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Sample records for airborne benzene concentrations

  1. Airborne concentrations of benzene and mineral spirits (stoddard solvent) during cleaning of a locomotive generator and traction motor.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2002-12-13

    Mineral spirits (also called Stoddard solvent), a petroleum distillate, is often used as a degreaser or an industrial cleaning agent. Although several studies measured airborne concentrations of mineral spirits in various occupational settings, none have characterized the airborne concentrations of benzene from use of mineral spirits. Recent case reports have suggested that benzene, as a contaminant in mineral spirits, might be responsible for adverse health effects. Because some claims of health effects in the railroad industry have been attributed to potential historical exposures to mineral spirits and little information is available regarding air concentrations in this type of occupational setting, a simulation study was conducted to quantitate historical exposures a railroad worker might have experienced while spraying mineral spirits on locomotive engine parts in the 1970s. To quantitate potential historical exposures, worker tasks were simulated under worst-case exposure conditions by spraying minerals spirits on a locomotive generator and traction motor. The results of both generator and traction motor cleaning events produced concentrations of mineral spirits ranging from 34 to 221 ppm and an average 1-h concentration of 121 ppm, whereas benzene concentrations associated with the spraying and drying tasks were less than the limit of detection (0.002-0.006 ppm). Results indicate that a railroad worker who cleaned a locomotive traction motor and generator with mineral spirits for 2 h each workday under worst-case exposure conditions would be exposed to an 8-h time-weighted average (based on lapel measurements) of 30.4 ppm airborne mineral spirits. On the basis of the conditions under which these concentrations were obtained, the results should be the reasonable maximum values that can be achieved in a modern-era (post-1970) workplace in the United States.

  2. Urinary biomarkers of exposure and of oxidative damage in children exposed to low airborne concentrations of benzene.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, R; Spatari, G; Pigini, D; Poli, D; Banda, I; Goldoni, M; Riccelli, M G; Petyx, M; Protano, C; Vitali, M; Barbaro, M; Mutti, A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the oxidative damage to nucleic acids in children (5-11 years) associated with exposure to environmental pollutants and tobacco smoke (ETS). For each subject, urinary sampling was done twice (evening and next morning) to measure by tandem LC-MS-MS such oxidated products of nucleic acids as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua). Methyl tert-butyl ether (U-MTBE), benzene (U-Benz), and its metabolites (t,t-muconic and S-phenylmercapturic acids, t,t-MA and S-PMA, respectively) were determined as biomarkers of exposure to air pollution, and cotinine as a biomarker of exposure to ETS. Biomarkers of exposure (S-PMA and U-MTBE) and of DNA oxidation (8-oxodGuo) were dependent on the urbanization and industrialization levels and increased in the evening sample as compared to next morning (p<0.05). In both evening and next morning samples, 8-oxodGuo and 8-oxoGuo correlated with each other (r=0.596 and r=0.537, respectively, p<0.01) and with biomarkers of benzene exposure, particularly S-PMA (r=0.59 and r=0.45 for 8-oxodGuo and r=0.411 and r=0.383 for 8-oxoGuo, p<0.01). No such correlations were observed for U-MTBE and cotinine. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that 8-oxodGuo was positively associated with S-PMA at both sampling times (β=0.18 and β=0.14 for evening and next morning sampling, respectively; p<0.02) and weakly with U-MTBE (β=0.07, p=0.020) only in the evening urines. These results suggest that the selected biomarkers of exposure to benzene, particularly S-PMA, are good tracers of exposure to complex mixtures of oxidative pollutants and that the associated oxidative damage to nucleic acids is detectable even at very low levels of exposure.

  3. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  4. An analysis of historical exposures of pressmen to airborne benzene (1938-2006).

    PubMed

    Novick, Rachel M; Keenan, James J; Gross, Sherilyn A; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    Benzene is an aromatic hydrocarbon that, with sufficient cumulative lifetime doses, can cause acute myelogenous leukemia. Because of its volatility and solvent properties, it was used in the printing industry in inks, ink solvents, and cleaning agents from the 1930s to the 1970s. This analysis represents the first known attempt to gather and synthesize the available data on historical airborne benzene concentrations in printing facilities and exposures to pressmen. The sources of fugitive benzene vapors from printing operations have been identified as evaporation from ink fountains, exposed sections of the printing cylinder, the paper web, the paper post exit, and spilled ink. In addition, specific activities that could lead to benzene exposure, such as filling the fountains, using solvents to clean the press, and using solvents as personal cleaning agents, potentially occurred multiple times per work period. Eighteen studies were identified that reported workplace airborne concentrations in printing facilities between 1938 and 2006. Typical benzene air concentrations, considering both personal and area samples of various durations, were as high as 200 p.p.m. in the 1930s through the 1950s, 3-35 p.p.m. in the 1960s, 1.3-16 p.p.m. in the 1970s, 0.013-1 in the 1980s, and far less than 1 p.p.m. in the 1990s and 2000s. The decrease in benzene air concentrations by the late 1970s was likely to be linked to the decreased benzene content of printing materials, increased engineering controls, and to more stringent occupational exposure limits.

  5. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  6. An effort to test the embryotoxicity of benzene, toluene, xylene, and formaldehyde to murine embryonic stem cells using airborne exposure technique.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuijie; Yuan, Lingmin; Zeng, Su

    2009-10-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylene, and formaldehyde are well-known indoor air pollutants, especially after house decoration. They are also common pollutants in the working places of the plastic industry, chemical industry, and leather industry. It has been reported that these pollutants cause people to be irritated, sick, experience a headache, and be dizzy. They also have the potential to induce asthma, aplastic anemia, and leukemia, even cause abortion or fetus malformation in humans. In this study, the airborne toxicity of benzene, toluene, xylene, and formaldehyde to murine embryonic stem cells (mES cells) were tested using airborne exposure technique to evaluate the mES cell airborne exposure model on embryotoxicity prediction. Briefly, mES cells were cultured on Transwell inserts and were exposed to an airborne surrounding of test chemicals in a chamber for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Cytotoxicity was determined using the MTT assay after further culture for 18 h at 37 degrees C in normal medium. The airborne IC(50) (50% inhibition concentration) of benzene, toluene, xylene, and formaldehyde derived from the fitted dose-response curves were 17,400 +/- 1290, 16,000 +/- 250, 4680 +/- 500, and 620 +/- 310 ppm, respectively. Formaldehyde was found to be the compound most toxic to mES cells compared to benzene homologues. The toxicity data had good correlation with the in vivo data. The results showed that the mES airborne exposure model may be used to predict embryotoxicity of volatile organic compounds.

  7. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  12. Temporal variability in airborne pollen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Raynor, G S; Hayes, J V; Ogden, E C

    1976-06-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the relationship between concentrations of airborne pollens and sampling time, using sequential rotoslide samplers at urban and rural locations. Short-period data showed an increase in variability with time between samples. Two-hour data showed a stronger trend for the first 12 hours but better agreement as the time between samples approached one day.

  13. DNA damage and repair capacity in workers exposed to low concentrations of benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; Doria, Denise; Fracasso, Maria Enrica; Barbieri, Anna; Sabatini, Laura; Drago, Ignazio; Violante, Francesco S; Soleo, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage and cellular repair capacity were studied in 18 male fuel tanker drivers and 13 male filling-station attendants exposed to low and very low concentrations of benzene, respectively, and compared to 20 males with no occupational exposure (controls). Exposure to airborne benzene was measured using passive personal samplers, and internal doses were assayed through the biomarkers t,t-muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid and urinary benzene. DNA damage was evaluated using tail intensity (TI) determined by the comet assay in peripheral lymphocytes. Urinary 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) was measured as a biomarker of oxidative damage. DNA repair kinetics were assessed using the comet assay in lymphocytes sampled 20 and 60 min post H2O2 exposure. Benzene exposure differed significantly between the drivers (median 246.3 µg/m(3)), attendants (median 13.8 µg/m(3)), and controls (median 4.1 µg/m(3)). There were no differences in TI and 8-oxodG among the three groups, or between smokers and non-smokers. DNA repair kinetics were similar among the drivers, attendants and controls, although the comet assay on H2 O2 -damaged lymphocytes after 60 min revealed significantly lower levels of TI only in drivers. The DNA repair process in smokers was similar to that observed in drivers. In conclusion, this study found no relationship between low levels of benzene exposure and DNA damage, although there was evidence that exposure interferes with DNA repair kinetics. The biological impact of this finding on the onset of genotoxic effects in exposed workers has still to be ascertained.

  14. Health risk equations and risk assessment of airborne benzene homologues exposure to drivers and passengers in taxi cabins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaokai; Feng, Lili; Luo, Huilong; Cheng, Heming

    2016-03-01

    Interior air environment and health problems of vehicles have attracted increasing attention, and benzene homologues (BHs) including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and styrene are primary hazardous gases in vehicular cabins. The BHs impact on the health of passengers and drivers in 38 taxis is assessed, and health risk equations of in-car BHs to different drivers and passengers are induced. The health risk of in-car BHs for male drivers is the highest among all different receptors and is 1.04, 6.67, and 6.94 times more than ones for female drivers, male passengers, and female passengers, respectively. In-car BHs could not lead to the non-cancer health risk to all passengers and drivers as for the maximal value of non-cancer indices is 0.41 and is less than the unacceptable value (1.00) of non-cancer health risk from USEPA. However, in-car BHs lead to cancer health risk to drivers as for the average value of cancer indices is 1.21E-04 which is 1.21 times more than the unacceptable value (1.00E-04) of cancer health risk from USEPA. Finally, for in-car airborne benzene concentration (X, μg/m(3)) to male drivers, female drivers, male passengers, and female passengers, the cancer health risk equations are Y = 1.48E-06X, Y = 1.42E-06X, Y = 2.22E-07X, and Y = 2.13E-07X, respectively, and the non-cancer health risk equations are Y = 1.70E-03X, Y = 1.63E-03X, Y = 2.55E-04X, and Y = 2.45E-04X, respectively.

  15. Benzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 02 / 001F TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BENZENE ( NONCANCER EFFECTS ) ( CAS No . 71 - 43 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) October 2002 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed

  16. A lack of consensus in the literature findings on the removal of airborne benzene by houseplants: Effect of bacterial enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriprapat, Wararat; Strand, Stuart E.

    2016-04-01

    Removal rates of benzene and formaldehyde gas by houseplants reported by several laboratories varied by several orders of magnitude. We hypothesized that these variations were caused by differential responses of soil microbial populations to the high levels of pollutant used in the studies, and tested responses to benzene by plants and soils separately. Five houseplant species and tobacco were exposed to benzene under hydroponic conditions and the uptake rates compared. Among the test plants, Syngonium podophyllum and Chlorophytum comosum and Epipremnum aureum had the highest benzene removal rates. The effects of benzene addition on populations of soil bacteria were determined using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays targeting microbial genes involved in benzene degradation. The total bacterial population increased as shown by increases in the levels of eubacteria 16S rRNA, which was significantly higher in the high benzene incubations than in the low benzene incubations. Transcripts (mRNA) of genes encoding phenol monooxygenases, catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and the housekeeping gene rpoB increased in all soils incubated with high benzene concentrations. Therefore the enrichment of soils with benzene gas levels typical of experiments with houseplants in the literature artificially increased the levels of total soil bacterial populations, and especially the levels and activities of benzene-degrading bacteria.

  17. Spatial variability in airborne pollen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Raynor, G S; Ogden, E C; Hayes, J V

    1975-03-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the relationship between airborne pollen concentrations and distance. Simultaneous samples were taken in 171 tests with sets of eight rotoslide samplers spaced from one to 486 M. apart in straight lines. Use of all possible pairs gave 28 separation distances. Tests were conducted over a 2-year period in urban and rural locations distant from major pollen sources during both tree and ragweed pollen seasons. Samples were taken at a height of 1.5 M. during 5-to 20-minute periods. Tests were grouped by pollen type, location, year, and direction of the wind relative to the line. Data were analyzed to evaluate variability without regard to sampler spacing and variability as a function of separation distance. The mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, ratio of maximum to the mean, and ratio of minimum to the mean were calculated for each test, each group of tests, and all cases. The average coefficient of variation is 0.21, the maximum over the mean, 1.39 and the minimum over the mean, 0.69. No relationship was found with experimental conditions. Samples taken at the minimum separation distance had a mean difference of 18 per cent. Differences between pairs of samples increased with distance in 10 of 13 groups. These results suggest that airborne pollens are not always well mixed in the lower atmosphere and that a sample becomes less representative with increasing distance from the sampling location.

  18. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  19. Possible Causes of Decreasing Benzene Concentrations in an Oil-Contaminated Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennan, D.; Bekins, B. A.; Warren, E.; Baedecker, M. J.; Eganhouse, R. P.

    2010-12-01

    Crude oil contamination from a 1979 oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota resulted in a subsurface oil body and a dissolved hydrocarbon plume in the groundwater. Benzene concentrations in the plume adjacent to the oil decreased from nearly 5 mg/L in 1993 to less than 3 mg/L in 2007. Benzene depletion within the plume and oil body was investigated with a microcosm study and analyses of the benzene content remaining in the oil. To test if the methanogenic microbial consortium adjacent to the oil is capable of degrading benzene, eight anaerobic microcosms were constructed with sediment from a methanogenic area of the plume that has been exposed to benzene. Microcosms were constructed in 120 mL serum bottles containing 60 g of anaerobic sediment, 20 mL pre-reduced mineral salts solution, and spiked with benzene to attain a target concentration of 2 mg/L. The methanogenic inhibitor, 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), was added to four bottles to achieve a concentration of 13.5 g/L. One bottle containing BES and another not containing BES were autoclaved. Over a year the average aqueous benzene concentrations decreased 2.9±0.4 μg/L-day in the inhibited microcosms, 3.1±0.3 μg/L-day in the uninhibited microcosms, and 2.1±0.5 μg/L-day in the autoclaved microcosms. Although the linear regressions slopes differed, the difference in the rates between the BES inhibited, uninhibited, and autoclaved treatments is not statistically significant with the existing data (p=0.19). Headspace analyses for methane conducted after 392 days showed concentrations in the uninhibited microcosms were about 40 times greater than the inhibited microcosms and autoclaved controls. The methane concentrations in the inhibited microcosm were lower than dissolved methane originally present in the pore water of the added sediment. Oil samples bailed from four wells in the oil body were analyzed for benzene concentrations and normalized to the benzene content of an archived sample representative of the

  20. Mismatch in aeroallergens and airborne grass pollen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, M. P.; Alcázar, P.; Hernández-Ceballos, M. A.; Galán, C.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate estimation of the allergen concentration in the atmosphere is essential for allergy sufferers. The major cause of pollinosis all over Europe is due to grass pollen and Phl p 5 has the highest rates of sensitization (>50%) in patients with grass pollen-induced allergy. However, recent research has shown that airborne pollen does not always offer a clear indicator of exposure to aeroallergens. This study aims to evaluate relations between airborne grass pollen and Phl p 5 concentrations in Córdoba (southern Spain) and to study how meteorological parameters influence these atmospheric records. Monitoring was carried out from 2012 to 2014. Hirst-type volumetric spore trap was used for pollen collection, following the protocol recommended by the Spanish Aerobiology Network (REA). Aeroallergen sampling was performed using a low-volume cyclone sampler, and allergenic particles were quantified by ELISA assay. Besides, the influence of main meteorological factors on local airborne pollen and allergen concentrations was surveyed. A significant correlation was observed between grass pollen and Phl p 5 allergen concentrations during the pollen season, but with some sporadic discrepancy episodes. The cumulative annual Pollen Index also varied considerably. A significant correlation has been obtained between airborne pollen and minimum temperature, relative humidity and precipitation, during the three studied years. However, there is no clear relationship between allergens and weather variables. Our findings suggest that the correlation between grass pollen and aeroallergen Phl p 5 concentrations varies from year-to-year probably related to a complex interplay of meteorological variables.

  1. Biomarkers of susceptibility following benzene exposure: influence of genetic polymorphisms on benzene metabolism and health effects.

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Damiano; Chiarella, Pieranna; Mansi, Antonella; Pigini, Daniela; Iavicoli, Sergio; Tranfo, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous occupational and environmental pollutant. Improved industrial hygiene allowed airborne concentrations close to the environmental context (1-1000 µg/m(3)). Conversely, new limits for benzene levels in urban air were set (5 µg/m(3)). The biomonitoring of exposure to such low benzene concentrations are performed measuring specific and sensitive biomarkers such as S-phenylmercapturic acid, trans, trans-muconic acid and urinary benzene: many studies referred high variability in the levels of these biomarkers, suggesting the involvement of polymorphic metabolic genes in the individual susceptibility to benzene toxicity. We reviewed the influence of metabolic polymorphisms on the biomarkers levels of benzene exposure and effect, in order to understand the real impact of benzene exposure on subjects with increased susceptibility.

  2. Benzene and toluene concentrations in a hemodialysis room in a medium sized South Korean city

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moon-Soo; Hong, Joong-Rock; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Hong, Sae-Yong; Jun, Yong-Taek; Son, Bu-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims The current study was designed to determine whether the indoor air pollution in a hemodialysis room (HD) was different from that of other comparable areas in a hospital. Methods Five air monitor samplers were hung on the ceiling and placed on the table in both the HD and general ward nursing stations, respectively. In addition, five samplers were placed in the nurse's breathing zone of the HD and the general ward, respectively. Ten air monitor samplers were also placed on the edge of the bed in the HD, which represented the patient's breathing zone. The levels of benzene and toluene were analyzed by GC/MS. Results In the general ward, the toluene concentration was significantly higher in the nurse breathing zone than that for the ceiling or table samples (p=0.001). The benzene concentration was also significantly higher in the general ward nurse breathing zone than that in the HD (p=0.006). In addition, the benzene concentrations on the table were higher at the general ward as compared to the HD (p=0.028), but there was no significant difference between the ceiling, general ward station and HD. Conclusions Both the benzene and toluene concentrations in the HD appear to be more affected by the outdoor atmospheric conditions than by any potential indoor internal sources. PMID:18787362

  3. Ambrosia airborne pollen concentration modelling and evaluation over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaoui-Laguel, Lynda; Vautard, Robert; Viovy, Nicolas; Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Colette, Augustin

    2014-05-01

    Native from North America, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (Common Ragweed) is an invasive annual weed introduced in Europe in the mid-nineteenth century. It has a very high spreading potential throughout Europe and releases very allergenic pollen leading to health problems for sensitive persons. Because of its health effects, it is necessary to develop modelling tools to be able to forecast ambrosia air pollen concentration and to inform allergy populations of allergenic threshold exceedance. This study is realised within the framework of the ATOPICA project (https://www.atopica.eu/) which is designed to provide first steps in tools and estimations of the fate of allergies in Europe due to changes in climate, land use and air quality. To calculate and predict airborne concentrations of ambrosia pollen, a chain of models has been built. Models have been developed or adapted for simulating the phenology (PMP phonological modelling platform), inter-annual production (ORCHIDEE vegetation model), release and airborne processes (CHIMERE chemical transport model) of ragweed pollen. Airborne pollens follow processes similar to air quality pollutants in CHIMERE with some adaptations. The detailed methodology, formulations and input data will be presented. A set of simulations has been performed to simulate airborne concentrations of pollens over long time periods on a large European domain. Hindcast simulations (2000 - 2012) driven by ERA-Interim re-analyses are designed to best simulate past periods airborne pollens. The modelled pollen concentrations are calibrated with observations and validated against additional observations. Then, 20-year long historical simulations (1986 - 2005) are carried out using calibrated ambrosia density distribution and climate model-driven weather in order to serve as a control simulation for future scenarios. By comparison with multi-annual observed daily pollen counts we have shown that the model captures well the gross features of the pollen

  4. A model to predict threshold concentrations for toxic effects of chlorinated benzenes in sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchsman, P.C.; Duda, D.J.; Barber, T.R.

    1999-09-01

    A probabilistic model was developed to predict effects threshold concentrations for chlorinated benzenes in sediment. Based on published quantitative structure-activity relationships relating the toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to the degree of chlorination, congeners with the same number of chlorine substitutions were considered toxicologically equivalent. Hexachlorobenzene was excluded from the assessment based on a lack of aquatic toxicity at the water solubility limit. The equilibrium partitioning approach was applied in a probabilistic analysis to derive predicted effects thresholds (PETs) for each chlorinated benzene group, with model input distributions defined by published log K{sub ow} values and aquatic toxicity data extracted from the published literature. The probabilistic distributions of PETs generally increased with chlorination, with 20th percentile values ranging from 3.2 mg/kg{sub 1{degree}OC} for chlorobenzene to 67 mg/kg{sub 1%OC} for tetrachlorobenzene congeners. The toxicity of total chlorinated benzenes in sediment can be assessed by applying the PETs in a toxic index model, based on the assumption that multiple chlorinated benzene congeners will show approximately additive toxicity, as characteristic of nonpolar narcotic toxicants. The 20th percentile PET values are one to two orders of magnitude higher than published screening-level guidelines, suggesting that the screening-level guidelines will provide overly conservative assessments in most cases. Relevant spiked sediment toxicity data are very limited but seem consistent with the probabilistic model; additional testing could be conducted to confirm the model's predictions.

  5. Airborne Nicotine Concentrations in the Workplaces of Tobacco Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seok-Ju; Park, Sung-Jun; Kim, Byoung-Seok; Lim, Hyun-Sul; Kim, Jik-Su; Kim, In-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nicotine is a natural alkaloid and insecticide in tobacco leaves. Green tobacco sickness (GTS) is known as a disease of acute nicotine intoxication among tobacco farmers. Until now, GTS has been recognized globally as a disease that results from nicotine absorption through the skin. However, we assumed that GTS might also result from nicotine inhalation as well as absorption. We aimed to measure the airborne nicotine concentrations in various work environments of Korean tobacco farmers. Methods We measured the nicotine concentrations in the tobacco fields, private curing barns, and joint curing barns of farmers from July to October 2010. All sampling and analyses of airborne nicotine were conducted according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health manual of analytic methods. Results The airborne nicotine concentrations (geometric mean [geometric standard deviation]) in the tobacco field were 83.4 mg/m3 (1.2) in the upper region and 93.3 mg/m3 (1.2) in the lower region. In addition, the nicotine concentration by personal sampling was 150.1 mg/m3. Similarly, the nicotine concentrations in the private curing barn, workers in curing barns, the front yard of the curing barn, and in the joint curing barn were 323.7 mg/m3 (2.0), 121.0 mg/m3 (1.5), 73.7 mg/m3 (1.7), and 610.3 mg/m3 (1.0), respectively. Conclusions The nicotine concentration in the workplaces of tobacco farmers was very high. Future studies should measure the environmental concentration of nicotine that is inhaled by tobacco farmers. PMID:24921017

  6. Photoacoustic spectroscopy-based detector for measuring benzene and toluene concentration in gas and liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyecz, Veronika; Mohácsi, Árpád; Puskás, Sándor; Vágó, Árpád; Szabó, Gábor

    2011-12-01

    Here we present a novel instrument for on-line, automatic measurement of benzene and toluene concentration in gas and liquid samples produced in the natural gas industry. Operation of the instrument is based on the collection of analytes on an adsorbent, separation using a chromatographic column and detection by near-infrared diode laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy. Sample handling, measurement and data evaluation are carried out fully automatically, using an integrated, programmable electronic unit. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory for natural gas, nitrogen and liquid glycol samples, and tested under field conditions at a natural gas dehydration unit of the MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Company. Minimum detectable concentrations (3σm-1) were found to be 2.5 µg l-1 for benzene and 4 µg l-1 for toluene in gas samples, while 1.5 mg l-1 for benzene and 3 mg l-1 for toluene in liquid samples, which is suitable for measuring benzene and toluene concentration in natural gas and glycol samples occurring at natural gas dehydration plants.

  7. An Order-of-Magnitude Estimation of Benzene Concentration in Saltstone Vault

    SciTech Connect

    ALEXANDER, CHOI

    2005-02-28

    The contents of Tank 48 that include the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitates of potassium and cesium will be grouted and stored in the Saltstone vault. The grouting process is exothermic, which should accelerate the decomposition of TPB precipitates eventually to benzene. Because the vault is not currently outfitted with an active ventilation system, there is a concern that a mixture of flammable gases may form in the vapor space of each cell filled with the curing grout. The purpose of this study was to determine if passive breathing induced by the diurnal oscillations of atmospheric pressure would provide any mitigating measure against potential flammability. Specifically, it was requested that a set of algorithms be developed that would predict the equilibrium concentration of benzene as a function of benzene generation rate, fill height, and the amplitude of the barometric pressure oscillations. These algorithms were to be derived based on several simplifying assumptions so that order of magnitude estimates could be made quickly for scoping purposes. This memo documents the resulting algorithms along with those key assumptions made. These algorithms were then applied to simulate several test cases, including the baseline case where the cell was filled to the maximum height of 25 ft at the bulk benzene generation rate of 3.4 g/hr.

  8. Does cutting of mugwort stands affect airborne pollen concentrations?

    PubMed

    Rantio-Lehtimäki, A; Helander, M L; Karhu, K

    1992-08-01

    Pollen of mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris L.) is the most important allergenic pollen in urban areas of south and central Finland in late summer. The purpose of this study was to investigate, experimentally, whether the cutting of mugwort stands affects its airborne pollen concentrations. Experimental plots were either cut (4 plots) or uncut (4 plots) in 2 previous seasons: 4 of them were small (less than 0.5 hectare) and 4 large (greater than 5 hectares). Finally, the plots were divided randomly into 2 groups according to a third variable, cutting in the study season, 1989. Samples were taken on 2 rainless mornings at the peak mugwort flowering time. Two rotorod type samplers were used at heights of 1 and 2 m from ground level, simulating the inhalation heights of children and adults, respectively. The results indicate that cutting mugwort stands significantly reduces airborne pollen concentrations, but the treated areas have to be large, since in the town area there are plenty of mugwort pollen sources. The pollen concentrations at the 2 heights tested did not differ significantly.

  9. Simultaneous Determination of Benzene and Toluene in Pesticide Emulsifiable Concentrate by Headspace GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Yang, Jing; Fan, Li; Li, Fengmin; Huang, Qiliang

    2013-01-01

    The toxic inert ingredients in pesticide formulations are strictly regulated in many countries. In this paper, a simple and efficient headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HSGC-MS) method using fluorobenzene as an internal standard (IS) for rapid simultaneous determination of benzene and toluene in pesticide emulsifiable concentrate (EC) was established. The headspace and GC-MS conditions were investigated and developed. A nonpolar fused silica Rtx-5 capillary column (30 m × 0.20 mm i.d. and 0.25 μm film thickness) with temperature programming was used. Under optimized headspace conditions, equilibration temperature of 120°C, equilibration time of 5 min, and sample size of 50 μL, the regression of the peak area ratios of benzene and toluene to IS on the concentrations of analytes fitted a linear relationship well at the concentration levels ranging from 3.2 g/L to 16.0 g/L. Standard additions of benzene and toluene to blank different matrix solutions 1ead to recoveries of 100.1%–109.5% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.3%–8.1%. The method presented here stands out as simple and easily applicable, which provides a way for the determination of toxic volatile adjuvant in liquid pesticide formulations. PMID:23607048

  10. Analysis of indoor concentrations of benzene using an air-quality model.

    PubMed

    Bouhamra, W S; Elkilani, A S; Raheem, M Y

    2000-01-01

    We performed measurements to determine indoor benzene levels in 26 residential houses in Kuwait, located in zones of different activity levels. Pumped (or active) sampling was conducted via use of 12 sampling tubes over a period of 24 hr for both indoor and outdoor concentrations simultaneously. Time-average indoor concentration varied linearly with time-average outdoor concentration in accordance with a mass-balance-based indoor air-quality model in which source and sink terms were incorporated. We used regression analysis to determine benzene adsorption rates, which appear in the removal and source terms of the model. The removal rate parameter varied between 0.12/hr and 2.16/hr, whereas source term parameter varied between 0.60 mg/hr and 76.07 mg/hr. Houses were then divided into three groups according to their benzene source strengths (i.e., < 1.0 mg/hr, 1-10 mg/hr, and 10-50 mg/hr). Qualitatively, these levels depended on the characteristics of occupants (e.g., smoking and gas cooker use, number of cars, and parking area) and location of the building.

  11. Integrated Gas Sensing System of SWCNT and Cellulose Polymer Concentrator for Benzene, Toluene, and Xylenes

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jisun; Sterner, Elizabeth S.; Swager, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    An integrated cellulose polymer concentrator/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sensing system is demonstrated to detect benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) vapors. The sensing system consists of functionalized cellulose as a selective concentrator disposed directly on top of a conductive SWCNT sensing layer. Functionalized cellulose concentrator (top layer) selectively adsorbs the target analyte and delivers the concentrated analyte as near as possible to the SWCNT sensing layer (bottom layer), which enables the simultaneous concentrating and sensing within a few seconds. The selectivity can be achieved by functionalizing cellulose acetate with a pentafluorophenylacetyl selector that interacts strongly with the target BTX analytes. A new design of the integrated cellulose concentrator/SWCNT sensing system allows high sensitivity with limits of detection for benzene, toluene, and m-xylene vapors of 55 ppm, 19 ppm, and 14 ppm, respectively, selectivity, and fast responses (<10 s to reach equilibrium), exhibiting the potential ability for on-site, real-time sensing applications. The sensing mechanism involves the selective adsorption of analytes in the concentrator film, which in turn mediates changes in the electronic potentials at the polymer-SWCNT interface and potentially changes in the tunneling barriers between nanotubes. PMID:26848660

  12. Integrated Gas Sensing System of SWCNT and Cellulose Polymer Concentrator for Benzene, Toluene, and Xylenes.

    PubMed

    Im, Jisun; Sterner, Elizabeth S; Swager, Timothy M

    2016-02-02

    An integrated cellulose polymer concentrator/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sensing system is demonstrated to detect benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) vapors. The sensing system consists of functionalized cellulose as a selective concentrator disposed directly on top of a conductive SWCNT sensing layer. Functionalized cellulose concentrator (top layer) selectively adsorbs the target analyte and delivers the concentrated analyte as near as possible to the SWCNT sensing layer (bottom layer), which enables the simultaneous concentrating and sensing within a few seconds. The selectivity can be achieved by functionalizing cellulose acetate with a pentafluorophenylacetyl selector that interacts strongly with the target BTX analytes. A new design of the integrated cellulose concentrator/SWCNT sensing system allows high sensitivity with limits of detection for benzene, toluene, and m-xylene vapors of 55 ppm, 19 ppm, and 14 ppm, respectively, selectivity, and fast responses (<10 s to reach equilibrium), exhibiting the potential ability for on-site, real-time sensing applications. The sensing mechanism involves the selective adsorption of analytes in the concentrator film, which in turn mediates changes in the electronic potentials at the polymer-SWCNT interface and potentially changes in the tunneling barriers between nanotubes.

  13. Correlation between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons concentration and airborne particle mutagenicity in the rubber factory.

    PubMed

    Barański, B; Palus, J; Rogaczewska, T; Szymczak, W; Spiechowicz, E

    1992-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the correlation between benzo[a]pyrene and coal tar pitch volatiles concentrations and mutagenic activity of airborne particles sampled at different workplaces of the factory producing various types of tires. The solid phase of aerosols was collected on Whatman glass-fibers filters using Staplex pumps. Coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs) were extracted from sample filters using ultrasonic-benzene extraction and determined by the gravimetric method. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) analysis was performed using high performance liquid chromatography with a spectrofluorimetric detector. The mutagenic substances were extracted from collected material with acetone. The mutagenic properties were estimated with the Ames' test using S. typhimurium strain TA98 without and with S9 fraction. At nearly all workplaces the concentrations of BaP and CTPVs were within the range of 4-61 ng/m3 and 0.11-1.26 mg/m3, respectively. Only at weighing were they much higher and amounted to 172-2261 ng/m3 for BaP and 3.05-4.07 mg/m3 for CTPVs. The highest exposure to mutagenic airborne particulate matter was found at weighing (1500 rev/m3), the mixers loading level (> 500 rev/m3) and the carbon black station (> 150 rev/m3). The air mutagenic activity at other workplaces, especially at the extruder mill of the mixer (> 90 rev/m3), the two-roll mill of mixers (> 70 rev/m3), mixer I loading (> 70 rev/m3), calendering (> 70 rev/m3) and fender vulcanizing (> 80 rev/m3) was even much more higher than that found in the urban indoor and outdoor air (2-9 rev/m3).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Leukemia in benzene workers.

    PubMed

    Rinsky, R A; Young, R J; Smith, A B

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the possible association between occupational exposure to benzene and subsequent death from leukemia, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a retrospective cohort mortality study of workers who had been exposed to benzene in the manufacture of rubber hydrochloride at two locations in Ohio. Ascertainment of vital status was accomplished for 98% of the cohort. Among 748 workers who had at least one day of exposure to benzene between 1940 and 1950, seven deaths from leukemia occurred; from United States death rates standardized for sex, age, and calendar time period, only 1.25 leukemia deaths would have been expected (standardized mortality ratio = 560; p less than 0.001). Mean duration of exposure to benzene was brief, and 437 (58%) of the cohort were exposed for less than 1 year. Evaluation of leukemia mortality for those workers exposed five or more years showed an SMR of 2100. All leukemia deaths were myelocytic or monocytic in cell type. Four additional cases of leukemia have been reorganized in workers at the study locations, but occurred in persons not encompassed by the strict definition of the cohort. Reconstruction of past exposures to benzene at the two locations indicates that in some areas of the plant airborne benzene concentrations rose occasionally to several hundred parts per million (ppm), but that for the most part, employee eight-hour time-weighted averages (TWA) fell within the limits considered permissible at the time of exposure. These data corroborate an initial analysis of the same cohort by Infante et al, and indicate that benzene is a human carcinogen at a range of exposures not greatly above the current legal standard.

  15. Evaluating the impact of ambient benzene vapor concentrations on product water from Condensation Water From Air technology.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Katherine M; Gellasch, Christopher A; Dusenbury, James S; Timmes, Thomas C; Hughes, Thomas M

    2017-07-15

    Globally, drinking water resources are diminishing in both quantity and quality. This situation has renewed interest in Condensation Water From Air (CWFA) technology, which utilizes water vapor in the air to produce water for both potable and non-potable purposes. However, there are currently insufficient data available to determine the relationship between air contaminants and the rate at which they are transferred from the air into CWFA untreated product water. This study implemented a novel experimental method utilizing an environmental test chamber to evaluate how air quality and temperature affects CWFA untreated product water quality in order to collect data that will inform the type of water treatment required to protect human health. This study found that temperature and benzene air concentration affected the untreated product water from a CWFA system. Benzene vapor concentrations representing a polluted outdoor environment resulted in benzene product water concentrations between 15% and 23% of the USEPA drinking water limit of 5μg/l. In contrast, product water benzene concentrations representing an indoor industrial environment were between 1.4 and 2.4 times higher than the drinking water limit. Lower condenser coil temperatures were correlated with an increased concentration of benzene in the product water. Environmental health professionals and engineers can integrate the results of this assessment to predict benzene concentrations in the product water and take appropriate health protective measures.

  16. Airborne particle concentrations at schools measured at different spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Fuoco, F. C.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.

    2013-03-01

    Potential adverse effects on children health may result from school exposure to airborne particles. To address this issue, measurements in terms of particle number concentration, particle size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations were performed in three school buildings in Cassino (Italy) and its suburbs, outside and inside of the classrooms during normal occupancy and use. Additional time resolved information was gathered on ventilation condition, classroom activity, and traffic count data around the schools were obtained using a video camera. Across the three investigated school buildings, the outdoor and indoor particle number concentration monitored down to 4 nm and up to 3 μm ranged from 2.8 × 104 part cm-3 to 4.7 × 104 part cm-3 and from 2.0 × 104 part cm-3 to 3.5 × 104 part cm-3, respectively. The total particle concentrations were usually higher outdoors than indoors, because no indoor sources were detected. I/O measured was less than 1 (varying in a relatively narrow range from 0.63 to 0.74), however one school exhibited indoor concentrations higher than outdoor during the morning rush hours. Particle size distribution at the outdoor site showed high particle concentrations in different size ranges, varying during the day; in relation to the starting and finishing of school time two modes were found. BC concentrations were 5 times higher at the urban school compared with the suburban and suburban-to-urban differences were larger than the relative differences of ultrafine particle concentrations.

  17. Airborne Nanoparticle Concentrations in the Manufacturing of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Apparel

    PubMed Central

    Vosburgh, Donna J.H.; Boysen, Dane A.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    One form of waterproof, breathable apparel is manufactured from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane laminated fabric, using a specific process to seal seams that have been sewn with traditional techniques. The sealing process involves applying waterproof tape to the seam by feeding the seam through two rollers while applying hot air (600°C). This study addressed the potential for exposure to particulate matter from this sealing process, by characterizing airborne particles in a facility that produces over 1,000 lightweight PTFE rain jackets per day. Aerosol concentrations throughout the facility were mapped, breathing zone concentrations were measured, and hoods used to ventilate the seam sealing operation were evaluated. The geometric mean (GM) particle number concentrations were substantially greater in the sewing and sealing areas (67,000 and 188,000 particles cm−3) compared to that measured in the office area (12,100 particles cm−3). Respirable mass concentrations were negligible throughout the facility (GM=0.002 mg m−3 in the sewing and sealing areas). The particles exiting the final discharge of the facility's ventilation system were dominated by nanoparticles (number median diameter = 25 nm; geometric standard deviation of 1.39). The breathing zone particle number concentrations of the workers who sealed the sewn seams were highly variable and significantly greater when sealing seams than when conducting other tasks (p<0.0001). The sealing workers’ breathing zone concentrations ranged from 147,000 particles cm−3 to 798,000 particles cm−3, and their seam responsibility significantly influenced their breathing zone concentrations (p=0.03). The finding that particle number concentrations were approximately equal outside the hood and inside the local exhaust duct indicated poor effectiveness of the canopy hoods used to ventilate sealing operations. PMID:21347955

  18. Airborne nanoparticle concentrations in the manufacturing of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) apparel.

    PubMed

    Vosburgh, Donna J H; Boysen, Dane A; Oleson, Jacob J; Peters, Thomas M

    2011-03-01

    One form of waterproof, breathable apparel is manufactured from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane laminated fabric using a specific process to seal seams that have been sewn with traditional techniques. The sealing process involves applying waterproof tape to the seam by feeding the seam through two rollers while applying hot air (600 °C). This study addressed the potential for exposure to particulate matter from this sealing process by characterizing airborne particles in a facility that produces more than 1000 lightweight PTFE rain jackets per day. Aerosol concentrations throughout the facility were mapped, breathing zone concentrations were measured, and hoods used to ventilate the seam sealing operation were evaluated. The geometric mean (GM) particle number concentrations were substantially greater in the sewing and sealing areas (67,000 and 188,000 particles cm⁻³)) compared with that measured in the office area (12,100 particles cm⁻³). Respirable mass concentrations were negligible throughout the facility (GM = 0.002 mg m⁻³) in the sewing and sealing areas). The particles exiting the final discharge of the facility's ventilation system were dominated by nanoparticles (number median diameter = 25 nm; geometric standard deviation of 1.39). The breathing zone particle number concentrations of the workers who sealed the sewn seams were highly variable and significantly greater when sealing seams than when conducting other tasks (p < 0.0001). The sealing workers' breathing zone concentrations ranged from 147,000 particles cm⁻³ to 798,000 particles cm⁻³, and their seam responsibility significantly influenced their breathing zone concentrations (p = 0.03). The finding that particle number concentrations were approximately equal outside the hood and inside the local exhaust duct indicated poor effectiveness of the canopy hoods used to ventilate sealing operations.

  19. An Order-of-Magnitude Estimation of Benzene Concentration in Saltstone Vault

    SciTech Connect

    CHOI, A

    2006-03-20

    The contents of Tank 48H that include the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitates of potassium and cesium will be grouted and stored in the Saltstone vault. The grouting process is exothermic, which should accelerate the rate of decomposition of TPB precipitates eventually to benzene. Because the vault is not currently outfitted with an active ventilation system, there is a concern that a mixture of flammable gases may form in the vapor space of each cell filled with the curing grout. The purpose of this study was to determine if passive breathing induced by the diurnal fluctuations of barometric pressure would provide any mitigating measure against potential flammability in the cell vapor space. In Revision 0 of this document, a set of algorithms were presented that would predict the equilibrium concentration of benzene in the cell vapor space as a function of benzene generation rate, fill height, and passive breathing rate. The algorithms were derived based on several simplifying assumptions so that order of magnitude estimates could be made quickly for scoping purposes. In particular, it was assumed that passive breathing would occur solely due to barometric pressure fluctuations that were sinusoidal; the resulting algorithm for estimating the rate of passive breathing into or out of each cell is given in Eq. (10). Since Revision 0 was issued, the validity of this critical assumption on the mode of passive breathing was checked against available passive ventilation data for the Hanford waste tanks. It was found that the passive breathing rates estimated from Eq. (10) were on average 50 to 90% lower than those measured for 5 out of 6 Hanford tanks considered in this study (see Table 1); for Tank U-106, the estimated passive breathing rates were on average 20% lower than the measured data. These results indicate that Eq. (10) would most likely under predict passive breathing rates of the Saltstone vault. At a given fill height and benzene generation rate, under

  20. Distribution analysis of airborne nicotine concentrations in hospitality facilities.

    PubMed

    Schorp, Matthias K; Leyden, Donald E

    2002-02-01

    A number of publications report statistical summaries for environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) concentrations. Despite compelling evidence for the data not being normally distributed, these publications typically report the arithmetic mean and standard deviation of the data, thereby losing important information related to the distribution of values contained in the original data. We were interested in the frequency distributions of reported nicotine concentrations in hospitality environments and subjected available data to distribution analyses. The distribution of experimental indoor airborne nicotine concentration data taken from hospitality facilities worldwide was fit to lognormal, Weibull, exponential, Pearson (Type V), logistic, and loglogistic distribution models. Comparison of goodness of fit (GOF) parameters and indications from the literature verified the selection of a lognormal distribution as the overall best model. When individual data were not reported in the literature, statistical summaries of results were used to model sets of lognormally distributed data that are intended to mimic the original data distribution. Grouping the data into various categories led to 31 frequency distributions that were further interpreted. The median values in nonsmoking environments are about half of the median values in smoking sections. When different continents are compared, Asian, European, and North American median values in restaurants are about a factor of three below levels encountered in other hospitality facilities. On a comparison of nicotine concentrations in North American smoking sections and nonsmoking sections, median values are about one-third of the European levels. The results obtained may be used to address issues related to exposure to ETS in the hospitality sector.

  1. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is aware of the potential toxicological hazards to humans that might be associated with prolonged spacecraft missions. Despite major engineering advances in controlling the atmosphere within spacecraft, some contamination of the air appears inevitable. NASA has measured numerous airborne contaminants during space missions. As the missions increase in duration and complexity, ensuring the health and well-being of astronauts traveling and working in this unique environment becomes increasingly difficult. As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants, and to review SMACs for various space-craft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee On Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMACs for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMACs for approximately 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the SMAC reports for 12 chemical contaminants that have been reviewed for

  2. Modelling airborne concentration and deposition rate of maize pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosz, Nathalie; Loubet, Benjamin; Huber, Laurent

    2004-10-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has reinforced the need to quantify gene flow from crop to crop. This requires predictive tools which take into account meteorological conditions, canopy structure as well as pollen aerodynamic characteristics. A Lagrangian Stochastic (LS) model, called SMOP-2D (Stochastic Mechanistic model for Pollen dispersion and deposition in 2 Dimensions), is presented. It simulates wind dispersion of pollen by calculating individual pollen trajectories from their emission to their deposition. SMOP-2D was validated using two field experiments where airborne concentration and deposition rate of pollen were measured within and downwind from different sized maize (Zea mays) plots together with micrometeorological measurements. SMOP-2D correctly simulated the shapes of the concentration profiles but generally underestimated the deposition rates in the first 10 m downwind from the source. Potential explanations of this discrepancy are discussed. Incorrect parameterisation of turbulence in the transition from the crop to the surroundings is probably the most likely reason. This demonstrates that LS models for particle transfer need to be coupled with air-flow models under complex terrain conditions.

  3. Measurement of airborne particle concentrations near the Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Benke, Roland R; Hooper, Donald M; Durham, James S; Bannon, Donald R; Compton, Keith L; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald N

    2009-02-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particle mass concentrations or mass loads are often used to estimate health effects from the inhalation of resuspended contaminated soil. Airborne particle mass concentrations were measured using a personal sampler under a variety of surface-disturbing activities within different depositional environments at both volcanic and nonvolcanic sites near the Sunset Crater volcano in northern Arizona. Focused field investigations were performed at this analog site to improve the understanding of natural and human-induced processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The level of surface-disturbing activity was found to be the most influential factor affecting the measured airborne particle concentrations, which increased over three orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. As the surface-disturbing activity level increased, the particle size distribution and the majority of airborne particle mass shifted from particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 mum (0.00039 in) to particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 mum (0.00039 in). Under ambient conditions, above average wind speeds tended to increase airborne particle concentrations. In contrast, stronger winds tended to decrease airborne particle concentrations in the breathing zone during light and heavy surface-disturbing conditions. A slight increase in the average airborne particle concentration during ambient conditions was found above older nonvolcanic deposits, which tended to be finer grained than the Sunset Crater tephra deposits. An increased airborne particle concentration was realized when walking on an extremely fine-grained deposit, but the sensitivity of airborne particle concentrations to the resuspendible fraction of near-surface grain mass was not conclusive in the field setting when human activities disturbed the bulk of near-surface material. Although the limited sample size precluded detailed statistical analysis, the differences in airborne particle

  4. Benzene exposure assessment for use of a mineral spirits-based degreaser.

    PubMed

    Fedoruk, Marion J; Bronstein, Rod; Kerger, Brent D

    2003-10-01

    This study examines benzene emissions from the use of a metal parts washer ("degreaser") supplied with a mineral spirits solvent containing either 9 or 58 ppm benzene. Air samples were obtained during a one-hour session of relatively vigorous parts cleaning activity using a degreaser station equipped with wet brush and sprayer attachments and a compressed air hose. Two methods were utilized to assess airborne benzene levels: U.S. EPA TO-14 (summa stainless steel canister) and NIOSH 1501 (charcoal tube). Overall, both methods provided similar results, excepting detection limit differences. The first simulation was performed with recycled solvent (9 ppm benzene in solvent) showing average one-hour airborne benzene levels < or =33 ppbv in the worker's breathing zone and directly above the parts cleaning tank. Average airborne benzene concentrations 18 inches away from the tank were below 2 ppbv during the 60-minute cleaning protocol. The second simulation with benzene-spiked recycled solvent (58 ppm benzene) showed airborne benzene levels averaging 500 ppbv measured over the 60-minute cleaning period in the worker's breathing zone and directly above the tank, while average concentrations 18 inches from the tank perimeter were 63 ppbv. The data indicate that average and peak exposures to airborne benzene were roughly proportional to the solvent benzene content, although the brief peak exposures exhibited greater variance probably related to aerosol generation associated with the use of the brush and/or spraying attachment. Under this selected upper bound exposure simulation, we found that cleaning parts using a recycled mineral spirits-based solvent in an open warehouse setting did not result in exposures in excess of the current occupational exposure limit of 0.5 ppm averaged over 8 hours for solvent benzene content between 9 and 58 ppm.

  5. Airborne determination of the temporo-spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, nitrogen oxides and ozone in the boundary layer across Greater London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Lee, J. D.; Davison, B.; Vaughan, A.; Purvis, R. M.; Lewis, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2014-10-01

    Highly spatially resolved mixing ratios of benzene and toluene, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) were measured in the atmospheric boundary layer above Greater London during the period 24 June to 9 July 2013 using a Dornier 228 aircraft. Toluene and benzene were determined in-situ using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), NOx by dual channel NOx chemiluminescence and O3 mixing ratios by UV absorption. Average mixing ratios observed over inner London at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. were 0.20 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.07, 13.2 ± 8.6, 21.0 ± 7.3 and 34.3 ± 15.2 ppbv for benzene, toluene, NO, NO2 and NOx respectively. Linear regression analysis between NO2, benzene and toluene mixing ratios yielded a trimodal distribution indicating that these compounds predominantly share the same or co-located sources within the city and that a significant fraction of NOx is directly emitted as NO2. Average mixing ratios measured at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. over outer London were always lower than over inner London. Where traffic densities were highest, the toluene / benzene (T / B) concentration ratios were highest (average of 1.8 ± 0.3 ppbv ppbv-1) indicative of strong local sources. Daytime maxima in NOx, benzene and toluene mixing ratios were observed in the morning (~40 ppbv NOx, ~350 pptv toluene and ~200 pptv benzene) and for ozone in the mid-afternoon (~40 ppbv O3) all at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l.

  6. Airborne determination of the temporo-spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, nitrogen oxides and ozone in the boundary layer across Greater London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Lee, J. D.; Davison, B.; Vaughan, A.; Purvis, R. M.; Harvey, A.; Lewis, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2015-05-01

    Highly spatially resolved mixing ratios of benzene and toluene, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) were measured in the atmospheric boundary layer above Greater London during the period 24 June to 9 July 2013 using a Dornier 228 aircraft. Toluene and benzene were determined in situ using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), NOx by dual-channel NOx chemiluminescence and O3 mixing ratios by UV absorption. Average mixing ratios observed over inner London at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. were 0.20 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.07, 13.2 ± 8.6, 21.0 ± 7.3 and 34.3 ± 15.2 ppbv for benzene, toluene, NO, NO2 and NOx respectively. Linear regression analysis between NO2, benzene and toluene mixing ratios yields a strong covariance, indicating that these compounds predominantly share the same or co-located sources within the city. Average mixing ratios measured at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. over outer London were always lower than over inner London. Where traffic densities were highest, the toluene / benzene (T / B) concentration ratios were highest (average of 1.8 ± 0.5 ppbv ppbv-1), indicative of strong local sources. Daytime maxima in NOx, benzene and toluene mixing ratios were observed in the morning (~ 40 ppbv NOx, ~ 350 pptv toluene and ~ 200 pptv benzene) and in the mid-afternoon for ozone (~ 40 ppbv O3), all at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l.

  7. A Quantitative Dynamic Simulation of Bremia lactucae Airborne Conidia Concentration above a Lettuce Canopy

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Carisse, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Lettuce downy mildew, caused by the oomycete Bremia lactucae Regel, is a major threat to lettuce production worldwide. Lettuce downy mildew is a polycyclic disease driven by airborne spores. A weather-based dynamic simulation model for B. lactucae airborne spores was developed to simulate the aerobiological characteristics of the pathogen. The model was built using the STELLA platform by following the system dynamics methodology. The model was developed using published equations describing disease subprocesses (e.g., sporulation) and assembled knowledge of the interactions among pathogen, host, and weather. The model was evaluated with four years of independent data by comparing model simulations with observations of hourly and daily airborne spore concentrations. The results show an accurate simulation of the trend and shape of B. lactucae temporal dynamics of airborne spore concentration. The model simulated hourly and daily peaks in airborne spore concentrations. More than 95% of the simulation runs, the daily-simulated airborne conidia concentration was 0 when airborne conidia were not observed. Also, the relationship between the simulated and the observed airborne spores was linear. In more than 94% of the simulation runs, the proportion of the linear variation in the hourly-observed values explained by the variation in the hourly-simulated values was greater than 0.7 in all years except one. Most of the errors came from the deviation from the 1:1 line, and the proportion of errors due to the model bias was low. This model is the only dynamic model developed to mimic the dynamics of airborne inoculum and represents an initial step towards improved lettuce downy mildew understanding, forecasting and management. PMID:26953691

  8. Evaluation of chromosome aberration and micronucleus frequencies in blood lymphocytes of workers exposed to low concentrations of benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; Maffei, Francesca; Carrieri, Mariella; D'Errico, Maria N; Drago, Ignazio; Hrelia, Patrizia; Bartolucci, Giovanni B; Soleo, Leonardo

    2014-08-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) was investigated in the peripheral lymphocytes of workers occupationally exposed to low or very low concentrations of benzene. The study included 43 exposed workers (all males), namely 19 fuel-tanker drivers and 24 filling-station attendants, and 31 male subjects with no occupational exposure to the toxicant (controls). Benzene exposure was verified by means of environmental monitoring with passive personal samplers (Radiello(®)), and through biological monitoring, i.e. by measurement of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid and benzene. The frequency of CA and MN in peripheral lymphocytes was determined according to standard procedures. Exposure to benzene was found to be significantly higher for fuel-tanker drivers (median 246.6 μg/m(3)) than for filling-station attendants (median 19.9 μg/m(3)). Both groups had significantly higher exposure than controls (median 4.3 μg/m(3)). No increased frequency of CA and MN was observed in either fuel-tanker drivers or filling-station attendants compared with controls. In all subjects examined as a single group, the frequency of MN was significantly dependent on age. Only in the fuel-tanker drivers was the frequency of MN found to depend not only on age, but also on exposure to benzene. In conclusion, the frequency of MN, but not of CA, could be influenced by exposure to benzene concentrations of up to one order of magnitude lower than the threshold limit value (time-weighted average).

  9. Concentrations of benzene and toluene in the atmosphere of the southwestern area at the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Humberto; Sosa, Rodolfo; Sánchez, Pablo; Bueno, Emma; González, Laura

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) presents important emissions of hazardous air pollutants. It is well documented that the MCMZ suffers a critical air pollution problem due to high ozone and particulate matter concentrations. However, toxic air pollutants such as benzene and toluene have not been considered. Benzene has accumulated sufficient evidence as a human carcinogen, and the ratio benzene/toluene is an excellent indicator to evaluate control strategies efficiency. In order to evaluate the levels of these two air toxic pollutants in the MCMZ, ambient air samples were collected in canisters and analyzed with a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector, according to procedures described in the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) method TO-15. Quality assurance was performed collecting duplicate samples which were analyzed in replicate to quantify the precision of air-quality measurements. Three different sites located in the Southwestern area in the MCMZ were selected for the sampling: the University campus, a gas station, and a vertical condominium area, in the same neighborhood, which presents different activities. At these sites, grab air samples were collected during the morning hours (7-8 a.m.), while for the University area, 24 h integrated air samples were collected simultaneously, with grab samples. Benzene concentrations (24 h sampling) in the atmosphere around the University campus have similar present levels as in other cities of North America. Mean values in this site were about 1.7 ppb. A significant variation exists between the benzene and toluene concentrations in the studied sites, being the more critical values than those registered at the gas station (an average of 25.8 ppb and a maximum of 141 ppb of benzene). There is a fuel regulation for gasoline in Mexico, which allows a maximum of 1 percent of benzene. However, since more than 60 percent of vehicles do not have catalytic converters (models before 1991

  10. Biomarkers of internal dose for the assessment of environmental exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; D'Errico, Maria Nicolà; Fustinoni, Silvia; Drago, Ignazio; Barbieri, Anna; Sabatini, Laura; Carrieri, Mariella; Apostoli, Pietro; Soleo, Leonardo

    2011-10-01

    The urinary excretion of t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA) and urinary benzene and the influence of a smoking habit and of exposure to urban traffic on the urinary excretion of these biomarkers were investigated in 137 male adults from the general population. All subjects were not occupationally exposed to benzene and resident in two cities in Puglia (Southern-Italy). Environmental exposure to benzene was measured using passive personal samplers. The biomarkers t,t-MA, SPMA and urinary benzene were determined in urine samples collected from each subject at the end of the environmental sampling. The percentage of cases above the limit of detection was higher for SPMA and urinary benzene in smokers than in non-smokers, and for airborne benzene and urinary benzene in subjects exposed to urban traffic. Airborne benzene was correlated with the time spent in urban traffic during the environmental sampling. Among the biomarkers, urinary benzene was found to be correlated with airborne benzene only in non-smokers, and with the time spent in urban traffic, both in smokers and non-smokers considered together, and in non-smokers only. Finally, multiple regression analysis showed that the urinary excretion of all the biomarkers was dependent on the number of cigarettes smoked per day and, for urinary benzene, also on the time spent in urban traffic. In conclusion, urinary benzene seems to be a more valid biomarker than t,t-MA and SPMA to assess environmental exposure to extremely low concentrations of benzene. Cigarette smoking prevailed over traffic exhaust fumes in determining the internal dose of benzene.

  11. Combining regression analysis and air quality modelling to predict benzene concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachokostas, Ch.; Achillas, Ch.; Chourdakis, E.; Moussiopoulos, N.

    2011-05-01

    State of the art epidemiological research has found consistent associations between traffic-related air pollution and various outcomes, such as respiratory symptoms and premature mortality. However, many urban areas are characterised by the absence of the necessary monitoring infrastructure, especially for benzene (C 6H 6), which is a known human carcinogen. The use of environmental statistics combined with air quality modelling can be of vital importance in order to assess air quality levels of traffic-related pollutants in an urban area in the case where there are no available measurements. This paper aims at developing and presenting a reliable approach, in order to forecast C 6H 6 levels in urban environments, demonstrated for Thessaloniki, Greece. Multiple stepwise regression analysis is used and a strong statistical relationship is detected between C 6H 6 and CO. The adopted regression model is validated in order to depict its applicability and representativeness. The presented results demonstrate that the adopted approach is capable of capturing C 6H 6 concentration trends and should be considered as complementary to air quality monitoring.

  12. Absolute tracer dye concentration using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The use of simultaneous airborne-laser-induced dye fluorescence and water Raman backscatter to measure the absolute concentration of an ocean-dispersed tracer dye is discussed. Theoretical considerations of the calculation of dye concentration by the numerical comparison of airborne laser-induced fluorescence spectra with laboratory spectra for known dye concentrations using the 3400/cm OH-stretch water Raman scatter as a calibration signal are presented which show that minimum errors are obtained and no data concerning water mass transmission properties are required when the laser wavelength is chosen to yield a Raman signal near the dye emission band. Results of field experiments conducted with an airborne conical scan lidar over a site in New York Bight into which rhodamine dye had been injected in a study of oil spill dispersion are then indicated which resulted in a contour map of dye concentrations, with a minimum detectable dye concentration of approximately 2 ppb by weight.

  13. Validation of LIRIC aerosol concentration retrievals using airborne measurements during a biomass burning episode over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis; Allan, James D.; Papayannis, Alexandros; Solomos, Stavros; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Nenes, Athanasios; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Vasilescu, Jeni; Nicolae, Doina; Coe, Hugh; Bacak, Asan; Chaikovsky, Anatoli

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we validate the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) retrievals of the aerosol concentration in the fine mode, using the airborne aerosol chemical composition dataset obtained over the Greater Athens Area (GAA) in Greece, during the ACEMED campaign. The study focuses on the 2nd of September 2011, when a long-range transported smoke layer was observed in the free troposphere over Greece, in the height range from 2 to 3 km. CIMEL sun-photometric measurements revealed high AOD ( 0.4 at 532 nm) and Ångström exponent values ( 1.7 at 440/870 nm), in agreement with coincident ground-based lidar observations. Airborne chemical composition measurements performed over the GAA, revealed increased CO volume concentration ( 110 ppbv), with 57% sulphate dominance in the PM1 fraction. For this case, we compare LIRIC retrievals of the aerosol concentration in the fine mode with the airborne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) measurements. Our analysis shows that the remote sensing retrievals are in a good agreement with the measured airborne in-situ data from 2 to 4 km. The discrepancies observed between LIRIC and airborne measurements at the lower troposphere (below 2 km), could be explained by the spatial and temporal variability of the aerosol load within the area where the airborne data were averaged along with the different time windows of the retrievals.

  14. [Benzene in soft drinks: a study in Florence (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo; Perico, Andrea; Colzi, Alessio; Bavazzano, Paolo; Di Giusto, Maurizio; Lamberti, Ilaria; Martino, Gianrocco; Puggelli, Francesco; Lorini, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the amount of benzene present in soft drinks sold in Florence (Italy). We analyzed 28 different types of soft drinks, by measuring concentrations of benzoic acid, sorbic acid, ascorbic acid (using high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection) and benzene (using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry). Data was analysed by using SPSS 18.0.Traces of benzene were detected in all analyzed beverages, with a mean concentration of 0.45 µg/L (range: 0.15-2.36 µg/L). Statistically significant differences in mean benzene concentrations were found between beverages according to the type of additive indicated on the drink label, with higher concentrations found in beverages containing both ascorbic acid and sodium benzoate. Two citrus fruit-based drinks were found to have benzene levels above the European limit for benzene in drinking water of 1 µg /L. Sodium benzoate and ascorbic acid were also detected in the two drinks.In conclusion, not all soft drink producers have taken steps to eliminate benzoic acid from their soft drinks and thereby reduce the risk of formation of benzene, as recommended by the European Commission. Furthermore, the presence of benzene in trace amounts in all beverages suggests that migration of constituents of plastic packaging materials or air-borne contamination may be occurring.

  15. Ambient airborne solids concentrations including volcanic ash at Hanford, Washington sampling sites subsequent to the Mount St. Helens eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehmel, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Airborne solids concentrations were measured on a near daily basis at two Hanford, Washington sites after the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980. These sites are about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. Collected airborne solids included resuspended volcanic ash plus normal ambient solids. Average airborne solids concentrations were greater at the Hanford meteorological station sampling site which is 24 km northwest of the Horn Rapids dam sampling site. These increased concentrations reflect the sampling site proximity to greater ash fallout depths. Both sites are in low ash fallout areas although the Hanford meteorological station site is closer to the greater ash fallout areas. Airborne solids concentrations were decreased by rain, but airborne solids concentrations rapidly increased as surfaces dried. Airborne concentrations tended to become nearly the same at both sampling sites only for July 12 and 13.

  16. Concentrations of airborne endotoxin and microorganisms at a 10,000-cow open-freestall dairy.

    PubMed

    Dungan, R S; Leytem, A B; Bjorneberg, D L

    2011-10-01

    Confined animal production systems produce increased bioaerosol concentrations, which are a potential respiratory health risk to individuals on site and downwind. In this longitudinal study, airborne endotoxin and microorganisms were collected during the spring, summer, and fall at a large, open-freestall dairy in southern Idaho. Compared with the background ambient atmosphere, both endotoxin and culturable heterotrophic bacteria concentrations were up to several-hundred-fold greater 50 m downwind from the facility, then decreased to near background concentrations at 200 m. However, downwind fungi concentrations were not increased above background concentrations. At 50 m downwind, the average inhalable endotoxin concentration ranged from 5 to 4,243 endotoxin units per m⁻³, whereas bacteria concentrations ranged from 10² to 10⁴ cfu per m⁻³ of air. Although the bioaerosol concentrations did not follow a seasonal trend, they did significantly correlate with meteorological factors. Increasing temperature was found to be positively correlated with increasing bacteria (r = 0.15, P < 0.05), fungi (r = 0.14, P < 0.05), and inhalable endotoxin (r = 0.32, P < 0.001) concentrations, whereas an inverse relationship occurred between the concentration and solar radiation. The airborne concentrations at 50 m were also found to be greatest at night, which can likely be attributed to changes in animal activity and wind speed and reduced exposure of the airborne microorganisms to UV radiation.

  17. Oxidative sulfonation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Kashnikova, L.V.; Golodov, V.A.; Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Levintova, T.D.

    1988-02-10

    The oxidative sulfonation of benzene with sulfur dioxide was studied in the presence of copper(II) chloride. The relation of the reaction rate to the amount of sulfur dioxide absorbed and the relation of the initial reaction rate to the benzene concentration is shown. With rise in benzene concentration, the initial reaction rate rose linearly and the amount of SO/sub 2/ absorbed remained practically constant. A mechanism was proposed that included the stage of the successive formation of an intermediate containing Cu(II) with benzene and sulfur dioxide and its subsequent redox breakdown to the final products as a result of attack by a Cu(II) benzene complex.

  18. Concentration and size distribution of total airborne microbes in hazy and foggy weather.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lijie; Qi, Jianhua; Shao, Congcong; Zhong, Xi; Gao, Dongmei; Cao, Wanwan; Gao, Jiawei; Bai, Ran; Long, Gaoyuan; Chu, Congcong

    2016-01-15

    Atmospheric bioaerosol particles were collected using a bioaerosol sampler from Oct. 2013 to Aug. 2014 in the coastal region of Qingdao. The total microbes were measured using an epifluorescence microscope after staining with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole). The concentration of total airborne microbes showed seasonal variation, with the highest value in winter and the lowest in summer. The mean concentration of total microbes was 6.55 × 10(5)Cells/m(3) on non-hazy days. The total microbe concentration increased to 7.09 × 10(5) and 9.00 × 10(5)Cells/m(3) on hazy and foggy days, respectively. The particle sizes of the total microbes presented a bimodal distribution on sunny days, with one peak at 1.1-2.1 μm and another at 4.7-7.0 μm. The size distribution of total microbes showed an increase in the fine fraction on hazy days and an increase in the coarse fraction on foggy days. However, the size distribution became unimodal during a heating period. Spearman correlation analysis showed that temperature and O3 had a significant negative correlation with the airborne microbe concentration, while PM2.5, SO2, NO2, CO and the air quality index (AQI) had significant positive correlations with the airborne microbe concentration during hazy days. The increased number of airborne microbes will affect the air quality on hazy days.

  19. Airborne concentrations of organophosphorus pesticides in Korean pesticide manufacturing/formulation workplaces.

    PubMed

    Han, Don-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Pesticide manufacturing/formulation workers rather than farmers or applicators or people living with them are primarily exposed to organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). However, airborne concentrations in the workplace have rarely been determined. A total of 121 air samples (personal or area sampling) were collected at 4 factories where chlorpyrifos, EPN, parathion, and phorate, were manufactured/formulated from March through July, 2007-2008. Samples were collected by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method and were analyzed by GC-MS. The geometric mean (GM) level of airborne chlorpyrifos was 0.17 mg/m(3), 85% Korean Occupational Exposure Limit (KOEL) of 0.2 mg/m(3), and at 95% confidence, airborne concentrations exceeded the KOEL 58.8% of the time or less, indicating that this concentration level was unacceptable according to exposure assessment using a LogNorm2(®). However, compared with levels of TLV and/or PEL and/or WEL, the GM concentration levels of other OPs were remarkably low (range, 0.1-15.0%) and that these levels of concentrations to the other OPs were acceptable. The levels of airborne concentrations of OPs depended on isolation of the process; in other words, the levels depended on the extent to which the process was automated. The reason that the airborne concentration levels, except for those of chlorpyrifos, were very much lower than expected may be attributable to the fact that there was not exposed to 100% toxic active ingredients in pesticide formulation workplaces because of the use of supplemental agents or additives to produce complete pesticides. This study is limited since there were seldom or neither any data of previous studies to be compared with the study results nor dermal exposure data. The results were used to revise KOELs for OPs in 2010.

  20. AIRBORNE ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS DURING BUFFING, BURNISHING, AND STRIPPING OF RESILIENT FLOOR TILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was conducted to evaluate airborne asbestos concentrations during low-speed spray-buffing, ultra high-speed burnishing, and wet-stripping of asbestos-containing resilient floor tile under pre-existing and prepared levels of floor care maintenance. Low-speed spray-buffin...

  1. Concentrations of airborne endotoxin and microorganisms at a 10,000 cow open-freestall dairy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined animal production systems produce elevated bioaerosol concentrations, which are a potential respiratory health risk to individuals on site and downwind. In this study, airborne endotoxin and microorganisms were collected during the spring, summer, and fall at a large open-freestall dairy i...

  2. Surface and Airborne Arsenic Concentrations in a Recreational Site near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 7058 μg g-1 in topsoil and bedrock, and more than 0.03 μg m-3 in air on a 2-week basis, were measured in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a very popular off-road area near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. The elevated arsenic concentrations in the topsoil and bedrock are correlated to outcrops of yellow sandstone belonging to the Muddy Creek Formation (≈ 10 to 4 Ma) and to faults crossing the area. Mineralized fluids moved to the surface through the faults and deposited the arsenic. A technique was developed to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations from the arsenic content in the topsoil. The technique was tested by comparing calculated with measured concentrations at 34 locations in the NDRA, for 3 periods of 2 weeks each. We then applied it to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations for more than 500 locations all over the NDRA. The highest airborne arsenic concentrations occur over sand dunes and other zones with a surficial layer of aeolian sand. Ironically these areas show the lowest levels of arsenic in the topsoil. However, they are highly susceptible to wind erosion and emit very large amounts of sand and dust during episodes of strong winds, thereby also emitting much arsenic. Elsewhere in the NDRA, in areas not or only very slightly affected by wind erosion, airborne arsenic levels equal the background level for airborne arsenic in the USA, approximately 0.0004 μg m-3. The results of this study are important because the NDRA is visited by more than 300,000 people annually. PMID:25897667

  3. Surface and Airborne Arsenic Concentrations in a Recreational Site near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J; Teng, Yuanxin; McLaurin, Brett T

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 7058 μg g(-1) in topsoil and bedrock, and more than 0.03 μg m(-3) in air on a 2-week basis, were measured in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a very popular off-road area near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. The elevated arsenic concentrations in the topsoil and bedrock are correlated to outcrops of yellow sandstone belonging to the Muddy Creek Formation (≈ 10 to 4 Ma) and to faults crossing the area. Mineralized fluids moved to the surface through the faults and deposited the arsenic. A technique was developed to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations from the arsenic content in the topsoil. The technique was tested by comparing calculated with measured concentrations at 34 locations in the NDRA, for 3 periods of 2 weeks each. We then applied it to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations for more than 500 locations all over the NDRA. The highest airborne arsenic concentrations occur over sand dunes and other zones with a surficial layer of aeolian sand. Ironically these areas show the lowest levels of arsenic in the topsoil. However, they are highly susceptible to wind erosion and emit very large amounts of sand and dust during episodes of strong winds, thereby also emitting much arsenic. Elsewhere in the NDRA, in areas not or only very slightly affected by wind erosion, airborne arsenic levels equal the background level for airborne arsenic in the USA, approximately 0.0004 μg m(-3). The results of this study are important because the NDRA is visited by more than 300,000 people annually.

  4. A method to quantify infectious airborne pathogens at concentrations below the threshold of quantification by culture.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Timothy D; Wang, Chong; Hoff, Steven J; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2013-04-01

    In aerobiology, dose-response studies are used to estimate the risk of infection to a susceptible host presented by exposure to a specific dose of an airborne pathogen. In the research setting, host- and pathogen-specific factors that affect the dose-response continuum can be accounted for by experimental design, but the requirement to precisely determine the dose of infectious pathogen to which the host was exposed is often challenging. By definition, quantification of viable airborne pathogens is based on the culture of micro-organisms, but some airborne pathogens are transmissible at concentrations below the threshold of quantification by culture. In this paper we present an approach to the calculation of exposure dose at microbiologically unquantifiable levels using an application of the "continuous-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model" and the validation of this approach using rhodamine B dye as a surrogate for aerosolized microbial pathogens in a dynamic aerosol toroid (DAT).

  5. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for selected airborne contaminants, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC's) for contaminants, and to review SMAC's for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee on Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMAC's for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMAC's for 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the first 11 SMAC reports that have been reviewed for their application of the guidelines developed in the first phase of this activity and approved by the subcommittee.

  6. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    To protect space crews from air contaminants, NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance for developing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) and review NASA's development of exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. The NRC convened the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines to address this task. The committee published Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants (NRC 1992). The reason for the review of chemicals in Volume 5 is that many of them have not been examined for more than 10 years, and new research necessitates examining the documents to ensure that they reflect current knowledge. New knowledge can be in the form of toxicologic data or in the application of new approaches for analysis of available data. In addition, because NASA anticipates longer space missions beyond low Earth orbit, SMACs for 1,000-d exposures have also been developed.

  7. Concentrations of airborne pollen grains in Sivrihisar (Eskisehir), Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erkara, Ismuhan Potoglu

    2008-03-01

    Pollen grains in the atmosphere of Sivrihisar were studied for a continuous period of 2 years (1 January 2005-31 December 2006) using a Durham sampler. During this period, pollen grains belonging to 41 taxa were recorded, 24 of which belonged to arboreal plants and 17 to non-arboreal. From these, 23,219 were identified in 2005 and 34,154 in 2006. Of the total pollen grains, 90.46% were arboreal, 9.43% non-arboreal, and 0.1% unidentifiable. The majority of the investigated allergic pollen grains were from Pinaceae, Cupressaceae, Fraxinus spp., Cedrus spp., Artemisia spp., Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae, Populus spp., Quercus spp., Urticaceae and Asteraceae, respectively. Pollen concentrations reached their highest levels in May. This information was then established into a calendar form according to the pollens determined in 2005-2006, in terms of annual, monthly and weekly numbers of taxa fall per cm2. A comparison between the results and the meteorological factors revealed a close relationship between pollen concentrations in the air and meteorological conditions. An increase in pollination was also linked to increasing temperatures and the wind. It was therefore concluded that high temperatures and relative humidity were also effective in increasing the number of pollens in the air.

  8. Indoor and outdoor measurements of vertical concentration profiles of airborne particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Micallef, A; Deuchar, C N; Colls, J J

    1998-05-04

    Vertical concentration profiles of various particle size ranges of airborne particulate matter were measured from ground level up to 3 m, in outdoor and indoor environments. Indoor measurements were carried out in an electronics workshop, while two outdoor environments were chosen: a street canyon cutting across a town and an open field situated in a semi-rural environment. The novel measurement technique employed in this experimental work, which can also be used to determine vertical concentration gradients of pollutants other than airborne particles in different environments, is given particular attention. Analyses of the collected data for the environments considered are presented and some conclusions and plausible explanations of the profiles are discussed. The workshop and street canyon environments exhibited larger concentrations and vertical concentration gradients as compared to the sports field. This indicates that people breathing at different heights are subjected to different concentrations of airborne particulate matter, which has implications for sitting air pollution monitors intended for protection of public health and estimation of human exposure.

  9. Concentration and characterization of airborne particles in Tehran's subway system.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Hosein; Hoseini, Mohammad; Seyedsalehi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Yousef; Jaafari, Jalil; Safari, Gholam Hosein

    2014-06-01

    Particulate matter is an important air pollutant, especially in closed environments like underground subway stations. In this study, a total of 13 elements were determined from PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected at two subway stations (Imam Khomeini and Sadeghiye) in Tehran's subway system. Sampling was conducted in April to August 2011 to measure PM concentrations in platform and adjacent outdoor air of the stations. In the Imam Khomeini station, the average concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 94.4 ± 26.3 and 52.3 ± 16.5 μg m(-3) in the platform and 81.8 ± 22.2 and 35 ± 17.6 μg m(-3) in the outdoor air, respectively. In the Sadeghiye station, mean concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 87.6 ± 23 and 41.3 ± 20.4 μg m(-3) in the platform and 73.9 ± 17.3 and 30 ± 15 μg m(-3), in the outdoor air, respectively. The relative contribution of elemental components in each particle fraction were accounted for 43% (PM10) and 47.7% (PM2.5) in platform of Imam Khomeini station and 15.9% (PM10) and 18.5% (PM2.5) in the outdoor air of this station. Also, at the Sadeghiye station, each fraction accounted for 31.6% (PM10) and 39.8% (PM2.5) in platform and was 11.7% (PM10) and 14.3% (PM2.5) in the outdoor. At the Imam Khomeini station, Fe was the predominant element to represent 32.4 and 36 % of the total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 11.5 and 13.3% in the outdoor, respectively. At the Sadeghiye station, this element represented 22.7 and 29.8% of total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 8.7 and 10.5% in the outdoor air, respectively. Other major crustal elements were 5.8% (PM10) and 5.3% (PM2.5) in the Imam Khomeini station platform and 2.3 and 2.4% in the outdoor air, respectively. The proportion of other minor elements was significantly lower, actually less than 7% in total samples, and V was the minor concentration in total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in both platform stations.

  10. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  11. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, Charles V.; Killian, E. Wayne; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.; Randolph, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector.

  12. [The airborne 1,3-butadiene concentrations in rubber and plastic processing plants].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiaki; Tainaka, Hidetsugu; Matsunaga, Ichiro; Goto, Sumio

    2002-03-01

    Environment pollution by 1,3-butadiene had considerably increased in Japan. The main cause of the pollution is the automotive exhaust gas, and leaks from factories, smoking, and burning of rubber and plastic products are considered to be minor sources. The object of this study was to determine the contamination levels of airborne 1,3-butadiene in factories processing rubber and plastics containing 1,3-butadiene. The concentrations of airborne 1,3-butadiene were measured in 21 plants (10 rubber processing plants and 11 plastics processing plants) in Osaka. 1,3-Butadiene in air was collected for 10 minutes with a charcoal tube and a portable small pump adjusted to a 250 ml/min flow rate. In each plant, indoor air samples at five points and an outdoor air sample at one point outside the plant were collected. The samples were subjected to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after thermal desorption from the charcoal. The concentrations of airborne 1,3-butadiene in the rubber processing plants and the plastics processing plants were 0.14-2.20 micrograms/m3 (geometric mean: 0.48 microgram/m3) and 0.23-4.51 micrograms/m3 (geometric mean: 0.80 microgram/m3), respectively. In all plants examined, indoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations were higher than the outdoor concentrations around the plants. Therefore, 1,3-butadiene was considered to arise from the processing of rubber or plastics, but the indoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations were much lower than the PEL-TWA (1 ppm = 2.21 mg/m3) of OSHA and the TLV-TWA (2 ppm) of ACGIH. The concentrations in the plants with closed room conditions without ventilation were higher than the concentrations in the other plants. It was suggested that ventilation affected the 1,3-butadiene concentration in the plants.

  13. Non-Seasonal Variation of Airborne Aspergillus Spore Concentration in a Hospital Building

    PubMed Central

    Oberle, Michael; Reichmuth, Markus; Laffer, Reto; Ottiger, Cornelia; Fankhauser, Hans; Bregenzer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial fungal infections are gaining increased attention from infectiologists. An adequate investigation into the levels of airborne Aspergillus and other fungal spores in hospital settings, under normal conditions, is largely unknown. We monitored airborne spore contamination in a Swiss hospital building in order to establish a seasonally-dependent base-line level. Air was sampled using an impaction technique, twice weekly, at six different locations over one year. Specimens were seeded in duplicate on Sabouraud agar plates. Grown colonies were identified to genus levels. The airborne Aspergillus spore concentration was constantly low throughout the whole year, at a median level of 2 spores/m3 (inter-quartile range = IQR 1–4), and displayed no seasonal dependency. The median concentration of other fungal spores was higher and showed a distinct seasonal variability with the ambient temperature change during the different seasons: 82 spores/m3 (IQR 26–126) in summer and 9 spores/m3 (IQR 6–15) in winter. The spore concentration varied considerably between the six sampling sites in the building (10 to 26 spores/m3). This variability may explain the variability of study results in the literature. PMID:26516890

  14. Airborne crystalline silica concentrations at coal-fired power plants associated with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.; Yager, J.

    2006-08-15

    This study presents measurements of airborne concentrations of respirable crystalline silica in the breathing zone of workers who were anticipated to encounter coal fly ash. Six plants were studied; two were fired with lignite coal, and the remaining four plants used bituminous and subbituminous coals. A total of 108 personal breathing zone respirable dust air samples were collected. Bulk samples were also collected from each plant site and subjected to crystalline silica analysis. Airborne dust particle size analysis was measured where fly ash was routinely encountered. The results from bituminous and subbituminous fired plants revealed that the highest airborne fly ash concentrations are encountered during maintenance activities: 0.008 mg/m{sup 3} to 96 mg/m{sup 3} (mean of 1.8 mg/m{sup 3}). This group exceeded the threshold limit values (TLV) in 60% of the air samples. During normal production activities, airborne concentrations of crystalline silica ranged from nondetectable to 0.18 mg/m{sup 3} (mean value of 0.048 mg/m{sup 3}). Air samples collected during these activities exceeded the current and proposed TLVs in approximately 54% and 65% of samples, respectively. Limited amounts of crystalline silica were detected in samples collected from lignite-fired plants, and approximately 20% of these air samples exceeded the current TLV. Particle size analysis in areas where breathing zone air samples were collected revealed mass median diameters typically between 3 {mu}m and 8 {mu}m. Bulk and air samples were analyzed for all of the common crystalline silica polymorphs, and only alpha quartz was detected.

  15. Surface Patterning of Benzene Carboxylic Acids on Graphite: Influence of structure, solvent, and concentration on molecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florio, Gina; Stiso, Kimberly; Campanelli, Joseph; Dessources, Kimberly; Folkes, Trudi

    2012-02-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was used to investigate the molecular self-assembly of four different benzene carboxylic acid derivatives at the liquid/graphite interface: pyromellitic acid (1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid), trimellitic acid (1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid), trimesic acid (1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid), and 1,3,5-benzenetriacetic acid. A range of two dimensional networks are observed that depend sensitively on the number of carboxylic acids present, the nature of the solvent, and the solution concentration. We will describe our recent efforts to determine (a) the preferential two-dimensional structure(s) for each benzene carboxylic acid at the liquid/graphite interface, (b) the thermodynamic and kinetic factors influencing self-assembly (or lack thereof), (c) the role solvent plays in the assembly, (e) the effect of in situ versus ex situ dilution on surface packing density, and (f) the temporal evolution of the self-assembled monolayer. Results of computational analysis of analog molecules and model monolayer films will also be presented to aid assignment of network structures and to provide a qualitative picture of surface adsorption and network formation.

  16. Setting Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for 1 hour or 24 hour contingency exposures to airborne chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hector D.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early years of the manned space program, NASA has developed and used exposure limits called Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) to help protect astronauts from airborne toxicants. Most of these SMACS are based on an exposure duration of 7 days, since this is the duration of a 'typical' mission. A set of 'contingency SMACs' is also being developed for scenarios involving brief (1-hour or 24- hour) exposures to relatively high levels of airborne toxicants from event-related 'contingency' releases of contaminants. The emergency nature of contingency exposures dictates the use of different criteria for setting exposure limits. The NASA JSC Toxicology Group recently began a program to document the rationales used to set new SMACs and plans to review the older, 7-day SMACs. In cooperation with the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology, a standard procedure has been developed for researching, setting, and documenting SMAC values.

  17. Climate change effects on airborne pathogenic bioaerosol concentrations: a scenario analysis.

    PubMed

    van Leuken, J P G; Swart, A N; Droogers, P; van Pul, A; Heederik, D; Havelaar, A H

    2016-01-01

    The most recent IPCC report presented further scientific evidence for global climate change in the twenty-first century. Important secondary effects of climate change include those on water resource availability, agricultural yields, urban healthy living, biodiversity, ecosystems, food security, and public health. The aim of this explorative study was to determine the range of expected airborne pathogen concentrations during a single outbreak or release in a future climate compared to a historical climatic period (1981-2010). We used five climate scenarios for the periods 2016-2045 and 2036-2065 defined by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute and two conversion tools to create hourly future meteorological data sets. We modelled season-averaged airborne pathogen concentrations by means of an atmospheric dispersion model and compared these data to historical (1981-2010) modelled concentrations. Our results showed that modelled concentrations were modified several percentage points on average as a result of climate change. On average, concentrations were reduced in four out of five scenarios. Wind speed and global radiation were of critical importance, which determine horizontal and vertical dilution. Modelled concentrations decreased on average, but large positive and negative hourly averaged effects were calculated (from -67 to +639 %). This explorative study shows that further research should include pathogen inactivation and more detailed probability functions on precipitation, snow, and large-scale circulation.

  18. Airborne concentrations of asbestos onboard maritime shipping vessels (1978-1992).

    PubMed

    Murbach, Dana M; Madl, Amy K; Unice, Ken M; Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Chapman, Pamela S; Brown, Jay L; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2008-06-01

    The exposure of shipyard workers to asbestos has been frequently investigated during the installation, repair or removal of asbestos insulation. The same level of attention, however, has not been directed to asbestos exposure of maritime seamen or sailors. In this paper, we assemble and analyze historical industrial hygiene (IH) data quantifying airborne asbestos concentrations onboard maritime shipping vessels between 1978 and 1992. Air monitoring and bulk sampling data were compiled from 52 IH surveys conducted on 84 different vessels, including oil tankers and cargo vessels, that were docked and/or at sea, but these were not collected during times when there was interaction with asbestos-containing materials (ACMs). One thousand and eighteen area air samples, 20 personal air samples and 24 air samples of unknown origin were analyzed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM); 19 area samples and six samples of unknown origin were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 13 area air samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, 482 bulk samples were collected from suspected ACMs, including insulation, ceiling panels, floor tiles, valve packing and gaskets. Fifty-three percent of all PCM and 4% of all TEM samples were above their respective detection limits. The average airborne concentration for the PCM area samples (n = 1018) was 0.008 fibers per cubic centimeter (f cc(-1)) (95th percentile of 0.040 f cc(-1)). Air concentrations in the living and recreational areas of the vessels (e.g. crew quarters, common rooms) averaged 0.004 f cc(-1) (95th percentile of 0.014 f cc(-1)), while air concentrations in the engine rooms and machine shops averaged 0.010 f cc(-1) (95th percentile of 0.068 f cc(-1)). Airborne asbestos concentrations were also classified by vessel type (cargo, tanker or Great Lakes), transport status (docked or underway on active voyage) and confirmed presence of ACM. Approximately 1.3 and 0% of the 1018 area samples

  19. Ambient airborne-solids concentrations including volcanic ash at Hanford, Washington sampling sites subsequent to the Mount St. Helens eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1981-06-01

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens, state of Washington, USA, occurred on May 18, 1980. The resulting volcanic ash plume was transported to the east. The Hanford area, northwest of Richland, Washington, was within the southern edge of the fallout plume. Airborne solid concentrations and airborne particle size distributions were measured at two sites in the Hanford area, a southern and northern site. During the initial sampling day (May 19), the average concentration for respirable particles, < 5.5-..mu..m diameter, was 1430-..mu..g/m/sup 3/ at the southern site; the total collection was 2610-..mu..g/m/sup 3/. The respirable content of the total airborne solids was 55%. At both sites average airborne solid concentrations decreased to 10- to 20-..mu..g/m/sup 3/ in December.

  20. Airborne endotoxin concentrations in indoor and outdoor particulate matter and their predictors in an urban city.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Y; Tamura, K; Shima, M

    2017-02-04

    Endotoxins are an important biological component of particulate matter and have been associated with adverse effects on human health. There have been some recent studies on airborne endotoxin concentrations. We collected fine (PM2.5 ) and coarse (PM10-2.5 ) particulate matter twice on weekdays and weekends each for 48 hour, inside and outside 55 homes in an urban city in Japan. Endotoxin concentrations in both fractions were measured using the kinetic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay. The relationships between endotoxin concentrations and household characteristics were evaluated for each fraction. Both indoor and outdoor endotoxin concentrations were higher in PM2.5 than in PM10-2.5 . In both PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 , indoor endotoxin concentrations were higher than outdoor concentrations, and the indoor endotoxin concentrations significantly correlated with outdoor concentrations in each fraction (R(2) =0.458 and 0.198, respectively). Indoor endotoxin concentrations in PM2.5 were significantly higher in homes with tatami or carpet flooring and in homes with pets, and lower in homes that used air purifiers. Indoor endotoxin concentrations in PM10-2.5 were significantly higher in homes with two or more children and homes with tatami or carpet flooring. These results showed that the indoor endotoxin concentrations were associated with the household characteristics in addition to outdoor endotoxin concentrations.

  1. Relating urban airborne particle concentrations to shipping using carbon based elemental emission ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Graham R.; Juwono, Alamsyah M.; Friend, Adrian J.; Cheung, Hing-Cho; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates a novel method for testing the hypothesis that variations in primary and secondary particle number concentration (PNC) in urban air are related to residual fuel oil combustion at a coastal port lying 30 km upwind, by examining the correlation between PNC and airborne particle composition signatures chosen for their sensitivity to the elemental contaminants present in residual fuel oil. Residual fuel oil combustion indicators were chosen by comparing the sensitivity of a range of concentration ratios to airborne emissions originating from the port. The most responsive were combinations of vanadium and sulphur concentration ([S], [V]) expressed as ratios with respect to black carbon concentration ([BC]). These correlated significantly with ship activity at the port and with the fraction of time during which the wind blew from the port. The average [V] when the wind was predominantly from the port was 0.52 ng m-3 (87%) higher than the average for all wind directions and 0.83 ng m-3 (280%) higher than that for the lowest vanadium yielding wind direction considered to approximate the natural background. Shipping was found to be the main source of V impacting urban air quality in Brisbane. However, contrary to the stated hypothesis, increases in PNC related measures did not correlate with ship emission indicators or ship traffic. Hence at this site ship emissions were not found to be a major contributor to PNC compared to other fossil fuel combustion sources such as road traffic, airport and refinery emissions.

  2. Effect of phytoremediation on concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 1998–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Effinger, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site near Charleston, South Carolina, USA, have been monitored since the installation of a phytoremediation system of hybrid poplar trees in 1998. Between 2000 and 2014, the concentrations of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene (BT&N) in groundwater in the planted area have decreased. For example, in the monitoring well containing the highest concentrations of BT&N, benzene concentrations decreased from 10,200 µg/L to less than 4000 µg/L, toluene concentrations decreased from 2420 µg/L to less than 20 µg/L, and naphthalene concentrations decreased from 6840 µg/L to less than 3000 µg/L. Concentrations of BT&N in groundwater in all wells were observed to be lower during the summer months relative to the winter months of a particular year during the first few years after installing the phytoremediation system, most likely due to increased transpiration and contaminant uptake by the hybrid poplar trees during the warm summer months; this pathway of uptake by trees was confirmed by the detection of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene in trees during sampling events in 2002, and later in the study in 2012. These data suggest that the phytoremediation system affects the groundwater contaminants on a seasonal basis and, over multiple years, has resulted in a cumulative decrease in dissolved-phase contaminant concentrations in groundwater. The removal of dissolved organic contaminants from the aquifer has resulted in a lower demand on dissolved oxygen supplied by recharge and, as a result, the redox status of the groundwater has changed from anoxic to oxic conditions. This study provides much needed information for water managers and other scientists on the viability of the long-term effectiveness of phytoremediation in decreasing groundwater contaminants and increasing dissolved oxygen at sites contaminated by benzene, toluene, and naphthalene.

  3. A literature review of concentrations and size distributions of ambient airborne Pb-containing particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Richmond-Bryant, Jennifer; Thornburg, Jonathan; Portzer, Jeff; Vanderpool, Robert; Cavender, Kevin; Rice, Joann

    2011-09-01

    The final 2008 lead (Pb) national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) revision maintains Pb in total suspended particulate matter as the indicator. However, the final rule permits the use of low-volume PM 10 (particulate matter sampled with a 50% cut-point of 10 μm) Federal Reference Method (FRM) monitors in lieu of total suspended particulate (TSP) monitors for some non-source-oriented monitoring. PM 10 FRM monitors are known to provide more reliable concentration measurements than TSP samplers because they are omni-directional samplers and so are not biased by wind conditions. However, by design they exclude the upper tail of the particle size distribution. Hence, each monitor produces uncertainties about measured concentrations of Pb-bearing PM. Uncertainties in reported Pb data are also related to spatiotemporal variation of the concentration and size distribution of Pb-bearing PM. Therefore, a comprehensive literature review was performed to summarize the current knowledge regarding the concentration and size distribution of Pb particles in the atmosphere. The objectives of this review were to compile data that could shed light on these uncertainties, to provide insights useful during future Pb NAAQS reviews, and to identify areas where more research is needed. Results of this review indicated that Pb size distribution data are relatively limited and often outdated. Thirty-nine articles were found to have sufficiently detailed information regarding airborne Pb concentrations, study location, sample collection methods, and analytical techniques; only 16 of those papers reported Pb concentration data for multiple size fractions. For the most part, U.S. and European studies from the last forty years illustrate that the largest mode of the size distribution of airborne particle-bound Pb has shifted to larger sizes while airborne Pb concentrations have decreased in urban areas. This shift occurred as tetraethyl Pb additives in gasoline were phased out and

  4. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses’ station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3–1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3–10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37–81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18–59% and 1–5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1–10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  5. Benzene Exposures and Risk Potential for Vehicle Mechanics from Gasoline and Petroleum-Derived Products.

    PubMed

    Williams, Pamela R D; Mani, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Benzene exposures among vehicle mechanics in the United States and abroad were characterized using available data from published and unpublished studies. In the United States, the time-weighted-average (TWA) airborne concentration of benzene for vehicle mechanics averaged 0.01-0.05 ppm since at least the late 1970s, with maximal TWA concentrations ranging from 0.03 to 0.38 ppm. Benzene exposures were notably lower in the summer than winter and in the Southwest compared to other geographic regions, but significantly higher during known gasoline-related tasks such as draining a gas tank or changing a fuel pump or fuel filter. Measured airborne concentrations of benzene were also generally greater for vehicle mechanics in other countries, likely due to the higher benzene content of gasoline and other factors. Short-term airborne concentrations of benzene frequently exceeded 1 ppm during gasoline-related tasks, but remained below 0.2 ppm for tasks involving other petroleum-derived products such as carburetor and brake cleaner or parts washer solvent. Application of a two-zone mathematical model using reasonable input values from the literature yielded predicted task-based benzene concentrations during gasoline and aerosol spray cleaner scenarios similar to those measured for vehicle mechanics during these types of tasks. When evaluated using appropriate biomarkers, dermal exposures were found to contribute little to total benzene exposures for this occupational group. Available data suggest that vehicle mechanics have not experienced significant exposures to benzene in the workplace, except perhaps during short-duration gasoline-related tasks, and full-shift benzene exposures have remained well below current and contemporaneous occupational exposure limits. These findings are consistent with epidemiology studies of vehicle mechanics, which have not demonstrated an increased risk of benzene-induced health effects in this cohort of workers. Data and information presented

  6. Inactivation of Airborne Bacteria and Viruses Using Extremely Low Concentrations of Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio; Sakasegawa, Miyusse; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Takigawa, Yasuhiro; Taura, Kouichi; Taguchi, Kazuhiko; Matsubara, Kazuki; Nakahara, Kouichi; Kato, Daisuke; Sogawa, Koushirou; Oka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Infectious airborne microbes, including many pathological microbes that cause respiratory infections, are commonly found in medical facilities and constitute a serious threat to human health. Thus, an effective method for reducing the number of microbes floating in the air will aid in the minimization of the incidence of respiratory infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate that chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at extremely low concentrations, which has no detrimental effects on human health, elicits a strong effect to inactivate bacteria and viruses and significantly reduces the number of viable airborne microbes in a hospital operating room. In one set of experiments, a suspension of Staphylococcus aureus, bacteriophage MS2, and bacteriophage ΦX174 were released into an exposure chamber. When ClO2 gas at 0.01 or 0.02 parts per million (ppm, volume/volume) was present in the chamber, the numbers of surviving microbes in the air were markedly reduced after 120 min. The reductions were markedly greater than the natural reductions of the microbes in the chamber. In another experiment, the numbers of viable airborne bacteria in the operating room of a hospital collected over a 24-hour period in the presence or absence of 0.03 ppm ClO2 gas were found to be 10.9 ± 6.7 and 66.8 ± 31.2 colony-forming units/m3 (n = 9, p < 0.001), respectively. Taken together, we conclude that ClO2 gas at extremely low concentrations (≤0.03 ppm) can reduce the number of viable microbes floating in the air in a room. These results strongly support the potential use of ClO2 gas at a non-toxic level to reduce infections caused by the inhalation of pathogenic microbes in nursing homes and medical facilities.

  7. Airborne Mold and Endotoxin Concentrations in New Orleans, Louisiana, after Flooding, October through November 2005

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Gina M.; Hjelmroos-Koski, Mervi; Rotkin-Ellman, Miriam; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2006-01-01

    Background The hurricanes and flooding in New Orleans, Louisiana, in October and November 2005 resulted in damp conditions favorable to the dispersion of bioaerosols such as mold spores and endotoxin. Objective Our objective in this study was to assess potential human exposure to bioaerosols in New Orleans after the flooding of the city. Methods A team of investigators performed continuous airborne sampling for mold spores and endotoxin outdoors in flooded and nonflooded areas, and inside homes that had undergone various levels of remediation, for periods of 5–24 hr during the 2 months after the flooding. Results The estimated 24-hr mold concentrations ranged from 21,000 to 102,000 spores/m3 in outdoor air and from 11,000 to 645,000 spores/m3 in indoor air. The mean outdoor spore concentration in flooded areas was roughly double the concentration in nonflooded areas (66,167 vs. 33,179 spores/m3; p < 0.05). The highest concentrations were inside homes. The most common mold species were from the genera of Cladosporium and Aspergillus/Penicillium; Stachybotrys was detected in some indoor samples. The airborne endotoxin concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 8.3 EU (endo-toxin units)/m3 but did not vary with flooded status or between indoor and outdoor environments. Conclusions The high concentration of mold measured indoors and outdoors in the New Orleans area is likely to be a significant respiratory hazard that should be monitored over time. Workers and returning residents should use appropriate personal protective equipment and exposure mitigation techniques to prevent respiratory morbidity and long-term health effects. PMID:16966092

  8. Survival of Airborne Bacteria in a High Urban Concentration of Carbon Monoxide1

    PubMed Central

    Lighthart, Bruce

    1973-01-01

    Vegetative cells of Serratia marcescens 8UK, Sarcina lutea, and spores of Bacillus subtilus var. niger were held in aerosols, with and without an urban concentration of CO (85 μliters per liter or ppm), for up to 6 hr at 15 C and a relative humidity (RH) of approximately 0, 25, 50, 75, and 95%. It was found that CO enhanced the death rate of S. marcescens 8UK at least four- to sevenfold at low RH (ca. 1 to 25%), but protected the cells at high RH (ca. 90%). Death rates of S. lutea, with or without added CO, were comparatively low over the entire RH range. However, in the first hour, airborne S. lutea held in CO-containing air were more stable than those in air without added CO (i.e., CO protection). A marked increase in the death rate (up to 70-fold) occurred in the subsequent 5 hr within the RH range of approximately 0 to 75%. Statistical analysis indicated that aerosol decay rates of B. subtilus var. niger spores decreased significantly, when held in a CO-containing as compared to a non-CO-containing atmosphere, in the 0 to 85% RH range. Thus, the data presented indicate that CO in the urban environment may have a protective or lethal effect on airborne bacteria, dependent upon at least the microbial species, aerosol age, and relative humidity. A mechanism for CO death enhancement and protection of airborne S. marcescens 8UK is suggested to involve CO uncoupling of an energy-requiring death mechanism and an energy-requiring maintenance mechanism at high and low RH, respectively. PMID:4631439

  9. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    MacVean, D.W.; Franzen, D.K.; Keefe, T.J.; Bennett, B.W.

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring.

  10. Concentrations and identification of culturable airborne fungi in underground stations of the Seoul metro.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Ho; Jang, Soojin; Park, Wha Me; Park, Jae Bum

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the culturable airborne fungi (CAF) concentrations in the underground subway stations of Seoul, Korea at two time points. This study measured the CAF concentrations in enclosed environments at 16 underground stations of the Seoul Metro in 2006 and 2013 and investigated the effects of various environmental factors, including the presence of platform screen doors, temperature, relative humidity, and number of passengers. CAF concentrations at the stations in 2006 were significantly higher than that at the same stations in 2013 (p < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between CAF concentration and relative humidity (r = 0.311, p < 0.05). Geotrichum and Penicillium were the predominant genera. The CAF concentrations in stations with an operating supply air were significantly higher than that in stations with no supply air (p < 0.001). Therefore, it is recommended that special attention be given to stations with clean supplied air to improve the indoor air quality of these subway stations.

  11. Concentrations and properties of airborne particles in the Mexico City subway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugica-Álvarez, V.; Figueroa-Lara, J.; Romero-Romo, M.; Sepúlveda-Sánchez, J.; López-Moreno, T.

    2012-03-01

    Samples of PM10 and PM2.5 were collected using High Vol and MiniVol devices on the platform of a subway station in Mexico City and in an outdoor location close to it, using such devices. Soluble extractable organic matter (SEOM) and water solubility of metals were determined. Elemental composition and solubility of trace metals were determined and individual aerosol particles were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). The concentration levels in both sizes were similar during all days with the exception of weekends, especially on Sunday when activity decreases due to lower trains' frequency. The largest particles concentrations in the subway were found from 06:00 to 14:00 and the lowest concentrations were registered from 22:00 to 06:00. Concentrations of PM2.5 ranging between 60 μg m-3 and 93 μg m-3 (10% and 90% percentile) in the subway were 6% larger than outside, whereas PM10 were 20% larger than outside ranging from 88 μg m-3 to 145 μg m-3. Greater Fe, Cu, Ni, Cr and Mn concentrations were quantified in the subway samples as compared to the airborne particles by up to 2.5, 9, 1.8, 2.0 and 2.6 times, respectively. Even when the solubility percent of these metals in the subway PM was smaller than in the outdoor airborne particles, metals' concentrations were greater. SEM and EDS exhibit the presence of many individual particles with a large metal content in the subway samples. Correlation analysis showed the influence of outdoor PM in the subway aerosols, but characterization revealed also important differences in the presence of metals and SEOM, due to underground sources such as friction, brake system, and metals from sparking. This means that a large number of commuters are exposed during labor days to large toxic metals concentrations as they transit.

  12. Systemic Approach for Health Risk Assessment of Ambient Air Concentrations of Benzene in Petrochemical Environments: Integration of Fuzzy Logic, Artificial Neural Network, and IRIS Toxicity Method

    PubMed Central

    NOVIN, Vahid; GIVEHCHI, Saeed; HOVEIDI, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reliable methods are crucial to cope with uncertainties in the risk analysis process. The aim of this study is to develop an integrated approach to assessing risks of benzene in the petrochemical plant that produces benzene. We offer an integrated system to contribute imprecise variables into the health risk calculation. Methods: The project was conducted in Asaluyeh, southern Iran during the years from 2013 to 2014. Integrated method includes fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks. Each technique had specific computational properties. Fuzzy logic was used for estimation of absorption rate. Artificial neural networks can decrease the noise of the data so applied for prediction of benzene concentration. First, the actual exposure was calculated then it combined with Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) toxicity factors to assess real health risks. Results: High correlation between the measured and predicted benzene concentration was achieved (R2= 0.941). As for variable distribution, the best estimation of risk in a population implied 33% of workers exposed less than 1×10−5 and 67% inserted between 1.0×10−5 to 9.8×10−5 risk levels. The average estimated risk of exposure to benzene for entire work zones is equal to 2.4×10−5, ranging from 1.5×10−6 to 6.9×10−5. Conclusion: The integrated model is highly flexible as well as the rules possibly will be changed according to the necessities of the user in a different circumstance. The measured exposures can be duplicated well through proposed model and realistic risk assessment data will be produced. PMID:27957464

  13. Relationship of airborne trimellitic anhydride concentrations to trimellitic anhydride--induced symptoms and immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.I.; Roach, D.E.; McGrath, K.G.; Larsen, R.S.; Zeiss, C.R.; Patterson, R.

    1983-12-01

    Eighteen workers exposed to trimellitic anhydride (TMA) powder were evaluated in 1979. Twelve of these workers were available for longitudinal study until 1982. Annual clinical evaluations and serum radioimmunoassays for total antibody binding and specific IgE binding to /sup 125/I-TM-HSA were performed. In 1979, five workers had antibody against TM-HSA. Of these, three workers were diagnosed with the late respiratory systemic syndrome (LRSS) and one worker with TMA-induced allergic rhinitis. The LRSS workers had significantly elevated total antibody binding of /sup 125/I-TM-HSA and the worker with rhinitis had significantly elevated specific IgE binding of /sup 125/I-TM-HSA per milliliter of serum. Although TMA handling was intermittent throughout the year, average airborne dust concentrations from 1974 to 1978 at job stations of the two heaviest TMA-exposed occupations, operator and assistant operator, were 2.1 and 0.82 mg/m3, respectively. After local exhaust ventilation had been improved, average airborne dust concentrations of TMA at the two latter job stations fell to levels of 0.03 and 0.01 mg/m3, respectively, in 1982. The decrease in TMA exposure coincided with a gradual fall in total antibody binding of /sup 125/I-TM-HSA per milliliter in 1982 and symptomatic improvement in the three individuals with the LRSS. The continuous low-level exposure of the worker with TMA rhinitis was sufficient to elicit a rise in specific IgE against TM-HSA from 1.1 ng of 125I-TM-HSA bound per milliliter in 1979 to 2.12 in 1982.

  14. Benzene Evolution Rates from Saltstone Prepared with 2X ITP Flowsheet Concentrations of Phenylborates and Heated to 85 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    2000-08-23

    The Saltstone Facility provides the final treatment and disposal of low level liquid wastes streams. At the Saltstone Facility, the waste is mixed with cement, flyash, and slag to form a grout, which is pumped into large concrete vaults where it cures. The facility started radioactive operations in June 1990. High Level Waste Engineering requested Savannah River Technology Center to determine the effect of TPB and its decomposition products (i.e., 3PB, 2PB, and 1PB) on the saltstone process. Previous testing performed by SRTC determined saltstone benzene evolution rates a function of ITP filtrate composition. Testing by the Thermal Fluids Laboratory has shown at design operation, the temperature in the Z-area vaults could reach 85 degrees Celsius. Saltstone asked SRTC to perform additional testing to determine whether curing at 85 degrees Celsius could change saltstone benzene evolution rates. This document describes the test performed to determine the effect of curing temperature on the benzene evolution rates.

  15. Integrating nephelometer measurements for the airborne fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) mass concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendrikar, Arun D.; Steinmetz, William K.

    This work describes the application of integrating nephelometer measurements for the determination of airborne fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) mass concentrations. In response to over 150 complaints (spanning a period of 20 years) from local citizens of irritant fogs and pungent odors, the North Carolina Division of Air Quality conducted a monitoring program, in collaboration with the Washington Regional Air Quality Office and PCS Phosphate, Inc., to characterize air quality in the Pamlico River airshed of eastern North Carolina. The continuous monitoring from 1 May through 31 October 2000 at four sites, involved collection of air samples and subsequent quantification for reactive acidic and basic gases, aerosols and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) using a 7-day Annular Denuder System (ADS). Additionally, the airborne concentration of the fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) was concurrently (to the ADS) monitored using a tapered element oscillating micro-balance (TEOM). Relevant meteorological data were obtained from conventional sensors installed at each sampling site. An integrating nephelometer was used for the regional visibility measurements. An integrating nephelometer was used to measure light scattering (a surrogate for visibility) continuously for 24-h per day over a 6-month period at the four sites. A linear relationship has been found for the nephelometer (Beta scat) measurements and mass data (PM 2.5) obtained both from the TEOM and ADS. The calculated correlation coefficient results between nephelometer and ADS and nephelometer and TEOM are satisfactory and close to one. This indicates that in this region, the nephelometer measurements have the potential to be a surrogate for the determination of regional airborne fine particle (PM 2.5) mass concentrations. The ratios for each of the four sampling sites using 24-h averages of nephelometer data and PM 2.5 concentrations from the ADS units and the TEOM gave an average ratio of 0.32±0.02. This value

  16. EVALUATION OF THREE CLEANING METHODS FOR REMOVING ASBESTOS FROM CARPET. DETERMINATION OF AIRBORNE ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH EACH METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of three cleaning methods to remove asbestos from contaminated carpet and to determine the airborne asbestos concentrations associated with the use of each method. The carpet on which the methods were tested was naturally cont...

  17. Ambient Airborne Solids Concentrations Including Volcanic Ash at Hanford, Washington Sampling Sites Subsequent to the Mount St. Helens Eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-12-20

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens occurred on May 18, 1980. Subsequently, airborne solid concentrations were measured as a function of time at two sites within the southern edge of the fallout plume about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. This ash was a source for investigating area-wide resuspension. Rain had a variable effect on decreasing airborne concentrations from resuspension. From 0.5 to 1.5 cm of rain were required to significantly reduce airborne solid concentrations through July. For a more aged resuspension source in September, a rain of 2.0 cm had a negligible effect. A monthly average threshold-wind speed for resuspension was defined as 3.6 m/s. For monthly-average wind speeds less than the threshold wind speed, monthly-average airborne concentrations tended to decrease with time. A decrease was recorded between September and October. For this 4-month time period, the half-life was on the order of 50 days, corresponding to a weathering rate of 5.1 year/sup -1/.

  18. Health risk assessment of ambient air concentrations of benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) in service station environments.

    PubMed

    Edokpolo, Benjamin; Yu, Qiming Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2014-06-18

    A comprehensive evaluation of the adverse health effects of human exposures to BTX from service station emissions was carried out using BTX exposure data from the scientific literature. The data was grouped into different scenarios based on activity, location and occupation and plotted as Cumulative Probability Distributions (CPD) plots. Health risk was evaluated for each scenario using the Hazard Quotient (HQ) at 50% (CEXP50) and 95% (CEXP95) exposure levels. HQ50 and HQ95 > 1 were obtained with benzene in the scenario for service station attendants and mechanics repairing petrol dispensing pumps indicating a possible health risk. The risk was minimized for service stations using vapour recovery systems which greatly reduced the benzene exposure levels. HQ50 and HQ95 < 1 were obtained for all other scenarios with benzene suggesting minimal risk for most of the exposed population. However, HQ50 and HQ95 < 1 was also found with toluene and xylene for all scenarios, suggesting minimal health risk. The lifetime excess Cancer Risk (CR) and Overall Risk Probability for cancer on exposure to benzene was calculated for all Scenarios and this was higher amongst service station attendants than any other scenario.

  19. Modeling breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M R; Gatano, B L; McKernan, J L; Dunn, K H; Blazicko, B A; Carlton, G N

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model to predict breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting in cross-flow ventilated booths. The model focuses on characterizing the generation and transport of overspray mist. It extends previous work on conventional spray guns to include exposures generated by HVLP guns. Dimensional analysis and scale model wind-tunnel studies are employed using non-volatile oils, instead of paint, to produce empirical equations for estimating exposure to total mass. Results indicate that a dimensionless breathing zone concentration is a nonlinear function of the ratio of momentum flux of air from the spray gun to the momentum flux of air passing through the projected area of the worker's body. The orientation of the spraying operation within the booth is also very significant. The exposure model requires an estimate of the contaminant generation rate, which is approximated by a simple impactor model. The results represent an initial step in the construction of more realistic models capable of predicting exposure as a mathematical function of the governing parameters.

  20. Biodiversity and concentrations of airborne fungi in large US office buildings from the BASE study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Feng C.; Macher, Janet M.; Hung, Yun-Yi

    The Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) study measured baseline concentrations of airborne fungi in 100 representative US office buildings in 1994-1998. Multiple samples for different sampling durations, sites, and times of the day were aggregated into building-wide indoor and outdoor average concentrations. Fungal concentrations were compared between locations (indoor vs. outdoor), sampling and analytical methods (culture vs. microscopy), and season (summer vs. winter). The arithmetic means (standard deviations) of the indoor/outdoor concentrations of culturable fungi and fungal spores were 100/680 (230/840) CFUm-3 and 270/6540 (1190/6780) sporem-3, respectively. Although fewer groups were observed indoors than outdoors, at lower average concentrations (except in two buildings), site-specific and building-wide indoor measurements had higher coefficients of variation. More groups were seen in summer, and aggregated concentrations tended to be higher than in winter except for culturable Aureobasidium spp. and Botrytis spp. outdoors and non-sporulating fungi in both locations. Rankings of the predominant fungi identified by both methods were similar, but overall indoor and outdoor spore concentrations were approximately 3 and 10 times higher, respectively, than concentrations of culturable fungi. In the 44 buildings with both measurements, the indoor and outdoor total culturable fungi to fungal spore ratios (total C/S ratios) were 1.27 and 0.25, with opposite seasonal patterns. The indoor C/S ratio was higher in summer than in winter (1.47 vs. 0.86; N=29 and 15, respectively), but the outdoor ratio was lower in summer (0.19 vs. 0.36, respectively). Comparison of the number of different fungal groups and individual occurrence in buildings and samples indicated that the outdoor environment and summer season were more diverse, but the proportional contributions of the groups were very similar suggesting that the indoor and outdoor environments were related

  1. MiR-34a, a promising novel biomarker for benzene toxicity, is involved in cell apoptosis triggered by 1,4-benzoquinone through targeting Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujiao; Sun, Pengling; Guo, Xiaoli; Gao, Ai

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to benzene is inevitable, and concerns regarding the adverse health effects of benzene have been raised. Most investigators found that benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity. In this regard, Our study aimed to explore a novel potential biomarker of adverse health effects following benzene exposure and the toxic mechanisms of benzene metabolites in vitro. This study consisted of 314 benzene-exposed workers and 288 control workers, an air benzene concentration of who were 2.64 ± 1.60 mg/m(3) and 0.05 ± 0.01 mg/m(3), respectively. In this population-based study, miR-34a expression was elevated in benzene-exposed workers. The correlation of miR-34a with the airborne benzene concentration, S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and trans, trans-muconic acid (t, t-MA), all of which reflect benzene exposure, was found. Correlation analysis indicated that miR-34a was associated with peripheral blood count, alanine transaminase (ALT) and oxidative stress. Furthermore, multivariate analysis demonstrated that miR-34a expression was strongly associated with white blood cell count (structure loadings = 0.952). In population-based study, miR-34a had the largest contribution to altered peripheral blood counts, which reflect benzene-induced hematotoxicity. The role of miR-34a in benzene toxicity was assessed using lentiviral vector transfection. Results revealed that 1,4-benzoquinone induced abnormal cell apoptosis and simultaneously upregulated miR-34a accompanied with decreased Bcl-2. Finally, inhibition of miR-34a elevated Bcl-2 and decreased 1,4-benzoquinone-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, miR-34a was observed to be involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity by targeting Bcl-2 and could be regarded as a potential novel biomarker for benzene toxicity.

  2. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Column CO2 Concentration to Cloud Tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Globally distributed atmospheric CO2 measurements with high precision, low bias and full seasonal sampling are crucial to advance carbon cycle sciences. However, two thirds of the Earth's surface is typically covered by clouds, and passive remote sensing approaches from space, e.g., OCO-2 and GOSAT, are limited to cloud-free scenes. They are unable to provide useful retrievals in cloudy areas where the photon path-length can't be well characterized. Thus, passive approaches have limited global coverage and poor sampling in cloudy regions, even though some cloudy regions have active carbon surface fluxes. NASA Goddard is developing a pulsed integrated-path, differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric column CO2 concentrations from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere also allow this technique to estimate column CO2 and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground with precise knowledge of the photon path-length. This allows retrievals of column CO2 concentrations to cloud tops, providing much higher spatial coverage and some information about vertical structure of CO2. This is expected to benefit atmospheric transport process studies, carbon data assimilation in models, and global and regional carbon flux estimation. We show some preliminary results of the all-sky retrieval capability using airborne lidar measurements from the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ASCENDS airborne campaigns on the NASA DC-8. These show retrievals of atmospheric CO2 over low-level marine stratus clouds, cumulus clouds at the top of planetary boundary layer, some mid-level clouds and visually thin high-level cirrus clouds. The CO2 retrievals from the lidar are validated against in-situ measurements and compared to Goddard PCTM model simulations. Lidar cloud slicing to derive CO2 abundance in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere also has been demonstrated. The

  3. Airborne Pollen Concentrations and Emergency Room Visits for Myocardial Infarction: A Multicity Case-Crossover Study in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Lavigne, Eric; Villeneuve, Paul J; Reeves, François

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have examined the acute cardiovascular effects of airborne allergens. We conducted a case-crossover study to evaluate the relationship between airborne allergen concentrations and emergency room visits for myocardial infarction (MI) in Ontario, Canada. In total, 17,960 cases of MI were identified between the months of April and October during the years 2004-2011. Daily mean aeroallergen concentrations (pollen and mold spores) were assigned to case and control periods using central-site monitors in each city along with daily measurements of meteorological data and air pollution (nitrogen dioxide and ozone). Odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression models adjusting for time-varying covariates. Risk of MI was 5.5% higher (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4, 7.6) on days in the highest tertile of total pollen concentrations compared with days in the lowest tertile, and a significant concentration-response trend was observed (P < 0.001). Higher MI risk was limited to same-day pollen concentrations, with the largest risks being observed during May (odds ratio = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.35) and June (odds ratio = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.22), when tree and grass pollen are most common. Mold spore concentrations were not associated with MI. Our findings suggest that airborne pollen might represent a previously unidentified environmental risk factor for myocardial infarction.

  4. Benzene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta, GA. Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  5. Airborne hyperspectral imaging for sensing phosphorus concentration in the Lake Okeechobee drainage basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogrekci, Ismail; Lee, Won Suk; Jordan, Jonathan D.

    2005-05-01

    Eutrophication disturbs the ecological balance in the Lake Okeechobee due to high concentration of phosphorus emanated from the regions in the lake's drainage basin. Ability of measuring phosphorus (P) concentrations of water in the Lake Okeechobee itself is very important. Furthermore, monitoring P in its drainage basins is crucial in order to find the cause of P loading and contributing regions. Also, inexpensive real-time sensing capability for a large area in a short time would help scientist, government agents, and civilians to understand the causes, spot the high-risk areas, and develop management practices for restoring the natural equilibrium. In order to measure P concentrations in the Lake Okeechobee drainage basin, airborne hyperspectral images were taken from five representative target sites by deploying a modified queen air twin engine aircraft. Each flight line covered a swath of approximately 365 m wide. Spatial resolution was about 1 m. Spectral range covered was between 412.65 and 991.82 nm with an approximate of 5 nm spectral resolution. Ground truthing was conducted to collect soil and vegetation samples, GPS coordinates of each location, and reflectance measurement of each sample. On the ground, spectral reflectance was measured using a handheld spectrometer in 400-2500 nm. The samples were sent to a laboratory for chemical analysis. Also diffuse reflectance of the samples was measured in a laboratory setting using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Images were geocorrected and rectified to reduce geometric effect. Calibration of images was conducted to obtain actual reflectance of the target area. Score, SAM (Spectral Angle Mapping), SFF (Spectral Feature Fitting) were computed for spectral matching with image derived spectral library.

  6. Apparatus and methods for monitoring the concentrations of hazardous airborne substances, especially lead

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2004-07-13

    Air is sampled at a rate in excess of 100 L/min, preferably at 200-300 L/min, so as to collect therefrom a substantial fraction, i.e., at least 20%, preferably 60-100%, of airborne particulates. A substance of interest (analyte), such as lead, is rapidly solubilized from the the collected particulates into a sample of liquid extractant, and the concentration of the analyte in the extractant sample is determined. The high-rate air sampling and particulate collection may be effected with a high-throughput filter cartridge or with a recently developed portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler. Rapid solubilization of lead is achieved by a liquid extractant comprising 0.1-1 M of acetic acid or acetate, preferably at a pH of 5 or less and preferably with inclusion of 1-10% of hydrogen peroxide. Rapid determination of the lead content in the liquid extractant may be effected with a colorimetric or an electroanalytical analyzer.

  7. Concentration, Size Distribution, and Infectivity of Airborne Particles Carrying Swine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C.; Davies, Peter R.; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    When pathogens become airborne, they travel associated with particles of different size and composition. Particle size determines the distance across which pathogens can be transported, as well as the site of deposition and the survivability of the pathogen. Despite the importance of this information, the size distribution of particles bearing viruses emitted by infectious animals remains unknown. In this study we characterized the concentration and size distribution of inhalable particles that transport influenza A virus (IAV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) generated by acutely infected pigs and assessed virus viability for each particle size range. Aerosols from experimentally infected pigs were sampled for 24 days using an Andersen cascade impactor able to separate particles by size (ranging from 0.4 to 10 micrometer (μm) in diameter). Air samples collected for the first 9, 20 and the last 3 days of the study were analyzed for IAV, PRRSV and PEDV, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified as geometric mean copies/m3 within each size range. IAV was detected in all particle size ranges in quantities ranging from 5.5x102 (in particles ranging from 1.1 to 2.1μm) to 4.3x105 RNA copies/m3 in the largest particles (9.0–10.0μm). PRRSV was detected in all size ranges except particles between 0.7 and 2.1μm in quantities ranging from 6x102 (0.4–0.7μm) to 5.1x104 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). PEDV, an enteric virus, was detected in all particle sizes and in higher quantities than IAV and PRRSV (p < 0.0001) ranging from 1.3x106 (0.4–0.7μm) to 3.5x108 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). Infectious status was demonstrated for the 3 viruses, and in the case of IAV and PRRSV, viruses were isolated from particles larger than 2.1μm. In summary, our results indicated that airborne PEDV, IAV and PRRSV can be found in a wide range of

  8. DIFFERENTIAL LUNG GENE EXPRESSION IN IMMUNOLOGICALLY-CHALLENGED RATS EXPOSED TO CONCENTRATED AIRBORNE PARTICULATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children residing in urbanized areas suffer disproportionately higher asthma-related morbidity and mortality. One explanation is that inner city children are exposured to higher levels of environmental asthma triggers such as airborne particulate matter. To elucidate gene-environ...

  9. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Concentration in the ASCENDS 2014 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Chen, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We report progress in demonstrating a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line by using 30 wavelength samples distributed across the lube. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength 10 times per second. The retrievals solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape and the column average CO2 concentrations using radiative transfer calculations based on HITRAN, the aircraft altitude, range to the scattering surface, and the atmospheric conditions. We compare these to CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. The number of wavelength samples can be reduced in the retrievals. During the ASCENDS airborne campaign in 2013 two flights were made in February over snow in the Rocky Mountains and the Central Plains allowing measurement of snow-covered surface reflectivity. Several improvements were made to the lidar for the 2014 campaign. These included using a new step-locked laser diode source, and incorporating a new HgCdTe APD detector and analog digitizer into the lidar receiver. Testing showed this detector had higher sensitivity, analog response, and a more linear dynamic range than the PMT detector used previously. In 2014 flights were made in late August and early September over the California Central Valley, the redwood forests along the California coast, two desert areas in Nevada and California, and two flights above growing agriculture in Iowa. Two flights were also made under OCO-2 satellite ground tracks. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, and mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, and through thin clouds and aerosol scattering. The lidar measurements clearly

  10. Concentrations, sources and geochemistry of airborne particulate matter at a major European airport.

    PubMed

    Amato, Fulvio; Moreno, Teresa; Pandolfi, Marco; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Delgado, Ana; Pedrero, Manuel; Cots, Nuria

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of aerosol particle concentrations (PM(10), PM(2.5), PM(1)) and chemical analysis (PM(10)) was undertaken at a major European airport (El Prat, Barcelona) for a whole month during autumn 2007. Concentrations of airborne PM at the airport were close to those at road traffic hotspots in the nearby Barcelona city, with means measuring 48 microg PM(10)/m(3), 21 microg PM(2.5)/m(3) and 17 microg PM(1)/m(3). Meteorological controls on PM at El Prat are identified as cleansing daytime sea breezes with abundant coarse salt particles, alternating with nocturnal land-sourced winds which channel air polluted by industry and traffic (PM(1)/PM(10) ratios > 0.5) SE down the Llobregat Valley. Chemical analyses of the PM(10) samples show that crustal PM is dominant (38% of PM(10)), followed by total carbon (OC + EC, 25%), secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA, 20%), and sea salt (6%). Local construction work for a new airport terminal was an important contributor to PM(10) crustal levels. Source apportionment modelling PCA-MLRA identifies five factors: industrial/traffic, crustal, sea salt, SIA, and K(+) likely derived from agricultural biomass burning. Whereas most of the atmospheric contamination concerning ambient air PM(10) levels at El Prat is not attributable directly to aircraft movement, levels of carbon are unusually high (especially organic carbon), as are metals possibly sourced from tyre detritus/smoke in runway dust (Ba, Zn, Mo) and from brake dust in ambient PM(10) (Cu, Sb), especially when the airport is at its most busy. We identify microflakes of aluminous alloys in ambient PM(10) filters derived from corroded fuselage and wings as an unequivocal and highly distinctive tracer for aircraft movement.

  11. Culturability and concentration of indoor and outdoor airborne fungi in six single-family homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taekhee; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Adhikari, Atin; Crawford, Carlos M.; Reponen, Tiina

    In this study, the culturability of indoor and outdoor airborne fungi was determined through long-term sampling (24-h) using a Button Personal Inhalable Aerosol Sampler. The air samples were collected during three seasons in six Cincinnati area homes that were free from moisture damage or visible mold. Cultivation and total microscopic enumeration methods were employed for the sample analysis. The geometric means of indoor and outdoor culturable fungal concentrations were 88 and 102 colony-forming units (CFU) m -3, respectively, with a geometric mean of the I/ O ratio equal to 0.66. Overall, 26 genera of culturable fungi were recovered from the indoor and outdoor samples. For total fungal spores, the indoor and outdoor geometric means were 211 and 605 spores m -3, respectively, with a geometric mean of I/ O ratio equal to 0.32. The identification revealed 37 fungal genera from indoor and outdoor samples based on the total spore analysis. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of culturable and total fungal spores showed significant correlations ( r=0.655, p<0.0001 and r=0.633, p<0.0001, respectively). The indoor and outdoor median viabilities of fungi were 55% and 25%, respectively, which indicates that indoor environment provides more favorable survival conditions for the aerosolized fungi. Among the seasons, the highest indoor and outdoor culturability of fungi was observed in the fall. Cladosporium had a highest median value of culturability (38% and 33% for indoor and outdoor, respectively) followed by Aspergillus/Penicillium (9% and 2%) among predominant genera of fungi. Increased culturability of fungi inside the homes may have important implications because of the potential increase in the release of allergens from viable spores and pathogenicity of viable fungi on immunocompromised individuals.

  12. Airborne concentrations of chrysotile asbestos in serpentine quarries and stone processing facilities in Valmalenco, Italy.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Andrea; Somigliana, Anna; Gemmi, Mauro; Bernabeo, Ferruccio; Savoca, Domenico; Cavallo, Domenico M; Bertazzi, Pier A

    2012-07-01

    Asbestos may be naturally present in rocks and soils. In some cases, there is the possibility of releasing asbestos fibres into the atmosphere from the rock or soil, subsequently exposing workers and the general population, which can lead to an increased risk of developing asbestos-related diseases. In the present study, air contaminated with asbestos fibres released from serpentinites was investigated in occupational settings (quarries and processing factories) and in the environment close to working facilities and at urban sites. The only naturally occurrence of asbestos found in Valmalenco area was chrysotile; amphibole fibres were never detected. An experimental cut-off diameter of 0.25 μm was established for distinguishing between Valmalenco chrysotile and antigorite single fibres using selected area electron diffraction analyses. Air contamination from chrysotile fibres in the examined occupational settings was site-dependent as the degree of asbestos contamination of Valmalenco serpentinites is highly variable from place to place. Block cutting of massive serpentinites with multiple blades or discs and drilling at the quarry sites that had the highest levels of asbestos contamination generated the highest exposures to (i.e. over the occupational exposure limits) asbestos. Conversely, working activities on foliated serpentinites produced airborne chrysotile concentrations comparable with ambient levels. Environmental chrysotile concentrations were always below the Italian limit for life environments (0.002 f ml(-1)), except for one sample collected at a quarry property boundary. The present exposure assessment study should encourage the development of an effective and concordant policy for proper use of asbestos-bearing rocks and soils as well as for the protection of public health.

  13. Airborne in-situ spectral characterization and concentration estimates of fluorescent organics as a function of depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittle, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The primary purpose of many in-situ airborne light scattering experiments in natural waters is to spectrally characterize the subsurface fluorescent organics and estimate their relative concentrations. This is often done by shining a laser beam into the water and monitoring its subsurface return signal. To do this with the proper interpretation, depth must be taken into account. If one disregards depth dependence when taking such estimates, both their spectral characteristics and their concentrations estimates can be rather ambiguous. A simple airborne lidar configuration is used to detect the subsurface return signal from a particular depth and wavelength. Underwater scatterometer were employed to show that in-situ subsurface organics are very sensitive to depth, but they also require the use of slow moving boats to cover large sample areas. Also, their very entry into the water disturbs the sample it is measuring. The method described is superior and simplest to any employed thus far.

  14. A study of airborne chrysotile concentrations associated with handling, unpacking, and repacking boxes of automobile clutch discs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, George C T; Madl, Amy K; Ingmundson, Kelsey J; Murbach, Dana M; Fehling, Kurt A; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Finley, Brent L

    2008-06-01

    Although automotive friction products (brakes and manual clutches) historically contained chrysotile asbestos, industrial hygiene surveys and epidemiologic studies of auto mechanics have consistently shown that these workers are not at an increased risk of developing asbestos-related diseases. Airborne asbestos levels during brake repair and brake parts handling have been well-characterized, but the potential exposure to airborne asbestos fibers during the handling of clutch parts has not been examined. In this study, breathing zone samples on the lapel of a volunteer worker (n=100) and area samples at bystander (n=50), remote area (n=25), and ambient (n=9) locations collected during the stacking, unpacking, and repacking of boxes of asbestos-containing clutches, and the subsequent cleanup and clothes handling, were analyzed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, fiber morphology and size distribution was evaluated using X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, and ISO analytical methods. It was observed that the (1) airborne asbestos concentrations increased with the number of boxes unpacked and repacked, (2) repetitive stacking of unopened boxes of clutches resulted in higher asbestos concentrations than unpacking and repacking the boxes of clutches, (3) cleanup and clothes handling tasks yielded very low asbestos concentrations. Fiber size and morphology analyses showed that amphibole fibers were not detected in the clutches and that the vast majority (>95%) of the airborne chrysotile fibers were less than 20 microm in length. Applying the ratio of asbestos fibers:total fibers (including non-asbestos) as determined by TEM to the PCM results, it was found that 30-min average airborne chrysotile concentrations (PCM adjusted) were 0.026+/-0.004 f/cc or 0.100+/-0.017 f/cc for a worker unpacking and repacking 1 or 2 boxes of clutches, respectively. The 30-min PCM adjusted average airborne asbestos

  15. Magnetic properties and element concentrations in lichens exposed to airborne pollutants released during cement production.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Winkler, Aldo; Guttová, Anna; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Loppi, Stefano

    2016-02-15

    The content of selected elements (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Ti, V and Zn) was measured in samples of the lichen Evernia prunastri exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, limestone and basalt quarries and urban and agricultural areas in SW Slovakia. Lichens transplanted around the investigated quarries and the cement mill rapidly (30 days) reflected the deposition of dust-associated elements, namely Ca (at the cement mill and the limestone quarry) and Fe, Ti and V (around the cement mill and the basalt quarry), and their content remained significantly higher throughout the whole period (30-180 days) with respect to the surrounding environment. Airborne pollutants (such as S) progressively increased in the study area from 30 to 180 days. The magnetic properties of lichen transplants exposed for 180 days have been characterized and compared with those of native lichens (Xanthoria parietina) and neighbouring bark, soil and rock samples, in order to test the suitability of native and transplanted samples as air pollution magnetic biomonitors. The magnetic mineralogy was homogeneous in all samples, with the exception of the samples from the basalt quarry. The transplants showed excellent correlations between the saturation remanent magnetization (Mrs) and the content of Fe. Native samples had a similar magnetic signature, but the values of the concentration-dependent magnetic parameters were up to two orders of magnitude higher, reflecting higher concentrations of magnetic particles. The concentrations of As, Ca and Cr in lichens correlated with Mrs values after neglecting the samples from the basalt quarry, which showed distinct magnetic properties, suggesting the cement mill as a likely source. Conversely, Ti and Mn were mostly (but not exclusively) associated with dust from the basalt quarry. It is suggested that the natural geological characteristics of the substrate may strongly affect the magnetic properties of lichen thalli

  16. Temporal Variability of the Bioaerosol Background at a Subway Station: Concentration Level, Size Distribution, and Diversity of Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dybwad, Marius; Skogan, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring bioaerosol environments may present a challenge to biological detection-identification-monitoring (BIODIM) systems aiming at rapid and reliable warning of bioterrorism incidents. One way to improve the operational performance of BIODIM systems is to increase our understanding of relevant bioaerosol backgrounds. Subway stations are enclosed public environments which may be regarded as potential bioterrorism targets. This study provides novel information concerning the temporal variability of the concentration level, size distribution, and diversity of airborne bacteria in a Norwegian subway station. Three different air samplers were used during a 72-h sampling campaign in February 2011. The results suggested that the airborne bacterial environment was stable between days and seasons, while the intraday variability was found to be substantial, although often following a consistent diurnal pattern. The bacterial levels ranged from not detected to 103 CFU m−3 and generally showed increased levels during the daytime compared to the nighttime levels, as well as during rush hours compared to non-rush hours. The airborne bacterial levels showed rapid temporal variation (up to 270-fold) on some occasions, both consistent and inconsistent with the diurnal profile. Airborne bacterium-containing particles were distributed between different sizes for particles of >1.1 μm, although ∼50% were between 1.1 and 3.3 μm. Anthropogenic activities (mainly passengers) were demonstrated as major sources of airborne bacteria and predominantly contributed 1.1- to 3.3-μm bacterium-containing particles. Our findings contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for BIODIM equipment by providing information that may be used to simulate operational bioaerosol backgrounds during controlled aerosol chamber-based challenge tests with biological threat agents. PMID:24162566

  17. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV.

  18. A coupled model of the airborne and surface concentration of radionuclides considering the resuspension-deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichige, Hiroyuki; Hatano, Yuko; Onda, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new model of estimating the long-term behavior of both the airborne and the surface concentrations of radionuclides in the vicinity of 30 km of Fukushima plant. Our model consists of the following simultaneous equations: δC- = viδC-+ ΛupS - ΛdownC - ΛdecC (1) δt δxi δS- = - Λ S + Λ C - Λ S, (2) δt up down env where C is the airborne concentration of a specific nuclide, S the surface concentration, the suffix i is 1 or 2 (2 dimensional), v the effective wind velocity which migrates the radionuclides in the air, Λup the rate constant of resuspension process, Λdown of deposition process, Λdec the decay constant, and Λenv is the rate constant of the surface concentration decrease due to environmental factors such as runoff, washoff, infiltrations, and the vegetation effects. These equations are based on our former study (Hatano and Hatano, 1997; Hatano et al., 1998) which successfully reproduce the long-term decrease of airborne concentration of the Chernobyl data such as Cs-137, Cs-134, Ce-144, and Ru-106 over nearly a decade. The first equation of the present study is essentially the same as our previous studies, besides that we added a new term for deposition. The second equation is newly added in the present study which describes the behavior of the surface concentration. In Fukushima case, we found that the radiation risk is much higher than the airborne concentration. That is why we add the second equation. Since the new model requires parameter values of Λs we need to estimate these values from actual data. In order to do so, we apply the method of inverse problem and thereby estimate the values. We also do the spectral analysis of the dose rate (mainly from Cs-137, -134) and study if it is possible to estimate the resuspended amount from the ground surface.

  19. Use of Cokriging to Improve Spatial Resolution of Ambient Airborne Contaminant Concentration Estimates in Detroit and Windsor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, L. D.; Bobryk, S. M.; Xu, X.

    2010-12-01

    A combination of active and passive air sampling devices was deployed to measure ambient air quality over a two-week period during September 2008 in Detroit, Michigan, USA and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Passive diffusion monitors were used to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and 26 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 100 sampling sites with an approximate spacing of 1 per 5 km2. Active samplers utilizing a pump were collocated at 50 of the passive sites to sample particulate matter (PM) and 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at an approximate sample density of 1 per 10 km2. The field campaign yielded acceptable data at 98 of the 100 passive monitoring sites. However, pump failures and power outages limited acceptable data to only 38 out of 50 active sites and the intended spatial coverage was not achieved. The utility of cokriging was therefore investigated as a means of improving PAH and PM concentration estimates by using more densely spaced passive sampler analyte concentrations as secondary information. Moderate positive correlation coefficients (p<0.05) were observed between total PAHs and NO2 (0.603), total PAHs and benzene (0.502), and PM1-2.5 and NO2 (0.555) in the study area, suggesting that NO2 and benzene could be used as non-exhaustive secondary data for cokriging. Variogram analysis was performed to specify the cross-covariance structure between each pair of pollutants using a linear model of coregionalization. Concentration maps produced through both ordinary kriging (OK) and ordinary cokriging (OCK) were compared and statistical metrics were used to quantify improvement in estimates for sampled points attributable to cokriging. Scatter plots of measured vs. estimated values indicate that both OK and OCK were able to reliably predict concentrations near measurement points. Modest improvement in cross validation correlation coefficients and residual error statistics were observed for PAH cokriged with NO2 and benzene

  20. Assessment of chlorophyll-a concentration in the Gulf of Riga using hyperspectral airborne and simulated Sentinel-3 OLCI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Brauns, Agris; Filipovs, Jevgenijs; Taskovs, Juris; Fedorovicha, Dagnija; Paavel, Birgot; Ligi, Martin; Kutser, Tiit

    2016-08-01

    Remote sensing has proved to be an accurate and reliable tool in clear water environments like oceans or the Mediterranean Sea. However, the current algorithms and methods usually fail on optically complex waters like coastal and inland waters. The whole Baltic Sea can be considered as optically complex coastal waters. Remote assessment of water quality parameters (eg., chlorophyll-a concentration) is of interest for monitoring of marine environment, but hasn't been used as a routine approach in Latvia. In this study, two simultaneous hyperspectral airborne data and in situ measurement campaigns were performed in the Gulf of Riga near the River Daugava mouth in summer 2015 to simulate Sentinel-3 data and test existing algorithms for retrieval of Level 2 Water products. Comparison of historical data showed poor overall correlation between in situ measurements and MERIS chlorophyll-a data products. Better correlation between spectral chl-a data products and in situ water sampling measurements was achieved during simultaneous airborne and field campaign resulting in R2 up to 0.94 for field spectral data, R2 of 0.78 for airborne data. Test of all two band ratio combinations showed that R2 could be improved from 0.63 to 0.94 for hyperspectral airborne data choosing 712 and 728 nm bands instead of 709 and 666 nm, and R2 could be improved from 0.61 to 0.83 for simulated Sentinel-3 OLCI data choosing Oa10 and Oa8 bands instead of Oa11 and Oa8. Repeated campaigns are planned during spring and summer blooms 2016 in the Gulf of Riga to get larger data set for validation and evaluate repeatability. The main challenges remain to acquire as good data as possible within rapidly changing environment and often cloudy weather conditions.

  1. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  2. Correlation between airborne Olea europaea pollen concentrations and levels of the major allergen Ole e 1 in Córdoba, Spain, 2012-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, M. P.; Alcázar, P.; Galán, C.

    2016-12-01

    Olea europaea L. pollen is the second-largest cause of pollinosis in the southern Iberian Peninsula. Airborne-pollen monitoring networks provide essential data on pollen dynamics over a given study area. Recent research, however, has shown that airborne pollen levels alone do not always provide a clear indicator of actual exposure to aeroallergens. This study sought to evaluate correlations between airborne concentrations of olive pollen and Ole e 1 allergen levels in Córdoba (southern Spain), in order to determine whether atmospheric pollen concentrations alone are sufficient to chart changes in hay fever symptoms. The influence of major weather-related variables on local airborne pollen and allergen levels was also examined. Monitoring was carried out from 2012 to 2014. Pollen sampling was performed using a Hirst-type sampler, following the protocol recommended by the Spanish Aerobiology Network. A multi-vial cyclone sampler was used to collect aeroallergens, and allergenic particles were quantified by ELISA assay. Significant positive correlations were found between daily airborne allergen levels and atmospheric pollen concentrations, although there were occasions when allergen was detected before and after the pollen season and in the absence of airborne pollen. The correlation between the two was irregular, and pollen potency displayed year-on-year variations and did not necessarily match pollen-season-intensity.

  3. Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

  4. Airborne Particulate Matter in Two Multi-Family Green Buildings: Concentrations and Effect of Ventilation and Occupant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Allison P.; Calderon, Leonardo; Xiong, Youyou; Wang, Zuocheng; Senick, Jennifer; Sorensen Allacci, MaryAnn; Plotnik, Deborah; Wener, Richard; Andrews, Clinton J.; Krogmann, Uta; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    There are limited data on air quality parameters, including airborne particulate matter (PM) in residential green buildings, which are increasing in prevalence. Exposure to PM is associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, and since Americans spend almost 90% of their time indoors, residential exposures may substantially contribute to overall airborne PM exposure. Our objectives were to: (1) measure various PM fractions longitudinally in apartments in multi-family green buildings with natural (Building E) and mechanical (Building L) ventilation; (2) compare indoor and outdoor PM mass concentrations and their ratios (I/O) in these buildings, taking into account the effects of occupant behavior; and (3) evaluate the effect of green building designs and operations on indoor PM. We evaluated effects of ventilation, occupant behaviors, and overall building design on PM mass concentrations and I/O. Median PMTOTAL was higher in Building E (56 µg/m3) than in Building L (37 µg/m3); I/O was higher in Building E (1.3–2.0) than in Building L (0.5–0.8) for all particle size fractions. Our data show that the building design and occupant behaviors that either produce or dilute indoor PM (e.g., ventilation systems, combustion sources, and window operation) are important factors affecting residents’ exposure to PM in residential green buildings. PMID:26805862

  5. Airborne Particulate Matter in Two Multi-Family Green Buildings: Concentrations and Effect of Ventilation and Occupant Behavior.

    PubMed

    Patton, Allison P; Calderon, Leonardo; Xiong, Youyou; Wang, Zuocheng; Senick, Jennifer; Sorensen Allacci, MaryAnn; Plotnik, Deborah; Wener, Richard; Andrews, Clinton J; Krogmann, Uta; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2016-01-20

    There are limited data on air quality parameters, including airborne particulate matter (PM) in residential green buildings, which are increasing in prevalence. Exposure to PM is associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, and since Americans spend almost 90% of their time indoors, residential exposures may substantially contribute to overall airborne PM exposure. Our objectives were to: (1) measure various PM fractions longitudinally in apartments in multi-family green buildings with natural (Building E) and mechanical (Building L) ventilation; (2) compare indoor and outdoor PM mass concentrations and their ratios (I/O) in these buildings, taking into account the effects of occupant behavior; and (3) evaluate the effect of green building designs and operations on indoor PM. We evaluated effects of ventilation, occupant behaviors, and overall building design on PM mass concentrations and I/O. Median PMTOTAL was higher in Building E (56 µg/m³) than in Building L (37 µg/m³); I/O was higher in Building E (1.3-2.0) than in Building L (0.5-0.8) for all particle size fractions. Our data show that the building design and occupant behaviors that either produce or dilute indoor PM (e.g., ventilation systems, combustion sources, and window operation) are important factors affecting residents' exposure to PM in residential green buildings.

  6. Airborne concentrations of trivalent and hexavalent chromium from contaminated soils at unpaved and partially paved commercial/industrial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Falerios, M.; Schild, K. ); Sheehan, P.; Paustenbach, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This method described was used to quantify airborne Cr(VI) levels at both indoor and outdoor locations at 21 sites in Hudson County, New Jersey which have soils containing chromite ore processing residue. Of the 21 sites evaluated, nine were unpaved or partially paved industrial/commercial sites or roadways with a moderate to high level of heavy truck traffic. Most of the remainder were commercial facilities with partially paved or unpaved parking lots and only light vehicle traffic. In addition, 15 residential sites in the area which do not have contaminated soil were sampled to characterized background levels of Cr(VI). The overall arithmetic mean values for indoor and outdoor Cr(VI) in total suspended particulates at the 12 industrial sites were 3.0 ng/m{sup 3} and 9.9ng/m{sup 3}, respectively. The indoor Cr(VI) concentrations measured at the 15 residential sites ranged from 0.38 to 3.3 ng/m{sup 3}. Airborne Cr(VI) levels outdoors at sites with chromite ore residue appear to be primarily influenced by the level of local vehicle traffic. Measured outdoor concentrations at sites with light vehicle traffic were generally low, within the range of levels measured indoors at the residential sites, and not strongly influenced by Cr(VI) concentrations in surface soils. At sites with a high rate of vehicle traffic, outdoor Cr(VI) concentrations exceeded background levels only on days when surface soils were dry. The average concentrations measured at these sites were more than 5,000-times lower than the current occupational exposure limit for Cr(VI) (TLV = 0.05 mg/m{sup 3}).

  7. Airborne asbestos concentration from brake changing does not exceed permissible exposure limit.

    PubMed

    Blake, Charles L; Van Orden, Drew R; Banasik, Marek; Harbison, Raymond D

    2003-08-01

    The use in the past, and to a lesser extent today, of chrysotile asbestos in automobile brake systems causes health concerns among professional mechanics. Therefore, we conducted four separate tests in order to evaluate an auto mechanic's exposure to airborne asbestos fibers while performing routine brake maintenance. Four nearly identical automobiles from 1960s having four wheel drum brakes were used. Each automobile was fitted with new replacement asbestos-containing brake shoes and then driven over a predetermined public road course for about 2253 km. Then, each car was separately brought into a repair facility; the brakes removed and replaced with new asbestos-containing shoes. The test conditions, methods, and tools were as commonly used during the 1960s. The mechanic was experienced in brake maintenance, having worked in the automobile repair profession beginning in the 1960s. Effects of three independent variables, e.g., filing, sanding, and arc grinding of the replacement brake shoe elements, were tested. Personal and area air samples were collected and analyzed for the presence of fibers, asbestos fibers, total dust, and respirable dust. The results indicated a presence in the air of only chrysotile asbestos and an absence of other types of asbestos. Airborne chrysotile fiber exposures for each test remained below currently applicable limit of 0.1 fiber/ml (eight-hour time-weighted average).

  8. Evaluation of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation in reducing the airborne cultural bacteria concentrations in an elementary school in the Midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunxiao; Lau, Josephine; Gibbs, Shawn G

    2015-05-01

    This article describes a casestudythe authors conducted in an elementary school in the Midwest. The objective was to evaluate the performance of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UGVI) to reduce the bioaerosol concentration in a classroom. Two fourth grade classrooms with the same dimensions were studied. One classroom was designated as the UVGI group and the other as the control group. Two-stage Tisch culturable impactors were utilized for collecting airborne bacteria with monthly samples collected from October 2012 to January 2013. Nonparametric methods were applied and p-values smaller than .05 were deemed significant. The concentrations of airborne cultural bacteria with a smaller size (1-8 pm) and the total bacterial concentrations from the UVGI classroom were significantly lower than those of the control room in three of four sampling months. These results could provide the preliminary results necessary to determine the effectiveness of upper-room UVGI in reducing the concentration of airborne cultural bacteria in classrooms and other buildings.

  9. Assessment of EOS Aqua AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice Concentrations using Landsat-7 and Airborne Microwave Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Markus, Thorsten; Hall, Dorothy K.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Klein, Marian; Ivanoff, Alvaro

    2006-01-01

    An assessment of Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) sea ice concentrations under winter conditions using ice concentrations derived from Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery obtained during the March 2003 Arctic sea ice validation field campaign is presented. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory's Airborne Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer Measurements, which were made from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration P 3B aircraft during the campaign, were used primarily as a diagnostic tool to understand the comparative results and to suggest improvements to the AMSR-E ice concentration algorithm. Based on the AMSR-E/ETM+ comparisons, a good overall agreement with little bias (approx. 1%) for areas of first year and young sea ice was found. Areas of new ice production result in a negative bias of about 5% in the AMSR-E ice concentration retrievals, with a root mean square error of 8%. Some areas of deep snow also resulted in an underestimate of the ice concentration (approx. 10%). For all ice types combined and for the full range of ice concentrations, the bias ranged from 0% to 3%, and the rms errors ranged from 1% to 7%, depending on the region. The new-ice and deep-snow biases are expected to be reduced through an adjustment of the new-ice and ice-type C algorithm tie points.

  10. Concomitant aerobic biodegradation of benzene and thiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Dyreborg, S.; Arvin, E.; Broholm, K.

    1998-05-01

    The concomitant aerobic biodegradation of benzene and thiophene was investigated in microcosm experiments using a groundwater enrichment culture. Benzene was biodegraded within 1 d, whereas thiophene could not be biodegraded as the sole source of carbon and energy. Some interesting phenomena were observed when both benzene and thiophene were present. In most cases, removal of thiophene was observed, and the removal occurred concomitantly with the biodegradation of benzene, suggesting that benzene was used as a primary substrate in the cometabolic biodegradation of thiophene. No biodegradation of the two compounds was observed for some combinations of concentrations, suggesting that thiophene could act as an inhibitor to benzene biodegradation. However, this effect could be overcome if more benzene was added to the microcosm. Residual concentrations of benzene and thiophene were observed in some microcosms and the data indicated that the biodegradation of the two compounds stopped when a critical threshold ratio between the concentrations of thiophene and benzene was reached. This ratio varied between 10 and 20. Results from modeling the biodegradation data suggested that thiophene was cometabolized concomitantly with the biodegradation of benzene and that the biodegradation may be described by a modified model based on a traditional model with an inhibition term incorporated.

  11. Benzene toxicity and risk assessment, 1972-1992: implications for future regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Paustenbach, D J; Bass, R D; Price, P

    1993-01-01

    Acute and chronic exposure to benzene vapors poses a number of health hazards to humans. To evaluate the probability that a specific degree of exposure will produce an adverse effect, risk assessment methods must be used. This paper reviews much of the published information and evaluates the various risk assessments for benzene that have been conducted over the past 20 years. There is sufficient evidence that chronic exposure to relatively high concentrations of benzene can produce an increased incidence of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Some studies have indicated that benzene may cause other leukemias, but due to the inconsistency of results, the evidence is not conclusive. To predict the leukemogenic risk for humans exposed to much lower doses of benzene than those observed in most epidemiology studies, a model must be used. Although several models could yield plausible results, to date most risk assessments have used the linear-quadratic or conditional logistic models. These appear to be the most appropriate ones for providing the cancer risk for airborne concentrations of 1 ppb to 10 ppm, the range most often observed in the community and workplace. Of the seven major epidemiology studies that have been conducted, there is a consensus that the Pliofilm cohort (rubber workers) is the best one for estimating the cancer potency because it is the only one with good exposure and incidence of disease data. The current EPA, OSHA, and ACGIH cancer potency estimates for benzene are based largely on this cohort. A retrospective exposure assessment and an analysis of the incidence of disease in these workers were completed in 1991. All of these issues are discussed and the implications evaluated in this paper. The range of benzene exposures to which Americans are commonly exposed and the current regulatory criteria are also presented. PMID:8020442

  12. Airborne black carbon concentrations over an urban region in western India-temporal variability, effects of meteorology, and source regions.

    PubMed

    Bapna, Mukund; Sunder Raman, Ramya; Ramachandran, S; Rajesh, T A

    2013-03-01

    This study characterizes over 5 years of high time resolution (5 min), airborne black carbon (BC) concentrations (July 2003 to December 2008) measured over Ahmedabad, an urban region in western India. The data were used to obtain different time averages of BC concentrations, and these averages were then used to assess the diurnal, seasonal, and annual variability of BC over the study region. Assessment of diurnal variations revealed a strong association between BC concentrations and vehicular traffic. Peaks in BC concentration were co-incident with the morning (0730 to 0830, LST) and late evening (1930 to 2030, LST) rush hour traffic. Additionally, diurnal variability in BC concentrations during major festivals (Diwali and Dushera during the months of October/November) revealed an increase in BC concentrations due to fireworks displays. Maximum half hourly BC concentrations during the festival days were as high as 79.8 μg m(-3). However, the high concentrations rapidly decayed suggesting that local meteorology during the festive season was favorable for aerosol dispersion. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model with BC as the dependent variable and meteorological parameters as independent variables was fitted. The variability in temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction accounted for about 49% of the variability in measured BC concentrations. Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis was used to identify the geographical location of local source regions contributing to the effective BC measured (at 880 nm) at the receptor site. The east north-east (ENE) direction to the receptor was identified as a major source region. National highway (NH8) and two coal-fired thermal power stations (at Gandhinagar and Sabarmati) were located in the identified direction, suggesting that local traffic and power plant emissions were likely contributors to the measured BC.

  13. Mining in subarctic Canada: airborne PM2.5 metal concentrations in two remote First Nations communities.

    PubMed

    Liberda, Eric N; Tsuji, Leonard J S; Peltier, Richard E

    2015-11-01

    Airborne particulate matter arising from upwind mining activities is a concern for First Nations communities in the western James Bay region of Ontario, Canada. Aerosol chemical components were collected in 2011 from two communities in northern Ontario. The chemical and mass concentration data of particulate matter collected during this study shows a significant difference in PM2.5 in Attawapiskat compared to Fort Albany. Elemental profiles indicate enhanced levels of some tracers thought to arise from mining activities, such as, K, Ni, and crustal materials. Both communities are remote and isolated from urban and industrial pollution sources, however, Attawapiskat First Nation has significantly enhanced levels of particulate matter, and it is likely that some of this arises from upwind mining activities.

  14. Alternative statistical methods for interpreting airborne Alder ( Alnus glutimosa (L.) Gaertner) pollen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Parrado, Zulima; Valencia Barrera, Rosa M.; Fuertes Rodríguez, Carmen R.; Vega Maray, Ana M.; Pérez Romero, Rafael; Fraile, Roberto; Fernández González, Delia

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the behaviour of Alnus glutinosa (alder) pollen grains in the atmosphere of Ponferrada (León, NW Spain) from 1995 to 2006. The study, which sought to determine the effects of various weather-related parameters on Alnus pollen counts, was performed using a volumetric method. The main pollination period for this taxon is January-February. Alder pollen is one of the eight major airborne pollen allergens found in the study area. An analysis was made of the correlation between pollen counts and major weather-related parameters over each period. In general, the strongest positive correlation was with temperature, particularly maximum temperature. During each period, peak pollen counts occurred when the maximum temperature fell within the range 9°C-14°C. Finally, multivariate analysis showed that the parameter exerting the greatest influence was temperature, a finding confirmed by Spearman correlation tests. Principal components analysis suggested that periods with high pollen counts were characterised by high maximum temperature, low rainfall and an absolute humidity of around 6 g m-3. Use of this type of analysis in conjunction with other methods is essential for obtaining an accurate record of pollen-count variations over a given period.

  15. The use of acetylene and 1,3-butadiene as tracers for vehicular combustion in urban air and the estimation of the contributions of vehicular emissions to benzene, and alkane concentrations in the Edmonton industrial area

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.; Wong, R.; Dann, T.; Wang, D.

    1998-12-31

    Acetylene, propylene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations at two downtown urban sites in Alberta, Canada were used to characterize an area dominated by vehicular emissions. The relationship of acetylene with 1,3-butadiene at the Edmonton industrial site was similar to that observed for the two downtown sites. This suggesting that these volatile organic compounds, VOCs, can be used as tracers for vehicular emissions for the Edmonton industrial area. The tracer VOCs were found to correlate with benzene, n-butane, iso-butane, n-pentane, iso-pentane, n-heptane and n-octane concentrations for the two Alberta downtown sites. The best fit lines from the downtown sites were used to predict daily concentrations of benzene and alkanes at the Edmonton industrial site. During the winter, when benzene levels are predicted to reach a maximum of 4.5 to 6.5 m g/m{sup 3}, it is estimated that industrial sources contribute < 1 m g/m{sup 3} to ambient levels at the Edmonton industrial site. During the summer, when predicted benzene levels are at a minimum of 1 to 2 m g/m{sup 3}, industrial area sources dominate the ambient benzene levels at the Edmonton industrial site, and can contribute up to 6 m g/m{sup 3}. For alkanes, such as butane and pentane, industrial area sources or evaporative storage tank emissions dominate throughout the year. This dominance of industrial sources is also observed for n-heptane and n-octane during summer months. During the winter when predicted n-heptane and n-octane concentrations reach a maximum, 11 to 100% of ambient daily levels can be attributed to vehicular emissions.

  16. Benzene in blood and phenol in urine in monitoring benzene exposure in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Braier, L.; Levy, A.; Dror, K.; Pardo, A.

    1981-01-01

    Determinations of benzene concentration in blood and of phenol in urine were made by head-space gas chromatography techniques on samples taken near the end of the work day from two groups of workers potentially exposed to low levels of benzene in the work-place atmosphere. Preliminary results suggest that benzene in blood is more reliable than phenol tests for assessing both exposure and uptake of benzene. Normal values of phenol in urine (10 mg/liter or less) were found in nearly all those cases in which benzene was detected in the blood.

  17. DNA damage in lymphocytes of benzene exposed workers correlates with trans,trans-muconic acids and breath benzene levels.

    PubMed

    Sul, Donggeun; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Mi-Young; Oh, Eunha; Im, Hosub; Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Woon-Won; Won, Namhee; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Eun-Mi; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2005-04-04

    Benzene causes many kinds of blood disorders in workers employed in many different environments. These diseases include myelodisplastic syndrome and acute and chronic myelocytic leukemia. In the present study, five occupational work places, including six industrial process types, namely, printing, shoe-making, methylene di-aniline (MDA), nitrobenzene, carbomer, and benzene production were selected, and the levels of breath benzene, and trans,trans-muconic acids (t,t-MA) and phenol in urine were evaluated, as well as hematological changes and lymphocyte DNA damage. The concentration of benzene in breath was less than 3 ppm in the workplaces, and benzene exposure was found to be higher in work places where benzene is used, than in those where benzene is produced. At low levels of benzene exposure, urinary t,t-MA correlated strongly with benzene in air. Highest Olive tail moments were found in workers producing carbomer. Levels of breathzone benzene were found to be strongly correlated with Olive tail moment values in the lymphocytes of workers, but not with hematological data in the six workplaces types. In conclusion, the highest benzene exposures found occurred in workers at a company, which utilized benzene in the production of carbomer. In terms of low levels of exposure to benzene, urinary t,t-MA and DNA damage exhibited a strong correlation with breath benzene, but not with hematological data. We conclude that breath benzene, t,t-MA and lymphocytic DNA damage are satisfactory biomonitoring markers with respect to benzene exposure in the workplace.

  18. Potential artifacts associated with historical preparation of joint compound samples and reported airborne asbestos concentrations.

    PubMed

    Brorby, G P; Sheehan, P J; Berman, D W; Bogen, K T; Holm, S E

    2011-05-01

    Airborne samples collected in the 1970s for drywall workers using asbestos-containing joint compounds were likely prepared and analyzed according to National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Method P&CAM 239, the historical precursor to current Method 7400. Experimentation with a re-created, chrysotile-containing, carbonate-based joint compound suggested that analysis following sample preparation by the historical vs. current method produces different fiber counts, likely because of an interaction between the different clearing and mounting chemicals used and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix. Differences were also observed during analysis using Method 7402, depending on whether acetic acid/dimethylformamide or acetone was used during preparation to collapse the filter. Specifically, air samples of sanded chrysotile-containing joint compound prepared by the historical method yielded fiber counts significantly greater (average of 1.7-fold, 95% confidence interval: 1.5- to 2.0-fold) than those obtained by the current method. In addition, air samples prepared by Method 7402 using acetic acid/dimethylformamide yielded fiber counts that were greater (2.8-fold, 95% confidence interval: 2.5- to 3.2-fold) than those prepared by this method using acetone. These results indicated (1) there is an interaction between Method P&CAM 239 preparation chemicals and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix that reveals fibers that were previously bound in the matrix, and (2) the same appeared to be true for Method 7402 preparation chemicals acetic acid/dimethylformamide. This difference in fiber counts is the opposite of what has been reported historically for samples of relatively pure chrysotile dusts prepared using the same chemicals. This preparation artifact should be considered when interpreting historical air samples for drywall workers prepared by Method P&CAM 239.

  19. Biofiltration control of VOC and air toxic emissions: n-Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    n-Butane and benzene vapors are routinely observed in urban atmospheres. Their presence in urban airsheds is of concern because of their ozone production potential as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and/or potential toxicity. Also, these saturated hydrocarbons are representative of airborne aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Separate laboratory studies have been conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) from airstreams using treated compost biofilters. The removal efficiencies were found to exceed 90% for a conditioned biofilter medium and pollutant low concentrations (< 25 ppm) and zeroth order kinetics at higher concentrations (> 100 ppm), whereas benzene vapor elimination followed zeroth order kinetics at concentrations up to 200 ppm. The maximum n-butane and benzene elimination capacities observed for the compost biofilters and conditions employed were 25 and 70 g pollutant m{sup -3} h{sup -1}, respectively. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E; McHale, Cliona M; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R; Smith, Martyn T

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings.

  1. Characterization of Changes in Gene Expression and Biochemical Pathways at Low Levels of Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24786086

  2. Historical ambient airborne asbestos concentrations in the United States - an analysis of published and unpublished literature (1960s-2000s).

    PubMed

    Abelmann, Anders; Glynn, Meghan E; Pierce, Jennifer S; Scott, Paul K; Serrano, Samantha; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor concentrations of airborne asbestos have been measured throughout the US over time. However, a thorough review and analysis of these data has not been conducted. The purpose of this study is to characterize asbestos concentrations in ambient air by environment type (urban, rural) and by decade, using measurements collected in the absence of known asbestos emission sources. A total of 17 published and unpublished studies and datasets were identified that reported the results of 2058 samples collected from the 1960s through the 2000s across the US. Most studies did not report asbestos fiber type, and data based on different analytical methods (e.g. Phase Contrast Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, etc.) were combined in the dataset; however, only fibers ≥5 μm in length were considered. For a small subset of the measurements (n = 186, 9.0%), a conversion factor was used to convert mass-based data (e.g. ng/m(3)) to count-based values (i.e. f/cc ≥5 μm). The estimated overall mean and median ambient asbestos concentrations for the 1960s through 2000s were 0.00093 f/cc and 0.00022 f/cc, respectively. Concentrations generally increased from the 1960s through the early 1980s, after which they declined considerably. While asbestos use decreased throughout the 1970s, these results indicate that ambient concentrations peaked during the early 1980s, which suggests the possible contribution of abatement or demolition activities. Lastly, ambient asbestos concentrations were higher in urban than rural settings, which is consistent with the greater use of asbestos-containing materials in more densely populated areas.

  3. Application of the urinary S-phenylmercapturic acid test as a biomarker for low levels of exposure to benzene in industry.

    PubMed Central

    van Sittert, N J; Boogaard, P J; Beulink, G D

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the determination of S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) in urine has been proposed as a suitable biomarker for the monitoring of low level exposures to benzene. In the study reported here, the test has been validated in 12 separate studies in chemical manufacturing plants, oil refineries, and natural gas production plants. Parameters studied were the urinary excretion characteristics of S-PMA, the specificity and the sensitivity of the assay, and the relations between exposures to airborne benzene and urinary S-PMA concentrations and between urinary phenol and S-PMA concentrations. The range of exposures to benzene was highest in workers in chemical manufacturing plants and in workers cleaning tanks or installations containing benzene as a component of natural gas condensate. Urinary S-PMA concentrations were measured up to 543 micrograms/g creatinine. Workers' exposures to benzene were lowest in oil refineries and S-PMA concentrations were comparable with those in smoking or nonsmoking control persons (most below the detection limit of 1 to 5 micrograms/g creatinine). In most workers S-PMA was excreted in a single phase and the highest S-PMA concentrations were at the end of an eight hour shift. The average half life of elimination was 9.0 (SD 4.5) hours (31 workers). Tentatively, in five workers a second phase of elimination was found with an average half life of 45 (SD 4) hours. A strong correlation was found between eight hour exposure to airborne benzene of 1 mg/m3 (0.3 ppm) and higher and urinary S-PMA concentrations in end of shift samples. It was calculated that an eight hour benzene exposure of 3.25 mg/m3 (1 ppm) corresponds to an average S-PMA concentration of 46 micrograms/g creatinine (95% confidence interval 41-50 micrograms/g creatinine). A strong correlation was also found between urinary phenol and S-PMA concentrations. At a urinary phenol concentration of 50 mg/g creatinine, corresponding to an eight hour benzene exposure of 32.5 mg/m3 (10

  4. Statistical distributions of airborne PCB and pesticide concentrations measured at regional sites on the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Gatz, D.F.; Sweet, C.W.; Basu, I.; Harlin, K.S.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to report results of testing measured concentrations of total PCBs and ten chlorinated pesticides in air and precipitation in the Great Lakes area for goodness-of-fit to the log normal distribution. Samples were collected at sites on Lakes Superior, Michigan, Erie, and Ontario in 1991--1993. With very few exceptions, distributions of concentrations in the gas and particle phases and in precipitation were not significantly different from log normal.

  5. National and regional distributions of airborne radon concentrations in US homes

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinowski, F.; Lucas, R.M.; Yeager, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    The National Residential Radon Survey was conducted during 1989 and 1990 to provide data on the frequency distribution of annual average radon concentrations in U.S. residences nationwide, in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency defined Regions, and in subgroups of the housing stock. The National Residential Radon Survey also provided housing and demographic data and a preliminary assessment of the relationship of housing and geographical characteristics to residential radon concentrations. This paper focuses solely on the national and regional estimates of annual average radon concentrations. A stratified, three-stage sampling procedure was used to select housing units for the survey. Data were collected through personal interviews with residents and placement of alpha track detectors in each level of the residences for 12 mo. The survey found an arithmetic annual average radon concentration in U.S. homes of 46.3 {plus_minus} 4.4 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (1.25 {plus_minus} 0.12 pCi L{sup {minus}}). About 6.0 {plus_minus} 1.4% of homes (5.8 million) had radon levels greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s action level for mitigation of 148 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (4 pCi L{sup {minus}1}). Concentrations varied significantly across Environmental Protection Agency Regions. A lognormal distribution was found to closely approximate the major distributions of radon concentrations. 9 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Spatial variations in airborne microorganism and endotoxin concentrations at green waste composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, L J; Deacon, L J; Liu, J; Drew, G H; Hayes, E T; Jackson, S; Longhurst, P J; Longhurst, J W S; Pollard, S J T; Tyrrel, S F

    2011-09-01

    The emission and dispersal of bioaerosols from open-air commercial composting facilities continues to be contentious. A meta-dataset enumerating cultivable microorganism emission and downwind concentrations is not yet available. A dataset derived from repeated and replicated field studies over a period of two years at two commercial composting facilities is presented. The data characterises patterns in Aspergillus fumigatus, actinomycetes, Gram-negative bacteria and endotoxin emission and downwind concentrations. For all bioaerosols, compost agitation activities had a significant impact on concentrations; levels were variable up to 600 m downwind from site. Bioaerosols declined rapidly from source and exhibited a secondary peak 100-150 m from site boundary. All bioaerosols were found downwind from site in elevated concentrations. Compared to those found 100 m upwind, levels were significantly higher at 180 m downwind for A. fumigatus; at 300-400 m for actinomycetes and Gram negative bacteria, and at 100 m for endotoxins. Periodically, elevated concentrations could be found for all bioaerosols at distances further downwind. The evidence provided by this data set provides operators and regulators of facilities with reliable data to inform the location, risk assessment and bioaerosol sampling strategies of commercial composting facilities.

  7. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  8. Large-scale radon hazard evaluation in the Oslofjord region of Norway utilizing indoor radon concentrations, airborne gamma ray spectrometry and geological mapping.

    PubMed

    Smethurst, Mark Andrew; Strand, Terje; Sundal, Aud Venke; Rudjord, Anne Liv

    2008-12-15

    We test whether airborne gamma ray spectrometer measurements can be used to estimate levels of radon hazard in the Oslofjord region of Norway. We compile 43,000 line kilometres of gamma ray spectrometer data from 8 airborne surveys covering 10,000 km2 and compare them with 6326 indoor radon measurements. We find a clear spatial correlation between areas with elevated concentrations of uranium daughters in the near surface of the ground and regions with high incidence of elevated radon concentrations in dwellings. This correlation permits cautious use of the airborne data in radon hazard evaluation where direct measurements of indoor radon concentrations are few or absent. In radon hazard evaluation there is a natural synergy between the mapping of radon in indoor air, bedrock and drift geology mapping and airborne gamma ray surveying. We produce radon hazard forecast maps for the Oslofjord region based on a spatial union of hazard indicators from all four of these data sources. Indication of elevated radon hazard in any one of the data sets leads to the classification of a region as having an elevated radon hazard potential. This approach is inclusive in nature and we find that the majority of actual radon hazards lie in the assumed elevated risk regions.

  9. Measurement of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Airborne Particulate Matter at Low Concentrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Soil & Water Colorimetric (diphenylcarbazide) 7199 Hexavalent Chromium by Ion Chromatography 218.6 Low level chelation & extraction NATTS...Hexane:Dichloromethane:Methanol Dionex ASE 200 Sample Concentration Evaporation in Ultrapure Nitrogen Stream Zymark Turbovap Solid Phase Extraction Supelco Custom...Glass Silica SPE Cartridge 1% Dichloromethane + 1% Acetone in Hexane GCMS Analysis Conventional Splitless Injection Selective Ion Monitoring

  10. Integrity of Lichen Cell Membranes in Relation to Concentration of Airborne Elements

    PubMed

    Garty; Kloog; Cohen

    1998-02-01

    This study dealt with the impact of air pollution on the integrity of cell membranes in the lichen Ramalina duriaei. The lichen was transplanted from a relatively unpolluted site in Israel to more polluted sites, adjacent to a 40-year-old town, for a period of 10 months. The concentrations of K, B, Al, Cr, Fe, Si, Ti, Zn, P, Ba, Cu, Mg, Na, Pb, Ca, Mn, Sr, and S in lichen thalli were compared with injury caused to the cell membranes. The study indicates that electric conductivity reflects adequately cellular injury to lichen thalli transplanted to sites near a motorway, an oil-fueled power plant and a rural community (a kibbutz). The concentrations of S, B, Al, Cr, Fe, Si, Ti, and Zn correlated with injury in cell membranes of R. duriaei retrieved from the biomonitoring sites, whereas the concentration of K in the thalli correlated inversely with the electric conductivity parameter. Leakage of K from lichen thalli as a result of air pollutants is suggested. This K leakage correlates positively with concentrations of S and Cr in transplants of R. duriaei to the Ashdod region.

  11. An improved filter pack technique for airborne measurement of low concentrations of SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferek, Ronald J.; Hegg, Dean A.; Herring, John A.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1991-12-01

    Recent improvements to the carbonate-impregnated filter technique for measuring low-level SO2concentrations have resulted in dramatically improved performance. The improvements are (1) a better cleaning procedure for the paper filter substrates, resulting in approximately 60% reduction of their sulfate blank, (2) the use of an ion-exchange resin to remove the carbonate matrix from the sample extract, resulting in a 100% increase in the signal-to-noise ratio, (3) the use of high-purity glycerol in the filter impregnate, resulting in approximately 10% further reduction of blanks, and (4) improved Chromatographic and standardization procedures for more accurate quantification of sample peaks. Combined, these improvements allow measurements to be made of SO2 concentrations in marine background air with a 2σ uncertainty of ±6 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) and, based on this, a 3σ detection limit of 9 pptv for air volumes of 4 m3 (which can be collected in 15 min aboard our research aircraft). Measurements in polluted air show better than 95% collection efficiency, even at concentrations as high as 100 ppbv. Vertical profiles of SO2 measured during three research flights off the Washington coast (one in clean marine air) showed concentrations ranging from 15 to 86 pptv in the mixed layer and from 40 to 93 pptv in the free troposphere.

  12. Trends and threshold exceedances analysis of airborne pollen concentrations in Metropolitan Santiago Chile

    PubMed Central

    Toro A., Richard; Córdova J., Alicia; Canales, Mauricio; Morales S., Raul G. E.; Mardones P., Pedro; Leiva G., Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Pollen is one of the primary causes of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in urban centers. In the present study, the concentrations of 39 different pollens in the Santiago de Chile metropolitan area over the period 2009–2013 are characterized. The pollen was monitored daily using Burkard volumetric equipment. The contribution of each type of pollen and the corresponding time trends are evaluated. The concentrations of the pollens are compared with the established threshold levels for the protection of human health. The results show that the total amount of pollen grains originating from trees, grasses, weeds and indeterminate sources throughout the period of the study was 258,496 grains m-3, with an annual average of 51,699 ± 3,906 grains m-3 year-1. The primary source of pollen is Platanus orientalis, which produces 61.8% of the analyzed pollen. Grass pollen is the third primary component of the analyzed pollen, with a contribution of 5.82%. Among the weeds, the presence of Urticacea (3.74%) is remarkable. The pollination pattern of the trees is monophasic, and the grasses have a biphasic pattern. The trends indicate that the total pollen and tree pollen do not present a time trend that is statistically significant throughout the period of the study, whereas the grass pollen and weed pollen concentrations in the environment present a statistically significant decreasing trend. The cause of this decrease is unclear. The pollen load has doubled over the past decade. When the observed concentrations of the pollens were compared with the corresponding threshold levels, the results indicated that over the period of the study, the pollen concentrations were at moderate, high and very high levels for an average of 293 days per year. Systematic counts of the pollen grains are an essential method for diagnosing and treating patients with pollinosis and for developing forestation and urban planning strategies. PMID:25946339

  13. Trends and threshold exceedances analysis of airborne pollen concentrations in Metropolitan Santiago Chile.

    PubMed

    Toro A, Richard; Córdova J, Alicia; Canales, Mauricio; Morales S, Raul G E; Mardones P, Pedro; Leiva G, Manuel A

    2015-01-01

    Pollen is one of the primary causes of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in urban centers. In the present study, the concentrations of 39 different pollens in the Santiago de Chile metropolitan area over the period 2009-2013 are characterized. The pollen was monitored daily using Burkard volumetric equipment. The contribution of each type of pollen and the corresponding time trends are evaluated. The concentrations of the pollens are compared with the established threshold levels for the protection of human health. The results show that the total amount of pollen grains originating from trees, grasses, weeds and indeterminate sources throughout the period of the study was 258,496 grains m-3, with an annual average of 51,699 ± 3,906 grains m-3 year-1. The primary source of pollen is Platanus orientalis, which produces 61.8% of the analyzed pollen. Grass pollen is the third primary component of the analyzed pollen, with a contribution of 5.82%. Among the weeds, the presence of Urticacea (3.74%) is remarkable. The pollination pattern of the trees is monophasic, and the grasses have a biphasic pattern. The trends indicate that the total pollen and tree pollen do not present a time trend that is statistically significant throughout the period of the study, whereas the grass pollen and weed pollen concentrations in the environment present a statistically significant decreasing trend. The cause of this decrease is unclear. The pollen load has doubled over the past decade. When the observed concentrations of the pollens were compared with the corresponding threshold levels, the results indicated that over the period of the study, the pollen concentrations were at moderate, high and very high levels for an average of 293 days per year. Systematic counts of the pollen grains are an essential method for diagnosing and treating patients with pollinosis and for developing forestation and urban planning strategies.

  14. Benzene formation in electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Pankow, James F.; Kim, Kilsun; McWhirter, Kevin J.; Luo, Wentai; Escobedo, Jorge O.; Strongin, Robert M.; Duell, Anna K.; Peyton, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objective The heating of the fluids used in electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) used to create “vaping” aerosols is capable of causing a wide range of degradation reaction products. We investigated formation of benzene (an important human carcinogen) from e-cigarette fluids containing propylene glycol (PG), glycerol (GL), benzoic acid, the flavor chemical benzaldehyde, and nicotine. Methods/Main results Three e-cigarette devices were used: the JUULTM “pod” system (provides no user accessible settings other than flavor cartridge choice), and two refill tank systems that allowed a range of user accessible power settings. Benzene in the e-cigarette aerosols was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Benzene formation was ND (not detected) in the JUUL system. In the two tank systems benzene was found to form from propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (GL), and from the additives benzoic acid and benzaldehyde, especially at high power settings. With 50:50 PG+GL, for tank device 1 at 6W and 13W, the formed benzene concentrations were 1.9 and 750 μg/m3. For tank device 2, at 6W and 25W, the formed concentrations were ND and 1.8 μg/m3. With benzoic acid and benzaldehyde at ~10 mg/mL, for tank device 1, values at 13W were as high as 5000 μg/m3. For tank device 2 at 25W, all values were ≤~100 μg/m3. These values may be compared with what can be expected in a conventional (tobacco) cigarette, namely 200,000 μg/m3. Thus, the risks from benzene will be lower from e-cigarettes than from conventional cigarettes. However, ambient benzene air concentrations in the U.S. have typically been 1 μg/m3, so that benzene has been named the largest single known cancer-risk air toxic in the U.S. For non-smokers, chronically repeated exposure to benzene from e-cigarettes at levels such as 100 or higher μg/m3 will not be of negligible risk. PMID:28273096

  15. Modeling airborne benzo(a)pyrene concentrations in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalel, Amir; Yuval; Svecova, Vlasta; Sram, Radim J.; Bartonova, Alena; Broday, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are complex hazardous organic compounds that are introduced into the atmosphere as by-products of partial combustion processes. For common atmospheric conditions, the large molecular weight PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P), are found in the particulate phase and are believed to account for a considerable amount of the fine particulate matter toxic potential. Nonetheless, unlike meteorological variables and criteria pollutants, PAHs are very rarely monitored on a routine basis in most parts of the world. We present methodology for development and evaluation of a model for estimation of daily and monthly ambient B[a]P concentrations. The model utilizes a very large ambient B[a]P database from three sites in the Czech Republic. The difficulties faced when dealing with ambient PAH data are discussed. Model performance was evaluated by a complete internal-, external-, and temporal cross validations. The models reproduced very accurately monthly mean ambient B[a]P concentrations and provided acceptable daily mean B[a]P concentrations. Spatial extrapolations resulted in small deterioration of the models' performance. The temporal backward extrapolation revealed comparable errors to the spatial extrapolations in spite of the dramatic emissions reduction in the early years of the study period.

  16. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Kenyon, E.M.; Seaton, M.J.; Schlosser, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase 11 enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Climate impact on airborne particulate matter concentrations in California using seven year analysis periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, A.; Hixson, M.; Hu, J.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, S.; Kleeman, M. J.

    2010-02-01

    The effect of global climate change on the annual average concentration of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in California was studied using a climate - air quality modeling system composed of global through regional models. Output from the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM) generated under the "business as usual" global emissions scenario was downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model followed by air quality simulations using the UCD/CIT airshed model. The air quality simulations were carried out for the entire state of California with a resolution of 8-km for the years 2000-2006 (present climate) and 2047-2053 (future climate). The 7-year windows were chosen to properly account for annual variability with the added benefit that the air quality predictions under the present climate could be compared to actual measurements. The climate - air quality modeling system successfully predicted the spatial pattern of present climate PM2.5 concentrations in California but the absolute magnitude of the annual average PM2.5 concentrations were under-predicted by ~35-40% in the major air basins. The majority of this under-prediction was caused by excess ventilation predicted by PCM-WRF that should be present to the same degree in the current and future time periods so that the net bias introduced into the comparison is minimized. Surface temperature, relative humidity (RH), rain rate, and wind speed were predicted to increase in the future climate while the ultra violet (UV) radiation was predicted to decrease in major urban areas in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) and South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). These changes resulted in a ~0.6-1.9 μg m-3 decrease in predicted PM2.5 concentrations in coastal and central Los Angeles. Annual average PM2.5 concentrations were predicted to increase at certain locations within the SJV and the Sacramento Valley due to the effects of climate change, but a corresponding analysis of the annual variability showed that these

  18. The effect of meteorological factors on airborne Betula pollen concentrations in Lublin (Poland).

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Krystyna; Kubik-Komar, Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    The present study investigated the pattern of the birch atmospheric pollen seasons in Lublin in the period 2001-2010. Pollen monitoring was conducted using a Lanzoni VPPS 2000 sampler. The atmospheric pollen seasons were determined with the 98% method. Regression analysis was used to determine correlations between meteorological conditions and the pattern of the birch pollen season. On average, the birch pollen season started on 12 April, ended on 13 May, and lasted 32 days. The peak value and the Seasonal Pollen Index showed the greatest variation in particular years. All the seasons were right-skewed. During the study years, a trend was found towards earlier occurrence of the seasonal peak. Regression equations were developed for the following parameters of the atmospheric pollen season: start, duration, peak value and average pollen concentration during the season. The obtained model fit was at a level of 64-81%. Statistical analysis shows that minimum temperature of February and March and total rainfall in June in the year preceding pollen release have the greatest effect on the birch atmospheric pollen season in Lublin. Low temperatures in February promote the occurrence of high pollen concentrations.

  19. Deriving the concentration of airborne ash with a CAS-DPOL instrument: assessing uncertainties introduced by the instrument design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanu, Antonio; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Freudenthaler, Volker; Sauer, Daniel; Gasteiger, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of gas and particles into the atmosphere resulting in strong impacts on anthropic systems and climate. Fine ash particles in suspension, even if at low concentrations, are a serious aviation safety hazard. A key point to predict the dispersion and deposition of volcanic ash is the knowledge of emitted mass and its particle size distribution. Usually the deposit is used to characterize the source but a large uncertainty is present for fine and very fine ash particles which are usually not well preserved. Conversely, satellite observations provide only column-integrated information and are strongly sensitive to cloud conditions above the ash plumes. Consequently, in situ measurements are fundamental to extend our knowledge on ash clouds, their properties, and interactions over the vertical extent of the atmosphere. Different in-situ instruments are available covering different particle size ranges using a variety of measurement techniques. Depending on the measurement technique, artefacts due to instrument setup and ambient conditions can strongly modify the measured number concentration and size distribution of the airborne particles. It is fundamental to correct for those effects to quantify the uncertainty associated with the measurement. Here we evaluate the potential of our optical light-scattering spectrometer CAS-DPOL to detect airborne mineral dust and volcanic ash (in the size range between 0.7μm and 50μm) and to provide a reliable estimation of the mass concentration, investigating the associate uncertainty. The CAS-DPOL instrument sizes particles by detecting the light scattered off the particle into a defined angle. The associated uncertainty depends on the optical instrument design and on unknown particles characteristics such as shape and material. Indirect measurements of mass concentrations are statistically reconstructed using the air flow velocity. Therefore, the detected concentration is strongly

  20. Climate impact on airborne particulate matter concentrations in California using seven year analysis periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, A.; Hixson, M.; Hu, J.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, S.-H.; Kleeman, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    The effect of global climate change on the annual average concentration of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in California was studied using a climate-air quality modeling system composed of global through regional models. Output from the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM) generated under the "business as usual" global emissions scenario was downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model followed by air quality simulations using the UCD/CIT airshed model. The system represents major atmospheric processes acting on gas and particle phase species including meteorological effects on emissions, advection, dispersion, chemical reaction rates, gas-particle conversion, and dry/wet deposition. The air quality simulations were carried out for the entire state of California with a resolution of 8-km for the years 2000-2006 (present climate with present emissions) and 2047-2053 (future climate with present emissions). Each of these 7-year analysis periods was analyzed using a total of 1008 simulated days to span a climatologically relevant time period with a practical computational burden. The 7-year windows were chosen to properly account for annual variability with the added benefit that the air quality predictions under the present climate could be compared to actual measurements. The climate-air quality modeling system successfully predicted the spatial pattern of present climate PM2.5 concentrations in California but the absolute magnitude of the annual average PM2.5 concentrations were under-predicted by ~4-39% in the major air basins. The majority of this under-prediction was caused by excess ventilation predicted by PCM-WRF that should be present to the same degree in the current and future time periods so that the net bias introduced into the comparison is minimized. Surface temperature, relative humidity (RH), rain rate, and wind speed were predicted to increase in the future climate while the ultra violet (UV) radiation was predicted to decrease

  1. ITP Filtrate Benzene Removal Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    Existing ITP filtrate hold tanks may provide sufficient capacity and residence time to strip dissolved benzene from the incoming filtrate using nitrogen sparging in the bottom of the old tanks. This is based on equilibrium supported by late Wash test data using aged washed slurry. Theoretical considerations indicate that benzene stripping will be more difficult from the ITP unwashed high salt filtrates due to reduced mass transfer. Therefore experimental sparging data is needed to quantify the theoretical effects.Foaming limits which dictate allowable sparging rate will also have to be established. Sparging in the hold tanks will require installation of sintered metal spargers, and possibly stirrers and foam monitoring/disengagement equipment. The most critical sparging needs are at the start of the precipitation/concentration cycle, when the filtrate flux rate is the highest,and at the end of wash cycle where Henry`s equilibrium constant falls off,requiring more gas to sparge the dissolved benzene. With adequate recycle (for proper distribution) or sparging in the old tanks, the 30 inch column could be used for the complete ITP process. A courser packing would reduce back pressure while enabling benzene stripping. The Late Wash Tests indicate adequate benzene stripping even at reduced gas flow. This will require experimental verification under ITP conditions. Using the 30 in. column vs 18 in. during the wash cycle will enhance stripping without need for additional sparging provided the minimum flow requirements are met.

  2. Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether, benzene, and total hydrocarbons at the Singapore-Malaysia causeway immigration checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.; Ong, H.Y.; Kok, P.W.

    1996-12-31

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the extent and levels of exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile emissions in a group of immigration officers at a busy cross-border checkpoint. A majority (80%) of the workers monitored were exposed to benzene at levels between 0.01 and 0.5 ppm, with only 1.2% exceeding the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration occupational exposure limit of 1 ppm. The geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 8-hr time-weighted average exposure were 0.03 ppm, 0.9 ppm, and 2.46 ppm for methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene, and total hydrocarbons (THC), respectively. The highest time-weighted average concentrations measured were 1.05 ppm for MTBE, 2.01 ppm for benzene, and 34 ppm for THC. It was found that motorbikes emitted a more significant amount of pollutants compared with motor cars. On average, officers at the motorcycle booths were exposed to four to five times higher levels of VOCs (GMs of 0.07 ppm, 0.23 ppm, and 4.7 ppm for MTBE, benzene, and THC) than their counterparts at the motor car booths (GMs of 0.01 ppm, 0.05 ppm, and 1.5 ppm). The airborne concentrations of all three pollutants correlated with the flow of vehicle traffic. Close correlations were also noted for the concentrations in ambient air for the three pollutants measured. Benzene and MTBE had a correlation coefficient of 0.97. The overall findings showed that the concentrations of various VOCs were closely related to the traffic density, suggesting that they were from a common source, such as exhaust emissions from the vehicles. The results also indicated that although benzene, MTBE, and THC are known to be volatile, a significant amount could still be detected in the ambient environment, thus contributing to our exposure to these compounds. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Comparison of direct and indirect methods of measuring airborne chrysotile fibre concentration.

    PubMed

    Eypert-Blaison, Celine; Veissiere, Sylvie; Rastoix, Olivier; Kauffer, Edmond

    2010-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy observations most frequently form a basis for estimating asbestos fibre concentration in the environment and in buildings with asbestos-containing materials. Sampled fibres can be transferred to microscope grids by applying either a direct [ISO (1995) Draft International ISO/DIS 10312. Ambient air. Determination of asbestos fibres. Direct transfer transmission electron microscopy procedure. Geneva, Switzerland: International Standardization Organization] or an indirect [AFNOR (1996) Détermination de la concentration en fibres d'amiante par microscopie électronique à transmission-Méthode indirecte. Cedex, France: AFNOR, p. 42; ISO (1997) Draft International ISO/DIS 13794. Ambient air. Determination of asbestos fibres. Indirect-transfer transmission electron microscopy procedure. Geneva, Switzerland: International Standardization Organization] method. In the latter case, ISO Standard 13794 recommends filtering calcination residues either on a polycarbonate (PC) filter (PC indirect method) or on a cellulose ester (CE) membrane (CE indirect method). The PC indirect method requires that fibres deposited on a PC filter be covered by a carbon layer, whereas in the CE indirect method, the CE membrane has to be directly processed using a method described in ISO Standard 10312. The purpose of this study was to compare results obtained using, on the one hand, direct preparation methods and, on the other hand, PC indirect or CE indirect methods, for counting asbestos fibres deposited on filters as a result of liquid filtration or air sampling. In direct method-based preparation, we observed that an etching time of 6-14 min does not affect the measured densities, except for fibres <1 microm deposited by liquid filtration. Moreover, in all cases, the direct method gives higher densities than the PC indirect method because of possible fibre disappearance when using the carbon evaporator implemented in the PC indirect method. The CE membrane

  4. Investigation of gasoline distributions within petrol stations: spatial and seasonal concentrations, sources, mitigation measures, and occupationally exposed symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sairat, Theerapong; Homwuttiwong, Sahalaph; Homwutthiwong, Kritsana; Ongwandee, Maneerat

    2015-09-01

    We measured levels of VOCs and determined the distributions of benzene concentrations over the area of two petrol stations in all three seasons. Using the concentrations and sampling positions, we created isoconcentration contour maps. The average concentrations ranged 18-1288 μg m(-3) for benzene and 12-81 μg m(-3) for toluene. The contour maps indicate that high-level contours of benzene were found not only at the fuel dispenser areas but also at the storage tank refilling points, open drainage areas where gasoline-polluted wastewater was flowing, and the auto service center located within the station area. An assessment of the benzene to toluene ratio contour plots implicates that airborne benzene and toluene near the fuel dispenser area were attributed to gasoline evaporation although one of the studied stations may be influenced by other VOC sources besides gasoline evaporation. Additionally, during the routine refilling of the underground fuel storage tanks by a tank truck, the ambient levels of benzene and toluene increased tremendously. The implementation of source control by replacing old dispensers with new fuel dispensers that have an efficient cutoff feature and increased delivery speed can reduce spatial benzene concentrations by 77%. Furthermore, a questionnaire survey among 63 service attendants in ten stations revealed that headache was the most reported health complaint with a response rate of 32%, followed by fatigue with 20%. These prominent symptoms could be related to an exposure to high benzene concentrations.

  5. The use of an experimental room for monitoring of airborne concentrations of microorganisms, glass fibers, and total particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, M.P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental room was used as a microcosm for studies of airborne particles and microorganisms in indoor environments. The interior of the room measures 4 by 4 by 2.2 m high and has a hardwood floor and the walls and ceiling are sheetrocked and coated with interior latex paint. Exterior walls are 11.4-cm thick plywood panels consisting of two outer sections of plywood insulated with fiber glass batts. The ceiling is of similar construction with 17.1-cm thick panels. Attached to the room entrance is an anteroom equipped with a HEPA-filtered air shower to reduce mixing of air resulting from entering and exiting during experiments. The room is equipped with a computer-controlled heating, ventilation, and cooling system. Temperature, relative humidity, air flow, and room pressure can be continuously monitored by probes located in the room and air handling system components. Several research projects have been conducted using this room including monitoring the potential for airborne glass fibers released from rigid fibrous ductboard, comparisons of commercially available samplers for monitoring of airborne fungal spores, and a study on the efficacy of vacuum bags to minimize dispersal of particles, including fungal spores from fungal-contaminated carpet. During studies designed to monitor airborne fiberglass, air samples were taken in the room serviced by new rigid fibrous glass ductwork, and the results were compared to those obtained in the room with bare metal ductwork installed. Monitoring of airborne fungal spores using the Andersen six-stage sampler, the high flow Spiral Biotech sampler, the Biotest RCS Plus sampler, and the Burkard spore trap sampler was performed following the release of Penicillium spores into the room through the supply register. Dispersal of carpet-associated particles and fungal spores was measured after vacuuming using conventional cellulose vacuum bags in comparison to recently developed bags.

  6. Retrieval of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration above Clouds and Cloud Top Pressure from Airborne Lidar Measurements during ASCENDS Science Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Rodriguez, M.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Kawa, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Goddard is developing an integrated-path, differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission. The approach uses pulsed lasers to measure both CO2 and O2 absorption simultaneously in the vertical path to the surface at a number of wavelengths across a CO2 line at 1572.335 nm and an O2 line doublet near 764.7 nm. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere allow the technique to estimate column CO2 and O2 number density and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground. This allows retrievals of CO2 column above clouds and cloud top pressure, and all-sky measurement capability from space. This additional information can be used to evaluate atmospheric transport processes and other remote sensing carbon data in the free atmosphere, improve carbon data assimilation in models and help global and regional carbon flux estimates. We show some preliminary results of this capability using airborne lidar measurements from the summers of 2011 and 2014 ASCENDS science campaigns. These show simultaneous retrievals of CO2 and O2 column densities for laser returns from low-level marine stratus clouds in the west coast of California. This demonstrates the supplemental capability of the future space carbon mission to measure CO2 above clouds, which is valuable particularly for the areas with persistent cloud covers, e.g, tropical ITCZ, west coasts of continents with marine layered clouds and southern ocean with highest occurrence of low-level clouds, where underneath carbon cycles are active but passive remote sensing techniques using the reflected short wave sunlight are unable to measure accurately due to cloud scattering effect. We exercise cloud top pressure retrieval from O2 absorption measurements during the flights over the low-level marine stratus cloud decks, which is one of

  7. Lidar Measurements of Industrial Benzene Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to measure benzene concentrations was added to the RIVM mobile DIAL system. In a ten-days campaign, it was used to measure benzene emissions in the Rijnmond, a heavily industrialised area in the South-west of the Netherlands with petrochemical industry, petrochemical products storage and the port of Rotterdam. On two of the ten days, benzene emissions were found. Combined with measurements of wind speed and wind direction, the Lidar measurements indicated the possible origins of these emissions. This makes the Lidar a valuable tool, augmenting the data collected at fixed monitoring stations.

  8. Occupational exposure to benzene at the ExxonMobil refinery at Baton Rouge, Louisiana (1977-2005).

    PubMed

    Panko, Julie M; Gaffney, Shannon H; Burns, Amanda M; Unice, Ken M; Kreider, Marisa L; Booher, Lindsay E; Gelatt, Richard H; Marshall, J Ralph; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2009-09-01

    Because crude oil contains up to 3% benzene and there is an association between high chronic exposure to appreciable concentrations of benzene and acute myelogenous leukemia, exposure of refinery workers has been studied for many years. To date, no extensive industrial hygiene exposure analyses for historical benzene exposure have been performed, and none have focused on the airborne concentrations in the workplace at specific refineries or for specific tasks. In this study, the authors evaluated the airborne concentrations of benzene and their variability over time at the ExxonMobil refinery in Baton Rouge between 1977 and 2005. Refinery workers were categorized into 117 worker groups using company job descriptions. These 117 groups were further collapsed into 25 job categories based on similarity of measured exposure results. Results of 5289 personal air samples are included in this analysis; 3403 were considered nontask (>or= 180 min) personal samples, and 830 were considered task-related (< 180 min) personal samples; the remainder did not fit in either category. In general, nontask personal air samples indicated that exposures of the past 30 years were generally below the occupational exposure limit of 1 ppm, but there was only a small, decreasing temporal trend in the concentrations. The job sampled most frequently during routine operations was process technician and, as broken down by area, resulted in the following mean benzene concentrations: analyzers (mean = 0.12 ppm), coker (mean = 0.013 ppm), hydrofiner (mean = 0.0054 ppm), lube blending and storage (mean = 0.010 ppm), waste treatment (mean = 0.092 ppm), and all other areas (mean = 0.055 ppm). Task-based samples indicated that the highest exposures resulted from the sampling tasks, specifically from those performed on process materials; in general, though, even these tasks had concentrations well below the STEL of 5 ppm. The most frequently sampled task was gauging (mean = 0.12 ppm). Task

  9. Concentrations of trace elements and compounds in the airborne suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, Ohio, from August 1971 to August 1972 and their dependence on wind direction: Complete data listing and concentration roses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Neustadter, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 75 chemical constituents in the airborne particulate matter were measured in Cleveland, Ohio during 1971 and 1972. Daily values, maxima, geometric means and their standard deviations covering a 1-year period (45 to 50 sampling days) at each of 16 sites are presented on microfiche for 60 elements, and for a lesser number of days for 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAH), the aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds (AH) as a group and carbon. In addition, concentration roses showing directional properties are presented for 39 elements, 10 PAH and the AH as a group. The elements (except carbon) are shown both in terms of concentration and percentage of the suspended particulate matter.

  10. Determinants of indoor benzene in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. K.; Jantunen, M. J.; Künzli, N.; Kulinskaya, E.; Colvile, R.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.

    This study identified the key determinants associated with the indoor benzene concentrations that were measured between 1996 and 2000 using the EXPOLIS protocol in the residences of six European cities, including Athens (Greece), Basel (Switzerland), Helsinki (Finland), Milan (Italy), Oxford (United Kingdom), and Prague (Czech Republic). Two consecutive days of home indoor and home outdoor measurements of benzene were carried out at the homes of adult participants on different dates and seasons during the sampling period. Regression models, with interactions searched by all-possible subset method, were used to assess the city effects and the determinants of home indoor benzene (adjusted R2=0.57, n=412). Outdoor benzene concentrations, outdoor temperature, wind speed, the use of anti-moth products, and indoor smoking in terms of number of cigarettes consumed per day were shown to be the key determinants of indoor benzene concentrations. The model was further used to predict the indoor benzene levels in cities. Non-linear relationships were commonly found, indicating that a unit change in the indoor concentration cannot be simply estimated by a proportional change of the determinant, and the pattern of relationships could be differed in different places. This finding is important in formulating indoor air quality guidelines as well as calculating an accurate health risk estimate based on the estimates of population's lifetime exposure levels.

  11. Study of gaseous benzene effects upon A549 lung epithelial cells using a novel exposure system.

    PubMed

    Mascelloni, Massimiliano; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Hodges, Nikolas J; Harrison, Roy M

    2015-08-19

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitous pollutants known to be present in both indoor and outdoor air arising from various sources. Indoor exposure has increasingly become a major cause of concern due to the effects that such pollutants can have on health. Benzene, along with toluene, is one of the main components of the VOC mixture and is a known carcinogen due to its genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of an in vitro model to study the short-term effects of exposure of lung cells to airborne benzene. We studied the effects of exposure on DNA and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A549 cells, exposed to various concentrations of benzene (0.03; 0.1; 0.3 ppm) in gaseous form using a custom designed cell exposure chamber. Results showed a concentration-dependent increase of DNA breaks and an increase of ROS production, confirming the feasibility of the experimental procedure and validating the model for further in vitro studies of exposure to other VOCs.

  12. The toxicology of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1993-01-01

    Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a series of phenolic and ring-opened products and their conjugates. The mechanism of benzene-induced aplastic anemia appears to involve the concerted action of several metabolites acting together on early stem and progenitor cells, as well as on early blast cells, such as pronormoblasts and normoblasts to inhibit maturation and amplification. Benzene metabolites also inhibit the function of microenvironmental stromal cells necessary to support the growth of differentiating and maturing marrow cells. The mechanism of benzene-induced leukemogenesis is less well understood. Benzene and its metabolites do not function well as mutagens but are highly clastogenic, producing chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, and micronuclei. Benzene has been shown to be a multi-organ carcinogen in animals. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that benzene is a human leukemogen. There is need to better define the lower end of the dose-response curve for benzene as a human leukemogen. The application of emerging methods in biologically based risk assessment employing pharmacokinetic and mechanistic data may help to clarify the uncertainties in low-dose risk assessment. PMID:8354177

  13. MAP3S/RAINE modeling abstracts, 1980. [Concise descriptions of models and availability for calculation of airborne concentration of sulfur dioxide and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, P.

    1980-07-01

    The MultiState Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S) has produced as a primary research output a number of numerical models for the calculation of airborne concentrations of sulfur dioxide and sulfate resulting from anthropogenic sources. Concise descriptions of these models, and of related modeling developments, are collected in this report. For each model, or model component, there is included a listing of the authors, a summary of what it is the model calculates and the method used, a list of references, and a statement of availability.

  14. The use of S-phenylmercapturic acid as a biomarker in molecular epidemiology studies of benzene.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Peter B; Kaur, Balvinder; Roach, Jonathan; Levy, Len; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pietro A; Pesatori, Angela; Fustinoni, Silvia; Buratti, Marina; Bonzini, Matteo; Colombi, Antonio; Popov, Todor; Cavallo, Domenico; Desideri, Arianna; Valerio, Federico; Pala, Mauro; Bolognesi, Claudia; Merlo, Franco

    2005-05-30

    S-Phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA), is a urinary metabolite of benzene, thought to be derived from the condensation product of benzene oxide with glutathione. S-PMA may be determined by GC, HPLC (UV or fluorescence detection), GC-MS, LC-MS/MS or immunoassays. The limit of sensitivities of most of these techniques is 1 microg/l urine or below. It has been suggested that S-PMA may have value as a biomarker for low level human exposure to benzene, in view of the facts that urinary excretion of S-PMA has been found to be related to airborne benzene in occupationally exposed workers, and that only low background levels of S-PMA have been found in control subjects. We have evaluated the use of S-PMA as a biomarker, using a commercially available analytical service, in a multicentre European study of populations exposed to varying levels of benzene, in Italy (Milan, Genoa) and in Bulgaria (Sofia). These were filling station attendants, urban policemen, bus drivers, petrochemical workers and referents (a total of 623 subjects). S-PMA was measured at the end of the work shift by an immunoassay procedure. Urinary benzene (in Milan only) and the benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) were measured before and after the work shift. Air-borne benzene was measured as a monitor of exposure. Urinary benzene was the most discriminatory biomarker and showed a relationship with airborne benzene at all levels of exposure studied (including groups exposed to <0.1 ppm benzene), whereas t,t-MA and S-PMA, as determined by immunoassay, were suitable only in the highest exposed workers (petrochemical industry, geometric mean 1765 microg/m3 (0.55 ppm) benzene). All three biomarkers were positively correlated with smoking as measured by urinary cotinine).

  15. Benzene toxicity of the occurrence of benzene in the ambient air of the Houston area

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.C.

    1980-01-01

    This study was conducted by either literature review or actual field survey. Results are summarized as follows: (1) long-term occupational exposure of workers to benzene vapor at levels of 3 to 7 ppM, 2 to 3 ppM and 1.6 ppM may result in a decreased level of leucocyte alkaline phosphates, an increased incidence of chromosome aberrations and an increased level of ALA in erythrocytes, respectively; (2) benzene is capable of causing fetotoxic effects in animals at levels as low as 10 ppM by volume; (3) exposure of animals to or less than 1 ppM benzene vapor may result in leucopenia, an inverse ratio of muscle antagonist chronaxy and a decreased level of ascorbic acid in fetus's and mother's liver as well as whole embryo; (4) benzene is causally associated with the increased incidence of pancytopenia, including unicytopenia, bicytopenia and aplastic anemia, and chromosome aberrations in occupational exposure population, and at best benzene must also be considered as a leukemogen; (5) since it can be emitted into the atmosphere from both man-made and natural sources, benzene in some concentrations is presented everywhere in the various compartments of the environment; (6) the findings of the emission of benzene from certain natural sources indicate that reducing benzene to a zero-level of exposure is theoretically impossible; (7) the annual average of benzene concentration detected in the Houston ambient air is 2.50 ppB, which is about 2.4 times higher than the nation-wide annual average exposure level and may have some health implications to the general public; and (8) in the Houston area, stationary sources are more important than mobile sources in contributing to benzene in the ambient air.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric VOCs, NO2, SO2, and O3 concentrations at a heavily industrialized region in Western Turkey, and assessment of the carcinogenic risk levels of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civan, Mihriban Yılmaz; Elbir, Tolga; Seyfioglu, Remzi; Kuntasal, Öznur Oğuz; Bayram, Abdurrahman; Doğan, Güray; Yurdakul, Sema; Andiç, Özgün; Müezzinoğlu, Aysen; Sofuoglu, Sait C.; Pekey, Hakan; Pekey, Beyhan; Bozlaker, Ayse; Odabasi, Mustafa; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2015-02-01

    Ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and ground-level ozone (O3) were measured at 55 locations around a densely populated industrial zone, hosting a petrochemical complex (Petkim), a petroleum refinery (Tupras), ship-dismantling facilities, several iron and steel plants, and a gas-fired power plant. Five passive sampling campaigns were performed covering summer and winter seasons of 2005 and 2007. Elevated concentrations of VOCs, NO2 and SO2 around the refinery, petrochemical complex and roads indicated that industrial activities and vehicular emissions are the main sources of these pollutants in the region. Ozone concentrations were low at the industrial zone and settlement areas, but high in rural stations downwind from these sources due to NO distillation. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was employed to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into six factors, which were associated with emissions sources. Traffic was found to be highest contributor to measured ∑VOCs concentrations, followed by the Petkim and Tupras. Median cancer risk due to benzene inhalation calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation was approximately 4 per-one-million population, which exceeded the U.S. EPA benchmark of 1 per one million. Petkim, Tupras and traffic emissions were the major sources of cancer risk due to benzene inhalation in the Aliaga airshed. Relative contributions of these two source groups changes significantly from one location to another, demonstrating the limitation of determining source contributions and calculating health risk using data from one or two permanent stations in an industrial area.

  17. [Exposure to benzene of service station employees and composition of benzene].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S; Fuselli, S; Iavarone, I; Vanacore, N; Carere, A

    1994-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies gasoline vapours and exhaust fumes from gasoline fueled automobiles as potential human carcinogens. Data on the chemical composition of gasoline marketed in Italy and especially on the concentration of benzene, are rather poor. Within the framework of an investigation aimed at assessing the mean annual level of exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons among gasoline pump attendants, made on a sample of attendants in Rome between December 1991 and November 1992, samples of gasoline were also collected so as to determine the benzene content of the gasoline over the investigation period, assess the variability of benzene concentration in the various gasolines and according to the season of the year, and take account of gasoline composition in analysing the factors determining individual exposure levels of pump attendants. Benzene exposure was measured via gas chromatography of air samples obtained with personal pumps in the breathing zone. The mean benzene exposure level (8 h TWA) of the 27 subjects under study was 1.73 mg/m3 (SD = 5.53). The benzene concentration in the samples of gasoline, which were collected on the same day as personal exposure monitoring was performed, was measured by means of high resolution gas chromatography (hr-GC). Mean benzene levels of 25.03 g/l (SD = 3.47), equivalent to 2.86% by volume, were measured in 24 samples of alkylated gasoline, and mean levels of 23.18 g/l (SD = 3.93), equivalent to 2.65% v/v, were measured in 10 samples of lead-free gasoline. Statistically significant associations were found between individual exposure to benzene and the quantity of gasoline pumped (r = 0.69) and the quantity of benzene present in the gasoline sold on the day monitoring was performed (r = 0.70). Using regression analysis, the estimated increase in the level of personal benzene exposure was 0.01 mg/m3 for every increase of 100 g in the benzene content of the total amount of gasoline sold

  18. Evaluation of the area factor used in the RESRAD code for the estimation of airborne contaminant concentrations of finite area sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.S.; Yu, C.; Wang, S.K.

    1998-07-01

    The area factor is used in the RESRAD code to estimate the airborne contaminant concentrations for a finite area of contaminated soils. The area factor model used in RESRAD version 5.70 and earlier (referred to as the old area factor) was a simple, but conservative, mixing model that tended to overestimate the airborne concentrations of radionuclide contaminants. An improved and more realistic model for the area factor (referred to here as the new area factor) is described in this report. The new area factor model is designed to reflect site-specific soil characteristics and meteorological conditions. The site-specific parameters considered include the size of the source area, average particle diameter, and average wind speed. Other site-specific parameters (particle density, atmospheric stability, raindrop diameter, and annual precipitation rate) were assumed to be constant. The model uses the Gaussian plume model combined with contaminant removal processes, such as dry and wet deposition of particulates. Area factors estimated with the new model are compared with old area factors that were based on the simple mixing model. In addition, sensitivity analyses are conducted for parameters assumed to be constant. The new area factor model has been incorporated into RESRAD version 5.75 and later.

  19. [Materials for the substantiation of the biological MAC of benzene].

    PubMed

    Ulanova, I P; Avilova, G G; Karpukhina, E A; Karimova, L K; Boĭko, V I; Makar'eva, L M

    1990-09-01

    Relatively great amount of benzene-originated phenol, the presence of a definite relationship between phenol amount in the urine and benzene content in the air indicate that it is reasonable to use a phenol sample as an exposure test. To determine the intensity of benzene exposure, data on phenol content in the urine of people working at some big-tonnage enterprises has been analyzed. On the basis of the national and foreign literature data on the correlation between the phenol urine concentration and the level of benzene exposure a regression equation was deduced, which has made it possible to calculate phenol content in the urine on the level of average working day benzene concentration adopted in the USSR. This value equals 15 mg/l, which was proposed as a biological benzene MAC.

  20. Biofiltration control of VOC emissions: Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory studies were conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane and benzene from air streams using activated sludge-treated compost biofilters. Four types of experimental biofilter systems were developed: a bench scale packed tower system used primarily for kinetic studies; a small scale column system used to study the effects of different filter media on n-butane removal; a three stage system used to study benzene elimination; and a static batch biofilter system used to study the effects of temperature, compost water content, compost pH, and initial benzene concentrations on benzene elimination. Removal efficiencies greater than 90% were obtained for n-butane. Removal followed first order kinetics at inlet concentrations less than 25 ppM n-butane and zero order kinetics above 100 ppM n-butane. Removal of benzene followed fractional order kinetics for inlet concentrations from 15 to 200 ppM benzene. Thus, the removal of benzene is both mass transfer and bioreaction limited for the concentration range studied. The removal efficiency of benzene was found to be highly dependent on compost water content, compost pH, and temperature. Compost showed a low capacity for benzene removal, which suggested that degradation of these hydrocarbons required different species of microorganisms.

  1. Occupational exposure to benzene in the shoe industry

    SciTech Connect

    Karacic, V.; Skender, L.; Prpic-Majic, D.

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine the possible actual exposure to benzene in the shoe industry from industrially used solvents, glues, and paints containing benzene as a nondeclared constituent, phenol in urine and benzene in blood, as indices of internal exposure to benzene, were measured in workers (N = 33). Since toluene, in contrast to benzene, is declared as a constituent in several glues, toluene in the blood of workers was also analysed. All analyses were performed using gas chromatography. Urine samples were collected on Monday morning (MI) before work and on Wednesday (WI) before and (WII) after work. Venous blood samples were taken on Wednesday only, 1/2 hour after work. There was no difference in the phenol concentrations of MI and WI, while the phenol concentration of WII was about twice as high as that in WI. In all blood samples, benzene was found, as well as toluene, which was about four times higher in comparison with benzene. A correlation (r = 0.465; p less than .01) was found between the difference in pre- and postshift phenol concentrations (WII-WI) in urine and the benzene concentrations in blood. The results presented show that a trace amount of benzene, which is often not declared as a constitutent in industrially used chemicals, could be a source of marked exposure to benzene. It can also be concluded that changes in phenol in urine (if preshift and postshift samples are taken) might be a sufficiently sensitive parameter to assess exposure to benzene even when other data concerning the presence of benzene in the working atmosphere are not available.

  2. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  3. Modeling Human Exposure Levels to Airborne Volatile Organic Compounds by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Ho; Kwak, Byoung Kyu; Ha, Mina; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The goal was to model and quantify the atmospheric concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as the result of the Hebei Spirit oil spill, and to predict whether the exposure levels were abnormally high or not. Methods We developed a model for calculating the airborne concentration of VOCs that are produced in an oil spill accident. The model was applied to a practical situation, namely the Hebei Spirit oil spill. The accuracy of the model was verified by comparing the results with previous observation data. The concentrations were compared with the currently used air quality standards. Results Evaporation was found to be 10- to 1,000-fold higher than the emissions produced from a surrounding industrial complex. The modeled concentrations for benzene failed to meet current labor environmental standards, and the concentration of benzene, toluene, ortho- meta- para-xylene were higher than the values specified by air quality standards and guideline values on the ocean. The concentrations of total VOCs were much higher than indoor environmental criteria for the entire Taean area for a few days. Conclusions The extent of airborne exposure was clearly not the same as that for normal conditions. PMID:22468262

  4. A principal component regression model to forecast airborne concentration of Cupressaceae pollen in the city of Granada (SE Spain), during 1995-2006.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Peinado, Francisco M; Valderrama, Mariano J; Bouzas, Paula R

    2013-05-01

    The problem of developing a 2-week-on ahead forecast of atmospheric cypress pollen levels is tackled in this paper by developing a principal component multiple regression model involving several climatic variables. The efficacy of the proposed model is validated by means of an application to real data of Cupressaceae pollen concentration in the city of Granada (southeast of Spain). The model was applied to data from 11 consecutive years (1995-2005), with 2006 being used to validate the forecasts. Based on the work of different authors, factors as temperature, humidity, hours of sun and wind speed were incorporated in the model. This methodology explains approximately 75-80% of the variability in the airborne Cupressaceae pollen concentration.

  5. Roadside and in-vehicle concentrations of monoaromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Pei-Ling; Harrison, Roy M.

    Airborne concentrations of benzene, toluene and the xylenes have been measured inside passenger cars whilst driven along major roads in the city of Birmingham, UK, as well as immediately outside the car, and at the roadside. A comparison of concentrations measured in the car with those determined from immediately outside showed little difference, with a mean ratio for benzene of 1.17±0.34 and for toluene 1.11±0.16 ( n=53). The ratio of in-car to roadside concentration was rather higher at 1.55±0.68 for benzene and 1.54±0.72 for toluene ( n=53). The roadside concentrations were typically several-fold higher than those measured at a background suburban monitoring station within Birmingham, although much variation was seen between congested and uncongested roads, with concentrations adjacent to uncongested roads similar to those measured at the background monitoring station. Measurements of benzene and toluene in a car driven on a rural road outside the city showed very comparable in-car and out-of-car concentrations strengthening the conclusion that pollution inside the car is derived from pollutants outside entering with ventilation air. The exceptions were an older car where in-car concentrations appreciably exceeded those outside (in-to out-vehicle ratio=2.3 for benzene and 2.2 for toluene where n=5) indicating probable self-contamination, and a very new car which built up increased VOC concentrations when stationary without ventilation (in-to out-vehicle ratio=2.4 for benzene and 3.3 for toluene where n=5). A further set of measurements inside London taxi cabs showed concentrations to be influenced by the area within which the taxi was driven, the traffic density and the presence of passengers smoking cigarettes.

  6. Estimating benzene exposure at a solvent parts washer.

    PubMed

    Nicas, Mark; Plisko, Marc J; Spencer, John W

    2006-05-01

    A mathematical model is described for estimating benzene exposure at a parts washer using petroleum distillates solvent containing benzene. The basic assumptions are that the benzene mass emission rate exponentially decreases over time, and that the air above the parts washer basin to which a worker is exposed is part of a well-mixed air zone termed the near field (relative to the source location). Two previously conducted simulations of the parts washer process are described. A single 1-hour time-weighted average (TWA) benzene concentration was measured during Simulation #1, and two 4-hour TWA benzene concentrations were measured during Simulation #2. The initial benzene concentrations in the solvents were known, and the exponential loss rate constants were estimated from subsequent determinations of the benzene concentrations. Values for the interzonal airflow rate were estimated based on the conceptual geometry of the near field zone and sparse information on air speed near the parts washers. Minimum values for the room supply/exhaust air rate were estimated based on the room volumes and ventilation conditions. The modeled benzene concentrations were within a multiplicative range of one-half to twofold the measured concentrations. Uncertainty in a model estimate was quantified by Monte Carlo analysis; the distributions of model estimates exhibited coefficients of variation of approximately 40%. Issues related to uncertainty in exposure estimates made by mathematical modeling are discussed.

  7. Determination of heavy metals concentrations in airborne particulates matter (APM) from Manjung district, Perak using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Nursyairah; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Airborne particulates trace metals are considered as public health concern as it can enter human lungs through respiratory system. Generally, any substance that has been introduced to the atmosphere that can cause severe effects to living things and the environment is considered air pollution. Manjung, Perak is one of the development districts that is active with industrial activities. There are many industrial activities surrounding Manjung District area such as coal fired power plant, quarries and iron smelting which may contribute to the air pollution into the environment. This study was done to measure the concentrations of Hg, U, Th, K, Cu, Fe, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Pb and Cd in the Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) collected at nine locations in Manjung District area within 15 km radius towards three directions (North, North-East and South-East) in 5 km intervals. The samples were collected using mini volume air sampler with cellulose filter through total suspended particulate (TSP). The sampler was set up for eight hours with the flow rate of 5 L/min. The filter was weighed before and after sample collection using microbalance, to get the amount of APM and kept in desiccator before analyzing. The measurement was done using calibrated Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The air particulate concentrations were found below the Malaysia Air Quality Guidelines for TSP (260 µg/m3). All of the metals concentrations were also lower than the guidelines set by World Health Organization (WHO), Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Argonne National Laboratory, USA NCRP (1975). From the concentrations, the enrichment factor were calculated.

  8. Interpretation of Urinary and Blood Benzene biomarkers of Exposure for Non-Occupationally Exposed Individuals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-occupational exposure to benzene occurs primarily through inhalation ofair impacted by motor vehicle exhaust, fuel sources, and cigarette smoke. This study relates published measurements ofbenzene biomarkers to air exposure concentrations. Benzene has three reliable biomar...

  9. A method for computing the damage level due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration.

    PubMed

    Acquesta, Alejandro D; Sánchez, Erica Yanina; Porta, Andres; Jacovkis, Pablo M

    2011-09-01

    The calculation of damage level due to the exposure to a toxic cloud is usually not included in most popular software, or it is included using techniques that do not take into account the variation in concentration over a period of time. In this work, a method is introduced for calculating the temporal evolution of the potential damage level and to obtain a more precise and descriptive estimation of this level. The proposed goal is: to estimate the maximum and minimum damage level experienced by a population due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration; to be able to assess the damage level experienced in a progressive way, as the exposure to the airborne chemical occurs. The method relies on transformations of time-concentration pairs on a continuum of damage level curves based on the available guideline levels, obtaining maximum and minimum approximations of the expected damage level for any exposure duration. Consequently, applying this method to transport model output data and demographic information, damage evolution in relation to time and space can be predicted, as well as its effect on the local population, which enables the determination of threat zones. The comparison between the proposed method and the current (Spanish and ALOHA) ones showed that the former can offer a more precise estimation and a more descriptive approach of the potential damage level. This method can be used by atmospheric dispersion models to compute damage level and graphically display the regions exposed to each guideline level on area maps.

  10. Airborne polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PBDD/Fs), and dechlorane plus (DP) in concentrated vehicle parking areas.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiru; Liu, Hehuan; Mo, Ligui; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Peng, Ping'an

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PBDD/Fs), and dechlorane plus (DP) in air around three concentrated vehicle parking areas (underground, indoor, and outdoor) in a metropolitan of South China. The parking areas showed higher concentrations of PBDEs, PBDD/Fs, and DP than their adjacent urban area or distinct congener/isomer profiles, which indicate their local emission sources. The highest PBDE and DP concentrations were found in the outdoor parking lot, which might be related to the heating effect of direct sunlight exposure. Multi-linear regression analysis results suggest that deca-BDEs without noticeable transformation contributed most to airborne PBDEs in all studied areas, followed by penta-BDEs. The statistically lower anti-DP fractions in the urban area than that of commercial product signified its degradation/transformation during transportation. Neither PBDEs nor vehicle exhaust contributed much to airborne PBDD/Fs in the parking areas. There were 68.1-100 % of PBDEs, PBDD/Fs, and DP associated with particles. Logarithms of gas-particle distribution coefficients (K ps) of PBDEs were significantly linear-correlated with those of their sub-cooled vapor pressures (p Ls) and octanol-air partition coefficients (K OAs) in all studied areas. The daily inhalation doses of PBDEs, DP, and PBDD/Fs were individually estimated as 89.7-10,741, 2.05-39.4, and 0.12-4.17 pg kg(-1) day(-1) for employees in the parking areas via Monte Carlo simulation.

  11. Comparison of two direct-reading instruments (FM-7400 and Fibrecheck FC-2) with phase contrast optical microscopy to measure the airborne fibre number concentration.

    PubMed

    Kauffer, E; Martin, P; Grzebyk, M; Villa, M; Vigneron, J C

    2003-07-01

    The use of direct-reading instruments to measure the airborne fibre number concentration is on the increase. The response of two of these instruments (FM-7400 and Fibrecheck FC-2) was compared with the conventional method of sampling on filters and counting by phase contrast microscopy. Four types of fibres were studied at different concentrations and relative humidity levels. The FM-7400 can be calibrated by the manufacturer for two different levels of sensitivity (standard and high). For the tests where it was set to the sensitivity level with which it had been calibrated, the ratio of the concentration measured by the instrument to the concentration obtained by the conventional method varied in the range 0.5-1 for the different types of fibres studied (chrysotile, glass wool and ceramic fibres). The Fibrecheck FC-2 is a much less versatile instrument. On the basis of a calibration allowing correct detection of asbestos fibres, it greatly overestimated the concentration of man-made mineral fibres. In its normal calibration state a fine chrysotile aerosol was poorly detected. For man-made mineral fibres, the response was highly dependent on the nature of the fibres. These instruments require calibration with the type of fibres to be studied. Unfortunately, this operation is not always accessible to the user and may require the services of a specialized laboratory, as the manufacturer is not always in a position to carry this out.

  12. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  13. Assessment and determinants of airborne bacterial and fungal concentrations in different indoor environments: Homes, child day-care centres, primary schools and elderly care centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João Cavaleiro; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Until now the influence of risk factors resulting from exposure to biological agents in indoor air has been far less studied than outdoor pollution; therefore the uncertainty of health risks, and how to effectively prevent these, remains. This study aimed (i) to quantify airborne cultivable bacterial and fungal concentrations in four different types of indoor environment as well as to identify the recovered fungi; (ii) to assess the impact of outdoor bacterial and fungal concentrations on indoor air; (iii) to investigate the influence of carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature and relative humidity on bacterial and fungal concentrations; and (iv) to estimate bacterial and fungal dose rate for children (3-5 years old and 8-10 years old) in comparison with the elderly. Air samples were collected in 68 homes, 9 child day-care centres, 20 primary schools and 22 elderly care centres, in a total of 264 rooms with a microbiological air sampler and using tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar culture media for bacteria and fungi growth, respectively. For each building, one outdoor representative location were identified and simultaneously studied. The results showed that child day-care centres were the indoor microenvironment with the highest median bacterial and fungal concentrations (3870 CFU/m3 and 415 CFU/m3, respectively), whereas the lowest median concentrations were observed in elderly care centres (222 CFU/m3 and 180 CFU/m3, respectively). Indoor bacterial concentrations were significantly higher than outdoor concentrations (p < 0.05); whereas the indoor/outdoor ratios for the obtained fungal concentrations were approximately around the unit. Indoor CO2 levels were associated with the bacterial concentration, probably due to occupancy and insufficient ventilation. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most frequently occurring fungi. Children's had two times higher dose rate to biological pollutants when compared to adult individuals. Thus, due to children

  14. [Factors affecting benzene diffusion from contaminated soils to the atmosphere and flux characteristics].

    PubMed

    Du, Ping; Wang, Shi-Jie; Zhao, Huan-Huan; Wu, Bin; Han, Chun-Mei; Fang, Ji-Dun; Li, Hui-Ying; Hosomi, Masaaki; Li, Fa-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    The influencing factors of benzene diffusion fluxes from sand and black soil to atmosphere were investigated using a flux chamber (30.0 cm x 17.5 cm x 29.0 cm). In this study, the benzene diffusion fluxes were estimated by measuring the benzene concentrations both in the headspace of the chamber and in the soils of different layers. The results indicated that the soil water content played an important role in benzene diffusion fluxes. The diffusion flux showed positive correlation with the initial benzene concentration and the benzene dissolution concentration for both soil types. The changes of air flow rate from 300 to 900 mL x min(-1) and temperature from 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C resulted in increases of the benzene diffusion flux. Our study of benzene diffusion fluxes from contaminated soils will be beneficial for the predicting model, and emergency management and precautions.

  15. Changes in DNA methylation patterns in subjects exposed to low-dose benzene.

    PubMed

    Bollati, Valentina; Baccarelli, Andrea; Hou, Lifang; Bonzini, Matteo; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cavallo, Domenico; Byun, Hyang-Min; Jiang, Jiayi; Marinelli, Barbara; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier A; Yang, Allen S

    2007-02-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns, including global hypomethylation, gene-specific hypermethylation/hypomethylation, and loss of imprinting (LOI), are common in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and other cancer tissues. We investigated for the first time whether such epigenetic changes are induced in healthy subjects by low-level exposure to benzene, a widespread pollutant associated with AML risk. Blood DNA samples and exposure data were obtained from subjects with different levels of benzene exposure, including 78 gas station attendants, 77 traffic police officers, and 58 unexposed referents in Milan, Italy (personal airborne benzene range, < 6-478 microg/m(3)). Bisulfite-PCR pyrosequencing was used to quantitate DNA methylation in long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) and AluI repetitive elements as a surrogate of genome-wide methylation and examine gene-specific methylation of MAGE-1 and p15. Allele-specific pyrosequencing of the H19 gene was used to detect LOI in 96 subjects heterozygous for the H19 imprinting center G/A single-nucleotide polymorphism. Airborne benzene was associated with a significant reduction in LINE-1 (-2.33% for a 10-fold increase in airborne benzene levels; P = 0.009) and AluI (-1.00%; P = 0.027) methylation. Hypermethylation in p15 (+0.35%; P = 0.018) and hypomethylation in MAGE-1 (-0.49%; P = 0.049) were associated with increasing airborne benzene levels. LOI was found only in exposed subjects (4 of 73, 5.5%) and not in referents (0 of 23, 0.0%). However, LOI was not significantly associated with airborne benzene (P > 0.20). This is the first human study to link altered DNA methylation, reproducing the aberrant epigenetic patterns found in malignant cells, to low-level carcinogen exposure.

  16. Quinones as toxic metabolites of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Irons, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Occupational exposure to benzene has long been associated with toxicity to the blood and bone marrow, including lymphocytopenia, pancytopenia, aplastic anemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and possible lymphoma. A variety of studies have established that benzene itself is not the toxic species but requires metabolism to reactive intermediates. The bioactivation of benzene is complex. Both primary and secondary oxidation of benzene and its metabolites are mediated via cytochrome P-450 in the liver, although the role of secondary metabolism in the bone marrow is not clear. Toxicity is associated with the dihydroxy metabolites, hydroquinone and catechol, which concentrate in bone marrow. Hydroquinone and its terminal oxidation product, p-benzoquinone, have been demonstrated to be potent suppressors of cell growth in culture. Suppression of lymphocyte blastogenesis by these compounds is a sulfhydryl-dependent process and occurs at concentrations that do not result in cell death, or in detectable alterations in energy metabolism, intracellular glutathione concentration, or protein synthesis. Recent studies suggest that these compounds and other membrane-penetrating sulfyhdryl alkylating agents, such as N-ethylmaleimide and cytochalasin A, and endogenous regulatory molecules, such as soluble immune response suppressor (SIRS), interfere with microtubule assembly in vitro and selectively interfere with microtubule-dependent cell functions at identical concentrations. These agents appear to react with nucleophilic sulfhydryl groups essential for guanosine triphosphate binding to tubulin that are particularly sensitive to sulfhydryl-alkylating agents.

  17. Relationships between airborne fungal spore concentration of Cladosporium and the summer climate at two sites in Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollins, P. D.; Kettlewell, P. S.; Atkinson, M. D.; Stephenson, D. B.; Corden, J. M.; Millington, W. M.; Mullins, J.

    Cladosporium conidia have been shown to be important aeroallergens in many regions throughout the world, but annual spore concentrations vary considerably between years. Understanding these annual fluctuations may be of value in the clinical management of allergies. This study investigates the number of days in summer when spore concentration exceeds the allergenic threshold in relation to regional temperature and precipitation at two sites in England and Wales over 27 years. Results indicate that number of days in summer when the Cladosporium spores are above the allergenic concentration is positively correlated with regional temperature and negatively correlated with precipitation for both sites over the study period. Further analysis used a winter North Atlantic Oscillation index to explore the potential for long-range forecasting of the aeroallergen. For both spore measurement sites, a positive correlation exists between the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index and the number of days in summer above the allergenic threshold for Cladosporium spore concentration.

  18. Benzene exposure and the effect of traffic pollution in Copenhagen, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skov, Henrik; Hansen, Asger B.; Lorenzen, Gitte; Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Løfstrøm, Per; Christensen, Carsten S.

    Benzene is a carcinogenic compound, which is emitted from petrol-fuelled cars and thus is found ubiquitous in all cities. As part of the project Monitoring of Atmospheric Concentrations of Benzene in European Towns and Homes (MACBETH) six campaigns were carried out in the Municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark. The campaigns were distributed over 1 year. In each campaign, the personal exposure to benzene of 50 volunteers (non-smokers living in non-smoking families) living and working in Copenhagen was measured. Simultaneously, benzene was measured in their homes and in an urban network distributed over the municipality. The Radiello diffusive sampler was applied to sample 5 days averages of benzene and other hydrocarbons. Comparison of the results with those from a BTX-monitor showed excellent agreement. The exposure and the concentrations in homes and in the urban area were found to be close to log-normal distribution. The annual averages of the geometrical mean values were 5.22, 4.30 and 2.90 μg m -3 for personal exposure, home concentrations and urban concentrations, respectively. Two main parameters are controlling the general level of benzene in Copenhagen: firstly, the emission from traffic and secondly, dispersion due to wind speed. The general level of exposure to benzene and home concentrations of benzene were strongly correlated with the outdoor level of benzene, which indicated that traffic is an important source for indoor concentrations of benzene and for the exposure to benzene.

  19. The effects of meteorological factors on airborne fungal spore concentration in two areas differing in urbanisation level.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M; Ribeiro, H; Delgado, J L; Abreu, I

    2009-01-01

    Although fungal spores are an ever-present component of the atmosphere throughout the year, their concentration oscillates widely. This work aims to establish correlations between fungal spore concentrations in Porto and Amares and meteorological data. The seasonal distribution of fungal spores was studied continuously (2005-2007) using volumetric spore traps. To determine the effect of meteorological factors (temperature, relative humidity and rainfall) on spore concentration, the Spearman rank correlation test was used. In both locations, the most abundant fungal spores were Cladosporium, Agaricus, Agrocybe, Alternaria and Aspergillus/Penicillium, the highest concentrations being found during summer and autumn. In the present study, with the exception of Coprinus and Pleospora, spore concentrations were higher in the rural area than in the urban location. Among the selected spore types, spring-autumn spores (Coprinus, Didymella, Leptosphaeria and Pleospora) exhibited negative correlations with temperature and positive correlations both with relative humidity and rainfall level. On the contrary, late spring-early summer (Smuts) and summer spores (Alternaria, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Ganoderma, Stemphylium and Ustilago) exhibited positive correlations with temperature and negative correlations both with relative humidity and rainfall level. Rust, a frequent spore type during summer, had a positive correlation with temperature. Aspergillus/Penicillium, showed no correlation with the meteorological factors analysed. This knowledge can be useful for agriculture, allowing more efficient and reliable application of pesticides, and for human health, by improving the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory allergic disease.

  20. Vinyl flooring in the home is associated with children’s airborne butylbenzyl phthalate and urinary metabolite concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Just, Allan C.; Miller, Rachel L.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Rundle, Andrew G.; Chen, Qixuan; Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hoepner, Lori; Camann, David E.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Perera, Frederica P.; Whyatt, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that vinyl flooring, as well as the vinyl-softening plasticizers butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), are associated with asthma and airway inflammation. While DEHP exposure is primarily dietary, whether home vinyl flooring contributes to indoor air and urinary metabolite concentrations for these two phthalates is unclear. Exposures to BBzP and DEHP were examined in a prospective birth cohort of New York City children (n=239) using: (1) visual observation of potential phthalate containing flooring, (2) a two-week home indoor air sample, and (3) concurrent urinary metabolites in a subset (n=193). The category “vinyl or linoleum” flooring was observed in 135 (56%) of monitored rooms; these rooms had statistically significantly higher indoor air geometric mean concentrations of BBzP (23.9 ng/m3) than rooms with wood or carpet flooring (10.6 ng/m3). Children from homes with “vinyl or linoleum” flooring also had significantly higher urinary BBzP metabolite concentrations than other children. Indoor air BBzP and urinary metabolite concentrations were correlated positively (Spearman’s rho 0.40). By contrast, indoor air DEHP was not associated with flooring type nor with its urinary metabolite concentrations. Vinyl flooring in the home may be an important source of children’s exposure to BBzP via indoor air. PMID:25690585

  1. The effects of meteorological factors on airborne fungal spore concentration in two areas differing in urbanisation level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M.; Ribeiro, H.; Delgado, J. L.; Abreu, I.

    2009-01-01

    Although fungal spores are an ever-present component of the atmosphere throughout the year, their concentration oscillates widely. This work aims to establish correlations between fungal spore concentrations in Porto and Amares and meteorological data. The seasonal distribution of fungal spores was studied continuously (2005-2007) using volumetric spore traps. To determine the effect of meteorological factors (temperature, relative humidity and rainfall) on spore concentration, the Spearman rank correlation test was used. In both locations, the most abundant fungal spores were Cladosporium, Agaricus, Agrocybe, Alternaria and Aspergillus/Penicillium, the highest concentrations being found during summer and autumn. In the present study, with the exception of Coprinus and Pleospora, spore concentrations were higher in the rural area than in the urban location. Among the selected spore types, spring-autumn spores ( Coprinus, Didymella, Leptosphaeria and Pleospora) exhibited negative correlations with temperature and positive correlations both with relative humidity and rainfall level. On the contrary, late spring-early summer (Smuts) and summer spores ( Alternaria, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Ganoderma, Stemphylium and Ustilago) exhibited positive correlations with temperature and negative correlations both with relative humidity and rainfall level. Rust, a frequent spore type during summer, had a positive correlation with temperature. Aspergillus/Penicillium, showed no correlation with the meteorological factors analysed. This knowledge can be useful for agriculture, allowing more efficient and reliable application of pesticides, and for human health, by improving the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory allergic disease.

  2. Day-time and night-time concentrations of airborne iron particles in the atmosphere of Madrid.

    PubMed

    Valero, F; Mura, M C

    1991-01-01

    Specific measurements of iron aerosol have been made over a 70 days period at a semi-urban site of Madrid. Measurements were made with the idea of assessing the relative contributions of day-time and night-time concentrations to daily ones. Statistics of day-time, night-time, daily and survey time period concentrations are given. Time variations were studied as well, clearly showing daily cyclical pattern identified by applying time spectral analysis. This periodicity is undoubtedly due to level differences between day-time and night-time concentrations of aerosol. Day-time average level ranged from 0.23 to 5.13 micrograms/m3 over the entire survey period (70 days) in contrast with night-times ones ranging from 0.17 to 3.04 micrograms/m3. Night-time/day-time concentration ratio shows a highly consistent value, 0.430 + 0.25 (sigma) during this period. On occasion when diffusion conditions are similar, this ratio increases to 0.518 + 0.18 (sigma). Day-time, night-time and daily concentrations correlation matrix suggests that former is the best daily level indicator.

  3. Airborne concentrations of PM(2.5) and diesel exhaust particles on Harlem sidewalks: a community-based pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kinney, P L; Aggarwal, M; Northridge, M E; Janssen, N A; Shepard, P

    2000-03-01

    Residents of the dense urban core neighborhoods of New York City (NYC) have expressed increasing concern about the potential human health impacts of diesel vehicle emissions. We measured concentrations of particulate matter [less than/equal to] 2.5 micro in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on sidewalks in Harlem, NYC, and tested whether spatial variations in concentrations were related to local diesel traffic density. Eight-hour (1000-1800 hr) air samples for PM(2.5 )and elemental carbon (EC) were collected for 5 days in July 1996 on sidewalks adjacent to four geographically distinct Harlem intersections. Samples were taken using portable monitors worn by study staff. Simultaneous traffic counts for diesel trucks, buses, cars, and pedestrians were carried out at each intersection on [Greater/equal to] 2 of the 5 sampling days. Eight-hour diesel vehicle counts ranged from 61 to 2,467 across the four sites. Mean concentrations of PM(2.5) exhibited only modest site-to-site variation (37-47 microg/m(3)), reflecting the importance of broader regional sources of PM(2.5). In contrast, EC concentrations varied 4-fold across sites (from 1.5 to 6 microg/m(3)), and were associated with bus and truck counts on adjacent streets and, at one site, with the presence of a bus depot. A high correlation (r = 0.95) was observed between EC concentrations measured analytically and a blackness measurement based on PM(2.5) filter reflectance, suggesting the utility of the latter as a surrogate measure of DEP in future community-based studies. These results show that local diesel sources in Harlem create spatial variations in sidewalk concentrations of DEP. The study also demonstrates the feasibility of a new paradigm for community-based research involving full and active partnership between academic scientists and community-based organizations.

  4. Implementation of a near-real time cross-border web-mapping platform on airborne particulate matter (PM) concentration with open-source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knörchen, Achim; Ketzler, Gunnar; Schneider, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Although Europe has been growing together for the past decades, cross-border information platforms on environmental issues are still scarce. With regard to the establishment of a web-mapping tool on airborne particulate matter (PM) concentration for the Euregio Meuse-Rhine located in the border region of Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands, this article describes the research on methodical and technical backgrounds implementing such a platform. An open-source solution was selected for presenting the data in a Web GIS (OpenLayers/GeoExt; both JavaScript-based), applying other free tools for data handling (Python), data management (PostgreSQL), geo-statistical modelling (Octave), geoprocessing (GRASS GIS/GDAL) and web mapping (MapServer). The multilingual, made-to-order online platform provides access to near-real time data on PM concentration as well as additional background information. In an open data section, commented configuration files for the Web GIS client are being made available for download. Furthermore, all geodata generated by the project is being published under public domain and can be retrieved in various formats or integrated into Desktop GIS as Web Map Services (WMS).

  5. Measurement of airborne concentrations of tire and road wear particles in urban and rural areas of France, Japan, and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panko, Julie M.; Chu, Jennifer; Kreider, Marisa L.; Unice, Ken M.

    2013-06-01

    In addition to industrial facilities, fuel combustion, forest fires and dust erosion, exhaust and non-exhaust vehicle emissions are an important source of ambient air respirable particulate matter (PM10). Non-exhaust vehicle emissions are formed from wear particles of vehicle components such as brakes, clutches, chassis and tires. Although the non-exhaust particles are relatively minor contributors to the overall ambient air particulate load, reliable exposure estimates are few. In this study, a global sampling program was conducted to quantify tire and road wear particles (TRWP) in the ambient air in order to understand potential human exposures and the overall contribution of these particles to the PM10. The sampling was conducted in Europe, the United States and Japan and the sampling locations were selected to represent a variety of settings including both rural and urban core; and within each residential, commercial and recreational receptors. The air samples were analyzed using validated chemical markers for rubber polymer based on a pyrolysis technique. Results indicated that TRWP concentrations in the PM10 fraction were low with averages ranging from 0.05 to 0.70 μg m-3, representing an average PM10 contribution of 0.84%. The TRWP concentration in air was associated with traffic load and population density, but the trend was not statistically significant. Further, significant differences across days were not observed. This study provides a robust dataset to understand potential human exposures to airborne TRWP.

  6. Retrieval of Vertical Structure of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration from Airborne Lidar Measurements during the 2011 and 2013 ASCENDS Science Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A.; Rodriguez, M.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Goddard is developing an integrated-path, differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission. The approach uses pulsed lasers to measure both CO2 and O2 absorption simultaneously in the vertical path to the surface at a number of wavelengths across a CO2 line at 1572.335 nm and the O2 line doublet near 764.7 nm. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere allow the technique to estimate column CO2 and O2 number density and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground. This allows sampling the vertical structure of CO2 and O2 when broken and/or thin clouds are present. This additional information can improve absorption line fits and estimates of column-averaged CO2 and O2 number density, and help isolate and identify sources/sinks of CO2 near the surface. We show some preliminary results of this capability using airborne lidar measurements from the summer 2011 and winter 2013 ASCENDS campaigns. These show simultaneous retrievals of CO2 and O2 column densities for laser returns from ground, low-altitude clouds and cirrus clouds. CO2 concentration in the planetary boundary layer, free troposphere, and lower stratosphere are estimated and compared to those from in-situ CO2 profiles measured during the campaigns.

  7. Elevated Atmospheric Levels of Benzene and Benzene-Related Compounds from Unconventional Shale Extraction and Processing: Human Health Concern for Residential Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Alisa L.; Orimoloye, Helen T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The advancement of natural gas (NG) extraction across the United States (U.S.) raises concern for potential exposure to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Benzene, a HAP and a primary chemical of concern due to its classification as a known human carcinogen, is present in petroleum-rich geologic formations and is formed during the combustion of bypass NG. It is a component in solvents, paraffin breakers, and fuels used in NG extraction and processing (E&P). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study are to confirm the presence of benzene and benzene-related compounds (benzene[s]) in residential areas, where unconventional shale E&P is occurring, and to determine if benzene[s] exists in elevated atmospheric concentrations when compared to national background levels. METHODS Ambient air sampling was conducted in six counties in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex with passive samples collected in evacuated 6-L Summa canisters. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, with sampling performed at variable distances from the facility fence line. RESULTS Elevated concentrations of benzene[s] in the atmosphere were identified when compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program. The 24-hour benzene concentrations ranged from 0.6 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 592 ppbv, with 1-hour concentrations from 2.94 ppbv to 2,900.20 ppbv. CONCLUSION Benzene is a known human carcinogen capable of multisystem health effects. Exposure to benzene is correlated with bone marrow and blood-forming organ damage and immune system depression. Sensitive populations (children, pregnant women, elderly, immunocompromised) and occupational workers are at increased risk for adverse health effects from elevated atmospheric levels of benzene[s] in residential areas with unconventional shale E&P. PMID:27199565

  8. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  9. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  10. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  11. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: The effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Schlosser, P.M.; Bond, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several investigators have demonstrated that a combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) is necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene. Enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of benzene and its metabolites include the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. Other organic molecules that are substrates for cytochrome P450 can inhibit the metabolism of benzene. For example, toluene has been shown to inhibit the oxidation of benzene in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme inducers, such as ethanol, can alter the target tissue dosimetry of benzene metabolites by inducing enzymes responsible for oxidation reactions involved in benzene metabolism. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Investigation of Airborne Chemical Concentrations in Certain Work Areas of Naval Air Rework Facility at North Island, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    and leading edge abrasive strips, etc. In the process of doing these jobs, it is necessary to strip and clean surfaces and to prepare them for...cyanide sump i3 another possible source of hydrogen cyanide. The possibility of "accidents" or human failure could lead to conditions where appreciable...termining concentrations of toxic gases and vapors. It has been proven through extensive use by leading industrial companies and government agencies

  13. Atmospheric benzene observations from oil and gas production in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July and August 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, Hannah S.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wisthaler, Armin; Blake, Donald R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Apel, Eric C.; Hills, Alan J.

    2016-09-01

    High time resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using a proton-transfer-reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QMS) instrument at the Platteville Atmospheric Observatory (PAO) in Colorado to investigate how oil and natural gas (O&NG) development impacts air quality within the Wattenburg Gas Field (WGF) in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The measurements were carried out in July and August 2014 as part of NASA's "Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality" (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign. The PTR-QMS data were supported by pressurized whole air canister samples and airborne vertical and horizontal surveys of VOCs. Unexpectedly high benzene mixing ratios were observed at PAO at ground level (mean benzene = 0.53 ppbv, maximum benzene = 29.3 ppbv), primarily at night (mean nighttime benzene = 0.73 ppbv). These high benzene levels were associated with southwesterly winds. The airborne measurements indicate that benzene originated from within the WGF, and typical source signatures detected in the canister samples implicate emissions from O&NG activities rather than urban vehicular emissions as primary benzene source. This conclusion is backed by a regional toluene-to-benzene ratio analysis which associated southerly flow with vehicular emissions from the Denver area. Weak benzene-to-CO correlations confirmed that traffic emissions were not responsible for the observed high benzene levels. Previous measurements at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) and our data obtained at PAO allow us to locate the source of benzene enhancements between the two atmospheric observatories. Fugitive emissions of benzene from O&NG operations in the Platteville area are discussed as the most likely causes of enhanced benzene levels at PAO.

  14. Diurnal variations of airborne pollen concentration and the effect of ambient temperature in three sites of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Ríos, B; Torres-Jardón, R; Ramírez-Arriaga, E; Martínez-Bernal, A; Rosas, I

    2016-05-01

    Pollen is an important cause of allergic respiratory ailments in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). However, very little is known if ambient air temperature correlates with the early blooming of plants observed in other urban areas around the world. A research study was conducted during the dry season of 2012-2013 at three representative sites of the MCMA with different urban characteristics with the aim to understand the relationships between the profusion and diversity of pollen against temperature and other meteorological variables and degree of urbanization. Pollen samples were collected using a Hirst-type trap sampler in the sites: Merced (highly urbanized), Iztapalapa (medium-high urbanized) and Coyoacan (moderately urbanized). Urbanization levels were determined using a composite index based on population density, proportion of surface covered by construction and asphalt, and urban heat island intensity. A set of representative pollen sampling tapes were assayed under a light microscope at magnification of ×1,000 and converted to grains per cubic meter. The most representative pollen types found in the three sites were, regardless of urbanization levels were: Fraxinus, Cupressaceae/Taxodiaceae, Casuarina, Alnus, Myrtaceae, and Pinus. Total pollen concentration was greatest in the moderately urbanized area, although earlier blooming took place at the highly urbanized zone. Total pollen concentration in the medium-high urbanized site has the lowest because the green areas in this zone of MCMA are few. In a diurnal basis, the most abundant pollen types peaked near midday or in the afternoon evening at the three sites. A Spearman test showed a positive correlation among bihourly pollen concentrations, temperature and relative humidity in all sites, but wind speed just correlated in Iztapalapa and Coyoacan. The results obtained suggest that Urban Heat Island Intensity can disturb flowering periods and pollen concentrations, largely in the highly urbanized

  15. Diurnal variations of airborne pollen concentration and the effect of ambient temperature in three sites of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ríos, B.; Torres-Jardón, R.; Ramírez-Arriaga, E.; Martínez-Bernal, A.; Rosas, I.

    2016-05-01

    Pollen is an important cause of allergic respiratory ailments in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). However, very little is known if ambient air temperature correlates with the early blooming of plants observed in other urban areas around the world. A research study was conducted during the dry season of 2012-2013 at three representative sites of the MCMA with different urban characteristics with the aim to understand the relationships between the profusion and diversity of pollen against temperature and other meteorological variables and degree of urbanization. Pollen samples were collected using a Hirst-type trap sampler in the sites: Merced (highly urbanized), Iztapalapa (medium-high urbanized) and Coyoacan (moderately urbanized). Urbanization levels were determined using a composite index based on population density, proportion of surface covered by construction and asphalt, and urban heat island intensity. A set of representative pollen sampling tapes were assayed under a light microscope at magnification of ×1,000 and converted to grains per cubic meter. The most representative pollen types found in the three sites were, regardless of urbanization levels were: Fraxinus, Cupressaceae/Taxodiaceae, Casuarina, Alnus, Myrtaceae, and Pinus. Total pollen concentration was greatest in the moderately urbanized area, although earlier blooming took place at the highly urbanized zone. Total pollen concentration in the medium-high urbanized site has the lowest because the green areas in this zone of MCMA are few. In a diurnal basis, the most abundant pollen types peaked near midday or in the afternoon evening at the three sites. A Spearman test showed a positive correlation among bihourly pollen concentrations, temperature and relative humidity in all sites, but wind speed just correlated in Iztapalapa and Coyoacan. The results obtained suggest that Urban Heat Island Intensity can disturb flowering periods and pollen concentrations, largely in the highly urbanized

  16. Airborne observed and receptor-oriented modelled urban increments of anthropogenic CO2, CO and NOX concentrations in the megacity of London in summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font Font, Anna Maria; Morguí, Josep Anton; Lee, James; McQuaid, Jim B.; Barratt, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    A better characterization of the emissions and the dynamics of anthropogenic CO2 in large-urban centres are needed to implement more effective mitigation measures to combat climate change. This study aims to establish a representative emissions ratio of anthropogenic CO2 (CO2ff) in the megacity of London using CO and NOX as tracers. Observations of CO2, CO and NOX mixing ratios obtained onboard the NERC-ARSF aircraft undertaken on 12 July 2012 over the city of London were used. Airborne observations were taken at ~380 m along four transects crossing London, two in the morning (10:30 to 12:30 GMT) and two in the afternoon (15:30-16:30 GMT). The ratio of the amounts of CO and CO2 in excess of natural abundances (denoted as ΔCO and ΔCO2, respectively) from the airborne observations was used to determine the fraction of CO2 derived from burning fossil fuels (CO2ff). Total observations of CO and CO2 were compared to NOX observations and background concentrations were determined as the intercept when NOX mixing ratios equalled zero derived from standardised major axis linear regression. Excess concentrations were calculated by subtracting total amounts minus the background. ΔCO showed good correlation with ΔCO2 in the morning transects (R=0.95) but not in the afternoon (R=-0.50). The mean (±1σ) CO/CO2ff was derived from linear regression using the morning measurements and valued 5.0±0.4 ppb ppm-1. Lagrangian Particle Dispersion (LPD) simulations in backward mode were undertaken to model urban increments of anthropogenic CO2 and CO and to calculate the emissions ratio from the emissions inventory EDGAR v4.2. The LPD model FLEXPART was run with the meteorological data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (spatial resolution of 0.2 x 0.2 degrees; 91 vertical levels) and multiplied with the EDGAR emissions inventory (spatial resolution 0.1 x 0.1 degrees) to obtain an increment at each receptor point along the transects. Annual and temporal

  17. Urinary trans-trans muconic acid (exposure biomarker to benzene) and hippuric acid (exposure biomarker to toluene) concentrations in Mexican women living in high-risk scenarios of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Pruneda-Alvarez, Lucía G; Ruíz-Vera, Tania; Ochoa-Martínez, Angeles C; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-12-16

    This study aimed to determine t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA; exposure biomarker for benzene) and hippuric acid (HA; exposure biomarker for toluene) concentrations in the urine of women living in Mexico. In a cross-sectional study, apparently healthy women (n = 104) were voluntarily recruited from localities with a high risk of air pollution; t,t-MA and HA in urine were quantified using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. Mean urinary levels of t,t-MA ranged from 680 to 1,310 μg/g creatinine. Mean values of HA ranged from 0.38 to 0.87 g/g creatinine. In conclusion, compared to data recently reported in literature, we found high urinary levels of t,t-MA and HA in assessed women participating in this study. We therefore deem the implementation of a strategy aimed at the reduction of exposure as a necessary measure for the evaluated communities.

  18. Short-term monitoring of benzene air concentration in an urban area: a preliminary study of application of Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test to assess pollutant impact on global environment and indoor.

    PubMed

    Mura, Maria Chiara; De Felice, Marco; Morlino, Roberta; Fuselli, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    In step with the need to develop statistical procedures to manage small-size environmental samples, in this work we have used concentration values of benzene (C6H6), concurrently detected by seven outdoor and indoor monitoring stations over 12 000 minutes, in order to assess the representativeness of collected data and the impact of the pollutant on indoor environment. Clearly, the former issue is strictly connected to sampling-site geometry, which proves critical to correctly retrieving information from analysis of pollutants of sanitary interest. Therefore, according to current criteria for network-planning, single stations have been interpreted as nodes of a set of adjoining triangles; then, a) node pairs have been taken into account in order to estimate pollutant stationarity on triangle sides, as well as b) node triplets, to statistically associate data from air-monitoring with the corresponding territory area, and c) node sextuplets, to assess the impact probability of the outdoor pollutant on indoor environment for each area. Distributions from the various node combinations are all non-Gaussian, in the consequently, Kruskal-Wallis (KW) non-parametric statistics has been exploited to test variability on continuous density function from each pair, triplet and sextuplet. Results from the above-mentioned statistical analysis have shown randomness of site selection, which has not allowed a reliable generalization of monitoring data to the entire selected territory, except for a single "forced" case (70%); most important, they suggest a possible procedure to optimize network design.

  19. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6 km.

  20. Concentration and emission sources of airborne metals in particulate matter in the industrial district of Médio Paraíba, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Josiane; de Almeida, Pierre Batista; Quiterio, Simone Lorena; Sousa, Célia Regina; Arbilla, Graciela; Escaleira, Viviane; de Carvalho, Maria Isabel; dos Santos Amaral Gomes da Silva, Alzira

    2006-11-01

    Total suspended particles and 12 airborne metals were determined in 4 sampling sites in the industrial region of Médio Paraíba, Brazil. The geometrical means for the four sampling locals were (in units of microg/m3): 65.9 in Barra Mansa, 57.3 in Jardim Paraíba (Volta Redonda), 41.7 in Resende, and 48.9 in Volta Grande (Volta Redonda). These values are lower than levels previously determined in urban and industrial locals of the Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro. For metals, the higher concentrations were obtained for Ca, Zn, Al, Fe, and Mg. Ca, Zn, and Al levels are higher than those determined in other industrial areas. These three metals are used in steel manufacturing, the main economical activity of the region. Enrichment factors for Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb are higher than 10, suggesting an industrial input. Statistical analysis show a high correlation among Ca, Mg, Zn, Cr, Al, Mn, and Fe, all of them used as raw materials in steel manufacturing and/or accumulated as industrial blast furnace slag and steelworks slag.

  1. Environmental exposure to benzene: an update.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L

    1996-01-01

    During the 1990s, several large-scale studies of benzene concentrations in air, food, and blood have added to our knowledge of its environmental occurrence. In general, the new studies have confirmed the earlier findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) studies and other large-scale studies in Germany and the Netherlands concerning the levels of exposure and major sources. For example, the new studies found that personal exposures exceeded indoor concentrations of benzene, which in turn exceeded outdoor concentrations. The new studies of food concentrations have confirmed earlier indications that food is not an important pathway for benzene exposure. The results of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on blood levels in a nationwide sample of 883 persons are in good agreement with the concentrations in exhaled breath measured in about 800 persons a decade earlier in the TEAM studies. Major sources of exposure continue to be active and passive smoking, auto exhaust, and driving or riding in automobiles. New methods in breath and blood sampling and analysis offer opportunities to investigate short-term peak exposures and resulting body burden under almost any conceivable field conditions. PMID:9118882

  2. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. This paper describes a long-term (26 week) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 1) the length of exposure, and it describes three 8-week experiments relating concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 2) their concentration in soil 3) the soil organic matter content and, 4) the degree of chlorination. In the 26-week experiment, the concentration of 1,2,4 - trichlorobenzene in earthworms fluctuated only slightly about a mean of 0.63 ppm (Fig. 1). Although a statistically significant decrease can be demonstrated over the test (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.62 p < 0.05), the decrease was minor. Hexachlorobenzene in earthworms showed a cyclical trend that coincided with replacement of the media, and a slight but statistically significant tendency to increase from about 2 to 3 ppm over the 26 weeks (r = 0.55, p < 0.05). Concentrations of both trichlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene in earthworms increased as the concentrations in the soil increased (Fig. 2), but leveled off at the highest soil concentrations. The most surprising result of this study was the relatively low concentrations in earthworms compared to those in soils. The average concentration of each of the six isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene in earthworms was only about 1 ppm (Table 2); the isomeric structure did not affect accumulation. The concentration of organic matter in soil had a prominent effect on hexachlorobenzene concentrations in earthworms (Fig. 3). Hexachlorobenzene concentrations decreased steadily from 9.3 ppm in earthworms kept in soil without any peat moss added to about 1 ppm in soil containing 16 or 32% organic matter.

  3. Parameterization of gaseous constituencies concentration profiles in the planetary boundary layer as required in support of airborne and satellite borne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindle, E. C.; Condon, E.; Casas, J.

    1976-01-01

    The research to develop the capabilities for sensing air pollution constituencies using satellite or airborne remote sensors is reported. Sensor evaluation and calibration are analyzed including data reduction. The proposed follow-on research is presented.

  4. Benzene: standards, occurrence, and exposure.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, B; Lundberg, P

    1985-01-01

    The national occupational standard values for benzene are 10 ppm for Australia, 10 ppm for Denmark, 10 ppm for Finland, 10 ppm for Japan, 10 ppm for The Netherlands, 10 ppm for the United States, and 5 ppm for Sweden; in the Federal Republic of Germany the technical guideline value is 8 ppm. Crude mineral oil contains benzene as a natural constituent of approximately 0.1%. Gasoline in Sweden may contain 4-5% benzene by volume. The 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) exposure levels of Swedish petroleum refinery workers vary between 0.1 to 1 mg benzene/m3 in air. The exposures of benzene in various other occupations were measured and described. Other environmental exposures to benzene may have their origin in pyrolysis, such as tobacco smoking and burning of substances such as polyvinylchloride.

  5. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  6. Benzene oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Highly reduced sediments from San Diego Bay, Calif., that were incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions metabolized benzene within 55 days when they were exposed initially to I ??M benzene. The rate of benzene metabolism increased as benzene was added back to the benzene-adapted sediments. When a [14C]benzene tracer was included with the benzene added to benzene-adapted sediments, 92% of the added radioactivity was recovered as 14CO2. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited benzene uptake and production of 14CO2 from [14C]benzene. Benzene metabolism stopped when the sediments became sulfate depleted, and benzene uptake resumed when sulfate was added again. The stoichiometry of benzene uptake and sulfate reduction was consistent with the hypothesis that sulfate was the principal electron acceptor for benzene oxidation. Isotope trapping experiments performed with [14C]benzene revealed that there was no production of such potential extracellular intermediates of benzene oxidation as phenol, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, cyclohexane, catechol, and acetate. The results demonstrate that benzene can be oxidized in the absence of O2, with sulfate serving as the electron acceptor, and suggest that some sulfate reducers are capable of completely oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide without the production of extracellular intermediates. Although anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to chelated Fe(III) has been documented previously, the study reported here provides the first example of a natural sediment compound that can serve as an electron acceptor for anaerobic benzene oxidation.

  7. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lynn C.

    2013-04-01

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit

  8. At-line benzene monitor for measuring benzene in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, W.J.

    1992-10-14

    A highly accurate and repeatable at-line benzene monitor (ALBM) has been developed to measure the benzene concentration in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) in the DWPF. This analyzer was conceived and jointly developed within SRTC by the Analytical Development and the Defense Waste Process Technology Sections with extensive support from the Applied Statistics Group and the TNX Operations Section. It is recommended that an ALBM specifically adapted to DWPF analytical requirements be used to measure benzene in PHA; calibrations be performed using a 10% methanol solution matrix (for standard stability); and based on experience gained in development at TNX, the services of ADS and ASG be employed to both adapt the ALBM to DWPF requirements and develop statistical control procedures.

  9. BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS AS BIOMARKERS OF BENZENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene is known to be hematotoxic and carcinogenic in animals and humans. While metabolism is required for toxicity, the identity of the ultimate carcinogen(s) remains unknown. Benzene oxide (BO) is the first and most abundant of the metabolites, but very little is known about...

  10. Hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, M. )

    1989-07-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene exposure has been well known for a century. Benzene causes leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, etc. The clinical and hematologic picture of aplastic anemia resulting from benzene exposure is not different from classical aplastic anemia; in some cases, mild bilirubinemia, changes in osmotic fragility, increase in lactic dehydrogenase and fecal urobilinogen, and occasionally some neurological abnormalities are found. Electromicroscopic findings in some cases of aplastic anemia with benzene exposure were similar to those observed by light microscopy. Benzene hepatitis-aplastic anemia syndrome was observed in a technician with benzene exposure. Ten months after occurrence of hepatitis B, a severe aplastic anemia developed. The first epidemiologic study proving the leukemogenicity of benzene was performed between 1967 and 1973 to 1974 among shoe workers in Istanbul. The incidence of leukemia was 13.59 per 100,000, which is a significant increase over that of leukemia in the general population. Following the prohibition and discontinuation of the use of benzene in Istanbul, there was a striking decrease in the number of leukemic shoe workers in Istanbul. In 23.7% of the series, consisting of 59 leukemic patients with benzene exposure, there was a preceding pancytopenic period. Furthermore, a familial connection was found in 10.2% of them. The 89.8% of the series showed the findings of acute leukemia. The possible factors that may determine the types of leukemia in benzene toxicity are discussed. The possible role of benzene exposure is presented in the development of malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and lung cancer.

  11. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  12. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  13. Vertically-resolved retrievals of the atmospheric CO2 concentration using multi-wavelength pulsed lidar measurements from the ASCENDS airborne campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Kawa, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Vertically resolved remote sensing measurements of CO2 can greatly aid the understanding of terrestrial processes compared to column-averaged measurements since the effects of such processes occur mainly in planetary boundary layer of the atmosphere. Using the NASA GSFC CO2 sounder, a multi-wavelength pulsed lidar system for CO2 remote sensing, we demonstrate vertically resolved CO2 concentration measurements from the ASCENDS (Active Sensing of Co2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons) airborne campaigns of July-August 2011 and February-March 2013. Our instrument uses an IPDA (Integrated Path Differential Absorption) approach probing 30 wavelengths across a 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. Our pulsed approach gives us height-resolved (from time-of-flight) atmospheric backscatter information, allowing us to resolve lidar reflections from clouds and the ground. When flying over thin or broken clouds, the instrument simultaneously measures the absorption to each individual cloud layer and ground. This allows us to split the vertical CO2 column into layers (cloud-slicing of the atmosphere) and solve for the CO2 concentration of each column layer. Data from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 making measurements through broken cumulus clouds showed not only a 15-20 ppm reduction in the column averaged CO2 measurements due to the summer biosphere, but also a further 10 ppm decrease in the CO2 concentration in the air below the cloud tops (in the planetary boundary layer) compared to the column average. Line shape information can also be used to resolve several vertical layers from measurements in clear air. Lower atmospheric CO2 has a broader absorption feature compared to that of upper atmospheric CO2 and so changes in lower atmospheric or boundary layer CO2 affect the total column absorption line shape differently compared to those of the upper atmosphere. The CO2 sounder instrument samples the entire absorption line, potentially allowing for resolving several

  14. Assessment of benzene induced oxidative impairment in rat isolated pancreatic islets and effect on insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is an organic compound used in petrochemicals and numerous other industries. It is abundantly released to our environment as a chemical pollutant causing widespread human exposure. This study mainly focused on benzene induced toxicity on rat pancreatic islets with respect to oxidative damage, insulin secretion and glucokinase (GK) activity. Benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally at doses 200, 400 and 800mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In rats, benzene significantly raised the concentration of plasma insulin. Also the effect of benzene on the release of glucose-induced insulin was pronounced in isolated islets. Benzene caused oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, and also reduced the cell viability and total thiols groups, in the islets of exposed rats. In conclusion, the current study revealed that pancreatic glucose metabolism is susceptible to benzene toxicity and the resultant oxidative stress could lead to functional abnormalities in the pancreas.

  15. Evidence That Humans Metabolize Benzene via Two Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Lan, Qing; Vermeulen, Roel; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Zhang, Luoping; Li, Guilan; Yin, Songnian; Hayes, Richard B.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Smith, Martyn T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent evidence has shown that humans metabolize benzene more efficiently at environmental air concentrations than at concentrations > 1 ppm. This led us to speculate that an unidentified metabolic pathway was mainly responsible for benzene metabolism at ambient levels. Objective We statistically tested whether human metabolism of benzene is better fitted by a kinetic model having two pathways rather than one. Methods We fit Michaelis-Menten-like models to levels of urinary benzene metabolites and the corresponding air concentrations for 263 nonsmoking Chinese females. Estimated benzene concentrations ranged from less than 0.001 ppm to 299 ppm, with 10th and 90th percentile values of 0.002 ppm and 8.97 ppm, respectively. Results Using values of Akaike’s information criterion obtained under the two models, we found strong statistical evidence favoring two metabolic pathways, with respective affinities (benzene air concentrations analogous to Km values) of 301 ppm for the low-affinity pathway (probably dominated by cytochrome P450 enzyme 2E1) and 0.594 ppm for the high-affinity pathway (unknown). The exposure-specific metabolite level predicted by our two-pathway model at nonsaturating concentrations was 184 μM/ppm of benzene, a value close to an independent estimate of 194 μM/ppm for a typical nonsmoking Chinese female. Our results indicate that a nonsmoking woman would metabolize about three times more benzene from the ambient environment under the two-pathway model (184 μM/ppm) than under the one-pathway model (68.6 μM/ppm). In fact, 73% of the ambient benzene dose would be metabolized via the unidentified high-affinity pathway. Conclusion Because regulatory risk assessments have assumed nonsaturating metabolism of benzene in persons exposed to air concentrations well above 10 ppm, our findings suggest that the true leukemia risks could be substantially greater than currently thought at ambient levels of exposure—about 3-fold higher among

  16. Observations of urban airborne particle number concentrations during rush-hour conditions: analysis of the number based size distributions and modal parameters.

    PubMed

    Lingard, Justin J N; Agus, Emily L; Young, David T; Andrews, Gordon E; Tomlin, Alison S

    2006-12-01

    A summertime study of the number concentration and the size distribution of combustion derived nanometre sized particles (termed nanoparticles) from diesel and spark-ignition (SI) engine emissions were made under rush-hour and free-flow traffic conditions at an urban roadside location in Leeds, UK in July 2003. The measured total particle number concentrations (N(TOTAL)) were of the order 1.8 x 10(4) to 3.4 x 10(4) cm(-3), and tended to follow the diurnal traffic flow patterns. The N(TOTAL) was dominated by particles < or =100 nm in diameter which accounted for between 89-93% of the measured particle number. By use of a log-normal fitting procedure, the modal parameters of the number based particle size distribution of urban airborne particulates were derived from the roadside measurements. Four component modes were identified. Two nucleation modes were found, with a smaller, more minor, mode composed principally of sub-11 nm particles, believed to be derived from particles formed from the nucleation of gaseous species in the atmosphere. A second mode, much larger in terms of number, was composed of particles within the size range of 10-20 nm. This second mode was believed to be principally derived from the condensation of the unburned fuel and lube oil (the solvent organic fraction or SOF) as it cooled on leaving the engine exhaust. Third and fourth modes were noted within the size ranges of 28-65 nm and 100-160 nm, respectively. The third mode was believed to be representative of internally mixed Aitken mode particles composed of a soot/ash core with an adsorbed layer of readily volatilisable material. The fourth mode was believed to be composed of chemically aged, secondary particles. The larger nucleation and Aitken modes accounted for between 80-90% of the measured N(TOTAL), and the particles in these modes were believed to be derived from SI and diesel engine emissions. The overall size distribution, particularly in modes II-IV, was observed to be strongly

  17. Benzene contamination at a metal plating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, B. A.; Burston, M. R.

    2005-08-01

    A metal plating facility in central Kentucky was required to complete a RCRA Facility Investigation to address a number of Solid Waste Management Units at the site. Twenty monitoring wells were installed at the facility. Ground water from the wells was sampled for total and dissolved metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid extractable compounds, base neutral compounds, and volatile organic compounds. Unexpectedly, relatively large concentrations of benzene, up to 120 μg/l, were detected in samples from some of the wells, including wells that should have been hydraulically upgradient from the facility. As a result of the detection of benzene, the facility completed an investigation to identify the source. A nearby facility had completed a gasoline underground storage tank (UST) closure at about the time of the installation of the 20 wells. Reportedly the UST had small holes when removed. Three potential pathways of migration (a ditch, sanitary sewer, and a sink hole) from the nearby facility to the metal-plating facility and residual soils with very large concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes have been identified.

  18. Benzene degradation coupled with chlorate reduction in a soil column study.

    PubMed

    Tan, N C G; van Doesburg, W; Langenhoff, A A M; Stams, A J M

    2006-03-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate are electron acceptors that during reduction result in the formation of molecular oxygen. The produced oxygen can be used for activation of anaerobic persistent pollutants, like benzene. In this study chlorate was tested as potential electron acceptor to stimulate benzene degradation in anoxic polluted soil column. A chlorate amended benzene polluted soil column was operated over a period of 500 days. Benzene was immediately degraded in the column after start up, and benzene removal recovered completely after omission of chlorate or a too high influent chlorate concentration (22 mM). Mass balance calculations showed that per mole of benzene five mole of chlorate were reduced. At the end of the experiment higher loading rates were applied to measure the maximal benzene degradation rate in this system; a breakthrough of benzene was not observed. The average benzene degradation rate over this period was 31 micromol l(-1) h(-1) with a maximal of 78 micromol l(-1) h(-1). The high degradation rate and the necessity of chlorate indicate that oxygen produced during chlorate reduction indeed is used for the activation of benzene. This is the first column study where benzene biodegradation at a high rate coupled with anaerobic chlorate reduction is observed.

  19. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  20. Seasonal variation of toxic benzene emissions in petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Ansari, M F; Gavane, A G; Pandit, V I; Nema, P; Devotta, S

    2007-05-01

    Petroleum refineries are largest chemical industries that are responsible for the emission of several pollutants into the atmosphere. Benzene is among the most important air pollutants that are emitted by petroleum refineries, since they are involved in almost every refinery process. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants, which play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. These contribute to toxic oxidants, which are harmful to ecosystem, human health and atmosphere. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. The ambient air concentrations of benzene were measured in several sites around the Digboi petroleum refinery, near the city of Gowahati in northeast India, during winter and summer 2004. The seasonal and spatial variations of the ambient air concentrations of this benzene were investigated and analyzed. An estimation of the contribution of the refinery to the measured atmospheric levels of benzene was also performed. The ambient air mixing ratios of benzene in a large area outside the refinery was generally low, in ppbv range, much lower than the ambient air quality standards. This article presents the temporal and spatial variation of air pollution in and around petroleum refinery and showed that no health risk due to benzene is present in the areas adjacent to the refinery.

  1. Contribution of traffic emissions to indoor airborne VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    The contribution of nearby vehicle traffic to indoor airborne volatile organic compound levels and to personal exposures was examined to determine the importance of this source. Indoor and outdoor levels of selected VOCs, aldehydes, ketones, and ethanol were measured at 10 homes in Toronto, on sidewalks near the traffic source, indoors and in the backyards or balconies of apartments (outdoors). Concurrently, air exchange rates were measured at each home with a perfluorocarbon tracer method. All the residences were within 1 km of urban intersections with traffic counts of more than 20,000 vehicles per day. Average concentrations of hexane, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, benzene and propionaldehyde decreased in the order: street level > indoor > outdoor. These compounds occur in vehicle emissions, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 24 to 88 % suggesting that traffic emissions contributed to indoor pollutant level through the process of air exchange. For other compounds different trends were observed. Indoors concentrations were greater than outdoors for ethylacetate, tetrachlorethane, pinene, limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, naphthalene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and ethanol, for example. These compounds are common in consumer products, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 2 to 44%. The differences in street and backyard (outdoor) concentrations for some compounds were large due to the presence of nearby vehicles at street level sampling sites, indicating that the impact of traffic on human exposures (pedestrians on sidewalks and occupants of vehicles) is potentially large, compared to the impact of general background urban air pollutants.

  2. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V.

    2014-10-01

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  3. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  4. Enhanced degradation of benzene by percarbonate activated with Fe(II)-glutamate complex.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaori; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Miao, Zhouwei; Xu, Minhui; Zhang, Xiang; Danish, Muhammad; Cui, Hang; Farooq, Usman; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Effective degradation of benzene was achieved in sodium percarbonate (SPC)/Fe(II)-Glu system. The presence of glutamate (Glu) could enhance the regeneration of Fe(III) to Fe(II), which ensures the benzene degradation efficiency at wider pH range and eliminate the influence of HCO3 (-) in low concentration. Meanwhile, the significant scavenging effects of high HCO3 (-) concentration could also be overcome by increasing the Glu/SPC/Fe(II)/benzene molar ratio. Free radical probe compound tests, free radical scavenger tests, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis were conducted to explore the reaction mechanism for benzene degradation, in which hydroxyl radical (HO•) and superoxide anion radical (O2 (•-)) were confirmed as the predominant species responsible for benzene degradation. In addition, the results obtained in actual groundwater test strongly indicated that SPC/Fe(II)-Glu system is applicable for the remediation of benzene-contaminated groundwater in practice.

  5. Analyses on influencing factors of airborne VOCS pollution in taxi cabins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaokai; Feng, Lili; Luo, Huilong; Cheng, Heming

    2014-11-01

    Due to the long time in vehicular cabins, people have high exposure to the airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCS), which will lead to negative effects on human health. In order to analyze the influencing factors of in-car VOCS pollution concentrations, 38 taxis were investigated on the static and closed conditions. The interior air of taxis was collected through activated Tenax adsorption tubes, and the air samples were analyzed with thermally desorbed gas chromatograph. The average concentrations of in-car benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene, butyl acetate, undecane, and total VOCS (TVOC) were 82.7, 212.3, 74.7, 182.3, 24.7, 33.5, 61.3, and 1,441.7 μg/m(3), respectively. Furthermore, the VOCS and TVOC concentrations increase with the rise of in-car temperature and relative humidity, and decrease with the increase of car age and total mileage. In addition, the VOCS and TVOC concentrations are higher in vehicles with small cabins than in ones with big cabins, and change with different sampling sites and various vehicular grades. Finally, according to the multiple linear regression analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis, car age is the most important factor influencing airborne VOCS and TVOC pollution concentrations in vehicular cabins, followed by interior temperature and total mileage.

  6. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1995-12-19

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

  7. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

  8. Low-dose metabolism of benzene in humans: science and obfuscation.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Stephen M; Kim, Sungkyoon; Thomas, Reuben; Johnson, Brent A; Bois, Frederic Y; Kupper, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous air pollutant that causes human leukemia and hematotoxic effects. Although the mechanism by which benzene causes toxicity is unclear, metabolism is required. A series of articles by Kim et al. used air and biomonitoring data from workers in Tianjin, China, to investigate the dose-specific metabolism (DSM) of benzene over a wide range of air concentrations (0.03-88.9 p.p.m.). Kim et al. concluded that DSM of benzene is greatest at air concentrations <1 p.p.m. This provocative finding motivated the American Petroleum Institute to fund a study by Price et al. to reanalyze the original data. Although their formal 'reanalysis' reproduced Kim's finding of enhanced DSM at sub-p.p.m. benzene concentrations, Price et al. argued that Kim's methods were inappropriate for assigning benzene exposures to low exposed subjects (based on measurements of urinary benzene) and for adjusting background levels of metabolites (based on median values from the 60 lowest exposed subjects). Price et al. then performed uncertainty analyses under alternative approaches, which led them to conclude that '… the Tianjin data appear to be too uncertain to support any conclusions …' regarding the DSM of benzene. They also argued that the apparent low-dose metabolism of benzene could be explained by 'lung clearance.' In addressing these criticisms, we show that the methods and arguments presented by Price et al. are scientifically unsound and that their results are unreliable.

  9. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-15

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  10. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  11. Benzene exposure in industries using or manufacturing paint in China--a literature review, 1956-2005.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Liang, Youxin; Bowes, Stephen; Xu, Hongzhi; Zhou, Yimei; Armstrong, Thomas W; Wong, Otto; Schnatter, A R; Fang, Jinbin; Wang, Laiming; Nie, Liping; Fu, Hua; Irons, Richard

    2009-11-01

    A systematic review of the Chinese literature was conducted from 1956 to 2005. The survey included both online and manual searching, as well as expert discussions aimed at providing insight into factors affecting benzene exposure levels in paint/coatings industries. Data extracted from 204 papers included: (1) year of occurrence, (2) type of paint/coatings products, (3) type of industries where the products were used or produced, (4) job titles and work activities, (5) type of literature searched, (6) working conditions whenever data were available, and (7) exposure levels. Most benzene measurements were short-term samples for comparison with the Chinese maximum allowable concentration standard. The accuracy and precision of the sampling and analytical methods were not reported. The distribution of benzene concentrations was tested and found to fit neither normal nor lognormal distributions. Analysis of variance (comparison for more than two groups) and t-test (comparison for two groups) were conducted on Blom-transformed benzene concentration data. The overall median benzene exposure levels were 215, 82, 31, and 6 mg/m(3) during the periods 1956-1978, 1979-1989, 1990-2001, and 2002-2005, respectively. Mean benzene exposure was significantly lower for paint manufacturing than paint spraying. No significant difference was found among paint types and benzene exposure for paint application. Benzene exposure was significantly higher in workplaces judged to have poor ventilation. No significant differences were found in benzene exposure as a function of industry type. Even though substantially lower when compared with levels in the past, recent benzene exposure measurements suggested that many facilities in the paint/coatings industries in China still have benzene concentrations that are above the current China occupational exposure limit for benzene (6 mg/m(3) as a time-weighted average). Benzene concentrations from the present exercise, while not directly supporting

  12. A multi-scale risk assessment for tephra fallout and airborne concentration from multiple Icelandic volcanoes - Part 2: Vulnerability and impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaini, C.; Biass, S.; Galderisi, A.; Bonadonna, C.; Folch, A.; Smith, K.; Höskuldsson, A.

    2014-08-01

    We perform a multi-scale impact assessment of tephra fallout and dispersal from explosive volcanic activity in Iceland. A companion paper (Biass et al., 2014; "A multi-scale risk assessment of tephra fallout and airborne concentration from multiple Icelandic volcanoes - Part I: hazard assessment") introduces a multi-scale probabilistic assessment of tephra hazard based on selected eruptive scenarios at four Icelandic volcanoes (Hekla, Askja, Eyjafjallajökull and Katla) and presents probabilistic hazard maps for tephra accumulation in Iceland and tephra dispersal across Europe. Here, we present the associated vulnerability and impact assessment that describes the importance of single features at national and European levels and considers several vulnerability indicators for tephra dispersal and deposition. At the national scale, we focus on physical, systemic and economic vulnerability of Iceland to tephra fallout, whereas at the European scale we focus on the systemic vulnerability of the air traffic system to tephra dispersal. This is the first vulnerability and impact assessment analysis of this type and, although it does not include all the aspects of physical and systemic vulnerability, it allows for identifying areas on which further specific analysis should be performed. Results include vulnerability maps for Iceland and European airspace and allow for the qualitative identification of the impacts at both scales in the case of an eruption occurring. Maps produced at the national scale show that tephra accumulation associated with all eruptive scenarios considered can disrupt the main electricity network, in particular in relation to an eruption of Askja. Results also show that several power plants would be affected if an eruption occurred at Hekla, Askja or Katla, causing a substantial systemic impact due to their importance for the Icelandic economy. Moreover, the Askja and Katla eruptive scenarios considered could have substantial impacts on agricultural

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Zinc in Airborne Particulate Matter Shows Tire Debris Concentrated in > 0.5 μm Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Gill, T. E.; Amaya, M. A.; Cahill, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), we speciated Zn in size-resolved fractions of particulate matter (PM) from El Paso, Texas. Spectral patterns indicated that Zn in tire debris is the dominant form of Zn in PM coarser than 0.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter. Although concentrated in the > 0.5 μm fraction, a large portion of the tire debris in PM is small enough to penetrate and deposit in the lower respiratory tract. We collected 3 sets of size-resolved samples of airborne particulate matter (PM) over periods of several days to several weeks in November 2008, and April and May 2009. Local PM compositions typically are dominated by anthropogenic input in November and geologic sources in April, and a mixture in May. The collection site is in the urban core of El Paso, TX, contiguous to the University of Texas at El Paso, 0.6 km from Interstate Highway 10, 0.4 km from State Highway 20, and 1 km from Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. The DRUM sampler (Davis Rotating Uniform size-cut Monitor) employs a rotating Lundgren-type impactor, draws 10 l per minute, and deposits PM on plastic strips mounted on rotating drums. The sampler collected and segregated ambient PM into 8 size cuts: 12-5 μm, 5-2.5, 2.5-1.15, 1.15-0.75, 0.75-0.56, 0.56-0.34, 0.34-0.26, and 0.26-0.09. We conducted the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource on beam line 7-3. Spectra of the 24 samples of PM and numerous model compounds were collected at the Zn K absorption edge in fluorescence mode using a 30-element Ge solid-state detector. The overall spectral patterns from the 3 seasons were similar to one another. But strikingly, each set of 8 XAS spectra displayed an obvious change in the Zn speciation at the 0.56-0.75 μm size cut. We compared the PM spectra to those of our suite of known model compounds and materials. The spectral pattern of the coarser size cuts was quite similar to those of the tires we tested. The Zn in the tires

  14. Current understandings and perspectives on non-cancer health effects of benzene: A global concern

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadar, Haji; Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-04-15

    Objective: Benzene, as a volatile organic compound, is known as one of the main air pollutants in the environment. The aim of this review is to summarize all available evidences on non-cancerous health effects of benzene providing an overview of possible association of exposure to benzene with human chronic diseases, specially, in those regions of the world where benzene concentration is being poorly monitored. Methodology: A bibliographic search of scientific databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scirus was conducted with key words of “benzene toxic health effects”, “environmental volatile organic compounds”, “diabetes mellitus and environmental pollutants”, “breast cancer and environmental pollution”, “prevalence of lung cancer”, and “diabetes prevalence”. More than 300 peer reviewed papers were examined. Experimental and epidemiologic studies reporting health effects of benzene and volatile organic compounds were included in the study. Results: Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that benzene exposure can lead to numerous non-cancerous health effects associated with functional aberration of vital systems in the body like reproductive, immune, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, and respiratory. Conclusion: Chronic diseases have become a health burden of global dimension with special emphasis in regions with poor monitoring over contents of benzene in petrochemicals. Benzene is a well known carcinogen of blood and its components, but the concern of benzene exposure is more than carcinogenicity of blood components and should be evaluated in both epidemiologic and experimental studies. Aspect of interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to diabetes, breast and lung cancers should be followed up. - Highlights: • Benzene is a volatile organic compound and established blood carcinogen. • Exposure to benzene needs to be

  15. Human Benzene Metabolism Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Vermeulen, Roel; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Zhang, Luoping; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported evidence that humans metabolize benzene via two enzymes, including a hitherto unrecognized high-affinity enzyme that was responsible for an estimated 73 percent of total urinary metabolites [sum of phenol (PH), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CA), E,E-muconic acid (MA), and S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA)] in nonsmoking females exposed to benzene at sub-saturating (ppb) air concentrations. Here, we used the same Michaelis-Menten-like kinetic models to individually analyze urinary levels of PH, HQ, CA and MA from 263 nonsmoking Chinese women (179 benzene-exposed workers and 84 control workers) with estimated benzene air concentrations ranging from less than 0.001 ppm to 299 ppm. One model depicted benzene metabolism as a single enzymatic process (1-enzyme model) and the other as two enzymatic processes which competed for access to benzene (2-enzyme model). We evaluated model fits based upon the difference in values of Akaike’s Information Criterion (ΔAIC), and we gauged the weights of evidence favoring the two models based upon the associated Akaike weights and Evidence Ratios. For each metabolite, the 2-enzyme model provided a better fit than the 1-enzyme model with ΔAIC values decreasing in the order 9.511 for MA, 7.379 for PH, 1.417 for CA, and 0.193 for HQ. The corresponding weights of evidence favoring the 2-enzyme model (Evidence Ratios) were: 116.2:1 for MA, 40.0:1 for PH, 2.0:1 for CA and 1.1:1 for HQ. These results indicate that our earlier findings from models of total metabolites were driven largely by MA, representing the ring-opening pathway, and by PH, representing the ring-hydroxylation pathway. The predicted percentage of benzene metabolized by the putative high-affinity enzyme at an air concentration of 0.001 ppm was 88% based upon urinary MA and was 80% based upon urinary PH. As benzene concentrations increased, the respective percentages of benzene metabolized to MA and PH by the high-affinity enzyme decreased successively

  16. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  17. REDUCTIONS IN HUMAN BENZENE EXPOSURE IN THE CALIFORNIA SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN. (R827352C004)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene typically contributes a significant fraction of the human cancer risk associated with exposure to urban air pollutants. In recent years, concentrations of benzene in ambient air have declined in many urban areas due to the use of reformulated gasolines, lower vehicle e...

  18. Small scale spatial gradients of outdoor and indoor benzene in proximity of an integrated steel plant.

    PubMed

    Licen, Sabina; Tolloi, Arianna; Briguglio, Sara; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Adami, Gianpiero; Barbieri, Pierluigi

    2016-05-15

    Benzene is known as a human carcinogen, whose annual mean concentration exceeded the EU limit value (5 μg/m(3)) only in very few locations in Europe during 2012. Nevertheless 10% to 12% of the EU-28 urban population was still exposed to benzene concentrations above the WHO reference level of 1.7 μg/m(3). WHO recommended a wise choice of monitoring stations positioning in proximity of "hot spots" to define and assess the representativeness of each site paying attention to micro-scale conditions. In this context benzene and other VOCs of health concern (toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) concentrations have been investigated, with weekly passive sampling for one year, both in outdoor and indoor air in inhabited buildings in close proximity (180 m far up to 1100 m) of an integrated steel plant in NE of Italy. Even though the outdoor mean annual benzene concentration was below the EU limit in every site, in the site closest to the works the benzene concentration was above 5 μg/m(3) in 14 weeks. These events were related to a benzene over toluene ratio above one, which is diagnostic for the presence of an industrial source, and to meteorological factors. These information pointed at the identification of the coke ovens of the plant as the dominant outdoor source of benzene. Benzene gradients with the increasing distance from coke ovens have been found for both outdoor and indoor air. Linear models linking outdoor to indoor benzene concentrations have been then identified, allowing to estimate indoor exposure from ambient air benzene data. In the considered period, a narrow area of about 250 m appeared impacted at a higher degree than the other sites both considering outdoor and indoor air. Passive BTEX sampling permits to collect information on both ambient air and daily life settings, allowing to assemble a valuable data support for further environmental cost-benefit analyses.

  19. Impact of a new gasoline benzene regulation on ambient air pollutants in Anchorage, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yuriko; Morris, Stephen S.; Salerno, Christopher; Schlapia, Anne M.; Stichick, Mathew

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard that limits the amount of benzene allowed in gasoline on ambient benzene concentrations. This new standard, together with two companion regulations that limit cold-temperature automotive emissions and the permeability of portable fuel containers, was expected to lower the levels of ambient benzene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nationwide. In this study the impact of the gasoline benzene standard was evaluated in Anchorage, Alaska in a two-phase ambient air monitoring study conducted before and after the new gasoline standard was implemented. Gasoline sold by Anchorage retailers was also evaluated in each phase to determine the content of benzene and other gasoline components. The average benzene content in Anchorage gasoline was reduced by 70%, from 5.05% (w/w) to 1.53% (w/w) following the implementation of the standard. The annual mean ambient benzene concentration fell by 51%, from 0.99 ppbv in Phase 1 to 0.49 ppbv in Phase 2. Analysis suggests the change in gasoline benzene content alone reduced benzene emissions by 46%. The changes in toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene content in gasoline between Phase 1 and 2 were relatively small and the differences in the mean ambient concentrations of these compounds between phases were modest. Our results suggest that cold winter communities in high latitude and mountainous regions may benefit more from the gasoline benzene standard because of high benzene emissions resulting from vehicle cold start and a tendency to develop atmospheric stagnation conditions in the winter.

  20. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11

    SciTech Connect

    Yuki Kasai; Yumiko Kodama; Yoh Takahata; Toshihiro Hoaki; Kazuya Watanabe

    2007-09-15

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 {mu}M, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site in Aichi, Japan was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Yuki; Kodama, Yumiko; Takahata, Yoh; Hoaki, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2007-09-01

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 microM, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations.

  2. Benzene and sulfide removal from groundwater treated in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Rakoczy, Jana; Feisthauer, Stefan; Wasmund, Kenneth; Bombach, Petra; Neu, Thomas R; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2013-12-01

    Sulfidic benzene-contaminated groundwater was used to fuel a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) over a period of 770 days. We aimed to understand benzene and sulfide removal processes in the anoxic anode chamber and describe the microbial community enriched over the operational time. Operated in batch feeding-like circular mode, supply of fresh groundwater resulted in a rapid increase in current production, accompanied by decreasing benzene and sulfide concentrations. The total electron recoveries for benzene and sulfide were between 18% and 49%, implying that benzene and sulfide were not completely oxidized at the anode. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from the anode-associated bacterial community revealed the dominance of δ-Proteobacteria (31%), followed by β-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, ϵ-Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes, most of which are known for anaerobic metabolism. Two-dimensional compound-specific isotope analysis demonstrated that benzene degradation was initiated by monohydroxylation, probably triggered by small amounts of oxygen which had leaked through the cation exchange membrane into the anode chamber. Experiments with [(13)C(6) ]-benzene revealed incorporation of (13)C into fatty acids of mainly Gram-negative bacteria, which are therefore candidates for benzene degradation. Our study demonstrated simultaneous benzene and sulfide removal by groundwater microorganisms which use an anode as artificial electron acceptor, thereby releasing an electrical current.

  3. Determination of benzene in soft drinks and other beverages by isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu-Liang; Casey, Valerie; Seaman, Steve; Tague, Brett; Becalski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    An automated, simple, and reproducible method was developed for the determination of benzene in soft drinks, based on isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected-ion monitoring mode. The method was used to assess benzene levels in samples of 124 soft drinks and beverages. Benzene was not detected in 60% of the 124 products. The average benzene levels in 6 products exceeded the Canadian maximum acceptable concentration of 5 microg/L for benzene in drinking water, and 2 of the 6 products had benzene levels above the World Health Organization guideline of 10 microg/L. The highest level of benzene, 23 microg/L, was found in a soft drink product specifically marketed to children.

  4. Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study

    SciTech Connect

    Forni, A.

    1996-12-01

    To study the evolution of cytogenetic damage from past exposure to high concentrations of benzene and its health significance, chromosome aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes were reinvestigated after approximately 20 years in four subjects with past severe hemopathy and in seven controls studied in the late 1960s. Increased chromosome-type aberrations were still present up to 30 years after benzene toxicity, but blood counts were normal. The vital status at the end of 1993 was ascertained for 32 subjects with a history of benzene toxicity and for 31 controls studied for CA from 1965 to 1970, who differed significantly for CA rates. Of the 32 benzene-exposed subjects, 1 was lost to follow-up, 20 were still alive, and 11 had died at ages 36 to 83, between 1 and 20 years after the last CA study. Five deaths were from neoplasia (acute erythroleukemia, brain tumor, cancer of lung, paranasal cavity, esophagus). The deceased subjects had significantly higher rates of chromosome-type aberrations than those alive, and those who died of neoplasia had the highest rates of these aberrations in the last study before death or diagnosis of cancer. Out of the 31 controls, 12 had died from 4 to 23 years after the CA study. Three deaths were from neoplasia (two lung cancer, one brain tumor). Even if this is a small sample, the results suggest a higher risk of cancer for the benzene-exposed cohort, who had persistently high CA rates in lymphocytes. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Soot precursor measurements in benzene and hexane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Furuhata, T.; Amagai, K.; Arai, M.

    2008-08-15

    To clarify the mechanism of soot formation in diffusion flames of liquid fuels, measurements of soot and its precursors were carried out. Sooting diffusion flames formed by a small pool combustion equipment system were used for this purpose. Benzene and hexane were used as typical aromatic and paraffin fuels. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method was used to obtain spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are considered as soot particles. Spatial distributions of soot in test flames were measured by a laser-induced incandescence (LII) method. Soot diameter was estimated from the temporal change of LII intensity. A region of transition from PAHs to soot was defined from the results of LIF and LII. Flame temperatures, PAH species, and soot diameters in this transition region were investigated for both benzene and hexane flames. The results show that though the flame structures of benzene and hexane were different, the temperature in the PAHs-soot transition region of the benzene flame was similar to that of the hexane flame. Furthermore, the relationship between the PAH concentrations measured by gas chromatography in both flames and the PAH distributions obtained from LIF are discussed. It was found that PAHs with smaller molecular mass, such as benzene and toluene, remained in both the PAHs-soot transition and sooting regions, and it is thought that molecules heavier than pyrene are the leading candidates for soot precursor formation. (author)

  6. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  7. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  8. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  9. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  10. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  11. Self-collected breath sampling for monitoring low-level benzene exposures among automobile mechanics.

    PubMed

    Egeghy, Peter P; Nylander-French, Leena; Gwin, Kristin K; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2002-07-01

    Automobile mechanics are exposed to benzene through their contact with gasoline vapor and engine exhaust. This study investigated the benzene uptake associated with these exposures. We first evaluated the reliability of self-collected breath samples among a subset of subjects and found good agreement between these samples and those collected under expert supervision (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.79, n = 69). We then used self-monitoring together with a longitudinal sampling design (with up to three measurements per worker) to measure benzene in air and benzene in end-exhaled breath among 81 workers from 12 automobile repair garages in North Carolina. A statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001, Mann-Whitney rank sum test) was observed between non-smokers and smokers for post-exposure benzene concentration in breath (median values of 18.9 and 39.1 micro g/m(3), respectively). Comparing pre- and post-exposure breath concentrations within these two groups, the difference was significant among non-smokers (P < 0.0001) but not significant among smokers (P > 0.05). Mixed effects regression analysis using backwards elimination yielded five significant predictors of benzene concentration in breath, namely benzene exposure (P < 0.0001), pre-exposure benzene concentration in breath (P = 0.021), smoking status (P < 0.0001), fuel system work (P = 0.0043) and carburetor cleaner use (P < 0.0001). The between-person variance component comprised only 28% of the total variance in benzene levels in breath, indicating that differences among individuals related to physiological and metabolic characteristics had little influence on benzene uptake among these workers.

  12. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  13. In vitro conjugation of benzene metabolites by human liver: potential influence of interindividual variability on benzene toxicity.

    PubMed

    Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P; Medinsky, M A

    1995-07-01

    In addition to industrial sources, benzene is present in the environment as a component of cigarette smoke and automobile emissions. Toxicity of benzene most likely results from oxidative metabolism of benzene to reactive products. However, susceptibility to these toxic effects may be related to a balance between activation (phase I) and detoxication (phase II) reactions. In the present study, we have estimated kinetic parameters of the two major detoxication reactions for benzene metabolites--phenol sulfation and hydroquinone glucuronidation--in liver subcellular fractions from 10 humans, and single samples from mice and rats. The extent of oxidative metabolism of benzene by these liver samples has been reported previously. Here, initial rates of phenol sulfation varied 3-fold (range 0.309-0.919 nmol/mg protein/min) among human samples. Measured rates were faster in rats (1.195 nmol/mg protein/min) than in mice (0.458 nmol/mg protein/min). Initial rates of hydroquinone glucuronidation by human samples also varied 3-fold (range 0.101-0.281 nmol/mg protein/min). Hydroquinone glucuronidation was more rapid by mouse microsomes (0.218 nmol/mg protein/min) than by rat microsomes (0.077 nmol/mg protein/min). To integrate interindividual differences in various enzyme activities, a physiological compartmental model was developed that incorporates rates of both conjugation reactions and oxidation reactions. Model equations were solved for steady-state concentrations of phenol and hydroquinone attained in human, mouse and rat blood during continuous exposure to benzene (0.01 microM in blood). Among the 10 human subjects, steady-state concentrations of phenol varied 6-fold (range 0.38-2.17 nM) and steady-state concentrations of hydroquinone varied 5-fold (range 6.66-31.44 nM). Predicted steady-state concentrations of phenol were higher in mice compared with rats (2.28 and 0.83 nM respectively). Likewise, higher steady-state concentrations of hydroquinone were predicted in

  14. Modeling benzene permeation through drinking water high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feng; Ong, Say Kee; Gaunt, James A

    2015-09-01

    Organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-, m-, and p-xylene from contaminated soil and groundwater may permeate through thermoplastic pipes which are used for the conveyance of drinking water in water distribution systems. In this study, permeation parameters of benzene in 25 mm (1 inch) standard inside dimension ratio (SIDR) 9 high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes were estimated by fitting the measured data to a permeation model based on a combination of equilibrium partitioning and Fick's diffusion. For bulk concentrations between 6.0 and 67.5 mg/L in soil pore water, the concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients of benzene were found to range from 2.0×10(-9) to 2.8×10(-9) cm2/s while the solubility coefficient was determined to be 23.7. The simulated permeation curves of benzene for SIDR 9 and SIDR 7 series of HDPE pipes indicated that small diameter pipes were more vulnerable to permeation of benzene than large diameter pipes, and the breakthrough of benzene into the HDPE pipe was retarded and the corresponding permeation flux decreased with an increase of the pipe thickness. HDPE pipes exposed to an instantaneous plume exhibited distinguishable permeation characteristics from those exposed to a continuous source with a constant input. The properties of aquifer such as dispersion coefficients (DL) also influenced the permeation behavior of benzene through HDPE pipes.

  15. Comparison of three prospective analytical methods for benzene analysis in jet-fuel environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    Accurate analysis of benzene in jet fuel has been a concern over the past several years. The method we have been using to analyze benzene in jet fuel is the NIOSH 1501 method, a method specifically designed for aromatic hydrocarbons including benzene. However, the method is not designed for analysis of benzene in jet fuel environments. At the present time there is no approved (either by NIOSH or OSHA) method for analysis of benzene in fuel environments. At the request of HQ AAC/SGPB, we recently conducted a study to compare three prospective analytical methods (NIOSH method 1501 (GC/FID wtih packed column) modified NIOSH 1501 method (GC/FID with capillary column), and High Pressure Liquid Chromatography with Ultraviolet Detection (HPLC/UV)). In this study spiked charcoal tube samples as well as air samples of known concentrations of benzene in JP-4 and Stoddard Solvents were analyzed by all three methods. The test results showed that modified NIOSH 1501 and HPLC methods had good correlation between spiked and measured amount of benzene in JP-4 and Stoddard Solvent mixtures. The NIOSH 1501 method utilizing packed column over estimated the test benzene concentration indicating positive interference from other hydrocarbons present in JP 4 and Stoddard Solvents.

  16. The relationship between low-level benzene exposure and leukemia in Canadian petroleum distribution workers

    SciTech Connect

    Schnatter, A.R.; Armstrong, T.W.; Nicolich, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between leukemia occurrence and long-term, low-level benzene exposures in petroleum distribution workers. Fourteen cases were identified among a previously studied cohort. Four controls per case were selected from the same cohort, controlling for birth year and time at risk. Industrial hygienists estimated workplace exposures for benzene, without knowledge of case-control status. Average benzene concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.2 ppm. Company medical records were used to abstract information on other potential confounders such as cigarette smoking. Odds ratios were calculated for several exposure metrics. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to control for potential confounders. The risk of leukemia was not associated with increasing cumulative exposure to benzene for these exposure levels. Duration of benzene exposure was more closely associated with leukemia risk than other exposure metrics, although results were not statistically significant. A family history of cancer and cigarette smoking were the two strongest risk factors for leukemia, with cumulative benzene exposure showing no additional risk when considered in the same models. This study is consistent with other data in that it was unable to demonstrate a relationship between leukemia and long-term, low-level benzene exposures. The power of the study was limited. Thus, further study on benzene exposures in this concentration range are warranted. 20 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  17. Oxidation of benzene with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with ferrocene in the presence of pyrazine carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shul'pina, L. S.; Durova, E. L.; Kozlov, Yu. N.; Kudinov, A. R.; Strelkova, T. V.; Shul'pin, G. B.

    2013-12-01

    It is found that ferrocene in the presence of small amounts of pyrazine carboxylic acid (PCA) effectively catalyzes the oxidation of benzene to phenol with hydrogen peroxide. Two main differences upon the oxidation of two different substrates, i.e., cyclohexane and benzene, with the same H2O2-ferrocene-PCA catalytic system are revealed: the rates of benzene oxidation and hydrogen peroxide decomposition are several times lower than the rate of cyclohexane oxidation at close concentrations of both substrates, and the rate constant ratios for the reactions of oxidizing particles with benzene and acetonitrile are significantly lower than would be expected for reactions involving free hydroxyl radicals. The overall rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition, including both the catalase and oxidase routes, is lower in the presence of benzene than in the presence of cyclohexane. It is suggested on the grounds of these data that a catalytically active particle different from the one generated in the absence of benzene is formed in the presence of benzene. This particle catalyzes hydrogen peroxide decomposition less efficiently than the initial complex and generates a dissimilar oxidizing particle that exhibits higher selectivity. It is shown that reactivity of the system at higher concentrations of benzene differs from that of an initial system not containing an aromatic component with the capability of π-coordination with metal ions.

  18. Instrument for benzene and toluene emission measurements of glycol regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyecz, Veronika; Mohácsi, Árpád; Puskás, Sándor; Vágó, Árpád; Szabó, Gábor

    2013-11-01

    We introduce an in-field and in-explosive atmosphere useable instrument, which can measure the benzene and toluene concentration in two gas and two glycol samples produced by natural gas dehydration units. It is a two-phase, on-line gas chromatograph with a photoacoustic spectroscopy based detector. The time resolution is 10 min per cycle and the minimum detectable concentrations are 2 mg m-3 for benzene, 3 mg m-3 for toluene in natural gas, and 5 g m-3 for benzene and 6 g m-3 for toluene in glycol. Test measurements were carried out at a dehydration plant belonging to MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Company. Benzene and toluene emissions of gas dehydration unit are calculated from the measured values based on mass balance of a glycol regenerator. The relationship between the outdoor temperature and the measured concentration was observed which is caused by temperature-dependent operation of the whole dehydration unit. Emission decreases with increase of outdoor temperature.

  19. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  20. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  1. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  2. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  3. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  4. Airborne Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds and NOx over a European megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Marvin; Lee, James; Davison, Brian; Misztal, Pawel; Karl, Thomas; Hewitt, Nick; Lewis, Alistair

    2014-05-01

    Ground level ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are priority pollutants whose concentrations are closely regulated by European Union Air Quality Directive 2008/50/EC. O3 is a secondary pollutant, produced from a complex chemical interplay between oxides of nitrogen (NOx = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Whilst the basic atmospheric chemistry leading to O3 formation is generally well understood, there are substantial uncertainties associated with the magnitude of emissions of both VOCs and NOx. At present our knowledge of O3 precursor emissions in the UK is primarily derived from National Atmospheric Emission inventories (NAEI) that provide spatially disaggregated estimates at 1x1km resolution, and these are not routinely tested at city or regional scales. Uncertainties in emissions propagate through into uncertainties in predictions of air quality in the future, and hence the likely effectiveness of control policies on both background and peak O3 and NO2 concentrations in the UK. The Ozone Precursor Fluxes in the Urban Environment (OPFUE) project aims to quantify emission rates for NOx and selected VOCs in and around the megacity of London using airborne eddy covariance (AEC). The mathematical foundation for AEC has been extensively reviewed and AEC measurements of ozone, dimethyl sulphide, CO2 and VOCs have been previously reported. During the summer of 2013, approximately 30 hours of airborne flux measurements of toluene, benzene, NO and NO2 were obtained from the NERC Airborne Research and Survey Facility's (ARSF) Dornier-228 aircraft. Over SE England, flights involved repeated south west to north east transects of ~50 km each over Greater London and it's surrounding suburbs and rural areas, flying at the aircraft's minimum operating flight altitude and airspeed (~300m, 80m/s). Mixing ratios of benzene and toluene were acquired at 2Hz using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and compared to twice hourly whole air canister

  5. Combined analysis of job and task benzene air exposures among workers at four US refinery operations.

    PubMed

    Burns, Amanda; Shin, Jennifer Mi; Unice, Ken M; Gaffney, Shannon H; Kreider, Marisa L; Gelatt, Richard H; Panko, Julie M

    2017-03-01

    Workplace air samples analyzed for benzene at four US refineries from 1976 to 2007 were pooled into a single dataset to characterize similarities and differences between job titles, tasks and refineries, and to provide a robust dataset for exposure reconstruction. Approximately 12,000 non-task (>180 min) personal samples associated with 50 job titles and 4000 task (<180 min) samples characterizing 24 tasks were evaluated. Personal air sample data from four individual refineries were pooled based on a number of factors including (1) the consistent sampling approach used by refinery industrial hygienists over time, (2) the use of similar exposure controls, (3) the comparability of benzene content of process streams and end products, (4) the ability to assign uniform job titles and task codes across all four refineries, and (5) our analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the distribution of benzene air concentrations for select jobs/tasks across all four refineries. The jobs and tasks most frequently sampled included those with highest potential contact with refinery product streams containing benzene, which reflected the targeted sampling approach utilized by the facility industrial hygienists. Task and non-task data were analyzed to identify and account for significant differences within job-area, task-job, and task-area categories. This analysis demonstrated that in general, areas with benzene containing process streams were associated with greater benzene air concentrations compared to areas with process streams containing little to no benzene. For several job titles and tasks analyzed, there was a statistically significant decrease in benzene air concentration after 1990. This study provides a job and task-focused analysis of occupational exposure to benzene during refinery operations, and it should be useful for reconstructing refinery workers' exposures to benzene over the past 30 years.

  6. The use of biomonitoring data in exposure and human health risk assessment: benzene case study

    PubMed Central

    Angerer, Juergen; Boogaard, Peter J.; Hughes, Michael F.; O’Lone, Raegan B.; Robison, Steven H.; Robert Schnatter, A.

    2013-01-01

    A framework of “Common Criteria” (i.e. a series of questions) has been developed to inform the use and evaluation of biomonitoring data in the context of human exposure and risk assessment. The data-rich chemical benzene was selected for use in a case study to assess whether refinement of the Common Criteria framework was necessary, and to gain additional perspective on approaches for integrating biomonitoring data into a risk-based context. The available data for benzene satisfied most of the Common Criteria and allowed for a risk-based evaluation of the benzene biomonitoring data. In general, biomarker (blood benzene, urinary benzene and urinary S-phenylmercapturic acid) central tendency (i.e. mean, median and geometric mean) concentrations for non-smokers are at or below the predicted blood or urine concentrations that would correspond to exposure at the US Environmental Protection Agency reference concentration (30 µg/m3), but greater than blood or urine concentrations relating to the air concentration at the 1 × 10−5 excess cancer risk (2.9 µg/m3). Smokers clearly have higher levels of benzene exposure, and biomarker levels of benzene for non-smokers are generally consistent with ambient air monitoring results. While some biomarkers of benzene are specific indicators of exposure, the interpretation of benzene biomonitoring levels in a health-risk context are complicated by issues associated with short half-lives and gaps in knowledge regarding the relationship between the biomarkers and subsequent toxic effects. PMID:23346981

  7. Reducing Benzene and Cresol Levels in National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Pilot-Scale Biorefinergy Scrubber Water

    SciTech Connect

    Buzek, M.L.; Phillips, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory converts biomass into energy by gasification or pyrolysis. The aqueous effluent generated in these processes must be disposed of as hazardous waste according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act because certain components exceed the regulatory concentration limit. Gas stripping of the scrubber water was investigated as a method of reducing benzene and cresol levels. A custom-designed packed-bed column was built and a half-factorial experimental design was implemented to determine the effects of gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, and column packing height on the final benzene concentration in the liquid. The experimental results show that packing height had a significant effect on final benzene concentration; gas flow rate and liquid flow rate had little effect. The effects of each design variable on final cresol concentration were not determined. Although the current column design did significantly reduce the benzene and cresol levels in the scrubber water, it did not reduce the concentrations below the regulatory limits. A full-factorial experimental design will be implemented with an increased packing height. Other variables, including column diameter and packing type, will be investigated to determine their effects on final benzene and cresol concentrations. Once the packed-bed column is determined to be effective in reducing contaminant concentrations below the regulatory limit, photocatalytic oxidation will be explored for remediating the benzene and cresol from the gas stream.

  8. Temporal changes in U.S. benzene emissions inferred from atmospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Tara J; Howard, Benjamin J; Parrish, David D; Goldan, Paul D; Kuster, William C; Atlas, Eliot L; Harley, Robert A

    2005-03-15

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments required the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) to enact stricter regulations aimed at reducing benzene emissions. In an effort to determine whether these new regulations have been successful in reducing atmospheric benzene concentrations, we have evaluated benzene-to-acetylene ratios from data sets spanning nearlythree decades, collected during several field studies and from the U.S. EPA's Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Station (PAMS) network. The field-study data indicate a decrease in benzene relative to acetylene of approximately 40% from 1994 to 2002. This corresponds to a decrease in benzene alone of approximately 56% over the same period. In contrast, the PAMS data exhibit high interannual variability with no discernible trend. This discrepancy is attributed to measurement problems in the PAMS data sets.

  9. Double photoionization of halogenated benzene

    SciTech Connect

    AlKhaldi, Mashaal Q.; Wehlitz, Ralf

    2016-01-28

    We have experimentally investigated the double-photoionization process in C{sub 6}BrF{sub 5} using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. We compare our results with previously published data for partially deuterated benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}D{sub 3}) over a wide range of photon energies from threshold to 270 eV. A broad resonance in the ratio of doubly to singly charged parent ions at about 65 eV appears shifted in energy compared to benzene data. This shift is due to the difference in the bond lengths in two molecules. A simple model can explain the shape of this resonance. At higher photon energies, we observe another broad resonance that can be explained as a second harmonic of the first resonance.

  10. Functionalization of benzene by superhalogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar; Kumar, Abhishek; Misra, Neeraj

    2017-03-01

    We perform ab initio MP2/6-311++G(d,p) calculations to analyze the molecular properties and aromaticity of NO3, BO2 as well as BF4 superhalogen substituted benzene and compare them with well known electron withdrawing group substituted benzene such as C6H5F and C6H5CN in neutral and ionic forms. It has been noticed that the properties (including aromaticity) of C6H5BO2 closely resemble those of C6H5F and C6H5CN. On the contrary, C6H5NO3 possesses some quite different properties such as high electron affinity, small frontier orbital energy gap and enhanced aromaticity. It is also revealed that C6H5BF4 exists only in the form of C6H5F⋯BF3 complex.

  11. An evaluation of the external radiation exposure dosimetry and calculation of maximum permissible concentration values for airborne materials containing 18F, 15O, 13N, 11C and 133Xe.

    PubMed

    Piltingsrud, H V; Gels, G L

    1985-11-01

    To better understand the dose equivalent (D.E.) rates produced by airborne releases of gaseous positron-emitting radionuclides under various conditions of cloud size, a study of the external radiation exposure dosimetry of these radionuclides, as well as negatron, gamma and x-ray emitting 133Xe, was undertaken. This included a calculation of the contributions to D.E. as a function of cloud radii, at tissue depths of 0.07 mm (skin), 3 mm (lens of eye) and 10 mm (whole body) from both the particulate and photon radiations emitted by these radionuclides. Estimates of maximum permissible concentration (MPC) values were also calculated based on the calculated D.E. rates and current regulations for personnel radiation protection (CFR84). Three continuous air monitors, designed for use with 133Xe, were evaluated for applications in monitoring air concentrations of the selected positron emitters. The results indicate that for a given radionuclide and for a cloud greater than a certain radius, personnel radiation dosimeters must respond acceptably to only the photon radiations emitted by the radionuclide to provide acceptable personnel dosimetry. For clouds under that radius, personnel radiation dosimeters must also respond acceptably to the positron or negatron radiations to provide acceptable personnel dosimetry. It was found that two out of the three air concentration monitors may be useful for monitoring air concentrations of the selected positron emitters.

  12. Intermolecular interactions in solid benzene.

    PubMed

    Kearley, G J; Johnson, M R; Tomkinson, J

    2006-01-28

    The lattice dynamics and molecular vibrations of benzene and deuterated benzene crystals are calculated from force constants derived from density-functional theory (DFT) calculations and compared with measured inelastic neutron-scattering spectra. A very small change (0.5%) in lattice parameter is required to obtain real lattice-mode frequencies across the Brillouin zone. There is a strong coupling between wagging and breathing modes away from the zone center. This coupling and sensitivity to cell size arises from two basic interactions. Firstly, comparatively strong interactions that hold the benzene molecules together in layers. These include an intermolecular interaction in which H atoms of one molecule link to the center of the aromatic ring of a neighboring molecule. The layers are held to each other by weaker interactions, which also have components that hold molecules together within a layer. Small changes in the lattice parameters change this second type of interaction and account for the changes to the lattice dynamics. The calculations also reveal a small auxetic effect in that elongation of the crystal along the b axis leads to an increase in internal pressure in the ac plane, that is, elongation in the b direction induces expansion in the a and c directions.

  13. Antioxidant Compounds in Traditional Indian Pickles May Prevent the Process-Induced Formation of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Mahesh M; Adiani, Vanshika; Variyar, Prasad; Sharma, Arun; Singhal, Rekha S

    2016-01-01

    Pickles in the Indian market contain ascorbic acid from the raw material used and benzoate as an added preservative that are involved in the formation of benzene in soft drinks. In this work, 24 market pickle samples were surveyed for benzene content, as well as its precursors and other constituents that influence its formation. The analysis showed that pickle samples were high in acid content (low pH) and showed significant amount of ascorbic acid, minerals (Cu and Fe), and benzoic acid present in them. Also, most samples exhibited high antioxidant activity that might be attributed to the ingredients used, such as fruits and spices. The solid-phase microextraction headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed in-house for benzene analysis. Eleven of 24 samples had benzene, with the highest concentration of 4.36 ± 0.82 μg of benzene per kg of pickle for a lime pickle that was also reported to have highest benzoic acid and considerably less hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) scavenging activity. However, benzene levels for all 11 samples were considerably below the World Health Organization regulatory limit of 10 μg/kg for benzene in mineral water. Studies on model systems revealed that the high antioxidant activity of Indian pickles may have had a strong inhibitory effect on benzene formation.

  14. Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas, Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2009-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Walker, Charles W.; Baker, Anna C.; Teunis, Jessica A.; Majcher, Emily H.; Brayton, Michael J.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with a continuous flow, fixed-film bioreactor seeded with native microorganisms in groundwater from the wetland area showed both aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of dichlorobenzenes, monochlorobenzene, and benzene, although monochlorobenzene and benzene degradation rates decreased under anaerobic conditions compared to aerobic conditions. In two bioreactors with established biofilms of WBC-2, percent removals of all chlorinated benzene compounds (medians of 86 to 94 percent) under anaerobic conditions were as high as those observed for the bioreactors seeded only with native microorganisms from the site groundwater, and benzene removal was greater in the WBC-2 bioaugmented bioreactors. The high percent removals in the WBC-2 bioreactors without the need for an acclimation period indicates that the same dechlorinators are involved in the chlorinated benzene degradation as those for the chlorinated ethanes and ethenes that the culture was developed to degrade. The ability of the WBC-2 culture to completely reduce the chlorinated benzenes and benzene, even in the presence of high sulfate and sulfide concentrations, is unique for known dechlorinating cultures. The availability of the established culture WBC-2, as well as the ability of the native wetland microbial community to degrade the site contaminants under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, provides flexibility in considering bioremediation options for the wetland areas at SCD.

  15. Exposure to benzene in urban workers: environmental and biological monitoring of traffic police in Rome

    PubMed Central

    Crebelli, R; Tomei, F; Zijno, A; Ghittori, S; Imbriani, M; Gamberale, D; Martini, A; Carere, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the contribution of traffic fumes to exposure to benzene in urban workers, an investigation on personal exposure to benzene in traffic police from the city of Rome was carried out.
METHODS—The study was performed from December 1998 to June 1999. Diffusive Radiello personal samplers were used to measure external exposures to benzene and alkyl benzenes during the workshift in 139 policemen who controlled medium to high traffic areas and in 63 office police. Moreover, as biomarkers of internal exposure to benzene, blood benzene, and urinary trans, trans-muconic and S-phenyl mercapturic acids were measured at the beginning and at the end of the workshift in 124 traffic police and 58 office police.
RESULTS—Time weighted average (TWA) exposure to benzene was consistently higher among traffic police than among indoor workers (geometric mean 6.8 and 3.5 µg/m3, respectively). Among the traffic police, the distribution of individual exposures was highly asymmetric, skewed toward higher values. Mean ambient benzene concentrations measured by municipal air monitoring stations during workshifts of traffic police were generally higher (geometric mean 12.6 µg/m3) and did not correlat with personal exposure values. In particular, no association was found between highest personal exposure scores and environmental benzene concentrations. Among the exposure biomarkers investigated, only blood benzene correlated slightly with on-shift exposure to benzene, but significant increases in both urinary trans, trans-muconic and S-phenylmercapturic acids were found in active smokers compared with non-smokers, irrespective of their job.
CONCLUSION—The exposure to traffic fumes during working activities in medium to high traffic areas in Rome may give a relatively greater contribution to personal exposure to benzene than indoor sources present in confined environments. Smoking significantly contributed to internal exposure to benzene in both

  16. Detailed mechanism for oxidation of benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of benzene is presented and used to compute experimentally obtained concentration profiles and ignition delay times over a wide range of equivalence ratio and temperature. The computed results agree qualitatively with all the experimental trends. Quantitative agreement is obtained with several of the composition profiles and for the temperature dependence of the ignition delay times. There are indications, however, that some important reactions are as yet undiscovered in this mechanism. Recent literature expressions have been used for the rate coefficients of most important reactions, except for some involving phenol. The discrepancy between the phenol pyrolysis rate coefficient used in this work and a recent literature expression remains to be explained.

  17. Comparison of predicted ground-level airborne radionuclide concentrations to measured values resulting from operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoak, W.V.

    1993-05-01

    A comparison study of measured and predicted downwind radionuclide concentrations from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) was performed. The radionuclide emissions consist primarily of the radioisotopes 11C, 13N, and 150. The gases, vented to the outside environment by a stack located at the facility, potentially increase the radiation exposure at the facility boundary. Emission rate, meteorological, and radiation monitoring station data were collected between September 26, 1992 and October 3, 1992. The meteorological and emission data were input to the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88-PC) computer code. The downwind radionuclide air concentrations predicted by the code were compared to the air concentrations measured by the monitoring stations. The code was found to slightly over-predict downwind concentrations during unstable atmospheric conditions. For stable atmospheric conditions, the code was not useful for predicting downwind air concentrations. This is thought to be due to an underestimation of horizontal dispersion.

  18. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  19. Benzene solubility in water: A reassessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    It is shown that the results of molecular dynamics simulations on the hydration thermodynamics of benzene at room temperature [Schravendijk and van der Vegt, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 1 (2005) 643] are in line with a former theoretical analysis [Graziano and Lee, J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 10367]. In fact: (a) the benzene-water van der Waals interaction energy proves to be larger in magnitude than the work of cavity creation and is able to account for the experimental finding that the hydration of benzene is a spontaneous process under the Ben-Naim standard conditions around room temperature; (b) the weak benzene-water H-bonds do not provide a significant contribution to benzene solubility in water because the favorable enthalpic component is almost entirely compensated for by an unfavorable entropic component. This enthalpy-entropy compensation occurs because the H-bonding potential of benzene is not strong.

  20. Improved Instrumentation for the Detection of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration using an Airborne IPDA LIDAR for 2014 NASA ASCENDS Science Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, G. R.; Riris, H.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Sun, X.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    NASA-GSFC is developing a twin-channel, Integrated-Path, Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar to measure atmospheric CO2 from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons). This lidar consists of two independent, tuned, pulsed transmitters on the same optical bench using a common 8" receiver telescope. The system measures CO2 abundance and O2 surface pressure in the same column to derive the dry volume mixing ratio (vmr). The system is being tested on an airborne platform up to altitudes of 13 Km. The lidar uses a cw scanning laser, externally pulsed and a fiber amplifier in a Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) configuration to measure lineshape, range to scattering surfaces and backscatter profiles. The CO2 operates at 1572.335 nm. The O2 channel uses similar technology but frequency doubles to the O2 A-band absorption, around 765nm. Both lasers are scanned across the absorption feature measuring at a fixed number of discrete (~30) wavelengths per scan around ~300 scans/s. Each output pulse is slightly chirped <12MHz as the laser is tuning. Removing this chirp will improve our ability to infer vertical CO2 distribution from a more accurately measured line shape. A Step Tuned Frequency Locked (STFL) DBR diode laser system has been integrated into the CO2 lidar. Tuning and locking takes a ~30μs and the laser is locked to < ±100KHz. We have the ability to position these pulses anywhere on the absorption line other than within a few MHz of line center. While the telescope and fiber coupling scheme remains unchanged the detectors have been upgraded. The O2 system now uses eight SPCMs in parallel to improve count rates and increase dynamic range. Especially useful when flying over bright surfaces. This will improve our ability to measure the O2 pressure at cloud tops and aid in the determining the vmr above clouds. An HgCdTe e-APD detector with a quantum efficient of >80%, linear over five

  1. Low-dose metabolism of benzene in humans: science and obfuscation

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous air pollutant that causes human leukemia and hematotoxic effects. Although the mechanism by which benzene causes toxicity is unclear, metabolism is required. A series of articles by Kim et al. used air and biomonitoring data from workers in Tianjin, China, to investigate the dose-specific metabolism (DSM) of benzene over a wide range of air concentrations (0.03–88.9 p.p.m.). Kim et al. concluded that DSM of benzene is greatest at air concentrations <1 p.p.m. This provocative finding motivated the American Petroleum Institute to fund a study by Price et al. to reanalyze the original data. Although their formal ‘reanalysis’ reproduced Kim’s finding of enhanced DSM at sub-p.p.m. benzene concentrations, Price et al. argued that Kim’s methods were inappropriate for assigning benzene exposures to low exposed subjects (based on measurements of urinary benzene) and for adjusting background levels of metabolites (based on median values from the 60 lowest exposed subjects). Price et al. then performed uncertainty analyses under alternative approaches, which led them to conclude that ‘… the Tianjin data appear to be too uncertain to support any conclusions …’ regarding the DSM of benzene. They also argued that the apparent low-dose metabolism of benzene could be explained by ‘lung clearance.’ In addressing these criticisms, we show that the methods and arguments presented by Price et al. are scientifically unsound and that their results are unreliable. PMID:23222815

  2. [Studies of ozone formation potentials for benzene and ethylbenzene using a smog chamber and model simulation].

    PubMed

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu

    2014-02-01

    Ozone formation potentials from irradiations of benzene-NO(x) and ethylbenzene-NO(x) systems under the conditions of different VOC/NO(x) ratios and RH were investigated using a characterized chamber and model simulation. The repeatability of the smog chamber experiment shows that for two sets of ethylbenzene-NO(x) irradiations with similar initial concentrations and reaction conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity and relative light intensity, the largest difference in O3 between two experiments is only 4% during the whole experimental run. On the basis of smog chamber experiments, ozone formation of photo-oxidation of benzene and ethylbenzene was simulated in terms of the master chemical mechanism (MCM). The peak ozone values for benzene and ethylbenzene simulated by MCM are higher than the chamber data, and the difference between the MCM-simulated results and chamber data increases with increasing RH. Under the conditions of sunlight irradiations, with benzene and ethylbenzene concentrations being in the range of (10-50) x 10(-9) and NO(x) concentrations in the range of (10-100) x 10(-9), the 6 h ozone contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were obtained to be (3.1-33) x 10(-9) and (2.6-122) x 10(-9), whereas the peak O3 contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were (3.5-54) x 10(-9) and (3.8-164) x 10(-9), respectively. The MCM-simulated maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values for benzene and ethylbenzene were 0.25/C and 0.97/C (per carbon), respectively. The maximum ozone reactivity (MOR) values for these two species were obtained to be 0.73/C and 1.03/C, respectively. The MOR value of benzene from MCM is much higher than that obtained by carter from SAPRC, indicating that SAPRC may underestimate the ozone formation potential of benzene.

  3. Factors influencing benzene formation from the decarboxylation of benzoate in liquid model systems.

    PubMed

    Medeiros Vinci, Raquel; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Andjelkovic, Mirjana; Canfyn, Michael; Van Overmeire, Ilse; Van Loco, Joris

    2011-12-28

    Benzene may occur in foods due to the oxidative decarboxylation of benzoate in the presence of hydroxyl radicals. This study investigated factors influencing benzene formation in liquid model systems. The type of buffer, other sources of hydroxyl radical formation in food (photo oxidation of riboflavin and lipid oxidation), transition metal ion concentrations, and the inhibitory effect of antioxidants were tested in benzoate containing model systems. Regarding the hydroxyl radical sources tested, the highest benzene formation was observed in light exposed model systems containing ascorbic acid, Cu(2+), and riboflavin in Na-citrate buffer (1250 ± 131 μg kg(-1)). In practice, it seems that the combination ascorbic acid/transition metal ion remains the biggest contributor to benzene formation in food. However, the concentration of Cu(2+) influences significantly benzene formation in such a system with highest benzene yields observed for Cu(2+) 50 μM (1400 μg kg(-1)). The presence of antioxidants with metal chelation or reduction properties could prevent completely benzene formation.

  4. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  5. Study of Humidity Effect on Benzene Decomposition by the Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianpeng; Zhao, Qiong; Liu, Jianqi; Zhong, Fangchuan

    2016-06-01

    The humidity effects on the benzene decomposition process were investigated by the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor. The results showed that the water vapor played an important role in the benzene oxidation process. It was found that there was an optimum humidity value for the benzene removal efficiency, and at around 60% relative humidity (RH), the optimum benzene removal efficiency was achieved. At a SIE of 378 J/L, the removal efficiency was 66% at 0% RH, while the removal efficiency reached 75.3% at 60% RH and dropped to 69% at 80% RH. Furthermore, the addition of water inhibited the formation of ozone and NO2 remarkably. Both of the concentrations of ozone and NO2 decreased with increasing of the RH at the same specific input energy. At a SIE of 256 J/L, the concentrations of ozone and NO2 were 5.4 mg/L and 1791 ppm under dry conditions, whereas they were only 3.4 mg/L and 1119 ppm at 63.5% RH, respectively. Finally, the outlet gas after benzene degradation was qualitatively analyzed by FT-IR and GC-MS to determine possible intermediate byproducts. The results suggested that the byproducts in decomposition of benzene primarily consisted of phenol and substitutions of phenol. Based on these byproducts a benzene degradation mechanism was proposed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11205007 and 11205029)

  6. Airborne mercury deposition and watershed characteristics in relation to mercury concentrations in water, sediments, plankton, and fish of eighty northern Minnesota lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J.A.; Glass, G.E.; Schmidt, K.W.; Huber, J.K.; Rapp, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    In light of increasing fish consumption advisories in several states, a comprehensive multimedia database was created to answer a variety of questions. Mercury concentrations in precipitation, lake water and sediment, zooplankton, and fish were measured and analyzed together with extensive watershed and lake chemistry data for 80 lake watersheds in the study region of northeastern Minnesota including the Superior National Forest, Voyageurs National Park, and Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Atmospheric deposition of mercury, transport, water column lifetimes, and sedimentation in lakes are determined. The factors relating mercury concentrations within the lake watershed components are analyzed and discussed. The notable correlates with mercury residue levels in northern pike of a standard length and weight (55 cm, 1.0 kg) were mercury concentrations in zooplankton and water, total organic carbon concentration, and pH. The primary source of mercury was found to be of atmospheric origin.

  7. Airborne mercury deposition and watershed characteristics in relation to mercury concentrations in water, sediments, plankton, and fish of eighty northern Minnesota lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, J.A.; Schmidt, K.W.; Huber, J.K.; Rapp, G.R. Jr. ); Glass, G.E. )

    1990-11-01

    In light of increasing fish consumption advisories in several states, a comprehensive multimedia database was created to answer a variety of questions. Mercury concentrations in precipitation, lake water and sediment, zooplankton, and fish were measured and analyzed together with extensive watershed and lake chemistry data for 80 lake watersheds in the study region of northeastern Minnesota including the Superior National Forest, Voyageurs National Park, and Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Atmospheric deposition of mercury, transport, water column lifetimes, and sedimentation in lakes are determined. The factors relating mercury concentrations within the lake watershed components are analyzed and discussed. The notable correlates with mercury residue levels in northern pike of a standard length and weight (55 cm, 1.0 kg) were mercury concentrations in zooplankton and water, total organic carbon concentration, and pH. The primary source of mercury was found to be of atmospheric origin.

  8. [Granulocyte alkaline phosphatase--a biomarker of chronic benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Khristeva, V; Meshkov, T

    1994-01-01

    In tracing the cellular population status in the peripheral blood of workers, exposed to benzene, was included and cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity in leucocytes. This enzyme is accepted as marker of the neutrophilic granulocytes, as maturation of the cells and their antibacterial activity are parallel to the cytochemical activity of the enzyme. 78 workers from the coke-chemical production from state firm "Kremikovtsi" and 41 workers from the production "Benzene" and "Isopropylbenzene"--Oil Chemical Plant, Burgas are included. The benzene concentrations in the air of the working places in all productions are in the range of 5 to 50 mg/m3. For cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity is used the method of L. Kaplow and phosphatase index was calculated. It was established that in 98.4% of all examined the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited to different rate, as from 46.5% [61 workers] it is zero. In considerably lower percentage of workers were established and other deviations: leucocytosis or leucopenia, neutropenia, increased percent of band neutrophils and toxic granules. The results of the investigation of the granulocyte population show that from all indices, the activity of granulocyte alkaline phosphatase demonstrates most convincing the early myelotoxic effect of benzene.

  9. Monitoring of benzene-exposed workers for genotoxic effects of benzene: improved-working-condition-related decrease in the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tompa, A; Major, J; Jakab, M G

    1994-01-16

    The genotoxic effects of benzene were assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 49 workers occupationally exposed to benzene (3-68.7 mg/m3 in the work environment) for 0-2, 2-10 and more than 10 years (10, 22 and 17 workers, respectively). Chromosomal aberrations, SCEs and UV-induced DNA synthesis were used as indicators of genotoxic effects. Most of the workers were followed up in 1991 and 1992, while the benzene concentrations were reduced to 1-18.4 mg/m3 air. Considered overall, in the "exposed" groups, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations were significantly higher than in controls thus providing evidence for the clastogenic effects of benzene. However, there seems to be no correlation between aberration frequencies and the duration of prior exposure to benzene. In 1991 and 1992, when the benzene concentrations were brought down, there was a concomitant decrease in the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations; in 1992 the decrease reached one third to one half of the initial frequencies, values still higher than in the controls. With the other genotoxic end-points, the changes were small and not consistent.

  10. Production of Phenol from Benzene via Cumene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, D. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment involving the production of phenol from benzene with the intermediate production of isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene hydroperoxide. (SL)

  11. Environmental and biological monitoring of benzene during self-service automobile refueling.

    PubMed Central

    Egeghy, P P; Tornero-Velez, R; Rappaport, S M

    2000-01-01

    Although automobile refueling represents the major source of benzene exposure among the nonsmoking public, few data are available regarding such exposures and the associated uptake of benzene. We repeatedly measured benzene exposure and uptake (via benzene in exhaled breath) among 39 self-service customers using self-administered monitoring, a technique rarely used to obtain measurements from the general public (130 sets of measurements were obtained). Benzene exposures averaged 2.9 mg/m(3) (SD = 5.8 mg/m(3); median duration = 3 min) with a range of < 0.076-36 mg/m(3), and postexposure breath levels averaged 160 microg/m(3) (SD = 260 microg/m(3)) with a range of < 3.2-1,400 microg/m(3). Log-transformed exposures and breath levels were significantly correlated (r = 0.77, p < 0.0001). We used mixed-effects statistical models to gauge the relative influences of environmental and subject-specific factors on benzene exposure and breath levels and to investigate the importance of various covariates obtained by questionnaire. Model fitting yielded three significant predictors of benzene exposure, namely, fuel octane grade (p = 0.0011), duration of exposure (p = 0.0054), and season of the year (p = 0.032). Likewise, another model yielded three significant predictors of benzene concentration in breath, specifically, benzene exposure (p = 0.0001), preexposure breath concentration (p = 0.0008), and duration of exposure (p = 0.038). Variability in benzene concentrations was remarkable, with 95% of the estimated values falling within a 274-fold range, and was comprised entirely of the within-person component of variance (representing exposures of the same subject at different times of refueling). The corresponding range for benzene concentrations in breath was 41-fold and was comprised primarily of the within-person variance component (74% of the total variance). Our results indicate that environmental rather than interindividual differences are primarily responsible for

  12. Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.

    1998-04-01

    A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

  13. Geogenic sources of benzene in aquifers used for public supply, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Statistical evaluation of two large statewide data sets from the California State Water Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program (1973 wells) and the California Department of Public Health (12417 wells) reveals that benzene occurs infrequently (1.7%) and at generally low concentrations (median detected concentration of 0.024 μg/L) in groundwater used for public supply in California. When detected, benzene is more often related to geogenic (45% of detections) than anthropogenic sources (27% of detections). Similar relations are evident for the sum of 17 hydrocarbons analyzed. Benzene occurs most frequently and at the highest concentrations in old, brackish, and reducing groundwater; the detection frequency was 13.0% in groundwater with tritium <1 pCi/L, specific conductance >1600 μS/cm, and anoxic conditions. This groundwater is typically deep (>180 m). Benzene occurs somewhat less frequently in recent, shallow, and reducing groundwater; the detection frequency was 2.6% in groundwater with tritium ≥1 pCi/L, depth <30 m, and anoxic conditions. Evidence for geogenic sources of benzene include: higher concentrations and detection frequencies with increasing well depth, groundwater age, and proximity to oil and gas fields; and higher salinity and lower chloride/iodide ratios in old groundwater with detections of benzene, consistent with interactions with oil-field brines.

  14. Geogenic sources of benzene in aquifers used for public supply, California.

    PubMed

    Landon, Matthew K; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-08-21

    Statistical evaluation of two large statewide data sets from the California State Water Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program (1973 wells) and the California Department of Public Health (12,417 wells) reveals that benzene occurs infrequently (1.7%) and at generally low concentrations (median detected concentration of 0.024 μg/L) in groundwater used for public supply in California. When detected, benzene is more often related to geogenic (45% of detections) than anthropogenic sources (27% of detections). Similar relations are evident for the sum of 17 hydrocarbons analyzed. Benzene occurs most frequently and at the highest concentrations in old, brackish, and reducing groundwater; the detection frequency was 13.0% in groundwater with tritium <1 pCi/L, specific conductance >1600 μS/cm, and anoxic conditions. This groundwater is typically deep (>180 m). Benzene occurs somewhat less frequently in recent, shallow, and reducing groundwater; the detection frequency was 2.6% in groundwater with tritium ≥1 pCi/L, depth <30 m, and anoxic conditions. Evidence for geogenic sources of benzene include: higher concentrations and detection frequencies with increasing well depth, groundwater age, and proximity to oil and gas fields; and higher salinity and lower chloride/iodide ratios in old groundwater with detections of benzene, consistent with interactions with oil-field brines.

  15. A case study on identification of airborne organic compounds and time courses of their concentrations in the cabin of a new car for private use.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiaki; Matsunaga, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    The cabin of an automobile can be considered to be a part of the living environment because many people spend long periods of time during business, shopping, recreation or travel activities. However, little is known about the interior air contamination due to organic compounds diffusing from the interior materials used in the interior of automobiles. In the present study, the compounds in the interior air of a new car were identified, and the time courses of their concentrations were examined for over 3 years after the delivery (July, 1999). A total of 162 organic compounds, involving many aliphatic hydrocarbons and aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified. High concentrations of n-nonane (458 microg/m(3) on the day following delivery), n-decane (1301 microg/m(3)), n-undecane (1616 microg/m(3)), n-dodecane (716 microg/m(3)), n-tridecane (320 microg/m(3)), 1-hexadecene (768 microg/m(3)), ethylbenzene (361 microg/m(3)), xylene (4003 microg/m(3)) and 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (429 microg/m(3)) were detected, and the sum of the concentrations determined for all compounds excluding formaldehyde (TVOC) was approximately 14 mg/m(3) on the day after the delivery. The concentrations of most compounds decreased with time, but increased with a rise of the interior temperature. The TVOC concentration in the next summer (July, 2000) was approximately one-tenth of the initial concentration. During the 3-year study period, the TVOC concentrations in summer exceeded the indoor guideline value (300 mug/m(3)) proposed by [Seifert B. Volatile organic compounds. In: Maroni M, Seifert B, Lindvall T, editors. Indoor air quality. A comprehensive reference book. Air quality monographs, vol. 3. Netherlands: Elsevier Science; 1995. p. 819-21]. The interior temperature and days lapsed after delivery were the main factors affecting the interior concentrations of most compounds according to multiple linear regression analysis. The results of this study offer useful fundamental data for

  16. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-01

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of 137Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  17. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  18. Biofiltration of benzene contaminated air streams using compost-activated carbon filter media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.; Kocher, W.M.; Abumaizar, R.J.

    1998-12-31

    Three laboratory-scale biofilter columns were operated for 81 days to investigate the removal of benzene from a waste gas stream. The columns contain a mixture of yard waste and sludge compost as biomedia. Different amounts of granular activated carbon (GAC) are mixed with the compost in two of the three columns to evaluate the extent to which biofilter performance can be enhanced. The effects of different operating conditions on the performance of the removal of benzene from air were evaluated. More than 90% removal efficiency was observed for an influent benzene concentration of about 75 ppm and an air flow rate of 0.3 L/min. in all 3 columns under steady-state conditions. Under most cases of shock loading conditions, such as a sudden increase in the air flow rate, or the benzene concentration in the influent, the biofilters containing GAC provided higher removal efficiencies and more stable operation than the biofilter containing compost only.

  19. Two-dimensional modelling of benzene transport and biodegradation in a laboratory-scale aquifer.

    PubMed

    Choi, N C; Choi, J W; Kim, S B; Park, S J; Kim, D J

    2009-01-01

    In this study biodegradation of aqueous benzene during transport in a laboratory-scale aquifer model was investigated by conducting a 2-D plume test and numerical modelling. Benzene biodegradation and transport was simulated with the 2-D numerical model developed for solute transport coupled with a Haldane-Andrews type function for inclusion of an inhibition constant which is effective for high concentrations. Experimental data revealed that in the early stages the benzene plume showed a rather clear shape but lost its shape with increased travel time. The mass recoveries of benzene at 9, 16, and 22 h were 37, 13 and 8%, respectively, showing that a significant mass reduction of aqueous benzene occurred in the model aquifer. The major processes responsible for the mass reduction were biodegradation and irreversible sorption. The modelling results also indicated that the simulation based on the microbial parameters from the batch experiments slightly overestimated the mass reduction of benzene during transport. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the benzene plume was sensitive to the maximum specific growth rate and slightly sensitive to the half-saturation constant of benzene but almost insensitive to the Haldane inhibition constant. The insensitivity to the Haldane inhibition constant was due to the rapid decline of the benzene peak concentration by natural attenuation such as hydrodynamic dispersion and irreversible sorption. An analysis of the model simulation also indicated that the maximum specific growth rate was the key parameter controlling the plume behaviour, but its impact on the plume was affected by competing parameter such as the irreversible sorption rate coefficient.

  20. Systems biology of human benzene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Li, Guilan; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Hubbard, Alan E.; Ren, Xuefeng; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; North, Matthew; Skibola, Christine F.; Yin, Songnian; Vulpe, Christopher; Chanock, Stephen J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Toxicogenomic studies, including genome-wide analyses of susceptibility genes (genomics), gene expression (transcriptomics), protein expression (proteomics), and epigenetic modifications (epigenomics), of human populations exposed to benzene are crucial to understanding gene-environment interactions, providing the ability to develop biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility. Comprehensive analysis of these toxicogenomic and epigenomic profiles by bioinformatics in the context of phenotypic endpoints, comprises systems biology, which has the potential to comprehensively define the mechanisms by which benzene causes leukemia. We have applied this approach to a molecular epidemiology study of workers exposed to benzene. Hematotoxicity, a significant decrease in almost all blood cell counts, was identified as a phenotypic effect of benzene that occurred even below 1ppm benzene exposure. We found a significant decrease in the formation of progenitor colonies arising from bone marrow stem cells with increasing benzene exposure, showing that progenitor cells are more sensitive to the effects of benzene than mature blood cells, likely leading to the observed hematotoxicity. Analysis of transcriptomics by microarray in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of exposed workers, identified genes and pathways (apoptosis, immune response, and inflammatory response) altered at high (>10ppm) and low (<1ppm) benzene levels. Serum proteomics by SELDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins consistently down-regulated in exposed workers. Preliminary epigenomics data showed effects of benzene on the DNA methylation of specific genes. Genomic screens for candidate genes involved in susceptibility to benzene toxicity are being undertaken in yeast, with subsequent confirmation by RNAi in human cells, to expand upon the findings from candidate gene analyses. Data on these and future biomarkers will be used to populate a large toxicogenomics database, to which we will apply bioinformatic

  1. Anaerobic benzene oxidation by Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Bain, Timothy S; Nevin, Kelly P; Barlett, Melissa A; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-12-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 10(9) and 8.4 × 10(9) cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 10(9) cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated.

  2. Resonant photodissociation in substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Tim; McAcy, Collin; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2011-05-01

    Cyclic aromatic molecules are abundant in organic chemistry, with a wide variety of applications, including pharmacology, pollution studies and genetic research. Among the simplest of these molecules is benzene (C6H6) , with many relevant molecules being benzene-like with a single atomic substitution. In such a substitution, the substituent determines a characteristic perturbation of the electronic structure of the molecule. We discuss the substitution of halogens into the ring (C6H5X), and its effects on the dynamics of ionization and dissociation of the molecule without the focal volume effect. In particular, using 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses, we present results in the dissociation of fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and iodobenzene into the phenyl ring (C6H5) and the atomic halogen, and the subsequent ionization of these fragments. The impact of the ``heavy atom effect'' on a 1 (π , π*) -->3 (n , σ*) singlet-triplet intersystem crossing will be emphasized. Currently under investigation is whether such a dissociation can be treated as an effective source of the neutral substituent. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0355235.

  3. Major sources of benzene exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L A

    1989-01-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis. PMID:2477239

  4. Seasonal variation of benzo(a)pyrene in the Spanish airborne PM10. Multivariate linear regression model applied to estimate BaP concentrations.

    PubMed

    Callén, M S; López, J M; Mastral, A M

    2010-08-15

    The estimation of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) concentrations in ambient air is very important from an environmental point of view especially with the introduction of the Directive 2004/107/EC and due to the carcinogenic character of this pollutant. A sampling campaign of particulate matter less or equal than 10 microns (PM10) carried out during 2008-2009 in four locations of Spain was collected to determine experimentally BaP concentrations by gas chromatography mass-spectrometry mass-spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). Multivariate linear regression models (MLRM) were used to predict BaP air concentrations in two sampling places, taking PM10 and meteorological variables as possible predictors. The model obtained with data from two sampling sites (all sites model) (R(2)=0.817, PRESS/SSY=0.183) included the significant variables like PM10, temperature, solar radiation and wind speed and was internally and externally validated. The first validation was performed by cross validation and the last one by BaP concentrations from previous campaigns carried out in Zaragoza from 2001-2004. The proposed model constitutes a first approximation to estimate BaP concentrations in urban atmospheres with very good internal prediction (Q(CV)(2)=0.813, PRESS/SSY=0.187) and with the maximal external prediction for the 2001-2002 campaign (Q(ext)(2)=0.679 and PRESS/SSY=0.321) versus the 2001-2004 campaign (Q(ext)(2)=0.551, PRESS/SSY=0.449).

  5. Benzene in the environment: an assessment of the potential risks to the health of the population

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Davidson, R; Courage, C; Rushton, L; Levy, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Benzene has long been recognised as a carcinogen and recent concern has centred on the effects of continuous exposure to low concentrations of benzene both occupationally and environmentally. This paper presents an overview of the current knowledge about human exposure to benzene in the United Kingdom population based on recently published data, summarises the known human health effects, and uses this information to provide a risk evaluation for sections of the general United Kingdom population.
METHOD—Given the minor contribution that non-inhalation sources make to the overall daily intake of benzene to humans, only exposure from inhalation has been considered when estimating the daily exposure of the general population to benzene. Exposure of adults, children, and infants to benzene has been estimated for different exposure scenarios with time-activity patterns and inhalation and absorption rates in conjunction with measured benzene concentrations for a range of relevant microenvironments. Exposures during refuelling and driving, as well as the contribution of active and passive tobacco smoke, have been considered as part of the characterisation of risk of the general population.
RESULTS—Infants (<1 years old), the average child (11 years old), and non-occupationally exposed adults, receive average daily doses in the range of 15-26, 29-50, and 75-522 µg of benzene, respectively, which correspond to average ranges to benzene in air of 3.40-5.76 µg/m3, 3.37-5.67 µg/m3, and 3.7-41 µg/m3 for infants, children, and adults, respectively. Infants and children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke have concentrations of exposure to benzene comparable with those of an adult passive smoker. This is a significant source of exposure as a 1995 United Kingdom survey has shown that 47% of children aged 2-15 years live in households where at least one person smokes. The consequence of exposure to benzene in infants is more significant than for

  6. Investigation of off-site airborne transport of lead from a superfund removal action site using lead isotope ratios and concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pribil, Michael J.; Maddaloni, Mark A.; Staiger, Kimberly; Wilson, Eric; Magriples, Nick; Ali, Mustafa; Santella, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) concentration and Pb isotopic composition of surface and subsurface soil samples were used to investigate the potential for off-site air transport of Pb from a former white Pb processing facility to neighboring residential homes in a six block area on Staten Island, NY. Surface and subsurface soil samples collected on the Jewett White Pb site were found to range from 1.122 to 1.138 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.393 to 2.411 for 208Pb/207Pb. The off-site surface soil samples collected from residential backyards, train trestle, near site grass patches and background areas varied from 1.144 to 1.196 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.427 to 2.464 for 208Pb/207Pb. Two soil samples collected along Richmond Terrace, where Jewett site soils accumulated after major rain events, varied from 1.136 to 1.147 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.407 to 2.419 for 208Pb/207Pb. Lead concentration for on-site surface soil samples ranged from 450 to 8000 ug/g, on-site subsurface soil samples ranged from 90,000 to 240,000 ug/g and off-site samples varied from 380 to 3500 ug/g. Lead concentration and isotopic composition for the Staten Island off-site samples were similar to previously published data for other northeastern US cities and reflect re-suspension and re-mobilization of local accumulated Pb. The considerable differences in both the Pb isotopic composition and Pb concentration of on-site and off-site samples resulted in the ability to geochemically trace the transport of particulate Pb. Data in this study indicate minimal off-site surface transport of Pb from the Jewett site into the neighboring residential area.

  7. Environmental factors affecting the start of pollen season and concentrations of airborne Alnus pollen in two localities of Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rajo, Francisco Javier; Dopazo, Angeles; Jato, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Alnus pollen is an early component of the annual atmospheric aerosol of the north-west regions of Spain, which causes the first occurrence of allergic symptoms. Seasonal and intra-daily variation of Alnus pollination, and the influence that main meteorological parameters exert, was studied in this paper. Monitoring was carried out from 1993-2002, by using two Lanzoni VPPS 2000 volumetric samplers. Once the atmospheric behaviour of this pollen had been identified, the final objective was to elaborate predictive models to determine the onset of the Alnus pollen season and its concentrations during the pollination period in two localities of north-west Spain (Santiago and Ourense). Winter chilling required to overcome the bud-dormancy period was similar in both cities, with around 800 Chilling Hours (C.H.) and 5.5 degrees C threshold temperature. Calculation of heat requirement for bud growth was carried out with maximum temperature, with around 50 Growth Degree Days (G.D.D. degrees C) needed, with 6 degrees C threshold temperature. Data from 2002 were used in order to determine the real validity of the models. This year was not taken into account to establish the aforementioned models. The variation between the predicted start of the pollen season and the observed season was smallest in Ourense. Verifying the proposed models for predicting daily mean concentrations of Alnus pollen during the pollen season shows that the predicted curves fits the observed variations of daily mean concentrations.

  8. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  11. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  15. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  18. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  3. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  8. Short-term prediction of Betula airborne pollen concentration in Vigo (NW Spain) using logistic additive models and partially linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotos-Yáñez, Tomas R.; Rodríguez-Rajo, F. J.; Jato, M. V.

    Betula pollen is a common cause of pollinosis in localities in NW Spain and between 13% and 60% of individuals who are immunosensitive to pollen grains respond positively to its allergens. It is important in the case of all such people to be able to predict pollen concentrations in advance. We therefore undertook an aerobiological study in the city of Vigo (Pontevedra, Spain) from 1995 to 2001, using a Hirst active-impact pollen trap (VPPS 2000) situated in the city centre. Vigo presents a temperate maritime climate with a mean annual temperature of 14.9 °C and 1,412 mm annual total precipitation. This paper analyses two ways of quantifying the prediction of pollen concentration: first by means of a generalized additive regression model with the object of predicting whether the series of interest exceeds a certain threshold; second using a partially linear model to obtain specific prediction values for pollen grains. Both models use a self-explicative part and another formed by exogenous meteorological factors. The models were tested with data from 2001 (year in which the total precipitation registered was almost twice the climatological average overall during the flowering period), which were not used in formulating the models. A highly satisfactory classification and good forecasting results were achieved with the first and second approaches respectively. The estimated line taking into account temperature and a calm S-SW wind, corresponds to the real line recorded during 2001, which gives us an idea of the proposed model's validity.

  9. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  10. Prognostic Aspects of Benzene Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Hernberg, S.; Savilahti, M.; Ahlman, K.; Asp, S.

    1966-01-01

    In 1955, a benzene mass-poisoning was detected in a shoe factory in Finland. One hundred and forty-seven persons were heavily exposed, and more than 100 had abnormal blood counts. One died and 10 required hospital treatment. This paper deals with a re-examination of the involved workers nine years later. One hundred and twenty-five persons attended for re-examination. Eight had died, two refused, and 11 could not be located. The possibility of death due to benzene poisoning having occurred among these persons was ruled out by checking the national death register. Each of the subjects underwent a haematological examination which included the haemoglobin value and the erythrocyte, reticulocyte, leucocyte, and thrombocyte counts. A differential count of the leucocytes was also made. A randomly chosen group of 86 persons served as a control group. The thrombocytes of the whole patient group and the erythrocytes of the men were significantly lower than those of the controls, whereas the leucocytes of the whole group and the erythrocytes of the women failed to show any statistical difference. In a multiple discriminant function analysis, considering all three counts at the same time, only the men differed slightly from the controls at the re-examination. The analysis also showed that the prognosis of the severe cases did not differ from that of the mild ones, provided the acute stage had been passed. Some illustrative case reports are added. One patient developed leukaemia after a latency of seven years, whereas most of the others—chosen because of grave symptoms in the initial stage—have recovered. The results are discussed from the point of view of prognosis. PMID:5946130

  11. A review of monitoring, sampling and analysis of reactor coolant, reactor containment atmosphere and airborne reactor effluents in post accident concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, A.P.; White, J.R.; Knox, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    A post-implementation review has been made in NRC Region I of the post-accident sampling systems (PASS), the gaseous effluent monitors, and the provisions for sampling effluent particulates and radioiodines which were required by the NRC subsequent to the TMI-2 accident (NUREG-0737). Prefabricated PASS systems were predominant. Problems included insufficient purge times, inadequate separation of dissolved gases, excessive dilution and the accuracy of analytical techniques in the presence of interferences. Microprocessor-controlled high-range gas monitors with integral provisions for sampling particulates and radioiodines in high concentrations were widely used. Calibration information was generally insufficient for the unambiguous conversion of monitor readings to release rates for a varying postaccident mixture of radiogases. The referenced sampling guidance (ANSI-N 13.1-1969) was inappropriate for the long sampling lines customarily used. Generic research is needed to establish the behavior of particulates and radioiodines in these lines.

  12. Magnetic characterization of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Doh, S.; Yu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Burning fossil fuels from vehicles, domestics, industries and power plants in the large urban or industrial areas emit significant quantity of anthropogenic particulates which become a potential threat to human health. Here, we present temporal variability of particulate pollution associated with compositional differences, using magnetic measurements and electron microscopic observations. Six different grain-sizes of airborne particulates have been collected by filtering from 10 precipitation events in Seoul, Korea from February 2009 to June 2009. Magnetic concentration proxies show relatively better (R2 >0.6) and poorer correlations (R2 <0.3) with the masses of samples filtered by >0.45 μm and <0.45 μm sizes, respectively, suggesting the usefulness of magnetic characterization for the >0.45 μm particulates. Temporally, magnetic concentrations are higher in the cold season than the warm season. In particular, a significant increase of magnetic concentration is observed in 3 μm and 1 μm filters after the Chinese wind-blown dust events, indicating additional influx of fine-grained anthropogenic particulates into Seoul. Microscopic observations identify that increase of magnetic concentration is highly linked with the frequent occurrence of combustion derived particulates (i.e., carbon and/or sulfur mixed particles) than natural alumino-silicates. Overall, the present study demonstrates that magnetic measurements efficiently reflect the concentration of particulates produced from fossil-fuel combustion among the airborne particles from various sources.

  13. Urinary Benzene Biomarkers and DNA Methylation in Bulgarian Petrochemical Workers: Study Findings and Comparison of Linear and Beta Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Wei Jie; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Dimont, Emmanuel; Farmer, Peter B.; Albetti, Benedetta; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Bollati, Valentina; Bolognesi, Claudia; Roggieri, Paola; Panev, Teodor I.; Georgieva, Tzveta; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic occupational exposure to benzene is associated with an increased risk of hematological malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The main objective of this study was to investigate the association between benzene exposure and DNA methylation, both in repeated elements and candidate genes, in a population of 158 Bulgarian petrochemical workers and 50 unexposed office workers. Exposure assessment included personal monitoring of airborne benzene at work and urinary biomarkers of benzene metabolism (S-phenylmercapturic acid [SPMA] and trans,trans-muconic acid [t,t-MA]) at the end of the work-shift. The median levels of airborne benzene, SPMA and t,t-MA in workers were 0.46 ppm, 15.5 µg/L and 711 µg/L respectively, and exposure levels were significantly lower in the controls. Repeated-element DNA methylation was measured in Alu and LINE-1, and gene-specific methylation in MAGE and p15. DNA methylation levels were not significantly different between exposed workers and controls (P>0.05). Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and beta-regression models were used to estimate benzene-methylation associations. Beta-regression showed better model specification, as reflected in improved coefficient of determination (pseudo R2) and Akaike’s information criterion (AIC). In beta-regression, we found statistically significant reductions in LINE-1 (−0.15%, P<0.01) and p15 (−0.096%, P<0.01) mean methylation levels with each interquartile range (IQR) increase in SPMA. This study showed statistically significant but weak associations of LINE-1 and p15 hypomethylation with SPMA in Bulgarian petrochemical workers. We showed that beta-regression is more appropriate than OLS regression for fitting methylation data. PMID:23227177

  14. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bin; Kaser, Lisa; Karl, Thomas; Graus, Martin; Peischl, Jeff; Campos, Teresa L.; Shertz, Steve; Apel, Eric C.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Hills, Alan; Gilman, Jessica B.; Lerner, Brian M.; Warneke, Carsten; Flocke, Frank M.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Guenther, Alex B.; Gouw, Joost A.

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from oil and gas production may have large impacts on air quality and climate change. Methane and VOCs were measured over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas plays on board the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 and NOAA WP-3D research aircraft in June-July of 2013. We used an eddy covariance technique to measure in situ fluxes of CH4 and benzene from both C-130 flights with high-resolution data (10 Hz) and WP-3D flights with low-resolution data (1 Hz). Correlation (R = 0.65) between CH4 and benzene fluxes was observed when flying over shale gas operations, and the enhancement ratio of fluxes was consistent with the corresponding concentration observations. Fluxes calculated by the eddy covariance method show agreement with a mass balance approach within their combined uncertainties. In general, CH4 fluxes in the shale gas regions follow a lognormal distribution, with some deviations for relatively large fluxes (>10 µg m-2 s-1). Statistical analysis of the fluxes shows that a small number of facilities (i.e., ~10%) are responsible for up to ~40% of the total CH4 emissions in the two regions. We show that the airborne eddy covariance method can also be applied in some circumstances when meteorological conditions do not favor application of the mass balance method. We suggest that the airborne eddy covariance method is a reliable alternative and complementary analysis method to estimate emissions from oil and gas extraction.

  15. Detailed mechanism of toluene oxidation and comparison with benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of toluene in both argon and nitrogen dilutents is presented. The mechanism was used to compute experimentally ignition delay times for shock-heated toluene-oxygen-argon mixtures with resonably good success over a wide range of initial temperatures and pressures. Attempts to compute experimentally measured concentration profiles for toluene oxidation in a turbulent reactor were partially successful. An extensive sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the reactions which control the ignition process and the rates of formation and destruction of various species. The most important step was found to be the reaction of toluene with molecular oxygen, followed by the reactions of hydroperoxyl and atomic oxygen with benzyl radicals. These findings contrast with the benzene oxidation, where the benzene-molecular oxygen reaction is quite unimportant and the reaction of phenyl with molecular oxygen dominates. In the toluene mechanism the corresponding reaction of benzyl radicals with oxygen is unimportant. Two reactions which are important in the oxidation of benzene also influence the oxidation of toluene for several conditions. These are the oxidations of phenyl and cyclopentadienyl radicals by molecular oxygen. The mechanism presented successfully computes the decrease of toluene concentration with time in the nitrogen diluted turbulent reactor. This fact, in addition to the good prediction of ignition delay times, shows that this mechanism can be used for modeling the ignition and combustion process in practical, well-mixed combustion systems.

  16. Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of benzene homologues in ambient air in the northeastern urban area of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin; Wang, Li; Xu, Linghong; Wang, Xuezhong; Yu, Yanting; Zhang, Yujie; Cao, Guan

    2014-01-01

    Ambient benzene homologues were measured at a site in the northeastern urban area of Beijing, China, from August 24 to September 4, 2012 by SUMMA canister sampling followed by laboratory determination using cryogenic cold trap pre-concentration-GC-MS/FID, and their health risks were also assessed. Daily total benzene homologues ranged from 0.99 to 49.71 microg/m3 with an average of 11.98 microg/m3. Benzene homologues showed higher concentrations in the morning and evening than that at noontime. Comparison with previous studies revealed a trend of decrease for ambient benzene homologues probably due to the effective emission control in Beijing in recent years. Vehicular exhaust was the main source while volatilization of paints and solvents also made substantial contributions. Health risk assessment showed that BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, m-xylene and p-xylene) and styrene had no appreciable adverse non-cancer health risks for the exposed population, while benzene has potential cancer risk of 1.34E-05. Available data from cities in China all implied that benzene imposes relatively higher cancer risk on the exposed populations and therefore strict control measures should be taken to further lower ambient benzene levels in China.

  17. Urinary methyl tert-butyl ether and benzene as biomarkers of exposure to urban traffic.

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Cattaneo, Andrea; Consonni, Dario; Scibetta, Licia; Costamagna, Paolo; Cavallo, Domenico M; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2011-02-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene are added to gasoline to improve the combustion process and are found in the urban environment as a consequence of vehicular traffic. Herein we evaluate urinary MTBE (MTBE-U) and benzene (BEN-U) as biomarkers of exposure to urban traffic. Milan urban policemen (130 total) were investigated in May, July, October, and December for a total of 171 work shifts. Personal exposure to airborne benzene and carbon monoxide (CO), and atmospheric data, were measured during the work shift, while personal characteristics were collected by a questionnaire. A time/activity diary was completed by each subject during the work shift. Spot urine samples were obtained for the determination of MTBE-U and BEN-U. Median personal exposure to CO and airborne benzene were 3.3 mg/m(3) and 9.6 μg/m(3), respectively; median urinary levels in end-of-shift (ES) samples were 147 ng/L (MTBE-U) and 207 ng/L (BEN-U). The time spent on traffic duty at crossing was about 40% of work time. Multiple linear regression models, taking into account within-subject correlations, were applied to investigate the role of urban pollution, atmospheric conditions, job variables and personal characteristics on the level of biomarkers. MTBE-U was influenced by the month of sampling and positively correlated to the time spent in traffic guarding, CO exposure and atmospheric pressure, while negatively correlated to wind speed (R(2) for total model 0.63, P<0.001). BEN-U was influenced by the month and smoking habit, and positively correlated to urinary creatinine; moreover, an interaction between CO and smoking was found (R(2)=0.62, P<0.001). These results suggest that MTBE-U is a reliable marker for assessing urban traffic exposure, while BEN-U is determined mainly by personal characteristics.

  18. Reduction of benzene toxicity by toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Plappert, U.; Barthel, E.; Seidel, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    BDF{sub 1} mice were exposed in inhalation chambers to benzene (900 ppm, 300 ppm) and/or toluene (500 ppm, 250 ppm) 6 hr per day, 5 days per week, for up to 8 weeks. Benzene alone induced a slight anemia after 4 and 8 weeks and a reduction of BFU-E and CFU-E numbers in the marrow. The coexposure to toluene reduced the degree of anemia. These results confirm previous studies where toluene was found to reduce benzene toxicity. This protective effect was most pronounced when DNA damage was studied in peripheral blood cells, bone marrow, and liver using the single cell gel (SCG) assay. With benzene alone, either with 300 or 900 ppm, a significant increase in DNA damage was detected in cells sampled from all three organs. Toluene alone did not induce a significant increase in DNA damage. The coexposure of benzene and toluene reduced the extent of DNA damage to about 50% of benzene alone. This result is considered a clear indication for a protective effect of toluene on the genetic toxicity of benzene. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Reductions in human benzene exposure in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruin, Scott A.; Denis, Michael J. St; Winer, Arthur M.; Colome, Steven D.; Lurmann, Frederick W.

    Benzene typically contributes a significant fraction of the human cancer risk associated with exposure to urban air pollutants. In recent years, concentrations of benzene in ambient air have declined in many urban areas due to the use of reformulated gasolines, lower vehicle emissions, and other control measures. In the California South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) ambient benzene concentrations have been reduced by more than 70% since 1989. To estimate the resulting effect on human exposures, the Regional Human Exposure (REHEX) model was used to calculate benzene exposures in the SoCAB for the years 1989 and 1997. Benzene concentration distributions in 14 microenvironments (e.g. outdoor, home, vehicle, work) were combined with California time-activity patterns and census data to calculate exposure distributions for 11 demographic groups in the SoCAB. For 1997, the calculated average benzene exposure for nonsmoking adults in the SoCAB was 2 ppb, compared to 6 ppb for 1989. For nonsmokers, about half of the 1997 exposure was due to ambient air concentrations (including their contributions to other microenvironments), but only 4% for smokers. Passive tobacco smoke contributed about one-fourth of all exposure for adult nonsmokers. In-transit microenvironments and attached garages contributed approximately 15 and 10%, respectively. From 1989 to 1997, decreases in passive smoke exposure accounted for about one-sixth of the decrease in exposure for nonsmoking adults, with the remainder due to decreases in ambient concentrations. The reductions in exposure during this time period indicate the effectiveness of reformulated fuels, more stringent emission standards, and smoking restrictions in significantly reducing exposure to benzene.

  20. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  1. Investigation into adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Qijin; Tang, Shankang; Wang, Lintong; Zhang, Yunchen

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene were investigated considering the operating variables and kinetic mechanism using nano-titania agglomerates in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor (AFBPR) designed. The special adsorption equilibrium constant, adsorption active sites, and apparent reaction rate coefficient of benzene were determined by linear regression analysis at various gas velocities and relative humidities (RH). Based on a series of photocatalytic degradation kinetic equations, the influences of operating variables on degradation efficiency, apparent reaction rate coefficient and half-life were explored. The findings indicated that the operating variables have obviously influenced the adsorption/photocatalytic degradation and corresponding kinetic parameters. In the photocatalytic degradation process, the relationship between photocatalytic degradation efficiency and RH indicated that water molecules have a dual-function which was related to the structure characteristics of benzene. The optimal operating conditions for photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in AFBPR were determined as the fluidization number at 1.9 and RH required related to benzene concentration. This investigation highlights the importance of controlling RH and benzene concentration in order to obtain the desired synergy effect in photocatalytic degradation processes.

  2. Determination of benzene residues in recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) by dynamic headspace-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Komolprasert, V; Hargraves, W A; Armstrong, D J

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic headspace-gas chromatography (HS/GC) method was developed to quantitate benzene in recycled PETE material derived from 21 PETE beverage bottles. The analytical system consisted of a purge-and-trap apparatus which was interfaced directly with a gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector. Cryofocusing and non-cryofocusing GC systems were used. The technique was applied to spiked PETE test samples which were prepared at various benzene concentrations ranging from 100 ppb to 117 ppm. The initial spiked benzene concentration in the PETE test samples was determined gravimetrically. The HS/GC technique was limited by the slow desorption rate of benzene from the PETE matrix; as a result, multipurges were performed at 60 degrees C. Regression analysis was done on the multipurge data to develop a desorption model which would predict the total amount of benzene in the PETE. The calculated results agreed with the experimental recoveries within +/- 10%. Recovery depended on the initial benzene level in the PETE and ranged from 70 to 90% after the first five purges.

  3. Sampling of benzene in tar matrices from biomass gasification using two different solid-phase sorbents.

    PubMed

    Osipovs, Sergejs

    2008-06-01

    Biomass tar mainly consists of stable aromatic compounds such as benzene and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, benzene being the biggest tar component in real biomass gasification gas. For the analysis of individual tar compounds, the solid-phase adsorption method was chosen. According to this method, tar samples are collected on a column with an amino-phase sorbent. With a high benzene concentration in biomass tar, some of the benzene will not be collected on the amino-phase sorbent. To get over this situation, we have installed another column with activated charcoal which is intended for collection of volatile organic compounds, including benzene, after the column with the amino-phase sorbent. The study of maximal adsorption amounts of various compounds on both adsorbents while testing different sampling volumes led to the conclusion that benzene is a limiting compound. The research proved that the use of two sorbents (500 mg + 100 mg) connected in series allows for assessment of tar in synthesis gas with a tar concentration up to 30-40 g m(-3), which corresponds to the requirements of most gasifiers.

  4. Seasonal and spatial variation of trace elements in multi-size airborne particulate matters of Beijing, China: Mass concentration, enrichment characteristics, source apportionment, chemical speciation and bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiajia; Tian, Hezhong; Cheng, Ke; Lu, Long; Wang, Yuxuan; Wu, Ye; Zhu, Chuanyong; Liu, Kaiyun; Zhou, Junrui; Liu, Xingang; Chen, Jing; Hao, Jiming

    2014-12-01

    The seasonal and spatial variation characteristics of 19 elements (Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Zn) in TSP/PM10/PM2.5 samples were investigated, which were collected from April 2011 to January 2012 simultaneously at an urban downtown site, a traffic roadside site, a suburban site, and a rural site in Beijing. The elevated concentrations of several toxic trace elements (As, Cd, Mn, Ni, Pb, etc.) in particles revealed that the contamination of toxic elements in Beijing could not be neglected. Positive matrix factorization method (PMF) was applied for source apportionment of trace elements in PM, and three factors (crust related sources, combustion sources, and traffic and steel industrial related sources) were identified. Furthermore, the chemical speciation and bioavailability of various elements were identified by applying European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) procedure. Our results showed that eight toxic elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn) exhibited higher mobility in PM2.5 than in PM10. Notably, elements of As, Cd, Pb and Zn were presented with higher mobility than the other elements, and these elements were lightly to release into the environment and easily available to human body. Additionally, As, Cd, Pb and Zn also accounted for higher percentages in the bound to mobile fractions at the central urban areas of Beijing. Therefore, special concerns should be paid to these toxic trace elements which had relatively high mobility in fine particles, when planning and implementing the comprehensive air pollution mitigation policies in Beijing.

  5. Airborne particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollution in a background site in the North China Plain: concentration, size distribution, toxicity and sources.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanhong; Yang, Lingxiao; Yuan, Qi; Yan, Chao; Dong, Can; Meng, Chuanping; Sui, Xiao; Yao, Lan; Yang, Fei; Lu, Yaling; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-01-01

    The size-fractionated characteristics of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied from January 2011 to October 2011 using a Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at the Yellow River Delta National Nature Reserve (YRDNNR), a background site located in the North China Plain. The average annual concentration of total PAHs in the YRDNNR (18.95 ± 16.51 ng/m(3)) was lower than that in the urban areas of China; however, it was much higher than that in other rural or remote sites in developed countries. The dominant PAHs, which were found in each season, were fluorene (5.93%-26.80%), phenanthrene (8.17%-26.52%), fluoranthene (15.23%-27.12%) and pyrene (9.23%-16.31%). A bimodal distribution was found for 3-ring PAHs with peaks at approximately 1.0-1.8 μm and 3.2-5.6 μm; however, 4-6 ring PAHs followed a nearly unimodal distribution, with the highest peak in the 1.0-1.8 μm range. The mass median diameter (MMD) values for the total PAHs averaged 1.404, 1.467, 1.218 and 0.931 μm in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. The toxicity analysis indicated that the carcinogenic potency of particulate PAHs existed primarily in the <1.8 μm size range. Diagnostic ratios and PCA analysis indicated that the PAHs in aerosol particles were mainly derived from coal combustion. In addition, back-trajectory calculations demonstrated that atmospheric PAHs were produced primarily by local anthropogenic sources.

  6. Benzene exposure in childhood: Role of living environments and assessment of available tools.

    PubMed

    Protano, Carmela; Guidotti, Maurizio; Manini, Paola; Petyx, Marta; La Torre, Giuseppe; Vitali, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Benzene is a widespread air pollutant and a well-known human carcinogen. Evidence is needed regarding benzene intake in the pediatric age group. We investigated the use of urinary (u) trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), and unmodified benzene (UB) for assessing exposure to low concentrations of environmental benzene and the role of living environment on benzene exposure in childhood. u-t,t-MA, u-SPMA, u-UB and u-cotinine were measured in urine samples of 243 Italian children (5-11 years) recruited in a cross-sectional study. Analytical results were compared with data obtained from questionnaires about participants' main potential exposure factors. u-UB, u-t,t-MA and u-SPMA concentrations were about 1.5-fold higher in children living in urban areas than in those in the rural group. Univariate analyses showed that u-UB was the only biomarker able to discriminate secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in urban and rural children (medians=411.50 and 210.50 ng/L, respectively); these results were confirmed by the strong correlation between u-UB and u-cotinine in the SHS-exposed group and by multivariate analyses. A regression model on u-SPMA showed that the metabolite is related to residence area (p<0.001), SHS exposure (p=0.048) and gender (p=0.027). u-UB is the best marker of benzene exposure in children in the present study, and it can be used as a good carcinogen-derived biomarker of exposure to passive smoking, especially related to benzene, when urine sample is collected at the end of the day. In addition, it is important to highlight that SHS resulted the most important contributor to benzene exposure, underlining the need for an information campaign against passive smoking exposure.

  7. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  8. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  9. A Comparative Pharmacokinetic Study of the Role of Gender and Developmental Differences in Occupational and Environmental Exposure to Benzene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    as follows: R = (Ci - Ce)/Ci x 100 where Ci = benzene concentration in inhaled air; Ce = benzene concentration in exhaled breath. Retention was...equation provided by Fisher et al. (1993:13) which scales an empirical VMAXC value to a specified body weight. VMAx = VMAxc x (Body Weight) exp .74 The...metabolism (VMAX). These results are expected since the ability of benzene to partition from the 4-2 PARAMETER AUCV AM Q_ XXX xx QC xx QL - X XX QS - x QR xx

  10. Outdoor and indoor benzene evaluation by GC-FID and GC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sousa, José A; Domingues, Valentina F; Rosas, Mónica S; Ribeiro, Susana O; Alvim-Ferraz, Conceiçao M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina F

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of benzene in different environments such as indoor (with and without tobacco smoke), a city area, countryside, gas stations and near exhaust pipes from cars running on different types of fuels was performed. The samples were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID) and tandem mass spectrometric detection (MS/MS) (to confirm the identification of benzene in the air samples). Operating conditions for the GC-MS analysis were optimized as well as the sampling and sample preparation. The results obtained in this work indicate that i) the type of fuel directly influences the benzene concentration in the air. Gasoline with additives provided the highest amount of benzene followed by unleaded gasoline and diesel; ii) the benzene concentration in the gas station was always higher than the advisable limit established by law (5 μg m⁻³) and during the unloading of gasoline the achieved concentration was 8371 μg m⁻³; iii) the data from the countryside (Taliscas) and the urban city (Matosinhos) were below 5 μg m⁻³ except 5 days after a fire on a petroleum refinery plant located near the city; iv) it was proven that in coffee shops where smoking is allowed the benzene concentration is higher (6 μg m⁻³) than in coffee shops where this is forbidden (4 μg m⁻³). This method may also be helpful for environmental analytical chemists who use GC-MS/MS for the confirmation or/and quantification of benzene.

  11. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. (a) Material safety data sheet. A material safety data sheet (MSDS) addressing benzene must be made...

  12. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. (a) Material safety data sheet. A material safety data sheet (MSDS) addressing benzene must be made...

  13. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. (a) Material safety data sheet. A material safety data sheet (MSDS) addressing benzene must be made...

  14. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. (a) Material safety data sheet. A material safety data sheet (MSDS) addressing benzene must be made...

  15. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. (a) Material safety data sheet. A material safety data sheet (MSDS) addressing benzene must be made...

  16. Urinary t,t-muconic acid as an indicator of exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, O; Seiji, K; Nakatsuka, H; Watanabe, T; Yin, S N; Li, G L; Cai, S X; Jin, C; Ikeda, M

    1989-01-01

    A method for rapidly determining t,t-muconic acid (MA) by high performance liquid chromatography was developed and successfully applied to urine samples from 152 workers exposed to benzene (64 men, 88 women) and 213 non-exposed controls (113 men, 100 women). The MA concentrations in urine correlated linearly with time weighted average benzene concentrations in the breath zone air of workers. A cross sectional balance study showed that about 2% of benzene inhaled is excreted into the urine as MA. The MA concentrations in the urine of the non-exposed was below the detection limit (less than 0.1 mg/l) in most cases, and the 95% lower confidence limit of MA for those exposed to benzene at 5 ppm (5.0 mg/l as a non-corrected value) was higher than the 97.5%-tile values for the non-exposed (1.4 mg/l). In practice, it was possible to separate those exposed to 6-7 ppm benzene from the non-exposed by means of urine analysis for MA. The urinary MA concentration was suppressed by coexposure to toluene. PMID:2923822

  17. Oxidation Mechanisms of Toluene and Benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1995-01-01

    An expanded and improved version of a previously published benzene oxidation mechanism is presented and shown to model published experimental data fairly successfully. This benzene submodel is coupled to a modified version of a toluene oxidation submodel from the recent literature. This complete mechanism is shown to successfully model published experimental toluene oxidation data for a highly mixed flow reactor and for higher temperature ignition delay times in a shock tube. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis showing the most important reactions is presented for both the benzene and toluene reacting systems. The NASA Lewis toluene mechanism's modeling capability is found to be equivalent to that of the previously published mechanism which contains a somewhat different benzene submodel.

  18. [Epigenic modifications associated with low benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Bollati, Valentina; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, mitochondrial DNA copy number and telomeres shortening are cellular modifications associated with an increasing number of tumors, cardiovascular and aging diseases. In our studies these modifications were evaluated in subjects occupationally exposed to low levels of benzene and in the general population. In peripheral blood lymphocytes a decrease of DNA methylation with the increase of personal benzene exposure was found, both in Alu and LINE-1 repetitive elements, and in the global DNA. Telomere length shortening in subjects exposed to traffic exhausts and an increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number correlated to benzene exposure was also found. DNA methylation measured in specimen repeats collected at intervals of 8 years decreased more markedly in exposed subjects than in controls. Our studies highlighted the association of epigenetic modifications of DNA with low benzene exposure.

  19. Measurement of DNA repair deficiency in workers exposed to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.M.; Au, W.W.; El Zein, R.; Grossman, L.

    1996-05-01

    We hypothesize that chronic exposure to environmental toxicants can induce genetic damage causing DNA repair deficiencies and leading to the postulated mutator phenotype of carcinogenesis. To test our hypothesis, a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was used in which pCMVcat plasmids were damaged with UV light (175, 350 J/m{sup 2} UV light), inactivating the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and then transfected into lymphocytes. Transfected lymphocytes were therefore challenged to repair the damaged plasmids, reactivating the reporter gene. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Gaucher cell lines were used as positive and negative controls for the HCR assay. The Gaucher cell line repaired normally but XP cell lines demonstrated lower repair activity. Additionally, the repair activity of the XP heterozygous cell line showed intermediate repair compared to the homozygous XP and Gaucher cells. We used HCR to measure the effects of benzene exposure on 12 exposed and 8 nonexposed workers from a local benzene plant. Plasmids 175 J/m{sup 2} and 350 J/m{sup 2} were repaired with a mean frequency of 66% and 58%, respectively, in control workers compared to 71% and 62% in exposed workers. Conversely, more of the exposed workers were grouped into the reduced repair category than controls. These differences in repair capacity between exposed and control workers were, however, not statistically significant. The lack of significant differences between the exposed and control groups may be due to extremely low exposure to benzene (<0.3 ppm), small population size, or a lack of benzene genotoxicity at these concentrations. These results are consistent with a parallel hprt gene mutation assay. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  1. Simple and complex disorder in binary mixtures with benzene as a common solvent.

    PubMed

    Požar, Martina; Seguier, Jean-Baptiste; Guerche, Jonas; Mazighi, Redha; Zoranić, Larisa; Mijaković, Marijana; Kežić-Lovrinčević, Bernarda; Sokolić, Franjo; Perera, Aurélien

    2015-04-21

    Substituting benzene for water in computer simulations of binary mixtures allows one to study the various forms of disorder, without the complications often encountered in aqueous mixtures. In particular, we study the relationship between the local order generated by different types of molecular interactions and the nature of the global disorder, by analyzing the relationship between the concentration fluctuations and the correlation functions and the associated structure factors. Alkane-benzene mixtures are very close to ideal mixtures, despite appreciable short range shape mismatch interactions, acetone-benzene mixtures appear as a good example of regular mixtures, and ethanol-benzene mixtures show large micro-segregation. In the latter case, we can unambiguously demonstrate, unlike in the case of water, the appearance of domain-domain correlations, both in the correlation functions and the structure factor calculated in computer simulations. This finding helps to confirm the existence of a pre-peak in the structure factor associated with the micro-heterogeneity, which was speculated from several of our previous simulations of aqueous-alcohol mixtures. The fact that benzene as a solvent allows us to solve some of the problems that could not be solved with water points towards some of the particularities of water as a solvent, which we discuss herein. The concept of molecular emulsion put forward in our earlier work is useful in formulating these differences between water and benzene through the analogy with direct and inverse micellar aggregates.

  2. Benzene and naphthalene in air and breath as indicators of exposure to jet fuel

    PubMed Central

    Egeghy, P; Hauf-Cabalo, L; Gibson, R; Rappaport, S

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To estimate exposures to benzene and naphthalene among military personnel working with jet fuel (JP-8) and to determine whether naphthalene might serve as a surrogate for JP-8 in studies of health effects. Methods: Benzene and naphthalene were measured in air and breath of 326 personnel in the US Air Force, who had been assigned a priori into low, moderate, and high exposure categories for JP-8. Results: Median air concentrations for persons in the low, moderate, and high exposure categories were 3.1, 7.4, and 252 µg benzene/m3 air, 4.6, 9.0, and 11.4 µg benzene/m3 breath, 1.9, 10.3, and 485 µg naphthalene/m3 air, and 0.73, 0.93, and 1.83 µg naphthalene/m3 breath, respectively. In the moderate and high exposure categories, 5% and 15% of the benzene air concentrations, respectively, were above the 2002 threshold limit value (TLV) of 1.6 mg/m3. Multiple regression analyses of air and breath levels revealed prominent background sources of benzene exposure, including cigarette smoke. However, naphthalene exposure was not unduly influenced by sources other than JP-8. Among heavily exposed workers, dermal contact with JP-8 contributed to air and breath concentrations along with several physical and environmental factors. Conclusions: Personnel having regular contact with JP-8 are occasionally exposed to benzene at levels above the current TLV. Among heavily exposed workers, uptake of JP-8 components occurs via both inhalation and dermal contact. Naphthalene in air and breath can serve as useful measures of exposure to JP-8 and uptake of fuel components in the body. PMID:14634191

  3. Health Risk Assessment of Inhalation Exposure to Formaldehyde and Benzene in Newly Remodeled Buildings, Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihui; Mo, Jinhan; Sundell, Jan; Fan, Zhihua; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess health risks associated with inhalation exposure to formaldehyde and benzene mainly emitted from building and decoration materials in newly remodeled indoor spaces in Beijing. Methods We tested the formaldehyde and benzene concentrations in indoor air of 410 dwellings and 451 offices remodeled within the past year, in which the occupants had health concerns about indoor air quality. To assess non-carcinogenic health risks, we compared the data to the health guidelines in China and USA, respectively. To assess carcinogenic health risks, we first modeled indoor personal exposure to formaldehyde and benzene using the concentration data, and then estimated the associated cancer risks by multiplying the indoor personal exposure by the Inhalation Unit Risk values (IURs) provided by the U.S. EPA Integrated Risk Information System (U.S. EPA IRIS) and the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), respectively. Results (1) The indoor formaldehyde concentrations of 85% dwellings and 67% offices were above the acute Reference Exposure Level (REL) recommended by the OEHHA and the concentrations of all tested buildings were above the chronic REL recommended by the OEHHA; (2) The indoor benzene concentrations of 12% dwellings and 32% offices exceeded the reference concentration (RfC) recommended by the U.S. EPA IRIS; (3) The median cancer risks from indoor exposure to formaldehyde and benzene were 1,150 and 106 per million (based on U.S. EPA IRIS IURs), 531 and 394 per million (based on OEHHA IURs). Conclusions In the tested buildings, formaldehyde exposure may pose acute and chronic non-carcinogenic health risks to the occupants, whereas benzene exposure may pose chronic non-carcinogenic risks to the occupants. Exposure to both compounds is associated with significant carcinogenic risks. Improvement in ventilation, establishment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission labeling systems for decorating and refurbishing materials

  4. Benzene metabolism by human liver microsomes in relation to cytochrome P450 2E1 activity.

    PubMed

    Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A; Medinsky, M A

    1994-09-01

    Low levels of benzene from sources including cigarette smoke and automobile emissions are ubiquitous in the environment. Since the toxicity of benzene probably results from oxidative metabolites, an understanding of the profile of biotransformation of low levels of benzene is critical in making a valid risk assessment. To that end, we have investigated metabolism of a low concentration of [14C]benzene (3.4 microM) by microsomes from human, mouse and rat liver. The extent of phase I benzene metabolism by microsomal preparations from 10 human liver samples and single microsomal preparations from both mice and rats was then related to measured activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. Measured CYP 2E1 activities, as determined by hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol, varied 13-fold (0.253-3.266 nmol/min/mg) for human samples. The fraction of benzene metabolized in 16 min ranged from 10% to 59%. Also at 16 min, significant amounts of oxidative metabolites were formed. Phenol was the main metabolite formed by all but two human microsomal preparations. In those samples, both of which had high CYP 2E1 activity, hydroquinone was the major metabolite formed. Both hydroquinone and catechol formation showed a direct correlation with CYP 2E1 activity over the range of activities present. A simulation model was developed based on a mechanism of competitive inhibition between benzene and its oxidized metabolites, and was fit to time-course data for three human liver preparations. Model calculations for initial rates of benzene metabolism ranging from 0.344 to 4.442 nmol/mg/min are directly proportional to measured CYP 2E1 activities. The model predicted the dependence of benzene metabolism on the measured CYP 2E1 activity in human liver samples, as well as in mouse and rat liver samples. These results suggest that differences in measured hepatic CYP 2E1 activity may be a major factor contributing to both interindividual and interspecies variations in hepatic metabolism of benzene

  5. Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring in accordance with the Westinghouse Hanford Company Chemical Hygiene Plan.

  6. Dynamics of Na(+)(Benzene) + Benzene Association and Ensuing Na(+)(Benzene)2* Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Amit K; Kolakkandy, Sujitha; Hase, William L

    2015-07-16

    Chemical dynamics simulations were used to study Bz + Na(+)(Bz) → Na(+)(Bz)2* association and the ensuing dissociation of the Na(+)(Bz)2* cluster (Bz = benzene). An interesting and unexpected reaction found from the simulations is direct displacement, for which the colliding Bz molecule displaces the Bz molecule attached to Na(+), forming Na(+)(Bz). The rate constant for Bz + Na(+)(Bz) association was calculated at 750 and 1000 K, and found to decrease with increase in temperature. By contrast, the direct displacement rate constant increases with temperature. The cross section and rate constant for direct displacement are approximately an order of magnitude lower than those for association. The Na(+)(Bz)2* cluster, formed by association, dissociates with a biexponential probability, with the rate constant for the short-time component approximately an order of magnitude larger than that for the longer time component. The latter rate constant agrees with that of Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory, consistent with rapid intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and intrinsic RRKM dynamics for the Na(+)(Bz)2* cluster. A coupled phase space model was used to analyze the biexponential dissociation probability.

  7. Airborne Microalgae: Insights, Opportunities, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Löndahl, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Airborne dispersal of microalgae has largely been a blind spot in environmental biological studies because of their low concentration in the atmosphere and the technical limitations in investigating microalgae from air samples. Recent studies show that airborne microalgae can survive air transportation and interact with the environment, possibly influencing their deposition rates. This minireview presents a summary of these studies and traces the possible route, step by step, from established ecosystems to new habitats through air transportation over a variety of geographic scales. Emission, transportation, deposition, and adaptation to atmospheric stress are discussed, as well as the consequences of their dispersal on health and the environment and state-of-the-art techniques to detect and model airborne microalga dispersal. More-detailed studies on the microalga atmospheric cycle, including, for instance, ice nucleation activity and transport simulations, are crucial for improving our understanding of microalga ecology, identifying microalga interactions with the environment, and preventing unwanted contamination events or invasions. PMID:26801574

  8. Isotope fractionation of benzene during partitioning - Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kopinke, F-D; Georgi, A; Imfeld, G; Richnow, H-H

    2017-02-01

    Isotope fractionation between benzene-D0 and benzene-D6 caused by multi-step partitioning of the benzenes between water and two organic solvents, n-octane and 1-octanol, as well as between water and the gas phase, was measured. The obtained fractionation factors αH = KH/KD are αH = 1.080 ± 0.015 and αH = 1.074 ± 0.015 for extraction into n-octane and 1-octanol, respectively, and αH = 1.049 ± 0.010 for evaporation from aqueous solution. The comparison of solvent- and gas-phase partitioning reveals that about 2/3 of the driving force of fractionation is due to different interactions in the aqueous phase, whereas 1/3 is due to different interactions in the organic phase. The heavy benzene isotopologue behaves more 'hydrophilically' and the light one more 'hydrophobically'. This synergistic alignment gives rise to relatively large fractionation effects in partitioning between water and non-polar organic matter. In contrast to a previous study, there is no indication of strong fractionation by specific interactions between benzene and octanol. Partitioning under non-equilibrium conditions yields smaller apparent fractionation effects due to opposite trends of thermodynamic and kinetic fractionation parameters, i.e. partition and diffusion coefficients of the isotopologues. This may have consequences which should be taken into account when considering isotope fractionation due to sorption in environmental compartments.

  9. Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Occupations Associated with Low-Dose Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Bollati, Valentina; Albetti, Benedetta; Byun, Hyang-Min; Bonzini, Matteo; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cocco, Pierluigi; Satta, Giannina; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Cipolla, Massimo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background: Benzene is an established leukemogen at high exposure levels. Although low-level benzene exposure is widespread and may induce oxidative damage, no mechanistic biomarkers are available to detect biological dysfunction at low doses. Objectives: Our goals were to determine in a large multicenter cross-sectional study whether low-level benzene is associated with increased blood mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn, a biological oxidative response to mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction) and to explore potential links between mtDNAcn and leukemia-related epigenetic markers. Methods: We measured blood relative mtDNAcn by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 341 individuals selected from various occupational groups with low-level benzene exposures (> 100 times lower than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration/European Union standards) and 178 referents from three Italian cities (Genoa, Milan, Cagliari). Results: In each city, benzene-exposed participants showed higher mtDNAcn than referents: mtDNAcn was 0.90 relative units in Genoa bus drivers and 0.75 in referents (p = 0.019); 0.90 in Milan gas station attendants, 1.10 in police officers, and 0.75 in referents (p-trend = 0.008); 1.63 in Cagliari petrochemical plant workers, 1.25 in referents close to the plant, and 0.90 in referents farther from the plant (p-trend = 0.046). Using covariate-adjusted regression models, we estimated that an interquartile range increase in personal airborne benzene was associated with percent increases in mtDNAcn equal to 10.5% in Genoa (p = 0.014), 8.2% (p = 0.008) in Milan, 7.5% in Cagliari (p = 0.22), and 10.3% in all cities combined (p < 0.001). Using methylation data available for the Milan participants, we found that mtDNAcn was associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation (–2.41%; p = 0.007) and p15 hypermethylation (+15.95%, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Blood MtDNAcn was increased in persons exposed to low benzene levels, potentially reflecting mitochondrial

  10. Degradation of Alkyl Benzene Sulfonate by Pseudomonas Species1

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, R. S.; Koft, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. HK-1 showed a direct relation between the concentration of alkyl benzene sulfonate (ABS) supplied and cell yields. Since growth on ABS alone did not occur, it was necessary to correlate the total energy obtained by the cells to the ABS concentration when glucose was supplied in a limiting concentration. Several types of metabolic attack in addition to the sulfonate removal were noted: (i) side-chain utilization as indicated by the production of tertiarybutyl alcohol and isopropanol and (ii) ring metabolism as indicated by the presence of phenol, catechol, mandelic acid, benzyl alcohol, and benzoic acid in spent growth media. Utilization of ABS was greatly enhanced by the presence of phenol. This enhancement suggests co-metabolism and that limited concentrations of phenolic products derived from ABS must be accumulated to get active metabolism of the ABS molecule. PMID:5017680

  11. Liquid-vapor equilibrium in the systems hexane-benzene-petroleum sulfoxides-diethylene glycol and hexane-benzene-petroleum sulfoxides-dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Vakhitova, N.G.; Baikova, A.Y.; Murinov, Y.I.; Nikitin, Y.E.

    1985-12-01

    This paper reports the results of studies of liquid-vapor equilibrium in the benzene-hexane system in presence of binary extractants: petroleum sulfoxide-dimethylformamide (DMFA) and petroleum sulfoxide-diethylene glycol (DEG). The physicochemical properties of the extractants are presented and the influence of the content of slelective solvent on vapor-liquid equilibrium was studied; the total concentration of the binary solvent in the experiments was 50 vol. %. Results also show that the introduction of a second solvent into petroleum sulfoxides alters the vapor-liquid equilibrium in the system substantially. The volatility of hexane is increased considerably, especially in the case of the PSO-DMFA mixed extractant. In the case of benzene, petroleum sulfoxides and their mixtures with diethylene glycol and dimethylformamide are approximately equal in effectiveness in the region of low benzene concentrations. In the region of high benzene concentrations mixed extractants are more effective than petroleum sulfoxides; this is decisive for isolation of aromatic hydrocarbons from mixtures rich in aromatics.

  12. Anaerobic benzene oxidation via phenol in Geobacter metallireducens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Smith, Jessica A; Bain, Timothy S; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-12-01

    Anaerobic activation of benzene is expected to represent a novel biochemistry of environmental significance. Therefore, benzene metabolism was investigated in Geobacter metallireducens, the only genetically tractable organism known to anaerobically degrade benzene. Trace amounts (<0.5 μM) of phenol accumulated in cultures of Geobacter metallireducens anaerobically oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide with the reduction of Fe(III). Phenol was not detected in cell-free controls or in Fe(II)- and benzene-containing cultures of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a Geobacter species that cannot metabolize benzene. The phenol produced in G. metallireducens cultures was labeled with (18)O during growth in H2(18)O, as expected for anaerobic conversion of benzene to phenol. Analysis of whole-genome gene expression patterns indicated that genes for phenol metabolism were upregulated during growth on benzene but that genes for benzoate or toluene metabolism were not, further suggesting that phenol was an intermediate in benzene metabolism. Deletion of the genes for PpsA or PpcB, subunits of two enzymes specifically required for the metabolism of phenol, removed the capacity for benzene metabolism. These results demonstrate that benzene hydroxylation to phenol is an alternative to carboxylation for anaerobic benzene activation and suggest that this may be an important metabolic route for benzene removal in petroleum-contaminated groundwaters, in which Geobacter species are considered to play an important role in anaerobic benzene degradation.

  13. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  14. Ignition delay times of benzene and toluene with oxygen in argon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcat, A.; Snyder, C.; Brabbs, T.

    1985-01-01

    The ignition delay times of benzene and toluene with oxygen diluted in argon were investigated over a wide range of conditions. For benzene the concentration ranges were 0.42 to 1.69 percent fuel and 3.78 to 20.3 percent oxygen. The temperature range was 1212 to 1748 K and the reflected shock pressures were 1.7 to 7.89 atm. Statistical evaluation of the benzene experiments provided an overall equation which is given. For toluene the concentration ranges were 0.5 to 1.5 percent fuel and 4.48 to 13.45 percent oxygen. The temperature range was 1339 to 1797 K and the reflected shock pressures were 1.95 to 8.85 atm. The overall ignition delay equation for toluene after a statistical evaluation is also given. Detailed experimental information is provided.

  15. Novel three-stage kinetic model for aqueous benzene adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Woo; Choi, Nag-Choul; Lee, Soon-Jae; Kim, Dong-Ju

    2007-10-15

    We propose a novel kinetic model for adsorption of aqueous benzene onto both granular activated carbon (GAC) and powdered activated carbon (PAC). The model is based on mass conservation of benzene coupled with three-stage adsorption: (1) the first portion for an instantaneous stage or external surface adsorption, (2) the second portion for a gradual stage with rate-limiting intraparticle diffusion, and (3) the third portion for a constant stage in which the aqueous phase no longer interacts with activated carbon. An analytical solution of the kinetic model was validated with the kinetic data obtained from aqueous benzene adsorption onto GAC and PAC in batch experiments with two different solution concentrations (C(0)=300 mg L(-1), 600 mg L(-1)). Experimental results revealed that benzene adsorption for the two concentrations followed three distinct stages for PAC but two stages for GAC. The analytical solution could successfully describe the kinetic adsorption of aqueous benzene in the batch reaction system, showing a fast instantaneous adsorption followed by a slow rate-limiting adsorption and a final long constant adsorption. Use of the two-stage model gave incorrect values of adsorption coefficients in the analytical solution due to inability to describe the third stage.

  16. Benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, and lead in smoke from tobacco products other than cigarettes.

    PubMed Central

    Appel, B R; Guirguis, G; Kim, I S; Garbin, O; Fracchia, M; Flessel, C P; Kizer, K W; Book, S A; Warriner, T E

    1990-01-01

    Benzene, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and lead in mainstream smoke from cigars, roll-your-own (RYO) cigarette and pipe tobaccos were sampled to evaluate their potential health significance. Results with reference cigarettes were consistent with published values, providing support for the methodology employed. The emissions of benzene and BaP, expressed as mass emitted per gram of tobacco consumed, were similar for all products evaluated; for benzene, the mean values for cigars, RYO cigarette and pipe tobaccos were 156 +/- 52, 68 +/- 11, and 242 +/- 126 micrograms/g, respectively. Mean values for BaP were 42 +/- 7 and 48 +/- 4 ng/g for cigars and RYO cigarette tobacco, respectively. Lead values were below the limit of reliable quantitation in all cases. The mean benzene concentrations in a puff ranged from 1 to 2 x 10(5) micrograms/m3 for cigars, RYO cigarette and pipe tobaccos. For BaP, the puff concentration averaged about 60 micrograms/m3 for cigars and RYO cigarette tobacco. The results suggest that smoking cigars, pipes or RYO cigarettes leads to potential exposures which exceed the No Significant Risk levels of benzene and BaP set pursuant to California's Proposition 65. These tobacco products are now required to bear a health hazard warning when sold in California. We recommend that this be adopted as national policy. PMID:2327532

  17. Benzene and its methyl-derivatives: derivation of maximum exposure levels in automobiles.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Thomas; Bolt, Hermann M; Jaeckh, Rudolf; Hengstler, Jan G

    2006-01-05

    Automobile drivers are exposed to several organic hydrocarbons. Concentrations measured in passenger compartments have been reported to range between 13 and 560 microg/m(3) for benzene, 33-258 microg/m(3) for toluene, 20-250 microg/m(3) for xylene (mixed isomers) and 3-23 microg/m(3) for trimethylbenzene (mixed isomers). These aromatic hydrocarbons are emitted from gasoline and from materials inside a car. In the present study we evaluated, whether these exposures pose a potential risk to the health of drivers. Therefore, we derived maximum exposure levels inside cars for chronic (ELIA(chronic)) and short-term (STELIA) exposure. The lowest ELIA's(chronic) for benzene, toluene, xylene and trimethylbenzene were 0.083, 1.2, 8.8 and 0.31 mg/m(3), respectively. The respective STELIA's were 16, 30, 29 and 25 mg/m(3). Obviously concentrations of toluene, xylene and trimethylbenzene inside cars do not exceed their individual STELIA's. In contrast, benzene seems to be problematic, since concentrations inside cars amount up to 0.56 mg/m(3), which exceeds the ELIA(chronic) derived for benzene. This should not be underestimated, since benzene is a genotoxic carcinogen that probably acts by non-threshold mechanisms. In conclusion, concentrations of toluene, xylene and trimethylbenzene usually observed inside cars are unlikely to pose a risk to the health of drivers. A systematic toxicological evaluation of the risk associated with benzene exposure in cars seems to be necessary.

  18. Start-up, performance and optimization of a compost biofilter treating gas-phase mixture of benzene and toluene.

    PubMed

    Rene, Eldon R; Kar, Saurajyoti; Krishnan, Jagannathan; Pakshirajan, K; López, M Estefanía; Murthy, D V S; Swaminathan, T

    2015-08-01

    The performance of a compost biofilter inoculated with mixed microbial consortium was optimized for treating a gas-phase mixture of benzene and toluene. The biofilter was acclimated to these VOCs for a period of ∼18d. The effects of concentration and flow rate on the removal efficiency (RE) and elimination capacity (EC) were investigated by varying the inlet concentration of benzene (0.12-0.95g/m(3)), toluene (0.14-1.48g/m(3)) and gas-flow rate (0.024-0.072m(3)/h). At comparable loading rates, benzene removal in the mixture was reduced in the range of 6.6-41% in comparison with the individual benzene degradation. Toluene removal in mixture was even more affected as observed from the reductions in REs, ranging from 18.4% to 76%. The results were statistically interpreted by performing an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to elucidate the main and interaction effects.

  19. Review of quantitative surveys of the length and stability of MTBE, TBA, and benzene plumes in groundwater at UST sites.

    PubMed

    Connor, John A; Kamath, Roopa; Walker, Kenneth L; McHugh, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the length and stability condition of groundwater plumes of benzene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been compiled from thousands of underground storage tank (UST) sites in the United States where gasoline fuel releases have occurred. This paper presents a review and summary of 13 published scientific surveys, of which 10 address benzene and/or MTBE plumes only, and 3 address benzene, MTBE, and TBA plumes. These data show the observed lengths of benzene and MTBE plumes to be relatively consistent among various regions and hydrogeologic settings, with median lengths at a delineation limit of 10 µg/L falling into relatively narrow ranges from 101 to 185 feet for benzene and 110 to 178 feet for MTBE. The observed statistical distributions of MTBE and benzene plumes show the two plume types to be of comparable lengths, with 90th percentile MTBE plume lengths moderately exceeding benzene plume lengths by 16% at a 10-µg/L delineation limit (400 feet vs. 345 feet) and 25% at a 5-µg/L delineation limit (530 feet vs. 425 feet). Stability analyses for benzene and MTBE plumes found 94 and 93% of these plumes, respectively, to be in a nonexpanding condition, and over 91% of individual monitoring wells to exhibit nonincreasing concentration trends. Three published studies addressing TBA found TBA plumes to be of comparable length to MTBE and benzene plumes, with 86% of wells in one study showing nonincreasing concentration trends.

  20. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  1. The pyrolysis of toluene and ethyl benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolovskaya, V. G.; Samgin, V. F.; Kalinenko, R. A.; Nametkin, N. S.

    1987-01-01

    The pyrolysis of toluene at 850 to 950 C gave mainly H2, CH4, and benzene; PhEt at 650 to 750 C gave mainly H2, CH4, styrene, benzene, and toluene. The rate constants for PhEt pyrolysis were 1000 times higher than those for toluene pyrolysis; the chain initiation rate constants differed by the same factor. The activation energy differences were 46 kJ/mole for the total reaction and 54 kJ/mole for chain initiation. The chain length was evaluated for the PhEt case (10 + or - 2).

  2. Carbon disulfide assisted polymerization of benzene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Zhanlong; Men, Zhiwei; Gao, Shuqin; Li, Zuowei; Lu, Guohui; Sun, Chenglin

    2012-03-01

    The chemical transformation of benzene (C(6)H(6)) and carbon disulfide (CS(2)) binary solution under high pressure condition is investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy up to 6.8 GPa. On increasing the pressure, all the Raman bands of benzene decrease in intensity, whereas new broad bands start to be observed at 1520 and 1450 cm(-1), indicating that a highly cross-linked polymer is formed. The recovered sample is analyzed through Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and is identified as a saturated hydrocarbon and element sulfur.

  3. Benzene partial hydrogenation: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Foppa, Lucas; Dupont, Jairton

    2015-04-07

    The partial hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexene is an economically interesting and technically challenging reaction. Over the last four decades, a lot of work has been dedicated to the development of an exploitable process and several approaches have been investigated. However, environmental constraints often represent a limit to their industrial application, making further research in this field necessary. The goal of this review is to highlight the main findings of the different disciplines involved in understanding the governing principles of this reaction from a sustainable chemistry standpoint. Special emphasis is given to ruthenium-catalyzed liquid phase batch hydrogenation of benzene.

  4. Microbial respiration and natural attenuation of benzene contaminated soils investigated by cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Michalzik, Beate; Bachmann, Anne; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-05-07

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damage. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and are known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Innovative cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of the soil micro-flora to sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. (13)C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving (12)CO2 and O2- from the natural attenuation process of benzene degradation to ultimately form (13)CO2. The respiratory quotient (RQ) decreased from a value 0.98 to 0.46 directly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with the maximum (13)CO2 concentration rate (0.63 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), indicating the highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into (13)CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore. The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration.

  5. Estimating Benzene Exposure Level over Time and by Industry Type through a Review of Literature on Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donguk; Choi, Sangjun; Ha, Kwonchul; Jung, Hyejung; Yoon, Chungsik; Koh, Dong-Hee; Ryu, Seunghun; Kim, Soogeun; Kang, Dongmug; Yoo, Kyemook

    2015-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to construct a retrospective exposure assessment for benzene through a review of literature on Korea. Airborne benzene measurements reported in 34 articles were reviewed. A total of 15,729 individual measurements were compiled. Weighted arithmetic means [AM(w)] and their variance calculated across studies were summarized according to 5-year period intervals (prior to the 1970s through the 2010s) and industry type. Industries were classified according to Korea Standard Industrial Classification (KSIC) using information provided in the literature. We estimated quantitative retrospective exposure to benzene for each cell in the matrix through a combination of time and KSIC. Analysis of the AM(w) indicated reductions in exposure levels over time, regardless of industry, with mean levels prior to the 1980–1984 period of 50.4 ppm (n = 2,289), which dropped to 2.8 ppm (n = 305) in the 1990–1994 period, and to 0.1 ppm (n = 294) in the 1995–1999 period. There has been no improvement since the 2000s, when the AM(w) of 4.3 ppm (n = 6,211) for the 2005–2009 period and 4.5 ppm (n = 3,358) for the 2010–2013 period were estimated. A comparison by industry found no consistent patterns in the measurement results. Our estimated benzene measurements can be used to determine not only the possibility of retrospective exposure to benzene, but also to estimate the level of quantitative or semiquantitative retrospective exposure to benzene. PMID:26929825

  6. Personal reflections on 50 years of study of benzene toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Parke, D V

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of benzene is reviewed, and the objectives of a quantitative balance study begun in 1945 are outlined; problems of toxicology and metabolism research of some 50 years ago are considered. The quantitative metabolism of 14C-benzene in the rabbit is annotated and compared with that of unlabeled benzene quantified by nonisotopic methods. The anomalies of phenylmercapturic acid and trans-trans-muconic acid as metabolites of benzene are examined in detail by isotopic and nonisotopic methods; these compounds are true but minor metabolites of benzene. Oxygen radicals are involved in both the metabolism of benzene and its toxicity; the roles of CYP2E1, the redox cycling of quinone metabolites, glutathione oxidation, and oxidative stress in the unique radiomimetic, hematopoietic toxicity of benzene are discussed. Differences between the toxicity of benzene and the halobenzenes are related to fundamental differences in their electronic structures and to the consequent pathways of metabolic activation and detoxication. PMID:9118881

  7. Peer Review Comments on the IRIS Assessment of Benzene

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Attachment to IRIS file for benzene, January 19, 2000, RESPONSE TO THE PEER REVIEW COMMENTS, II. Extrapolation of the Benzene Inhalation Unit Risk Estimate to the Oral Route of Exposure (EPA/NCEA-W-0517, July 1999)

  8. Sonochemical treatment of benzene/toluene contaminated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, G.; Gleason, M.; Popov, V.

    1998-12-31

    Studies of the destruction of benzene and toluene in water were undertaken using ultrasonic irradiation in a parallel place Near Field Acoustic Processor (NAP). This magnetostrictive system is capable of degrading both benzene and toluene in a continuous stirred tank reactor configuration. The reaction kinetics were characterized by first order rate constants for the disappearance of the parent compound; these ranged from 2.7 {times} 1{sup {minus}3} to 3.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} mm{sup {minus}1} over an applied power density range of 0.6 to 3.6 watt mL{sup {minus}1} and target concentration of approximately 25 to 900 {micro}M. The rate constant is shown to be inversely proportional to the target compound concentration, indicating higher order reaction kinetics. The conversion efficiency for the system was characterized through the G efficiency commonly used in radiation chemistry. The G efficiency ranged between 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} molecules destroyed per 100 eV of electrical energy drawn from the wall outlet. These values are comparable to those of other advanced oxidation processes. Suggestions are made regarding methods to improve this technology.

  9. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  10. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  11. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  12. Fullerene-Benzene purple and yellow clusters: Theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Megan P.; Khan, Sakiba; Baytak, Aysegul K.; Khan, Arshad

    2016-11-01

    Fullerene (FR, C60) gives a purple colored solution almost instantly when benzene is added to it. Interestingly, this purple solution turns yellow in about 7 weeks and remains yellow afterwards. The concentration of the purple complex increases with temperature indicating its formation kinetically favored, which transforms into a more stable yellow complex very slowly with time. The geometry optimization by density functional theory (DFT) followed by spectra (TD-DFT method) calculations suggest that the purple and yellow complexes are due to clusters of six benzene molecules arranged vertically and horizontally respectively around the FR molecule.

  13. Benzene derivatives produced by Fusarium graminearum - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Setshedi, Itumeleng

    2015-06-01

    Using NMR spectroscopy benzene derivatives were detected in mycelia of Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize. In previous studies F. graminearum was found to cause cancer to humans and benzene derivatives were detected in breath of cancer sufferers. Surprisingly, no study found benzene derivatives to be the cancerous agents in F. graminearum. In this study we detected benzene derivatives in F. graminearum and propose to study their role as cancer agents.

  14. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  15. Rotating biological contactor reactor with biofilm promoting mats for treatment of benzene and xylene containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sarayu, K; Sandhya, S

    2012-12-01

    A novel rotating biological contactor (RBC) bioreactor immobilized with microorganisms was designed to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC), such as benzene and xylene from emissions, and its performance was investigated. Gas-phase VOCs stripped by air injection were 98 % removed in the RBC when the superficial air flow rate was 375 ml/h (1,193 and 1,226 mg/l of benzene and xylene, respectively). The maximum removal rate was observed to be 1,007 and 1,872 mg/m(3)/day for benzene and xylene, respectively. The concentration profile of benzene and xylene along the RBC was dependent on the air flow rate and the degree of microbial adaptation. Air flow rate and residence time were found to be the most important operational parameters for the RBC reactor. By manipulating these operational parameters, the removal efficiency and capacity of the bioreactor could be enhanced. The kinetic constant K (s) demonstrated a linear relationship that indicated the maximum removal of benzene and xylene in RBC reactor. The phylogenic profile shows the presence of bacterium like Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., and Enterococcus sp., which belonged to the phylum Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria that were responsible for the 98 % organic removal in the RBC.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Heidi Yoon, Y.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2013-03-20

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}. Our results show that even a trace amount of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH{sub 4}, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  17. Exposure level and distribution characteristics of airborne bacteria and fungi in Seoul metropolitan subway stations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Youn; Kim, Yoon Shin; Kim, Daekeun; Kim, Hyeon Tae

    2011-01-01

    The exposure level and distribution characteristics of airborne bacteria and fungi were assessed in the workers' activity areas (station office, bedroom, ticket office and driver's seat) and passengers' activity areas (station precinct, inside the passenger carriage, and platform) of the Seoul metropolitan subway. Among investigated areas, the levels of airborne bacteria and fungi in the workers' bedroom and station precincts were relatively high. No significant difference was found in the concentration of airborne bacteria and fungi between the underground and above ground activity areas of the subway. The genera identified in all subway activity areas with a 5% or greater detection rate were Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Bacillus and Corynebacterium for airborne bacteria and Penicillium, Cladosporium, Chrysosporium, Aspergillus for airborne fungi. Staphylococcus and Micrococcus comprised over 50% of the total airborne bacteria and Penicillium and Cladosporium comprised over 60% of the total airborne fungi, thus these four genera are the predominant genera in the subway station.

  18. Benzene stripping in a flotation unit

    SciTech Connect

    Hillquist, D.; Litchfield, J.; Willet, S.; Whiteford, R.

    1994-12-31

    An induced gas flotation unit is used as a combination stripping/flotation vessel with fuel gas as the stripping/flotation medium. The gas bubbles simultaneously float the oils and solids, and strip out and recover the benzene and other volatile components from wastewater and from the floated oils and solids. The effluent stripping gas is then either used as fuel gas, or recycled to the process for product recovery. The induced gas flotation stripper, IGFS, is self-cleaning and normally experiences no sludge build up or fouling. The unit requires a minimum of operator attention and maintenance. It is sealed to eliminate emissions, has a high stripping efficiency, and has a significantly wider operating range than conventional strippers. The unit does not experience the biological fouling and disposal problems of air strippers, or the fouling and higher capital and operating costs of steam strippers. The IGFS unit was installed at the BF Goodrich ethylene plant in Calvert City in 1991. The unit was designed to treat a combined stream consisting of quench water, neutralized spent caustic, and a number of intermittent smaller oily water streams. The unit is operating effectively in stripping the benzene to levels below the NESHAP requirements. The average benzene removal efficiency is above 97%. Operating data indicate that the benzene removal efficiency can be further enhanced by increasing temperature, increasing stripping flow, reducing oil emulsions in the influent and eliminating dilution from recycled water. This paper presents performance and operating experience of the IGFS unit.

  19. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  20. Formation of Benzene in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Crim, F. Fleming (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block-the aromatic benzene molecule-has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3- butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 --> C6H6, + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadlene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium.

  1. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  2. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  5. Formation of benzene in the interstellar medium

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block—the aromatic benzene molecule—has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3-butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 → C6H6 + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadiene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium. PMID:21187430

  6. Effect of alcohol addition on shock-initiated formation of soot from benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael; Yuan, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Soot formation in benzene-methanol and benzene-ethanol argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1580-2250 K, pressures 2.0-3.0 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations (2.0-2.7) x 10 to the 17th atoms/cu cm. The results obtained indicate that the addition of alcohol suppresses the formation of soot from benzene at all temperatures, and that the reduction in soot yields is increased with the amount of alcohol added. The analysis of the results indicates that the suppression effect is probably due to the oxidation of soot and soot precursors by OH and the removal of hydrogen atoms by alcohol and water molecules.

  7. Contrastive analysis of the Raman spectra of polychlorinated benzene: hexachlorobenzene and benzene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Zhou, Qin; Huang, Yu; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    Detection of persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated benzene in environment in trace amounts is challenging, but important. It is more difficult to distinguish homologues and isomers of organic pollutantd when present in trace amounts because of their similar physical and chemical properties. In this work we simulate the Raman spectra of hexachlorobenzene and benzene, and figure out the vibration mode of each main peak. The effect on the Raman spectrum of changing substituents from H to Cl is analyzed to reveal the relations between the Raman spectra of homologues and isomers of polychlorinated benzene, which should be helpful for distinguishing one kind of polychlorinated benzene from its homologues and isomers by surface enhanced Raman scattering.

  8. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  8. Associations between immune function in yearling beef cattle and airborne emissions of sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and VOCs from oil and natural gas facilities.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Daniel G; Waldner, Cheryl L; Wickstrom, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Researchers assessed the associations between airborne emissions from oil and gas field facilities and the structure and function of the immune system of yearling beef cattle in 27 herds during spring 2002. They evaluated the immune systems of these animals by enumerating B lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte subtypes (CD4, CD8, gammadelta, and WC1) in peripheral circulation and by measuring systemic antibody production in response to vaccination. Researchers prospectively measured exposure to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by using air-quality data from passive monitors installed in pastures and wintering areas. They estimated the mean exposure of each animal over the 6-month period before the start of sample collection. The researchers used mixed models, which adjusted for clustering by herd and accounted for known risk factors, to examine potential associations between exposure to airborne sulfur dioxide, VOCs (measured as concentrations of benzene and toluene) and hydrogen sulfide, as well as proximity to emission sources (well-site density), and the immune system outcomes. Increasing exposure to VOCs measured as toluene was associated with significant CD4 T lymphocytopenia. The number of CD4 T lymphocytes was 30% lower in cattle exposed to VOCs measured as toluene in the highest quartile (> 0.823 microg/m3) than in cattle exposed in the lowest quartile (< 0.406 microg/m3).

  9. Environmental exposure to benzene, micronucleus formation and polymorphisms in DNA-repair genes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Sabrina; Maffei, Francesca; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Ravegnini, Gloria; L'insalata, Domenica; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Violante, Francesco Saverio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2012-03-18

    This report is part of a biomarker study conducted in an Italian population with exposure to environmental benzene ranging from 1.43 to 31.41 μg/m³ (values from personal sampling). DNA damage induced by benzene is the crucial mechanism of its genotoxicity, which leads to chronic benzene poisoning, haematotoxicity and leukaemia. Therefore, genetic variation in DNA-repair genes may modulate susceptibility to benzene-induced DNA damage. In light of this, the effects of polymorphisms in DNA-repair genes (APEX1, hOGG1, NBS1, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3) on micronucleus (MN) formation as a biomarker of early biological effects were evaluated. A significantly higher median MN frequency was recorded in traffic wardens than in controls. However, none of the analysed polymorphisms was significantly associated with the median MN frequency. A gene-gender interaction was observed for the APEX1 genotype. The APEX1 variant genotype was associated with significantly lower median MN frequency in men, not in women. Statistical analysis did not reveal any association between the score of the protective alleles - hypothetically pushing the pathway towards optimal DNA-damage repair - and MN. Even though there are some limitations in the study, our results indicate that the general population may be exposed to benzene concentrations higher than the threshold level for air-quality standards in the European Union of 10 μg/m³. Furthermore, urban traffic wardens are exposed to significantly higher levels of benzene than individuals spending most of the time indoors. This higher exposure may contribute to DNA damage, suggesting that benzene might be implicated both as an environmental and occupational risk factor in leukaemia and other haematological diseases. In conclusion, this study suggest the need for (i) regular monitoring of traffic wardens for possible exposure to benzene, as a precautionary step to reduce the associated health risks, and (ii) more comprehensive studies in order to

  10. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  11. Pilot scale benzene stripping column testing: Review of test data and application to the ITP columns

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Gaughan, T.P.; Taylor, G.A.

    1993-09-10

    Radioactive cesium will be removed from aqueous high level waste (HLW) solutions by precipitation with sodium tetraphenyl borate (TPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process. Benzene is generated due to the radiolysis of TPB, and dissolves into the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and into the water used to wash (WW) the precipitate. These solutions will be processed through stripping columns to reduce the benzene concentration to satisfy limits for disposal of the DSS and for temporary storage of the WW. A pilot scale testing program to evaluate the stripping column operation in support of ITP startup activities has been completed. Equipment and test plans were developed so that data obtained from the pilot scale testing would be directly applicable to full scale column operation and could be used to project hydraulic performance and stripping efficiency of both columns. A review of the test data indicate that the ITP stripping columns will be capable of reducing benzene concentrations in salt solutions to satisfy Saltstone and Tank 22 acceptance limits. An antifoam (AF) will be required to maintain the column differential pressure below the vendor recommendation of 40 inches wc so that design feed rates can be achieved. Additionally, the testing program indicated that the nitrogen rate can be decreased from the ITP column design rates and still satisfy benzene concentration requirements in the product.

  12. Towards airborne nanoparticle mass spectrometry with nanomechanical string resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Silvan; Kurek, Maksymilian; Boisen, Anja

    2013-06-01

    Airborne nanoparticles can cause severe harm when inhaled. Therefore, small and cheap portable airborne nanoparticle monitors are highly demanded by authorities and the nanoparticle producing industry. We propose to use nanomechanical resonators to build the next generation cheap and portable airborne nanoparticle sensors. Recently, nanomechanical mass spectrometry was established. One of the biggest challenges of nanomechanical sensors is the low efficiency of diffusion-based sampling. We developed an inertial-based sampling method that enables the efficient sampling of airborne nanoparticles on a nanomechanical sensor operating directly in air. We measured a sampling rate of over 1000 particles per second, for 28 nm silica nanoparticles with a concentration of 380000 #/cm3, collected on a 500 nm wide nanomechanical string resonator. We show that it is possible to reach a saturated sampling regime in which 100% of all nanoparticles are captured that are owing in the projection of the nanostring. We further show that it is possible to detect single airborne nanoparticles by detecting 50 nm Au particles with a 250 nm wide string resonator. Our resonators are currently operating in the first bending mode. Mass spectrometry of airborne nanoparticles requires the simultaneous operation in the first and second mode, which can be implemented in the transduction scheme of the resonator. The presented results lay the cornerstone for the realization of a portable airborne nanoparticle mass spectrometer.

  13. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dougal, R.A.

    1993-08-01

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  14. 54 FR 38044: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants; Benzene Emissions From Maleic Anhydride Plants, Ethylbenzene/Styrene Plants, Benzene Storage Vessels, Benzene Equipment Leaks, and Coke By- Product Recovery Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Final Rule on National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants; Benzene Emissions From Maleic Anhydride Plants, Ethylbenzene/Styrene Plants, Benzene Storage Vessels, Benzene Equipment Leaks, and Coke By-Product Recovery Plants.

  15. Leukemia risk associated with benzene exposure in the Pliofilm cohort.

    PubMed

    Paxton, M B

    1996-12-01

    A reanalysis of the Pliofilm cohort was conducted incorporating six additional years of follow-up information gathered by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and a new set of exposure estimates developed recently. The distribution of individual worker exposures calculated with the Paustenbach exposure estimates was compared to those derived using two earlier sets of job-, plant-, and year-specific exposure estimates. A traditional standardized mortality ratio analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to investigate the impact of these exposure estimates and the NIOSH updated information on evaluation of benzene's leukemogenicity. There were no additional cases of multiple myeloma or any indication of increased incidences of solid tumors. The data added in the update did not greatly modify the estimated relative risk of all leukemias associated with benzene exposure but confirmed previous findings that occupational exposure only to very high concentrations had leukemogenic potential. Leukemia has not been observed in anyone who began employment in Pliofilm production after 1950. Neither the Paustenbach nor the Crump exposures gave dose-response estimates as steep as that resulting from the Rinsky exposures.

  16. Catalytic oxidation of benzene using DBD corona discharges.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Zhang, X; Yu, X; Feng, T; Yao, S

    2006-09-01

    Plasma oxidation of benzene (C(6)H(6)) in oxygen and nitrogen was investigated using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with or without MnO2 or TiO2 at atmospheric pressure and without external heating except plasma heating. An alternative current power supply was used to generate corona discharges for the plasma oxidation. The energy density was controlled under 200 J/L to keep an increase in gas temperature less than 167 K. C(6)H(6) was oxidized to carbon monoxide (CO) and dioxide (CO(2)). Typically, the energy efficiency at an energy density of 92J/L was about 0.052, 0.039, and 0.024 mol/kWh with MnO2, TiO2, and without MnO2 and TiO2, respectively. Benzene oxidation mechanism was mentioned. A comparison on energy efficiency as a function of initial concentration of hydrocarbons, inorganic sulphur compounds, and chloro (fluoro and bromo) carbons was given.

  17. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  18. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  19. Airborne Infrared Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2017-01-01

    A unique program of infrared astronomical observations from aircraft evolved at NASA’s Ames Research Center, beginning in the 1960s. Telescopes were flown on a Convair 990, a Lear Jet, and a Lockheed C-141 - the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) - leading to the planning and development of SOFIA: a 2.7 m telescope now flying on a Boeing 747SP. The poster describes these telescopes and highlights of some of the scientific results obtained from them.

  20. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  1. Assessment of benzene and toluene emissions from automobile exhaust in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Muttamara, S; Leong, S T; Lertvisansak, I

    1999-07-01

    The use of unleaded gasoline, together with an increase in the number of vehicles in Bangkok, has significantly influenced benzene and toluene concentrations in vehicular emissions and contributes to the air pollution problem. As a matter of practical necessity, a quick test program is done for the measurement of emission concentrations/rates for vehicles driven on the road. Exhaust emission measurement at idle mode was conducted in a fleet of 12 vehicles of different model years and manufacturers. The study revealed that the benzene and toluene concentrations in the exhaust effluent averaged 4.4-22.02 and 12.24-44.75 mg/m3, respectively for 1990-1992 cars and decreased to 0.76-4.14 and 0.89-6.26 mg/m3, respectively for 1994-1995 cars. In another study, exhaust emission measurement on a chassis dynamometer was carried out in a fleet of nine selected, in-use cars. It was observed that benzene and toluene emission rates were considerably higher-in the range of 70.84-85.82 and 354.15- 429.00 mg/km, respectively, for 1990-1991 model year cars. Lower benzene and toluene emission rates of 0.43-95.07 and 2. 15-475.35 mg/km, respectively, were represented by newer cars with model years 1994-1995. These results indicated that there was a significant increase in benzene and toluene emission concentrations and rates with increasing car mileage and model year. The finding also revealed that only 28% of the tested vehicles complied to the approved emission standard.

  2. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  3. Temporal trends and weekend-weekday differences for benzene and 1,3-butadiene in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Richard

    Temporal trends and weekend-weekday differences in benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were investigated at a number of sites in the Houston, Texas area using monitoring data collected by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The dataset included two networks, the Community Air Toxics Monitoring Network (CATMN), which has 24-h measurements every six days, and the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring System (PAMS), which includes hourly measurements. The period for data analysis was 1997-2004. The CATMN network had the larger number of stations. Over this time period, the network average benzene concentration at the CATMN stations was 0.93 ppb with individual stations ranging within a factor of about two of this network average. The network average 1,3-butadiene concentration was 0.57 ppb with most individual stations ranging within a factor of about six of this network average. These ranges suggest more spatial variability for 1,3-butadiene concentrations compared to benzene concentrations. Variations in meteorology can influence benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations making it difficult to examine the true concentration trends. Therefore, a generalized additive model (GAM) was used in a time-series analysis to adjust the benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for variations caused by daily differences in meteorology. The analysis revealed very little difference in the weekend-weekday concentrations, except for a block of time during the morning rush hour where weekday concentrations were slightly higher. The GAM analysis showed that there was a significant decrease in the benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations throughout the trend period of 1997-2004. The average annual percent decrease across the sites was 1.7% for benzene for a meteorologically adjusted model (MA model) and 3.2% for a model without meteorological adjustment (raw trend or RT model). For 1,3-butadiene, there was a 3.7% annual decrease for MA model and 5.1% annual decrease

  4. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  5. Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Huwiler, Simona G; Kung, Johannes W; Weidenweber, Sina; Hellwig, Petra; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Biskup, Till; Weber, Stefan; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Ermler, Ulrich; Boll, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    In chemical synthesis, the widely used Birch reduction of aromatic compounds to cyclic dienes requires alkali metals in ammonia as extremely low-potential electron donors. An analogous reaction is catalyzed by benzoyl-coenzyme A reductases (BCRs) that have a key role in the globally important bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds at anoxic sites. Because of the lack of structural information, the catalytic mechanism of enzymatic benzene ring reduction remained obscure. Here, we present the structural characterization of a dearomatizing BCR containing an unprecedented tungsten cofactor that transfers electrons to the benzene ring in an aprotic cavity. Substrate binding induces proton transfer from the bulk solvent to the active site by expelling a Zn(2+) that is crucial for active site encapsulation. Our results shed light on the structural basis of an electron transfer process at the negative redox potential limit in biology. They open the door for biological or biomimetic alternatives to a basic chemical synthetic tool.

  6. The thermal conductivity of benzene and toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramires, M. L. V.; Vieira Dos Santos, F. J.; Mardolcar, U. V.; de Castro, C. A. Nieto

    1989-09-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquid toluene and benzene was measured in the temperature range 298 to 370 K, near the saturation line, using an absolute transient hot-wire technique. The measurements were made in a modified version of an existing instrument, equipped with a new automatic Wheatstone bridge, computer controlled. The bridge measures the time that the resistance of a 7- μm-diameter platinum wire takes to reach predetermined values, programmed by the computer. The computer can generate up to 1024 analog voltages, via a 12-bit D/A converter. The accuracy of the measurements with this new arrangement was assessed by measuring the thermal conductivity of a primary standard, toluene, at several temperatures and was found to be of the order of 0.3%. Benzene was chosen because it is under study as a possible secondary standard for liquid thermal conductivity by the Subcommittee on Transport Properties of IUPAC.

  7. Risk analysis for worker exposure to benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, William H.; Flowers, Roxanne E.

    1992-05-01

    Cancer risk factors (characterized by route, dose, dose rate per kilogram, fraction of lifetime exposed, species, and sex) were derived for workers exposed to benzene via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure at the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) and at leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites were evaluated. At the current PEL of 1 ppm, the theoretical lifetime excess risk of cancer from benzene inhalation is ten per 1000. The theoretical lifetime excess risk for worker inhalation exposure at LUST sites ranged from 10 to 40 per 1000. These results indicate that personal protection should be required. The theoretical lifetime excess risk due to soil ingestion is five to seven orders of magnitude less than the inhalation risks.

  8. Assessment and prediction of exposure to benzene of filling station employees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakitsios, Spyros P.; Papaloukas, Costas L.; Kassomenos, Pavlos A.; Pilidis, Georgios A.

    In the present study, the exposure to benzene of employees working in two filling stations (one urban and one rural) was estimated, through the method of passive sampling. Additional data (30' measurements of benzene exposure through active sampling to employees dealing with different activities, meteorological and traffic data) were collected. The measurements campaign was performed in both summer and wintertime to determine the seasonal variation of the exposure pattern. In addition, a set of artificial neural networks (ANNs) was developed to predict benzene exposure pattern for the filling station employees based on active sampling data and the parameters related to the employees' exposure. The quantification of the contribution of each parameter to the overall exposure pattern was also attempted. The results showed that although vapour recovery technologies are installed in the refuelling systems and benzene emissions are significantly reduced compared to the past, filling station employees are still highly exposed to benzene (52-15 μg m -3). Benzene exposure is strongly correlated to car refuelling (exposure levels up to 85 μg m -3), while activities like car washing or working in cash machine inside an office contribute to lower exposure levels (up to 44 and 24 μg m -3 respectively). In rural filling station, exposure levels were in general lower compared to the urban ones, due to the smaller amount of gasoline that was traded and the absence of any significant traffic effect or urban background concentration. The developed ANN seemed to be a promising technique in the prediction of the exposure pattern giving very good results, and the quantification of the parameters affirmed the importance of the refueling procedure to the exposure levels.

  9. Spectroscopic benzene detection using a broadband monolithic DFB-QCL array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Rafał; Witinski, Mark; Li, Biao; Wysocki, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative laser spectroscopic measurements of complex molecules that have a broad absorption spectra require broadly tunable laser sources operating preferably in the mid-infrared molecular fingerprint region. In this paper a novel broadband mid-infrared laser source comprising of an array of single-mode distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers was used to target a broadband absorption feature of benzene (C6H6), a toxic and carcinogenic atmospheric pollutant. The DFB-QCL array is a monolithic semiconductor device with no opto-mechanical components, which eliminates issues with mechanical vibrations. The DFB-QCLs array used in this work provides spectral coverage from 1022.5 cm-1 to 1053.3 cm-1, which is sufficient to access the absorption feature of benzene at 1038 cm-1 (9.64 μm). A sensor prototype based on a 76 m multipass cell (AMAC-76LW, Aerodyne Research) and a dispersive DFB-QCL array beam combiner was developed and tested. The Allan deviation analysis of the retrieved benzene concentration data yields a short-term precision of 100 ppbv/Hz1/2 and a minimum detectable concentration of 12 ppbv for 200 s averaging time. The system was also tested by sampling atmospheric air as well as vapors of different chemical products that contained traces of benzene.

  10. Kinetics of the uptake of sup 14 C-labeled chlorinated benzenes from soil by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, E.; Scheunert, I.; Korte, F. )

    1989-04-01

    ({sup 14}C)Benzene, ({sup 14}C)1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, ({sup 14}C)pentachlorobenzene, and ({sup 14}C)hexachlorobenzene were applied to soils in outdoor lysimeters to a 10-cm depth (2 mg/kg dry soil); barley and cress plants were grown for one vegetation period and analyzed after varying time intervals. The bioaccumulation factors (concentration of radioactive substances in plants divided by that in soils) of barley were higher than those of cress, except for hexachlorobenzene. In barley, bioaccumulation factors increased with decreasing chlorine content of the molecules, except for benzene, whereas in cress hexachlorobenzene exhibited the highest bioaccumulation factor. The conversion ratios of chlorinated benzenes (percentage of conversion products based on total radioactivity in plants) were negatively correlated to the chlorine content of the molecules and, in barley, positively correlated with time; in general, they were higher in barley than in cress. The concentration of radioactive substances in the plants, as well as bioaccumulation factors, decreased with time, except for a slight increase in benzene-derived residues in barley after 125 days. This effect is due to growth dilution. The percentage of radioactivity in barley seeds, based on that in the whole plant, was negatively correlated to the chlorine content of the molecule.

  11. Modulation of affinity of a marine pseudomonad for toluene and benzene by hydrocarbon exposure.

    PubMed

    Law, A T; Button, D K

    1986-03-01

    Trace (microgram liter) quantities of either toluene or benzene injected into an amino-acid-limited continuous culture of Pseudomonas sp. strain T2 were utilized immediately with affinities of 2.6 and 6.8 liters g of cells h, respectively, and yielded large amounts of organic products, carbon dioxide, and cells. The immediate utilization of hydrocarbons by hydrocarbon-deprived organisms helps to establish the nutritional value of nonpolar substrates in the environment. The observation of small Michaelis constants for toluene transport led to tests of metabolic competition between hydrocarbons; however, competitive inhibition of toluene metabolism was not found for benzene, naphthalene, xylene, dodecane, or amino acids. Benzene and terpenes were inhibitory at milligram liter concentrations. Toluene was metabolized by a strongly inducible system when compared with benzene. The capacity of toluene to effect larger affinity values increased with exposure time and concentration. The kinetics of induction suggested saturation phenomena, resulting in an induction constant, K(ind), of 96 mug of toluene liter. Maximal induction of amino-acid-grown cells required about 80 h, with the affinity reaching 317 liters g of cells h.

  12. Validation of Armadillo officinalis Dumèril, 1816 (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) as a bioindicator: in vivo study of air benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Agodi, A; Oliveri Conti, G; Barchitta, M; Quattrocchi, A; Lombardo, B M; Montesanto, G; Messina, G; Fiore, M; Ferrante, M

    2015-04-01

    This study tests the potential for using Armadillo officinalis as a bioindicator of exposure to and activation of benzene metabolic pathways using an in vivo model. A. officinalis specimens collected in a natural reserve were divided into a control and three test groups exposed to 2.00, 5.32 or 9.09 µg/m(3) benzene for 24h. Three independent tests were performed to assess model reproducibility. Animals were dissected to obtain three pooled tissue samples per group: hepatopancreas (HEP), other organs and tissues (OOT), and exoskeleton (EXO). Muconic acid (MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA), two human metabolites of benzene, and changes in mtDNA copy number, a human biomarker of benzene exposure, were determined in each sample; benzene was determined only in EXO. MA was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection, S-PMA by triple quadrupole mass spectrometer liquid chromatography with electro spray ionization (LC-MS-ESI-TQD), mtDNA by real-time quantitative PCR and end-point PCR, and benzene by quadrupole mass spectrometer head-space gas chromatography (HSGC-MS). MA and S-PMA levels rose both in HEP and OOT; EXO exhibited increasing benzene concentrations; and mtDNA copy number rose in HEP but not in OOT samples. Overall, our findings demonstrate that A. officinalis is a sensitive bioindicator of air benzene exposure and show for the first time its ability to reproduce human metabolic dynamics.

  13. Estimation of viable airborne microbes downwind from a point source.

    PubMed Central

    Lighthart, B; Frisch, A S

    1976-01-01

    Modification of the Pasquill atmospheric diffusion equations for estimating viable microbial airborne cell concentrations downwind form a continuous point source is presented. A graphical method is given to estimate the ground level cell concentration given (i) microbial death rate, (ii) mean wind speed, (iii) atmospheric stability class, (iv) downwind sample distance from the source, and (v) source height. PMID:1275491

  14. PTEN methylation involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zuo, Xin; Bai, Wenlin; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that benzene is a hematotoxic carcinogen. PTEN promoter methylation is a representative example of transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. However, the effect of PTEN methylation on benzene-induced hematotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, the animal model of benzene hematotoxicity was successfully established. WBC significantly decreased in experimental groups (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the weight of rats increased slowly and even declined with increasing doses of benzene in the benzene-treated groups. An increase in the level of PTEN methylation was observed in the low dose group, and PTEN methylation level increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, it was interesting that PTEN mRNA expression increased in the low dose group, but declined with increasing doses of benzene. The decrease of tumor suppressor function caused by PTEN methylation may be an important mechanism of benzene hematotoxicity. Furthermore, lymphoblast cell line F32 was incubated by benzene and then treated with 5-aza and TSA, alone or in combination. A dramatic decrease in the PTEN mRNA expression and a significant increase of PTEN methylation level in benzene-treated cells were also shown. PTEN mRNA expression was up regulated and PTEN methylation level was reduced by the epigenetic inhibitors, 5-aza and TSA. In conclusion, PTEN methylation is involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity through suppressing PTEN mRNA expression.

  15. Occupational Exposure to Benzene and Chromosomal Structural Aberrations in the Sperm of Chinese Men

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Francesco; Weldon, Rosana H.; Li, Guilan; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Xing, Caihong; Kurtovich, Elaine; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Benzene is an industrial chemical that causes blood disorders, including acute myeloid leukemia. We previously reported that occupational exposures near the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit (8 hr) of 1 ppm was associated with sperm aneuploidy. Objective: We investigated whether occupational exposures near 1 ppm increase the incidence of sperm carrying structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods: We applied a sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization assay to measure frequencies of sperm carrying partial chromosomal duplications or deletions of 1cen or 1p36.3 or breaks within 1cen-1q12 among 30 benzene-exposed and 11 unexposed workers in Tianjin, China, as part of the China Benzene and Sperm Study (C-BASS). Exposed workers were categorized into low-, moderate-, and high-exposure groups based on urinary benzene (medians: 2.9, 11.0, and 110.6 µg/L, respectively). Median air benzene concentrations in the three exposure groups were 1.2, 3.7, and 8.4 ppm, respectively. Results: Adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all structural aberrations combined were 1.42 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.83), 1.44 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.85), and 1.75 (95% CI: 1.36, 2.24) and for deletion of 1p36.3 alone were 4.31 (95% CI: 1.18, 15.78), 6.02 (95% CI: 1.69, 21.39), and 7.88 (95% CI: 2.21, 28.05) for men with low, moderate, and high exposure, respectively, compared with unexposed men. Chromosome breaks were significantly increased in the high-exposure group [IRR 1.49 (95% CI: 1.10, 2.02)]. Conclusions: Occupational exposures to benzene were associated with increased incidence of chromosomally defective sperm, raising concerns for worker infertility and spontaneous abortions as well as mental retardation and inherited defects in their children. Our sperm findings point to benzene as a possible risk factor for de novo 1p36 deletion syndrome. Because chromosomal aberrations in sperm can arise from defective stem

  16. Reassessing benzene risks using internal doses and Monte-Carlo uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, L A

    1996-01-01

    --pharmacokinetic and hematotoxic--are examined to test the plausibility of this finding. A framework for incorporating causally relevant biological information into benzene risk assessment is introduced, and it is shown that both pharmacokinetic and hematotoxic models appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that sufficiently low concentrations of inhaled benzene do not create and excess risk. PMID:9118928

  17. Interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates: A molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Yu; Wei, Ning; Wang, Ce; Zhou, He; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Lu

    2015-11-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to analyze orientations of sodium branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates molecules at nonane/water interface, which is helpful to design optimal surfactant structures to achieve ultralow interfacial tension (IFT). Through the two dimensional density profiles, monolayer collapses are found when surfactant concentration continues to increase. Thus the precise scope of monolayer is certain and orientation can be analyzed. Based on the simulated results, we verdict the interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates at the oil-water interface, and discuss the effect of hydrophobic tail structure on surfactant assignment. Bigger hydrophobic size can slow the change rate of surfactant occupied area as steric hindrance, and surfactant meta hydrophobic tails have a stronger tendency to stretch to the oil phase below the collapsed concentration. Furthermore, an interfacial model with reference to collapse, increasing steric hindrance and charge repulsive force between interfacial surfactant molecules, responsible for effecting of surfactant concentration and structure has been supposed.

  18. Comparison of Benzene & Toluene removal from synthetic polluted air with use of Nano photocatalyticTiO2/ ZNO process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mono aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) are a group of hazardous pollutants which originate from sources such as refineries, gas, and oil extraction fields, petrochemicals and paint and glue industries. Conventional methods, including incineration, condensation, adsorption and absorption have been used for removal of VOCs. None of these methods is economical for removal of pollutants of polluted air with low to moderate concentrations. The heterogeneous photocatalytic processes involve the chemical reactions to convert pollutant to carbon dioxide and water. The aim of this paper is a comparison of Benzene & Toluene removal from synthetic polluted air using a Nano photocatalytic TiO2/ ZNO process. Results The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that Nano crystals of TiO2 and ZNO were in anatase and rutile phases. Toluene & benzene were decomposed by TiO2/ ZNO Nano photocatalyst and UV radiation. Kruskal-wallis Test demonstrated that there are significant differences (pvalue < 0.05) between pollutant concentrations in different operational conditions. Conclusions Degradation of toluene & benzene increases with increasing UV intensity and decreasing initial concentrations. Effect of TiO2/ZNO Nano photocatalyst on benzene is less than that on toluene. In this research, Toluene & benzene removal by TiO2/ZNO and UV followed first-order reactions. PMID:24499601

  19. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  20. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hospodsky, Denina; Qian, Jing; Nazaroff, William W.; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study presents evidence for elevated concentrations of indoor airborne bacteria due to human occupancy, and investigates the sources of these bacteria. Samples were collected in a university classroom while occupied and when vacant. The total pa