. Vandana Desai (Caltech). Please see the companion posters by Emily Petroff, Zak Schroeder, and Thomas Loughran, et al, for information concerning the science results.

  15. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  16. Comprehension and retrieval of failure cases in airborne observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, Sergio J.; Mock, Kenrick J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes research dealing with the computational problem of analyzing and repairing failures of electronic and mechanical systems of telescopes in NASA's airborne observatories, such as KAO (Kuiper Airborne Observatory) and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy). The research has resulted in the development of an experimental system that acquires knowledge of failure analysis from input text, and answers questions regarding failure detection and correction. The system's design builds upon previous work on text comprehension and question answering, including: knowledge representation for conceptual analysis of failure descriptions, strategies for mapping natural language into conceptual representations, case-based reasoning strategies for memory organization and indexing, and strategies for memory search and retrieval. These techniques have been combined into a model that accounts for: (a) how to build a knowledge base of system failures and repair procedures from descriptions that appear in telescope-operators' logbooks and FMEA (failure modes and effects analysis) manuals; and (b) how to use that knowledge base to search and retrieve answers to questions about causes and effects of failures, as well as diagnosis and repair procedures. This model has been implemented in FANSYS (Failure ANalysis SYStem), a prototype text comprehension and question answering program for failure analysis.

  17. Comprehension and retrieval of failure cases in airborne observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Sergio J.; Mock, Kenrick J.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes research dealing with the computational problem of analyzing and repairing failures of electronic and mechanical systems of telescopes in NASA's airborne observatories, such as KAO (Kuiper Airborne Observatory) and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy). The research has resulted in the development of an experimental system that acquires knowledge of failure analysis from input text, and answers questions regarding failure detection and correction. The system's design builds upon previous work on text comprehension and question answering, including: knowledge representation for conceptual analysis of failure descriptions, strategies for mapping natural language into conceptual representations, case-based reasoning strategies for memory organization and indexing, and strategies for memory search and retrieval. These techniques have been combined into a model that accounts for: (a) how to build a knowledge base of system failures and repair procedures from descriptions that appear in telescope-operators' logbooks and FMEA (failure modes and effects analysis) manuals; and (b) how to use that knowledge base to search and retrieve answers to questions about causes and effects of failures, as well as diagnosis and repair procedures. This model has been implemented in FANSYS (Failure ANalysis SYStem), a prototype text comprehension and question answering program for failure analysis.

  18. Astronomy and Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy is, by definition, the sum of the material and spiritual values created by mankind and of the institutions necessary to communicate these values. Consequently, astronomy belongs to the culture of each society and its scientific progress does nothing but underline its role in culture. It is interesting that there is even a European society which bears this name "Astronomy for Culture" (SEAC). Its main goal is "the study of calendric and astronomical aspects of culture". Owning ancient evidence of astronomical knowledge, dating from the dawn of the first millennium, Romania is interested in this topic. But Astronomy has a much deeper role in culture and civilization. There are many aspects that deserve to be discussed. Examples? The progress of astronomy in a certain society, in connection with its evolution; the place held by the astronomy in literature and, generally, in art; the role of the SF in the epoch of super-mediatization; astronomy and belief; astronomy and astrology in the modern society, and so forth. These are problems that can be of interest for IAU, but the most important one could be her educational role, in the formation of the culture of the new generation, in the education of the population for the protection of our planet, in the ensuring of a high level of spiritual development of the society in the present epoch.

  19. Junior High Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  20. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  1. Indian Astronomy: History of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  2. A Basic Astronomy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    This bibliography lists the most useful and scientifically accurate astronomy books published in the 1980s for beginners and students. The books are categorized under the topics of: (1) astronomy in general; (2) solar system as a whole; (3) planets; (4) asteroids, comets, and meteorites; (5) the sun; (6) stars and their evolution; (7) mikly way…

  3. Astronomy Demonstrations and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    Demonstrations in astronomy classes seem to be more necessary than in physics classes for three reasons. First, many of the events are very large scale and impossibly remote from human senses. Secondly, while physics courses use discussions of one- and two-dimensional motion, three-dimensional motion is the normal situation in astronomy; thus,…

  4. Towards "Astronomy for Development"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevindran

    2015-08-01

    The ambition of the IAU's decadal strategic plan is to use astronomy to stimulate development globally. The Office of Astronomy for Development was established in 2011 to implement this visionary plan. This talk will reflect on the past, present and future activities of the office, and describe the status of implementation of the plan at this halfway point in the 2010-2020 decade.

  5. Astronomy in Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Valério A. R. M.; Paulo, Cláudio M.

    2015-03-01

    We present the state of Astronomy in Mozambique and how it has evolved since 2009 following the International Year of Astronomy. Activities have been lead by staff at University Eduardo Mondlane and several outreach activities have also flourished. In 2010 the University introduced its first astronomy module, Introduction to Astronomy and Astrophysics, for the second year students in the Department of Physics. The course has now produced the first students who will be graduating in late 2012 with some astronomy content. Some of these students will now be looking for further studies and those who have been keen in astronomy have been recommended to pursue this as a career. At the university level we have also discussed on the possibility to introduce a whole astronomy course by 2016 which falls well within the HCD that the university is now investing in. With the announcement that the SKA will be split between South Africa with its partner countries (including Mozambique), and Australia we have been working closely with the Ministry of Science and Technology to make astronomy a priority on its agenda. In this respect, an old telecommunications antenna is being converted by the South Africa SKA Project Office, and donated to Mozambique for educational purposes. It will be situated in Maluana, Mozambique.

  6. Rubric Sorting Astronomy Essays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Len, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    Student essays on introductory astronomy exams can be consistently and efficiently graded by a single instructor, or by multiple graders for a large class. This is done by constructing a robust outcome rubric while sorting exams into separate stacks, then checking each stack for consistency. Certain online resources readily provide primary source prompts for writing astronomy exam essay questions.

  7. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  8. History of Oriental Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S. M. Razaullah

    2002-12-01

    This volume deals specifically with recent original research in the history of Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Islamic, and Indian astronomy. It strikes a balance between landmarks of history of Ancient and Medieval Astronomy in the Orient on one hand, and on the other the transmission of the European Astronomy into the countries of the Orient. Most contributions are based on research by the experts in this field. The book also indicates the status of astronomy research in non-European cultural areas of the world. The book is especially of interest to historians of astronomy and science, and students of cultural heritage. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0657-8

  9. Peer Instruction for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul

    Peer Instruction for Astronomy is an instructor's guide to an exciting and easily-implemented enhancement for lecture classes in introductory astronomy. Application of this powerful and efficient teaching technique requires that the instructor have on hand a large number of thought-provoking, conceptual short answer questions aimed at a variety of levels. While significant numbers of such questions have been published for use in Physics, Peer Instruction for Astronomy provides the first such compilation for Astronomy, and includes hints on use of the technique and applications of the method. KEY TOPICS: Covers peer instruction, incentives, a large database of conceptual questions for use in class, and a list of readings and resources. MARKET: Ideal for introductory astronomy instructors at the undergraduate or advanced high school level.

  10. Joseph Henry and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Joseph Henry (1797-1878) is best known for his work in electromagnetism and as the first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. But he was also a pioneer solar physicist, an early advocate of US participation in astrophysics, and a facilitator of international cooperation in astronomy. This paper will briefly trace his role in the development of the US astronomical community from the time he taught astronomy at Princeton in the 1830s through his death, focusing on failed efforts to persuade US astronomers and patrons of astronomy that the best path for US astronomy should be astrophysics. He thought that the US could make a more significant contribution to astronomy science by striking out on a less travelled path rather than competing with the established European observatories.

  11. Astronomical Book Trek: Astronomy Books of 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Provided in two separate annotated lists are technical and nontechnical astronomy books. Categories in the latter group include: general astronomy; astronomy textbooks; amateur astronomy; astronomy history; life on other worlds; astrophysics; the solar system; space exploration; and the sun. (JN)

  12. Notes on Soviet space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Soviet space programs intended for making astronomical observations are reviewed. The Cosmos, Intercosmos, and Prognoz satellites designed for astronomical measurements are identified, and unmanned lunar and planetary missions are discussed, including the Luna, Lunokhod, Mars, and Venera programs. The Salyut 4 space station is described in detail along with the following major astronomical instruments: the Orbiting Solar Telescope 1, the infrared telescope spectrometer, the two solar spectrometers, the light-nuclei mass spectrometer, and the Filin and RT-4 X-ray telescopes. The future of Soviet space astronomy is assessed, particularly the tasks of the Salyut 5 station and the scheduled launch of Salyut 6.

  13. Developing Astronomy in Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Taboada, R. E.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction Beginning from a brief historical introduction the up to day situation is presented and the topics relevant to Astronomy development analyzed from the view point of a person actually working in Astrophysics. Arising from national needs, Astronomical Calculations is the only "native-born" branch of astronomy in Cuba. Cuba was an observational platform capable to provide the Soviet Union with the 24 hours solar patrol needed by its Space Agency System to protect the men in orbit. This was the beginning of a very fruitful development of solar research in Cuba. Russia installed the instruments, trained the people to operate them, and gives the academic environment to develop the scientific work in solar physics, space weather, and related topics. What about Stellar Astronomy? The Cuban astro-climate is not good to develop an observational base. We are trying to develop stellar astronomy in collaboration with institutions capable to provide both, the academic and technical environment; but to continue developing Stellar Astronomy we need to influence the public opinion and convince people they need groups working in Astronomy. How to do that? Publishing. Giving conferences talking about OUR work, not only like spectators of the science. Showing science is culture in modern times. Showing projects in Astronomy can be cheap. ¡This is very important! Astronomy is not a luxury. Real possibilities I consider the Virtual Observatory concept the more appropriate in the near future, but it is necessary to have a connectivity level that is not commonly provided in Cuba, and to train the people. Concluding remarks From my experience "engagement" is the key word for Astronomy development in developing countries. Astronomy can not be developed without an appropriate academic environment, and we have not it. It is not "only" about financial resources, it is about "real collaboration" with a mature partner and common research goals.

  14. Global Astronomy Month - An Annual Celebration of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenatigala, Thilina; Simmons, Mike

    2015-03-01

    One of the most successful global outreach efforts in history was the International Year of Astronomy 2009. With the momentum created by this year long program, it was important to take the efforts to coming years. The Astronomers Without Borders organization captured the energy of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 and refocused it as an ongoing annual celebration of the Universe by organizing Global Astronomy Month, a worldwide celebration of astronomy in all its forms, every April. In 2010, the program saw professionals and amateur astronomers, educators and astronomy enthusiasts from around the globe participating together in the spirit of International Year of Astronomy 2009 and provided a global stage for established programs and a framework for partnerships. The 2011 version of the program saw much bigger participation with several global partner organizations joining in creating more than 40 global level programs throughout the month. Within a short period of two years, Global Astronomy Month has evolved to a much needed global platform after International Year of Astronomy 2009.

  15. DARTAB: a program to combine airborne radionuclide environmental exposure data with dosimetric and health effects data to generate tabulations of predicted health impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, C.L.; Eckerman, K.F.; Schlatter, E.C.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

    1981-08-01

    The DARTAB computer code combines radionuclide environmental exposure data with dosimetric and health effects data to generate tabulations of the predicted impact of radioactive airborne effluents. DARTAB is independent of the environmental transport code used to generate the environmental exposure data and the codes used to produce the dosimetric and health effects data. Therefore human dose and risk calculations need not be added to every environmental transport code. Options are included in DARTAB to permit the user to request tabulations by various topics (e.g., cancer site, exposure pathway, etc.) to facilitate characterization of the human health impacts of the effluents. The DARTAB code was written at ORNL for the US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation Programs.

  16. Community Based Astronomy: Bringing families and communities together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Astronomy in K-12 formal education is still largely underrepresented as a science. Yet, it is arguably one of the most engaging and entertaining of the physical sciences. Many school systems have been slow to adopt curriculum frameworks that include astronomy. Even when astronomy is required either as a distinct subject or hidden within the catagory of "Earth science", many teachers spend little time on it in their classrooms since they have no formal training in this subject. A community based, informal astronomy education model that encorporates resources from government agencies, industry, local colleges, science centers and planetariums, families, civic groups, schools, and amateur astronomy clubs can provide a solution and be highly effective in creating sustained learning environments in this discipline as well as fostering an atmosphere of general acceptance and promotion of astronomy by whole communities. In addition, the opportunity exists to reinforce the teaching of astronomy in schools through the involvement of these groups in an informal education setting. This paper will discuss a Community Based Astronomy program that has been implemented in Montgomery County, Maryland. The tie-in to formal education through both schools and systemic reform initiatives will be presented. In addition, detailed guidelines for running astronomy clubs in conjunction with family astronomy nights will be provided.

  17. Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program in New Zealand in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, Dave; Smith, Ron; Taylor, Mike; Doyle, Jim; Eckermann, Steve; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Rapp, Markus; Williams, Biff; Bossert, Katrina; Pautet, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, Tasmania, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements beginning in late May and extending beyond the airborne component. DEEPWAVE employed two aircraft, the NSF/NCAR GV and the German DLR Falcon. The GV carried the standard flight-level instruments, dropsondes, and the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP). It also hosted new airborne lidar and imaging instruments built specifically to allow quantification of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes (e.g., orography, convection, jet streams, fronts, and secondary GW generation) throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-100 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) was also developed for the GV, and together with additional IR "wing" cameras, imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar able to measure radial winds below the Falcon where aerosol backscatter was sufficient. Additional ground-based instruments included a 449 MHz boundary layer radar, balloons at multiple sites, two ground-based Rayleigh lidars, a second ground-based AMTM, a Fabry Perot interferometer measuring winds and temperatures at ~87 and 95 km, and a meteor radar measuring winds from ~80-100 km. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights, 13 Falcon flights, and an extensive series of ground-based measurements whether or not the aircraft were flying. Together, these observed many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation

  18. Future Professional Communication in Astronomy II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto

    The present volume gathers together the talks presented at the second colloquium on the Future Professional Communication in Astronomy (FPCAII), held at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, MA) on 13-14 April 2010. This meeting provided a forum for editors, publishers, scientists, librarians and officers of learned societies to discuss the future of the field. The program included talks from leading researchers and practitioners and drew a crowd of approximately 50 attendees from 10 countries. These proceedings contain contributions from invited and contributed talks from leaders in the field, touching on a number of topics. Among them: The role of disciplinary repositories such as ADS and arXiv in astronomy and the physical sciences; Current status and future of Open Access Publishing models and their impact on astronomy and astrophysics publishing; Emerging trends in scientific article publishing: semantic annotations, multimedia content, links to data products hosted by astrophysics archives; Novel approaches to the evaluation of facilities and projects based on bibliometric indicators; Impact of Government mandates, Privacy laws, and Intellectual Property Rights on the evolving digital publishing environment in astronomy; Communicating astronomy to the public: the experience of the International Year of Astronomy 2009.

  19. Astronomy Education and Outreach in a Large Urban University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, L.

    2010-10-01

    This presentation outlines initiatives in astronomy education undertaken within a large urban university in Canada and discusses the role of science librarians in promoting awareness of educational resources in astronomy. Education and public outreach was a key theme during the International Year of Astronomy 2009. A local campus-based observatory program with an interactive chat facility that provides live online viewing of telescope images of the night sky is described, along with a discussion of its role in public outreach. As the learning commons concept is developed in the library it will create more opportunities for partnering with science faculty and the campus observatory to support educational initiatives in astronomy.

  20. Effectively Engaging Family Groups in Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob

    2006-12-01

    Can family astronomy programs be designed that engage entire family groups in learning and not just support the learning of one or two children in the family group? Can parents be trained ‘on the fly’ to engage in leading their children’s science learning? Can children and their parents find roles that allow them to learn together as a group? I will present results from a two new sets of family astronomy programs that work towards getting a “YES!” in reply to all three questions.

  1. Strategies for Astronomy Development in the Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy in the Southeast Asia has significantly growth. New telescopes and instruments, number of astronomers and astronomical activities have been increased during the past decade. Nevertheless, there are still some constraints for the development of astronomy in the Southeast Asia, especially national policy and funding in astronomy, proper scientific training programs, critical number of astronomers and concrete collaboration in the region.Long-term plans for key science direction, infrastructures, human resources and capacity buildings need to be considered for the sustainable development of Astronomy in the region. Southeast Asian Regional Office for Astronomy Development: SEA ROAD will take an important role for the regional collaboration and accomplishment on the development in astronomy in the Southeast Asia.

  2. Teaching Astronomy with Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Students today are expected to have access to computers and the Internet. Students young and old, in school and out of school, are interested in learning about astronomy, and have computers to use for this. Teach Astronomy is a website with a comprehensive digital astronomy textbook freely available to students and educators. In addition to the textbook, there are astronomy Wikipedia articles, image archives from Astronomy Picture of the Day and AstroPix, and video lectures covering all topics of astronomy. Teach Astronomy has a unique search tool called the wikimap that can be used to search through all of the resources on the site. Astronomy: State of the Art (ASOTA) is a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Over 18,000 students have enrolled over the past year and half. This MOOC has been presented in various forms. First, only to students on the web, with content released weekly on host site Udemy. Then to university students who met formally in the classroom for educational activities, but were also expected to watch lectures online on their own time. Presently, it is available online for students to go at their own pace. In the future it will be available in an extended format on a new host site, Coursera. ASOTA instructors use social media to interact with students. Students ask questions via the course host site, Udemy. Live question and answer sessions are conducted using Google Hangouts on Air, and interesting and relevant astronomy news, or supplementary educational content is shared via the ASOTA Facebook page. Teaching on the Internet may seem impersonal and impractical, but by learning to use all of these tools, instructors have the ability to interact with students, and keep them engaged.

  3. Worldviews of Introductory Astronomy Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Chrystin; Wallace, C. S.; Brissenden, G.; Prather, E. E.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS)

    2014-01-01

    As a part of a larger project to study introductory astronomy students’ worldviews and beliefs about the role of science in society, we examined students’ responses to a subset of questions designed to probe students’ worldviews and how they change after taking a general education, introductory astronomy course (Astro 101). Specifically, we looked at about 400 students’ choices for the top ten scientific discoveries in the past 150 years. We collected students’ rankings twice: Once at the start of their Astro 101 class and once at the end. We created a rubric that we used to categorize the responses and we established the inter-rater reliability of the rubric. Our results show that students preferentially answered with topics related to technology and health and medicine. The data also show that there was an increase, pre- to post-instruction, in the number of responses in the technology and health and medicine categories. We also saw a decrease in the number of responses in the science category. These results imply that an aspect of the course specifically implemented to broaden student’s views on science in relation to society was successful. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0847170, for the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) program. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  4. The Future of Space Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, George B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of space astronomy, considering advantages, the space telescope and ground-based astronomy, an orbiting astrophysics facility, solar physics, and other areas. Indicates that earth-based astronomy will continue to be carried out there and space astronomy will be limited to observations that can be carried out only from…

  5. Mathematical Astronomy in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plofker, Kim

    Astronomy in South Asia's Sanskrit tradition, apparently originating in simple calendric computations regulating the timing of ancient ritual practices, expanded over the course of two or three millennia to include detailed spherical models, an endless variety of astrological systems, and academic mathematics in general. Assimilating various technical models, methods, and genres from the astronomy of neighboring cultures, Indian astronomers created new forms that were in turn borrowed by their foreign counterparts. Always recognizably related to the main themes of Eurasian geocentric mathematical astronomy, Indian astral science nonetheless maintained its culturally distinct character until Keplerian heliocentrism and Newtonian mechanics replaced it in colonial South Asia's academic mainstream.

  6. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    A recent paper in this journal1 presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses.2-4 Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In this paper we describe the use of Tracker in introductory astronomy to analyze a ``video'' consisting of a series of still images of star fields and sunspots. Because astronomy focuses on concepts unfamiliar to most students, the visualization that video analysis provides can be especially valuable.

  7. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannone, John C.

    2011-05-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a point of conclusion to a lecture. This presentation will give examples of these things from the ancient literature (sacred Hebraic texts), classical literature (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey), traditional poetry (Longfellow, Tennyson and Poe) and modern literature (Frost, Kooser, and others, including the contemporary work of this author).

  8. Reports on astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. M.

    The current activities of the International Astronomical Union in organizing observational campaigns, establishing standards, and facilitating scientific communication are reviewed in reports submitted by the commission presidents. Topics examined include ephemerides, celestial mechanics, positional astronomy, instruments and techniques, solar activity, atomic and molecular data, planetary science, the rotation of the earth, meteors and interplanetary dust, photographic astrometry, double and multiple stars, variables, galaxies, stellar spectra, radial velocities, and the structure and dynamics of the Galactic system. Consideration is given to interstellar matter, stellar constitution, the theory of stellar atmospheres, star clusters and associations, radio astronomy, close binaries, astronomy from space, stellar classification, cosmology, high-energy astrophysics, and the search for extraterrestrial life.

  9. Astronomy in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, Hernan

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the current state of Astronomy in Argentina and describes its origins. We briefly describe the institutions where astronomical research takes place, the observational facilities available, the training of staff and professionals, and the role of the institutions in scientific promotion. We also discuss the outreach of Astronomy towards the general public, as well as amateur activities. The article ends with an analysis of the future prospects of astronomy in Argentina. Although we have tried to be as objective as possible, some statements inevitably contain some personal views.

  10. Telescopes in education: the great optical astronomy experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gilbert A.

    2000-10-01

    The idea for developing the Telescopes In Education (TIE) program began around 1990. While working with Boy Scouts, it became apparent that optical astronomy captivated the interest of more boys and their parents than any other Merit Badge that I had worked with in the past. That was the beginning of the learning curve in astronomy and optical instruments.

  11. A Radio Astronomy Curriculum for STARLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltuch, D.; Hund, L.; Buck, S.; Fultz, C.; Smith, T.; Harris, R.; Castelaz, M. W.; Moffett, D.; LaFratta, M.; Walsh, L.

    2005-12-01

    We present elements of a curriculum that will accompany the STARLAB module "Sensing the Radio Sky" a portable planetarium program and projection of the radio sky. The curriculum will serve to familiarize high school students to a set of topics in radio astronomy. The curriculum includes lessons and activities addressing several topics related to radio astronomy and the Milky Way that consists of two main resources: a manual and a multimedia website. It is designed to accommodate a wide variety of possible uses and time constraints. The manufacturer of STARLAB, Learning Technologies, Inc. produces a short manual to accompany each presentation for the STARLAB. The "Sensing the Radio Sky" manual we have created includes the mandatory, minimum background information that students need to understand radio astronomy. It briefly discusses waves and electromagnetic radiation, similarities and differences between optical and radio astronomy, probable misconceptions about radio astronomy, how radio images are produced, synchrotron radiation in the Milky Way, and galactic coordinates. It also includes a script that presenters can choose to follow inside the STARLAB, a lesson plan for teachers, and activities for students to complete before and after the STARLAB experience that mirror the scientific method. The multimedia website includes more detailed information about electromagnetic radiation and a more detailed comparison of optical and radio astronomy. It also discusses the life cycles of stars, radiation from a variety of specific sources, and pulsars, as each relates to radio astronomy. The five highly detailed lessons are pulled together in sixth "overview lesson", intended for use by teachers who want to present more than the basic material in the manual, but do not have the classroom time to teach all five of the in-depth lessons. . We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  12. 2005 College Astronomy Teaching Excellence Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, E. E.; Slater, T. F.; Greene, W. M.; Thaller, M.; Brissenden, G.; UA Steward Observatory CAPER Team; NASA JPL Navigator EPO CenterAstrononomy Education Team; NASA Spitzer EPO Team

    2004-12-01

    As part of the education and public outreach efforts of the NASA JPL Navigator and Spitzer EPO Programs along with the American Astronomical Society and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, astronomy educators affiliated with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona are conducting a series of two- and three-day teaching excellence workshops for college faculty. These regional workshops are being held at community colleges around the country and in conjunction with professional society meetings, such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, and through the infrastructure of the National Science Foundation's Summer Chautauqua Workshop program. These interactive teaching excellence workshops focus on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses and construct effective course syllabi reflecting the ASTRO 101 goals publicized by the AAS. To improve instruction, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. Texts used at the workshop include: (i) Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching, Slater and Adams, Prentice Hall, 2002; (ii) Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy, Pompea, Brooks Cole, 2000; Insights into the Universe, Slater and Zeilik, and (iv) Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, Adams, Prather, & Slater, Prentice Hall, 2005.

  13. Astronomy, Astrology, and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Dorian Gieseler

    Astronomy and astrology were combined with medicine for thousands of years. Beginning in Mesopotamia in the second millennium BCE and continuing into the eighteenth century, medical practitioners used astronomy/astrology as an important part of diagnosis and prescription. Throughout this time frame, scientists cited the similarities between medicine and astrology, in addition to combining the two in practice. Hippocrates and Galen based medical theories on the relationship between heavenly bodies and human bodies. In an enduring cultural phenomenon, parts of the body as well as diseases were linked to zodiac signs and planets. In Renaissance universities, astronomy and astrology were studied by students of medicine. History records a long tradition of astrologer-physicians. This chapter covers the topic of astronomy, astrology, and medicine from the Old Babylonian period to the Enlightenment.

  14. The Astronomy Education Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S. C.; Fraknoi, A.

    2001-12-01

    We announce the launch the Astronomy Education Review, a new electronic journal designed to serve 5 educational arenas in astronomy and space science: K-12, undergraduate, graduate, informal, and outreach. The journal will publish reviewed/refereed papers on research in astronomy education (both new work and papers reprinted from other journals); commentary on how to apply results of astronomy education research in "real life;" short reports on innovative techniques, approaches, activities, and materials; annotated lists of useful resources plus announcements of opportunities in education (funding, cooperation, employment, workshops and symposia, materials testing, etc.); and editorials, resource reviews, opinion pieces, and interactive discussions. This paper provides information on how to access the journal and how to submit papers to it.

  15. Women in Astronomy 2009

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space science research institutions have traditionally been populated by a strong male workforce, but this structure is rapidly changing. To help meet these challenges, the "Women in Astronomy and ...

  16. Cultural Astronomy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Steven L.

    While Japan is known more for its contributions to modern astronomy than its archaeoastronomical sites, there is still much about the culture's heritage that is of interest in the study of cultural astronomy. This case study provides an overview of historical considerations necessary to understand the place of astronomy in Japanese society as well as methodological considerations that highlight traditional approaches that have at times been a barrier to interdisciplinary research. Some specific areas of study in the cultural astronomy of Japan are discussed including examples of contemporary research based on interdisciplinary approaches. Japan provides a fascinating background for scholars who are willing to go beyond their curiosity for sites of alignment and approach the culture with a desire to place astronomical iconography in social context.

  17. Astronomy in Everyday Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Bladon, G.; Russo, P.; Christensen, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    For a long time astronomers and other scientists believed that the importance of their work was evident to society. But in these difficult days of financial austerity, even the most obvious benefits of science have to undergo careful scrutiny. So, now more than ever is the time to highlight the importance of astronomy as a field in terms of its contributions to our technology, our mind sets and our lives. Here we will outline both the tangible and intangible reasons why astronomy is an important part of society. Whilst considerable attention will be given to technology and knowledge transfer from astronomy, perhaps the most important contribution outlined is the awareness that astronomy gives us of the vastness of the Universe and our place within it.

  18. Astronomy in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Mexican astronomy has a long standing tradition of excellence in research. After a brief review of its history, I outline the current profile of the community, the available infrastructure and participating institutions, and give a glimpse into the future through current projects. The development of astronomy can serve as a powerful lever for science, technological development, education and outreach, as well as for improving the much needed link between basic research and industry development.

  19. NASA thesaurus: Astronomy vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A terminology of descriptors used by the NASA Scientific and Technical information effort to index documents in the area of astronomy is presented. The terms are listed in hierarchical format derived from the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus Volume 1 -- Hierarchical Listing. Over 1600 terms are included. In addition to astronomy, space sciences covered include astrophysics, cosmology, lunar flight and exploration, meteors and meteorites, celestial mechanics, planetary flight and exploration, and planetary science.

  20. Popularising astronomy in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Babak A.

    2011-06-01

    The interest to astronomy has incredibly risen in the younger generation of Iranians during the last two decades. By the end of the devastating war with Iraq, science popularisation activities started again in Iran and with only a handful of astronomers and few dozens of serious amateur astronomers in the whole country in late 1980s now there are thousands of amateur astronomers (60% female on average) and over 100 professional astronomers propelling the fun and science of astronomy in the society.

  1. Native American (K-5) and Math (9 - 12 ) Astronomy Lessons Plans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canterna, Ronald W.; Singer, E.; Hoffman, J.

    2007-12-01

    As part of the education component of the Wyoming RET program astronomy lesson plans were developed for elementary and senior HS students. E. Singer developed a thematic unit for grades K-5 based on Native American astronomy. J Hoffman developed lesson plans for high school (9-12) math classes based on astronomy topics. Both plans will be present.

  2. Bad Astronomy Goes Hollywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plait, P.

    2003-05-01

    It can be argued that astronomy is the oldest of all the sciences, so you'd think that after all this time people would have a pretty good understanding of it. In reality, however, misconceptions about astronomy abound, and even basic concepts are misunderstood. There are many sources of these cosmic misconceptions, including incorrect textbooks, parents and/or teachers who don't understand astronomy and therefore spread misinformation, urban legends, and so on. Perhaps the most pervasive source of bad astronomy is Hollywood. Science fiction movies are enormously popular, but are commonly written and directed by people who don't have even a passing familiarity with astronomy. The smash hit "Armageddon" (the number one box office movie of 1998), for example, used vast quantities of incorrect astronomy in the plot. It reinforced such popular misconceptions as huge asteroids impacting the Earth with little warning, small meteorites being hot when they impact, air existing in space, and that a simple bomb can blow up an asteroid the size of a small moon (even when the bomb is buried only 800 feet deep!). However, movie scenes can be used as a hook that engages the student, helping them learn and remember the correct science. In this talk, I will light-heartedly discuss specific examples of common misinformation, using movie clips, diagrams, and a splash of common sense to show just where Hollywood gets it wrong, and what you can do to help students and the public get it right.

  3. Astronomy and Mathematics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    There are many European countries where Astronomy does not appear as a specific course on the secondary school. In these cases Astronomy content can be introduced by means of other subjects. There are some astronomical topics within the subject of Physics but this talk concerns introducing Astronomy in Mathematics classes. Teaching Astronomy through Mathematics would result in more exposure than through Physics as Mathematics is more prevalent in the curriculum. Generally it is not easy to motivate students in Mathematics but they are motivated to find out more about the universe and Astronomy current events than appears in the media. This situation can be an excellent introduction to several mathematics topics. The teachers in secondary and high school can use this idea in order to present more attractive mathematics courses. In particular some different examples will be offered regarding * Angles and spherical coordinates considering star traces * Logarithms and visual magnitudes * Plane trigonometry related orbital movements * Spherical trigonometry in connection with ecliptic obliquity * Conic curves related to sundial at several latitudes Some students do not enjoy studying Mathematics but they can be attracted by practical situations using Applied Mathematics: Astronomy is always very attractive to teenagers.

  4. Conceptual frameworks in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pundak, David

    2016-06-01

    How to evaluate students' astronomy understanding is still an open question. Even though some methods and tools to help students have already been developed, the sources of students' difficulties and misunderstanding in astronomy is still unclear. This paper presents an investigation of the development of conceptual systems in astronomy by 50 engineering students, as a result of learning a general course on astronomy. A special tool called Conceptual Frameworks in Astronomy (CFA) that was initially used in 1989, was adapted to gather data for the present research. In its new version, the tool included 23 questions, and five to six optional answers were given for each question. Each of the answers was characterized by one of the four conceptual astronomical frameworks: pre-scientific, geocentric, heliocentric and sidereal or scientific. The paper describes the development of the tool and discusses its validity and reliability. Using the CFA we were able to identify the conceptual frameworks of the students at the beginning of the course and at its end. CFA enabled us to evaluate the paradigmatic change of students following the course and also the extent of the general improvement in astronomical knowledge. It was found that the measure of the students’ improvement (gain index) was g = 0.37. Approximately 45% of the students in the course improved their understanding of conceptual frameworks in astronomy and 26% deepened their understanding of the heliocentric or sidereal conceptual frameworks.

  5. Astronomy Across Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ted

    2014-01-01

    African astronomy is growing rapidly. The Southern African Large Telescope is the largest optical telescope in the southern hemisphere, MeerKat and the Square Kilometer Array will revolutionize radio astronomy in the coming decade, and Namibia hosts HESS II, the world’s largest gamma-ray telescope. A growing community of observational and theoretical astronomers utilizes these multi-wavelength observational facilities. The largest concentrations of researchers are in southern Africa, but the community is now expanding across the continent. Substantial resources are being invested in developing the next generation of African astronomers. The African Astronomical Society was formed in 2011 to foster and coordinate the growth of the science in Africa. The IAU has located its global Office of Astronomy for Development in South Africa, with the mandate to find innovative ways of using astronomy to promote social and educational development around the world. African astronomy offers abundant opportunities for collaborative research with colleagues from across the globe. This special session will introduce many of the aspects of African astronomy to the US community, with the aim of engendering new partnerships and strengthening existing ones.

  6. The USGS Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) program: CD-ROMs expand potential for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Kover, A.N.; Schoonmaker, J.W. Jr.; Pohn. H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) began the systematic collection of Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) data in 1980. The SLAR image data, useful for many geologic applications including petroleum exploration, are compiled into mosaics using the USGS 1:250,000-scale topographic map series for format and control. Mosaics have been prepared for over 35% of the United States. Image data collected since 1985 are also available as computer compatible tapes (CCTs) for digital analysis. However, the use of tapes is often cumbersome. To make digital data more readily available for use on a microcomputer, the USGS has started to prepare compact discs-read only memory (CD-ROM). Several experimental discs have been compiled to demonstrate the utility of the medium to make available very large data sets. These discs include necessary nonproprietary software text, radar, and other image data. The SLAR images selected for these discs show significantly different geologic features and include the Long Valley caldera, a section of the San Andreas fault in the Monterey area, the Grand Canyon, and glaciers in southeastern Alaska. At present, several CD-ROMs are available as standard products distributed by the USGS EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57198. This is also the source for all USGS SLAR photographic and digital material.

  7. The US Geological Survey's side-looking airborne radar acquisition program: Image data from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Kovar, A.N.; Schoonmaker, J.W. Jr. )

    1993-04-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) has been systematically collecting side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) image data for the US since 1980. The image strip swaths, ranging in width from 20 to 46 km, are acquired commercially by X-band (3 cm) radar systems. Data are acquired with 60 percent side-lap for better mosaic preparation and stereoscopic capability. The image strips are assembled into 1[degree] x 2[degree] mosaic quadrangles that are based on the USGS 1:250,000-topographic map series for control, format, and nomenclature. These mosaics present the data in a broad synoptic view that facilitates geologic interpretation. SLAR image mosaics have been prepared for more than 35 percent of the US west of the Rocky Mountain front. In addition to quadrangle mosaics, regional composite mosaics have been prepared as value-added products. These include Pacific Northwest (14 quadrangles), southern California Coastal (from San Francisco to San Diego), Reno-Walker (includes parts of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks), Uinta Basin (Salt Lake City, Price and Grand Junction), and Salton Sea Region (San Diego, Santa Ana, El Centro and Salton Sea). Most of the image data are available on computer compatible tapes and photographic products. To make the data more accessible and reasonably priced, the strip images are being processed into CD-ROM (compact disc, read-only memory). One demonstration CD-ROM includes the mosaics of Las Vegas, Mariposa, Ritzville, Walla Walla, and Pendleton quadrangles.

  8. International Year of Astronomy (IYA): A Boost to Astronomy Education in Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazine, Angela R.; Albin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) activities at Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA (USA). The global focus of IYA was to celebrate astronomy and its cultural / scientific contributions, which correlate with the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first look at the heavens with a small telescope. Our planetarium and observatory utilized this opportunity to increase astronomy awareness and education locally. A plethora of special events were organized including two planetarium productions about Galileo and the telescope, special displays in the exhibit hall, two astronaut lectures, a children's workshop with Galileoscopes, and even a Galileo impersonator. Such IYA-related programs increased our overall annual attendance while at the same time served to re-introduce our local audience to astronomy in a creative way.

  9. A Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Mridha, Shahjahan; Afroz, Maqsuda

    2015-08-01

    In its strategic planning for the "Astronomy for Development Project," the International Astronomical Union (IAU) has ecognized, among other important missions, the role of astronomy in understanding the far-reaching possibilities for promoting global tolerance and citizenship. Furthermore, astronomy is deemed inspirational for careers in science and technology. The "Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh"--the first of its kind in the country--aspires to fulfill these missions. As Bangladesh lacks resources to promote astronomy education in universities and schools, the role of disseminating astronomy education to the greater community falls on citizen science organizations. One such group, Anushandhitshu Chokro (AChokro) Science Organization, has been carrying out a successful public outreach program since 1975. Among its documented public events, AChokro organized a total solar eclipse campaign in Bangladesh in 2009, at which 15,000 people were assembled in a single open venue for the eclipse observation. The organization has actively pursued astronomy outreach to dispel public misconceptions about astronomical phenomena and to promote science. AChokro is currently working to build an observatory and Science Outreach Center around a recently-acquired 14-inch Scmidt-Cassegrain telescope and a soon-to-be-acquired new 16-inch reflector, all funded by private donations. The telescopes will be fitted with photometers, spectrometers, and digital and CCD cameras to pursue observations that would include sun spot and solar magnetic fields, planetary surfaces, asteroid search, variable stars and supernovae. The Center will be integrated with schools, colleges, and community groups for regular observation and small-scale research. Special educational and observing sessions for adults will also be organized. Updates on the development of the Center, which is expected to be functioning by the end of 2015, will be shared and feedback invited on the fostering of

  10. Ultraviolet Stellar Astronomy - Skylab Experiment S019

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This chart provides information about Skylab's Ultraviolet (UV) Stellar Astronomy experiment (SO19), a scientific airlock-based facility/experiment that would study UV spectra of early-type stars and galaxies. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  11. SOFIA - Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.

    1992-01-01

    The features and scientific aims of SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy), a planned 2.5 m telescope to be installed in an aircraft and operated at altitudes from 41,000 to 46,000 ft, are discussed. A brief overview of the SOFIA program is given.

  12. Astronomy and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    2009-10-01

    The problems of teaching of astronomy in the schools of the former communist countries has been disccused in the connection with the genealogical (family names) of the Presidents of the Countries and scientists astronomers and other Country leaders. Particularly the recent decision of the Russian authorities to reduce the hours for the course of astronomy in the Russian secondary schools is supposed to critics. Some improvements of the situation has been reported. The hours for the astronomy teaching in Russia varry, according with the will of Ministers of Education of the Countries, Prime ministers and Presidents. Similar news came from the Romania. In conclusion, there is no a stable curriculum for astronomy (physics) in some countries. This reffer especially to the number of hours. The influence of presidents of the Countries is so great, that the fate of the astronomy teaching (probably of science teaching in general), that it is difficult to have a scientific education in a country without an elementary scientific education of the Leaders of the Countries, particularly of the persons above. An incomplete list of political leaders and scientists (astronomers and physicists) with the same family names is given. Since the number of persons with decision power in the area is about 3 per country in 4 years, the modern astronomy is taught during about 200 years, the total number of family names responsible for the area of astronomy teaching throughout the world during the last 200 years is about 10000. A similar calculation could be made for physics teaching. Another aspect of the problem is the relation of the number of publications with the GDP/capita of the country. The relation between science and policy is mediated by the number of papers /population which "grosso modo" is proportional to the GDP/capita for the country given. Subsequently the GDP/capita corellates strongly with the policy. The SPIRES database ilustrates this with evidence, but with taking in

  13. Astronomy for a Better World”: IAU/OAD Task Force One Activities to Develop Astronomy Education and Research at Universities in the Developing World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Kolenberg, Katrien

    2015-08-01

    The Task Force (1) on Astronomy for Universities & Research (TF-1) was established in 2012 as part of the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD). This Task Force drives activities related to astronomy education and research at universities mainly in the developing world. Astronomy is used to stimulate research and education in STEM fields and to develop and promote astronomy in regions of the world where there is little or no astronomy. There is also potential for developing research in the historical and cultural aspects of astronomy which may prove important for stimulating an interest in the subject in communities where there is yet no established interest in the science.Since the establishment of the OAD, over 25 TF-1 programs have been funded (or partially funded) to support a wide variety of interesting and innovative astronomy programs in Africa, Asia, South-East Asia, Middle-East, and in South & Central America. Nearly every aspect of development has been supported. These programs include supporting: regional astronomy training schools, specialized workshops, research visits, university twinning programs, distance learning projects, university astronomy curriculum development, as well as small telescope and equipment grants. In addition, a large new program - Astrolab - was introduced (by J-P De Greve and Michele Gerbaldi) to bring starlight” into the class room. In the Astrolab program students carry out and reduce CCD photometry secured by them using remotely controlled telescopes. Results from pilot programs will be discussed.OAD TF-1 programs will be discussed along with future plans for improving and expanding these programs to bring astronomy education and research to a greater number of people and indeed to use Astronomy for a Better World. Information and advice will also be provided about applying for support in the future.

  14. Astronomy in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2010-07-01

    Which is more appropriate? “Astronomy in culture,” or “Astronomy and culture,” or “Culture without astronomy?” These are only few variants, each with its own sense. I guess the last question is the most pertinent. Does culture really exist without astronomy? The existence and evolution of the human civilization answer NO! But what “culture” means? When we are thinking of a culture (the Hellenistic one, for instance), we mean a set of customs, artistic, religious, intellectual manifestations that differentiate one group or society from another. On the other hand, we often use the notion of culture in a different sense: shared beliefs, ways of regarding and doing, which orient more or less consciously the behavior of an individual or a group. An example would be the laic culture. Moreover, the set of knowledge acquired in one or several domains also constitutes a culture, for instance the scientific culture of an individual or a group. Finally, the set of cultures is nothing else but the civilization. Now, if we come back in time into the history of civilization, we find a permanent component, which was never missing and often played a decisive part in its evolution: the Astronomy.

  15. Assessing NASE Professional Development in Astronomy Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana E.; Garcia, Beatriz; Ros, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2009, the Network for Astronomy School Education (NASE) has held 55+ workshops in countries in Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America, training more than 1200 teachers and potentially reaching one million or more students. Like most modern professional development programs, NASE's emphasis is on interactive, hands-on learning. However, our emphasis is on "low-tech" tools that are readily available, and, inexpensive. Teachers are led through a series of activities that cover a wide range of topics in astronomy, more or less equivalent to that covered in the typical 1st year astronomy course in US colleges.In 2014 we adopted the Astronomy Diagnostic Test as pre- and post- workshop tests to gauge the change in teachers' knowledge as a result of participation in this intervention. We chose the ADT because it is a reliable and validated instrument and is available in Spanish. In this paper we discuss our results using the Astronomy Diagnostic Test 2.0 in several countries.

  16. Astronomy 101 in Washington State High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Julie H.; Garner, S.; Stetter, T.; McKeever, J.; Santo Pietro, V.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Washington in the High School (UWHS) program enables high schools to offer the 5 quarter credits Astronomy 101 (Astr 101) course for college credits. The credits are transferable to most colleges and universities. The course provides an alternative to advance placement courses and programs such as Washington's Running Start whereby high school students take courses at community colleges. Astr 101 focuses on stars, galaxies and the universe, as well as background topics such as gravitation, electromagnetic radiation and telescopes. The course satisfies the UW "natural world” and "quantitative/symbolic reasoning” distribution requirements. Students must pay a fee to enroll, but the credits cost less than half what they would cost for the course if taken on one of the UW campuses. The course can be offered as either one semester or full-year at the high school. Teachers who offer Astr 101 must be approved in advance by the UW Astronomy Department, and their syllabi and course materials approved also. Teachers receive orientation, professional development opportunities, classroom visits and support (special web site, answering questions, making arrangements for campus visits, planetarium visits) from astronomy department course coordinator. The UWHS Astr 101 program has produced positive outcomes for the astronomy department, the participating teachers and the students who complete the course. In this poster we will discuss our 5 years of experience with offering Astr 101, including benefits to the students, teachers, high schools, university and department, student outcomes, course assessments and resources for offering the course.

  17. Astronomy Librarian - Quo Vadis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerstrom, Jill; Grothkopf, Uta

    "You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of some of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of Open Access, to name but a few topics.

  18. Python in Astronomy 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Robitaille, Thomas; Tollerud, Erik; Mumford, Stuart; Cruz, Kelle

    2016-04-01

    The second Python in Astronomy conference will be held from 21-25 March 2016 at the University of Washington eScience Institute in Seattle, WA, USA. Similarly to the 2015 meeting (which was held at the Lorentz Center), we are aiming to bring together researchers, Python developers, users, and educators. The conference will include presentations, tutorials, unconference sessions, and coding sprints. In addition to sharing information about state-of-the art Python Astronomy packages, the workshop will focus on improving interoperability between astronomical Python packages, providing training for new open-source contributors, and developing educational materials for Python in Astronomy. The meeting is therefore not only aimed at current developers, but also users and educators who are interested in being involved in these efforts.

  19. The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Christopher; Frey, Katie

    2015-08-01

    The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus (UAT) is an open, interoperable and community-supported thesaurus which unifies the existing divergent and isolated Astronomy & Astrophysics vocabularies into a single high-quality, freely-available open thesaurus formalizing astronomical concepts and their inter-relationships. The UAT builds upon both the International Astronomical Union Thesaurus and the International Virtual Observatory Alliance Thesaurus with major contributions from the astronomy portions of the thesauri developed by the Institute of Physics Publishing, the American Institute of Physics, and SPIE, donated to the American Astronomical Society (AAS). In this talk, I will describe the effort behind the creation of the UAT, its continued development through the leadership of the AAS, and discuss some of its current and potential applications.

  20. Astronomy Outreach for Special Needs Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2008-06-01

    While there are many outreach programs for the public and for children, there are few programs for special needs children. I describe a NASA-STScI-IDEAS funded outreach program I created for children using a telescope (including remote and robotic observations), hands-on astronomy demonstrations (often with edible ingredients). The target audience is seriously ill children with special medical needs and their families who are staying at the Long Island Ronald McDonald House in conjunction the children's surgery and medical treatments at local hospitals. These educational activities help children and their families learn about astronomy while providing a diversion to take their minds off their illness during a stressful time. A related program for hospitalized children has been started at the Hagedorn Pediatric Inpatient Center at Winthrop University Hospital.

  1. Radio astronomy with microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic constellation of microspacecraft in lunar orbit can carry out valuable radio astronomy investigations in the frequency range of 30kHz--30MHz, a range that is difficult to explore from Earth. In contrast to the radio astronomy ivestigations that have flown on individual spacecraft, the four microspacecraft together with a carrier spacecraft, which transported them to lunar orbit, form an interferometer with far superior angular resolution. Use of microspacecraft allows the entire constellation to be launched with a Taurus-class vehicle. Also distinguishing this approach is that the Moon is used as needed to shield the constellation from RF interference from the Earth and Sun.

  2. Astronomy before the telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C.

    This book is the most comprehensive and authoritative survey to date of world astronomy before the telescope in AD 1609. International experts have contributed chapters examining what observations were made, what instruments were used, the effect of developments in mathematics and measurement, and the diversity of early views of cosmology and astrology. The achievements of European astronomers from prehistoric times to the Renaissance are linked with those of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, India and the Islamic world. Other chapters deal with early astronomy in the Far East and in the Americas, and with traditional astronomical knowledge in Africa, Australia and the Pacific.

  3. Astronomy in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabti, A. W.

    2006-08-01

    The history of modern Iraqi astronomy is reviewed. During the early 1970's Iraqi astronomy witnessed significant growth through the introduction of the subject at university level and extensively within the school curriculum. In addition, astronomy was popularised in the media, a large planetarium was built in Baghdad, plus a smaller one in Basra. Late 1970 witnessed the construction of the Iraqi National Observatory at Mount Korek in Iraqi Kurdistan. The core facilities of the Observatory included 3.5-meter and 1.25-meter optical telescopes, and a 30-meter radio telescope for millimetre wavelength astronomy. The Iraqi Astronomical Society was founded and Iraq joined the IAU in 1976. During the regime of Saddam Hussain in the 1980's, the Observatory was attacked by Iranian artillery during the Iraq-Iran war, and then again during the second Gulf war by the US air force. Years of sanctions during the 1990's left Iraq cut off from the rest of the international scientific community. Subscriptions to astronomical journals were halted and travel to conferences abroad was virtually non-existent. Most senior astronomers left the country for one reason or another. Support from expatriate Iraqi astronomers existed (and still exists) however, this is not sufficient. Recent changes in Iraq, and the fall of Saddam's regime, has meant that scientific communication with the outside world has resumed to a limited degree. The Ministry of Higher Education in Baghdad, Baghdad University and the Iraqi National Academy of Science, have all played active roles in re-establishing Iraqi astronomy and re-building the damaged Observatory at Mount Korek. More importantly the University of Sallahudin in Erbil, capital of Iraqi Kurdistan, has taken particular interest in astronomy and the Observatory. Organized visits to the universities, and also to the Observatory, have given us a first-hand assessment of the scale of the damage to the Observatory, as well as the needs of astronomy teaching

  4. Astronomical Book Trek: Astronomy Books of 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1984-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of technical and non-technical astronomy books. Topic areas of non-technical books include general astronomy, amateur astronomy, computers and astronomy, history of astronomy, pseudoscience, space exploration, physics and astronomy, and textbooks. Each entry includes author, title, description, source, and current cost.…

  5. Popular Astronomy in the World and in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    A review on the popular astronomy and astronomy outreach in the world and in Armenia is given. Various ways and methods of popularization of astronomy are described. The International Year of Astronomy (IYA-2009), amateur astronomy, publication of books and other materials, the database of astronomical books, AstroBook exhibition, science-popular articles, "Astghagitak" online science-popular astronomical journal, calendar of astronomical events, databases of Solar and Lunar eclipses 2001-2050, planetary triple conjunctions 2001-2050, and of periodic comets at ArAS webpage, ArAS School Lectures Program, public lectures, "Universe" club at "Mkhitar Sebastatsi" educational ensemble, the online database of Armenian astronomers, biographies of famous Armenian astronomers, astronomers' anniversaries, scientific journalism of Armenia, and "Mass media news" section at ArAS webpage are described and discussed.

  6. Quickly Creating Interactive Astronomy Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    An innate advantage for astronomy teachers is having numerous breathtaking images of the cosmos available to capture students' curiosity, imagination, and wonder. Internet-based astronomy image libraries are numerous and easy to navigate. The Astronomy Picture of the Day, the Hubble Space Telescope image archive, and the NASA Planetary…

  7. School-Based Extracurricular Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy in 2009 focused considerable public attention on Astronomy and generated valuable resources for educators. These activities are an effective vehicle for promoting Science to students and to the wider school community. The most engaging practical astronomy activities are best delivered with sustained support from…

  8. Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Paul; Roberts, Sarah; Newsam, Andy; Barclay, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to summarise the good, bad and (occasionally) ugly aspects of teaching astronomy in UK schools. It covers the most common problems reported by teachers when asked about covering the astronomy/space topics in school. Particular focus is given to the GCSE Astronomy qualification offered by Edexcel (which is currently the…

  9. Developing Astronomy Research and Education in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sese, R. M. D.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N. Thijs

    2015-03-01

    In the past few years, the Philippines has been gradually developing its research and educational capabilities in astronomy and astrophysics. In terms of astronomy development, it is still lagging behind several neighboring Southeast Asian countries such as Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia, while it is advanced with respect to several others. One of the main issues hampering progress is the scarcity of trained professional Filipino astronomers, as well as long-term visions for astronomy development. Here, we will be presenting an overview of astronomy education and research in the country. We will discuss the history and current status of astronomy in the Philippines, including all levels of education, outreach and awareness activities, as well as potential areas for research and collaborations. We also discuss issues that need to be addressed to ensure sustainable astronomy development in the Philippines. Finally, we discuss several ongoing and future programs aimed at promoting astronomy research and education. In essence, the work is a precursor of a possible white paper which we envision to submit to the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) in the near future, with which we aim to further convince the authorities of the importance of astrophysics. With the support of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), this may eventually lead to the creation of a separate astronomy agency in the Philippines.

  10. Colonial American Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Donald K.

    2007-12-01

    While a foundation of German scientific methods enabled the rapid growth of North American Astronomy in the nineteenth century, during the seventeenth and most of the eighteenth centuries, the colonial men of science looked only to the English mother country for scientific patronage and guidance. An essay on fundamental astronomy appeared in one of the annual colonial almanacs as early as 1656, telescopic observations were made about 1660 and the first original colonial astronomical work was published by Thomas Danforth on the comet of 1664. By 1671 the Copernican ideas were so espoused at Harvard College that a physics class refused to read a Ptolemaic textbook when it was assigned to them by a senior instructor. At least in the Cambridge-Boston area, contemporary colonialist had access to the most recent scientific publications from the mother country. Observations of the great comet of 1680 by the Almanac maker, John Foster, reached Isaac Newton and were used and gratefully acknowledged in his Principia. During the seventeenth century the colonial interest in astronomy was more intense than it was for other sciences but colonists still occupied a position in the scientific backwater when compared with contemporary European scientists. Nevertheless, the science of astronomy was successfully transplanted from England to North America in the seventeenth century.

  11. Teaching Astronomy in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agar Beet, Ernest

    2016-02-01

    Preface; Preface to the second edition; Introduction. Teaching astronomy in the past: the case against teaching it; Addenda; 1. Why, when, and how?; 2. In the classroom; 3. In the open air; 4. The school telescope; 5. Teaching aids; Bibliography; Index.

  12. Astronomy Video Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, John

    2008-05-01

    One of Galileo's staunchest supporters during his lifetime was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants” was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. The Astronomy Video poster will contain all the basic information about the contest including: categories, rules, prizes, web address for more info and how to download the new song, "Shoulders of Giants.”

  13. Astronomy Video Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, John

    2008-05-01

    During Galileo's lifetime his staunchest supporter was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants” was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. During this presentation the basic categories, rules, and prizes for the Astronomy Video Contest will be covered and finally the new song "Shoulders of Giants” by THE CHROMATICS will be unveiled

  14. Astronomy on the Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santascoy, J.

    2016-01-01

    Many of us are interested in increasing youth and minority involvement in the sciences. Using art that integrates images of space exploration with ethnic astronomical mythology may increase participation in astronomy in general, while also forming a bridge to underrepresented communities. This paper describes a freely available presentation of Carlos Callejo's Discover the Secrets of the Universe Through the Library for outreach.

  15. Astronomy and Public Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    Astronomy is an unusual science in that almost all of what we study can only be passively observed. We enjoy tremendous public support for our research and education, both domestically and abroad. Our discoveries in cosmology and exoplanets have captured world-wide attention, as have stunning images from the Great Observatories of NASA, and ground based telescopes. Despite the passive nature of our science, it touches humanity profoundly. There are groups of amateur astronomers in every conceivable country who meet to look at the sky. Almost one billion people from 150 countries participated in The International Year of Astronomy 2009. No other science reaches humanity as ours does. In a recent poll, it was found that the among all the things the US does abroad, US science is seen by the world as our most positive face. We as astronomers can use this good will to affect positive changes in the world through public policy. I would like to explore how astronomy has impacted public policy, especially foreign policy, and what more we can do in the future. I also hope to encourage astronomers that a career path into public policy is an excellent use of a Ph.D. in astronomy.

  16. The Future of Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Jesse L.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a summary of the Reports of the Panels'' published by the Astronomy Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences in 1973, involving aspects of cosmology, quasars, exploding galaxies, stars, stellar evolution, solar system, organic molecules, life, and interstellar communication. Included are recommendations for scientific…

  17. Outlook for ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of galactic and extragalactic research is given with emphasis on the problems of temperature determination, chemical abundance determination, and the question about the energy sources for the high temperature regions. Stellar astronomy, stellar winds, and the interstellar medium are among the topics covered.

  18. The International Astronomy Olympiad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Michael G.

    2011-06-01

    The International Astronomy Olympiad (IAO) is an annual scientific-educating event for students of the junior high-school classes, aged 14-18 years. The Euro-Asian Astronomical Society founded the IAO in 1996. The Olympiad includes an intellectual competition between these students. The style of the problems is aimed at developping the imagination, creativity and independent thinking.

  19. The New Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henbest, Nigel; Marten, Michael

    1996-08-01

    There's more to the Universe than meets the eye. In a marvelous review of multi-wavelength astronomy, The New Astronomy compares traditional optical images to infrared, ultraviolet, radio, and X-ray astronomical observations of a staggering variety of cosmic objects. With over 300 photographs and images obtained by telescopes and detectors operating at different wavelengths, the authors present startlingly different views of the solar system, stars, galaxies and, in this new edition, Halley's Comet and Supernova 1987A. Specially processed by astronomers worldwide, these images reveal in spectacular detail otherwise invisible events such as starbirth, stardeath, and distant quasar eruptions. Emphasizing the physical processes that produce astronomical radiation, they explain how the observations have expanded our existing knowledge and provided new discoveries. They also describe the new techniques in nontechnical language. By giving equal weight to observations at all wavelengths, this book corrects the bias toward optical astronomy and objectively presents all views of the Universe. It will appeal to everyone interested in the mysteries of astronomy. Nigel Henbest and Michael Marten previously collaborated (along with Heather Couper) on The Guide to the Galaxy (CUP, 1994).

  20. X-ray Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    1973-01-01

    This new field, generated from observations above the atmosphere, has been an unexpected gift to astronomy by giving a better understanding of the role and importance of high energy phenomena. The history, instrumentation, and types of celestial sources observed are discussed. (DF)

  1. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses. Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In…

  2. History of Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberg, Marc

    1985-01-01

    Examines the development of American astronomy by discussing: general studies on the subject; early efforts through 1825; establishing foundations (1825-1875); the transitional period (1875-1945); and the space age (1945 to the present). Points out that the field is underdeveloped with a need for additional work. (JN)

  3. Astronomy posters. Abstracts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Woerden, H.

    Contents: IAU Symposia Nos. 164: Stellar populations. 165: Compact stars in binaries. 166: Astronomical and astrophysical objectives of sub-milliarcsecond optical astrometry. 167: New developments in array technology and applications. 168: Examining the Big Bang and diffuse background radiations. 169: Unsolved problems of the Milky Way. Joint Discussions Nos. 1: Gas disks in galaxies. 2: Origin and detection of planetary systems. 3: Helio- and asteroseismology. 4: Current developments in astronomy education. 5: Activity in the central parts of galaxies. 6: Sun and heliosphere - challenges for solar-terrestrial physics, magneto- and hydrodynamics. 7: History of astronomy. 8: Time scales - state of the art. 9: Women in astronomy. 10: Extragalactic planetary nebulae. 11: Stellar and interstellar lithium and primordial nucleosynthesis. 12: Accuracy of the HR diagram and related parameters. 13: Recent advances in convection theory and modelling. 14: Towards the establishment of the astronomical standards. 15: Statistical evaluation of astronomical time series. 16: Astrophysical applications of powerful new atomic databases. 17: Dust around young stars: How related to solar system dust? 18: Solar system radar observations. 19: Nutation. 20: The status of archiving astronomical data. Working Groups Nos. 1: Problems of astronomy in Africa. 2: Near-Earth objects detection. 3: International catalog projects. 4: Asteroids and comets.

  4. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  5. Astronomy and Art Merged: Targeting Other Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, A. F.

    1999-05-01

    One of the fundamental concerns of museum exhibition is to reach as broad an audience as possible. One way to open up the history of astronomy to a wider audience is to create an exhibit with an interdisciplinary theme and to select a venue outside of a science institution. Here I discuss ``Awestruck by the Majesty of the Heavens: Artistic Perspectives from the Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum History of Astronomy Collection," which took place at the Chicago Cultural Center from January to March of 1997. ``Awestruck" featured a selection of celestial charts, portrait prints of famous astronomers, plates from books on astronomical topics, and other works on paper. It focused on the connections between art and science during the period 1500-1800. Scientific content and place within the history of astronomy were discussed in addition to the artistic merit of the objects. The Chicago Cultural Center is an institution that is home to a wide variety of cultural programming including art, music, film, theater, and dance. In addition to providing a different audience for this material than that which typically visits the Adler, ``Awestruck" also represented an expansion of material for the Cultural Center's audience to view, as their exhibition spaces primarily show only 20th-century art. Programming such as gallery talks and the production of an art-museum-type exhibition catalog will also be discussed.

  6. Strategies for Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J.

    2000-12-01

    No matter whether you are teaching school children, undergraduates, or colleagues, a few key strategies are always useful. I will present and give examples for the following five key strategies for teaching astronomy. 1. Provide a Contextual Framework: It is much easier to learn new facts or concepts if they can be ``binned" into some kind of pre-existing mental framework. Unless your listeners are already familiar with the basic ideas of modern astronomy (such as the hierarchy of structure in the universe, the scale of the universe, and the origin of the universe), you must provide this before going into the details of how we've developed this modern picture through history. 2. Create Conditions for Conceptual Change: Many people hold misconceptions about astronomical ideas. Therefore we cannot teach them the correct ideas unless we first help them unlearn their prior misconceptions. 3. Make the Material Relevant: It's human nature to be more interested in subjects that seem relevant to our lives. Therefore we must always show students the many connections between astronomy and their personal concerns, such as emphasizing how we are ``star stuff" (in the words of Carl Sagan), how studying other planets helps us understand our own, and so on. 4. Limit Use of Jargon: The number of new terms in many introductory astronomy books is larger than the number of words taught in many first courses in foreign language. This means the books are essentially teaching astronomy in a foreign language, which is a clear recipe for failure. We must find ways to replace jargon with plain language. 5. Challenge Your Students: Don't dumb your teaching down; by and large, students will rise to meet your expectations, as long as you follow the other strategies and practice good teaching.

  7. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars - 2009 Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Bring telescope to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is a three-year NASA-funded outreach program at parks during and after concerts and family events - a Halloween Spooky Garden Walk. While there have been many outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this program targets a completely different audience - music lovers who attend summer concerts held in community parks. These music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. This program includes solar observing before the concerts, telescope observations including a live image projection system, an astronomical video presentation, and astronomy banners/posters. Approximately 500 - 16,000 people attended each event and 25% to 50% of the people at each event participated in the astronomy program. This program also reached underrepresented and underserved groups (women, minorities, older adults). The target audience is 2,900,000 people, which is larger than combined population of Atlanta, Boston, Denver, Minneapolis, and San Francisco. Although eleven events were planned in 2009, two were canceled due to rain and our largest event, the NY Philharmonic in the Park (attended by 67,000 people in 2008), was cancelled for financial reasons. Our largest event in 2009 was the Tanglewood Music Festival, Lenox MA, attended by 16,000 people where 5000 people participated in astronomy activities. The Amateur Observers' Society of NY assisted with the NY concerts and the Springfield STARS club assisted at Tanglewood. 1500 people looked through telescopes at the Halloween program (6000 saw the posters). In 2009 over 15,000 people participated in these astronomy activities which were attended by

  8. Airborne measurements of NO, NO2, and NO(sub y) as related to NASA's TRACE-A field program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John; Sandholm, Scott

    1995-01-01

    The Georgia Tech group's effort on NASA's GTE program and TRACE-A field mission primarily involved analysis and interpretation of the measurement data base obtained during the TRACE-A field campaign. These investigations focused on the distribution of ozone and ozone precursors over the south Atlantic and nearby continental regions of Africa and South Africa. The Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry near the Equator-Atlantic (TRACE-A) Mission was designed with the goal of investigating tropospheric trace gas distributions, sources, and photochemical state over the southern Atlantic. Major scientific issues related to N(x)O(y) tropospheric chemistry addressed in this program included: (1) what controls the tropospheric ozone budget over the southern Atlantic? (2) What are the spatial distributions of CO, CO2, NO, NO2, NO(sub y), O3, NMHC, H2O3, etc. over the southern Atlantic? (3) How does long range transport of long-lived NO(y) compounds affect the more reactive NO(x) budget in southern Atlantic troposphere?

  9. The African Cultural Astronomy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urama, Johnson O.; Holbrook, Jarita C.

    2011-06-01

    Indigenous, endogenous, traditional, or cultural astronomy focuses on the many ways that people and cultures interact with celestial bodies. In most parts of Africa, there is very little or no awareness about modern astronomy. However, like ancient people everywhere, Africans wondered at the sky and struggled to make sense of it. The African Cultural Astronomy Project aims to unearth the body of traditional knowledge of astronomy possessed by peoples of the different ethnic groups in Africa and to consider scientific interpretations when appropriate for cosmogonies and ancient astronomical practices. Regardless of scientific validity, every scientist can relate to the process of making observations and creating theoretical mechanisms for explaining what is observed. Through linking the traditional and the scientific, it is believed that this would be used to create awareness and interest in astronomy in most parts of Africa. This paper discusses the vision, challenges and prospects of the African Cultural Astronomy Project in her quest to popularize astronomy in Africa.

  10. 2011 Astronomy Day at McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Sandra; Hemeway, M.; Wetzel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Our philosophy is that everyday is Astronomy Day because the McDonald Observatory's Frank N. Bash Visitors Center is open 362 days a year. So, how did we create a special celebration for the "Astronomy Day” declared by the Astronomical League? During September 26-29 we conducted 20 videoconferences and served 12,559 students with "Astronomy Day” programming. Connect2Texas provides bridging for a network of Texas-based museums and cultural, historical, and scientific organizations that offer educational content to schools throughout the state via videoconferencing. Connect2Texas connected McDonald Observatory to 334 schools; most of these schools were in Texas, but schools in a dozen other states also participated. While most schools had a "view-only" connection, at least 20 of the schools had interactive connections, whereby the students could ask questions of the presenter. Connect2Texas also collects evaluation information from the participating schools that we will use to produce a report for our funders and make modifications to future programs as need be. The videoconferences were offered free of charge. The theme for the 2011 Astronomy Day program was the Year of the Solar System, which aligns with NASA's theme for 2011 and 2012. By aligning with this NASA theme, we could leverage NASA artwork and materials to both advertise and enrich the learning experience. Videoconference materials also included pre- and post-videoconference assessment sheets, an inquiry based activity, and pre- and post-videoconference activities, all of which were made available online. One of the lessons learned from past Astronomy Day videoconferences is that the days the Astronomical League declares as "Astronomy Day” are not always good days for Texas schools to participate. So, we choose an Astronomy Day that meets the needs of Texas schools and our schedule - so any day can be Astronomy Day. 2011 Astronomy Day was made possible by The Meyer-Levy Charitable Trust.

  11. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Gehrz, R. D.

    2009-12-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5 m infrared telescope in a Boeing 747SP. Flying at altitudes as high as 45,000 feet, it will enable 0.3 μm- 1.6 mm observations with an average transmission of ≥ 80%. We describe the key role that Tom Phillips played in the early days of airborne astronomy that culminated in the development of SOFIA. The facility design and status are described. Nine first generation instruments that will fly on SOFIA include broadband imaging cameras, moderate resolution spectrographs capable of resolving emission features due to dust and large molecules, and high resolution spectrometers suitable for kinematical studies of molecular and atomic gas lines at km s-1 resolution. World-wide deployments will provide access to the entire sky and enable timely observations of transient events. SOFIA's sensitivity for imaging and spectroscopy is similar to that of the space observatory ISO. Its telescope is diffraction-limited beyond 25μm, making its images 3 times sharper than those obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope at these wavelengths. We describe the characteristics of the observatory and give several examples of science opportunities with SOFIA.

  12. The NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE): 2007 College Astronomy Teaching Excellence Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, E. E.; Slater, T. F.; Greene, W. M.; Thaller, M.

    2006-12-01

    Since 2003 the NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) has been devoted to the professional development of introductory college astronomy faculty with a special focus on faculty teaching at community colleges. As part of our efforts CAE conducts 2-day and 3-day Teaching Excellence Workshops. In Tier I (introductory) Workshops, the overarching goal is for participants to become familiar with learner-centered teaching and assessment materials, as well as how to implement them in their college introductory astronomy courses. To accomplish this goal, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by reviewing research on the nature of teaching and learning; setting course goals and objectives; and using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, and ranking tasks. Participants also learn how to create more effective multiple-choice tests. In Tier II (advanced) Workshops, the overarching goal is to help past workshop participants with their obstacles to implementing a learner-centered introductory college astronomy course. Workshop participants work to understand how students learn while engaged in learner-centered activities and what the role of the instructor is in the learner-centered class. CAE regional workshops are held at community colleges around the country, NASA Research Centers, and in conjunction with professional society meetings, such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, and also through the infrastructure of the National Science Foundation's Summer Chautauqua Workshop program. The NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) is a partnership with the Univ. of Arizona Conceptual Astronomy & Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team. CAE is supported by NASA JPL's Navigator Public Engagement program (consisting of several space telescopes--including SIM PlanetQuest, the Terrestrial Planet Finder, the Keck Interferometer, and the Large

  13. Handbook of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.

    2006-11-01

    Foreword; Preface; 1. General data; 2. Astronomy and astrophysics; 3. Radio astronomy; 4. Infrared and submillimeter astronomy; 5. Ultraviolet astronomy; 6. X-ray astronomy; 7. Gamma-ray astronomy; 8. Cosmic rays; 9. Earth's atmosphere and environment; 10. Relativity and cosmology; 11. Atomic physics; 12. Electromagnetic radiation; 13. Plamsa physics; 14. Experimental astronomy and astrophysics; 15. Astronautics; 16. Mathematics; 17. Probability and statistics; 18. Radiation safety; 19. Astronomical catalogs; 20. Computer science; 21. Glossary of abbreviations and symbols; Appendices; Index.

  14. Multiwavelength Astronomy Modules for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christie; Brazas, J.; Lane, S.; York, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Chicago Multiwavelength Astronomy modules are web-based lessons covering the history, science, tools, and impact of astronomy across the wavebands, from gamma ray to infrared. Each waveband includes four lessons addressing one aspect of its development. The lessons are narrated by a historical docent or practicing scientist who contributed to a scientific discovery or instrument design significant to astronomical progress. The process of building each lesson began with an interview conducted with the scientist, or the consultation of a memoir or oral history transcript for historical docents. The source was then excerpted to develop a lesson and supplemented by archival material from the University of Chicago Library and other archives; NASA media; and participant contributed photographs, light curves, and spectra. Practicing educators also participated in the lesson development and evaluation. In July 2013, the University of Chicago sponsored 9 teachers and 15 students to participate in a STEM education program designed to engage participants as co-learners as they used the Multiwavelength Astronomy lessons in conjunction with talks given by the participating scientists. Teachers also practiced implementation of the resources with students and designed authentic research activities that make use of NASA mission data, which were undertaken as mini-research projects by student teams during the course of the program. This poster will introduce the Multiwavelength Astronomy web modules; highlight educator experiences in their use with high school audiences; and analyze the module development process, framing the benefits to and contributions of each of the stakeholders including practicing astronomers in research and space centers, high school science educators, high school students, University libraries and archives, and the NASA Science Mission Directorate. The development of these resources, and the summer professional development workshops were

  15. ``Astrophysique sur Mesure'', E-learning in Astronomy and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Benoît; Delsanti, Audrey; Guillaume, Damien; Balança, Christian; Balkowski, Chantal

    2011-06-01

    ``Astrophysique sur Mesure'' (astrophysics made-to-measure) is a set of e-learning programmes started 4 years ago at the Paris Observatory. In order to deliver attractive and efficient programmes, we have added many multimedia tools to usual lectures: animations, Java applets. The programmes are presented on two different platforms. The first one offers the content of all the lectures in free access. A second platform with restricted access is provided to registered students taking part in the e-learning program and benefiting from the help of tutors. The development of these programs helps to increase the sphere of influence of astronomy taught at the Paris Observatory, hence to increase the presence of astronomy in various degree courses. Instead of teaching classical astronomy lectures to a happy few, we can bring astronomy and astrophysics to a wider audience.

  16. New horizons in astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    Besides the study of astronomy itself, other topics included cover the geological and biological developments on earth and basic physics of matter, heat, and light. Optical and radio telescopes are discussed, as well as photographic and photoelectric means of detection. The immediate solar system is described by topics on the properties and atmospheres of the inner and outer planets, the sun's energy, sunspots, and the solar spectrum. Stars both on and off the main sequence are discussed in terms of distances, intrinsic properties, lifetimes and evolution. The Milky Way is compared to other galaxies in size, star population and structure, and the different galaxy shapes are pictured. Topics of most recent interest are covered by results of the lunar explorations, new concepts of Mars, and problems of space travel. Problems of modern astronomy include pulsars, neutron stars, and quasars.

  17. Astronomy and astrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Astrology meets a large success in our societies, from the private to the political sphere as well as in the media, in spite of the demonstrated inaccuracy of its psychological as well as operational predictions. We analyse here the relations between astrology and astronomy, as well as the criticisms opposed by the latter to the former. We show that most of these criticisms are weak. Much stronger ones emerge from the analysis of the astrological practice compared to the scientific method, leading us to conclude to the non-scientificity of astrology. Then we return to the success of astrology, and from its analysis we propose a renewed (and prophylactic) rôle for astronomy in society.

  18. Life after Introductory Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B.; Hameed, S.

    2000-12-01

    Beginning astronomy is a popular class for undergraduates, and a fair percentage of these students would take another nontechnical class in this field if one were available. What other courses exist for students to take after introductory astronomy? At NMSU we offer three classes that enroll large numbers of juniors/seniors who are nonscience majors. These classes are (1) Into the Final Frontier: the Human Exploration of Space, (2) The Search for Life in the Universe, (3) and Revolutionary Ideas in Science. Curricula for these classes, teaching strategies, and course materials will be provided in this poster presentation for those wishing to offer similar classes at their institutions. Some of th work presented in this poster was support by the NSF and NASA

  19. Practical Semantic Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew; Gray, N.; Burke, D.

    2010-01-01

    Many activities in the era of data-intensive astronomy are predicated upon some transference of domain knowledge and expertise from human to machine. The semantic infrastructure required to support this is no longer a pipe dream of computer science but a set of practical engineering challenges, more concerned with deployment and performance details than AI abstractions. The application of such ideas promises to help in such areas as contextual data access, exploiting distributed annotation and heterogeneous sources, and intelligent data dissemination and discovery. In this talk, we will review the status and use of semantic technologies in astronomy, particularly to address current problems in astroinformatics, with such projects as SKUA and AstroCollation.

  20. The Timbuktu Astronomy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medupe, Rodney Thebe; Warner, Brian; Jeppie, Shamil; Sanogo, Salikou; Maiga, Mohammed; Maiga, Ahmed; Dembele, Mamadou; Diakite, Drissa; Tembely, Laya; Kanoute, Mamadou; Traore, Sibiri; Sodio, Bernard; Hawkes, Sharron

    The ancient city of Timbuktu was the main centre for commerce and scholarship in West Africa from the 13th century until the 17th century. Books were bought from North Africa and other centres of Islamic learning, and local scholars also wrote many books on astronomy, medicine, mathematics, literature, law and islam. Scholarship peaked during the 16th and 17th century but declined gradually until the 19th century. Our project aims to study the ancient manuscripts from Timbuktu in order to search for astronomy in them. The main aim of the project is to document our research and use it to attract African youth into science and technology by appealing to their heritage. This paper outlines progress made since the inception of the project in 2006.

  1. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    2012-04-01

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North America, and the development of new facilities such as LOFAR, ALMA, FAST, and Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes in Australia and South Africa. These developments are driven by advances in radio-frequency, digital and information technologies that tremendously enhance the capabilities in radio astronomy. These new developments foreshadow major scientific advances driven by radio observations in the next triennium. We highlight these facility developments in section 3 of this report. A selection of science highlight from this triennium are summarized in section 2.

  2. Using the Teach Astronomy Website to Enrich Introductory Astronomy Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Impey, C. D.; Patikkal, A.; Austin, C. L.

    2013-04-01

    This year we implemented Teach Astronomy as a free online resource to be used as a teaching tool for non-science major astronomy courses and for a general audience interested in the subject. The comprehensive astronomy content of the website includes: an introductory text book, encyclopedia articles, images, two to three minute topical video clips, podcasts, and news articles. Teach Astronomy utilizes a novel technology to cluster, display, and navigate search results, called a Wikimap. We will present an overview of how Teach Astronomy works and how instructors can use it as an effective teaching tool in the classroom. Additionally, we will gather feedback from science instructors on how to improve the features and functionality of the website, as well as develop new assignment ideas using Teach Astronomy.

  3. Students Across Texas Celebrate Astronomy Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, S.; Wetzel, M.; Hemenway, M. K.

    2010-08-01

    Over the past three years, McDonald Observatory has offered special Astronomy Day videoconference programs to students across Texas—the second largest state in the U.S. (Only Alaska is larger). Videoconferencing allows many students and teachers access to our Observatory, which is remotely located 180 miles (290 kilometers) from any major city. McDonald Observatory partners with Connect2Texas to advertise the Astronomy Day event. Connect2Texas provides the electronic bridge between schools and the Observatory. They also provide an online evaluation for teachers to complete. In 2009 the Astronomy Day videoconference celebrated the International Year of Astronomy and the historic observations made by Galileo Galilei. During the videoconference, the classes explore the Moon or Venus by making real-time telescopic observations. Students also receive an introduction to the Observatory, an opportunity to perform an activity relating to Galileo's observations, and an interview with an astronomer. A website provides teachers pre-and post-video conference materials, instructions, and a certificate of completion that can be customized for each student. The website also lists content alignment with state science education standards.

  4. Flowering of Japanese astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozai, Y.

    1988-06-01

    A development history is presented for Japanese astronomy from the 6th century to the present day, together with a status report and account of future plans. About 500 professionals currently belong to the Astronomical Society of Japan. Tokyo's Mitaka Observatory employs a staff of about 70 astronomers; most modern astronomical instruments, however, have been installed at sites outside the Tokyo area. The limitations of present instruments are notably severe for astronomers working in the visible and IR wavelengths.

  5. Evangelista Torricelli and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rosa María

    2015-05-01

    In the classical History of Science, Evangelista Torricelli (1608-1649) appears inextricably linked to the "origin of modern science" and so he is the prototype of the pure Galilean. As the court mathematician in Florence, academic, lecturer and prestigious scientist, he combined these activities with the task of telescopic lens maker. His theoretical ideas in Astronomy were nearer to those of Descartes than of his mentor, Galileo. Here, I summarize the two sides.

  6. Astronomy in Romanian universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosu, Mihail

    In this work we present characteristics of the Romanian higher education related to the study of Astronomy. In spite of Romanian economic problems, opportunities for Bachelor's degree, Master's degree (at "Babes-Bolyai" University of Cluj-Napoca) and Ph.D. degree are provided for students enrolled at the faculties of Mathematics or Physics. General regulations, description of courses, research resources and job opportunities are also described and discussed in this paper.

  7. SPAN: Astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Green, James L.; Warren, Wayne H., Jr.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a multi-mission, correlative data comparison network which links science research and data analysis computers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The purpose of this document is to provide Astronomy and Astrophysics scientists, currently reachable on SPAN, with basic information and contacts for access to correlative data bases, star catalogs, and other astrophysic facilities accessible over SPAN.

  8. Astronomy in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarna, M.; Stępień, K.

    2015-09-01

    Polish post-war astronomy was built virtually from nothing. Currently, about 250 astronomers are employed in seven academic institutes and a few smaller units across Poland. Broad areas of astrophysics are covered and the level of astronomical research in Poland is higher than the world average. Joining ESO has created an atmosphere that is conducive to further improvements in the quality of Polish research, and it marks an important step towards the full integration of Polish astronomers into the international scientific community.

  9. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  10. Syllabus Computer in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important and actual subjects and training courses in the curricula for undergraduate level students at the National university of Uzbekistan is ‘Computer Methods in Astronomy’. It covers two semesters and includes both lecture and practice classes. Based on the long term experience we prepared the tutorial for students which contain the description of modern computer applications in astronomy.The main directions of computer application in field of astronomy briefly as follows:1) Automating the process of observation, data acquisition and processing2) Create and store databases (the results of observations, experiments and theoretical calculations) their generalization, classification and cataloging, working with large databases3) The decisions of the theoretical problems (physical modeling, mathematical modeling of astronomical objects and phenomena, derivation of model parameters to obtain a solution of the corresponding equations, numerical simulations), appropriate software creation4) The utilization in the educational process (e-text books, presentations, virtual labs, remote education, testing), amateur astronomy and popularization of the science5) The use as a means of communication and data transfer, research result presenting and dissemination (web-journals), the creation of a virtual information system (local and global computer networks).During the classes the special attention is drawn on the practical training and individual work of students including the independent one.

  11. Astronomy in the streets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebe, Fatoumata

    2015-08-01

    The Ephemerides Association was founded last year by a PhD student in Astronomy. The association is devoted to the promotion and advancement of knowledge of the universe through research and education.The main activities of the association are scientific meetings, the planning and realization of scientific projects, the support of the scientific activities of its members, and the dissemination of related information among members and other interested persons.The association targets the disadvantaged zones of the Paris suburbs.The main issue was how to bring astronomy in those places. In the suburbs, since most of the youth are poor, most leisure activities like cinema are out of your reach. Thus, mostly of them will play football or basketball outside.We decided to go to meet young people who find themselves together in the evening. We prepare the telescope as well as the fasicules to start the observation of the planets. The discussion finally lead to their career plans and aspirations. Astronomy has become a tool to address societal issues. We present our results after one year of activity.

  12. A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, S. D.; Cash, J. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Howell, S. B.; King, J. R.; Leising, M. D.; Mayo, E. A.; Mighell, K. J.; Smith, D. M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A partnership has been established between South Carolina State University (SCSU, a Historically Black College/University), the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) and Clemson University (CU) under an award from NSF's "Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)" program. The mission of POCA is to develop an effective, long-term partnership that combines the strengths of the three institutions to increase the scientific and educational output of all the partners with special emphasis on enhancing diversity in the field of astronomy. Components of the program include enhancing faculty and student research in astronomy at SCSU, recruiting and retaining underrepresented minority students into the field, outreach through planetarium programs and museum exhibits and developing web based resources in astronomy education. Activities in the first year of the program are discussed. We have begun developing and testing several new astronomy laboratory exercises. Our first summer internship program has concluded successfully. With PAARE scholarship money, we are now supporting four physics majors at SCSU who have chosen the astronomy option (concentration) for their degree. SCSU undergraduates have acquired observing experience on the KPNO Mayall 4-meter telescope under the guidance of faculty and graduate students from CU. NOAO astronomers have collaborated with SCSU faculty to begin a research program that studies RV Tauri stars. Funds from PAARE are supporting follow-up research to a just-completed doctoral dissertation by E. A. Mayo described elsewhere in these proceedings. Future plans for graduate fellowships and related activities are discussed in addition to summer internships for POCA undergraduates at CU and NOAO. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  13. Early Spacelab physics and astronomy missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the scientific problems which will be investigated during the early Spacelab physics and astronomy missions are reviewed. The Solar Terrestrial Programs will include the Solar Physics Spacelab Payloads (SPSP) and the Atmospheres, Magnetospheres and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) missions. These missions will study the sun as a star and the influence of solar phenomena on the earth, including sun-solar wind interface, the nature of the solar flares, etc. The Astrophysics Spacelab Payloads (ASP) programs are divided into the Ultraviolet-Optical Astronomy and the High Energy Astrophysics areas. The themes of astrophysics Spacelab investigations will cover the nature of the universe, the fate of matter and the life cycles of stars. The paper discusses various scientific experiments and instruments to be used in the early Spacelab missions.

  14. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  15. Infrared Astronomy. [observations of extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.

    1981-01-01

    Several observational programs in infrared astronomy are described and significant findings are briefly discussed. The near infrared work concentrates largely on the use of the 5 m Hale telescope in spectroscopic and photometric studies of extragalactic sources. Observations of the P alpha line profile in a low redshift quasar, X-ray bursters, reflection nebula, and cataclysmic variables are included. Millimeter continuum observations of dust emission from quasars and galactic molecular clouds are also discussed. Finally, improvements to instrumentation are reported.

  16. Highlights of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  17. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are given. The AOL system is described and its potential for various measurement applications including bathymetry and fluorosensing is discussed.

  18. Quickly creating interactive astronomy illustrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    An innate advantage for astronomy teachers is having numerous breathtaking images of the cosmos available to capture students' curiosity, imagination, and wonder. Internet-based astronomy image libraries are numerous and easy to navigate. The Astronomy Picture of the Day, the Hubble Space Telescope image archive, and the NASA Planetary Photojournal are just a few of the many available.1-3 At the same time, computer video projectors and SMART Boards are becoming ever more commonplace in classrooms. Taken together, it has never been easier to bring astronomy directly into classrooms to actively engage students to improve student understanding and motivate student learning.

  19. Beyond Astro 101 -- Examining Lower Division Astronomy Curriculum For The 21 St Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Lancelot L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Summer, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    So-called "ASTRO 101” survey courses in general astronomy are offered to non-science majors in colleges and universities across the United States, to fulfill general-education requirements in the physical sciences. At least two of the common Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) for these courses are critical thinking and understanding astronomy as a scientific discipline. We argue that a comprehensive lower-division astronomy program surpassing ASTRO 101 would increase science literacy for non-science majors, STEM students, and the general public. The program would include diverse astronomy course offerings, interdisciplinary science courses (e.g. astrobiology), service-learning and peer-mentoring activities, and internship opportunities.

  20. Status of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Becklin, E. E.; de Buizer, J.; Herter, T.; Keller, L. D.; Krabbe, A.; Marcum, P. M.; Roellig, T. L.; Sandell, G. H. L.; Temi, P.; Vacca, W. D.; Young, E. T.; Zinnecker, H.

    2011-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a joint US/German project, is a 2.5-m infrared airborne telescope carried by a Boeing 747-SP that flies in the stratosphere at altitudes as high as 45,000 ft (13.72 km). This facility is capable of observing from 0.3 μm to 1.6 mm with an average transmission greater than 80% averaged over all wavelengths. SOFIA will be staged out of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center aircraft operations facility at Palmdale, CA. The SOFIA Science Mission Operations (SMO) will be located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. First science flights began in 2010 and a full operations schedule of up to one hundred 8 to 10 hour-long flights per year will be reached by 2014. The observatory is expected to operate until the mid-2030s. SOFIA's initial complement of seven focal plane instruments includes broadband imagers, moderate-resolution spectrographs that will resolve broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high-resolution spectrometers capable of studying the kinematics of atomic and molecular gas at sub-km/s resolution. We describe the SOFIA facility and outline the opportunities for observations by the general scientific community and for future instrumentation development. The operational characteristics of the SOFIA first-generation instruments are summarized. The status of the flight test program is discussed and we show First Light images obtained at wavelengths from 5.4 to 37 μm with the FORCAST imaging camera. Additional information about SOFIA is available at http://www.sofia.usra.edu and http://www.sofia.usra.edu/Science/docs/SofiaScienceVision051809-1.pdf.

  1. NASA Astrophysics E/PO Impact: NASA SOFIA AAA Program Evaluation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela; Backman, Dana E.; Clark, Coral; Inverness Research Sofia Aaa Evaluation Team, Wested Sofia Aaa Evaluation Team

    2015-01-01

    SOFIA is an airborne observatory, studying the universe at infrared wavelengths, capable of making observations that are impossible for even the largest and highest ground-based telescopes. SOFIA also inspires the development of new scientific instrumentation and fosters the education of young scientists and engineers.SOFIA is an 80% - 20% partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), consisting of an extensively modified Boeing 747SP aircraft carrying a reflecting telescope with an effective diameter of 2.5 meters (100 inches). The SOFIA aircraft is based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Building 703, in Palmdale, California. The Science Program and Outreach Offices are located at NASA Ames Research center. SOFIA is a program in NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Astrophysics Division.Data will be collected to study many different kinds of astronomical objects and phenomena, including star cycles, solar system formation, identification of complex molecules in space, our solar system, galactic dust, nebulae and ecosystems.Airborne Astronomy Ambassador (AAA) Program:The SOFIA Education and Communications program exploits the unique attributes of airborne astronomy to contribute to national goals for the reform of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, and to elevate public scientific and technical literacy.The AAA effort is a professional development program aspiring to improve teaching, inspire students, and inform the community. To date, 55 educators from 21 states; Cycles 0, 1 and 2; have completed their astronomy professional development and their SOFIA science flight experience. Evaluation has confirmed the program's positive impact on the teacher participants, on their students, and in their communities. The inspirational experience has positively impacted their practice and career trajectory. AAAs have incorporated content knowledge and specific components of their experience into their curricula, and have given

  2. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiltsee, Christopher B.; Brooks, Walter F.

    1989-01-01

    The system concept for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), as developed by NASA Ames Research Center is described. The SOFIA facility is a 3-meter class optical/infrared/submillimeter telescope mounted in an open cavity in the forebody of a Boeing 747 aircraft, to be operational in 1992. It represents the next generation of Ames' existing airborne IR facilities, and is about ten times more sensitive than the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) with 3 times better angular resolution, and able to detect all the far-infrared point sources discovered by IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite) survey in 1983. Major requirements and design attributes of the SOFIA telescope are presented, along with a brief description of the Ground Support/Operations System.

  3. Transmission of Babylonian Astronomy to Other Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alexander

    Babylonian astronomy and astrology were extensively transmitted to other civilizations in the second and first millennia BC. Greek astronomy in particular was largely shaped by knowledge of Babylonian observations and mathematical astronomy.

  4. Emergence and Growth of Solar Astronomy in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hong Sik

    2003-06-01

    In this article I review the past and current status of solar astronomy in Korea and present some future prospects. Along with a brief historical account on the introduction of modern astronomy to Korea, I describe in detail how solar astronomy in Korea has developed since its birth about 20 years ago. With education of solar astronomers at domestic universities and collaboration with foreign scientists in China, Japan and the U. S., there has been a rapid growth of solar physics in Korea in the past decade. For further advance of solar astronomy in Korea, Korean solar astronomers have to build their own observing facilities and develop instrumentation programs. Also it is very important to bring up manpower competent for these projects.

  5. Spinoff from Space Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    American Science and Engineering (AS&E) built NASA's first x-ray telescope, flown on OSO-4 (Orbiting Solar Observatory), and developed the x-ray detectors that operated flawlessly for four years aboard SAS-1 (Small Astronomy Satellite). The experience AS&E acquired in detecting and processing cosmic x-rays gave the company a broad technology base for commercial applications. Among the commercial products that stemmed from AS&E's space technology are: Micro Dose x-ray scanner for medical use; a digital radiography diagnosis, a system for nondestructive testing of manufactured products; a system of load management for electric utilities; and additional specialized instruments.

  6. Astronomy in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobouti, Y.

    2006-08-01

    Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, Iran In spite of her renowned pivotal role in the advancement of astronomy on the world scale during 9th to 15th centuries, Iran's rekindled interest in modern astronomy is a recent happening. Serious attempts to introduce astronomy into university curricula and to develop it into a respectable and worthwhile field of research began in the mid 60's. The pioneer was Shiraz University. It should be credited for the first few dozens of astronomy- and astrophysics- related research papers in international journals, for training the first half a dozen of professional astronomers and for creating the Biruni Observatory. Here, I take this opportunity to acknowledge the valuable advice of Bob Koch and Ed Guinan, then of the University of Pennsylvania, in the course of the establishment of this observatory. At present the astronomical community of Iran consists of about 65 professionals, half university faculty members and half MS and PhD students. The yearly scientific contribution of its members has, in the past three years, averaged to about 15 papers in reputable international journals, and presently has a healthy growth rate. Among the existing observational facilities, Biruni Observatory with its 51 cm Cassegrain, CCD cameras, photometers and other smaller educational telescopes, is by far the most active place. Tusi Observatory of Tabriz University has 60 and 40 cm Cassegrains, and a small solar telescope. A number of smaller observing facilities exist in Meshed, Zanjan, Tehran, Babol and other places. The Astronomical Society of Iran (ASI), though some 30 years old, has expanded and institutionalized its activities since early 1990's. ASI sets up seasonal schools for novices, organizes annual colloquia and seminars for professionals and supports a huge body of amateur astronomers from among high school and university students. Over twenty of ASI members are also members of IAU and take active part in its

  7. Astrology as Cultural Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Nicholas

    The practice of astrology can be traced in most if not all human societies, in most time periods. Astrology has prehistoric origins and flourishes in the modern world, where it may be understood as a form of ethnoastronomy - astronomy practiced by the people. The Western tradition, which originated in Mesopotamia and was developed in the Greek world, has been most studied by academics. However, India is also home to a tradition which has survived in a continuous lineage for 2,000 years. Complex systems of astrology also developed in China and Mesoamerica, while all other human societies appear to seek social and religious meaning in the stars.

  8. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  9. Applied Astronomy: Asteroid Prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.

    2013-09-01

    In the age of asteroid mining the ability to find promising ore-bearing bodies will be valuable. This will give rise to a new discipline- "Applied Astronomy". Just as most geologists work in industry, not in academia, the same will be true of astronomers. Just how rare or common ore-rich asteroids are likely to be, and the skills needed to assay their value, are discussed here, with an emphasis on remote - telescopic - methods. Also considered are the resources needed to conduct extensive surveys of asteroids for prospecting purposes, and the cost and timescale involved. The longer-term need for applied astronomers is also covered.

  10. School Workshops on Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Żakowicz, G.

    2015-03-01

    Do you want to know how to make students volunteer to stay all night long watching the stars with their telescopes freezing? Or how to inspire decent adults to prepare a `queue-list to Jupiter', wait for their turn for hours, and control that no one approaches the telescope bypassing the line? Or how to attract people of all age to forget their laziness and duties, and to get up at 3 a.m. to watch the transit of Venus? If your answer is `yes', then come and see what can be done at the School Workshops on Astronomy.

  11. Astronomy in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiteiro, Bárbara; Rodrigues, Berta

    2016-04-01

    The motivation of young students to science is much higher when the theoretical teaching is accompanied by practice and these are engaged in activities that involve real problems of their society and requiring a scientific basis for its discussion. Several activities such as collaboration on current scientific experiments, direct contact with scientists, participation in science competitions, visits to Science Museums, artistic and craft activities, the use of simulators and virtual laboratories, increase the degree of student satisfaction and motivate them in their learning processes. This poster shows some of Astronomy activities with students of schools Agrupamento de Escolas José Belchior Viegas within the Physics and Chemistry classes.

  12. Islamic Mathematical Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelle, Clemency

    A short survey on Islamic mathematical astronomy practiced during the period running from the eight century until the fifteenth is presented. Various pertinent themes, such as the translation of foreign scientific works and their impact on the tradition; the introduction, assimilation, and critique of the Ptolemaic model; and the role of observations, will be covered. In addition, the zīj, the dominant format for astronomical works, will be briefly explained as well as the legacy of the Islamic tradition of astral sciences to other cultures.

  13. Astronomy in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, Beatriz; Maciel, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    A historical background combined with political decisions along time explain the increasing importance of Brazil in the world's astronomical scenario. Professional astronomy was triggered in the late sixties and early seventies by the two main historical institutions then existing (ON and IAG/USP), together with the creation of agencies for research and combined with individual actions. There are presently 670 astronomers working in the country, including permanent jobs and graduate students. A brief description of observational facilities and plans to increase access to other facilities is presented.

  14. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  15. Handbook of CCD Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.

    2000-04-01

    This handbook constitutes a concise and accessible reference on all practical aspects of using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs). Starting with the electronic workings of these modern marvels, Steven Howell discusses their basic characteristics and then gives methods and examples for determining their values. While the focus is on using CCDs in professional observational astronomy, advanced amateur astronomers, and researchers in physics, chemistry, medical imaging, and remote sensing will also benefit from the material. Tables of useful and hard-to-find data, and key practical equations round off the book's treatment. For exercises and more information, log on to www.psi.edu/~howell/ccd.html.

  16. Greek mathematical astronomy reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Hugh

    2002-03-01

    Recent investigations have thrown new light on such topics as the early Greek belief in heliocentricity, the relation between Greek and Babylonian astronomy, the reliability of Ptolemy's Syntaxis, Hipparchus's theory of motion for the sun, Hipparchus's value for the obliquity of the ecliptic, and Eratosthenes' estimate of the size of the earth. Some claims resulting from these investigations are controversial, especially the reevaluation of Ptolemy (though it is notable that no one any longer uses data from the Syntaxis for investigating such things as the spin of the earth). This essay presents the evidence for these claims; it makes no pretense of presenting the evidence against them.

  17. Geodetic activities of the Department of Defense under IGY programs

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, O.W.; Daugherty, K.I.

    1983-10-16

    Attention is given to the U.S. Department of Defence (DOD) activities that contributed to the International Geophysical Year's active, passive, and cooperative satellite programs. The DOD continues to support the deployment, enhancement, and application of novel technology in such areas as satellite altimetry, gravity radiometry, inertial surveying, interferometry, airborne gravimetry, inertial surveying, and CCD and laser methods for geodetic astronomy. Also noted are such major department initiatives as the Global Positioning System, which will become operational toward the end of this decade.

  18. Undergraduate Astronomy Instruction with an Automated Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, M. N.; Littler, C.; Weathers, D.

    2001-12-01

    The University of North Texas (UNT) currently enrolls about 2400 students per academic year in survey astronomy classes. All students complete a 1-credit laboratory course, designed to fulfill a laboratory science curriculum requirement. As one element in our laboratory program, we are developing an automated observatory for use by these students. The UNT Monroe Observatory, located at a dark site 45 miles from campus, has been designed with a roll-off roof covering two (expandable to four) observing stations. Each station consists of a Celestron 14-inch telescope on a Paramount GT-1100 base from Software Bisque, outfitted with an AP7 CCD camera from Apogee Instruments. We intend to remotely operate these stations from the university in Denton. We are developing an integrated astronomy laboratory sequence, employing digital imagery from the remote observatory, multimedia presentations in a planetarium, and table-top experiments in a lab setting. The automated observatory will permit students to conduct individualized observational astronomy experiments in a manner similar to those employed in astronomical research. As of October 2001, we have acquired equipment for two observing stations, prepared the site, completed the building design, and signed a construction contract. We anticipate first use during the 2002-2003 academic year. The UNT Observatory has been funded in part through the National Science Foundation's CCLI grant program, #9950630.

  19. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  20. Undergraduate Astronomy Instruction With an Automated Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Michael; Littler, Christopher; Weathers, Duncan

    2001-10-01

    The University of North Texas currently enrolls 2400 students per academic year in survey astronomy classes. As one element in our laboratory program, we are developing an automated observatory for use by these students. The UNT Monroe Observatory is located at a dark site approximately 45 miles northwest of Denton (80 miles from the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex). We plan 2-4 telescopes in the 36-40 cm range, outfitted with CCD cameras, to be remotely operated from the University in Denton. This automated observatory will permit students to conduct individualized observational astronomy experiments in a manner similar to those employed in astronomical research. These imaging experiments will be the centerpiece of the students' laboratory experience. Our goal is to provide an exemplary laboratory experience for students attempting to meet a natural science curriculum requirement. Currently, the equipment has been procured and the observing site prepared. We anticipate first use during the 2002-2003 academic year.

  1. Mosaic Infrared Sensor for Space Astronomy (MIRSSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development of mosaic infrared detector/focal plane arrays for space astronomy is reported. The Mosaic IR Sensor for Space Astronomy (MIRSSA) Program is an effort to develop PV HgCdTe detector arrays with the spectral response of up to 5 micron and silicon CCDs for low temperature applications. Desired background-limited performance (BLIP) for space applications requires an extremely high R sub A product which can be achieved by selecting the detector materials and the operating temperature. The parameters were determined by measurement of HgCdTe PV detector arrays at various temperatures in the SW and MW spectral bands. It is demonstrated that high performance PV HgCdTe detectors can be fabricated for low temperature applications.

  2. Astronomy Education for Pre-Service Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, W. H.; Pertaub, R.; Ruberg, L.; Jones, S.

    2004-12-01

    Many pre-service teachers go on to teach science at the elementary, middle, and high-school levels. As such, their potential impact on the overall scientific literacy of Americans is huge. Despite the enormous importance of science teaching in society, most colleges and universities do not offer science courses that address the teachers' specific needs for combined content and pedagogy. In this presentation, we explore the NEED to provide effective pre-service training in Astronomy and Space Science, document the DILEMMA extant in most colleges and universities, and describe some new APPROACHES to engaging pre-service teachers in astronomical inquiry. Finally, we seek out further INPUT from astronomers and educators who are actively addressing the challenge of improving astronomy education for pre-service teachers. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA's Space Science Education and Public Outreach Program.

  3. Early Radio Astronomy in the USSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.

    2007-12-01

    As in many other countries, radio astronomy in the Soviet Union began as an outgrowth of wartime radar research. The early leaders of Soviet radio astronomy, including Simon Braude, Vladimir Kotelnikov, Vladimir Troitskii, and Viktor Vitkevitch, all began their careers during WWII. Although the theoretical contributions of people like Iosef Shklovsky and Vitaly Ginzburg were well known in the West, the early experimental and observational programs received much less attention, partially the result of cold war military secrecy. When they were noticed, the Soviet observations were largely ignored or declared wrong. We will discuss the controversial Soviet contributions to the detection of polarized cosmic radio emission, the development of very long baseline interferometry, the prediction and verification of radio recombination lines, and the first detection of variability in an extragalactic radio source.

  4. Astronomy Matters for Chemistry Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes basic misconceptions about the origin of elements and forms of matter found in chemistry texts that need modification in light of modern observational data and interpretations given in astronomy. Notes that there are forms of matter other than elements and compounds. Confounding examples from astronomy include white dwarfs, neutron…

  5. Prospects for gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission and the Gamma Ray Experiment aboard the SMM spacecraft are discussed. Mission plans for interplanetary probes are also discussed. The Gamma Ray observatory and its role in future gamma ray astronomy is highlighted. It is concluded that gamma ray astronomy will be of major importance in the development of astronomical models and in the development of comsological theory.

  6. Gamma ray astronomy in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the development of gamma ray astronomy is presented. Gamma ray telescopes and other optical measuring instruments are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on findings that were unobtainable before gamma ray astronomy. Information on evolution of the solar system, the relationship of the solar system to the galaxy, and the composition of interstellar matter is discussed.

  7. Science and Mathematics in Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolack, Edward

    2009-01-01

    A brief historical introduction to the development of observational astronomy will be presented. The close historical relationship between the successful application of mathematical concepts and advances in astronomy will be presented. A variety of simple physical demonstrations, hands-on group activities, and puzzles will be used to understand how the properties of light can be used to understand the contents of our universe.

  8. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  9. Thread safe astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.

    2008-03-01

    Observational astronomy is the beneficiary of an ancient chain of apprenticeship. Kepler's laws required Tycho's data. As the pace of discoveries has increased over the centuries, so has the cadence of tutelage (literally, "watching over"). Naked eye astronomy is thousands of years old, the telescope hundreds, digital imaging a few decades, but today's undergraduates will use instrumentation yet unbuilt - and thus, unfamiliar to their professors - to complete their doctoral dissertations. Not only has the quickening cadence of astronomical data-taking overrun the apprehension of the science within, but the contingent pace of experimental design threatens our capacity to learn new techniques and apply them productively. Virtual technologies are necessary to accelerate our human processes of perception and comprehension to keep up with astronomical instrumentation and pipelined dataflows. Necessary, but not sufficient. Computers can confuse us as efficiently as they illuminate. Rather, as with neural pathways evolved to meet competitive ecological challenges, astronomical software and data must become organized into ever more coherent `threads' of execution. These are the same threaded constructs as understood by computer science. No datum is an island.

  10. Astronomy. Internet site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimenko, Anatoly Vasilievich

    The Internet site covers a wide area of actual astronomical topics, including 1) Astronomical News 2) Didactics of Astronomy 3) Space Research (Cosmonautics) 4) That's interesting 5) A Handbook of an astronomer 6) The Solar system 7) A Photogalery 8) Works of Schoolars 9) History of Astronomy The most important of them is the section concerning Space Research (Cosmonautics). This section covers a wide range of topics, beginning with very complete Illustrated History of Soviet Space research , the building of Soviet Rockets, a complete list of Cosmonauts with biographies, a list of all the flies. The author of the site concerns much ineterest to recent and extraordinary astronomiucal phenomena, such as Hazardous asteroids, Comets, Solar and Moon Eclipses, Meteorites, as well as to correct from the scientifical point of view interpretation of the extraordinary astronomical phenomena. The section concerning the Solar system is richly illustrated and give detailed explanations to Solar System evolution and actual state, explains many phenomena in the Solar system. THe Internet site is designed for schoolars as well as to amateur and professional astronomers.

  11. Active Astronomy Roadshow Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Oram, Kathleen; Alabre, Dayana; Douyon, Ralph; UMass Lowell Haiti Development Studies Center

    2016-01-01

    College-age Haitian students working with advisors and volunteers from UMass Lowell in 2015 developed and tested an activity-based K-8 curriculum in astronomy, space, and earth science. Our partner school is located in Les Cayes, Haiti a city where only 65% of children attend school, and only half of those will complete 6th grade. Astronomy provides an accessible and non-intimidating entry into science, and activity-based learning contrasts with the predominant traditional teaching techniques in use in Haiti, to reach and inspire a different cohort of learners. Teachers are predominantly women in Haiti, so part of the effort involves connecting them with scientists, engineers and teacher peers in the US. As a developing nation, it is vital for Haitian (as for all) children to grow up viewing women as leaders in science. Meanwhile in the US, few are aware of the reality of getting an education in a 3rd world nation (i.e. most of the world), so we also joined with teachers in Massachusetts to give US school children a peek at what daily life is like for their peers living in our vibrant but impoverished neighbor. Our Haitian partners are committed to helping their sister-schools with curriculum and educator workshops, so that the overall quality of education can rise, and not be limited to the very few schools with access to resources. We will describe the activites, motivation, and and the lessons learned from our first year of the project.

  12. Astronomy LITE Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2006-12-01

    Project LITE (Light Inquiry Through Experiments) is a materials, software, and curriculum development project. It focuses on light, optics, color and visual perception. According to two recent surveys of college astronomy faculty members, these are among the topics most often included in the large introductory astronomy courses. The project has aimed largely at the design and implementation of hands-on experiences for students. However, it has also included the development of lecture demonstrations that employ novel light sources and materials. In this presentation, we will show some of our new lecture demonstrations concerning geometrical and physical optics, fluorescence, phosphorescence and polarization. We have developed over 200 Flash and Java applets that can be used either by teachers in lecture settings or by students at home. They are all posted on the web at http://lite.bu.edu. For either purpose they can be downloaded directly to the user's computer or run off line. In lecture demonstrations, some of these applets can be used to control the light emitted by video projectors to produce physical effects in materials (e.g. fluorescence). Other applets can be used, for example, to demonstrate that the human percept of color does not have a simple relationship with the physical frequency of the stimulating source of light. Project LITE is supported by Grant #DUE-0125992 from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education.

  13. Ancient Astronomy in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsamian, Elma S.

    2007-08-01

    The most important discovery, which enriched our knowledge of ancient astronomy in Armenia, was the complex of platforms for astronomical observations on the Small Hill of Metzamor, which may be called an ancient “observatory”. Investigations on that Hill show that the ancient inhabitants of the Armenian Highlands have left us not only pictures of celestial bodies, but a very ancient complex of platforms for observing the sky. Among the ancient monuments in Armenia there is a megalithic monument, probably, being connected with astronomy. 250km South-East of Yerevan there is a structure Zorats Kar (Karahunge) dating back to II millennium B.C. Vertical megaliths many of which are more than two meters high form stone rings resembling ancient stone monuments - henges in Great Britain and Brittany. Medieval observations of comets and novas by data in ancient Armenian manuscripts are found. In the collection of ancient Armenian manuscripts (Matenadaran) in Yerevan there are many manuscripts with information about observations of astronomical events as: solar and lunar eclipses, comets and novas, bolides and meteorites etc. in medieval Armenia.

  14. Teaching Astronomy at CUSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriakose, V. C.

    The Department offers a one semester course in Astronomy for PG students. The paper is titled as `Relativity and Astrophysics’ and content of the course is: Tensor Analysis, General Relativity, Cosmology and Astrophysics. From 2009-10 academic year onwards, two experiments: (1) Determination of apparent mass of a star and (2) Measurements of lunar topography are included in the M. Sc. practicals. Students are also given training in sky watching. Since 2006 onwards the department is conducting a summer programme for school children for 10 days during vacation and two days are set apart for Astronomy related topics. We give training to students to make small telescopes and they are also introduced to wonders of the sky. This is now an annual programme of the department. From last year onwards we visit schools especially in villages and students were given training in making small telescopes and a sky watching programme is also held for the benefit of the students. We also conduct sky watching programme in the campus for the benefit of students and the public.

  15. Making Astronomy Accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Noreen A.

    2011-05-01

    A new semester begins, and your students enter the classroom for the first time. You notice a student sitting in a wheelchair or walking with assistance from a cane. Maybe you see a student with a guide dog or carrying a Braille computer. Another student gestures "hello” but then continues hand motions, and you realize the person is actually signing. You wonder why another student is using an electronic device to speak. Think this can't happen in your class? According to the U.S. Census, one out of every five Americans has a disability. And some disabilities, such as autism, dyslexia and arthritis, are considered "invisible” disabilities. This means you have a high probability that one of your students will have a disability. As an astronomy instructor, you have the opportunity to reach a wide variety of learners by using creative teaching strategies. I will share some suggestions on how to make astronomy and your part of the universe more accessible for everyone.

  16. The Astronomy Genealogy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomy Genealogy Project, to be known as AstroGen, will list as many as possible of the world's astronomers with their academic parents (aka thesis advisors) and enable the reader to trace both academic ancestors and descendants. It will be very similar to the highly successful Mathematics Genealogy Project (MGP), available at http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu. The MGP, which has been in operation since 1996, now contains the names of about 170,000 "mathematicians." These include many physicists and astronomers, as well as practitioners of related sciences. Mitchel Keller, the director of the MGP, has generously shared the software used in that project, and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) will host AstroGen, a project of the Historical Astronomy Division, on its website. We expect to start seeking entries soon, depending on the availability of computational assistance from the AAS IT department. We are seeking volunteers to help run the project. If you are interested, please contact me at joe.tenn@sonoma.edu.

  17. Astronomy. Inspiration. Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, N.

    2008-10-01

    This paper speculates how poetry and other kind of arts are tightly related to astronomy. Hence the connection between art and natural sciences in general will be discussed in the frame of ongoing multidisciplinary project `Astronomy. Inspiration. Art' at Public Observatory in Belgrade (started in 2004). This project tends to inspire (better to say `infect') artist with a cosmic themes and fantastic sceneries of the Universe. At the very beginning of the project, Serbian poet and philosopher Laza Lazić (who published 49 books of poetry, stories and novels), as well as writer Gordana Maletić (with 25 published novels for children) were interested to work on The Inspiration by Astronomical Phenomena in Serbian Literature. Five young artists and scientists include their new ideas and new approach to multidisciplinary studies too (Srdjan Djukić, Nenad Jeremić, Olivera Obradović, Romana Vujasinović, Elena Dimoski). Two books that will be presented in details in the frame of this Project, "STARRY CITIES" (http://zavod.co.yu) and "ASTROLIES", don't offer only interesting illustrations, images from the latest astronomical observations and currently accepted cosmological theories -- those books induces, provoking curiosity in a specific and witty way, an adventure and challenge to explore and create.

  18. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    {\\bf The Astronomy Workshop} (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe a few of the available tools. {\\bf Solar Systems Visualizer}: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. {\\bf Solar System Calculators}: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed. {\\bf Stellar Evolution}: The "Life of the Sun" tool animates the history of the Sun as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve over billions of years. In "Star Race," the user selects two stars of different masses and watches their evolution in a split-screeen format that emphasizes the great differences in stellar lifetimes and fates.

  19. Astronomy books in Spanish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, Julieta

    Great cultures have created language. They have discovered its strength among other reasons for education. For a long time the Bible was one of the few books available in western culture, its influence is beyond any doubt. Many developing nations have no science books in their mother tongue. They might carry a few translations but these do not convey the local culture so it is harder for students to grasp the concepts and to build on what they know. Books, even if they are extremely simple, should be written in local languages because that will facilitate the conveying of knowledge and the creation of scientific culture. In the books examples that pertain to every day local life must be given, in particular examples that have to do with women. Women play a central role in developing nations by child bearing; if they become literate they will influence enormously the quality of their children's education, in particular their science comprehension. In Mexico a collection that includes astronomy books has recently been edited by the National Council for Culture and Arts. The books are small and light, which encourages middle-school students to carry them around and read them while traveling in public transportation, such as the subway. Every other page is a new subject, that carries illustrations, abstracts and conclusions. The astronomy books are on search for extraterrestrial life, the stars and the universe. These books are distributed nation-wide and are inexpensive. They have been written by Mexican astronomers.

  20. Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Radar is a powerful technique that has furnished otherwise unavailable information about solar system bodies for three decades. The advantages of radar in planetary astronomy result from: (1) the observer's control of all the attributes of the coherent signal used to illuminate the target, especially the wave form's time/frequency modulation and polarization; (2) the ability of radar to resolve objects spatially via measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency; (3) the pronounced degree to which delay-Doppler measurements constrain orbits and spin vectors; and (4) centimeter-to-meter wavelengths, which easily penetrate optically opaque planetary clouds and cometary comae, permit investigation of near-surface macrostructure and bulk density, and are sensitive to high concentrations of metal or, in certain situations, ice. Planetary radar astronomy has primarily involved observations with Earth-based radar telescopes, but also includes some experiments with a spaceborne transmitter or receiver. In addition to providing a wealth of information about the geological and dynamical properties of asteroids, comets, the inner planets, and natural satellites, radar experiments have established the scale of the solar system, have contributed significantly to the accuracy of planetary ephemerides, and have helped to constrain theories of gravitation. This review outlines radar astronomical techniques and describes principal observational results.

  1. Application of Superconducting Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers for Terahertz-Band Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a next-generation heterodyne mixer detector - a hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer employing a superconducting microbridge - has gradually opened up terahertz-band astronomy. The surrounding state-of-the-art technologies including fabrication processes, 4 K cryostats, cryogenic low-noise amplifiers, local oscillator sources, micromachining techniques, and spectrometers, as well as the HEB mixers, have played a valuable role in the development of super-low-noise heterodyne spectroscopy systems for the terahertz band. The current developmental status of terahertz-band HEB mixer receivers and their applications for spectroscopy and astronomy with ground-based, airborne, and satellite telescopes are presented.

  2. Balloon infrared astronomy platform (BIRAP). [development and characteristics of a balloon-borne attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeb, M. E.; True, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a balloon-borne attitude control system for infrared astronomy studies is discussed. The Balloon Infrared Astronomy Platform (BIRAP) is the result of the development effort. The BIRAP uses electronic gimballing for the offset pointing which eliminates a set of mechanical gimbals. Guide stars with visual magnitudes as low as plus 6 are used for fine tracking assuring that all areas of the sky can be covered. The BIRAP control concept uses a closed loop system in the airborne equipment with automatic update through a command link that can be operated either manually or automatically by a ground based computer.

  3. Astronomy and the developing world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villone, B.

    2008-06-01

    Today Astronomy is studied by a small number of researchers. Although there is general interest in astronomy, it is difficult for the general public to gain access to information and knowledge on the subject. The institution of the International Year of Astronomy could provide a solution to the problem by providing a scientific basis for the traditional and cultural perception of the sky. It could also encourage scientific research in the field. These words are taken from the Proclamation of the International Year of Astronomy by UNESCO in 2005 and should encourage activity in astronomy in and for developing countries. There is no undisputed definition of a developing country, as it involves a complex evaluation of much data: in this work, I will use the International Statistical Institute evaluation.

  4. Astronomy Education - the Caribbean Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque-Copilah, Shirin; Cornwall, Derick; Pasha, Syed

    This paper presents the results of a survey conducted in high schools (ages 11-18) among teachers and students to establish the status of Astronomy education in the Caribbean. The survey indicates strong interest in Astronomy among students and educators alike but because of inadequate resources and a lack of teacher training it has not been given the attention it deserves. In addition we present the results of the Caribbean Institute of Astronomy's (CARINA) ongoing efforts at astronomy education and popularization both independently and in conjunction with the only Science Center in the Caribbean. Problems specific to astronomy education in the Caribbean are also discussed with regard to funding communication and lack of human resources.

  5. Contextualization of Physics and Astronomy Through Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Yasemin; Gurel, Z.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the need for enriched learning environments in science education through the integrated setting of a physics course that is included in the training program for physics teachers. The participants are researchers, prospective physics teachers, civil defence volunteers and astronomers as collaborators. In this course an approach is adopted to incorporate indoor and outdoor settings in the same process to support one another with the purpose of contextualizing physics through nature. In the heart of the course is experience and observation, particularly in nature, in the form of a residential camp. Nature is a setting where students are faced with the sky and a telescope and do sky observations throughout the night. The part of the course involving astronomy is based on this engagement with the problems that arise from the topic of sky and telescope and are brought into the class in ill-structured form as a result of experience and observation. Within this thesis, the data gathered in two consecutive years, 2008 and 2009, are evaluated qualitatively. The problems were formed around a core experience but with the same core experience, problems varied from year to year depending on the human factor within the experience, namely the different characteristics of different people in different conditions, and environmental factors; geography and weather conditions, and the increasing experience of the researchers. Furthermore IYA2009 was also effective on the program of the course in 2009. Through this thesis prospective physics teachers’ participation in astronomy was broadened and it resulted in the formation of new knowledge, better understanding and led to the advancement of the use of astronomy in physics education. It is consistent with the inclusion of astronomy in new secondary and high school physics curriculum in our country as well.

  6. Crowdfunding Astronomy Research With Google Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2015-12-01

    For nearly four years, NASA's Kepler space telescope searched for planets like Earth around more than 150,000 stars similar to the Sun. In 2008 with in-kind support from several technology companies, our non-profit organization established the Pale Blue Dot Project, an adopt-a-star program that supports scientific research on the stars observed by the Kepler mission. To help other astronomy educators conduct successful fundraising efforts, I describe how this innovative crowdfunding program successfully engaged the public over the past seven years to help support an international team in an era of economic austerity.

  7. Astronomy Olympiads in Russia and Their Position in Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, B.; Tarakanov, P.; Kostina, M.

    2012-12-01

    Astronomy olympiads started to be organised in Russia more than 60 years ago (then it was still USSR). In 1994, on the basis of several regional astronomy olympiads, appeared the All-Russian Astronomy Olympiad (Vserossijskaya astronomicheskaya olimpiada) or ARAO. It has been organised under the auspices of the Ministry of Education and pupils attending higher forms have taken part in it. The main objective of ARAO is to find and support talented pupils. Leading universities of the country (Russia) have also organised their own astronomy olympiads. In this way there are Astronomy Olympiads of Saint Petersburg, Moscow and Kazan. Among them the largest is that of Saint Petersburg. The main characteristic of these olympiads is that they have also included pupils of younger forms and have prepared their own tasks. The main objective of these olympiads is to find and support future students of astronomy classes at those universities. All astronomy Olympiads have played an important role in preparing future astronomers. This work is supported by Leading Scientific Schools Grant No. NSH-3290.2010.2.

  8. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2008-05-01

    While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this IYA-2009 program targets a completely different audience - music lovers who are attending free summer music concerts held in community parks. The target audience is music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party. This program will permit the entire community (adults, teenagers, children, and seniors) to participate in telescope observations to enhance the public appreciation of astronomy. This program will also reach under-represented groups (economically disadvantaged, women, and minorities). The population base for the initial target audience (Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York) is 2,700, 000 which is larger than combined population of Boston, Dallas, and San Francisco. Combining music concerts with astronomy assures an audience of people who have made a commitment to be outside at night for several hours. The attendance at these concerts ranges from 500 to 10,000 people per concert. If successful, this program will result in tens of thousands of people to looking through a telescope. Using an electronic projection system with a large screen will permit simultaneous viewing by audience members waiting to look through the telescope and will also be used to provide supplementary educational material. Visible constellations will also be identified along with their astronomical legends. My partner is the Amateur Observers' Society of New York. They have run a summer telescope in the park program for the past 20 years and are a participant in NASA's Night Sky network. I previously brought a telescope to a summer concert in Oyster Bay, NY and 90% of the 700 people attending the concert came to look at the Jupiter and its moons. Because concerts are held in parks throughout the US, I welcome new partners for this exciting IYA-2009 activity.

  9. Preservice elementary teachers learning of astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Chuck Gary

    The dissertation presents a new approach for the study of preservice elementary teacher astronomy education. The approach suggests that learning astronomical concepts are facilitated by greater sophistication in scale perception and spatial-aptitude. This dissertation is underscored by the national call for elementary science education reform efforts and suggests certain strategies shown more effective for the development of accurate astronomical comprehension. The present research study describes how preservice elementary teachers conceptualize and communicate ideas about Space. Instead of assuming a universal mental conception of cosmic orientations and relationships, the dissertation claims that the perception of Space related dimensions vary among preservice elementary teachers. Furthermore, the dissertation suggests individual perceptions of the scale sizes and orientations of celestial systems have direct influences on mental models used to organize and communicate astronomical information. The development of inaccurate mental models of the scaled dimensions of Space may perpetuate the teacher-student cycle of misconception and naive-theory generation among children in elementary education settings. The ability to conceptualize the vast cosmos is facilitated by the minds ability to think about vast scales and orientations of celestial objects. The Earth-based perspective of astronomy education compels the learner to think about astronomical principles within imaginary frames of reference and across unfamiliar scaled dimensions. Therefore, mental astronomical model building is underscored by the perception of scale and cosmic spatiality. This study suggests these cognitive skill sets are interconnected and facilitate the learning of accurate astronomy principles; as well as play an important role when designing an astronomy education program for preservice elementary teachers. This research study is comprised of three separate standalone articles designed and

  10. Should Astronomy Abolish Magnitudes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    2001-12-01

    Astronomy is riddled with a number of anachronistic and counterintuitive practices. Among these are: plotting increasing stellar temperature from right to left in the H-R diagram; giving the distances to remote astronomical objects in parsecs; and reporting the brightness of astronomical objects in magnitudes. Historical accident and observational technique, respectively, are the bases for the first two practices, and they will undoubtedly persist in the future. However, the use of magnitudes is especially egregious when essentially linear optical detectors like CCDs are used for measuring brightness, which are then reported in a logarithmic (base 2.512 deg!) scale. The use of magnitudes has its origin in three historical artifacts: Ptolemy's method of reporting the brightness of stars in the "Almagest"; the 19th century need for a photographic photometry scale; and the 19th century studies by psychophysicists E. H. Weber and G. T. Fechner on the response of the human eye to light. The latter work sought to uncover the relationship between the subjective response of the human eye and brain to the objective brightness of external optical stimuli. The resulting Fechner-Weber law states that this response is logarithmic: that is, that the eye essentially takes the logarithm of the incoming optical signal. However, after more than a century of perceptual studies, most intensively by S. S. Stevens, it is now well established that this relation is not logarithmic. For naked eye detection of stars from the first to sixth magnitudes, it can be reasonably well fit by a power law with index of about 0.3. Therefore, the modern experimental studies undermine the physiological basis for the use of magnitudes in astronomy. Should the historical origins of magnitudes alone be reason enough for their continued use? Probably not, since astronomical magnitudes are based on outdated studies of human perception; make little sense in an era of linear optical detection; and provide a

  11. Indian Astronomy: the missing link in Eurocentric history of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Shirin; Sharma, Deva

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive history of Astronomy should show in reasonable chronological order, the contributions from wherever they arise in the world, once they are reliably documented. However, the authors note that consistently, the extremely rich contributions from Ancient Indian scholars like Aryabatha and Bhramagupta are omitted in Eurocentric education and syllabi. It is speculated whether religious underpinnings could have been responsible for its suppression in the past. An appeal is made to represent the history of Astronomy in Eurocentric versions, to be inclusive of Indian Astronomy as accurately and completely as possible in science education.

  12. Using Computers in Introductory Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Grace L.

    1995-12-01

    Computer literacy is fast becoming a focal point in undergraduate education. Scientific literacy has been a continuing goal of undergraduate programs across the nation and a course in introductory astronomy is often used to satisfy such science requirements. At U. MD an introduction to computer skills is being integrated into our astronomy curriculum for non-science majors. The campus is adequately equipped with computer labs, yet many students enter college without basic computer skills. In Astronomy 101 (General Astronomy) students are introduced to electronic mail, a Listserver, and the world wide web. Students in this course are required to register for a free campus computer account. Their first assignment is to use e-mail to subscribe to the class Listserver, Milkyway. Through Milkyway, students have access to weekly lecture summaries, questions to review for exams, and copies of previous exams. Using e-mail students may pose questions, provide comments, or exchange opinions using Milkyway, or they may e-mail the instructor directly. Studies indicate that using e-mail is less intimidating to a student than asking a question in a class of 200 students. Monitoring e-mail for student questions has not been a problem. Student reaction has been favorable to using e-mail, since instructor office hours are not always convenient, especially to commuting or working students. Through required assignments, students receive an introduction to accessing information on the world wide web using Netscape. Astronomy has great resources available on the Internet which can be used to supplement and reinforce introductory material. Assignments are structured so that students will gain the techniques necessary to access available information. It is hoped that students will successfully apply the computer skills they learn in astronomy class to their own fields and as life-long learners. We have found that students comfortable with computers are willing to share their knowledge

  13. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  14. AstroJazz: Integrating Live Jazz and Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    AstroJazz is an innovative public education program in astronomy that blends stunning imagery with live jazz music and a touch of humor to awaken the cosmic curiosity of both adults and children. The program debuted in February 2005 at the Fiske Planetarium on the campus of the University of Colorado, Boulder with an astronomer-chanteuse (the author), a pianist, bassist, drummer, and technical assistant who created dome effects to compliment the PowerPoint slides associated with each song. This AstroJazz quartet played ten songs, five original tunes (Look Up!, Are We Alone? Andromeda Affaire, StarMan Blues, Star Kissed)), and five standard tunes with lyrical twists toward astronomy & astrobiology (e.g. Stormy Weather - Solar Style and Stardust a la SETI.) The hour-long program also includes educational interludes where the astronomy chanteuse interacts with the audience, providing insights and perspective into the wonders of our universe. The performance program that is handed to all audience members contains additional "gee-whiz" facts and provides leads to websites like Astronomy Picture of the Day and spaceweather.com that provide ongoing points of contact for public interest in astronomy. AstroJazz was very well received in its debut performance and now has several new opportunities to perform. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the AstroJazz program is engaging and educational for a very broad audience, including families with young children, world-class astronomers, and spouses of musicians who had never before been exposed to astronomy. This paper will describe the origins and intended evolution of AstroJazz, and offer a mini-sample of the music and slides used in the program. It will also discuss strategies for how the impact on audiences might be assessed.

  15. Capturing Public Interest in Astronomy through Art and Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mangala; Sabraw, J.; Salgado, J. F.; Statler, T. S.; Summers, F.

    2008-05-01

    Our 90-minute interactive panel and brainstorming session is about engaging greater public interest in astronomy during IYA 2009 through art and music. This session will focus on: (i) plans for visually interesting and challenging astronomy presentations (examples below) to connect with an audience at venues such as museums, concert halls, etc. that might be apprehensive about science but open to creative experiences (ii) ways to capitalize on interest generated through the arts to inspire lifelong appreciation of astronomy (iii) the nuts-and-bolts of turning creative ideas into exhibits or visualizations (iv) balancing scientific accuracy with artistic license (v) ways to publicize and disseminate programs at the interface of astronomy and the fine arts; and (vi) how scientists, E/PO professionals, artists, musicians et al. can bridge the "two cultures" - starting and sustaining multi-disciplinary collaborations, articulating expectations, and building synergy. The presenters will share with the E/PO community some of the astronomy-art projects and resources that we have been developing for the IYA through a variety of collaborations. Our portfolios include state-of-the-art astronomy visualizations and tools, music videos and podcasts that highlight stunning images from NASA's Great Observatories; a video suite of Solar System images that can accompany live performances of Holst's The Planets; and SCALE: a multicomponent traveling art installation including the largest pastel drawing of the Milky Way.

  16. Estimate of Interference from the Aeronautical Mobile Services of the Cities of Glendale and Pasadena to Goldstone Radio Astronomy Stations at 4.9 Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C.; Sue, M.; Manshadi, F.

    2006-05-01

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently allocated the 4.9-GHz band to public safety telecommunications services. Radio Astronomy Services (RAS) also has been using this frequency. NASA will primarily use Deep Space Station 28 (DSS 28) at Goldstone, California, for radio astronomy services that are sensitive to radio-frequency interference (RFI). This study is to determine the RFI potential of airborne transmission from two cities to radio astronomy sites in Goldstone. Propagation losses over the terrain between both cities and Goldstone are estimated using the Trans-Horizon Interference Propagation Loss (THIPL) software recently developed at JPL and high-resolution terrain data. The necessary coordination area for protecting the Goldstone radio astronomy station has been defined based on the minimum propagation loss required. Study results and suggestions for modification to the airborne areas proposed by both cities' police departments are presented.

  17. Astronomy and political theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    This paper will argue that astronomical models have long been applied to political theory, from the use of the Sun as a symbol of the emperor in Rome to the application of Copernican theory to the needs of absolute monarchy. We will begin with consideration of astral divination (the use of astronomy to ascertain divine intentions) in the ancient Near East. Particular attention will be paid to the use of Newton's discovery that the universe operates according to a single set of laws in order to support concepts of political quality and eighteenth century Natural Rights theory. We will conclude with consideration of arguments that the discovery of the expanding, multi-galaxy universe, stimulated political uncertainty in the 1930s, and that photographs of the Earth from Apollo spacecraft encouraged concepts of the `global village'.

  18. Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbel, E. L.

    2002-12-01

    A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

  19. Division X: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Taylor, Russ; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Chapman, Jessica; Dubner, Gloria; Garrett, Michael; Goss, W. Miller; Torrelles, Jose M.; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Carilli, Chris; Hills, Richard; Shastri, Prajval

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division X in the IAU 2009GA took place in three sessions during the day of August 6, 2009. The meeting, being well attended, started with the approval for the meeting agenda. Then the triennium reports were made in the first session by the president of Division X, Ren-Dong Nan, and by the chairs of three working groups: “Historic Radio Astronomy WG” by Wayne Orchiston, “Astrophysically Important Lines WG” by Masatoshi Ohishi, and “Global VLBI WG” by Tasso Tzioumis (proxy chair appointed by Steven Tingay). Afterwards, a dozen reports from observatories and worldwide significant projects have been presented in the second session. Business meeting of “Interference Mitigation WG” was located in the third session.

  20. Remote access astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beare, Richard; Bowdley, David; Newsam, Andrew; Roche, Paul

    2003-05-01

    There is still nothing to beat the excitement and fulfilment that you can get from observing celestial bodies on a clear dark night, in a remote location away from the seemingly ever increasing light pollution from cities. However, it is also the specific requirements for good observing that can sometimes prevent teachers from offering this opportunity to their students. Compromises for a town-based school or college might be to view only bright objects such as planets, or stars of magnitude 4 or brighter because of light pollution, but you would still require a knowledgeable teacher or astronomer and equipment to take outside with the students. Remote access astronomy using robotic telescopes can partly provide a solution to these problems and also opens up the doors to exciting projects that may otherwise be inaccessible to schools and colleges.

  1. Gravitational wave astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, L. S.

    Astronomers rely on a multiplicity of observational perspectives in order to infer the nature of the Universe. Progress in astronomy has historically been associated with new or improved observational perspectives. Gravitational wave detectors now under construction will provide us with a perspective on the Universe fundamentally different from any we have come to know. With this new perspective comes the hope of new insights and understanding, not just of exotic astrophysical processes, but of "bread-and-butter" astrophysics: e.g., stars and stellar evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, neutron star structure, and cosmology. In this report the author discusses briefly a small subset of the areas of conventional, "bread-and-butter" astrophysics where we can reasonably hope that gravitational wave observations will provide us with valuable new insights and understandings.

  2. Astronomy on a Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venner, L.

    2008-11-01

    Engaging ``K-to-Gray'' audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission Center for Environmental and Scientific Education (CESE) and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ, operated by Ramapo College of New Jersey. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED--certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) to the ˜25,000 students and ˜15,000 visitors that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year.

  3. Infrared astronomy after IRAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Thompson, R. I.; Werner, M. W.; Witteborn, F. C.; Becklin, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The development of infrared astronomy in the wake of IRAS is discussed. Attention is given to an overview of next generation infrared telescope technology, with emphasis on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) which has been built to replace IRAS in the 1990s. Among the instruments to be included on SIRTF are: a wide-field high-resolution camera covering the infrared range 3-30 microns with large arrays of detectors; an imaging photometer operating in the range 3-700 microns; and a spectrograph covering the range 2.5-200 microns with resolutions of 2 and 0.1 percent. Observational missions for the SIRTF are proposed in connection with: planetary formation; star formation; cosmic energy sources; active galactic nuclei; and quasars.

  4. Spreading Astronomy Education Through Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baki, P.

    2006-08-01

    Although Astronomy has been an important vehicle for effectively passing a wide range of scientific knowledge, teaching the basic skills of scientific reasoning, and for communicating the excitement of science to the public, its inclusion in the teaching curricula of most institutions of higher learning in Africa is rare. This is partly due to the fact that astronomy appears to be only good at fascinating people but not providing paid jobs. It is also due to the lack of trained instructors, teaching materials, and a clear vision of the role of astronomy and basic space science within the broader context of education in the physical and applied sciences. In this paper we survey some of the problems bedeviling the spread of astronomy in Africa and discuss some interdisciplinary traditional weather indicators. These indicators have been used over the years to monitor the appearance of constellations. For example, orions are closely intertwined with cultures of some ethnic African societies and could be incorporated in the standard astronomy curriculum as away of making the subject more `home grown' and to be able to reach out to the wider populace in popularizing astronomy and basic sciences. We also discuss some of the other measures that ought to be taken to effectively create an enabling environment for sustainable teaching and spread of astronomy through Africa.

  5. Georgians Experience Astronomy Research in Schools: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.; Aguilar, J. C.; Higdon, S. J. U.

    2010-01-01

    Georgia Department of Education and its partners at Columbus State and Georgia Southern Universities are engaged in creating a comprehensive program to institutionalize high quality astronomy in its high schools. The goal of the Georgians Experience Astronomy Research in Schools (GEARS) project is to transform the way high-school Astronomy is taught in 100% of GA's public schools by 2012. GEARS will be an innovative and rigorous, NASA research-infused Astronomy curriculum, which will reach thousands of students in rural, urban, and suburban areas and will be taught by highly trained teachers. GEARS project leaders have two objectives: 1) Develop and implement an online high-school Astronomy course for inclusion in the GA Virtual School portal. The GEARS course will be a progression through inquiry-based research experiences culminating in authentic data analysis and data mining activities selected from the NASA archives. The GEARS framework and units will meet the new Georgia Performance Standards in Astronomy and will be incorporated into teacher workshops. 2) Ensure the sustainability and utilization of GEARS both online and in a blended classroom approach by providing teacher professional development, integrating it into Space Science for Teachers graduate courses, and by developing a network of Georgia Astronomy Resource Teachers who will teach GEARS astronomy and mentor other teachers in their local areas. This poster will provide an overview of the workshop and course curricular framework, design philosophy and sample units. Partnerships with interested parties, especially those with NASA data, are sought. The project website is http://cheller.phy.georgiasouthern.edu/ shigdon/GEARS/GEARS.html. This project is funded by NASA Grant NNX09AH83A through the GADOE, supported by CSU and GSU.

  6. Building a Successful Teachers' Workshop in Astronomy & Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, T. A.; Thornton, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    We discuss the Teachers' Workshop in Astronomy & Astrophysics, a 2-day long summer workshop we designed to aid K-12 grade teachers in incorporating astronomy and astrophysics into their curricula. These workshops are part of a faculty-led outreach program entitled Outreach in Astronomy & Astrophysics with the UCI Observatory, funded by an NSF FOCUS grant to the University of California, Irvine. Approximately 20 teachers from the Compton, Newport/Mesa and Santa Ana Unified School Districts attend each workshop. Our teachers realize that astronomy captures the imagination of their students, and thus lessons in astronomy can very effectively convey a number of challenging math and science concepts. Our workshop is designed to give teachers the content and instruction needed to achieve that goal. Because only a small fraction of teachers have taken a college astronomy course, an important component of the workshop is lectures on: (1) the motion of objects in the night sky, moon phases and the seasons, (2) the solar system, (3) the physics of light, and (4) interesting applications such as searching for planets around other stars and charting the expansion history of the Universe. The second important component of the workshop is the kit of material each teacher receives, which includes a introductory astronomy textbook, planetarium software, and the ASP's "Universe at Your Fingertips" and "More Universe at Your Fingertips", etc.. The latter two books give teachers many examples of creative hands-on activities and experiments they can do with their classes and instruction on how to build a coherent curriculum for their particular grade level. We also introduce teachers to Contemporary Laboratory Exercises in Astronomy (CLEA), a suite of computer lab exercises that can be used effectively in high school physics classes. For more information, see http://www.physics.uci.edu/%7Eobservat/#e&o. Funding provided by NSF grant EHR-0227202 (PI: Ronald Stern).

  7. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  8. Applied Historical Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, F. Richard

    2014-01-01

    F. Richard Stephenson has spent most of his research career -- spanning more than 45 years -- studying various aspects of Applied Historical Astronomy. The aim of this interdisciplinary subject is the application of historical astronomical records to the investigation of problems in modern astronomy and geophysics. Stephenson has almost exclusively concentrated on pre-telescopic records, especially those preserved from ancient and medieval times -- the earliest reliable observations dating from around 700 BC. The records which have mainly interested him are of eclipses (both solar and lunar), supernovae, sunspots and aurorae, and Halley's Comet. The main sources of early astronomical data are fourfold: records from ancient and medieval East Asia (China, together with Korea and Japan); ancient Babylon; ancient and medieval Europe; and the medieval Arab world. A feature of Stephenson's research is the direct consultation of early astronomical texts in their original language -- either working unaided or with the help of colleagues. He has also developed a variety of techniques to help interpret the various observations. Most pre-telescopic observations are very crude by present-day standards. In addition, early motives for skywatching were more often astrological rather than scientific. Despite these drawbacks, ancient and medieval astronomical records have two remarkable advantages over modern data. Firstly, they can enable the investigation of long-term trends (e.g. in the terrestrial rate of rotation), which in the relatively short period covered by telescopic observations are obscured by short-term fluctuations. Secondly, over the lengthy time-scale which they cover, significant numbers of very rare events (such as Galactic supernovae) were reported, which have few -- if any-- counterparts in the telescopic record. In his various researches, Stephenson has mainly focused his attention on two specific topics. These are: (i) long-term changes in the Earth's rate of

  9. Color in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    2002-05-01

    The vocabulary of astronomy is riddled with color terms. Stars are referred to as red or blue - even brown -- though rarely green. Astronomers say light from a star can be "blueshifted" or that it can be "reddened". Color, however, is not a simple one-dimensional physical parameter equal to wavelength or frequency. It is a complex, psychophysical phenomenon involving at least three degrees of freedom - hue, saturation and brightness -- as well as observational context. Nonetheless, many astronomers treat hue alone or hue plus saturation as the same thing as color. A recent report on "the color of the universe" is a case in point (Baldry and Glazebrook, Bull. Am. As. Soc., 34, No. 1, 571, 2002). Even discounting the authors' initial and (possibly) subsequent errors in arriving at a "color" associated with the composite spectrum derived from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (first reported as "pale turquoise", then "beige"), the method of viewing the light was left vague, and context is important. For example, consider the question "What color is the Moon?" When viewed from Earth, the Moon appears white against the black sky. Place a piece of "average" lunar material in a lighted room, and it will appear dark gray. To most human observers, the 2000 or so naked eye stars observable from the northern hemisphere all appear white, with the few exceptions which look reddish/orange such as Betelgeuse, Arcturus, Aldeberan, Antares and Pollux. Yet the dimmer double star companion to Alberio can appear bluish when viewed beside its much brighter yellowish/orange neighbor if both are viewed by eye through a small aperture, slightly defocused telescope. This presentation will explore several visual phenomena that can help clarify the concept of color in astronomy. Supported in part by NSF grant # DUE-9950551 for "Project LITE: Light Inquiry Through Experiments".

  10. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  11. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  12. Art & Astronomie - impressions celestes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël

    2015-10-01

    Ce livre revisite l'histoire de l'art dans ce qu'elle a de plus universel : son rapport au ciel. De l'Orient à l'Occident, de l'Antiquité à l'époque contemporaine, du classique au plus inattendu, il crée un espace singulier où se mêlent art et science, un musée imaginaire croisant sensibilité intime et compréhension du Cosmos, un jeu sans cesse réinventé...; car il n'y a pas une seule manière de regarder les étoiles. Bien sûr, le ciel possède un énorme pouvoir évocateur, une force inspiratrice à nulle autre pareille, mais l'inspiration n'est pas la seule des relations entre l'art et l'astronomie. En effet, les artistes peuvent apporter leur grain de sel aux révolutions scientifiques, tandis que l'astronomie peut aider à comprendre certaines œuvres. Avec près de 600 illustrations, cet ouvrage n'a pas pour but d'égrener la liste exhaustive des représentations de ciel étoilé, clair de lune, ambiance crépusculaire ou soleil de midi, mais plutôt d'aborder les multiples relations entre l'art et la science. Il s'agit d'une invitation à un voyage aux frontières mouvantes et incertaines des plus belles réalisations de l'esprit humain.

  13. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  14. "It's Our Universe": Astronomy Outreach in Appalachian Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mangala; Eberts, G.; Hartwick, M.; Miller, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present highlights from an on-going astronomy outreach program for all ages, being conducted by a collaboration of astronomers both professional and amateur with the local public library in Athens county in Appalachian Ohio. The elements of our program include a two-part series of exhibits, a public lecture series highlighting women or minority astronomers or astronauts, and five `Space Days' with hands-on astronomy activities for grades 4-6. Complementing these are the extremely popular telescopic observations of the Sun or the night sky. We are making a special effort to reach homeschooled children. We gratefully acknowledge funding from a NASA/STScI IDEAS grant.

  15. Status of astronomy in Rwanda and volunteer work at Kigali Institute of Education (KIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Nkundabakura, P.; Uwamahoro, J.

    2015-03-01

    Until 2009, astronomy was undeveloped in Rwanda, without astronomy courses at universities and schools, astronomical facilities, or any outreach programmes. With the international year of astronomy in 2009, Dr. Pheneas Nkundabakura and Dr. Jean Uwamahoro from the KIE Maths-Physics department, both graduates from the South African NASSP Programme (http://www.star.ac.za), started a program of implementing the astronomical knowledge at schools and universities. During the same year 2009, IAU donated 100 galileoscopes for the secondary schools, and several astronomy workshops were organised for the teachers. IAU donated also 5 laptops to help students and lecturers to learn and use astronomy software. With this, KIE students have now a possibility to choose astronomy/space science for their undergraduate final year research projects. Moreover, there is an ongoing effort to look for further collaboration towards establishing the first astronomical facility (observatory) in the country.

  16. Freshman Seminars: Interdisciplinary Engagements in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, M. K.

    2006-08-01

    The Freshman Seminar program at the University of Texas is designed to allow groups of fifteen students an engaging introduction to the University. The seminars introduce students to the resources of the university and allow them to identify interesting subjects for further research or future careers. An emphasis on oral and written communication by the students provides these first-year students a transition to college-level writing and thinking. Seminar activities include field trips to an art museum, a research library, and the Humanities Research Center rare book collection. This paper will report on two seminars, each fifteen weeks in length. In "The Galileo Scandal" students examine Galileo's struggle with the church (including a mock trial). They perform activities that connect his use of the telescope and observations to astronomical concepts. In "Astronomy and the Humanities" students analyze various forms of human expression that have astronomical connections (art, drama, literature, music, poetry, and science fiction); they perform hands-on activities to reinforce the related astronomy concepts. Evaluation of the seminars indicates student engagement and improvement in communication skills. Many of the activities could be used independently to engage students enrolled in standard introductory astronomy classes.

  17. Promoting Mental Model Building in Astronomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ian; Barker, Miles; Jones, Alister

    2003-01-01

    While astronomy has recently re-emerged in many science curricula, there remain unresolved teaching and learning difficulties peculiar to astronomy education. This paper argues that mental model building, the core process in astronomy itself, should be reflected in astronomy education. Also, this crucial skill may promote a better understanding of…

  18. Conceptual Astronomy Knowledge among Amateur Astronomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berendsen, Margaret L.

    2005-01-01

    Amateur astronomers regularly serve as informal astronomy educators for their communities. This research inquires into the level of knowledge of basic astronomy concepts among amateur astronomers and examines factors related to amateur astronomy that affect that knowledge. Using the concept questions from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2,…

  19. Toolsets for Airborne Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-02

    article title:  Toolsets for Airborne Data     View larger image The ... limit of detection values. Prior to accessing the TAD Web Application ( https://tad.larc.nasa.gov ) for the first time, users must ...

  20. The Profile of Astronomy Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czart, K.

    Presentation of questionnaires carried out on Polish Astronomy Portal websites. There was over 80 questionnaires during 2 years period. As most part of users visiting this website are astronomy amateurs, we can assume questionnaires give a picture of astronomy amateurs community. Questionnaires can be divided into four main thematical groups: profile of users (age, sex, activities), what do they think about controversial astronomical problems (is Pluto a planet?), what are their likings (favorit star, most beatiful planet) and “business” questions (how did they find our website?, how many astronomical services do they visit regularly?).