Science.gov

Sample records for airborne black carbon

  1. Carbon black vs. black carbon and other airborne materials containing elemental carbon: physical and chemical distinctions.

    PubMed

    Long, Christopher M; Nascarella, Marc A; Valberg, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Airborne particles containing elemental carbon (EC) are currently at the forefront of scientific and regulatory scrutiny, including black carbon, carbon black, and engineered carbon-based nanomaterials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and graphene. Scientists and regulators sometimes group these EC-containing particles together, for example, interchangeably using the terms carbon black and black carbon despite one being a manufactured product with well-controlled properties and the other being an undesired, incomplete-combustion byproduct with diverse properties. In this critical review, we synthesize information on the contrasting properties of EC-containing particles in order to highlight significant differences that can affect hazard potential. We demonstrate why carbon black should not be considered a model particle representative of either combustion soots or engineered carbon-based nanomaterials. Overall, scientific studies need to distinguish these highly different EC-containing particles with care and precision so as to forestall unwarranted extrapolation of properties, hazard potential, and study conclusions from one material to another.

  2. Effects of airborne black carbon pollution on maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illes, Bernadett; Anda, Angela; Soos, Gabor

    2013-04-01

    The black carbon (BC) changes the radiation balance of the Earth and contributes to global warming. The airborne BC deposited on the surface of plant, changing the radiation balance, water balance and the total dry matter (TDM) content of plant. The objective of our study was to investigate the impact of soot originated from motor vehicle exhaust on maize. The field experiment was carried out in Keszthely Agrometeorological Research Station (Hungary) in three consecutive years (2010, 2011, 2012) of growing season. The test plant was the maize hybrid Sperlona (FAO 340) with short growing season. The BC was chemically "pure", which means that it is free any contaminants (e.g. heavy metals). The BC was coming from the Hankook Tyre Company (Dunaújváros, Hungary), where used that for improve the wear resistance of tires. We used a motorised sprayer of SP 415 type to spray the BC onto the leaf surface. The leaf area index (LAI) was measured each week on the same 12 sample maize in each treatment using an LI 3000A automatic planimeter (LI-COR, Lincoln, NE). Albedo was measured by pyranometers of the CMA-11 type (Kipp & Zonen, Vaisala), what we placed the middle of the plot of 0.3 ha. The effects of BC were studied under two different water supplies: evapotranspirometers of Thornthwaite type were used for "ad libitum" treatment and rainfed treatment in field plots. In 2010 and 2012, a big difference was not observed in the case of LAI in the effects of BC. However, in 2011 there was a significant difference. The LAI of the BC polluted maize was higher (10-15%, P<0.05), than the LAI of the control maize in the rainfed plot and in the ET chambers, respectively. The albedo of the BC contaminated maize decreased (15-30%, P<0.05) in all three years. We also detected that the green plant surface of maize increased on BC contaminated treatment. These results may suggest that the plant is able to absorb the additional carbon source through the leaves. The albedo decreased

  3. Domestic airborne black carbon and exhaled nitric oxide in children in NYC.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Alexandra G; Chillrud, Steven N; Mellins, Robert B; Acosta, Luis M; Miller, Rachel L; Quinn, James W; Yan, Beizhan; Divjan, Adnan; Olmedo, Omar E; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Kinney, Patrick L; Perera, Frederica P; Jacobson, Judith S; Goldstein, Inge F; Rundle, Andrew G; Perzanowski, Matthew S

    2012-01-01

    Differential exposure to combustion by-products and allergens may partially explain the marked disparity in asthma prevalence (3-18%) among New York City neighborhoods. Subclinical changes in airway inflammation can be measured by fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). FeNO could be used to test independent effects of these environmental exposures on airway inflammation. Seven- and eight-year-old children from neighborhoods with lower (range 3-9%, n=119) and higher (range 11-18%, n=121) asthma prevalence participated in an asthma case-control study. During home visits, FeNO was measured, and samples of bed dust (allergens) and air (black carbon; BC) were collected. Neighborhood built-environment characteristics were assessed for the 500 m surrounding participants' homes. Airborne BC concentrations in homes correlated with neighborhood asthma prevalence (P<0.001) and neighborhood densities of truck routes (P<0.001) and buildings burning residual oil (P<0.001). FeNO concentrations were higher among asthmatics with than in those without frequent wheeze (≥4 times/year) (P=0.002). FeNO concentrations correlated with domestic BC among children without seroatopy (P=0.012) and with dust mite allergen among children with seroatopy (P=0.020). The association between airborne BC in homes and both neighborhood asthma prevalence and FeNO suggest that further public health interventions on truck emissions standards and residual oil use are warranted. PMID:22377682

  4. Long-term Airborne Black Carbon Measurements on a Lufthansa Passenger Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Su, H.; Ditas, J.; Scharffe, D.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Y.; McMeeking, G. R.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Poeschl, U.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles containing black carbon are the most absorbing component of incoming solar radiation and exert a significant positive radiative forcing thus forming next to CO2 the strongest component of current global warming. Nevertheless, the role of black carbon particles and especially their complex interaction with clouds needs further research which is hampered by the limited experimental data, especially observations in the free troposphere, and in the UTLS (upper troposphere and lower stratosphere). In August 2014, a single particle soot photometer (SP2) was included in the extensive scientific payload of the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) project. CARIBIC is in operation since 1997 and carries out systematic observations of trace gas and aerosol sampling and on-line analyses, as well as DOAS remote sensing system at 10-12 km altitude. For this a special air freight container combining different instruments is transported on a monthly basis using a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 passenger aircraft with destinations from 120°W to 120°E and 10°N to 75°N. The integration of a SP2 offers the possibility for the first long-term measurement of global distribution of black carbon. Up to date the SP2 measurements have been analyzed for 392 flights hours over four continents (Fig. 1). The first measurements show promising results of black carbon including periods when background concentrations in the UTLS were encountered. Beside a general distribution of number and mass of black carbon particles, peak events were detected with up to 20 times higher concentrations compared to the background. Moreover, high concentration plumes have been observed continuously over a range of 10,000 km. Interestingly, our results show also a generally lower amount of black carbon mass in the tropics compared to the mid latitude northern hemisphere.

  5. Long-term airborne black carbon measurements on a Lufthansa passenger aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditas, Jeannine; Su, Hang; Scharffe, Dieter; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Yuxuan; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Pöschl, Ulrich; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles containing black carbon are the most absorbing component of incoming solar radiation and exert a significant positive radiative forcing thus forming next to CO² the strongest component of current global warming (Bond, 2013). Nevertheless, the role of black carbon particles and especially their complex interaction with clouds needs further research which is hampered by the limited experimental data, especially observations in the free and upper troposphere, and in the UTLS (upper troposphere and lower stratosphere). Many models underestimate the global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon by a factor of almost 3 (Bond, 2013). In August 2014, a single particle soot photometer was included in the extensive scientific payload of the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) project. CARIBIC is in operation since 1997 (with an interruption for 2002-2005) and carries out systematic observations at 10-12 km altitude. For this a special air freight container combining different instruments is transported on a monthly basis using a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 passenger aircraft with destinations from 120°W to 120°E and 10°N to 75°N. The container has equipment for trace gas analyses and sampling and aerosol analyses and sampling and is connected to an inlet system that is part of the aircraft which contains a camera and DOAS remote sensing system. The integration of a single particle soot photometer (SP2) offers the possibility for the first long-term measurement of global distribution of black carbon and so far flights up to November 2015 have been conducted with more than 400 flight hours. So far the SP2 measurements have been analysed for flights over four continents from Munich to San Francisco, Sao Paulo, Tokyo, Beijing, Cape Town, Los Angeles and Hong Kong). The first measurements show promising results of black carbon measurements. Background concentrations in the UTLS

  6. Airborne measurements of Black Carbon using miniature high-performance Aethalometers during global circumnavigation campaign GLWF 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Drinovec, Luka; Vidmar, Primož; Lenarčič, Matevž

    2013-04-01

    While ground-level measurements of atmospheric aerosols are routinely performed around the world, there exists very little data on their vertical and geographical distribution in the global atmosphere. This data is a crucial requirement for our understanding of the dispersion of pollutant species of anthropogenic origin, and their possible effects on radiative forcing, cloud condensation, and other phenomena which can contribute to adverse outcomes. Black Carbon (BC) is a unique tracer for combustion emissions, and can be detected rapidly and with great sensitivity by filter-based optical methods. It has no non-combustion sources and is not transformed by atmospheric processes. Its presence at altitude is unequivocal. Recent technical advances have led to the development of miniaturized instruments which can be operated on ultra-light aircraft, balloons or UAV's. From January to April 2012, a 'Pipistrel Virus' single-seat ultra-light aircraft flew around the world on a photographic and environmental-awareness mission. The flight track covered all seven continents; crossed all major oceans; and operated at altitudes around 3000 m ASL and up to 8900 m ASL. The aircraft carried a specially-developed high-sensitivity miniaturized dual-wavelength Aethalometer, which recorded BC concentrations with very high temporal resolution and sensitivity (see Reference below). We present examples of data from flight tracks over remote oceans, uninhabited land masses, and densely populated areas. Back-trajectories are used to show transport of polluted air masses. Measuring the dependence of the aerosol absorption on the wavelength, we show that aerosols produced during biomass combustion can be transported to high altitude in high concentrations. 1. __, Carbon Sampling Takes Flight, Science 2012, 335, 1286. 2. G. Močnik, L. Drinovec, M. Lenarčič, Airborne measurements of Black Carbon during the GLW Flight using miniature high-performance Aethalometers, accessed 8 January 2013

  7. Domestic airborne black carbon levels and 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate among children in New York City☆

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Maria Jose; Yan, Beizhan; Chillrud, Steven N.; Acosta, Luis M.; Divjan, Adnan; Jacobson, Judith S.; Miller, Rachel L.; Goldstein, Inge F.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to airborne black carbon (BC) has been associated with asthma development, respiratory symptoms and decrements in lung function. However, the mechanism through which BC may lead to respiratory symptoms has not been completely elucidated. Oxidative stress has been suggested as a potential mechanism through which BC might lead to adverse health outcomes. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) allows for the non-invasive collection of airway lining fluid containing biomarkers of oxidative stress like 8-isoprostane, a stable by-product of lipid peroxidation. Therefore, we sought to characterize the association between domestic airborne BC concentrations and 8-isoprostane in EBC. Materials and methods Seven- and eight-year-old children participated in an asthma case–control study in New York City. During home visits, air samples and EBC were collected. Seven day averages of domestic levels of particulate matter <2.5 µm (PM2.5), BC and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were measured. Urea and 8-isoprostane were measured by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) in EBC. Results In univariate models, PM2.5 and BC, but not ETS, were significantly associated with increases in 8-isoprostane in the EBC (β = 0.006 and β = 0.106 respectively, p < 0.05 for both). These associations remained statistically significant for both PM2.5 and BC after adjustment for covariates. In a co-pollutant model including PM2.5, BC and ETS, only BC remained a statistically significant predictor of 8-isoprostane (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our findings suggest the BC fraction of PM might contain exposure relevant to increased oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:25262082

  8. Atmospheric profiles of Black Carbon at remote locations using light-weight airborne Aethalometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. D.; Močnik, G.; Drinovec, L.; Lenarcic, M.

    2012-12-01

    While measurements of atmospheric aerosols are routinely performed at ground-level around the world, there is far less knowledge of their concentrations at altitude: yet this data is a crucial requirement for our understanding of the dispersion of pollutants of anthropogenic origin, with their associated effects on radiative forcing, cloud condensation, and other adverse phenomena. Black Carbon (BC) is a unique tracer for combustion emissions, and can be detected rapidly and with great sensitivity by filter-based optical methods. It has no non-combustion sources and is not transformed by atmospheric processes. Recent technical advances have developed light-weight miniaturized instruments which can be operated on light aircraft or carried aboard commercial passenger flights. From January to April 2012, a single-seat ultra-light aircraft flew around the world on a scientific, photographic and environmental-awareness mission. The flight track crossed all seven continents and all major oceans, with altitudes up to 8.9 km ASL. The aircraft carried a custom-developed high-sensitivity dual-wavelength light-weight Aethalometer, operating at 370 and 880 nm with special provision to compensate for the effects of changing pressure, temperature and humidity. The instrument recorded BC concentrations with high temporal resolution and sensitivity better than 5 ng/m3. We present examples of data from flight tracks over remote oceans, uninhabited land masses, and densely populated areas, analyzing the spectral dependence of absorption to infer the contributions to BC from fossil fuel vs. biomass combustion, and aggregating the data into vertical profiles. The regional and long range transport of BC may be investigated using back-trajectories. We have also operated miniature instruments in the passenger cabins of long-distance commercial aircraft. Since there are no combustion sources within the cabin, any BC in the ventilation air must necessarily have originated from the outside

  9. Airborne black carbon concentrations over an urban region in western India-temporal variability, effects of meteorology, and source regions.

    PubMed

    Bapna, Mukund; Sunder Raman, Ramya; Ramachandran, S; Rajesh, T A

    2013-03-01

    This study characterizes over 5 years of high time resolution (5 min), airborne black carbon (BC) concentrations (July 2003 to December 2008) measured over Ahmedabad, an urban region in western India. The data were used to obtain different time averages of BC concentrations, and these averages were then used to assess the diurnal, seasonal, and annual variability of BC over the study region. Assessment of diurnal variations revealed a strong association between BC concentrations and vehicular traffic. Peaks in BC concentration were co-incident with the morning (0730 to 0830, LST) and late evening (1930 to 2030, LST) rush hour traffic. Additionally, diurnal variability in BC concentrations during major festivals (Diwali and Dushera during the months of October/November) revealed an increase in BC concentrations due to fireworks displays. Maximum half hourly BC concentrations during the festival days were as high as 79.8 μg m(-3). However, the high concentrations rapidly decayed suggesting that local meteorology during the festive season was favorable for aerosol dispersion. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model with BC as the dependent variable and meteorological parameters as independent variables was fitted. The variability in temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction accounted for about 49% of the variability in measured BC concentrations. Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis was used to identify the geographical location of local source regions contributing to the effective BC measured (at 880 nm) at the receptor site. The east north-east (ENE) direction to the receptor was identified as a major source region. National highway (NH8) and two coal-fired thermal power stations (at Gandhinagar and Sabarmati) were located in the identified direction, suggesting that local traffic and power plant emissions were likely contributors to the measured BC.

  10. A model for the formation of airborne particulate matter based on the gas-phase adsorption on amorphous carbon blacks.

    PubMed Central

    Risby, T H; Sehnert, S S

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the physicochemical properties that describe the adsorption of a series of solutes onto the surfaces of amorphous carbon blacks. Adsorption was studied at concentrations that correspond to low surface coverages and in the presence of volatile solvent diluents. The adsorbates and adsorbents were selected for their relevance as models for environmental agent-particle complexes originating from incomplete combustion. The data clearly show that the major factors that determine the strength of adsorption are the surface properties of the adsorbent and the intermolecular forces between the surface and the adsorbing molecule. The heat of adsorption data have been used to predict the lifetime of the absorbate-adsorbent complexes. PMID:3383817

  11. Airborne measurements of black carbon aerosol over the Southeastern U.S. during the Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.; Watts, L.; Holloway, J.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Liao, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) field campaign was a large-scale, collaborative project, which took place in the Southeastern U.S. in June and July of 2013. The goal of the campaign was to investigate the impacts of biogenic and anthropogenic gases and aerosols on the formation of haze and anomalous climate cooling in the region. During SAS, a NOAA Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument was utilized onboard NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol mass and microphysical properties. BC aerosol is emitted into the atmosphere from biomass burning (BB) and incomplete combustion of fossil and biofuel. Hence, BC sources are strongly linked to anthropogenic activity. BC aerosol is currently the second largest anthropogenic climate forcing agent after CO2(g), and its climate impacts, which depend on vertical burden and internal mixing, are not fully understood. In the Southeast, BC aerosol is expected to provide surface area for the condensation of semi-volatile products of VOC oxidation and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Hence, BC is expected to impact the haze formation and regional climate. In this work we present an overview of BC measurements during Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study, the NOAA contribution to SAS. Geographical variations in mass mixing ratios, mass size distributions, and mixing state of BC over the Southeast U.S. are discussed. Relationships of BC with carbon monoxide (CO), acetonitrile (ACN) and other trace gases are used to investigate the impacts of urban, BB, natural gas development, and power plant emissions on the distribution and properties of BC aerosol in the region. Among studied urban centers, St. Louis and Atlanta were determined to be the largest source regions of BC. A clear weekend effect in BC mass mixing ratios and microphysical properties was observed in the metropolitan Atlanta region. Compared to BB and urban centers, power plants and natural gas developments

  12. 'Glory and the Curse of the Black Carbon'

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Glory spacecraft will improve our understanding of how the sun and airborne particles called aerosols (black carbons among them), affect Earth's climate. Set to launch February 2011, the mis...

  13. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON BLACK CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Report to Congress on Black Carbon describes domestic and international sources of black carbon emissions, and summarizes available scientific information on the climate effects of black carbon. Further, the Report evaluates available black carbon mitigation options and thei...

  14. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm. PMID:27174890

  15. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-05-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm.

  16. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm. PMID:27174890

  17. Black Carbon as an Additional Indicator of the Adverse Health Effects of Airborne Particles Compared with PM10 and PM2.5

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Gerard; Simic-Lawson, Milena; Fischer, Paul; van Bree, Leendert; ten Brink, Harry; Keuken, Menno; Atkinson, Richard W.; Anderson, H. Ross; Brunekreef, Bert; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current air quality standards for particulate matter (PM) use the PM mass concentration [PM with aerodynamic diameters ≤ 10 μm (PM10) or ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5)] as a metric. It has been suggested that particles from combustion sources are more relevant to human health than are particles from other sources, but the impact of policies directed at reducing PM from combustion processes is usually relatively small when effects are estimated for a reduction in the total mass concentration. Objectives: We evaluated the value of black carbon particles (BCP) as an additional indicator in air quality management. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of health effects of BCP compared with PM mass based on data from time-series studies and cohort studies that measured both exposures. We compared the potential health benefits of a hypothetical traffic abatement measure, using near-roadway concentration increments of BCP and PM2.5 based on data from prior studies. Results: Estimated health effects of a 1-μg/m3 increase in exposure were greater for BCP than for PM10 or PM2.5, but estimated effects of an interquartile range increase were similar. Two-pollutant models in time-series studies suggested that the effect of BCP was more robust than the effect of PM mass. The estimated increase in life expectancy associated with a hypothetical traffic abatement measure was four to nine times higher when expressed in BCP compared with an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. Conclusion: BCP is a valuable additional air quality indicator to evaluate the health risks of air quality dominated by primary combustion particles. PMID:21810552

  18. Airborne measurements of single particle refractory black carbon over the continental U.S. during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Gao, R.; Holloway, J. S.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) campaign was a large-scale, collaborative project, which took place in the continental U.S. in May and June of 2012. The goal of the campaign was to investigate the impacts of continental convection on the composition and chemistry of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere through a series of aircraft and ground-based measurements of atmospheric gases and particles. During DC3, a NOAA Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument was utilized onboard NASA's DC8 research aircraft for measurements of refractory black carbon (rBC) in atmospheric particles with 1 second time resolution. Particles containing rBC are emitted into the atmosphere by incomplete combustion of fossil and bio fuel and hence are strongly linked to anthropogenic sources. These particles are of great importance because, among other effects, they increase the radiative forcing of the Earth's system through absorption of shortwave solar radiation in the troposphere, accelerate the rate of melting of arctic ice and snow by changing the albedo, and pose a respiratory and cardiovascular health risk in the boundary layer. Removal processes and timescales for rBC-containing particles are poorly constrained, which leads to high uncertainty in modeling of regional and global distributions. In this work, an overview of the NOAA SP2 measurements during DC3 is presented. Geographical variations in mass loadings and size distributions of rBC over the continental U.S. are discussed. Vertical profiles of rBC concentrations are generated and, in conjunction with carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) mixing ratios, are used to investigate the impacts of cloud convection and storm processing on the removal of rBC-containing particles from convected air masses. Comparisons of rBC mass loadings with acetonitrile (CH3CN) and CO mixing ratios are made to identify biomass burning plumes from wild fires originating in Colorado and New Mexico, and to

  19. Airborne intercomparisons of carbon monoxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Sachse, Glen W.; Hill, Gerald F.; Condon, Estelle P.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of carbon monoxide (CO) are discussed. The intercomparison was conducted as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and included a laser differential absorption method and two grab sample/gas chromatograph methods. Measurements were obtained during approximately 90 flight hours, during which the CO mixing ratios ranged from about 60 to 140 ppbv. The level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements was well within the overall accuracy stated for each instrument. The correlation observed between the measurements from the respective pairs of instruments ranged from 0.85 to 0.98, with no evidence for the presence of either a constant or proportional bias between any of the instruments.

  20. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  1. Longitudinal variability of black carbon vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. P.; Weinzierl, B.; Samset, B. H.; Perring, A. E.; Dollner, M.; Heimerl, K.; Markovic, M. Z.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol contributes substantially to both climate forcing and climate forcing uncertainty. An important source of this uncertainty derives from the difficulty in predicting BC's global abundance and vertical distribution. Here we present a multi-year record of black carbon (BC) vertical concentration profiles from both sides of the Atlantic, obtained from airborne Single Particle Soot Photometers (SP2s) flown on the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon research aircraft from the CONCERT, ACCESS, DC3, SEAC4RS, and SALTRACE campaigns. The measurements constrain the relative rates of BC transport/removal from, and zonal mixing in, the upper troposphere, as well as the range of BC loadings in these regions. They also constrain the time-rates of change of BC loads in altitudes at which it is a highly efficient (although sparse) climate forcer, and a relatively long-lived aerosol tracer. We find that concentration of BC in the upper troposphere can vary by a factor 10. Over the Northern mid-latitudes concentrations are however consistent to a fraction of this range over wide longitudinal ranges, over month-long timescales. The data show that BC becomes zonally mixed here starting at 500 hPa and extending to near the tropopause. These results imply broader value than previously associated with measured vertical profiles in constraining global scale BC loadings aloft.

  2. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  3. Low-Wind and Other Microclimatic Factors in Near-road Black Carbon Variability: A Case Study and Assessment Implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne black carbon from urban traffic is a climate forcing agent and has been associated with health risk to near-road populations. In this paper, we describe a case study of black carbon concentration and compositional variability at and near a traffic-laden multi-lane highw...

  4. Determination of the carbon content of airborne fungal spores.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Heidi; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Zibuschka, Franziska; Hitzenberger, Regina; Kraus, Gunther F; Puxbaum, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores contribute potentially to the organic carbon of the atmospheric aerosol, mainly in the "coarse aerosol" size range 2.5-10 microm aerodynamic equivalent diameter (aed). Here, we report about a procedure to determine the organic carbon content of fungal spores frequently observed in the atmosphere. Furthermore, we apply a new (carbon/individual) factor to quantify the amount of fungal-spores-derived organic carbon in aerosol collected at a mountain site in Austria. Spores of representatives of Cladosporium sp., Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., and Alternaria sp., the four predominant airborne genera, were analyzed for their carbon content using two different analytical procedures. The result was an average carbon content of 13 pg C/spore (RSD, 46%), or expressed as a carbon-per-volume ratio, 0.38 pg C/microm3 (RSD, 30%). These values are comparable to conversion factors for bacteria and some representatives of the zooplankton. Because biopolymers are suspected of interfering with elemental carbon determination by thermal methods, the amount of "fungal carbon" that might be erroneously mistaken for soot carbon was determined using the "two-step combustion" method of Cachier et al. and termed as "apparent elemental carbon" (AEC). This fraction amounted to up to 46% of the initial fungal carbon content. Although the aerosol samples were collected in March under wintry conditions, the organic carbon from fungal spores amounted to 2.9-5.4% of organic carbon in the "coarse mode" size fraction.

  5. Evolution of black carbon properties in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black carbon deposited in soil from natural or deliberate wildfires and engineered black carbon products (biochar) intentionally added to soil are known to have significant effects on soil biogeochemical processes and in many cases to influence the yield and quality of crops and to enhance the abili...

  6. Coal as a Substitute for Carbon Black

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushida, R. O.

    1982-01-01

    New proposal shows sprayed coal powder formed by extrusion of coal heated to plastic state may be inexpensive substitute for carbon black. Carbon black is used extensively in rubber industry as reinforcing agent in such articles as tires and hoses. It is made from natural gas and petroleum, both of which are in short supply.

  7. Airborne Measurement of Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics over Heterogeneous Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, T. J.; Hill, T. C.; Clement, R.; Moncrieff, J.; Disney, M.; Nichol, C. J.; Williams, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon sinks are currently believed to account for the removal and storage of approximately 25% of anthropogenic carbon emissions from the atmosphere. The processes involved are numerous and complex and many feedbacks are at play. The ability to study the dynamics of different ecosystems at scales meaningful to climatic forcing is essential for understanding the key processes involved and identifying crucial sensitivities and thresholds. Airborne platforms with the requisite instrumentation offer the opportunity to directly measure biological processes and atmospheric structures at scales that are not achievable by ground measurements alone. The current generation of small research aircraft such as the University of Edinburgh’s Diamond HK36TTC ECO Dimona present excellent platforms for measurement of both the atmosphere and terrestrial surface. In this study we present results from airborne CO2/H2O flux measuring campaigns in contrasting climatic systems to quantify spatial patterns in ecosystem photosynthesis. Several airborne campaigns were undertaken in Arctic Finland, as part of the Arctic Biosphere Atmosphere Coupling at Multiple Scales (ABACUS) project (2008), and mainland UK as part of the UK Population Biology Network (UKPopNet) 2009 project, to explore the variability in surface CO2 flux across spatial scales larger than captured using conventional ground based eddy covariance. We discuss the application of our aircraft platform as a tool to address the challenge of understanding carbon dynamics within landscapes of heterogeneous vegetation class, terrain and hydrology using complementary datasets acquired from airborne eddy covariance and remote sensing.

  8. Detecting Airborne Mercury by Use of Polymer/Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, Abhijit; Ryan, Margaret; Homer, Margie; Kisor, Adam; Jewell, April; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Manatt, Kenneth; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William

    2009-01-01

    Films made of certain polymer/carbon composites have been found to be potentially useful as sensing films for detecting airborne elemental mercury at concentrations on the order of tens of parts per billion or more. That is to say, when the polymer/carbon composite films are exposed to air containing mercury vapor, their electrical resistances decrease by measurable amounts. Because airborne mercury is a health hazard, it is desirable to detect it with great sensitivity, especially in enclosed environments in which there is a risk of a mercury leak from lamps or other equipment. The present effort to develop polymerbased mercury-vapor sensors complements the work reported in NASA Tech Briefs Detecting Airborne Mercury by Use of Palladium Chloride (NPO- 44955), Vol. 33, No. 7 (July 2009), page 48 and De tecting Airborne Mer cury by Use of Gold Nanowires (NPO-44787), Vol. 33, No. 7 (July 2009), page 49. Like those previously reported efforts, the present effort is motivated partly by a need to enable operation and/or regeneration of sensors under relatively mild conditions more specifically, at temperatures closer to room temperature than to the elevated temperatures (greater than 100 C ) needed for regeneration of sensors based on noble-metal films. The present polymer/carbon films are made from two polymers, denoted EYN1 and EYN2 (see Figure 1), both of which are derivatives of poly-4-vinyl pyridine with amine functional groups. Composites of these polymers with 10 to 15 weight percent of carbon were prepared and solution-deposited onto the JPL ElectronicNose sensor substrates for testing. Preliminary test results showed that the resulting sensor films gave measurable indications of airborne mercury at concentrations on the order of tens of parts per billion (ppb) or more. The operating temperature range for the sensing films was 28 to 40 C and that the sensor films regenerated spontaneously, without heating above operating temperature (see Figure 2).

  9. Biophysical influence of airborne carbon nanomaterials on natural pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Valle, Russell P; Wu, Tony; Zuo, Yi Y

    2015-05-26

    Inhalation of nanoparticles (NP), including lightweight airborne carbonaceous nanomaterials (CNM), poses a direct and systemic health threat to those who handle them. Inhaled NP penetrate deep pulmonary structures in which they first interact with the pulmonary surfactant (PS) lining at the alveolar air-water interface. In spite of many research efforts, there is a gap of knowledge between in vitro biophysical study and in vivo inhalation toxicology since all existing biophysical models handle NP-PS interactions in the liquid phase. This technical limitation, inherent in current in vitro methodologies, makes it impossible to simulate how airborne NP deposit at the PS film and interact with it. Existing in vitro NP-PS studies using liquid-suspended particles have been shown to artificially inflate the no-observed adverse effect level of NP exposure when compared to in vivo inhalation studies and international occupational exposure limits (OELs). Here, we developed an in vitro methodology called the constrained drop surfactometer (CDS) to quantitatively study PS inhibition by airborne CNM. We show that airborne multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets induce a concentration-dependent PS inhibition under physiologically relevant conditions. The CNM aerosol concentrations controlled in the CDS are comparable to those defined in international OELs. Development of the CDS has the potential to advance our understanding of how submicron airborne nanomaterials affect the PS lining of the lung.

  10. Review and developments of dissemination models for airborne carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1980-01-01

    Dissemination prediction models were reviewed to determine their applicability to a risk assessment for airborne carbon fibers. The review showed that the Gaussian prediction models using partial reflection at the ground agreed very closely with a more elaborate diffusion analysis developed for the study. For distances beyond 10,000 m the Gaussian models predicted a slower fall-off in exposure levels than the diffusion models. This resulting level of conservatism was preferred for the carbon fiber risk assessment. The results also showed that the perfect vertical-mixing models developed herein agreed very closely with the diffusion analysis for all except the most stable atmospheric conditions.

  11. EVALUATION OF CARBON BLACK SLURRIES AS CLEAN BURNING FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to examine the pumpability, atomization and combustion characteristics of slurries made of mixtures of carbon black with No. 2 fuel oil and methanol. Carbon black-No. 2 fuel oil and carbon black-methanol slurries, with carbon black contents of up to 50 ...

  12. Quantification of airborne road-side pollution carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baquero, T.; Shukrallah, S.; Karolia, R.; Osammor, O.; Inkson, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    Roadside diesel particulate matter (DPM) has been collected using a P-Trak particle counter with modified inlet filter. The P-Trak monitor assesses ultrafine particle number in real-time rather than accumulated PM mass over a period of time, which is important for DPM where the particles are often <100nm in size. Collected pollution particulate matter was analysed by SEM and TEM, quantifying particle size, morphology and size distribution. The primary carbon nanoparticles form complex fractal aggregates with open porous morphologies and evidence of secondary carbon deposition. For the chosen collection sites, occasional but significantly larger mineral and fibrous particles were identified. The assessment of airborne particles by mass collection (TEOM), particle-number (P-Trak) and TEM methods is discussed.

  13. [Carbon sources metabolic characteristics of airborne microbial communities in constructed wetlands].

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi-Wen; Wang, Lin; Xu, Ai-Ling; Wu, Deng-Deng; Xia, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Using BIOLOG-GN plates, this article describes the carbon sources metabolic characteristics of airborne microbial communities in a free surface-flow constructed wetland in different seasons and clarify the correlation between airborne microbial metabolic functions and environmental factors. The average well color development (AWCD), carbon metabolic profiles and McIntosh values of airborne microbial communities in different seasons were quite different. Analysis of the variations showed that AWCD in spring and summer differed significantly from that in autumn and winter (P < 0.01). In the same season, the degree of utilization of different types of carbon by airborne microbes was different. Summer had a significant difference from other seasons (P < 0.05). Dominant communities of airborne microbes in four seasons were carboxylic acids metabolic community, carbohydrates metabolic community, polymers metabolic community and carboxylic acids metabolic community respectively. Principal component analysis showed that the carbon metabolic characteristics of airborne microbial community in autumn were similar to those in winter but different from those in spring and summer. The characteristics of carbon metabolism revealed differences between summer and spring, autumn, or winter. These differences were mainly caused by amines or amides while the differences between spring and autumn or winter were mainly caused by carboxylic acids. Environmental factors, including changes in wind speed, temperature, and humidity acted to influence the carbon sources metabolic properties of airborne microbial community. The dominant environmental factors that acted to influence the carbon sources metabolic properties of airborne microbial community varied between different seasons.

  14. Black carbon concentration in a Greenland Dye-3 ice core

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, P.; Johnson, B.; Wu, Hong )

    1992-10-01

    We have determined the black carbon concentration in Greenland Dye-3 ice core samples covering the time period from about 3380 to 100 years before present. The average concentration found is 1.53 microg of black carbon per 1 kg of ice. We have found significantly lower black carbon concentrations during the time period from 750 to 100 years before present connected possibly with the Little Ice Age and corresponding changes in atmospheric general circulation patterns and black carbon sources. 18 refs.

  15. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2002-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  16. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2003-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  17. Brominated carbon black: An EDXD study

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Marilena; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2014-06-19

    An energy dispersive X-Ray study of pure and brominated carbon black was carried out. The analysis of the diffraction patterns reveals that the low bromine load (ca.1% mol) is trapped into the structure, without significantly modifying it. This allows the application of the difference methods, widely tested for electrolyte solutions, inorganic matrices containing metals and isomorphic substitutions.

  18. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  19. Cross-sectional study of pulmonary function in carbon black workers in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.M.; Diaz, J.F.; Fyfe, I.M.; Ingalls, T.H.

    1988-04-01

    Since a proportion of airborne carbon black particles is of respirable size, the possibility that it may affect pulmonary function was investigated in 913 employees of 6 carbon black producers in the United States. Exposure was estimated by combining the mean total dust exposures of each job category with the length of time workers had spent in each job, giving a measurement expressed in mg/m3.months. Pulmonary function was measured by spirometry. The major variables affecting pulmonary function were age and cigarette smoking. When the effects of age and smoking were controlled in an age-specific, two-way analysis of variance, no consistent effects of total dust exposure were detectable in these workers. This study provided no evidence that exposure to total dust under the conditions pertaining in the contemporary carbon black industry had detrimental effects on the pulmonary function of men employed in the production and handling of this product.

  20. Cycling of Black Carbon in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Alysha I.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is a byproduct of biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial timescales in the world's oceans has remained unknown. Here, we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) isolated by solid phase extraction (SPE) and determined its residence time. The range of DBC structures and 14C ages indicates that DBC is not homogeneous in the ocean. We conclude that there are at least two distinct pools of marine DBC, a younger pool that cycles on centennial timescales and an ancient pool that cycles on >105 year timescales.

  1. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  2. Black carbon characterization in Quebec black spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Quideau, Sylvie; Wasylishen, Roderick; MacKenzie, M. Derek

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC), an important component of the global soil carbon pool, is a major by-product of wildfires in Quebec black spruce forests. However, BC characteristics vary depending on the environmental conditions under which it is formed and this may further affect its resistance to degradation. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and physical properties of BC formed under variable fire severity to assess its potential for recalcitrance as a passive carbon pool. Samples (n = 267) of BC produced by early season wildfires in 2005-2007 were collected from the surface of black spruce forest floors to cover the range of severity encountered in these fire-affected forests. Representative samples (n = 33) were then analyzed using elemental analysis, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and surface area analysis (BET method). Properties of BC sampled in the field were compared with those of samples produced under a range of controlled formation conditions in the laboratory. The NMR spectra of the BC collected on sites affected by low fire severity showed a distribution of total intensity between the different spectral regions very similar to those of unburned fuels, and were dominated by peaks indicative of cellulose, while spectra for BC from higher fire severity sites were dominated by a broad peak assigned to aromatic carbons. Atomic H/C and O/C ratios decreased along the fire severity gradient, confirming that increasing severity was associated with an increase in condensation. By comparing field- to laboratory-produced samples, we concluded that the temperature of formation in the field ranged between 75 and 250 ° C. In all analyzed BC samples, the fraction of aromatic carbon:total carbon was low, suggesting that the freshly produced BC in this boreal forest environment may be susceptible to rapid physical alteration and chemical degradation. Nevertheless, it is important to highlight

  3. Black carbon measurements using an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Dusek, U.; Berner, A.

    1996-08-01

    An integrating sphere was used to determine the black carbon (BC) content of aerosol filter samples dissolved in chloroform (method originally described by Heintzenberg [1982]). The specific absorption coefficient Ba (equal to absorption per mass) of the samples was also measured using the sphere as an integrating detector for transmitted light. Comparing the Ba of ambient samples taken in Vienna, Austria, to the BC concentrations measured on the dissolved filters, a value of approximately 6 m2/g was found to be a reasonable value for the Ba of the black carbon found at the site. The size dependence of Ba of a nebulized suspension of soot was measured using a rotating impactor, and a reasonable agreement between measured and calculated values was found.

  4. Black pine (Pinus nigra) barks as biomonitors of airborne mercury pollution.

    PubMed

    Chiarantini, Laura; Rimondi, Valentina; Benvenuti, Marco; Beutel, Marc W; Costagliola, Pilario; Gonnelli, Cristina; Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Paolieri, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Tree barks are relevant interfaces between plants and the external environment, and can effectively retain airborne particles and elements at their surface. In this paper we have studied the distribution of mercury (Hg) in soils and in black pine (Pinus nigra) barks from the Mt. Amiata Hg district in southern Tuscany (Italy), where past Hg mining and present-day geothermal power plants affect local atmospheric Hg concentration, posing serious environmental concerns. Barks collected in heavily Hg-polluted areas of the district display the highest Hg concentration ever reported in literature (8.6mg/kg). In comparison, barks of the same species collected in local reference areas and near geothermal power plants show much lower (range 19-803μg/kg) concentrations; even lower concentrations are observed at a "blank" site near the city of Florence (5-98μg/kg). Results show a general decrease of Hg concentration from bark surface inwards, in accordance with a deposition of airborne Hg, with minor contribution from systemic uptake from soils. Preliminary results indicate that bark Hg concentrations are comparable with values reported for lichens in the same areas, suggesting that tree barks may represent an additional useful tool for biomonitoring of airborne Hg. PMID:27341111

  5. Stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    I use a general circulation model of Earth's climate to simulate stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols, varying the altitude of injection, initial particle size, and whether the deposited black carbon modifies ground albedo. 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols injected into the stratosphere each year will cause significant enough surface cooling to negate anthropogenic warming if the aerosols are small (r=0.03 mum) or if the aerosols are injected into the middle stratosphere, although using small aerosols causes large regional cooling effects that would be catastrophic to agriculture. The aerosols cause significant stratospheric heating, resulting in stratospheric ozone destruction and circulation changes, most notably an increase in the Northern Hemisphere polar jet, which forms an Arctic ozone hole and forces a positive mode of the Arctic Oscillation. The hydrologic cycle is perturbed, specifically the summer monsoon system of India, Africa, and East Asia, resulting in monsoon precipitation collapse. Global primary productivity is decreased by 35.5% for the small particle case. Surface cooling causes some sea ice regrowth, but not at statistically significant levels. All of these climate impacts are exacerbated for small particle geoengineering, with high altitude geoengineering with the default particle size (r=0.08 mum) causing a reasonable amount of cooling, and large particle (r=0.15 mum) geoengineering or particle injection into the lower stratosphere causing few of these effects. The modification of ground albedo by the soot particles slightly perturbs the radiative budget but does not cause any distinguishable climate effects. The cheapest means we investigated for placing 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols into the stratosphere by diesel fuel combustion would cost 1.4 trillion initially and 541 billion annual, or 2.0% and 0.8% of GDP, respectively. The additional carbon dioxide released from combusting diesel to produce these aerosols is about 1

  6. COCAP - A compact carbon dioxide analyser for airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Martin; Lavrič, Jošt V.; Jeschag, Wieland; Bryzgalov, Maksym; Hök, Bertil; Heimann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Airborne platforms are a valuable tool for atmospheric trace gas measurements due to their capability of movement in three dimensions, covering spatial scales from metres to thousands of kilometres. Although crewed research aircraft are flexible in payload and range, their use is limited by high initial and operating costs. Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have the potential for substantial cost reduction, but require lightweight, miniaturized and energy-efficient scientific equipment. We are developing a COmpact Carbon dioxide analyser for Airborne Platforms (COCAP). It contains a non-dispersive infrared CO2sensor with a nominal full scale of 3000 μmol/mol. Sampled air is dried with magnesium perchlorate before it enters the sensor. This enables measurement of the dry air mole fraction of CO2, as recommended by the World Meteorological Organization. During post-processing, the CO2 measurement is corrected for temperature and pressure variations in the gas line. Allan variance analysis shows that we achieve a precision of better than 0.4 μmol/mol for 10 s averaging time. We plan to monitor the analyser's stability during flight by measuring reference air from a miniature gas tank in regular intervals. Besides CO2, COCAP measures relative humidity, temperature and pressure of ambient air. An on-board GPS receiver delivers accurate timestamps and allows georeferencing. Data is both stored on a microSD card and simultaneously transferred over a wireless serial interface to a ground station for real-time review. The target weight for COCAP is less than 1 kg. We deploy COCAP on a commercially available fixed-wing UAV (Bormatec Explorer) with a wingspan of 2.2 metres. The UAV has high payload capacity (2.5 kg) as well as sufficient space in the fuselage (80x80x600 mm3). It is built from a shock-resistant foam material, which allows quick repair of minor damages in the field. In case of severe damage spare parts are readily available. Calculations suggest that the

  7. New Potential Sources for Black Onaping Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, L.; Schultz, P. H.; Wolbach, W. S.

    1997-01-01

    One intriguing and important issue of the Sudbury Structure concerns the source of the relatively large amount of C in the Onaping Formation Black member. This dilemma was recently addressed, and the conclusion was reached that an impactor could not have delivered all of the requisite C. Becker et al. have suggested that much of the C came from the impactor and reported the presence of interstellar He "caged" inside some fullerenes that may have survived the impact. So, conceivably, the C inventory in the Sudbury Structure comes from both target and impactor materials, although the known target rocks have little C. We discuss here the possibility of two terrestrial sources for at least some of the C: (1) impact evaporation/dissociation of C from carbonate target rocks and (2) the presence of heretofore-unrecognized C-rich (up to 26 wt%) siliceous "shale," fragments, which are found in the upper, reworked Black member. Experimental: Hypervelocity impact of a 0.635-diameter Al projectile into dolomite at 5.03 km/s (performed at the Ames Research Center vertical gun range) produced a thin, black layer (= 0.05 mm thick) that partially lined the crater and coated impactor remnants. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) imagery shows this layer to be spongelike on a submicron scale and Auger spectroscopic analyses yield: 33% C, 22% Mg, 19% 0, and 9% Al (from the projectile). Elemental mapping shows that all of the available 0 is combined with Ca and Mg, Al is not oxidized, and C is in elemental form. Dissociation efficiency of C from CO2 is estimated to be <10% of crater volume. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the C is highly disorganized graphite. Another impact experiment [4] also produced highly disordered graphite from a limestone target (reducing collector), in addition to small amounts of diamond/lonsdaleite/chaoite (oxidizing collector). These experiments confirm the reduction of C from carbonates in impact vapor plumes. Observational: SEM observations and

  8. CCN activation of pure and coated carbon black particles.

    PubMed

    Dusek, U; Reischl, G P; Hitzenberger, R

    2006-02-15

    The CCN (cloud condensation nucleus) activation of pure and coated carbon black particles was investigated using the University of Vienna cloud condensation nuclei counter (Giebl, H.; Berner, A.; Reischl, G.; Puxbaum, H.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Hitzenberger, R. J. Aerosol Sci. 2002, 33, 1623-1634). The particles were produced by nebulizing an aqueous suspension of carbon black in a Collison atomizer. The activation of pure carbon black particles was found to require higher supersaturations than predicted by calculations representing the particles as insoluble, wettable spheres with mobility equivalent diameter. To test whether this effect is an artifact due to heating of the light-absorbing carbon black particles in the laser beam, experiments at different laser powers were conducted. No systematic dependence of the activation of pure carbon black particles on laser power was observed. The observations could be modeled using spherical particles and an effective contact angle of 4-6 degrees of water at their surface. The addition of a small amount of NaCl to the carbon black particles (by adding 5% by mass NaCl to the carbon black suspension) greatly enhanced their CCN efficiency. The measured CCN efficiencies were consistent with Kohler theory for particles consisting of insoluble and hygroscopic material. However, coating the carbon black particles with hexadecanol (a typical film-forming compound with one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic end) efficiently suppressed the CCN activation of the carbon black particles.

  9. Recommendations for reporting "black carbon" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Ogren, J. A.; Fiebig, M.; Laj, P.; Li, S.-M.; Baltensperger, U.; Holzer-Popp, T.; Kinne, S.; Pappalardo, G.; Sugimoto, N.; Wehrli, C.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zhang, X.-Y.

    2013-08-01

    Although black carbon (BC) is one of the key atmospheric particulate components driving climate change and air quality, there is no agreement on the terminology that considers all aspects of specific properties, definitions, measurement methods, and related uncertainties. As a result, there is much ambiguity in the scientific literature of measurements and numerical models that refer to BC with different names and based on different properties of the particles, with no clear definition of the terms. The authors present here a recommended terminology to clarify the terms used for BC in atmospheric research, with the goal of establishing unambiguous links between terms, targeted material properties and associated measurement techniques.

  10. Brown Carbon: Results From Ground and Airborne Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Forrister, H.; Liu, J.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    Brown carbon (BrC) is directly measured with high sensitivity by isolating it from black carbon in aerosol extracts and using long path wave-guide spectrophotometry. Ambient measurements by this approach show that BrC is pervasive and can be found in almost all locations, ranging from urban environments to remote continental sites and upper reaches of the free troposphere. Biomass burning appears to be the major source in many urban and rural locations, but other sources of incomplete combustion, such as vehicle emissions in urban environments also play a role. Secondary aerosols not associated with combustion sources may also contribute, but are likely of lesser importance. Studies of ambient wildfire smoke plumes show that BrC levels decrease as it ages, with a half-life of approximately 10 hours. However, a small fraction of the emitted BrC is stable and may account for much of the BrC observed throughout the atmosphere due to widely dispersed and ubiquitous smoke. A radiative transfer model indicates that this background BrC reduced US continental TOA forcing by 20 percent. Human health studies point to similar chemical components linked to BrC (i.e., HULIS), of this same ubiquitous smoke, as a significant source of adverse cardiorespiratory effects. This talk will summarize findings on BrC sources, transformations and estimates of environmental effects based on bulk measurements.

  11. Phase Behavior of Dilute Carbon Black Suspensions and Carbon Black Stabilized Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, Michael; Tiwari, Ayush; Bose, Arijit; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2014-11-01

    We use para-amino benzoic acid terminated carbon black (CB) as a tunable model particulate material to study the effect of inter-particle interactions on phase behavior and steady shear stresses in suspensions and particle-stabilized emulsions. We modulate inter-particle interactions by adding NaCl to the suspension, thus salting surface carboxylate groups. Surprisingly, yield stress behavior emerged at a volume fraction of CB as low as ϕCB = 0.008, and gel behavior was observed at ϕCB >0.05, well below the percolation threshold for non-interacting particles. The yield stress was found to grow rapidly with carbon black concentration suggesting that salt-induced hydrophobicity leads to strong inter-particle interactions and the formation of a network at low particle concentrations. The yield stresses of CB-stabilized emulsions also grows rapidly with carbon black concentrations, implying that inter-droplet interactions can be induced through the tuning of carbon black concentration in emulsion systems. Emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants show no inter-droplet interactions. In contrast, oil droplets in the CB-stabilized emulsion move collectively or are immobilized because of an interconnected CB network in the aqueous phase.

  12. Low-wind and other microclimatic factors in near-road black carbon variability: A case study and assessment implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Marissa S.; Keener, Timothy C.; Birch, M. Eileen; Baldauf, Richard; Neal, Jill; Yang, Y. Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    Airborne black carbon from urban traffic is a climate forcing agent and has been associated with health risks to near-road populations. In this paper, we describe a case study of black carbon concentration and compositional variability at and near a traffic-laden multi-lane highway in Cincinnati, Ohio, using an onsite aethalometer and filter-based NIOSH Method 5040 measurements; the former measured 1-min average black carbon concentrations and the latter determined the levels of organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) averaged over an approximately 2-h time interval. The results show significant wind and temperature effects on black carbon concentration and composition in a way more complex than predicted by Gaussian dispersion models. Under oblique low winds, namely ux[=u×sin(θ)]˜ (0, -0.5 m s-1), which mostly occurred during morning hours, black carbon concentrations per unit traffic flow were highest and had large variation. The variability did not always follow Gaussian dispersion but was characteristic of a uniform distribution at a near-road distance. Under all other wind conditions, the near-road black carbon variation met Gaussian dispersion characteristics. Significant differences in roadside dispersion are observed between OC and EC fractions, between PM2.5 and PM10-2.5, and between the morning period and rest of the day. In a general case, the overall black carbon variability at the multi-lane highway can be stated as bimodal consisting of Gaussian dispersion and non-Gaussian uniform distribution. Transition between the two types depends on wind velocity and wind angle to the traffic flow. In the order of decreasing importance, the microclimatic controlling factors over the black carbon variability are: 1) wind velocity and the angle with traffic; 2) diurnal temperature variations due to thermal buoyancy; and 3) downwind Gaussian dispersion. Combinations of these factors may have created various traffic-microclimate interactions that have significant

  13. Influence of public transport in black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Y.; Oyola, P.; Gramsch, E. V.; Moreno, F.; Rubio, M.

    2013-05-01

    As a consequence of poor air quality in Santiago de Chile, several measures were taken by the local authorities to improve the environmental conditions and protect the public health. In year 2005 the Chilean government implemented a project called "Transantiago" aimed to introduce major modifications in the public transportation system. The primary objectives of this project were to: provide an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable service and improve the quality of service without increasing fares. In this work we evaluate the impact of the Transantiago system on the black carbon pollution along four roads directly affected by the modification to the transport system. The black carbon has been used to evaluate changes in air quality due to changes in traffic. The assessment was done using measurements of black carbon before Transantiago (June-July 2005) and after its implementation (June-July 2007). Four sites were selected to monitor black carbon at street levels, one site (Alameda) that represents trunk-bus streets, i.e., buses crossing the city through main avenues. Buses using these streets had an important technological update with respect to 2005. Two streets (Usach and Departamental) show a mixed condition, i.e., they combine feeder and trunk buses. These streets combine new EURO III buses with old buses with more than 3 years of service. The last street (Eliodoro Yañez) represent private cars road without public transportation and did not experience change. Hence, the results from the years 2005 and 2007 can be directly compared using an appropriate methodology. To ensure that it was not the meteorological conditions that drive the trends, the comparison between year 2005 and 2007 was done using Wilcoxon test and a regression model. A first assessment at the four sites suggested a non decrease in black carbon concentration from 2005 to 2007, except for Alameda. A first statistical approach confirmed small increases in BC in Usach and E

  14. Respiratory health effects of carbon black: a survey of European carbon black workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K; Trethowan, N W; Harrington, J M; Rossiter, C E; Calvert, I A

    1993-01-01

    A study population of 3086 employees was identified in 18 carbon black production plants in seven European countries. Respiratory health questionnaires, spirometry, and chest radiographs were used to estimate effects on health and personal monitoring procedures were employed to measure current exposure to inspirable and respirable dust along with sulphur and carbon monoxide. The low concentrations of gaseous contaminants made the generation of their current and cumulative exposure indices impossible. Low responses from some plants restricted the final analysis to 1742 employees in 15 plants (81% response rate) for respiratory symptoms and spirometry, and 1096 chest radiographs from 10 plants (74% response rate). In total, 1298 respirable and 1317 inspirable dust samples, as well as 1301 sulphur dioxide and 1322 carbon monoxide samples were collected. This study is the first to include a comprehensive and concurrent assessment of occupational exposure to carbon black dust and its associated gaseous contaminants. Cough, sputum, and the symptoms of chronic bronchitis were found to be associated with increasing indices of current exposure. Lung function tests also showed small decreases in relation to increasing dust exposure in both smokers and non-smokers. Nearly 25% of the chest radiographs showed small opacities of category 0/1 or greater. These were strongly associated with indices of cumulative dust exposure. The findings are consistent with a non-irritant effect of carbon black dust on the airways combined with dust retention in the lungs. Further cross sectional studies are planned to investigate whether long term exposure to carbon black dust causes damage to the lung parenchyma. PMID:8280639

  15. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, B.; Davis, K.; Barrick, J. D. W.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, G.; Dobler, J. T.; Fried, A.; Lauvaux, T.; Lin, B.; McGill, M. J.; Miles, N. L.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; O'Dell, C.; Sweeney, C.; Yang, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital - 2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT - America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT - America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2 and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  16. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron; Davis, Ken; Barrick, John; Browell, Edward; Chen, Gao; Dobler, Jeremy; Fried, Alan; Lauvaux, Thomas; Lin, Bing; McGill, Matt; Miles, Natasha; Nehrir, Amin; Obland, Michael; O'Dell, Chris; Sweeney, Colm; Yang, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital -2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport -America (ACT -America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT -America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  17. Thermal properties of carbon black aqueous nanofluids for solar absorption

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this article, carbon black nanofluids were prepared by dispersing the pretreated carbon black powder into distilled water. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were explored. The photothermal properties, optical properties, rheological behaviors, and thermal conductivities of the nanofluids were also investigated. The results showed that the nanofluids of high-volume fraction had better photothermal properties. Both carbon black powder and nanofluids had good absorption in the whole wavelength ranging from 200 to 2,500 nm. The nanofluids exhibited a shear thinning behavior. The shear viscosity increased with the increasing volume fraction and decreased with the increasing temperature at the same shear rate. The thermal conductivity of carbon black nanofluids increased with the increase of volume fraction and temperature. Carbon black nanofluids had good absorption ability of solar energy and can effectively enhance the solar absorption efficiency. PMID:21767359

  18. A comparison of black carbon measurement methods for combustion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, A. L.; Pavlovic, J.; Yelverton, T.; Hagler, G.; Aurell, J.; Ebersviller, S.; Seay, B.; Jetter, J.; Gullett, B.; Hays, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon is an important short-term climate forcer that has been linked with adverse health effects. Multiple black carbon measurement methodologies exist, but no standard measurement method or calibration material has been agreed upon. Moreover, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses elemental carbon in its ambient monitoring networks and in its emissions inventory, assuming that elemental carbon is equivalent to black carbon. Instrument comparisons with ambient aerosols have demonstrated considerable differences between black carbon and elemental carbon, as well as among different black carbon measurements. However, there have been few published comparable studies for source emissions. We used multiple measurement methods to quantify black carbon and elemental carbon emissions from a range of combustion sources (diesel gensets, coal fired boilers, prescribed fires and cookstoves) emitting particles of varying composition and physical characteristics. The ratio of black carbon to elemental carbon (BC/EC) ranged from 0.50 to 2.8 and depended upon the combustion source. The greatest agreement was observed for emissions from cookstoves (BC/EC = 1.1 ± 0.3). The largest differences were seen for emissions from large stationary diesel genset (BC/EC = 2.3 ± 0.5) and were most pronounced when a diesel particulate filter was used (BC/EC 2.5 ± 0.6). This suggests that this source category may be underrepresented in emissions inventories based on elemental carbon. Black carbon concentrations derived from filter-based attenuation were highly correlated with photo-acoustic absorption measurements, but were generally 50% greater. This is likely due to the choice of calibration factor, which is currently ambiguously defined. These results highlight the importance of developing a standard calibration material to improve comparability among measurements.

  19. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Alysha I.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a by-product of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial time scales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon isolated by solid phase extraction at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is 1.2 ± 0.1 μM in the deep Atlantic. The average 14C age of surface DBC is 4800 ± 620 14C years and much older in a deep water sample (23,000 ± 3000 14C years). The range of DBC structures and 14C ages indicates that DBC is not homogeneous in the ocean. We show that there are at least two distinct pools of marine DBC, a younger pool that cycles on centennial time scales and an ancient pool that cycles on >105 year time scales.

  20. New Potential Sources for Black Onaping Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, L.; Schultz, P. H.; Wolbach, W. S.

    1997-01-01

    One intriguing and important issue of the Sudbury Structure concerns the source of the relatively large amount of C in the Onaping Formation Black member. This dilemma was recently addressed, and the conclusion was reached that an impactor could not have delivered all of the requisite C. Becker et al. have suggested that much of the C came from the impactor and reported the presence of interstellar He "caged" inside some fullerenes that may have survived the impact. So, conceivably, the C inventory in the Sudbury Structure comes from both target and impactor materials, although the known target rocks have little C. We discuss here the possibility of two terrestrial sources for at least some of the C: (1) impact evaporation/dissociation of C from carbonate target rocks and (2) the presence of heretofore-unrecognized C-rich (up to 26 wt%) siliceous "shale," fragments, which are found in the upper, reworked Black member. Experimental: Hypervelocity impact of a 0.635-diameter Al projectile into dolomite at 5.03 km/s (performed at the Ames Research Center vertical gun range) produced a thin, black layer (= 0.05 mm thick) that partially lined the crater and coated impactor remnants. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) imagery shows this layer to be spongelike on a submicron scale and Auger spectroscopic analyses yield: 33% C, 22% Mg, 19% 0, and 9% Al (from the projectile). Elemental mapping shows that all of the available 0 is combined with Ca and Mg, Al is not oxidized, and C is in elemental form. Dissociation efficiency of C from CO2 is estimated to be <10% of crater volume. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the C is highly disorganized graphite. Another impact experiment [4] also produced highly disordered graphite from a limestone target (reducing collector), in addition to small amounts of diamond/lonsdaleite/chaoite (oxidizing collector). These experiments confirm the reduction of C from carbonates in impact vapor plumes. Observational: SEM observations and

  1. Geolocating Russian sources for Arctic black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2014-08-01

    To design and implement an effective emission control strategy for black carbon (BC), the locations and strength of BC sources must be identified. Lack of accurate source information from the Russian Federation has created difficulty for a range of research and policy activities in the Arctic because Russia occupies the largest landmass in the Arctic Circle. A project was initiated to resolve emission sources of BC in the Russian Federation by using the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF). It used atmospheric BC data from two Arctic sampling stations at Alert Nunavut, Canada, and Tiksi Bay, Russia. The geographical regions of BC emission sources in Russia were identified and summarized as follows: (1) a region surrounding Moscow, (2) regions in Eurasia stretching along the Ural Mountains from the White Sea to the Black Sea, and (3) a number of scattered areas from western Siberia to the Russian Far East. Particulate potassium ions, non-marine sulfate, and vanadium were used to assist in resolving the source types: forest fire/biomass burning, coal-fired power plant, and oil combustion. Correlating these maps with the BC map helped to resolve source regions of BC emissions and connect them to their corresponding source types. The results imply that a region south of Moscow and another north of the Ural Mountains could be significant BC sources, but none of the grid cells in these regions could be linked to forest fires, oil combustion, or coal-fired power plants based on these three markers.

  2. The carbonate system in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyet, Catherine; Bradshaw, Alvin L.; Brewer, Peter G.

    We have measured both alkalinity and total carbon dioxide on a selected set of Black Sea samples from cruise 134 of R.V. Knorr, using gas extraction/coulometry techniques, and improved titration procedures that permit more accurate data than those obtained in earlier expeditions. Earlier results had shown an apparent excess in alkalinity, by a factor of 1.6, from the stoichiometric ratio predicted from the sequential oxidation of Redfield ratio organic matter by the species O 2, NO 3- and SO 42-. Thus both the nature of the organic substrate and our fundamental knowledge of reaction stoichiometry in anoxic systems were called into question. We show that the total CO 2 balance is consistent, within narrower limits than found earlier, with oxidation of organic matter by sulfate: 2CH 2O+SO 42- → 2HCO 3-+H 2S and consistent with work on sediment interstitial waters in anoxic conditions ( BERNERet al., 1970, Limnology and Oceanography, 15. 544-549: BEN YAAKOV, 1973, Limnology and Oceanography, 18, 86-94). The total CO 2 results are lower by 300 μmol kg -1 in surface waters, and 50 μmol kg -1 in deep waters, than data reported from the 1969 Atlantis II expedition. While changes in Black Sea hydrography have been documented, these CO 2 system changes are far too large to be accounted for by these processes and are more likely the result of improved technique, rather than geochemical evolution.

  3. Black Carbon Measurements in SOLVE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Gregory L.; Baumgardner, Darrel R.

    2004-01-01

    Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT), under funding from NASA s Radiation Sciences Program, participated in the SOLVE II field campaign with measurements of light absorbing particles (black carbon and metals). These measurements were made with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2) on the NASA DC-8. The SP-2 is a new measurement technique that was developed under the SBIR program with funding from the Office of Naval Research. The original instrument suite for the DC-8 did not include the SP-2 and its addition and operation during SOLVE II was intended solely as a means to test its functionality and prepare it for future flight operations. For this reason it required several flights in the early stages of the project to tune its operation and fix some problems that arose. During the flights of January 26, 29, and 30, and February 2, 4 and 6, however, it worked as designed and acquired credible data.

  4. Black carbon aerosol size in snow.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, J P; Gao, R S; Perring, A E; Spackman, J R; Fahey, D W

    2013-01-01

    The effect of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) aerosol on snow is of enduring interest due to its consequences for climate forcing. Until now, too little attention has been focused on BC's size in snow, an important parameter affecting BC light absorption in snow. Here we present first observations of this parameter, revealing that BC can be shifted to larger sizes in snow than are typically seen in the atmosphere, in part due to the processes associated with BC removal from the atmosphere. Mie theory analysis indicates a corresponding reduction in BC absorption in snow of 40%, making BC size in snow the dominant source of uncertainty in BC's absorption properties for calculations of BC's snow albedo climate forcing. The shift reduces estimated BC global mean snow forcing by 30%, and has scientific implications for our understanding of snow albedo and the processing of atmospheric BC aerosol in snowfall.

  5. Regional prediction of soil organic carbon content over croplands using airborne hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Bel, Liliane; Lefebvre, Josias; Chehdi, Kacem

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the Prostock-Gessol3 and the BASC-SOCSENSIT projects, dedicated to the spatial monitoring of the effects of exogenous organic matter land application on soil organic carbon storage. It aims at identifying the potential of airborne hyperspectral AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soils comprise hortic or glossic luvisols, calcaric, rendzic cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle data (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks which were georeferenced. Tracks were atmospherically corrected using a set of 22 synchronous field spectra of both bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. Atmospherically corrected track tiles were mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution resulting in a 66 Gb image. A SPOT4 satellite image was acquired the same day in the framework of the SPOT4-Take Five program of the French Space Agency (CNES) which provided it with atmospheric correction. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then NDVI calculation and thresholding enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. All 18 sampled sites known to be bare at this very date were correctly included in this map. A total of 85 sites sampled in 2013 or in the 3 previous years were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic spectra which were related to topsoil SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples. The use of the total sample including 27 sites under cloud shadows led to non-significant results. Considering 43 sites outside cloud shadows only, median

  6. Addressing inconsistencies in black carbon literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonkoff, S. B.; Chafe, Z.; Smith, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    The literature describing black carbon (BC) emissions, and their effect on Earth’s climate, is growing rapidly. Unfortunately, inconsistencies in definitions; data collection and characterization; system boundaries; and time horizons have led to confusion about the relative importance of BC compared to other climate-active pollutant (CAPs). We discuss three sources of confusion: 1) Currently available BC inventories are not directly comparable to those used by the IPCC to track the greenhouse gases (GHGs) considered in the Kyoto Protocol (CO2, CH4, N2O). In particular, BC inventories often include all emissions: natural and anthropogenic in origin, controllable and non-controllable. IPCC inventories include only anthropogenic emissions. This BC accounting is appropriate for atmospheric science deliberations, but risks being interpreted as an overstatement against official Kyoto GHG inventories in a policy or control context. The IPCC convention of using 1750 as the starting year for emission inventories further complicates matters: significant BC emissions were emitted previous to that date by both human and natural sources. Though none of the pre-1750 BC emissions remain in the atmosphere today, their legacy presents challenges in assigning historical responsibility for associated global warming among sectors and regional populations. 2) Inconsistencies exist in the specific emissions sources considered in atmospheric models used to predict net BC forcing often lead to widely varying climate forcing estimates. For example, while some analyses consider only fossil fuel 1, others include both open biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion 2, and yet others include sources beyond biomass and fossil fuel burning 3. 3) Inconsistencies exist in how analyses incorporate the relationship between BC emissions and the associated cooling aerosols and processes, such as organic carbon (OC), and aerosol indirect effects (AIE). Unlike Kyoto GHGs, BC is rarely emitted in pure

  7. Global atmospheric black carbon inferred from AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Makiko; Hansen, James; Koch, Dorothy; Lacis, Andrew; Ruedy, Reto; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Chin, Mian; Novakov, Tica

    2003-05-01

    AERONET, a network of well calibrated sunphotometers, provides data on aerosol optical depth and absorption optical depth at >250 sites around the world. The spectral range of AERONET allows discrimination between constituents that absorb most strongly in the UV region, such as soil dust and organic carbon, and the more ubiquitously absorbing black carbon (BC). AERONET locations, primarily continental, are not representative of the global mean, but they can be used to calibrate global aerosol climatologies produced by tracer transport models. We find that the amount of BC in current climatologies must be increased by a factor of 2-4 to yield best agreement with AERONET, in the approximation in which BC is externally mixed with other aerosols. The inferred climate forcing by BC, regardless of whether it is internally or externally mixed, is 1 W/m2, most of which is probably anthropogenic. This positive forcing (warming) by BC must substantially counterbalance cooling by anthropogenic reflective aerosols. Thus, especially if reflective aerosols such as sulfates are reduced, it is important to reduce BC to minimize global warming. aerosols | air pollution | climate change

  8. Global atmospheric black carbon inferred from AERONET

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Makiko; Hansen, James; Koch, Dorothy; Lacis, Andrew; Ruedy, Reto; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Chin, Mian; Novakov, Tica

    2003-01-01

    AERONET, a network of well calibrated sunphotometers, provides data on aerosol optical depth and absorption optical depth at >250 sites around the world. The spectral range of AERONET allows discrimination between constituents that absorb most strongly in the UV region, such as soil dust and organic carbon, and the more ubiquitously absorbing black carbon (BC). AERONET locations, primarily continental, are not representative of the global mean, but they can be used to calibrate global aerosol climatologies produced by tracer transport models. We find that the amount of BC in current climatologies must be increased by a factor of 2–4 to yield best agreement with AERONET, in the approximation in which BC is externally mixed with other aerosols. The inferred climate forcing by BC, regardless of whether it is internally or externally mixed, is ≈1 W/m2, most of which is probably anthropogenic. This positive forcing (warming) by BC must substantially counterbalance cooling by anthropogenic reflective aerosols. Thus, especially if reflective aerosols such as sulfates are reduced, it is important to reduce BC to minimize global warming. PMID:12746494

  9. Interdisciplinary Intercomparison of Black Carbon Analysis in Soil and Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Masiello, Caroline A.

    2007-08-01

    Analysis and Characterization of Black Carbon in the Environment, Vienna, Austria, 18-19 April 2007 Last April, a symposium was held to discuss new aspects of the rapidly growing field of research focusing on black carbon in soil, sediment, and the atmosphere. About 70 scientists attended the 2-day session during the European Geosciences Union General Assembly, in Vienna. Part of this symposium included a workshop on chemical reference materials, where results of an interdisciplinary intercomparison of black carbon (BC) measurements in different environmental matrices were released.

  10. Airborne radioactivity Survey of part of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 133 square miles of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  11. Black Carbon Contribution to Organic Carbon Stocks in Urban Soil.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Potter, Jonathan; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Manning, David A C; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2015-07-21

    Soil holds 75% of the total organic carbon (TOC) stock in terrestrial ecosystems. This comprises ecosystem-derived organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC), a recalcitrant product of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. Urban topsoils are often enriched in BC from historical emissions of soot and have high TOC concentrations, but the contribution of BC to TOC throughout the urban soil profile, at a regional scale is unknown. We sampled 55 urban soil profiles across the North East of England, a region with a history of coal burning and heavy industry. Through combined elemental and thermogravimetic analyses, we found very large total soil OC stocks (31-65 kg m(-2) to 1 m), exceeding typical values reported for UK woodland soils. BC contributed 28-39% of the TOC stocks, up to 23 kg C m(-2) to 1 m, and was affected by soil texture. The proportional contribution of the BC-rich fraction to TOC increased with soil depth, and was enriched in topsoil under trees when compared to grassland. Our findings establish the importance of urban ecosystems in storing large amounts of OC in soils and that these soils also capture a large proportion of BC particulates emitted within urban areas.

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF BLACK CARBON PARTICLES CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Onasch, T.B.; Sedlacek, A.; Cross, E. S.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Ahern, A.; Lack, D. A.; Cappa, C. D.; Trimborn, A.; Freedman, A.; Olfert, J. S.; Jayne, J. T.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Mazzoleni, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Thornhill, D. A.; Slowik, J. G.; Kok, G. L.; Brem, B. T.; Subramanian, R.; Spackman, J. R.; Freitag, S.; and Dubey, M. K.

    2009-12-14

    Accurate measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of aerosol particles containing black carbon are necessary to improve current estimates of the radiative forcing in the atmosphere. A collaborative research effort between Aerodyne Research, Inc. and Boston College has focused on conducting field and laboratory experiments on carbonaceous particles and the development and characterization of new particulate instrumentation. This presentation will focus on the chemical, physical, and optical properties of black carbon particles measured in the laboratory in order to understand the effects of atmospheric processing on black carbon particles. Results from a three-week study during July 2008 of mass- and optical-based black carbon measurements will be presented. The project utilized the Boston College laboratory flame apparatus and aerosol conditioning and characterization equipment. A pre-mixed flat flame burner operating at controlled fuel-to-air ratios produced stable and reproducible concentrations of soot particles with known sizes, morphologies, and chemical compositions. In addition, other black carbon particle types, including fullerene soot, glassy carbon spheres, oxidized flame soot, Regal black, and Aquadag, were also atomized, size selected, and sampled. The study covered an experimental matrix that systematically selected particle mobility size (30 to 300 nm) and black carbon particle mass, particle number concentration, particle shape (dynamic shape factor and fractal dimension), and particle chemistry and density (changed via coatings). Particles were coated with a measured thickness (few nm to {approx}150 nm) of sulfuric acid or bis (2-ethylhexyl) sebacate and passed through a thermal denuder to remove the coatings. Highlights of the study to be presented include: (1) Characterization of the chemical and physical properties of various types of black carbon particles, (2) Mass specific absorption measurements as a function of fuel

  13. Black Carbon - Soil Organic Matter abiotic and biotic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, Francesca; Boot, Claudia; Denef, Karolien; Foster, Erika; Haddix, Michelle; Jiang, Xinyu; Soong, Jennifer; Stewart, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Wildfires, prescribed burns and the use of char as a soil amendment all add large quantities of black carbon to soils, with profound, yet poorly understood, effects on soil biology and chemical-physical structure. We will present results emerging from our black carbon program, which addresses questions concerning: 1) black carbon-soil organic matter interactions, 2) char decomposition and 3) impacts on microbial community structure and activities. Our understanding derives from a complementary set of post-fire black carbon field surveys and laboratory and field experiments with grass and wood char amendments, in which we used molecular (i.e., BPCA, PLFA) and isotopic (i.e., 13C and 15N labelled char) tracers. Overall, emerging results demonstrate that char additions to soil are prone to fast erosion, but a fraction remains that increases water retention and creates a better environment for the microbial community, particularly favoring gram negative bacteria. However, microbial decomposition of black carbon only slowly consumes a small fraction of it, thus char still significantly contributes to soil carbon sequestration. This is especially true in soils with little organic matter, where black carbon additions may even induce negative priming.

  14. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.40 Applicability; description of the carbon black...

  15. Raman Spectroscopy for the Investigation of Carbon Based Black Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccato, A.; Jehlicka, J.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon based black pigments play an important role among artists' materials. The disordered structure of these materials is investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, which helps in the comprehension of their production processes.

  16. Global civil aviation black carbon emissions.

    PubMed

    Stettler, Marc E J; Boies, Adam M; Petzold, Andreas; Barrett, Steven R H

    2013-09-17

    Aircraft black carbon (BC) emissions contribute to climate forcing, but few estimates of BC emitted by aircraft at cruise exist. For the majority of aircraft engines the only BC-related measurement available is smoke number (SN)-a filter based optical method designed to measure near-ground plume visibility, not mass. While the first order approximation (FOA3) technique has been developed to estimate BC mass emissions normalized by fuel burn [EI(BC)] from SN, it is shown that it underestimates EI(BC) by >90% in 35% of directly measured cases (R(2) = -0.10). As there are no plans to measure BC emissions from all existing certified engines-which will be in service for several decades-it is necessary to estimate EI(BC) for existing aircraft on the ground and at cruise. An alternative method, called FOX, that is independent of the SN is developed to estimate BC emissions. Estimates of EI(BC) at ground level are significantly improved (R(2) = 0.68), whereas estimates at cruise are within 30% of measurements. Implementing this approach for global civil aviation estimated aircraft BC emissions are revised upward by a factor of ~3. Direct radiative forcing (RF) due to aviation BC emissions is estimated to be ~9.5 mW/m(2), equivalent to ~1/3 of the current RF due to aviation CO2 emissions.

  17. Adsorption of Water Vapor on a Graphitized Carbon Black.

    PubMed

    Easton; Machin

    2000-11-01

    Absorption isotherms for water vapor on a highly graphitized carbon black, Sterling FT-G (2700), have been determined at 280.15 and 295.15 K. Interparticle capillary condensation with extensive hysteresis is observed but capillary condensation (adsorption) occurs under metastable, supersaturation conditions. Contact angles for water adsorbed on this carbon black are calculated and two models for capillary condensation are discussed. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube from different grades of carbon black using arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Sharma, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of nanotube from different grades (Tread * A(non-ASTM), N134,N121,N660 and N330)of carbon black using DC arc discharge method at 40A current for 60sec. Carbon black samples of different grades were procured from industry (Aditya Birla Science and Technology Limited, India). Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) of the deposited carbon nanostructures suggests that MWCNTs are formed at 40A and for a minimal exposure time of 60sec.The result formed indicates the N330 grade of carbon black gets converted to MWCNTs (Multiwall Carbon nanotube) as compared to other grades.

  19. Relationships between MODIS black-sky shortwave albedo and airborne lidar based forest canopy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Lauri; Rautiainen, Miina; Arumäe, Tauri; Lang, Mait; Flewelling, James; Tokola, Timo; Stenberg, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    Albedo is one of the essential climate variables affecting the Earth's radiation balance. It is however not well understood how changes in forest canopy structure influence the albedo. Canopy structure can be mapped consistently for fairly large areas using airborne lidar sensors. Our objective was to study the relationships between MODIS shortwave black sky albedo product and lidar-based estimates of canopy structure in different biomes ranging from arctic to tropical. Our study is based on six structurally different forest sites located in Finland, Estonia, USA and Laos. Lidar-based mean height of the canopy, canopy cover and their transformations were used as predictor variables to describe the canopy structure. Tree species composition was also included for the three sites where it was available. We noticed that the variables predicting albedo best were different in open and closed canopy forests. In closed canopy forests, the species information was more important than canopy structure variables (R2=0.31-0.32) and using only structural variables resulted in poor R2 (0.13-0.15). If the 500 m MODIS pixel contained a mixture of forests and other land cover types, the albedo was strongly related to the forest area percent. In open canopy forests, structural variables such as canopy cover or height explained albedo well, but species information still improved the models (R2=0.27-0.52). We obtained the highest R2=0.52 using only structural variables in Laos on a partially degraded tropical forest with large variation in canopy cover. The different canopy structure variables were often correlated and the one that provided the best model changed from site to site.

  20. Measurements of Black Carbon and aerosol absorption during global circumnavigation and Arctic campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Drinovec, Luka; Vidmar, Primož; Lenarčič, Matevž

    2015-04-01

    . Lenarčič, Airborne measurements of Black Carbon during the GLW Flight using miniature high-performance Aethalometers, http://www.worldgreenflight.com/ 3. Samset et al., Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 14, 20083-20115, doi:10.5194/acpd-14-20083-2014, 2014. 4. Bond et al., Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: a scientific assessment, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 10 118, 5380-5552, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50171, 2013.

  1. The atmospheric lifetime of black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cape, J. N.; Coyle, M.; Dumitrean, P.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) in the atmosphere contributes to the human health effects of particulate matter and contributes to radiative forcing of climate. The lifetime of BC, particularly the smaller particle sizes (PM2.5) which can be transported over long distances, is therefore an important factor in determining the range of such effects, and the spatial footprint of emission controls. Theory and models suggest that the typical lifetime of BC is around one week. The frequency distributions of measurements of a range of hydrocarbons at a remote rural site in southern Scotland (Auchencorth Moss) between 2007 and 2010 have been used to quantify the relationship between atmospheric lifetime and the geometric standard deviation of observed concentration. The analysis relies on an assumed common major emission source for hydrocarbons and BC, namely diesel-engined vehicles. The logarithm of the standard deviation of the log-transformed concentration data is linearly related to hydrocarbon lifetime, and the same statistic for BC can be used to assess the lifetime of BC relative to the hydrocarbons. Annual average data show BC lifetimes in the range 4-12 days, for an assumed OH concentration of 7 × 105 cm-3. At this site there is little difference in BC lifetime between winter and summer, despite a 3-fold difference in relative hydrocarbon lifetimes. This observation confirms the role of wet deposition as an important removal process for BC, as there is no difference in precipitation between winter and summer at this site. BC lifetime was significantly greater in 2010, which had 23% less rainfall than the preceding 3 years.

  2. Australian climate-carbon cycle feedback reduced by soil black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Johannes; Skjemstad, Jan; Sohi, Saran; Carter, John; Barson, Michele; Falloon, Pete; Coleman, Kevin; Woodbury, Peter; Krull, Evelyn

    2008-12-01

    Annual emissions of carbon dioxide from soil organic carbon are an order of magnitude greater than all anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions taken together. Global warming is likely to increase the decomposition of soil organic carbon, and thus the release of carbon dioxide from soils, creating a positive feedback. Current models of global climate change that recognize this soil carbon feedback are inaccurate if a larger fraction of soil organic carbon than postulated has a very slow decomposition rate. Here we show that by including realistic stocks of black carbon in prediction models, carbon dioxide emissions are reduced by 18.3 and 24.4% in two Australian savannah regions in response to a warming of 3∘C over 100 years. This reduction in temperature sensitivity, and thus the magnitude of the positive feedback, results from the long mean residence time of black carbon, which we estimate to be approximately 1,300 and 2,600 years, respectively. The inclusion of black carbon in climate models is likely to require spatially explicit information about its distribution, given that the black carbon content of soils ranged from 0 to 82% of soil organic carbon in a continental-scale analysis of Australia. We conclude that accurate information about the distribution of black carbon in soils is important for projections of future climate change.

  3. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  4. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Morozova, Irina; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-10-02

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This paper develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile.more » Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30–65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert

  5. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-10-02

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This paper develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile. Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30–65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert, and

  6. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Morozova, Irina; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-11-01

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is particularly needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This study develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile. Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30-65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow

  7. Black carbon particles in the urban atmosphere in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gengchen; Bai, Jianhui; Kong, Qinxin; Emilenko, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    A study of the concentration of black carbon particles and its variation in the urban atmosphere has been carried out since 1996 in the Beijing area. The measurements were done in the late autumn and early winter each year, the period before and after domestic heating activities begin. The results show the presence of black carbon particles at the high level that vary over a large range in the urban atmosphere in Beijing. The mean value of daily average concentration for the whole observation period of 1996 2004 is 20.0 μg m-3. An evident decrease of black carbon particle concentration in the Beijing area is observed after 2000, and the daily average concentration of black carbon particles is estimated to be 16.0 μg m-3 with a variation range of 2.10 50.50 μg m-3 for the period of 2000 2004. The observation method and main variation behavior characteristics of black carbon particles in the urban atmosphere in the Beijing area are given and discussed.

  8. Airborne radioactivity surveys of parts of Savery SW and Savery SE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 222 square miles of Savery SW and Savery SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  9. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 266 square miles of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  10. Low-wind and other microclimatic factors in near-road black carbon variability: A case study and assessment implications

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Marissa S.; Keener, Timothy C.; Birch, M. Eileen; Baldauf, Richard; Neal, Jill; Yang, Y. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Airborne black carbon from urban traffic is a climate forcing agent and has been associated with health risks to near-road populations. In this paper, we describe a case study of black carbon concentration and compositional variability at and near a traffic-laden multi-lane highway in Cincinnati, Ohio, using an onsite aethalometer and filter-based NIOSH Method 5040 measurements; the former measured 1-min average black carbon concentrations and the latter determined the levels of organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) averaged over an approximately 2-h time interval. The results show significant wind and temperature effects on black carbon concentration and composition in a way more complex than predicted by Gaussian dispersion models. Under oblique low winds, namely ux[= u × sin(g=q)]~ (0,−0.5 m s−1), which mostly occurred during morning hours, black carbon concentrations per unit traffic flow were highest and had large variation. The variability did not always follow Gaussian dispersion but was characteristic of a uniform distribution at a near-road distance. Under all other wind conditions, the near-road black carbon variation met Gaussian dispersion characteristics. Significant differences in roadside dispersion are observed between OC and EC fractions, between PM2.5 and PM10–2.5, and between the morning period and rest of the day. In a general case, the overall black carbon variability at the multi-lane highway can be stated as bimodal consisting of Gaussian dispersion and non-Gaussian uniform distribution. Transition between the two types depends on wind velocity and wind angle to the traffic flow. In the order of decreasing importance, the microclimatic controlling factors over the black carbon variability are: 1) wind velocity and the angle with traffic; 2) diurnal temperature variations due to thermal buoyancy; and 3) downwind Gaussian dispersion. Combinations of these factors may have created various traffic–microclimate interactions that have

  11. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of the carbon...

  12. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Channel Process Subcategory § 458.30 Applicability; description of the carbon...

  13. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon...

  14. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of the carbon...

  15. A Novel Airborne Carbon Isotope Analyzer for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Source Fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Owano, T. G.; Leifer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies on major sources of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) indicate significant underestimation of methane release from fossil fuel industrial (FFI) and animal husbandry sources, among others. In addition, uncertainties still exist with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, especially source fingerprinting. CO2 isotopic analysis provides a valuable in situ measurement approach to fingerprint CH4 and CO2as associated with combustion sources, leakage from geologic reservoirs, or biogenic sources. As a result, these measurements can characterize strong combustion source plumes, such as power plant emissions, and discriminate these emissions from other sources. As part of the COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) campaign, a novel CO2 isotopic analyzer was installed and collected data aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Developing methods to derive CH4 and CO2 budgets from remote sensing data is the goal of the summer 2014 COMEX campaign, which combines hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages the synergy between high spatial resolution HSI and moderate spatial resolution NIS. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (100-3000 ppm). The laboratory accuracy is ±1.2 ppm (1σ) in CO2 from 370-1000 ppm, with a long-term (1000 s) precision of ±0.012 ppm. The long-term precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.04 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.06 ‰. The analyzer was field-tested as part of the COWGAS campaign, a pre-cursor campaign to COMEX in March 2014, where it successfully discriminated plumes related to combustion processes associated with

  16. Double-Pulse Two-Micron IPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    An advanced double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-micron laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation from up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  17. Black carbon over the Amazon during SAMBBA: it gets everywhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Liu, D.; Szpek, K.; Langridge, J.; Johnson, B. T.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning represents a major source of Black Carbon (BC) aerosol to the atmosphere, which can result in major perturbations to weather, climate and ecosystem development. Large uncertainties in these impacts prevail, particularly on regional scales. One such region is the Amazon Basin, where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis during the dry season. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to BC aerosol properties. Results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). The physical, chemical and optical properties of BC-containing particles across the region will be characterised, with particular emphasis on the vertical distribution. BC was ubiquitous across the region, with measurements extending from heavily deforested regions in the Western Amazon Basin, through to agricultural fires in the Cerrado (Savannah-like) region and more pristine areas over the Amazon Rainforest. Measurements in the vicinity of Manaus (a city located deep into the jungle) were also conducted. BC concentrations peaked within the boundary layer at a height of around 1.5km. BC-containing particles were found to be rapidly coated in the near-field, with little evidence for additional coating upon advection and dilution. Biomass burning layers within the free troposphere were routinely observed. BC-containing particles within such layers were typically associated with less coating than those within the boundary layer, suggestive of wet removal of more coated BC particles. The importance of such properties in relation to the

  18. Black Carbon Measurements in Arctic Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, S. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Hegg, D. A.; Clarke, A. D.; Brandt, R. E.; Adames, A. F.

    2008-12-01

    A survey of the black carbon (BC) content of Arctic snow is underway, updating and expanding the 1983/84 survey of Clarke and Noone. Samples of snow are collected in mid to late spring when the entire winter snowpack is accessible. The samples are melted and filtered, and the filters are analyzed for absorptive impurities. Snow has been sampled on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, and sea ice, and in forests. To date about one thousand snow samples have been melted and filtered. The sampling effort has been assisted by IPY collaborations with S. Gerland (Svalbard), K. Steffen and C. Boeggild (Greenland), M. Sturm (Canada), V. Radionov (Russia), and J. Morison (North Pole), as well as several other volunteers. Two expeditions to arctic Russia were carried out, across longitudes 50-170 E, to cover a region that had not been sampled in the 1983/84 survey. The filters are examined with a spectrophotometer, scanning wavelengths 450-900 nm. The relative contributions of BC and soil dust to the absorption can be estimated from the spectral dependence of transmission. Calibration is achieved with use of several standard filters containing measured amounts of a commercial soot with a mass absorption cross-section of about 6 square meters per gram. Preliminary results indicate that the snow cover in Alaska, Canada, and the Arctic Ocean has lower BC concentrations now than 20 years ago (5-10 ppb instead of 15-30 ppb), consistent with the declining trend of BC found in air samples at Alert. Background levels of BC in arctic Russia, distant from sources of local pollution, have median values 20-30 ppb, but with higher concentrations at the surface at some locations, and lower concentrations in newly fallen snow. In some regions, particularly the Canadian Arctic islands and the Arctic coast of northeast Siberia, the snow cover, even at its maximum depth in April before melting began, was thin and patchy; in these regions the albedo is determined more by snow thickness than by

  19. A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Mascaro, Joseph; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Vaudry, Romuald; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Hall, Jefferson S; van Breugel, Michiel

    2012-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is fast turning the corner from demonstration technology to a key tool for assessing carbon stocks in tropical forests. With its ability to penetrate tropical forest canopies and detect three-dimensional forest structure, LiDAR may prove to be a major component of international strategies to measure and account for carbon emissions from and uptake by tropical forests. To date, however, basic ecological information such as height-diameter allometry and stand-level wood density have not been mechanistically incorporated into methods for mapping forest carbon at regional and global scales. A better incorporation of these structural patterns in forests may reduce the considerable time needed to calibrate airborne data with ground-based forest inventory plots, which presently necessitate exhaustive measurements of tree diameters and heights, as well as tree identifications for wood density estimation. Here, we develop a new approach that can facilitate rapid LiDAR calibration with minimal field data. Throughout four tropical regions (Panama, Peru, Madagascar, and Hawaii), we were able to predict aboveground carbon density estimated in field inventory plots using a single universal LiDAR model (r ( 2 ) = 0.80, RMSE = 27.6 Mg C ha(-1)). This model is comparable in predictive power to locally calibrated models, but relies on limited inputs of basal area and wood density information for a given region, rather than on traditional plot inventories. With this approach, we propose to radically decrease the time required to calibrate airborne LiDAR data and thus increase the output of high-resolution carbon maps, supporting tropical forest conservation and climate mitigation policy.

  20. Green Carbon, Black Carbon, White Carbon: Simultaneous Differentiation Between Soil Organic Matter, Pyrogenic Carbon and Carbonates Using Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Peltre, C.; Chan, J.; Baumgartl, T.; Erskine, P.; Apesteguía, M.; Virto, I.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of soil carbon stocks and fluxes continues to be an important endeavor in assessments of soil quality, and more broadly in assessments of ecosystem functioning. The quantification of soil carbon in alkaline, carbonate-containing soils, such as those found in Mediterranean areas, is complicated by the need to differentiate between organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC), which continues to present methodological challenges. Acidification is frequently used to eliminate carbonates prior to soil OC quantification, but when performed in the liquid phase, can promote the dissolution and loss of a portion of the OC. Acid fumigation (AF) is increasingly preferred for carbonate removal, but its effectiveness is difficult to assess using conventional elemental and isotopic analyses. The two-step approach is time, labor and cost intensive, and generates additional uncertainties from the calculations. Quantification of the actively cycling pool of soil organic C (SOC) in many soils is further complicated by the potential presence of more recalcitrant/stable forms such as pyrogenic or black carbon (BC) derived from incomplete combustion of vegetation, or even geogenic carbon such as coal. The wide spectrum of materials currently considered BC makes its quantification challenging. The chemical method using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) as markers of condensed aromatic structures indicative of pyrogenic C is highly time, labor and cost intensive, and can generate artifacts. Several research groups are now developing method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of these various forms of soil carbon using thermal analysis techniques such as thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis. The objective of this presentation is to provide a general overview and specific examples of the current progress and technical challenges in this evolving methodology.

  1. Overview of EPA activities and research related to black carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this international presentation is to give an overview of EPA activities related to black carbon (BC). This overview includes some summary information on how EPA defines BC, current knowledge on United States emissions and forecasted emission reductions, and ongoin...

  2. Black carbon emissions reductions from combustion of alternative jet fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speth, Raymond L.; Rojo, Carolina; Malina, Robert; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Recent measurement campaigns for alternative aviation fuels indicate that black carbon emissions from gas turbines are reduced significantly with the use of alternative jet fuels that are low in aromatic content. This could have significant climate and air quality-related benefits that are currently not accounted for in environmental assessments of alternative jet fuels. There is currently no predictive way of estimating aircraft black carbon emissions given an alternative jet fuel. We examine the results from available measurement campaigns and propose a first analytical approximation (termed 'ASAF') of the black carbon emissions reduction associated with the use of paraffinic alternative jet fuels. We establish a relationship between the reduction in black carbon emissions relative to conventional jet fuel for a given aircraft, thrust setting relative to maximum rated thrust, and the aromatic volume fraction of the (blended) alternative fuel. The proposed relationship is constrained to produce physically meaningful results, makes use of only one free parameter and is found to explain a majority of the variability in measurements across the engines and fuels that have been tested.

  3. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract global warming?

    PubMed

    Bond, Tami C; Sun, Haolin

    2005-08-15

    Field measurements and model results have recently shown that aerosols may have important climatic impacts. One line of inquiry has investigated whether reducing climate-warming soot or black carbon aerosol emissions can form a viable component of mitigating global warming. We review and acknowledge scientific arguments against considering aerosols and greenhouse gases in a common framework, including the differences in the physical mechanisms of climate change and relevant time scales. We argue that such a joint consideration is consistent with the language of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. We synthesize results from published climate-modeling studies to obtain a global warming potential for black carbon relative to that of CO2 (680 on a 100 year basis). This calculation enables a discussion of cost-effectiveness for mitigating the largest sources of black carbon. We find that many emission reductions are either expensive or difficult to enact when compared with greenhouse gases, particularly in Annex I countries. Finally, we propose a role for black carbon in climate mitigation strategies that is consistent with the apparently conflicting arguments raised during our discussion. Addressing these emissions is a promising way to reduce climatic interference primarily for nations that have not yet agreed to address greenhouse gas emissions and provides the potential for a parallel climate agreement.

  4. Carbon and black carbon in Yosemite National Park soils: sources, prescribed fire impacts, and policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, G.; Traina, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the chemical and radiocarbon properties of black carbon recently deposited and accumulated in surface soils of six sites along an altitudinal gradient in Yosemite National Park, central California. The effect of prescribed (or controlled) forest burning on existing carbon and black carbon in surface soils was assessed to illuminate the role of this forest management and wildfire control strategy in the soil carbon cycle. The proportional contribution of fossil fuel or radiocarbon dead carbon versus biomass sources on these black carbon materials was analyzed to elucidate their origin, estimate their ages and explore the possible effects of prescribed burning on the amount of black carbon produced recently as well as historically. Supplementing these field results, we conducted a comparative spatial analysis of recent prescribed burn and wildfire coverage in Central California's San Joaquin Valley to approximate the effectiveness of prescribed burning for wildfire prevention. Federal and California policies pertaining to prescribed forest fires and/or black carbon were then evaluated for their effectiveness, air quality considerations, and environmental benefits. 13C NMR spectrum of soil surface char from study sites Prescribed burn coverage versus wildfires in central California

  5. The Emergence of Black Carbon into the Climate Policy Arena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streets, D. G.; Bond, T. C.

    2002-05-01

    Until a few years ago, aerosols such as black carbon were solely in the domain of atmospheric research. We did not fully understand their roles in atmospheric chemistry or absorption of radiation. The only policy relevance concerned fine particles in general, and the regulation of inhalable particulate matter in the developed world signaled that high local concentrations in cities were a public health issue. But gradually the importance of aerosols spread to regional scale. We learned that aerosols play important roles in regional air quality concerns such as regional haze, visibility impairment, and reduced insolation. Finally, the importance of aerosols reached global scale, as it was realized that their role in climate modification is significant. Within the last year, the importance of black carbon has come to the forefront. Work by Hansen, Jacobson and others has elevated the contribution of black carbon to perhaps the second most important global warming species after carbon dioxide. This is beginning to have profound repercussions in the policy arena and in the world of research planning. In his speech of June 11, 2001, President Bush specifically mentioned black soot as an important pollutant not addressed by the Kyoto Protocol. Then, on February 14, 2002, he unveiled a new U.S. Climate Change Strategy that called for a National Aerosol-Climate Interactions Program (NACIP) to define and evaluate the role of aerosols that absorb solar radiation, such as black carbon and mineral dust. The result has been the formulation of a much more policy-focused agenda to supersede the more academic aerosol research programs of previous years. But black carbon poses an array of problems not previously faced in air pollution control regimes: it is exceedingly difficult to measure accurately, a large portion of the global budget arises from biomass burning, the fuel-derived sources are largely domestic stoves used for cooking and heating, and the primary emitting countries

  6. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  16. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  17. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  18. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  19. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black...

  20. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black...

  1. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp...

  2. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black...

  3. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp...

  4. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black...

  5. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black...

  6. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black...

  7. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Greg; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Clothiaux, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output. This requires long-term measurements in many regions, as model success in one region or season does not apply to all regions and seasons. AERONET is an automated network of more than 180 surface radiometers located throughout the world. The sky radiance measurements obtained by AERONET are inverted to provide column-averaged aerosol refractive indices and size distributions for the AERONET database, which we use to derive column-averaged black carbon concentrations and specific absorptions that are constrained by the measured radiation field. This provides a link between AERONET sky radiance measurements and the elemental carbon concentration of transport models without the need for an optics module in the transport model. Knowledge of both the black carbon concentration and aerosol absorption optical depth (i.e., input and output of the optics module) will enable improvements to the transport model optics module.

  8. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-01-01

    The carbon emissions inventories used to initialize transport models and general circulation models are highly parameterized, and created on the basis of multiple sparse datasets (such as fuel use inventories and emission factors). The resulting inventories are uncertain by at least a factor of 2, and this uncertainty is carried forward to the model output. [Bond et al., 1998, Bond et al., 2004, Cooke et al., 1999, Streets et al., 2001] Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output on a continuous basis.

  9. New Forms of Black Carbon Aerosols Detected in Antarctic Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols are a significant but relatively short-lived source of climate forcing. Distinct to other climate forcers like carbon dioxide and methane, BC particles have optical and chemical properties that evolve while aging in the atmosphere. Little is known with regards to the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles in the remote atmosphere, or how BC properties may have evolved with human activities. Antarctic ice cores provide a historical record of BC particles in the atmosphere. Using a new method of tangential flow filtration and transmission electron microscopy, we have isolated and characterized black carbon in century-old Antarctic ice. Our findings revealed unexpected diversity in particle morphology, insoluble coatings, and association with metals, with properties that could have significant atmospheric effects. Given that these new forms of BC may exist in significant proportions, we propose the need to incorporate these forms into future models of atmospheric and climate variability.

  10. Synthesis of carbon black/carbon nitride intercalation compound composite for efficient hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaochun; Gao, Honglin; Yan, Shicheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2014-08-21

    The photoactivity of g-C3N4 is greatly limited by its high recombination rate of photogenerated carriers. Coupling g-C3N4 with other materials has been demonstrated to be an effective way to facilitate the separation and transport of charge carriers. Herein we report a composite of conductive carbon black and carbon nitride intercalation compound synthesized through facile one-step molten salt method. The as-prepared carbon black/carbon nitride intercalation compound composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis absorption spectrum and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon black nanoparticles, homogeneously dispersed on the surface of carbon nitride intercalation compound, efficiently enhanced separation and transport of photogenerated carriers, thus improving the visible-light photocatalytic activity. The composite of 0.5 wt% carbon black and carbon nitride intercalation compound exhibited a H2 production rate of 68.9 μmol h(-1), which is about 3.2 times higher than hydrogen production on pristine carbon nitride intercalation compound.

  11. Taking Stock of Circumboreal Forest Carbon With Ground Measurements, Airborne and Spaceborne LiDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neigh, Christopher S. R.; Nelson, Ross F.; Ranson, K. Jon; Margolis, Hank A.; Montesano, Paul M.; Sun, Guoqing; Kharuk, Viacheslav; Naesset, Erik; Wulder, Michael A.; Andersen, Hans-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The boreal forest accounts for one-third of global forests, but remains largely inaccessible to ground-based measurements and monitoring. It contains large quantities of carbon in its vegetation and soils, and research suggests that it will be subject to increasingly severe climate-driven disturbance. We employ a suite of ground-, airborne- and space-based measurement techniques to derive the first satellite LiDAR-based estimates of aboveground carbon for the entire circumboreal forest biome. Incorporating these inventory techniques with uncertainty analysis, we estimate total aboveground carbon of 38 +/- 3.1 Pg. This boreal forest carbon is mostly concentrated from 50 to 55degN in eastern Canada and from 55 to 60degN in eastern Eurasia. Both of these regions are expected to warm >3 C by 2100, and monitoring the effects of warming on these stocks is important to understanding its future carbon balance. Our maps establish a baseline for future quantification of circumboreal carbon and the described technique should provide a robust method for future monitoring of the spatial and temporal changes of the aboveground carbon content.

  12. ENHANCED TOXICITY OF CHARGED CARBON NANOTUBES AND ULTRAFINE CARBON BLACK PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Man-made carbonaceous nano-particles such as single and multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (CNT) and ultra-fine carbon black (UFCB) particles are finding increasing applications in industry, but their potential toxic effects is of concern. In aqueous media, these particles cluster in...

  13. Dissolved black carbon in Antarctic lakes: Chemical signatures of past and present sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Alia L.; Jaffé, Rudolf; Ding, Yan; McKnight, Diane M.

    2016-06-01

    The perennially ice-covered, closed-basin lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, serve as sentinels for understanding the fate of dissolved black carbon from glacial sources in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that dissolved black carbon can persist in freshwater and saline surface waters for thousands of years, while preserving the chemical signature of the original source materials. The ancient brines of the lake bottom waters have retained dissolved black carbon with a woody chemical signature, representing long-range transport of black carbon from wildfires. In contrast, the surface waters are enriched in contemporary black carbon from fossil fuel combustion. Comparison of samples collected 25 years apart from the same lake suggests that the enrichment in anthropogenic black carbon is recent. Differences in the chemical composition of dissolved black carbon among the lakes are likely due to biogeochemical processing such as photochemical degradation and sorption on metal oxides.

  14. Airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer for IPDA Measurements of Tropospheric CO2: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council's decadal survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space[1] recommended the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission for launch in 2013-2016 as a logical follow-on to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 [2]. The use of a laser absorption measurement technique provides the required ability to make day and night measurements of CO2 over all latitudes and seasons. As a demonstrator for an approach to meeting the instrument needs for the ASCENDS mission we have developed the airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) which uses the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Spectrometer [3] technique operating in the 2 micron wavelength region.. During 2006 a short engineering checkout flight of the CO2LAS was conducted and the results presented previously [4]. Several short flight campaigns were conducted during 2007 and we report results from these campaigns.

  15. Verification of engineering assumptions in modeling of airborne release of Carbon-14

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.A.; Yim, Man-Sung

    1996-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure variation on the flow velocity, water vapor transport, and oxygen depletion within a hypothetical low-level engineered waste facility were recently modeled with a set of engineering assumptions. The model that resulted from these activates is termed {open_quotes}GETAR{close_quote} for gas evolution, transport and reaction. Results of transport calculations show that the pumping effect of barometric pressure changes is the dominant mechanism for inducing the release of carbon-14 in a facility with a monitoring well. Coupled with this calculation, are recent results that indicate that a greater fraction of the carbon-14 within a hypothetical waste facility would be available for biodegradation and release via an airborne pathway rather than into groundwater.

  16. Black carbon and other absorbing impurities in northwestern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibb, J. E.; Polashenski, C.; Courville, Z.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the SAGE Traverse in May 2013, described in companion presentations by Courville et al. and Polashenski et al., snow samples were collected at 3 cm resolution down to 21 cm in 26 pits between Summit and northwest Greenland. Concentrations of major ions and black carbon have been quantified in these samples. We will discuss spatial patterns in both the concentrations in near surface layers and the inventories (mass/unit area) over different water equivalent depth intervals of these impurities as indicators of provenance of the snow falling on different regions along the 4000 km traverse route. Surface albedo measurements made at each sampling location will also be compared to the burden and depth profiles of the major absorbing impurities, black carbon, and calcium (a tracer of dust). Preliminary assessment of the relationship between impurity concentrations and snow microphysical characteristics (describe more fully by Courville at al.) in individual pit strata will also be presented.

  17. The Black Lake (Quebec, Canada) mineral carbonation experimental station: CO2 capture in mine waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, G.; Constantin, M.; Duchesne, J.; Dupuis, C.; Entrazi, A.; Gras, A.; Huot, F.; Fortier, R.; Hebert, R.; Larachi, F.; Lechat, K.; Lemieux, J. M.; Molson, J. W. H.; Maldague, X.; Therrien, R.; Assima, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    Passive mineral carbonation of chrysotile mining and milling waste was discovered at the Black Lake mine, southern Québec, 10 years ago. Indurated crusts were found at the surface and within waste piles where mineral and rock fragments are cemented by hydrated magnesium carbonates. A long-term research program has yielded significant insight into the process of CO2 capture from the atmosphere, and how it can be implemented during mining operations. Laboratory experiments show that the waste mineralogy is crucial, brucite being more reactive than serpentine. Partial water saturation, circa 40%, is also critical to dissolve magnesium from minerals, and transport aqueous CO2 to precipitation sites. Grain armoring by iron oxidation induced by dissolved oxygen prevents further reaction. Two experimental cells constructed with milling waste and fitted with various monitoring probes (T, H2O content, leachate) and gas sampling ports, have been monitored for more than 3 years, along with environmental conditions. The interstitial gas in the cells remains depleted in CO2 indicating continuous capture of ambient atmospheric CO2 at rates faster than advection to reaction sites. The energy released by the exothermic mineral carbonation reactions has been observed both in laboratory experiments (up to 4 °C) and in the field. Warm air, depleted to 10 ppmv CO2, vents at the surface of the waste piles, indicating reaction with atmospheric CO2 deep inside the piles. A thermal anomaly, detected by airborne infrared and coincident with a known venting area, was selected for locating a 100 m deep borehole fitted with sensor arrays to monitor active mineral carbonation within the pile. The borehole has intersected areas where mineral carbonation has indurated the milling waste. The borehole will be monitored for the next 3 years to better understand the mineral carbonation process, and its potential to yield recoverable geothermal energy in mining environments.

  18. Void morphology in polyethylene/carbon black composites

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, D.W.M.; Wartenberg, M.; Schwartz, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and contrast matching techniques is used to determine the size and quantity of voids incorporated during fabrication of polyethylene/carbon black composites. The analysis used to extract void morphology from SANS data is based on the three-phase model of microcrack determination via small angle x-rayscattering (SAXS) developed by W.Wu{sup 12} and applied to particulate reinforced composites.

  19. Personal exposure to Black Carbon in transport microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dons, Evi; Int Panis, Luc; Van Poppel, Martine; Theunis, Jan; Wets, Geert

    2012-08-01

    We evaluated personal exposure of 62 individuals to the air pollutant Black Carbon, using 13 portable aethalometers while keeping detailed records of their time-activity pattern and whereabouts. Concentrations encountered in transport are studied in depth and related to trip motives. The evaluation comprises more than 1500 trips with different transport modes. Measurements were spread over two seasons. Results show that 6% of the time is spent in transport, but it accounts for 21% of personal exposure to Black Carbon and approximately 30% of inhaled dose. Concentrations in transport were 2-5 times higher compared to concentrations encountered at home. Exposure was highest for car drivers, and car and bus passengers. Concentrations of Black Carbon were only half as much when traveling by bike or on foot; when incorporating breathing rates, dose was found to be twice as high for active modes. Lowest 'in transport' concentrations were measured in trains, but nevertheless these concentrations are double the concentrations measured at home. Two thirds of the trips are car trips, and those trips showed a large spread in concentrations. In-car concentrations are higher during peak hours compared to off-peak, and are elevated on weekdays compared to Saturdays and even more so on Sundays. These findings result in significantly higher exposure during car commute trips (motive 'Work'), and lower concentrations for trips with motive 'Social and leisure'. Because of the many factors influencing exposure in transport, travel time is not a good predictor of integrated personal exposure or inhaled dose.

  20. Measuring black carbon spectral extinction in the visible and infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Peters, D. M.; McPheat, R.; Lukanihins, S.; Grainger, R. G.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents measurements of the spectral extinction of black carbon aerosol from 400 nm to 15 μm. The aerosol was generated using a Miniature Combustion Aerosol Standard soot generator and then allowed to circulate in an aerosol cell where its extinction was measured using a grating spectrometer in the visible and a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared. Size distribution, number concentration, and mass extinction cross sections have also been obtained using single-particle aerosol samplers. A mean mass extinction cross section at 550 nm of 8.3 ± 1.6 m2 g-1 is found which, assuming a reasonable single scatter albedo of 0.2, corresponds to a mass absorption cross section of 6.6 ± 1.3 m2 g-1. This compares well with previously reported literature values. Computer analysis of electron microscope images of the particles provides independent confirmation of the size distribution as well as fractal parameters of the black carbon aerosol. The aerosol properties presented in this work are representative of very fresh, uncoated black carbon aerosol. After atmospheric processing of such aerosols (which could include mixing with other constituents and structural changes), different optical properties would be expected.

  1. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  2. Impact of Black Carbon Aerosols on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Hansen, J.; Nazarenko, L.; Luo, Y.

    2002-12-01

    We have evaluated the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the regional climates of China and India: regions where aerosol emissions have been increasing at an alarming rate. We use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model to perform simulations that investigate recent trends in summer precipitation observed over China - North drought, South flooding - considered to be the largest observed in several decades. We perform several simulations to differentiate between the climate effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols and use realistic aerosol distributions obtained from measurements over China, India and the Indian Ocean. The trends in precipitation as well as the summer time surface cooling over China and India have been captured by using aerosols that have a low single scatter albedo (0.85), i.e., by assuming that the aerosols are mostly absorbing. Since black carbon aerosols are absorbing aerosols and cause surface cooling with heating at the top of the atmosphere and in the lower troposphere, the change in the vertical temperature profile causes changes in the large-scale vertical velocity fields, latent heating, convective activity and cloud cover. This change in the large-scale circulation may explain some of the changes in the precipitation and temperature trends observed over China and India in recent decades. Our results suggest that black carbon aerosols can have a significant influence on regional climate through changes in the hydrological cycle and large-scale circulation.

  3. Peat Depth Assessment Using Airborne Geophysical Data for Carbon Stock Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaney, Antoinette; McKinley, Jennifer; Ruffell, Alastair; Robinson, Martin; Graham, Conor; Hodgson, Jim; Desissa, Mohammednur

    2013-04-01

    The Kyoto Agreement demands that all signatory countries have an inventory of their carbon stock, plus possible future changes to this store. This is particularly important for Ireland, where some 16% of the surface is covered by peat bog. Estimates of soil carbon stores are a key component of the required annual returns made by the Irish and UK governments to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Saturated peat attenuates gamma-radiation from underlying rocks. This effect can be used to estimate the thickness of peat, within certain limits. This project examines this relationship between peat depth and gamma-radiation using airborne geophysical data generated by the Tellus Survey and newly acquired data collected as part of the EU-funded Tellus Border project, together encompassing Northern Ireland and the border area of the Republic of Ireland. Selected peat bog sites are used to ground truth and evaluate the use of airborne geophysical (radiometric and electromagnetic) data and validate modelled estimates of soil carbon, peat volume and depth to bedrock. Data from two test line sites are presented: one in Bundoran, County Donegal and a second line in Sliabh Beagh, County Monaghan. The plane flew over these areas at different times of the year and at a series of different elevations allowing the data to be assessed temporally with different soil/peat saturation levels. On the ground these flight test lines cover varying surface land use zones allowing future extrapolation of data from the sites. This research applies spatial statistical techniques, including uncertainty estimation in geostatistical prediction and simulation, to investigate and model the use of airborne geophysical data to examine the relationship between reduced radioactivity and peat depth. Ground truthing at test line locations and selected peat bog sites involves use of ground penetrating radar, terrestrial LiDAR, peat depth probing, magnetometry, resistivity, handheld gamma

  4. Analysis of Transpacific Transport of Black Carbon during HIPPO-3 and Implications for Black Carbon Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Liu, J.; Horowitz, L. W.; Henze, D. K.; Gao, R.; Lin, J.; Tao, S.

    2013-12-01

    Long-range transport of black carbon (BC) is a growing concern as a result of the great effect of BC on climate change and air quality. We study transpacific transport of BC during HIPPO-3 based on a combination of inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis. We use the GEOS-Chem Model and its adjoint to estimate the origin of BC over the North Pacific and constrain Asian BC emissions. We find that the sources of BC transported to the North Pacific in March and April, 2010 are different. While biomass burning in Southeast Asia contributes about 60% of BC in March, more than 90% BC comes from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion in East Asia in April. GEOS-Chem model generally resolves the spatial and temporal variation of BC concentrations over the North Pacific, but is unable to reproduce the low end and high end of BC observations. We find that using the optimized BC emissions derived from inverse modeling cannot significantly improve model simulations. This indicates that uncertainties remaining in BC transport account for the major biases in BC simulations. The aging process is one of the key factors controlling the wet scavenging and remote concentrations of BC. We conduct several sensitivity tests on BC aging and find that the aging time scale of anthropogenic BC is several hours, smaller than the values used in most global models, while the aging process of biomass burning BC may occur much slower on a time scale of a few days. To evaluate the effect of BC aging and wet deposition on transpacific transport of BC, we develop an idealized BC transport model. We find that the mid-latitude air mass captured by HIPPO-3 aircraft may experience a series of precipitation events, particularly near the East Asia source region. Therefore, transpacific transport of BC is sensitive to BC aging when the aging rate is fast, and the effect of the aging process peaks when the aging time scale is in the range of 1-1.5 d. This further indicates that BC aging close to the sources

  5. Arctic Black Carbon Initiative: Reducing Emissions of Black Carbon from Power & Industry in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresko, J.; Hodson, E. L.; Cheng, M.; Fu, J. S.; Huang, K.; Storey, J.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of black carbon (BC) on snow and ice is widely considered to have a climate warming effect by reducing the surface albedo and promoting snowmelt. Such positive climate feedbacks in the Arctic are especially problematic because rising surface temperatures may trigger the release of large Arctic stores of terrestrial carbon, further amplifying current warming trends. Recognizing the Arctic as a vulnerable region, the U.S. government committed funds in Copenhagen in 2009 for international cooperation targeting Arctic BC emissions reductions. As a result, the U.S. Department of State has funded three research and demonstration projects with the goal to better understand and mitigate BC deposition in the Russian Arctic from a range of sources. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Arctic BC initiative presented here is focused on mitigating BC emissions resulting from heat and power generation as well as industrial applications. A detailed understanding of BC sources and its transport and fate is required to prioritize efforts to reduce BC emissions from sources that deposit in the Russian Arctic. Sources of BC include the combustion of fossil fuels (e.g. coal, fuel oil, diesel) and the combustion of biomass (e.g. wildfires, agricultural burning, residential heating and cooking). Information on fuel use and associated emissions from the industrial and heat & power sectors in Russia is scarce and difficult to obtain from the open literature. Hence, our project includes a research component designed to locate Arctic BC emissions sources in Russia and determine associated BC transport patterns. We use results from the research phase to inform a subsequent assessment/demonstration phase. We use a back-trajectory modeling method (potential source contribution function - PSCF), which combines multi-year, high-frequency measurements with knowledge about atmospheric transport patterns. The PSCF modeling allows us to map the probability (by season and year) at course

  6. Effect of Pt and Fe catalysts in the transformation of carbon black into carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Myrseth, Velaug; Kosinski, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    In this research carbon nanotubes and carbon nano onion-like structures were synthesized from carbon black using metal catalysts at 400 °C and 700 °C. Platinum and iron-group metals were used as catalysts for the transformation of CB into graphitized nanocarbon and the effect of both metals was compared. The synthesized products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization shows that this process is very efficient in the synthesis of high quality graphitized products from amorphous carbon black, even though the process temperature was relatively low in comparison with previous studies. Distinguished graphitic walls of the newly formed carbon nanostructures were clearly visible in the HRTEM images. Possible growth difference related to the type of catalyst used is briefly explained with the basis of electron vacancies in d-orbitals of metals.

  7. Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Terje; Næsset, Erik; Ohlson, Mikael; Bolstad, Paul V.; Kolka, Randall

    2015-01-01

    A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C. PMID:26426532

  8. Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Terje; Næsset, Erik; Ohlson, Mikael; Bolstad, Paul V; Kolka, Randall

    2015-01-01

    A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C.

  9. Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Terje; Næsset, Erik; Ohlson, Mikael; Bolstad, Paul V; Kolka, Randall

    2015-01-01

    A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C. PMID:26426532

  10. Using Airborne and Satellite Imagery to Distinguish and Map Black Mangrove

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the results of studies evaluating color-infrared (CIR) aerial photography, CIR aerial true digital imagery, and high resolution QuickBird multispectral satellite imagery for distinguishing and mapping black mangrove [Avicennia germinans (L.) L.] populations along the lower Texas g...

  11. Black carbon and particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in New York City's subway stations.

    PubMed

    Vilcassim, M J Ruzmyn; Thurston, George D; Peltier, Richard E; Gordon, Terry

    2014-12-16

    The New York City (NYC) subway is the main mode of transport for over 5 million passengers on an average weekday. Therefore, airborne pollutants in the subway stations could have a significant impact on commuters and subway workers. This study looked at black carbon (BC) and particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in selected subway stations in Manhattan. BC and PM2.5 levels were measured in real time using a Micro-Aethalometer and a PDR-1500 DataRAM, respectively. Simultaneous samples were also collected on quartz filters for organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) analysis and on Teflon filters for gravimetric and trace element analysis. In the underground subway stations, mean real time BC concentrations ranged from 5 to 23 μg/m(3), with 1 min average peaks >100 μg/m(3), while real time PM2.5 levels ranged from 35 to 200 μg/m(3). Mean EC levels ranged from 9 to 12.5 μg/m(3). At street level on the same days, the mean BC and PM2.5 concentrations were below 3 and 10 μg/m(3), respectively. This study shows that both BC soot and PM levels in NYC's subways are considerably higher than ambient urban street levels and that further monitoring and investigation of BC and PM subway exposures are warranted. PMID:25409007

  12. Black carbon and particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in New York City's subway stations.

    PubMed

    Vilcassim, M J Ruzmyn; Thurston, George D; Peltier, Richard E; Gordon, Terry

    2014-12-16

    The New York City (NYC) subway is the main mode of transport for over 5 million passengers on an average weekday. Therefore, airborne pollutants in the subway stations could have a significant impact on commuters and subway workers. This study looked at black carbon (BC) and particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in selected subway stations in Manhattan. BC and PM2.5 levels were measured in real time using a Micro-Aethalometer and a PDR-1500 DataRAM, respectively. Simultaneous samples were also collected on quartz filters for organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) analysis and on Teflon filters for gravimetric and trace element analysis. In the underground subway stations, mean real time BC concentrations ranged from 5 to 23 μg/m(3), with 1 min average peaks >100 μg/m(3), while real time PM2.5 levels ranged from 35 to 200 μg/m(3). Mean EC levels ranged from 9 to 12.5 μg/m(3). At street level on the same days, the mean BC and PM2.5 concentrations were below 3 and 10 μg/m(3), respectively. This study shows that both BC soot and PM levels in NYC's subways are considerably higher than ambient urban street levels and that further monitoring and investigation of BC and PM subway exposures are warranted.

  13. Characterization of carbon black modified by maleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Kosinski, Pawel; Skodvin, Tore; Myrseth, Velaug

    2013-09-01

    We present here a method for modifying the surface of carbon black (CB) using a simple heat treatment in the presence of a carboxylic acid as well as water or ethylene glycol as a solvent. CB was mixed with maleic acid and either water or ethylene glycol, and heated at 250°C. Unlike the traditional surface modification processes which use heat treatment of carbon with mineral acids the present modification method using a carboxylic acid proved to be simple and time efficient. CB from two different vendors was used, and the modified samples were characterized by TGA, BET surface area measurement, XRD, particle size and zeta potential measurements, and FTIR. It was found that several material properties, including thermal stability and surface area, of the modified CB are significantly altered relative to the parental carbon samples. This method provides a rapid and simple route to tailor new materials with desired properties.

  14. Birchwood biochar as partial carbon black replacement in styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birchwood feedstock was used to make slow pyrolysis biochar that contained 89% carbon and < 2% ash. This biochar was blended with carbon black as filler for styrene-butadiene rubber. Composites made from blended fillers of 25/75 biochar/carbon black were equivalent to or superior to their 100% carbo...

  15. Roles of black carbon on the fate of heavy metals and agrochemicals in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Char(coal) and other black carbon materials can comprise up to 35% of total organic carbon in US agricultural soils, and are known to strongly and often irreversibly bind contaminants including heavy metals. Black carbon has received renewed interests in recent years as a solid co-product formed du...

  16. Black-backed woodpecker habitat suitability mapping using conifer snag basal area estimated from airborne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Planes, Á.; Garcia, M.; Siegel, R.; Koltunov, A.; Ramirez, C.; Ustin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Occupancy and habitat suitability models for snag-dependent wildlife species are commonly defined as a function of snag basal area. Although critical for predicting or assessing habitat suitability, spatially distributed estimates of snag basal area are not generally available across landscapes at spatial scales relevant for conservation planning. This study evaluates the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) to 1) identify individual conifer snags and map their basal area across a recently burned forest, and 2) map habitat suitability for a wildlife species known to be dependent on snag basal area, specifically the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus). This study focuses on the Rim Fire, a megafire that took place in 2013 in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, creating large patches of medium- and high-severity burned forest. We use forest inventory plots, single-tree ALS-derived metrics and Gaussian processes classification and regression to identify conifer snags and estimate their stem diameter and basal area. Then, we use the results to map habitat suitability for the black-backed woodpecker using thresholds for conifer basal area from a previously published habitat suitability model. Local maxima detection and watershed segmentation algorithms resulted in 75% detection of trees with stem diameter larger than 30 cm. Snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 91.8 % and conifer snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 84.8 %. Finally, Gaussian process regression reliably estimated stem diameter (R2 = 0.8) using height and crown area. This work provides a fast and efficient methodology to characterize the extent of a burned forest at the tree level and a critical tool for early wildlife assessment in post-fire forest management and biodiversity conservation.

  17. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in ultrafiltered high-molecular-weight DOM (UDOM) was measured in surface waters of Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean (USA) to ascertain the importance of riverine and estuarine DOM as a source of BC to the ocean. BC comprised 5-72% of UDOM-C (27+/-l7%) and on average 8.9+/-6.5% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with higher values in the turbid region of the Delaware Estuary and lower yields in the river and coastal ocean. The spatial and seasonal distributions of BC along the salinity gradient of Delaware Bay suggest that the higher levels of BC in surface water UDOM originated from localized sources, possibly from atmospheric deposition or released from resuspended sediments. Black carbon comprised 4 to 7% of the DOC in the coastal Atlantic Ocean, revealing that river-estuary systems are important exporters of colloidal BC to the ocean. The annual flux of BC from Delaware Bay UDOM to the Atlantic Ocean was estimated at 2.4x10(exp 10) g BC yr(exp -1). The global river flux of BC through DOM to the ocean could be on the order of 5.5x1O(exp 12)g BC yr (exp -1). These results support the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition.

  18. Carbonaceous aerosols influencing atmospheric radiation: Black and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere may both scatter and absorb solar radiation. The fraction associated with the absorbing component is generally referred to as black carbon (BC) and is mainly produced from incomplete combustion processes. The fraction associated with condensed organic compounds is generally referred to as organic carbon (OC) or organic matter and is mainly scattering. Absorption of solar radiation by carbonaceous aerosols may heat the atmosphere, thereby altering the vertical temperature profile, while scattering of solar radiation may lead to a net cooling of the atmosphere/ocean system. Carbonaceous aerosols may also enhance the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the fine particle (D < 2.5 {mu}m) source rates of both OC and BC. The source rates for anthropogenic organic aerosols may be as large as the source rates for anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, suggesting a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The role of BC in decreasing the amount of reflected solar radiation by OC and sulfates is discussed. The total estimated forcing depends on the source estimates for organic and black carbon aerosols which are highly uncertain. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is also described.

  19. Biomass burning in boreal forests and peatlands: Effects on ecosystem carbon losses and soil carbon stabilization as black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turetsky, M. R.; Kane, E. S.; Benscoter, B.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change has increased both annual area burned and the severity of biomass combustion in some boreal regions. For example, there has been a four-fold increase in late season fires in boreal Alaska over the last decade relative to the previous 50 years. Such changes in the fire regime are expected to stimulate ecosystem carbon losses through fuel combustion, reduced primary production, and increased decomposition. However, biomass burning also will influence the accumulation of black carbon in soils, which could promote long-term soil carbon sequestration. Variations in slope and aspect regulate soil temperatures and drainage conditions, and affect the development of permafrost and thick peat layers. Wet soil conditions in peatlands and permafrost forests often inhibit combustion during wildfires, leading to strong positive correlations between pre- and post- fire organic soil thickness that persist through multiple fire cycles. However, burning can occur in poorly drained ecosystems through smouldering combustion, which has implications for emission ratios of CO2:CH4:CO as well as black carbon formation. Our studies of combustion severity and black carbon concentrations in boreal soils show a negative relationship between concentrations of black carbon and organic carbon in soils post-fire. Relative to well drained stands, poorly drained sites with thick peat layers (such as north-facing stands) had less severe burning and low concentrations of black carbon in mineral soils post-fire. Conversely, drier forests lost a greater proportion of their organic soils during combustion but retained larger black carbon stocks following burning. Overall, we have quantified greater black carbon concentrations in surface mineral soil horizons than in organic soil horizons. This is surprising given that wildfires typically do not consume the entire organic soil layer in boreal forests, and could be indicative of the vulnerability of black carbon formed in organic horizons

  20. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Cheryl L; Shepson, Paul B; Subramanian, R; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Heimburger, Alexie; McCabe, David; Baum, Ellen; Stirm, Brian H; Bond, Tami C

    2016-02-16

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas is flared and vented in the world annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. About 7 BCM per year is flared in the United States, and half is from North Dakota alone. There are few emission measurements from associated gas flares and limited black carbon (BC) emission factors have been previously reported from the field. Emission plumes from 26 individual flares in the Bakken formation in North Dakota were sampled. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. Particle optical absorption was measured using a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a single particle soot photometer. The BC emission factors varied over 2 orders of magnitude, with an average and uncertainty range of 0.14 ± 0.12 g/kg hydrocarbons in associated gas and a median of 0.07 g/kg which represents a lower bound on these measurements. An estimation of the BC emission factor derived from PSAP absorption provides an upper bound at 3.1 g/kg. These results are lower than previous estimations and laboratory measurements. The BC mass absorption cross section was 16 ± 12 m(2)/g BC at 530 nm. The average absorption Ångström exponent was 1.2 ± 0.8, suggesting that most of the light absorbing aerosol measured was black carbon and the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon was small. PMID:26764563

  1. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes, K.; Torn, M.S.; Lapenas, A.G.; Schmidt, M.W.I.

    2008-09-15

    Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m{sup -2}, or about 7-10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182-541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene poly carboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  2. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Cheryl L; Shepson, Paul B; Subramanian, R; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Heimburger, Alexie; McCabe, David; Baum, Ellen; Stirm, Brian H; Bond, Tami C

    2016-02-16

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas is flared and vented in the world annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. About 7 BCM per year is flared in the United States, and half is from North Dakota alone. There are few emission measurements from associated gas flares and limited black carbon (BC) emission factors have been previously reported from the field. Emission plumes from 26 individual flares in the Bakken formation in North Dakota were sampled. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. Particle optical absorption was measured using a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a single particle soot photometer. The BC emission factors varied over 2 orders of magnitude, with an average and uncertainty range of 0.14 ± 0.12 g/kg hydrocarbons in associated gas and a median of 0.07 g/kg which represents a lower bound on these measurements. An estimation of the BC emission factor derived from PSAP absorption provides an upper bound at 3.1 g/kg. These results are lower than previous estimations and laboratory measurements. The BC mass absorption cross section was 16 ± 12 m(2)/g BC at 530 nm. The average absorption Ångström exponent was 1.2 ± 0.8, suggesting that most of the light absorbing aerosol measured was black carbon and the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon was small.

  3. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  4. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  5. Seasonal features of black carbon measured at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, K.; Osada, K.; Yabuki, M.; Shiobara, M.; Yamanouchi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is one of important aerosol constituents because the strong light absorption ability. Low concentrations of aerosols and BC let BC make insignificant contribution to aerosol radiative forcing in the Antarctica at the moment. Because of less or negligible source strength of BC in the Antarctic circle, BC can be used as a tracer of transport from the mid-latitudes. This study aims to understand seasonal feature, transport pathway, and origins of black carbon in the Antarctic coats. Black carbon measurement has been made using 7-wavelength aethalometer at Syowa Station, Antarctica since February, 2005. Mass BC concentrations were estimated from light attenuation by Weingartner's correction procedure (Weingartner et al., 2003) in this study. Detection limit was 0.2 - 0.4 ng/m3 in our measurement conditions (2-hour resolution and flow rate of ca. 10LPM). BC concentrations ranged from near detection limit to 55.7 ng/m3 at Syowa Station, Antarctica during the measurements. No trend has been observed since February, 2005. High BC concentrations were coincident with poleward flow from the mid-latitudes under the storm conditions by cyclone approach, whereas low BC concentrations were found in transport from coastal regions and the Antarctic continent. Considering that outflow from South America and Southern Africa affect remarkably air quality in the Southern Ocean of Atlantic and Indian Ocean sectors, BC at Syowa Station might be originated from biomass burning and human activity on South America and Southern Africa. Seasonal features of BC at Syowa Station shows maximum in September - October and lower in December - April. Spring maximum in September - October was obtained at the other Antarctic stations (Neumayer, Halley, South pole, and Ferraz). Although second maximum was found in January at the other stations, the maximum was not observed at Syowa Station.

  6. Tungsten nitride nanocrystals on nitrogen-doped carbon black as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youzhen; Li, Jinghong

    2015-01-11

    The direct synthesis of tungsten nitride (WN) nanoparticles on nitrogen-doped carbon black (N-carbon black) was achieved through facile nucleation and growth of WN nanoparticles on simultaneously generated N-carbon black under ammonia annealing. As a noble-metal-free catalyst, the WN/N-carbon black hybrid exhibited excellent performance in ORR, coupled with superior methanol tolerance and long-term stability in comparison to commercial Pt/C catalysts, through an efficient four-electron-dominant ORR process.

  7. Tungsten nitride nanocrystals on nitrogen-doped carbon black as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youzhen; Li, Jinghong

    2015-01-11

    The direct synthesis of tungsten nitride (WN) nanoparticles on nitrogen-doped carbon black (N-carbon black) was achieved through facile nucleation and growth of WN nanoparticles on simultaneously generated N-carbon black under ammonia annealing. As a noble-metal-free catalyst, the WN/N-carbon black hybrid exhibited excellent performance in ORR, coupled with superior methanol tolerance and long-term stability in comparison to commercial Pt/C catalysts, through an efficient four-electron-dominant ORR process. PMID:25413157

  8. Meta-Analysis of Cardiac Mortality in Three Cohorts of Carbon Black Production Workers

    PubMed Central

    Morfeld, Peter; Mundt, Kenneth A.; Dell, Linda D.; Sorahan, Tom; McCunney, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between airborne environmental particle exposure and cardiac disease and mortality; however, few have examined such effects from poorly soluble particles of low toxicity such as manufactured carbon black (CB) particles in the work place. We combined standardised mortality ratio (SMR) and Cox proportional hazards results from cohort studies of US, UK and German CB production workers. Under a common protocol, we analysed mortality from all causes, heart disease (HD), ischemic heart disease (IHD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Fixed and random effects (RE) meta-regression models were fit for employment duration, and for overall cumulative and lugged quantitative CB exposure estimates. Full cohort meta-SMRs (RE) were 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79–1.29) for HD; 1.02 (95% CI 0.80–1.30) for IHD, and 1.08 (95% CI 0.74–1.59) for AMI mortality. For all three outcomes, meta-SMRs were heterogeneous, increased with time since first and time since last exposure, and peaked after 25–29 or 10–14 years, respectively. Meta-Cox coefficients showed no association with lugged duration of exposure. A small but imprecise increased AMI mortality risk was suggested for cumulative exposure (RE-hazards ratio (HR) = 1.10 per 100 mg/m3-years; 95% CI 0.92–1.31), but not for lugged exposures. Our results do not demonstrate that airborne CB exposure increases all-cause or cardiac disease mortality. PMID:27005647

  9. Recommendations for the interpretation of "black carbon" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Ogren, J. A.; Fiebig, M.; Laj, P.; Li, S.-M.; Baltensperger, U.; Holzer-Popp, T.; Kinne, S.; Pappalardo, G.; Sugimoto, N.; Wehrli, C.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zhang, X.-Y.

    2013-04-01

    Although black carbon (BC) is one of the key atmospheric particulate components driving climate change and air quality, there is no agreement on the terminology that considers all aspects of specific properties, definitions, measurement methods, and related uncertainties. As a result, there is much ambiguity in the scientific literature of measurements and numerical models that refer to BC with different names and based on different properties of the particles, with no clear definition of the terms. The authors present here a recommended terminology to clarify the terms used for BC in atmospheric research, with the goal of establishing unambiguous links between terms, targeted material properties and associated measurement techniques.

  10. Modal character of atmospheric black carbon size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, A.; Sidla, S.; Galambos, Z.; Kruisz, C.; Hitzenberger, R.; ten Brink, H. M.; Kos, G. P. A.

    1996-08-01

    Samples of atmospheric aerosols, collected with cascade impactors in the urban area of Vienna (Austria) and at a coastal site on the North Sea, were investigated for black carbon (BC) as the main component of absorbing material and for mass. The size distributions are structured. The BC distributions of these samples show a predominant mode, the accumulation aerosol, in the upper submicron size range, a less distinct finer mode attributable to fresh emissions from combustion sources, and a distinct coarse mode of unclear origin. It is important to note that some parameters of the accumulation aerosol are related statistically, indicating the evolution of the atmospheric accumulation aerosol.

  11. Climate Effects of Black Carbon Aerosols in China and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Surabi; Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa; Luo, Yunfeng

    2002-09-01

    In recent decades, there has been a tendency toward increased summer floods in south China, increased drought in north China, and moderate cooling in China and India while most of the world has been warming. We used a global climate model to investigate possible aerosol contributions to these trends. We found precipitation and temperature changes in the model that were comparable to those observed if the aerosols included a large proportion of absorbing black carbon (``soot''), similar to observed amounts. Absorbing aerosols heat the air, alter regional atmospheric stability and vertical motions, and affect the large-scale circulation and hydrologic cycle with significant regional climate effects.

  12. Black carbon concentrations and mixing state in the Finnish Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, T.; Brus, D.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Svensson, J.; Asmi, E.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition was measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) in the Finnish Arctic during winter 2011-2012. The Sammaltunturi measurement site at the Pallas GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station receives air masses from different source regions including the Arctic Ocean and continental Europe. The SP2 provides detailed information about mass distributions and mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC). The measurements showed widely varying rBC mass concentrations (0-120 ng m-3), which were related to varying contributions of different source regions and aerosol removal processes. The rBC mass was log-normally distributed showing a relatively constant rBC core mass mean diameter with an average of 194 nm (75-655 nm sizing range). On average, the number fraction of particles containing rBC was 0.24 (integrated over 350-450 nm particle diameter range) and the average particle diameter to rBC core volume equivalent diameter ratio was 2.0 (averaged over particles with 150-200 nm rBC core volume equivalent diameters). These average numbers mean that the observed rBC core mass mean diameter is similar to those of aged particles, but the observed particles seem to have unusually high particle to rBC core diameter ratios. Comparison of the measured rBC mass concentration with that of the optically detected equivalent black carbon (eBC) using an Aethalometer and a MAAP showed that eBC was larger by a factor of five. The difference could not be fully explained without assuming that only a part of the optically detected light absorbing material is refractory and absorbs light at the wavelength used by the SP2. Finally, climate implications of five different black carbon mixing state representations were compared using the Mie approximation and simple direct radiative forcing efficiency calculations. These calculations showed that the observed mixing state means significantly lower warming effect or even a net cooling effect when compared with

  13. Carbon in black crusts from the Tower of London

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandra Bonazza; Peter Brimblecombe; Carlota M. Grossi; Cristina Sabbioni

    2007-06-15

    This paper investigates the origin, fluxes, and transformation of carbon compounds within black crusts on the stone walls of the Tower of London. The crusts were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon, including the water soluble fraction. The stratigraphy of the old, thicker crusts highlighted the presence of prismatic particles, spherical aluminosilicates and metals, and carbonaceous particles. These are indicative of wood, coal and oil combustion processes. Elemental carbon and low solubility compounds such as oxalates appeared to be conserved because of long residence times. Conversely, more soluble ions, like chloride and formate would be removed from the layers relatively quickly by rainfall. At higher organic carbon concentrations acetic acid may be produced within the crusts from biological transformations. Currently, traffic sources contribute to increasingly organic rich crusts. The deposition of elemental carbon to buildings darkens surfaces and has important aesthetic implications. The increased organic content may have further aesthetic consequence by changing the color of buildings to warmer tones, particularly browns and yellows. Management of historic buildings requires us to recognize the shift away from simple gypsum crusts to those richer in organic materials. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effect of the Purple carbon black on the properties of NR/BR blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanfang, Zhao; Dan, Liu; Shengbo, Lin; Binjian; Yinmei, Zhao; Shuangquan, Liao

    2014-08-01

    Purple black is light colored mineral filler mining in recent years in Hainan. The effect of the dosage of the purple carbon black and purple carbon black modificated by Si69 on the vulcanization characteristics, mechanical properties, thermal stability, the damping performance of NR/BR blend rubber were studied, and the blending adhesive tensile sections were analyzed by SEM. Research showed that, with the increasing dosage of the purple carbon black, vulcanization characteristics of NR/BR blend had a little change. Adding the purple carbon black into blending had a reinforcing effect. when the dosage of the purple carbon black was 20, the mechanical properties of blending adhesive was good; Coupling agent Si69 had a modification effect on the purple carbon black. With increasing dosage of Si69, performance of the rubber was improved initially and then decreased; when the mass fraction of Si69 was 8% of the dosage of the purple carbon black, rubber performance was optimal. Purple carbon black had no obvious effect on thermal stability of the rubber, but it improved the damping rubber temperature and damping factor.

  15. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Miller Hill area, Carbon county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 65 square miles northwest of Miller Hill, Carbon county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either the radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to uranium, or to thorium, or to a combination of uranium and thorium. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly

  16. Characterization and control of airborne particles emitted during production of epoxy/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cena, Lorenzo G; Peters, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    This work characterized airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. It also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood, and biosafety cabinet) for control of particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured using an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), and particle morphology was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The ratios of the geometric mean (GM) concentrations measured during the process to that measured in the background (P/B ratios) were used as indices of the impact of the process and the LEVs on observed concentrations. Processing CNT-epoxy nanocomposites materials released respirable size airborne particles (P/B ratio: weighing = 1.79; sanding = 5.90) but generally no nanoparticles (P/B ratio ∼1). The particles generated during sanding were predominantly micron sized with protruding CNTs and very different from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in large (>1 μm) tangled clusters. Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were lower when sanding was performed in the biological safety cabinet (GM = 0.20 μg/m(3) compared with those with no LEV (GM = 2.68 μg/m(3) or those when sanding was performed inside the fume hood (GM = 21.4 μg/m(3); p-value < 0.0001). The poor performance of the custom fume hood used in this study may have been exacerbated by its lack of a front sash and rear baffles and its low face velocity (0.39 m/sec). PMID:21253981

  17. Airborne sulfur trace species intercomparison campaign: Sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Hoell, James M., Jr.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of sulfur trace gases are presented. The intercomparison was part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) and was conducted during the summer of 1989. The intercomparisons were conducted on the Wallops Electra aircraft during flights from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. Sulfur measurements intercompared included sulfur dioxide (SO2), dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Measurement techniques ranged from filter collection systems with post-flight analyses to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph systems employing various methods for measuring and identifying the sulfur gases during flight. Sampling schedules for the techniques ranged from integrated collections over periods as long as 50 minutes to one- to three-minute samples every ten or fifteen minutes. Several of the techniques provided measurements of more than one sulfur gas. Instruments employing different detection principles were involved in each of the sulfur intercomparisons. Also included in the intercomparison measurement scenario were a host of supporting measurements (i.e., ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total sulfur, aerosols, etc.) for purposes of: (1) interpreting results (i.e., correlation of any noted instrument disagreement with the chemical composition of the measurement environment); and (2) providing supporting chemical data to meet CITE-3 science objectives of studying ozone/sulfur photochemistry, diurnal cycles, etc. The results of the intercomparison study are briefly discussed.

  18. Airborne Detection and Dynamic Modeling of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Jamey; Mitchell, Taylor; Whyte, Seabrook

    2015-11-01

    To facilitate safe storage of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4, airborne monitoring is investigated. Conventional soil gas monitoring has difficulty in distinguishing gas flux signals from leakage with those associated with meteorologically driven changes. A low-cost, lightweight sensor system has been developed and implemented onboard a small unmanned aircraft that measures gas concentration and is combined with other atmospheric diagnostics, including thermodynamic data and velocity from hot-wire and multi-hole probes. To characterize the system behavior and verify its effectiveness, field tests have been conducted over controlled rangeland burns and over simulated leaks. In the former case, since fire produces carbon dioxide over a large area, this was an opportunity to test in an environment that while only vaguely similar to a carbon sequestration leak source, also exhibits interesting plume behavior. In the simulated field tests, compressed gas tanks are used to mimic leaks and generate gaseous plumes. Since the sensor response time is a function of vehicle airspeed, dynamic calibration models are required to determine accurate location of gas concentration in (x , y , z , t) . Results are compared with simulations using combined flight and atmospheric dynamic models. Supported by Department of Energy Award DE-FE0012173.

  19. PTCR effect in carbon black/copolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. C.; Chakki, A.; Achour, M. E.; Graça, M. P. F.

    2011-01-01

    Some materials show an abrupt increase in resistivity when the temperature changes only over a few degrees. This phenomenon, known as PTCR effect (positive temperature coefficient of resistivity), has been largely studied in the last few years, due to its potential applications in industry. Particularly, it can be used in auto controlled heaters, temperature sensors, protection circuits and in security systems for power electronic circuits. In this work we present the study of the electrical properties of the percolating system carbon black particles filled with ethylene butylacrylate copolymer composite (EBA), in the temperature range from -100 to 100 °C and in frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 kHz. The PTCR effect was observed at temperatures slightly above the room temperature, for concentrations higher than that of the percolation critical concentration. The mechanism responsible for the change in resistivity, at this stage, is predominantly tunnelling, wherein the conductive filler particles are not in physical contact, and the electrons tunnel through the insulating gap between them. At low temperatures, such as below and close to the glass transition temperature, the DC conductivity obeys the Arrhenius law. The calculated activation energy values are independent of carbon black contents inside the copolymer matrix, suggesting that these particles do not interact significantly with the chain segments of the macromolecules in the EBA copolymer.

  20. Occupational exposure to carbon black in its manufacture.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, K; Trethowan, W N; Harrington, J M; Calvert, I A; Glass, D C

    1992-10-01

    Carbon black is manufactured by the vapour phase pyrolysis of heavy aromatic hydrocarbon feedstocks. Its manufacture is worldwide and the majority of its production is for use in the rubber industry especially tyre manufacture. Its carbonaceous nature has led many to investigate the occurrence of exposure-related medical conditions. To quantify any such relationships, it is necessary to assess exposure accurately. As part of such an epidemiological investigation survey involving the measurement both of respirable and of total inhalable carbon black was undertaken in 18 plants in seven European countries between mid-1987 and mid-1989. A total of 1298 respirable samples (SIMPEDS cyclone) and 1317 total inhalable samples (IOM head) were taken and deemed of sufficient quality for inclusion in the study. The distributions of the time-weighted average values were assessed and found to be best described by a log-normal distribution, and so exposure is characterized by geometric means and standard deviations. The data are presented in terms of 13 separate job titles for both dust fractions and shows a wide variation between job titles, with the highest mean exposure experienced by the site cleaners, and 30% of the samples taken from the warehouse packers being in excess of the relevant countries' occupational exposure limits for total inhalable dust. The quality and extent of this data allows both for comparison with exposure standards and for generation of occupational exposure indices, which will be presented in another paper (Gardiner et al., in preparation). PMID:1444068

  1. High Black Carbon (BC) Concentrations along Indian National Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract:Black carbon (BC), the optically absorbing component of carbonaceous aerosol, has direct influence on radiation budget and global warming. Vehicular pollution is one of the main sources for poor air quality and also atmospheric pollution. The number of diesel vehicles has increased on the Indian National Highways during day and night; these vehicles are used for the transport of goods from one city to another city and also used for public transport. A smoke plume from the vehicles is a common feature on the highways. We have made measurements of BC mass concentrations along the Indian National Highways using a potable Aethalometer installed in a moving car. We have carried out measurements along Varanasi to Kanpur (NH-2), Varanasi to Durgapur (NH-2), Varanasi to Singrauli (SH-5A) and Varanasi to Ghazipur (NH-29). We have found high concentration of BC along highways, the average BC mass concentrations vary in the range 20 - 40 µg/m3 and found high BC mass concentrations up to 600 μg/m3. Along the highways high BC concentrations were characteristics of the presence of industrial area, power plants, brick kilns and slow or standing vehicles. The effect of increasing BC concentrations along the National Highways and its impact on the vegetation and human health will be presented. Key Words: Black Carbon; Aethalometer; mass concentration; Indian National Highways.

  2. Making Carbon Emissions Remotely Sensible: Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL), its Near-Surface Survey of Carbon Gases and Isotopologues on Alaska's North Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Sayres, D. S.; Healy, C. E.; Munster, J. B.; Baker, B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed process-oriented study of the mechanisms of conversion in the Arctic of fossil carbon to atmospheric gas is progressing, but necessarily limited to a few point locations and requiring detailed subsurface measurements inaccessible to remote sensing. Airborne measurements of concentration, transport and flux of these carbon gases at sufficiently low altitude to reflect surface variations can tie such local measurements to remotely observable features of the landscape. Carbon dioxide and water vapor have been observable for over 20 years from low-altitude small aircraft in the Arctic and elsewhere. Methane has been more difficult, requiring large powerful aircraft or limited flask samples. Recent developments in spectroscopy, however, have reduced the power and weight required to measure methane at rates suitable for eddy-covariance flux estimates. The Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL) takes advantage of Integrated Cavity-Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, and water vapor in a new airborne system. The system, moreover, measures these gases' stable isotopologues every two seconds or faster helping to separate thermogenic from biogenic emissions. Paired with the Best Airborne Turbulence (BAT) probe developed for small aircraft by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and a light twin-engine aircraft adapted by Aurora Flight Sciences Inc., the FOCAL measures at 6 m spacing, covering 100 km in less than 30 minutes. It flies between 10 m and 50 m above ground interspersed with profiles to the top of the boundary layer and beyond. This presentation gives an overview of the magnitude and variation in fluxes and concentrations of CH4, CO2, and H2O with space, time, and time of day in a spatially extensive survey, more than 7500 km total in 15 flights over roughly a 100 km square during the month of August 2013. An extensive data set such as this at low altitude with high-rate sampling addresses features that repeat on 1 km scale

  3. Mapping Forest Carbon by Fusing Terrestrial and Airborne LiDAR Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The storage and flux of terrestrial carbon (C) is one of the largest and most uncertain components of the global C budget, the vast majority of which is held within the biomass of the world's forests. However, the spatial distribution and quantification of forest C remains difficult to measure on a large scale. Remote sensing of forests with airborne LiDAR has proven to be an extremely effective method of bridging the gap between data from plot-level forestry mensuration and landscape-scale C storage estimates, but the standard method of assessing forest C is typically based on national or regional-scale allometric equations that are often not representative on the local-scale. Improvement of these measurements is necessary in order for collaborative multi-national carbon monitoring programs such as REDD implemented by the UNFCCC to be successful in areas, such as tropical forests, with tree species that have insufficiently documented allometric relationships. The primary goal of this study is to set forth a pipeline for precise non-destructive monitoring of C storage by: 1) determining C storage on 15 1/10th ha plots in a 25.6 ha Virginia temperate forest using the recently updated national allometric equations from Chojnacky et. al 2014, 2) comparing these estimates to non-destructively determined individual tree biomass using several semi-automated approaches of three-dimensionally analyzing the point cloud from a high-precision Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), and 3) creating a predictive model of forest C storage by fusing airborne LiDAR data to the plot-level TLS measurements. Our findings align with several other studies, indicating a strong relationship between allometrically-derived C estimates and TLS-derived C measurements (R2=0.93, n=30) using relatively few individuals, suggesting the potential application of these methods to species that are understudied or are without allometric relationships. Voxel based C storage was estimated on the plot level and

  4. CONTINUOUS BLACK CARBON MEASUREMENTS INDOORS AND OUTDOORS AT AN OCCUPIED HOUSE FOR ONE YEAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black carbon is one of the components of particulate matter, and is of importance because the only known source of aerosol black carbon in the atmosphere is the combustion of carbonaceous fuels (Hansen, 1997). Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formed in the combustion process ar...

  5. INDOOR-OUTDOOR RELATIONSHIPS OF PARTICLES, PAH, AND BLACK CARBON IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time instrumentation for measuring particles, PAH, and black carbon (soot) has been operated since May of 1998 in an occupied 3-story town house in Reston, VA. Indoor and outdoor concentrations have been measured every five minutes for the particles and black carbon and ev...

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Selected Ways for Determining Black Carbon Source Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have been conducted which compare various methods for the determination of black carbon in the atmosphere. Relatively little attention has been paid, however, to similar measurements of black carbon from different types of emission sources. Of particular int...

  7. Improving estimation of tree carbon stocks by harvesting aboveground woody biomass within airborne LiDAR flight areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, M.; Asner, G. P.; Swemmer, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The accurate estimation of carbon stored in a tree is essential to accounting for the carbon emissions due to deforestation and degradation. Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has been successful in estimating aboveground carbon density (ACD) by correlating airborne metrics, such as canopy height, to field-estimated biomass. This latter step is reliant on field allometry which is applied to forest inventory quantities, such as stem diameter and height, to predict the biomass of a given tree stem. Constructing such allometry is expensive, time consuming, and requires destructive sampling. Consequently, the sample sizes used to construct such allometry are often small, and the largest tree sampled is often much smaller than the largest in the forest population. The uncertainty resulting from these sampling errors can lead to severe biases when the allometry is applied to stems larger than those harvested to construct the allometry, which is then subsequently propagated to airborne ACD estimates. The Kruger National Park (KNP) mission of maintaining biodiversity coincides with preserving ecosystem carbon stocks. However, one hurdle to accurately quantifying carbon density in savannas is that small stems are typically harvested to construct woody biomass allometry, yet they are not representative of Kruger's distribution of biomass. Consequently, these equations inadequately capture large tree variation in sapwood/hardwood composition, root/shoot/leaf allocation, branch fall, and stem rot. This study eliminates the "middleman" of field allometry by directly measuring, or harvesting, tree biomass within the extent of airborne LiDAR. This enables comparisons of field and airborne ACD estimates, and also enables creation of new airborne algorithms to estimate biomass at the scale of individual trees. A field campaign was conducted at Pompey Silica Mine 5km outside Kruger National Park, South Africa, in Mar-Aug 2010 to harvest and weigh tree mass. Since

  8. ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope of Alaska Science and Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than predicted by climate models. The impact of this warming on permafrost degradation is not well understood, but it is projected to increase carbon decomposition and greenhouse gas production (CO₂ and/or CH₄) by arctic ecosystems. Airborne observations of atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, and cloud properties at the North Slope of Alaska are improving our understanding of global climate, with the goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections.

  9. Influence of carbon black and indium tin oxide absorber particles on laser transmission welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aden, Mirko; Mamuschkin, Viktor; Olowinsky, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    For laser transmission welding of polypropylene carbon black and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used as absorber particles. Additionally, the colorant titanium dioxide is mixed to the absorbing part, while the transparent part is kept in natural state. The absorption coefficients of ITO and carbon black particles are obtained, as well as the scattering properties of polypropylene loaded with titanium dioxide (TiO2). At similar concentrations the absorption coefficient of ITO is an order of magnitude smaller than that of carbon black. Simulations of radiation propagation show that the penetration depth of laser light is smaller for carbon black. Therefore, the density of the released heat is higher. Adding TiO2 changes the distribution of heat in case of ITO, whereas for carbon black the effect is negligible. Thermal simulations reveal the influence of the two absorbers and TiO2 on the heat affected zone. The results of the thermal simulations are compared to tensile test results.

  10. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of High-Abrasion-Furnace Carbon Black

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Harada, Ryusuke; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2007-02-02

    The soft x-ray absorption spectra of high-abrasion-furnace carbon black were measured to obtain local-structure/chemical-states information of the primary particles and/or crystallites. The soft x-ray absorption spectral features of carbon black represent broader {pi}* and {sigma}* peak structures compared to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The subtracted spectra between the carbon black and HOPG, (carbon black) - (HOPG), show double-peak structures on both sides of the {pi}* peak. The lower-energy peak, denoted as the 'pre-peak', in the subtracted spectra and the {pi}*/{sigma}* peak intensity ratio in the absorption spectra clearly depend on the specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption (NSA). Therefore, it is concluded that the pre-peak intensity and the {pi}*/{sigma}* ratio reflect the local graphitic structure of carbon black.

  11. Reducing black carbon emissions from diesel vehicles in Russia: An assessment and policy recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd

    2015-11-13

    This article assesses options and challenges of reducing black carbon emissions from diesel vehicles in Russia. Black carbon is a product of incomplete diesel combustion and is a component of fine particulate matter. Particulate matter emissions have adverse health impacts, causing cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer; black carbon is also a large climate forcer. Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources affect not only the Russian territory but also contribute to overall pollution. Here, this paper analyzes current ecological standards for vehicles and fuel, evaluates policies for emission reductions from existing diesel vehicle fleet, and assesses Russia’s attempts to encourage the use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel. Based on best practices of black carbon emission reductions, this paper provides a number of policy recommendations for Russia.

  12. Reducing black carbon emissions from diesel vehicles in Russia: An assessment and policy recommendations

    DOE PAGES

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd

    2015-11-13

    This article assesses options and challenges of reducing black carbon emissions from diesel vehicles in Russia. Black carbon is a product of incomplete diesel combustion and is a component of fine particulate matter. Particulate matter emissions have adverse health impacts, causing cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer; black carbon is also a large climate forcer. Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources affect not only the Russian territory but also contribute to overall pollution. Here, this paper analyzes current ecological standards for vehicles and fuel, evaluates policies for emission reductions from existing diesel vehicle fleet, and assesses Russia’s attempts to encouragemore » the use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel. Based on best practices of black carbon emission reductions, this paper provides a number of policy recommendations for Russia.« less

  13. The role of carbon black distribution in cathodes for Li ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominko, Robert; Gaberscek, Miran; Drofenik, Jernej; Bele, Marjan; Pejovnik, Stane; Jamnik, Janko

    The influence of carbon black distribution/arrangement in cathode composite on cathode performance is studied using three types of active materials: LiMn 2O 2-spinel, LiCoO 2, and LiFePO 4. To the active materials, carbon black is added in two different ways: (a) using a conventional mixing procedure and (b) using a novel coating technology (NCT) invented in our laboratory. Different technologies yield different arrangement (distribution) of carbon black around active particles. It is shown that the uniformity of carbon black distribution affects significantly the cathode kinetics, regardless of the type of active particles used. A simple model explaining the influence of carbon black distribution on cathode kinetics is presented.

  14. Light Absorption in Arctic Sea Ice - Black Carbon vs Chlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Hunke, E. C.; Flanner, M.; Wang, H.; Dubey, M. K.; Jeffery, N.

    2015-12-01

    The fingerprint of climate change is more obvious in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. This is not only because the surface temperature there has increased at twice the rate of global mean temperature but also because Arctic sea ice extent has reached a record low of 49% reduction relative to the 1979-2000 climatology. Radiation absorption through black carbon (BC) deposited on Arctic snow and sea ice surface is one of the major hypothesized contributors to the decline. However, we note that chlorophyll-a absorption owing to increasing biology activity in this region could be a major competitor during boreal spring. Modeling of sea-ice physical and biological processes together with experiments and field observations promise rapid progress in the quality of Arctic ice predictions. Here we develop a dynamic ice system module to investigate discrete absorption of both BC and chlorophyll in the Arctic, using BC deposition fields from version 5 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) and vertically distributed layers of chlorophyll concentrations from Sea Ice Model (CICE). To this point, our black carbon mixing ratios compare well with available in situ data. Both results are in the same order of magnitude. Estimates from our calculations show that sea ice and snow around the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay has the least black carbon absorption while values at the ice-ocean perimeter in the region of the Barents Sea peak significantly. With regard to pigment concentrations, high amounts of chlorophyll are produced in Arctic sea ice by the bottom microbial community, and also within the columnar pack wherever substantial biological activity takes place in the presence of moderate light. We show that the percentage of photons absorbed by chlorophyll in the spring is comparable to the amount attributed to BC, especially in areas where the total deposition rates are decreasing with time on interannual timescale. We expect a continuous increase in

  15. First Airborne Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the MERLIN Demonstrator CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, Axel; Büdenbender, Christian; Ehret, Gerhard; Fix, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Kiemle, Chritstoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    2016-04-01

    CHARM-F is the new airborne four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Due to its high technological conformity it is also a demonstrator for MERLIN, the French-German satellite mission providing a methane lidar. MERLIN's Preliminary Design Review was successfully passed recently. The launch is planned for 2020. First CHARM-F measurements were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The aircraft's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, result in data similar to those obtained by a spaceborne system. The CHARM-F and MERLIN lidars are designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between the system and ground. The successfully completed CHARM-F flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. Furthermore, the dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on system design questions. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard the aircraft during the flight campaign: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the aircraft lidar. For the near future, detailed characterizations of CHARM-F are planned, further support of the MERLIN design, as well as the scientific aircraft campaign CoMet.

  16. How shorter black carbon lifetime alters its climate effect.

    PubMed

    Hodnebrog, Øivind; Myhre, Gunnar; Samset, Bjørn H

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC), unlike most aerosol types, absorbs solar radiation. However, the quantification of its climate impact is uncertain and presently under debate. Recently, attention has been drawn both to a likely underestimation of global BC emissions in climate models, and an overestimation of BC at high altitudes. Here we show that doubling present day BC emissions in a model simulation, while reducing BC lifetime based on observational evidence, leaves the direct aerosol effect of BC virtually unchanged. Increased emissions, together with increased wet removal that reduces the lifetime, yields modelled BC vertical profiles that are in strongly improved agreement with recent aircraft observations. Furthermore, we explore the consequences of an altered BC profile in a global circulation model, and show that both the vertical profile of BC and rapid climate adjustments need to be taken into account in order to assess the total climate impact of BC. PMID:25255429

  17. Comprehensive Black Carbon Emission Inventory of India: Uncertainty Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, J. F.; Paliwal, U.; Sharma, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new GIS based comprehensive high resolution grid wise emission inventory of Black carbon from India in the year 2011. The emissions have been determined at district level and were spatially distributed into grids at a resolution of 40x40 km2. The uncertainty in emissions has been estimated using Monte Carlo simulation by considering the variability in activity data and emission factors. Monthly variation of BC emissions has also been determined. The total BC annual emission for India in 2011 is determined to be 892.12 ± 151.53 Gg/yr. Domestic fuels contributed maximum (48%) followed by Industry (22%), Transport (17%), open burning (12%) and others (1%).

  18. How shorter black carbon lifetime alters its climate effect.

    PubMed

    Hodnebrog, Øivind; Myhre, Gunnar; Samset, Bjørn H

    2014-09-25

    Black carbon (BC), unlike most aerosol types, absorbs solar radiation. However, the quantification of its climate impact is uncertain and presently under debate. Recently, attention has been drawn both to a likely underestimation of global BC emissions in climate models, and an overestimation of BC at high altitudes. Here we show that doubling present day BC emissions in a model simulation, while reducing BC lifetime based on observational evidence, leaves the direct aerosol effect of BC virtually unchanged. Increased emissions, together with increased wet removal that reduces the lifetime, yields modelled BC vertical profiles that are in strongly improved agreement with recent aircraft observations. Furthermore, we explore the consequences of an altered BC profile in a global circulation model, and show that both the vertical profile of BC and rapid climate adjustments need to be taken into account in order to assess the total climate impact of BC.

  19. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  20. Optical Properties of Small Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Geier, M.; Arienti, M.

    2013-12-01

    The optical properties of ice crystals play a fundamental role in modeling atmospheric radiation and hydrological cycle, which are critical in monitoring climate change. While Black Carbon (BC) is recognized as the dominant absorber with positive radiative forcing (warming) (Ramanathan & Carmichael, 2008), in-situ observations (Cappa, et al, 2012) indicate that the characterization of the mixing state of BC with ice crystals and other non-BC particles in global climate models (Ghan & Schwartz, 2007) needs further investigation. The limitation in the available mixing models is due to the drastically different absorbing properties of BC compared to other aerosols. We explore the scattering properties of ice crystals (in shapes commonly found in cirrus clouds and contrails - Yang, et al. 2012) with the inclusion of BC particles. The Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) (Yurkin & Hoekstra, 2011) is utilized to directly calculate the optical properties of the crystals with multiple BC inclusions, modeled as a distribution of spheres. The results are then compared with the most popular models of internal and external mixing (Liou, et al. 2011). The DDA calculations are carried out over a broad range of BC particle sizes and volume fractions within the crystal at the 532 nm wavelength and for ice crystals smaller than 50 μm. The computationally intensive database generated in this study is critical for understanding the effect of different types of BC inclusions on the atmosphere radiative forcing. Examples will be discussed to illustrate the modification of BC optical properties by encapsulation in ice crystals and how the parameterization of the BC mixing state in global climate models can be improved. Acknowledgements Support by Sandia National Laboratories' LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of

  1. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. We conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. We also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  2. Enhanced haze pollution by black carbon in megacities in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, A. J.; Huang, X.; Nie, W.; Sun, J. N.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y. F.; Yang, X.-Q.; Wang, M. H.; Chi, X. G.; Wang, J. P.; Virkkula, A.; Guo, W. D.; Yuan, J.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wu, Y. F.; Song, Y.; Zhu, T.; Zilitinkevich, S.; Kulmala, M.; Fu, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol-planetary boundary layer (PBL) interactions have been found to enhance air pollution in megacities in China. We show that black carbon (BC) aerosols play the key role in modifying the PBL meteorology and hence enhancing the haze pollution. With model simulations and data analysis from various field observations in December 2013, we demonstrate that BC induces heating in the PBL, particularly in the upper PBL, and the resulting decreased surface heat flux substantially depresses the development of PBL and consequently enhances the occurrences of extreme haze pollution episodes. We define this process as the "dome effect" of BC and suggest an urgent need for reducing BC emissions as an efficient way to mitigate the extreme haze pollution in megacities of China.

  3. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, Stefan; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, Kai

    2013-03-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  4. Comparative studies of industrial grade carbon black powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Komal; Chauhan, Alok P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Comparative studies of two dissimilar industrial grade Carbon Black (CB) powders (N375 and N405) were conducted. The structure, surface area and particle size are the three important characteristics of CB powder that determine their processability and application as filler in preparing rubber compounds. The powders were characterized for their structure using dibutyl phthalate absorption (DBPA), particle size via laser particle size analyzer and surface area by nitrogen adsorption method. The structural characterization showed that N405 had lower DBPA in comparison to N375, confirming low structure of N405 grade CB powder. It was observed from the particle size analysis that N375 was coarser than N405 grade CB. The total surface area values were determined by the BET method based on the cross sectional area of the nitrogen molecule. N375, a coarse grade CB powder with high structure, depicted less surface area as compared to N405.

  5. Electrical properties of foamed polypropylene/carbon black composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, M.; Kotzev, G.; Vulchev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Polypropylene composites containing carbon black fillers were produced by vibration assisted extrusion process. Solid (unfoamed) composite samples were molded by conventional injection molding method, while structural foams were molded by a low pressure process. The foamed samples were evidenced to have a solid skin-foamed core structure which main parameters were found to depend on the quantity of material injected in the mold. The average bubbles' sizes and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. It is established that the conductivity of the foamed samples gradually decreases when reducing the sample density. Nevertheless, the conductivity is found to be lower than the conductivity of the unfoamed samples both being of the same order. The flexural properties of the composites were studied and the results were discussed in the context of the structure parameters of the foamed samples.

  6. Wet Removal of Organic and Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, A.; Bond, T. C.; Lehmann, C.

    2012-12-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) aerosols derived from the combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are significant atmospheric pollutants that alter the Earth's radiation balance and affect human health. Carbonaceous aerosol lifetime and extent of its effects are mainly controlled by its wet removal, especially by rain. Limited work has been done to measure both BC and OC from rain events even though these aerosols are co-emitted and exist together in the atmosphere. The choices of analytical techniques for measuring OC and BC in water are limited, and researchers often employ the same techniques used for measuring atmospheric carbon particles. There is no agreement in the methods employed for monitoring carbon concentration in precipitation. As part of the method development, the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Thermal-Optical Analysis (TOA), Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/VIS) Spectrophotometer, and the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer were evaluated for measuring BC suspended in water, water insoluble OC (WIOC) and dissolved OC (DOC). The study also monitored the concentration of BC, WIOC, and DOC in rainwater collected at Bondville (Illinois) for 18 months. Results indicated that 34% (±3%) of the BC mass was lost in the SP2 analysis, most probably during the nebulization process. Filtration required for TOA also had large losses (>75%) because quartz fiber filters were ineffective for capturing BC particles from water. Addition of NH4H2PO4 as a coagulant improved (>95%) the capture efficiency of the filters. UV/VIS spectrophotometry had good linearity, but the sensitivity for detecting BC particles (±20 μg/L) suspended in water was inadequate. TOC analysis was a robust technique for measuring both DOC and total carbon (BC + OC). The chosen techniques were TOC analysis for DOC, and TOA with an optimized filtration procedure for BC and WIOC. The mean concentrations in rainwater were 8.72 (±9.84) μg/L of BC, 88.97 (±62.64) μg/L of WIOC, and 1

  7. Black carbon as a carbon source for young soils in a glacier forefield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmeier, E.; Pichler, B.; Krebs, R.; Mavris, C.; Egli, M.

    2012-04-01

    Most evident changes in Alpine soils today occur in proglacial areas where existing young soils are continuously developing. Due to climate change, additional areas will become ice-free and subject to weathering and new soil formation. The glacier forefields of the European Alps are continuously exposed since the glaciers reached their maximum expansion in the 1850s. In these proglacial areas, initial soils have started to develop so that they may offer, under optimal conditions, a continuous chronosequence from 0 to 150 year-old soils. The buildup of organic carbon (Corg) in soil is an important factor controlling weathering and the formation of soils. Not only autochthonous but also distant (allochthonous) sources may contribute to the accumulation of soil organic carbon in young soils and surfaces of glacier forefields. Black carbon could be an important component in Alpine soils. However, only little is known about black carbon in very young soils that develop in glacier forefields. The aim of our study was to examine whether black carbon as an allochthonous source of soil organic matter can be detected in the initial soils, and to estimate its relative contribution (as a function of time) to total organic carbon. We investigated surface soil samples (topsoils, A or AO horizon) from 35 sites distributed over the whole proglacial area of Morteratsch, where ideal conditions for a soil chronosequence from 0 to 150 years can be found. Along this sequence, bare till sediments to weakly developed soils (Leptosols) can be encountered. Black carbon concentrations were determined in fine-earth using the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) marker method as described by Brodowski et al. (2005). We found that the proportion of BPCA-C to total Corg was related to the time since the surface was exposed. The youngest soils (younger than 40 years) contained the highest proportion of BPCA-C (up to 120 g BPCA-C/kg Corg). In these soils, however, the Corg concentrations were very

  8. Observation of black carbon, ozone and carbon monoxide in the Kali Gandaki Valley Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Kathayat, B.

    2014-12-01

    The increased melting of snow and ice in the arctic and the Himalaya is a growing concern for all of the earth's population. Deposition of black carbon (BC) on the snow and ice surface accelerates melting by absorbing the radiative energy and directly transferring all that energy onto the underlying surface. During pre-monsoon season, satellite images show a thick layer of haze covering the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) and the Himalayan foothills. Sub-micron particles are transported to the Himalaya from the IGP predominantly driven by the thermal valley wind system. The Himalayas consist of some of the tallest mountain ranges in the world, over 8000m tall that reach the stratosphere. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from IGP to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.) half-way along the Kali Gandaki valley. The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we present our observations of black carbon, ozone, carbon monoxide at Jomsom to show the diurnal and seasonal variability of the pollutants. The results show diurnal patterns in the concentration of these pollutants and also episodes of high pollutant transport along the valley. These transport episodes are more common during the pre-monsoon season which indicates that deep mountain valleys like the Kali Gandaki valley facilitate the transport of pollutants and thus promote snow and glacial melting.

  9. Carbon black dispersion pre-plating technology for printed wire board manufacturing. Final technology evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, D.W.; Gavaskar, A.R.; Jones, J.A.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    The project compared chemical use, waste generation, cost, and product quality between electroless copper and carbon-black-based preplating technologies at the printed wire board (PWB) manufacturing facility of McCurdy Circuits in Orange, CA. The carbon-black based preplating technology evaluated is used as an alternative process for electroless copper (EC) plating of through-holes before electrolytic copper plating. The specific process used at McCurdy is the BlackHole (BH) technology process, which uses a dispersion of carbon black in an aqueous solution to provide a conductive surface for subsequent electrolytic copper plating. The carbon-black dispersion technology provided effective waste reduction and long-term cost savings. The economic analysis determined that the new process was cost efficient because chemical use was reduced and the process proved more efficient; the payback period was less than 4 yrs.

  10. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Contributes to the Development of Carbon Black Cytotoxicity to Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Gwan; Noh, Won Jun; Kim, Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Carbon black, a particulate form of pure elemental carbon, is an industrial chemical with the high potential of occupational exposure. Although the relationship between exposure to particulate matters (PM) and cardiovascular diseases is well established, the cardiovascular risk of carbon black has not been characterized clearly. In this study, the cytotoxicity of carbon black to vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells were examined to investigate the potential vascular toxicity of carbon black. Carbon black with distinct particle size, N330 (primary size, 28~36 nm) and N990 (250~350 nm) were treated to A-10, rat aortic smooth muscle cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cell line, ECV304, and cell viability was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay. Treatment of carbon black N990 resulted in the significant reduction of viability in A-10 cells at 100 μg/ml, the highest concentration tested, while N330 failed to cause cell death. Cytotoxicity to ECV304 cells was induced only by N330 at higher concentration, 200 μg/ml, suggesting that ECV304 cells were relatively resistant to carbon black. Treatment of 100 μg/ml N990 led to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected by dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) in A-10 cells. Pretreatment of antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sulforaphane restored decreased viability of N990-treated A-10 cells, and N-acetylcysteine, but not sulforaphane, attenuated N990-induced ROS generation in A-10 cells. Taken together, present study shows that carbon black is cytotoxic to vascular cells, and the generation of reactive oxygen contributes to the development of cytotoxicity. ROS scavenging antioxidant could be a potential strategy to attenuate the toxicity induced by carbon black exposure. PMID:24278567

  11. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  12. Analyzing carbon dioxide and methane emissions in California using airborne measurements and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations have increased over the past decades and are linked to global temperature increases and climate change. These changes in climate have been suggested to have varying effects, and uncertain consequences, on agriculture, water supply, weather, sea-level rise, the economy, and energy. To counteract the trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations of GHGs, the state of California has passed the California Global Warming Act of 2006 (AB-32). This requires that by the year 2020, GHG (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4)) emissions will be reduced to 1990 levels. To quantify GHG fluxes, emission inventories are routinely compiled for the State of California (e.g., CH4 emissions from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) Project). The major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the state of California are: transportation, electricity production, oil and gas extraction, cement plants, agriculture, landfills/waste, livestock, and wetlands. However, uncertainties remain in these emission inventories because many factors contributing to these processes are poorly quantified. To alleviate these uncertainties, a synergistic approach of applying air-borne measurements and chemical transport modeling (CTM) efforts to provide a method of quantifying local and regional GHG emissions will be performed during this study. Additionally, in order to further understand the temporal and spatial distributions of GHG fluxes in California and the impact these species have on regional climate, CTM simulations of daily variations and seasonality of total column CO2 and CH4 will be analyzed. To assess the magnitude and spatial variation of GHG emissions and to identify local 'hot spots', airborne measurements of CH4 and CO2 were made by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in January and February 2013 during the Discover-AQ-CA study. High mixing ratios of GHGs were

  13. Methods to Parameterize Brown Carbon, Distinguish Brown Carbon Absorption From Enhanced Black Carbon Absorption, and Assess the Stability of Brown Carbon to Photochemical Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. M.; Pokhrel, R. P.; Beamesderfer, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Langridge, J.; Lack, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present results obtained during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment-4 (FLAME-4) with a combination of multi-wavelength photoacoustic and cavity ringdown spectrometers. It will be shown that the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent of biomass burning emissions can be better parameterized by the organic carbon to black carbon ratio than by the modified combustion efficiency. Two different methods to distinguish the contribution to aerosol absorption from brown carbon versus black carbon and enhanced black carbon absorption will be presented. One method is based on extending the absorption seen at 660 nm with an assumed Angstrom exponent while the other assumes a similar absorption enhancement (determined via thermal denuder) of black carbon at 660 and 405 nm. Potential errors and advantages of both methods will be discussed. Finally, chamber experiments that show degradation of brown carbon by photochemical oxidation will be presented along with a number of methods by which to assess the amount of brown carbon that is degraded.

  14. Uptake Mechanism for Iodine Species to Black Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Choung, Sungwook; Um, Wooyong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Min-Gyu

    2013-08-13

    Natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in determining the fate and transport of iodine species such as iodide (I-) and iodate (IO3-) in groundwater system. Although NOM exists as diverse forms in environments, prior iodine studies have mainly focused on uptake processes of iodide and iodate to humic materials. This study was conducted to determine the iodide and iodate uptake potential for a particulate NOM (i.e., black carbon [BC]). A laboratory-produced BC and commercial humic acid were used for batch experiments to compare their iodine uptake properties. The BC exhibited >100 times greater uptake capability for iodide than iodate at low pH~3, while iodide uptake was negligible for the humic acid. The uptake properties of both solids strongly depend on the initial iodine aqueous concentrations. After uptake reaction of iodide to the BC, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy results indicated that the iodide was converted to electrophilic species, and iodine was covalently bound to carbon atom in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the BC. The computed distribution coefficients (i.e., Kd values) suggest that the BC materials retard significantly the transport of iodide at low pH in environmental systems containing even a small amount of BC.

  15. Uptake mechanism for iodine species to black carbon.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Um, Wooyong; Kim, Minkyung; Kim, Min-Gyu

    2013-09-17

    Natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in determining the fate and transport of iodine species such as iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) in groundwater system. Although NOM exists as diverse forms in environments, prior iodine studies have mainly focused on uptake processes of iodide and iodate to humic materials. This study was conducted to determine the iodide and iodate uptake potential for a particulate NOM (i.e., black carbon [BC]). A laboratory-produced BC and commercial humic acid were used for batch experiments to compare their iodine uptake properties. The BC exhibited >100 times greater uptake capability for iodide than iodate at low pH of ~3, while iodide uptake was negligible for the humic acid. The uptake properties of both solids strongly depend on the initial iodine aqueous concentrations. After uptake reaction of iodide to the BC, X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy results indicated that the iodide was converted to electrophilic species, and iodine was covalently bound to carbon atom in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the BC. The computed distribution coefficients (i.e., Kd values) suggest that the BC materials retard significantly the transport of iodide at low pH in environmental systems containing even a small amount of BC.

  16. Dissolved Black Carbon in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Yang, W.; Chen, M.; Ma, H.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC) has been ubiquitously reported in dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, the abundance and provenance of DBC in the ocean are not well understood. Here, DBC in the South China Sea (SCS) was determined at molecular level using the benzenepolycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) method. DBC showed high concentrations in the upper 100 m seawater with the average of 1.13 μmol l-1 (n=55). In the intermediate seawater (200-1500 m), DBC ranged from 0.67 to 0.89 μmol l-1 with the average of 0.78 μmol l-1 (n=9), exhibiting nearly homogeneous distributions. The vertical distribution pattern indicated that DBC significantly degraded in the photic zone, corresponding to an attenuate constant of 12.5±4.9 km-1. The ratios of B6CA/B3CAs increased downward, implying that aromatic condensation degree of DBC increase during transport from surface to deep water. Using the standing crops of DBC in the upper 200 m and the residence time of seawater, atmospheric deposition of DBC was estimated to be 1.94 TgC yr-1, accounting for around 16% of the global BC deposition. Our study highlights that DBC could be an important component of ocean carbon cycling in Pacific Asia Marginal Seas.

  17. Nanoscale mapping of carbon oxidation in pyrogenic black carbon from ancient Amazonian anthrosols.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, B S; Baptista, D L; Sena, L A; Cançado, L G; Falcão, N P S; Jorio, A; Achete, C A

    2015-04-01

    Understanding soil organic matter is necessary for the development of soil amendments, which are important for sustaining agriculture in humid tropical climates. Ancient Amazonian anthrosols are uniquely high in black recalcitrant carbon, making them extremely fertile. In this study, we use high-resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy to resolve the oxidation process of carbon in the nanoscale crystallites within the black carbon grains of this special soil. Most alkali and acid chemical extraction methods are known to cause chemical modifications in soil organic matter and to give poor or no information about the real spatial structure of soil aggregates. However, here we show that carbon-oxygen functional groups such as phenol, carbonyl, and carboxyl dominate over different spatial regions, with areas varying from over tens to hundreds of nm(2). The chemical maps show that in the nanoscale grain, the surface has a tendency to be less aromatic than the grain core, where higher oxidative-degradation levels are indicated by the presence of carbonyl and carboxyl groups. A deep understanding of these structures could allow artificial reproduction of these natural events. PMID:25699655

  18. Testing of a Two-Micron Double-Pulse IPDA Lidar Instrument for Airborne Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Singh, U. N.

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing a tunable two-micron double-pulse laser transmitter, an airborne IPDA lidar system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for atmospheric carbon dioxide column measurements. The instrument comprises a receiver with 0.4 m telescope and InGaAs pin detectors coupled to 12-bit, 200 MS/s waveform digitizers. For on-site ground testing, the 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar was installed inside a trailer located where meteorological data and CO2 mixing ratio profiles were obtained from CAPABLE and LiCoR in-suite sampling, respectively. IPDA horizontal ground testing with 860 m target distance indicated CO2 sensitivity of 2.24 ppm with -0.43 ppm offset, while operating at 3 GHz on-line position from the R30 line center. Then, the IPDA lidar was integrated inside the NASA B-200 aircraft, with supporting instrumentation, for airborne testing and validation. Supporting instruments included in-situ LiCoR sensor, GPS and video recorder for target identification. Besides, aircraft built-in sensors provided altitude, pressure, temperature and relative humidity sampling during flights. The 2-mm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne testing was conducted through ten daytime flights (27 hours flight time). Airborne testing included different operating and environmental conditions for flight altitude up to 7 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. Relying on independent CO2 in-situ sampling, conducted through NOAA, airborne IPDA CO2 sensitivity of 4.15 ppm with 1.14 ppm offset were observed at 6 km altitude and 4 GHz on-line offset frequency. This validates the 2-μm double-pulse IPDA lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurement.

  19. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but

  20. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S. C.; Tom, M. S.; Sweeney, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 5-year multi-institution and multi-agency airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, with scientific objectives that are central to the carbon-cycle and radiative-forcing goals of the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) SGP region; 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative-forcing, convective processes, and CO2 concentrations over the ARM SGP region, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  1. Relations between environmental black carbon sorption and geochemical sorbent characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Kukulska, Zofia; Kalaitzidis, Stavros; Christanis, Kimon; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2004-07-01

    Pyrogenic carbon particles in sediments (soot and charcoal, collectively termed "black carbon" or BC) appear to be efficient sorbents of many hydrophobic organic compounds, so they may play an important role in the fate and toxicity of these substances. To properly model toxicant sorption behavior, it is important to (i) quantify the magnitude of the role of BC in sorption and (ii) elucidate which geochemical BC characteristics determine the strength of environmental BC sorption. Sorption isotherms of d10-phenanthrene (d10-PHE) were determined over a wide concentration range (0.0003-20 microg/L), for five sediments with widely varying characteristics. From the sorption isotherms, we determined Freundlich coefficients of environmental BC sorption, K(F,BCenv. These varied from 10(4.7) to 10(5.5). From the data, it could be deduced that BC was responsible for 49-85% of the total d10-PHE sorption at a concentration of 1 ng/L. At higher concentrations, the importance of BC for the sorption process diminished to <20% at 1 microg/L and 0-1% at 1 mg/L. There were no significant relationships between BC sorption strength and the tested geochemical BC characteristics [the fraction of small (<38 microm) BC particles, the BC resistance to high-temperature oxidation, the fraction of biomass-derived BC, the native polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and total organic carbon contents]. Because of the limited variation in BC sorption strength with widely varying BC characteristics, the presented BC sorption coefficients may putatively be used as generic starting points for environmental modeling purposes. PMID:15296315

  2. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Shepson, P. B.; Subramanian, R.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Mccabe, D. C.; Baum, E. K.; Caulton, D.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Bond, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of associated natural gas is flared and vented in the world, annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. Based on estimates from satellite observations, the United States flares about 7 BCM of gas, annually (the 5th highest flaring volume worldwide). The volume of gas flared in the US is growing, largely due to flaring in the Bakken formation in North Dakota. Black carbon (BC), a combustion by-product from gas flaring, is a short-term climate pollutant that absorbs shortwave radiation both in the atmosphere and on snow and ice surfaces. Flaring may be a significant source of global BC climate effects. For example, modeling estimates suggest that associated gas flares are the source of a significant percentage of BC surface concentrations in the Arctic, where BC-induced ice melting occurs. However, there are no direct field measurements of BC emission factors from associated gas flares. Emission measurements of BC that include a range of flaring conditions are needed to ascertain the magnitude of BC emissions from this source. Over one hundred flare plumes were sampled in the Bakken formation using a small aircraft. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. BC was measured using two methods; optical absorption was measured using a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Simultaneous sampling of BC absorption and mass allows for the calculation of the BC mass absorption cross-section. Results indicate that emission factor variability between flares in the region is significant; there are two orders of magnitude variation in the BC emission factors.

  3. Emissions of Black Carbon Aerosols from Alaskan Boreal Forest Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Fahrni, S. M.; Rogers, B. M.; Wiggins, E. B.; Santos, G.; Czimczik, C. I.; Randerson, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Boreal wildfires are a major source of carbonaceous aerosols. Emissions from wildfires in Alaska represent ~ 33% of all open biomass combustion emissions of black carbon (BC) in the United States. BC contributes to atmospheric warming and accelerates melting of ice and snow. With fire frequency and burned area projected to increase in boreal regions, BC has the potential to become an important positive feedback to climate change. Quantifying the emissions, constraining the sources and better understanding the transportation patterns of BC to the polar regions are therefore critical for constraining the strength of this feedback. We present results from direct measurements of BC from wildfires in Alaska during the summer of 2013 collected as a part of NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) campaign. Fine aerosol particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected at two locations: Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed and Delta Junction Agricultural and Forestry Experimental Site. Using a Sunset OCEC analyzer, we separated BC from organic carbon aerosols, measured concentrations and analyzed the radiocarbon (14C) content with accelerator mass spectrometry. We also analyzed the total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) elemental and stable isotope composition of the bulk PM2.5 with EA-IRMS. We compared the temporal dynamics of BC concentrations and isotopic composition with active fire/thermal anomaly information from MODIS. Our results show that boreal forest fire emissions in interior Alaska increased BC concentrations by up to an order of magnitude above background levels. The mean Δ14C value of fire-emitted BC was 120‰ with a range of +99‰ to +149‰ after correcting for contributions from background BC. This range was in good agreement with measurements of the depth of burn in soil organic carbon layers from interior wildland fires, and Δ14C profiles. High fire periods also corresponded to elevated C:N ratios. The δ15N of the aerosols was

  4. Mortality study of carbon black workers in the United States from 1935 to 1974

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.M.; Ingalls, T.H.

    1980-05-01

    In a retrospective cohort study, the observed mortality of employees of four United States carbon black producers was compared with that expected on the basis of population death rates of the states in which the plants were located. Of 190 deaths among carbon black workers, 29 were due to malignant neoplasms and 89 were due to heart disease. Observed deaths of workers did not exceed expectation in any of the diagnostic categories examined. The results of this study suggest that exposure to carbon black does not increase workers' risk of mortality from malignant neoplasms of heart disease above those of the populations from which they are drawn.

  5. Cohort Study of Carbon Black Exposure and Risk of Malignant and Nonmalignant Respiratory Disease Mortality in the US Carbon Black Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Linda D.; Gallagher, Alexa E.; Crawford, Lori; Jones, Rachael M.; Mundt, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate lung cancer and respiratory disease mortality associations with cumulative inhalable carbon black exposure among 6634 US carbon black workers. Methods: This analysis was performed using standardized mortality ratio (SMRs) and Cox regression analyses. Results: Lung cancer mortality was decreased overall (SMR = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 0.89) but less so among hourly male workers (SMR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.05). No exposure–response association was observed with time-dependent cumulative inhalable carbon black: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.0 (95% CI, 0.6 to 1.6) for 20 to less than 50 mg/m3·yr); HR = 1.3 (95% CI, 0.8 to 2.1) for 50 to less than 100 mg/m3·yr; and HR = 1.4 (95% CI, 0.9 to 2.1) for 100 mg/m3·yr or more compared with referent (<20 mg/m3·yr). No consistent associations were observed between cumulative inhalable carbon black exposure and respiratory disease mortality. Conclusion: Quantitative carbon black exposure estimates were not related to lung cancer or nonmalignant respiratory disease mortality. PMID:26340287

  6. Oxidation of Black Carbon by Biotic and Abiotic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Thies, Janice E.; Burton, Sarah D.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2006-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relative importance of either biotic or abiotic oxidation of biomass-derived black carbon (BC) and to characterize the surface properties and charge characteristics of oxidized particulate BC. We incubated BC and BC-soil mixtures at two different temperatures (30 C and 70 C) with and without microbial inoculation, nutrient additions, or manure amendments for four months. Abiotic processes were more important for oxidation of BC than biotic processes during this short-term incubation, as inoculation with microorganisms did not change any of the measured parameters. Black C incubated at both 30 C and 70 C without microbial activity showed dramatic decreases in pH (in water) from 5.4 to 5.2 and 3.4, as well as increases in cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7) by 53% and 538% and in oxygen (O) contents by 4% and 38%, respectively. Boehm titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested that the formation of carboxylic functional groups was the reason for the enhanced CEC during oxidation. The analyses of BC surface properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the oxidation of BC particles initiated on the surface. Incubation at 30 C only enhanced oxidation on particle surfaces, while oxidation during incubation at 70 C penetrated into the interior of particles. Such short-term oxidation of BC has great significance for the stability of BC in soils as well as for its effects on soil fertility and biogeochemistry.

  7. Variable effects of labile carbon on the carbon use of different microbial groups in black slate degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Anne-Gret; Trumbore, Susan; Xu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dachung; Kothe, Erika; Gleixner, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    Weathering of ancient organic matter contributes significantly to biogeochemical carbon cycles over geological times. The principle role of microorganisms in this process is well recognized. However, information is lacking on the contribution of individual groups of microorganisms and on the effect of labile carbon sources to the degradation process. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the degradation process using a column experiment. Investigations were performed on low metamorphic black slates. All columns contained freshly crushed, sieved (0.63-2 mm), not autoclaved black slates. Two columns were inoculated with the lignite-degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune and received a culture medium containing 13C labeled glucose, two columns received only this culture medium and two control columns received only water. The total mass balance was calculated from all carbon added to the slate and the CO 2 and DOC losses. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were extracted to investigate microbial communities. We used both the compound specific 14C and 13C signal of the PLFA to quantify carbon uptake from black slates and the glucose of the culture medium, respectively. The total carbon loss in these columns exceeded the amount of added carbon by approximately 60%, indicating that black slate carbon has been used. PLFA associated with Gram-positive bacteria dominated the indigenous community and took up 22% of carbon from black slate carbon, whereas PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria used only 8% of carbon from the slates. PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were both mostly activated by the glucose addition. The added Schizophyllum did not establish well in the columns and was overgrown by the indigenous microbial community. Our results suggest that especially Gram-positive bacteria are able to live on and degrade black slate material. They also benefit from easy degradable carbon from the nutrient broth. In

  8. Retrieval of Black Carbon Absorption from Proposed Satellite Measurements Over the Ocean Glint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Matins, J. V.; Remer, L. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Haze and air pollution includes many chemicals that together form small particles suspended in the air called aerosols. One of the main ingredients found to affect climate and human health is Black Carbon. Black particles emitted from engines that do not burn the fuel completely, e.g. old trucks. Black carbon absorption of sunlight emerges as one of the key components of man-made forcing of climate. However, global characterization of black carbon emissions, distribution and pathways in which it can affect the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the atmosphere is very uncertain. A new method is proposed to measure sunlight absorption by fine aerosol particles containing black carbon over the ocean glint from a satellite mission designed for this purpose. The satellite will scan the same spot over the ocean in the glint plane and a plane 40 degrees off-glint a minute apart, collecting measurements of the reflected light across the solar spectrum. First the dark ocean off the glint is used to derive aerosol properties. Then the black carbon absorption is derived prop the attenuation of the bright glint by the aerosol layer. Such measurements if realized in a proposed future mission - COBRA are expected to produce global monthly climatology of black carbon absorption with high accuracy (110 to 15%) that can show their effect on climate.

  9. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-06-08

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source-tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate ofmore » BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation in the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on season and location in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer, when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in the Himalayas and central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to the northeast plateau in all seasons and southeast plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching the northwest plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about

  10. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-01-07

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fatemore » of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% to

  11. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in

  12. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Morgan, W. T.; Flynn, M.; Highwood, E. J.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Coe, H.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2) measurements of refractory BC (rBC) mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the United Kingdom. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM). We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA) did change for different air masses, with lower SSA

  13. Black Carbon in the Arctic: Assessment of and efforts to reduce black carbon emissions from wildfires and agricultural burning in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinder, B.; Hao, W. M.; Larkin, N. K.; McCarty, G.; O'neal, K. J.; Gonzalez, O.; Luxenberg, J.; Rosenblum, M.; Petkov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon and other short-lived climate forcers exert a warming effect on the climate but remain in the atmosphere for short time periods when compared to carbon dioxide. Black carbon is a significant contributor to increasing temperatures in the Arctic region, which has warmed at twice the global rate over the past 100 years. Black carbon warms the Arctic by absorbing incoming solar radiation while in the atmosphere and, when deposited onto Arctic ice, leading to increased atmospheric temperatures and snow and ice melt. Black carbon remains in the atmosphere for a short time period ranging from days to weeks; therefore, local atmospheric conditions at the time of burning determine the amount of black carbon transport to the Arctic. Most black carbon transport and deposition in the Arctic results from the occurrence of wildfires, prescribed forest fires, and agricultural burning at latitudes greater than 40 degrees north latitude. Wildfire affects some 10-15 million hectares of forest, forest steppe, and grasslands in Russia each year. In addition to wildfire, there is widespread cropland burning in Russia occurring in the fall following harvest and in the spring prior to tilling. Agricultural burning is common practice for crop residue removal as well as suppression of weeds, insects and residue-borne diseases. The goal of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Black Carbon Initiative is to assess black carbon emissions from agricultural burning and wildfires in Russia and explore practical options and opportunities for reducing emissions from these two sources. The emissions assessment combines satellite-derived burned area measurements of forest and agricultural fires, burn severity information, ancillary geospatial data, vegetation and land cover maps, fuels data, fire emissions data, fire/weather relationship information, and smoke transport models to estimate black carbon transport and deposition in the Arctic. The assessment addresses

  14. The suitability of the urinary metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene as an index of poly nuclear aromatic hydrocarbon bioavailability from workers exposed to carbon black.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, K; Hale, K A; Calvert, I A; Rice, C; Harrington, J M

    1992-12-01

    Levels of airborne dust have been measured in the breathing zone of five warehouse packers in a carbon black manufacturing plant on consecutive days over 1 week. Post-shift urine samples were collected on individuals over the week and the concentration of the pyrene metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene have been measured. A questionnaire was used to assess the likelihood of potential confounding factors, such as direct exposure to feedstock oil, as well as smoking and diet. The arithmetic mean both of airborne dust and of excreted 1-hydroxypyrene for each individual have been correlated (a) with the constraint that the regression line pass through the origin, and (b) without this constraint. The slope of the regression through the origin was significant and that of the second regression (not through the origin) was not. The statistical test to determine whether excretion on days after Monday was higher than that on Monday itself proved highly significant. The results suggest that 1-hydroxypyrene may be a useful indicator of exposure to the PNAs adsorbed onto carbon black.

  15. Comparison Between Elemental Carbon Measured Using Thermal-Optical Analysis and Black Carbon Measurements Using A Novel Cellphone-Based System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Khan, B.; Leong, I.; Lukac, M.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is produced through the incomplete combustion of fossil and solid fuels. Current BC emissions inventories have large uncertainties of factors of 2 or more due to sparse measurements and because BC is often emitted by local sources that vary over time and space (Bond et al, 2004). Those uncertainties are major sources of error in air pollution models. Emissions from a variety of improved cookstove/fuel/combustion conditions were collected on pre-conditioned 47 mm quartz-fiber filters and analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) using thermal-optical analysis (TOA). The samples were then analyzed for BC concentration by using cellphone-based instrumentation developed by Ramanathan et al., 2011. The cellphone-based monitoring system (CBMS) is a wireless, low-cost, low-power system that monitors BC emissions. The CBMS is comprised of an aerosol filter sampler containing a battery-powered air pump and a 25mm filter holder that draws air in through a quartz-fiber filter. As black carbon deposits increase, the filter darkens--the darkest color representing the highest loading. A cellphone photograph of the filter with the black carbon deposit is taken and relayed to an analytics unit for comparison to a reference scale to estimate airborne BC concentration. The BC concentration can then be compared to the thermally derived EC concentration. TOA was conducted on a Sunset Laboratory Dual Optics Carbon Analyzer using a modified version of the Birch and Cary (1996) NIOSH 5040 protocol. The dual-optical instrument permitted simultaneous monitoring of the transmission (TOT) and reflectance (TOR). 619 samples were collected; EC was obtained using NIOSH TOT and NIOSH TOR methods, and BC was obtained using the CBMS analytics unit. The mean BC value reported by the CBMS agrees within 20% of the reference values for EC, confirming the findings in Ramanathan et al. (2011) based on samples from India. Given this accuracy, we conclude that the CBMS

  16. Black carbon, a 'hidden' player in the global C cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santín, C.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    During the 2011 alone more than 600 scientific papers about black carbon (BC) were published, half of them dealing with soils (ISI Web of Knowledge, accessed 15/01/2012). If the search is extended to the other terms by which BC is commonly named (i.e. biochar, charcoal, pyrogenic C or soot), the number of 2011 publications increases to >2400, 20% of them also related to soils. These figures confirm BC as a well-known feature in the scientific literature and, thus, in our research community. In fact, there is a wide variety of research topics where BC is currently studied: from its potential as long-term C reservoir in soils (man-made biochar), to its effects on the Earth's radiation balance (soot-BC), including its value as indicator in paleoenvironmental studies (charcoal) or, even surprisingly, its use in suicide attempts. BC is thus relevant to many aspects of our environment, making it a very far-reaching, but also very complex topic. When focusing 'only' on the role of BC in the global C cycle, numerous questions arise. For example: (i) how much BC is produced by different sources (i.e. vegetation fires, fossil fuel and biofuel combustion); (ii) what are the main BC forms and their respective proportions generated (i.e. proportion of atmospheric BC [BC-soot] and the solid residues [char-BC]); (iii) where does this BC go (i.e. main mobilization pathways and sinks); (iv) how long does BC stay in the different systems (i.e. residence times in soils, sediments, water and atmosphere); (v) which are the BC stocks and its main transformations within and between the different systems (i.e. BC preservation, alteration and mineralization); (vi) what is the interaction of BC with other elements and how does this influence BC half-life (i.e. physical protection, interaction with pollutants, priming effects in other organic materials)? These questions, and some suggestions about how to tackle these, will be discussed in this contribution. It will focus in particular on the

  17. Environmental hazards and distribution of radioactive black sand along the Rosetta coastal zone in Egypt using airborne spectrometric and remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, M F; Aziz, A M; Ghieth, B M

    2014-11-01

    High-resolution airborne gamma ray spectrometry, conducted in 2003, was used to estimate radioactive elements spatial abundance along the Rosetta coastal zone area. It was noticed that both Uranium and Thorium are concentrated in the black sand deposits along the beach. In contrary, Potassium was observed in high level abundance at the cultivated Nile Delta lands due to the accumulated usage of fertilizers. Exposure Rate (ER), Absorbed Dose Rate (ADR) and Annual Effective Dose Rate (AEDR) were calculated to evaluate the radiation background influence in human. Results indicated that the human body in the study sites is subjected to radiation hazards exceeds the accepted limit for long duration exposure. In addition, the areas covered by the highest concentration of Uranium and Thorium show the highest level of radiogenic heat production. Detection the environmental hazards of the radioactive black sands in the study site encouraged this research to monitor the spatial and temporal distribution of these sediments. The Landsat Thematic Mapper images acquired in 1990, 2003 and 2013 were analyzed using remote sensing image processing techniques. Image enhancements, classification and changes detection indicated a positive significant relationship between the patterns of coastline changes and distribution of the radioactive black sand in the study sites. The radioactive black sands are usually concentrated in the eroded areas. Therefore, in 1990 high concentration of the radioactive black sands were observed along the eastern and western flanks of the Rosetta promontory. Distribution of these sediments decreased due to the construction of the protective sea walls. Most of the radioactive black sands are transported toward the east in Abu Khashaba bay under the effect of the longshore currents and toward the west in Alexandria and Abu Quir bay under the action of the seasonal reverse currents.

  18. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vapourization with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vapourizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial Fullerene-enriched Soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x<6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For Fullerene Soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x≫6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply-charged ions (n>1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C15 were present. When such signals were present, C1+/C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+/C3+ was <0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake, aging and heterogeneous chemistry.

  19. Wetting and Non-Wetting Models of Black Carbon Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, B. F.; Laura, S.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of recent modeling studies on the activation of black carbon (BC) aerosol to form cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We use a model of BC activation based on a general modification of the Koehler equation for insoluble activation in which we introduce a term based on the activity of water adsorbed on the particle surface. We parameterize the model using the free energy of adsorption, a parameter directly comparable to laboratory measurements of water adsorption on carbon. Although the model of the water- surface interaction is general, the form of the activation equation that results depends upon a further model of the distribution of water on the particle. One possible model involves the symmetric growth of a water shell around the isoluble particle core (wetting). This model predicts upper and lower bounding curves for the activation supersaturation given by the range of water interaction energies from hydrophobic to hydrophilic which are in agreement with a large body of recent activation data. The resulting activation diameters are from 3 to 10 times smaller than activation of soluble particles of identical dry diameter. Another possible model involves an exluded liquid droplet growing in contact with the particle (non-wetting). The geometry of this model much more resembles classic assumptions of heterogeneous nucleation theory. This model can yield extremely high activation supersaturation as a function of diameter, as has been observed in some experiments, and enables calculations in agreement with some of these results. We discuss these two geometrical models of water growth, the different behaviors predicted by the resulting activation equation, and the means to determine which model of growth is appropriate for a given BC particle characterized by either water interaction energy or morphology. These simple models enable an efficient and physically reasonable means to calculate the activation of BC aerosol to form CCN based upon a

  20. Stability of black carbon in soils across a climatic gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Thies, Janice E.; Burton, Sarah D.

    2008-06-04

    The recalcitrant properties of black carbon (BC) grant it to be a significant pool of stable C in soils. Up to now, however, the longevity of BC under different climates is still unclear. In this study, we used BC samples from historical charcoal blast furnace sites to examine the stability of BC across a climatic gradient of mean annual temperatures (MAT) from 3.9 to 17.2ºC. The results showed that C concentration and C storage in the BC-containing soils at a soil depth of 0 - 0.2 m were 9.0 and 4.7 times higher than those in adjacent soils, respectively. Carbon in the BC-containing soils was more stable, with a significantly lower amount of labile C fraction (4.4 mg g C-1 vs. 27.5 mg g C-1) and longer half-life of the recalcitrant C fraction (59 years vs. 9 years) than the adjacent soils determined from incubation experiments. The stability of BC was primarily due to its inherently recalcitrant chemical composition as suggested by short-term incubation and solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of isolated BC particles. A significant negative relationship between C storage and MAT (-0.62; P<0.01) further indicated that C storage was decreased with warmer climate. However, the lack of a relationship between MAT and BC mineralization (P>0.05) suggested that the stability of the remaining BC was similar between sites with very different MAT. Despite the fact that warming or cooling result in immediate consequences for BC stocks, it may have little impact on the stability of the remaining BC over the period studied.

  1. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massling, A.; Nielsen, I. E.; Kristensen, D.; Christensen, J. H.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.; Skov, H.

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of Black Carbon (BC) in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS) at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in BC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. The data was obtained using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. A correlation between BC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. This process may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon) based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to BC measurements. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and modeled concentrations of both BC and sulfate was observed. The dominant source is found to be combustion of fossil fuel with biomass burning as a minor though significant source. During winter and spring the Arctic atmosphere is known to be impacted by long-range transport of BC and associated with the Arctic haze phenomenon.

  2. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  3. Conceptually Characterizing the Radiative Effects of Black Carbon Internal Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Ming, Y.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), as a strongly absorbing aerosol, is distinct from most other climate forcers, as it not only has positive top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing, but also redistributes the absorbed radiation vertically through surface dimming and enhancement of atmospheric absorption. Internal mixing (IM) between BC and other aerosol species, e.g. sulfate and organic carbon (OC), primarily from fossil fuel and biomass burning respectively, further enhances its absorbing ability. Most studies of BC focus on particle-scale changes or TOA radiative forcing enhancement. Our work identifies three layer-scale radiative fluxes (at TOA, atmospheric absorption, and at the surface) due to IM and connects them to particle-scale effects through a new conceptual radiative transfer model (RTM). We also employ a Mie calculation for particle-scale effects and a comprehensive RTM for evaluation of the conceptual model. We find that, although scattering decreases and absorption increases by the same amount at the particle scale due to IM, a weakening in scattering is one order of magnitude less at the layer scale, and thus can be neglected to simplify the conceptual RTM. Our result after simplification indicates that IM enhances atmospheric absorption by increasing TOA forcing and decreasing surface forcing the same amount. This is supported by similar findings both globally and over major BC source regions using the comprehensive RTM. Our conceptual RTM well captures layer-scale radiative effects of IM by reducing the complexity of computing and understanding IM-radiation interactions. Using the conceptual RTM, we estimate a global average increase of 0.42 W/m2 when internal mixing of BC with sulfate and OC is included relative to a case where internal mixing with OC is absent. We conclude that including OC in IM with BC is important, especially when analyzing the climate effects of biomass burning and sulfate mitigation.

  4. Russia's black carbon emissions: focus on diesel sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd; Kuklinski, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate forcer with a particularly pronounced forcing effect in polar regions such as the Russian Arctic. Diesel combustion is a major global source of BC emissions, accounting for 25-30 % of all BC emissions. While the demand for diesel is growing in Russia, the country's diesel emissions are poorly understood. This paper presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this paper analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. We use the COPERT emission model (COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport) with Russia-specific emission factors for all types of on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60 % of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5 % (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the paper also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The study also factors in the role of superemitters in BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles and off-road sources. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC and 17 Gg of organic carbon (OC) in 2014. Off-road diesel sources emitted 58 % of all diesel BC in Russia.

  5. Antarctic black carbon tracks Southern Hemisphere climate throughout the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienzo, M. M.; McConnell, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass-burning and fossil-fuel combustion emit black carbon (BC) aerosols which impact climate directly by changing Earth's radiation budget and indirectly by changing cloud formation and reducing albedo when deposited on bright surfaces such as snow and ice. BC aerosols have been shown to be the second most important anthropogenic climate-forcing agent today, after carbon dioxide. However, on longer timescales, knowledge of natural variations in BC emissions and climate drivers of regional-scale biomass burning is limited. Here we present the first high-resolution 14,000-year record of BC aerosol deposition in Antarctica. The two ice cores analyzed were the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (WD) core from 14,000 years before 1950 (yr BP) to 2,475 yr BP and the East Antarctic B40 core from 2,485 yr BP to present. BC and a wide range of trace elements were analyzed via a continuous melter system allowing for sub-annual resolution in both cores. For BC concentration determinations, a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; Droplet Measurement Technologies) was used. BC fluxes in the WD and B40 Holocene composite more than doubled from <25 μg m-2 yr-1 at the end of the last glacial termination (14 kyr BP) to >50 μg m-2 yr-1 in the mid-Holocene (~7.5 kyr BP), and then declined to <20 μg m-2 yr-1 in the late Holocene, with lowest BC fluxes observed during the Little Ice Age. We compare Antarctic BC fluxes to low-latitude paleoclimate proxies to investigate a potential link between low latitude climate, biomass burning and BC emissions.

  6. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (5-year interval) airborne lidar data set for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved and/or coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change was estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 yr-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 yr-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01 (fire return rate of 100 years), as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  7. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2015-09-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (five year interval) airborne lidar dataset for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved/coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change were estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 year-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a~tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 year-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire occurrence) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 year-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01, as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon dynamics models. Space

  8. Modern biofuels life-cycle effects on black carbon emissions and impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Chen, Y.; Tsao, C.

    2010-12-01

    The rapid growth of modern biofuels production (primarily ethanol) contributes to increased black carbon and co-pollutant emissions, particularly due to the field burning of agriculture wastes and the indirect land use impacts of forest clearing. U.S. bioenergy policy has already mandated life-cycle emissions thresholds for greenhouse gases from biofuels but there is still a need to incorporate black carbon and other short-lived climate forcers into these metrics. Thus, an understanding of the biofuels sector for black carbon and co-pollutant emissions and impacts remains a critical knowledge gap. Here we combine high-resolution agronomic data and regional chemical transport modeling to consider the life-cycle emissions of black carbon from sugarcane ethanol production in Brazil. Furthermore, we explore the potential for significant radiative forcing from the pre-harvest burning of sugarcane fields and the indirect land use emissions associated with deforestation.

  9. Simplifying the calculation of light scattering properties for black carbon fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Grainger, R. G.

    2014-08-01

    Black carbon fractal aggregates have complicated shapes that make the calculation of their optical properties particularly computationally expensive. Here, a method is presented to estimate fractal aggregate light scattering properties by optimising simplified models to full light scattering calculations. It is found that there are no possible spherical models (at any size or refractive index) that well represent the light scattering in the visible or near-thermal infrared. As such, parameterisations of the light scattering as a function of the number of aggregate particles is presented as the most pragmatic choice for modelling distributions of black carbon when the large computational overheads of rigorous scattering calculations cannot be justified. This parameterisation can be analytically integrated to provide light scattering properties for lognormal distributions of black carbon fractal aggregates and return extinction cross sections with 0.1% accuracy for typical black carbon size distributions. Scattering cross sections and the asymmetry parameter can be obtained to within 3%.

  10. Simplifying the calculation of light scattering properties for black carbon fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Grainger, R. G.

    2014-02-01

    Black carbon fractal aggregates have complicated shapes that make the calculation of their optical properties particularly computationally expensive. Here, a method is presented to estimate fractal aggregate light scattering properties by optimising simplified models to full light scattering calculations. It is found that there are no possible spherical models (at any size or refractive index) that well represent the light scattering in the visible, or near-thermal infrared. As such, parameterisations of the light scattering as a function of the number of aggregate particles is presented as the most pragmatic choice for modelling distributions of black carbon when the large computational overheads of rigorous scattering calculations cannot be justified. This parameterisation can be analytically integrated to provide light scattering properties for log-normal distributions of black carbon fractal aggregates and return extinction cross-sections with 0.1% accuracy for typical black carbon size distributions. Scattering cross-sections and the asymmetry parameter can be obtained to within 3%.

  11. Electromagnetic Properties of Carbon Black Based Epoxy Resin Composites in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Volynets, N.; Brosseau, C.; Micciulla, F.; Amaral-Labat, G.

    2013-05-01

    The concentration dependence of electromagnetic response properties of epoxy resin filled with small amounts of commercially available high surface area highly conducting carbon black is investigated experimentally and modeled via simple Maxwell-Garnett formalism in the microwave frequency range.

  12. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    DOE PAGES

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCMmore » biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.« less

  13. Trend in global black carbon emissions from 1960 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Tao, Shu; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Balkanski, Yves; Boucher, Olivier; Ciais, Philippe; Shen, Guofeng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Yuanchen; Lin, Nan; Su, Shu; Li, Bengang; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Wenxin

    2014-06-17

    Black carbon (BC) plays an important role in both climate change and health impact. Still, BC emissions as well as the historical trends are associated with high uncertainties in existing inventories. In the present study, global BC emissions from 1960 to 2007 were estimated for 64 sources, by using recompiled fuel consumption and emission factor data sets. Annual BC emissions had increased from 5.3 (3.4-8.5 as an interquartile range) to 9.1 (5.6-14.4) teragrams during this period. Our estimations are 11-16% higher than those in previous inventories. Over the period, we found that the BC emission intensity, defined as the amount of BC emitted per unit of energy production, had decreased for all the regions, especially China and India. Improvements in combustion technology and changes in fuel composition had led to an increase in energy use efficiency, and subsequently a decline of BC emission intensities in power plants, the residential sector, and transportation. On the other hand, the BC emission intensities had increased in the industrial and agricultural sectors, mainly due to an expansion of low-efficiency industry (coke and brick production) in developing countries and to an increasing usage of diesel in agriculture in developed countries. PMID:24825392

  14. Black carbon emissions in China from 1949 to 2050.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Tao, Shu; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Junfeng; Shen, Huizhong; Shen, Guofeng; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaopeng; Li, Wei; Huang, Ye; Zhang, Yanyan; Lu, Yan; Chen, Han; Chen, Yuanchen; Wang, Chen; Zhu, Dan; Wang, Xilong; Li, Bengang; Liu, Wenxin; Ma, Jianmin

    2012-07-17

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from China are of global concern. A new BC emission inventory (PKU-BC(China)) has been developed with the following improvements: (1) The emission factor database was updated; (2) a 0.1° × 0.1° gridded map was produced for 2007 based on county-level proxies; (3) time trends were derived for 1949-2007 and predicted for 2008-2050; and (4) the uncertainties associated with the inventory were quantified. It was estimated that 1957 Gg of BC were emitted in China in 2007, which is greater than previously reported. Residential coal combustion was the largest source, followed by residential biofuel burning, coke production, diesel vehicles, and brick kilns. By using a county-level disaggregation method, spatial bias in province-level disaggregation, mainly due to uneven per capita emissions within provinces, was reduced by 42.5%. Emissions increased steadily since 1949 until leveling off in the mid-1990s, due to a series of technological advances and to socioeconomic progress. BC emissions in China in 2050 are predicted to be 920-2183 Gg/yr under various scenarios; and the industrial and transportation sectors stand to benefit the most from technological improvements. PMID:22730898

  15. Daily personal exposure to black carbon: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ryan D.; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous personal monitoring is the benchmark for air pollution exposure assessment. Black carbon (BC) is a strong marker of primary combustion like vehicle and biomass emissions. There have been few studies that quantified daily personal BC exposure and the contribution that different microenvironments make to it. In this pilot study, we used a portable aethalometer to measure BC concentrations in an individual's breathing zone at 30-s intervals while he performed his usual daily activities. We used a GPS and time-activity diary to track where he spent his time. We performed twenty 24-h measurements, and observed an arithmetic mean daily exposure concentration of 603 ng/m3. We estimated that changing commute modes from bus to train reduced the 24-h mean BC exposure concentration by 29%. Switching from open windows to closed windows and recirculated air in a car led to a reduction of 32%. Living in a home without a wood-fired heater caused a reduction of 50% compared with a wood-heated home. Our preliminary findings highlight the potential utility of simple approaches to reduce a person's daily BC exposure.

  16. Trend in global black carbon emissions from 1960 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Tao, Shu; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Balkanski, Yves; Boucher, Olivier; Ciais, Philippe; Shen, Guofeng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Yuanchen; Lin, Nan; Su, Shu; Li, Bengang; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Wenxin

    2014-06-17

    Black carbon (BC) plays an important role in both climate change and health impact. Still, BC emissions as well as the historical trends are associated with high uncertainties in existing inventories. In the present study, global BC emissions from 1960 to 2007 were estimated for 64 sources, by using recompiled fuel consumption and emission factor data sets. Annual BC emissions had increased from 5.3 (3.4-8.5 as an interquartile range) to 9.1 (5.6-14.4) teragrams during this period. Our estimations are 11-16% higher than those in previous inventories. Over the period, we found that the BC emission intensity, defined as the amount of BC emitted per unit of energy production, had decreased for all the regions, especially China and India. Improvements in combustion technology and changes in fuel composition had led to an increase in energy use efficiency, and subsequently a decline of BC emission intensities in power plants, the residential sector, and transportation. On the other hand, the BC emission intensities had increased in the industrial and agricultural sectors, mainly due to an expansion of low-efficiency industry (coke and brick production) in developing countries and to an increasing usage of diesel in agriculture in developed countries.

  17. Oil emulsification using surface-tunable carbon black particles.

    PubMed

    Saha, Amitesh; Nikova, Ani; Venkataraman, Pradeep; John, Vijay T; Bose, Arijit

    2013-04-24

    Emulsification of oil from a subsurface spill and keeping it stable in the water is an important component of the natural remediation process. Motivated by the need to find alternate dispersants for emulsifying oil following a spill, we examine particle-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions. Emulsions that remain stable for months are prepared either by adding acid or salt to carboxyl-terminated carbon black (CB) suspension in water to make the particles partially hydrophobic, adding the oil to this suspension and mixing. When naphthalene, a model potentially toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is added to octane and an emulsion formed, it gets adsorbed significantly by the CB particles, and its transport into the continuous water is markedly reduced. In contrast to an undesirable seawater-in-crude oil emulsion produced using a commercially used dispersant, Corexit 9500A, we demonstrate the formation of a stable crude oil-in-seawater emulsion using the CB particles (with no added acid or salt), important for natural degradation. The large specific surface area of these surface functionalized CB particles, their adsorption capability and their ability to form stable emulsions are an important combination of attributes that potentially make these particles a viable alternative or supplement to conventional dispersants for emulsifying crude oil following a spill. PMID:23527962

  18. Characterization of the interactions between protein and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-Tao; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Chen, Chun-Chao; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Wang, Liang-Shun; Gregory, Clive; Jones, Tim; BéruBé, Kelly; Lee, Chun-Nin; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2014-01-15

    A considerable amount of studies have been conducted to investigate the interactions of biological fluids with nanoparticle surfaces, which exhibit a high affinity for proteins and particles. However, the mechanisms underlying these interactions have not been elucidated, particularly as they relate to human health. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as models for protein-particle conjugates, we characterized the physicochemical modifications of carbon blacks (CB) with 23nm or 65nm in diameter after protein treatment. Adsorbed BALF-containing proteins were quantified and identified by pathways, biological analyses and protein classification. Significant modifications of the physicochemistry of CB were induced by the addition of BSA. Enzyme modulators and hydrolase predominately interacted with CB, with protein-to-CB interactions that were associated with the coagulation pathways. Additionally, our results revealed that an acute-phase response could be activated by these proteins. With regard to human health, the present study revealed that the CB can react with proteins (∼55kDa and 70kDa) after inhalation and may modify the functional structures of lung proteins, leading to the activation of acute-inflammatory responses in the lungs. PMID:24291665

  19. Black carbon radiative forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Takano, Yoshi; Gu, Yu; Qi, Ling; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, L. Ruby

    2014-11-01

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. The annual mean BC snow albedo forcing is 2.9 W m-2 averaged over snow-covered plateau regions, which is a factor of 3 larger than the value over global land snowpack. BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing, and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC aggregates, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. The annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 with uncertainties of -70-85% in the plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  20. Assessing the climatic benefits of black carbon mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Robert E.; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    2010-01-01

    To limit mean global warming to 2 °C, a goal supported by more than 100 countries, it will likely be necessary to reduce emissions not only of greenhouse gases but also of air pollutants with high radiative forcing (RF), particularly black carbon (BC). Although several recent research papers have attempted to quantify the effects of BC on climate, not all these analyses have incorporated all the mechanisms that contribute to its RF (including the effects of BC on cloud albedo, cloud coverage, and snow and ice albedo, and the optical consequences of aerosol mixing) and have reported their results in different units and with different ranges of uncertainty. Here we attempt to reconcile their results and present them in uniform units that include the same forcing factors. We use the best estimate of effective RF obtained from these results to analyze the benefits of mitigating BC emissions for achieving a specific equilibrium temperature target. For a 500 ppm CO2e (3.1 W m-2) effective RF target in 2100, which would offer about a 50% chance of limiting equilibrium warming to 2.5 °C above preindustrial temperatures, we estimate that failing to reduce carbonaceous aerosol emissions from contained combustion would require CO2 emission cuts about 8 years (range of 1–15 years) earlier than would be necessary with full mitigation of these emissions. PMID:20566891

  1. Black Carbon Trends over Several Decades at Multiple Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preble, C. V.; Hadley, O. L.; Bond, T. C.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Archived air quality data in the U.S. and Europe can be used to reconstruct past trends in black carbon (BC), an indicator of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Here, we consider coefficient of haze (COH) data that was extensively measured in California, New Jersey, and other North American locations from the mid-1960s to the turn of the century. We reinstated COH monitors alongside aethalometers in Vallejo and San Jose, California, and after two years of air monitoring determined that COH is proportional to and, thus, can be used to infer past concentrations of BC. Analyzing COH data sets, we found that BC concentrations markedly decreased from 1965 to 2000 in both California and New Jersey. The opposing trend of increasing energy consumption over the same period indicates successful regulatory control of sources and a shift from dirtier to cleaner fuels. As air quality improved over four decades, a seasonal trend of maximum BC concentrations in winter persisted in California but, somewhat surprisingly, disappeared in New Jersey. A strong weekly cycle of lowest BC concentrations on weekends was evident in California and New Jersey, suggesting that diesel traffic, which exhibits a similar weekly cycle, has been a major source of BC in both states. Our extended analysis will include BC trends in other regions of North America and Europe and will be applied to understand BC radiative forcing in California and deposition of pollutants in the Arctic.

  2. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J. E.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J. E.; Sathaye, J. A.

    2003-03-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

  3. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  4. Source forensics of black carbon aerosols from China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Andersson, August; Lee, Meehye; Kirillova, Elena N; Xiao, Qianfen; Kruså, Martin; Shi, Meinan; Hu, Ke; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Du, Ke; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2013-08-20

    The limited understanding of black carbon (BC) aerosol emissions from incomplete combustion causes a poorly constrained anthropogenic climate warming that globally may be second only to CO2 and regionally, such as over East Asia, the dominant driver of climate change. The relative contribution to atmospheric BC from fossil fuel versus biomass combustion is important to constrain as fossil BC is a stronger climate forcer. The source apportionment is the underpinning for targeted mitigation actions. However, technology-based "bottom-up" emission inventories are inconclusive, largely due to uncertain BC emission factors from small-scale/household combustion and open burning. We use "top-down" radiocarbon measurements of atmospheric BC from five sites including three city sites and two regional sites to determine that fossil fuel combustion produces 80 ± 6% of the BC emitted from China. This source-diagnostic radiocarbon signal in the ambient aerosol over East Asia establishes a much larger role for fossil fuel combustion than suggested by all 15 BC emission inventory models, including one with monthly resolution. Our results suggest that current climate modeling should refine both BC emission strength and consider the stronger radiative absorption associated with fossil-fuel-derived BC. To mitigate near-term climate effects and improve air quality in East Asia, activities such as residential coal combustion and city traffic should be targeted. PMID:23844635

  5. Global Civil Aviation Black Carbon Particle Mass and Number Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettler, M. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a product of incomplete combustion emitted by aircraft engines. In the atmosphere, BC particles strongly absorb incoming solar radiation and influence cloud formation processes leading to highly uncertain, but likely net positive warming of the earth's atmosphere. At cruise altitude, BC particle number emissions can influence the concentration of ice nuclei that can lead to contrail formation, with significant and highly uncertainty climate impacts. BC particles emitted by aircraft engines also degrade air quality in the vicinity of airports and globally. A significant contribution to the uncertainty in environmental impacts of aviation BC emissions is the uncertainty in emissions inventories. Previous work has shown that global aviation BC mass emissions are likely to have been underestimated by a factor of three. In this study, we present an updated global BC particle number inventory and evaluate parameters that contribute to uncertainty using global sensitivity analysis techniques. The method of calculating particle number from mass utilises a description of the mobility of fractal aggregates and uses the geometric mean diameter, geometric standard deviation, mass-mobility exponent, primary particle diameter and material density to relate the particle number concentration to the total mass concentration. Model results show good agreement with existing measurements of aircraft BC emissions at ground level and at cruise altitude. It is hoped that the results of this study can be applied to estimate direct and indirect climate impacts of aviation BC emissions in future studies.

  6. Scavenging of black carbon in Chilean coastal fogs.

    PubMed

    Heintzenberg, Jost; Cereceda-Balic, Francisco; Vidal, Victor; Leck, Caroline

    2016-01-15

    In November/December 2013 a pilot experiment on aerosol/fog interaction was conducted on a coastal hill in the suburbs of Valparaíso, Chile. Passages of garúa fog were monitored with continuous recordings of a soot photometer and an optical aerosol spectrometer. An optical fog sensor and an automatic weather station provided meteorological data with which the aerosol could be classified. High-resolution back trajectories added meteorological information. From filter samples, optical and chemical aerosol information was derived. Scavenging coefficients of black carbon (BC) and measured particulate mass below 1 μm diameter (PM1) were estimated with three approaches. Averaging over all fog periods of the campaign yielded a scavenging coefficient of only 6% for BC and 40% for PM1. Dividing the data into four 90°-wind sectors gave scavenging factors for BC ranging from 13% over the Valparaíso, Viña del Mar conurbation to 50% in the marine sector (180°-270°). The third, and independent approach was achieved with two pairs of chemical aerosol samples taken inside and outside fogs, which yielded a scavenging coefficient of 25% for BC and 70% for nonseasalt sulfate. Whereas fogs occurred rather infrequently in the beginning of the campaign highly regular daily fog cycles appeared towards the end of the experiment, which allowed the calculation of typical diurnal cycles of the aerosol in relation to a fog passage. PMID:26410708

  7. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Beig, G.; Sahu, S.; Fasullo, J.; Orlikowski, D.

    2009-12-01

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~30%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  8. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Beig, G.; Sahu, S.; Fasullo, J.; Orlikowski, D.

    2010-05-01

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  9. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

    2002-09-26

    Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

  10. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  11. Black Carbon Radiative Forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Gu, Yu; Qi, L.; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-11-28

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. Our best estimate of the annual BC snow albedo forcing in the Plateau is 2.9 W m-2 (uncertainty: 1.5–5.0 W m-226 ). We find that BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. Our best estimate of the annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 (uncertainty: 0.7–4.3 W m-230 ) in the Plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  12. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  13. Identifying a Sea Breeze Circulation Pattern Over the Los Angeles Basin Using Airborne In Situ Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannan, A. L.; Schill, S.; Trousdell, J.; Heath, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Yang, M. M.; Bertram, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Los Angeles Basin in Southern California is an optimal location for a circulation study, due to its location between the Pacific Ocean to the west and the Santa Monica and San Gabriel mountain ranges to the east, as well as its booming metropolitan population. Sea breeze circulation carries air at low altitudes from coastal to inland regions, where the air rises and expands before returning back towards the coast at higher altitudes. As a result, relatively clean air is expected at low altitudes over coastal regions, but following the path of sea breeze circulation should increase the amount of anthropogenic influence. During the 2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program, a highly modified DC-8 aircraft completed flights from June 23 to 25 in and around the LA Basin, including missed approaches at four local airports—Los Alamitos and Long Beach (coastal), Ontario and Riverside (inland). Because carbon dioxide (CO2) is chemically inert and well-suited as a conserved atmospheric tracer, the NASA Langley Atmospheric Vertical Observations of CO2 in the Earth's Troposphere (AVOCET) instrument was used to make airborne in situ carbon dioxide measurements. Combining measured wind speed and direction data from the aircraft with CO2 data shows that carbon dioxide can be used to trace the sea breeze circulation pattern of the Los Angeles basin.

  14. Organic Carbon--water Concentration Quotients (IIsocS and [pi]pocS): Measuring Apparent Chemical Disequilibria and Exploring the Impact of Black Carbon in Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    When black carbon (bc) and biologically derived organic carbon (bioc) phases are present in sediments or suspended particulates, both forms of carbon act additively to sorb organic chemicals but the bc phase has more sorption capacity per unit mass. . . .

  15. Elution of benzo(a)pyrene from carbon blacks into biomembranes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, D.R.; Worrell, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Elution of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) from carbon blacks into phospholipid vesicles composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was investigated. Samples of rubber-grade carbon blacks designated N-234, N-339, N-351, and N-375 containing exogenously adsorbed BaP were prepared by solvent extracting endogenous compounds from the carbon blacks and then readsorbing BaP at the desired concentrations. Concentrations of exogenous BaP on the carbon blacks were approximately 100-fold higher than normally occur on commercial carbon blacks, but the higher levels were used to improve the ability to detect elution of BaP into membranes. Elution of BaP from carbon blacks was studied using a fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Elution from N-234 was below detection limits of the system. Elution of BaP from N-339, N-351, and N-375 into DMPC and DPPC vesicles occurred in a biphasic manner. Elution occurred within 60 min of mixing carbon blacks with vesicles, although not all BaP was eluted from the particles. When the concentration of BaP adsorbed to N-375 was reduced, the rate and extent of elution were lowered. Extent of elution of BaP in these experiments may be greater than that of endogenous BaP on commercial carbon blacks because of the considerably higher quantities of exogenous BaP present. Furthermore, solvent extraction of endogenous materials prior to readsorption of BaP may alter the adsorption characteristics.

  16. Factorial Based Response Surface Modeling with Confidence Intervals for Optimizing Thermal Optical Transmission Analysis of Atmospheric Black Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate how thermal-optical transmission analysis (TOT) for refractory light-absorbing carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was optimized with empirical response surface modeling. TOT employs pyrolysis to distinguish the mass of black carbon (BC) from organic carbon (...

  17. Effects of Black Carbon on Climate: Advances in Measurement and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles are non-spherical agglomerates consisting of hundreds or thousands of graphitic carbon spherules the diameters of which are about 15-50 nm. The spherules are graphitic in their molecular states and are, thus, strongly light-absorbing. BC particles are emitted by the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fossil fuels and biomass. BC mass in the atmosphere resides in agglomerates typically between 100 and 600 nm in diameter. They influence the global radiation budget by strongly absorbing solar radiation in the visible wavelengths and by changing the albedo of snow through deposition. Radiative forcing (RF) of BC is defined as the change in net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere in W m-2 due to a change of BC between the pre-industrial time and present-day periods. The instantaneous direct radiative forcing of airborne BC particles (BC DRF), which does not include climate feedbacks, is determined by their absorption cross sections and spatial distributions. The distributions of BC are, in turn, controlled by its emission, dynamical transport, and loss during transport. The absorption cross section of BC is controlled by its optical properties (i.e., refractive index) and microphysical properties (size distribution, morphology, and mixing state). Because it is crucial to characterize these parameters, we first developed techniques to measure them accurately. Newly-developed BC measurement technologies constitute the firm basis of our studies. The techniques were applied to laboratory experiments and field observations of BC particles in air and rainwater. We also developed regional scale three-dimensional (3D) models to quantitatively interpret the observational results. One of the models calculates BC aging and optical/radiative processes explicitly without parameterizations. The reliable field measurements and model calculations of BC has enabled an improved understanding of the physical and chemical processes that control the

  18. Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I

    2006-01-01

    This report supports the effort for development of small scale fabrication of UCO (a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2}) fuel kernels for the generation IV high temperature gas reactor program. In particular, it is focused on optimization of dispersion conditions of carbon black in the broths from which carbon-containing (UO{sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O + C) gel spheres are prepared by internal gelation. The broth results from mixing a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and urea solution with an acid-deficient uranyl nitrate (ADUN) solution. Carbon black, which is previously added to one or other of the components, must stay dispersed during gelation. The report provides a detailed description of characterization efforts and results, aimed at identification and testing carbon black and surfactant combinations that would produce stable dispersions, with carbon particle sizes below 1 {micro}m, in aqueous HMTA/urea and ADUN solutions. A battery of characterization methods was used to identify the properties affecting the water dispersability of carbon blacks, such as surface area, aggregate morphology, volatile content, and, most importantly, surface chemistry. The report introduces the basic principles for each physical or chemical method of carbon black characterization, lists the results obtained, and underlines cross-correlations between methods. Particular attention is given to a newly developed method for characterization of surface chemical groups on carbons in terms of their acid-base properties (pK{sub a} spectra) based on potentiometric titration. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic. In addition, background information on carbon black properties and the mechanism by which surfactants disperse carbon black in water is also provided. A list of main physical and chemical properties characterized, samples analyzed, and results obtained, as well as information on the desired trend or

  19. Challenges for Reducing Emissions of Black Carbon from the Transport Sector in Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-05-01

    The transport sector is a large contributor of harmful gaseous and particulate emissions in many urban areas. Black carbon is a component of short-lived particulate matter emitted predominantly by freight, public transport, and heavy- duty trucks. Controlling the emissions of black carbon from the transport sector is important for mitigating its impacts on climate, ecosystems, and human health. However, reducing the emissions of black carbon from mobile sources may be a challenging task in many developing urban areas due to economic, social, and technical constrains. Several emissions control technologies offer a proven approach for reducing emissions of black carbon from diesel-powered mobile sources, but the accurate quantification of associated emissions benefits in developing urban areas is not well documented. We describe recent advances for the estimation of black carbon emissions from the transport sector in real world driving conditions and present examples of the potential benefits of implementing various emission control technologies in Mexico. The results can help in the identification of key factors that hinder the implementation of control emissions for reducing emissions of black carbon elsewhere.

  20. Measurement of Black Carbon and Co-pollutants Emitted from Diesel Vehicles in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.; Fortner, E.; Herndon, S.; Knighton, B.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Roscioli, J. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Paramo, V. H.; Zirath, S.; Mejia, J.; Jazcilevich, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Freight, public transport, and heavy-duty trucks can contribute to harmful emissions of black carbon and other co-pollutants in many urban areas. Controlling the emissions of black carbon from the transport sector is important for the potential of mitigating its impacts on climate, ecosystems, and human health. However, reducing the emissions of black carbon from mobile sources is be a challenging task in many developing urban areas due to economic, social, and technical constrains, as well as the uncertainties surrounding the accurate quantification of the associated benefits. Several emissions control technologies offer a proven approach for reducing emissions of black carbon from diesel-powered mobile sources, but the accurate quantification of associated emissions benefits in developing urban areas is not well documented. We present the results of the measurement of black carbon and co-emitted pollutants of dozens of diesel powered vehicles, including freight trucks, public transport buses, and intra-city metrobuses sampled during a 4-day experiment in Mexico City in February of 2013 as part of the SLCFs-Mexico project. Measurements were obtained with the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory, remote sensing, and portable emissions measurements, and encompassed the sampling of several vehicle models and technologies in experimental and real-world driving conditions. The results can help in the identification of key factors that hinder the implementation of control emissions for reducing emissions of black carbon elsewhere and the potential benefits of implementing various emission control technologies.

  1. Latitudinal distribution of black carbon soot in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Kato, Katharine

    1995-01-01

    Black carbon soot from the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere has been systematically collected at latitudes from 90 deg N to 45 deg S. The measured latitudinal distribution of this soot at 10 to 11 km altitude is found to covary with commercial air traffic fuel use, suggesting that aircraft fuel combustion at altitude is the principal source. In addition, at latitudes where the commercial air traffic is high, measured black carbon soot values are high even at 20 km altitude, suggesting that aircraft-generated soot injected just above the tropopause may be transported to higher altitudes. During the volcanically influenced period in which these samples were collected, the number abundances, total mass, and calculated total surface area of black carbon soot are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than similar measures of sulfuric acid aerosol. During volcanically quiescent periods, the calculated total surface area of black carbon soot aerosol is of the same order of magnitude as that of the background sulfuric acid aerosol. It appears from this comparison that black carbon soot is only capable of influencing lower stratosphere or upper troposphere chemistry during periods when the aerosol budget is not dominated by volcanic activity. It remains to determine the extent to which black carbon soot particles act as nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosol formation. However, mass balance calculations suggest that aircraft soot injected at altitude does not represent a significant source of condensation nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosols.

  2. Advantage of SBR/carbon black masterbatch for tire tread application

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, K.; Ishiguro, M.; Akimoto, H.; Ishida, M.

    1992-04-01

    The performance required of tire tread is becoming more severe and more various year by year, as social demands on tires have been changing. To improve wear resistance, driving safety and good drive feeling, new HP tires (high performance passenger car tires) are developed intensively. In addition, good fuel efficiency is required to satisfy the CAFE rule, which was proposed for a better global environment. To support this movement of the tire industry, material suppliers are making an effort to supply better materials. Mitsubishi Kasei has been improving the quality and production process of WMB, a SBR/carbon black master-batch produced by co-coagulation of SBR latex, carbon black and extender oil under the wet dispersion process. Compared to the tire tread made from dry-mixing compounds, that made from the WMB shows the following characteristics: (1) the abrasion resistance and the durability are higher; (2) from the viscoelastic properties, skid performance and driving stability are expected to be improved. These characteristics are remarkable when WMB is compounded in the recipes for HP and racing tires using fine carbon black. In this article, these features of WMB are studied from the view point of carbon black dispersion and polymer-carbon black interaction. Furthermore, the changes of carbon black structure during abrasion and fatigue process are analyzed and the mechanisms of these processes are discussed.

  3. Are emissions of black carbon from gasoline vehicles overestimated? Real-time, in situ measurement of black carbon emission factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xing, Zhenyu; Zhao, Shuhui; Zheng, Mei; Mu, Chao; Du, Ke

    2016-03-15

    Accurately quantifying black carbon (BC) emission factors (EFs) is a prerequisite for estimation of BC emission inventory. BC EFs determined by measuring BC at the roadside or chasing a vehicle on-road may introduce large uncertainty for low emission vehicles. In this study, BC concentrations were measured inside the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles with different engine sizes under different driving modes to determine the respective EFs. BC EFs ranged from 0.005-7.14 mg/kg-fuel under the speeds of 20-70 km/h, 0.05-28.95 mg/kg-fuel under the accelerations of 0.5-1.5m/s(2). Although the water vapor in the sampling stream could result in an average of 12% negative bias, the BC EFs are significantly lower than the published results obtained with roadside or chasing vehicle measurement. It is suggested to conduct measurement at the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles instead of in the atmosphere behind the vehicles to reduce the uncertainty from fluctuation in ambient BC concentration. PMID:26799329

  4. Are emissions of black carbon from gasoline vehicles overestimated? Real-time, in situ measurement of black carbon emission factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xing, Zhenyu; Zhao, Shuhui; Zheng, Mei; Mu, Chao; Du, Ke

    2016-03-15

    Accurately quantifying black carbon (BC) emission factors (EFs) is a prerequisite for estimation of BC emission inventory. BC EFs determined by measuring BC at the roadside or chasing a vehicle on-road may introduce large uncertainty for low emission vehicles. In this study, BC concentrations were measured inside the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles with different engine sizes under different driving modes to determine the respective EFs. BC EFs ranged from 0.005-7.14 mg/kg-fuel under the speeds of 20-70 km/h, 0.05-28.95 mg/kg-fuel under the accelerations of 0.5-1.5m/s(2). Although the water vapor in the sampling stream could result in an average of 12% negative bias, the BC EFs are significantly lower than the published results obtained with roadside or chasing vehicle measurement. It is suggested to conduct measurement at the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles instead of in the atmosphere behind the vehicles to reduce the uncertainty from fluctuation in ambient BC concentration.

  5. Probing Black Carbon-containing Particle Microphysics with the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lewis, E. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Lambe, A. T.; Davidovits, P.; Kleinman, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of the structure and mixing state of black-carbon containing particles is important for calculating their radiative forcing and provides insight into their source and life cycle. Recently analysis of black carbon-containing particles has demonstrated that for a fraction of such particles, the black carbon may reside on or near the surface of the particle as opposed to the traditional core-shell configuration typically assumed in which the black carbon core is surrounded by a shell of non-refractory material. During the DOE-sponsored Aerosol Lifecycle field campaign held in summer, 2011 at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY, episodes were encountered in which a high fraction of particles containing black carbon had such configurations, and these episodes corresponded to air masses that contained biomass burning plumes (Sedlacek et al., 2012). Subsequent analysis found other episodes in field campaigns in Colorado and California in which high fractions this configuration corresponded to biomass burning plumes. In an effort to evaluate this interpretation and explore formation mechanisms, a series of laboratory-based experiments examining the coagulation of regal black (surrogate for collapsed soot) with model non-refractory coatings [dioctyl sebacate (surrogate for organic aerosols with liquid-like character) and deliquesced ammonium sulfate (solid)] were carried out. The results of these experiments and their potential implications on black carbon radiative forcing will be discussed. Sedlacek, III, Arthur, E. R. Lewis, L. I. Kleinman, J. Xu and Q. Zhang (2012), Determination of and Evidence for Non-core-shell structure of particles containing black carbon using the single particle soot photometer (SP2). Geophys. Res. Lett., 39 L06802, doi:10.1029/2012GL050905

  6. Impacts of black carbon and co-pollutant emissions from transportation sector in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, Miguel; Almanza, Victor; Garcia, Agustin; Jazcilevich, Aron; Lei, Wenfang; Molina, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon is one of the most important short-lived climate-forcing agents, which is harmful to human health and also contributes significantly to climate change. Transportation is one of the largest sources of black carbon emissions in many megacities and urban complexes, with diesel vehicles leading the way. Both on-road and off-road vehicles can emit substantial amounts of harmful BC-containing particulate matter (PM) and are also responsible for large emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and many other co-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Regionally, black carbon emissions contributions from mobile sources may vary widely depending on the technical characteristics of the vehicle fleet, the quality and chemical properties of the fuels consumed, and the degree of local development and economic activities that foster wider and more frequent or intensive use of vehicles. This presentation will review and assess the emissions of black carbon from the on-road and off-road transportation sector in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. Viable mitigation strategies, including innovative technological alternatives to reduce black carbon and co-pollutants in diesel vehicles and their impacts on climate, human health and ecosystems will be described.

  7. 20 years of Black Carbon measurements in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Rebecca; Quedenau, Jörn; Kuik, Friderike; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Schmale, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is an important short-lived climate-forcing pollutant contributing to global warming through absorption of sunlight. At the same time, BC, as a component of particulate matter (PM) exerts adverse health effects, like decreased lung function and exacerbated asthma. Globally, anthropogenic emission sources of BC include residential heating, transport, and agricultural fires, while the dominant natural emission sources are wildfires. Despite the various adverse effects of BC, legislation that requires mandatory monitoring of BC concentrations does not currently exist in the European Union. Instead, BC is only indirectly monitored as component of PM10 and PM2.5 (particulate matter with a diameter smaller 10 μm and 2.5 μm). Before the introduction of mandatory PM10 and PM2.5 monitoring in the European Union in 2005 and 2015, respectively, 'black smoke', a surrogate for BC, was a required measurement in Germany from the early 1990s. The annual mean limit value was 14 μg m-3 from 1995 and 8 μg m-3 from 1998 onwards. Many 'black smoke' measurements were stopped in 2004, with the repeal of the regulations obtaining at the time. However, in most German federal states a limited number BC monitoring stations continued to operate. Here we present a synthesis of BC data from 213 stations across Germany covering the period between 1994 and 2014. Due to the lack of a standardized method and respective legislation, the data set is very heterogeneous relying on twelve different measurement methods including chemical, optical, and thermal-optical methods. Stations include locations classified as background, urban-background, industrial and traffic among other types. Raw data in many different formats has been modelled and integrated in a relational database, allowing various options for further data analysis. We highlight results from the year 2009, as it is the year with the largest measurement coverage based on the same measurement method, with 30 stations. In

  8. Cellphones as a Distributed Platform for Black Carbon Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Ramana, M.; Lukac, M. L.; Siva, P.; Ahmed, T.; Kar, A.; Rehman, I.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), the visible component of soot that gives emissions such as diesel engine exhaust their dark color, has come to be recognized as a major contributor to global warming, and a frontline concern for climate change strategies (Ramanathan 2001, Jacobson 2010). We have developed a new low-cost instrument for gathering and measuring atmospheric BC concentrations that leverages cellphones to transmit data from an air filtration unit to a centralized database for analysis. Our new system relies on image processing techniques, as opposed to other more expensive optical methods, to interpret images of filters captured with a cellphone camera. As a result, the entire system costs less than $500 (and is orders of magnitude cheaper than an Aethalometer, the prevailing method for measuring atmospheric BC). We are working with three community groups in Los Angeles, and will recruit three groups in the San Francisco Bay Area, to enable 40 citizens to be actively engaged in monitoring BC across California. We are working with The Energy Resources Institute, an international NGO based in India, to deploy this instrument with 60 people in conjunction with Project Surya, which aims to deploy clean cookstoves and rigorously evaluate their impact on BC emissions. Field tests of this new instrument performed in California report an average error of 0.28 µg/m3 when compared with an Aethelometer. These excellent results hold the promise of making large-scale data collection of BC feasible and relatively easy to reproduce (Ramanathan et al., forthcoming). The use of cellphones for data collection permits monitoring of BC to occur on a greater, more comprehensive scale not previously possible, and serves as a means of instituting more precise, variation-sensitive evaluations of emissions. By storing the data in a publicly available repository, our system will provide real-time access to mass-scale BC measurements to researchers and the public. Through our pilot

  9. A technique for determination of black carbon in cellulose filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianjun; Khan, A. J.; Husain, Liaquat

    A technique has been developed to determine black carbon (BC) concentrations in aerosols collected on Whatman 41 (cellulose) filters using high-volume samplers. The cellulose substrate was dissolved in a 70% (w/v) solution of ZnCl 2, and hydrosols were transferred to quartz filters, which were analyzed for BC using the thermal-optical method. The technique was applied to Whatman 41 and quartz filter blanks, filters with standards, and monthly composites made from daily samples collected during August 1993 and 1995 at Mayville and Whiteface Mountain, NY. The results show BC recoveries of 92.7±4.3% from cellulose filters. The blanks for the Whatman 41 filters were <1% of the BC observed on the filters. The BC concentrations at Mayville were determined to be 0.94±0.07 and 0.62±0.04 μg/m 3 for August 1993 and 1995, respectively; the concentrations at Whiteface Mountain, NY for the same years were 0.39±0.03 and 0.40±0.02 μg/m 3. Hence, the method developed here can be used to determine BC in Whatman 41 filters with an accuracy of about ±7%. The technique developed here will be used to determine BC concentration in filters collected daily from July 1978 to the present at Whiteface Mountain, and from July 1983 onwards at Mayville, NY. The data will be used to study long-term trends, seasonal variations, atmospheric transport, and source attributions for BC. The combined data for BC and (SO 42-), may reveal the variations in fine particle mass over time.

  10. Climate Response of Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic Black Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld,John H.

    2008-01-01

    The equilibrium climate effect of direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) is examined by 100-year simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model II-prime coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model. Anthropogenic BC is predicted to raise globally and annually averaged equilibrium surface air temperature by 0.20 K if BC is assumed to be externally mixed. The predicted increase is significantly greater in the Northern Hemisphere (0.29 K) than in the Southern Hemisphere (0.11 K). If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with the present day level of sulfate aerosol, the predicted annual mean surface temperature increase rises to 0.37 K globally, 0.54 K for the Northern Hemisphere, and 0.20 K for the Southern Hemisphere. The climate sensitivity of BC direct radiative forcing is calculated to be 0.6 K W (sup -1) square meters, which is about 70% of that of CO2, independent of the assumption of BC mixing state. The largest surface temperature response occurs over the northern high latitudes during winter and early spring. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the largest temperature increase is predicted to occur in the upper troposphere. Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic BC is also predicted to lead to a change of precipitation patterns in the tropics; precipitation is predicted to increase between 0 and 20 N and decrease between 0 and 20 S, shifting the intertropical convergence zone northward. If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with sulfate instead of externally mixed, the change in precipitation pattern is enhanced. The change in precipitation pattern is not predicted to alter the global burden of BC significantly because the change occurs predominantly in regions removed from BC sources.

  11. The Mixing State of Black Carbon in Asian Outflow (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.; Oshima, N.; Sahu, L. K.

    2009-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol efficiently absorbs visible sunlight and heats the atmosphere. The magnitude of the photo-absorption of BC depends on its particle size distribution and mixing state (coating thickness or shell/core diameter ratio). In addition, the efficiency of wet removal of BC is sensitive to mixing state. Therefore, it is critically important to understand the evolution of the mixing state of BC, especially in Asia, where BC emissions are largest. The size distribution and mixing state of BC were measured by an SP2 instrument over the East China Sea and Yellow Sea in March-April 2009 during the A-FORCE (Aerosol-Radiative Forcing in East Asia) aircraft campaign. Aircraft sampling was made in air masses strongly influenced by emissions from China, Korea, and Japan in the latitude region between 27 and 37N. In the boundary layer, the mass median diameter of BC was stable at about 200 nm in air masses with ages exceeding 1 day. BC in these air masses was thickly coated even over the Yellow Sea at distances of only a few hundred km from the coastlines of China and Korea. Thinly coated (shell/core diameter ratio < 1.2) BC was observed only in the vicinity of urban areas of Korea and Japan. The dominance of thickly coated BC in the moderately aged outflow is consistent with our previous ground-based and aircraft measurements showing that BC coating proceeds within 24 hours in the outflow of urban air. The variability of the observed BC mixing state is interpreted in terms of available volatile aerosol compounds.

  12. Measurements of Black Carbon Induced Snow-Albedo Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, O. L.; Kirchstetter, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Several modeling studies have indicated that black carbon (BC) reduces the albedo of snow and ice and appreciably contributes to Northern Hemisphere warming and glacier retreat. Observations of the BC impact on snow albedo are needed to verify model predictions. Whereas field studies dating back to the early 1980s measured BC concentrations in snow and ice in the arctic, the BC effect on snow albedo and melting has been difficult to observe directly because the albedo reduction is small and often masked by other natural variables. This study evaluates both the initial impact of BC on snow albedo, as well as associated feedbacks due to snow age and BC scavenging during snow melting. The first feedback is related to the increasing grain size of snow as it ages. Larger snow grains allow sunlight to penetrate farther, where it is exposed to and may be increasingly absorbed by BC. This enhances the albedo reduction attributable to the mass of BC present in the snow and deposits energy at greater depths in the snowpack, potentially increasing the melt rate and therefore the growth rate of the snow grains. The second potential feedback, associated with BC transport through a melting snowpack, occurs if BC is scavenged from the melt water by the ice grains thus increasing the BC concentration in the remaining snow. Measurement of pristine and sooty snow made in the laboratory verifies that BC reduces snow albedo to a greater extent for larger-grained snow. Experimental observations yield an empirical model of the BC snow albedo reduction. Measurements of BC transport in both laboratory and natural snow were used to develop a model of the evolution of the vertical distribution of BC in melting snow. These measurements provide the first quantification of a BC concentration enhancement in melting snow.

  13. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Salil; Evans, Katherine J.; Hack, James J.; Truesdale, John

    2013-04-19

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $W^{-1}m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $ PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  14. Speciation of the ionizable antibiotic sulfamethazine on black carbon (biochar).

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Marc; Pignatello, Joseph J; Beltrán, José L; Granados, Mercè; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-12-01

    Adsorption of ionizable compounds by black carbon is poorly characterized. Adsorption of the veterinary antibiotic sulfamethazine (SMT; a.k.a., sulfadimidine; pK(a1) = 2.28, pK(a2) = 7.42) on a charcoal was determined as a function of concentration, pH, inorganic ions, and organic ions and molecules. SMT displayed unconventional adsorption behavior. Despite its hydrophilic nature (log K(ow) = 0.27), the distribution ratio K(d) at pH 5, where SMT(0) prevails, was as high as 10(6) L kg(-1), up to 10(4) times greater than literature reported K(oc). The K(d) decreases at high and low pH but not commensurate with the decline in K(ow) of the ionized forms. At pH 1, where SMT(+) is predominant and the surface is positive, a major driving force is π-π electron donor-acceptor interaction of the protonated aniline ring with the π-electron rich graphene surface, referred to as π(+)-π EDA, rather than ordinary electrostatic cation exchange. In the alkaline region, where SMT(-) prevails and the surface is negative, adsorption is accompanied by near-stoichiometric proton exchange with water, leading to the release of OH(-) and formation of an exceptionally strong H-bond between SMT(0) and a surface carboxylate or phenolate, classified as a negative charge-assisted H-bond, (-)CAHB. At pH 5, SMT(0) adsorption is accompanied by partial proton release and is competitive with trimethylphenylammonium ion, signifying contributions from SMT(+) and/or the zwitterion, SMT(±), which take advantage of π(+)-π EDA interaction and Coulombic attraction to deprotonated surface groups. In essence, both pK(a1) and pK(a2) increase, and SMT(±) is stabilized, in the adsorbed relative to the dissolved state. PMID:22026725

  15. New Routes to Functionalize Carbon Black for Polypropylene Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Céline; Hadzifejzovic, Emina; Shkal, Fatma; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Moghal, Jonathan; Parker, Emily M; Sawangphruk, Montree; Slocombe, Daniel R; Foord, John S; Moloney, Mark G

    2016-08-01

    Methods for chemical surface functionalization for carbon black (CB) nanoparticles were studied to produce (CB)/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites with superior electrical and thermal properties. Nanoparticle dispersion is known to directly control the extent to which nanocomposites maximize the unique attributes of their nanoscale fillers. As a result, tailored nanoparticle surface chemistry is a widely utilized method to enhance the interfacial interactions between nanoparticles and polymer matrices, assisting improved filler dispersion. In this work, a rapid chemical functionalization approach using a number of diarylcarbene derivatives, followed by the azo-coupling of substituted diazonium salts, for the covalent introduction of selected functional groups to the CB surface, is reported. Characterization of the modified CB by XPS, TGA, CHN, and ATR-IR collectively confirmed surface functionalization, estimating surface grafting densities of the order of 10(13) and 10(14) molecules/cm(2). Nanocomposites, synthesized by solvent mixing PP with pristine and modified CB, demonstrated macroscopic property changes as a result of the nanoparticle surface functionalization. Pronounced improvements were observed for PP nanocomposites prepared with a dodecyl-terminated diaryl functionalized CB, in which TEM analysis established improved nanofiller dispersion owing to the enhanced CB-PP interfacial interactions in the nanocomposite. Observed dielectric relaxation responses at 20 wt % loading and a reduced percolation threshold realized conductivities of 1.19 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 10 wt %, compared to 2.62 × 10(-15) S cm(-1) for pristine CB/PP nanocomposites at the same filler loading. In addition, thermal properties signify an increase in the number of nucleation sites by the raised degree of crystallinity as well as increased melting and crystallization temperatures. PMID:27417277

  16. Black Carbon Increases Cation Exchange Capcity in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Liang,B.; Lehmann, J.; Solomon, D.; Kinyangi, J.; Grossman, J.; ONeill, B.; Skjemstad, J.; Thies, J.; Luizao, F.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Black Carbon (BC) may significantly affect nutrient retention and play a key role in a wide range of biogeochemical processes in soils, especially for nutrient cycling. Anthrosols from the Brazilian Amazon (ages between 600 and 8700 yr BP) with high contents of biomass-derived BC had greater potential cation exchange capacity (CEC measured at pH 7) per unit organic C than adjacent soils with low BC contents. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) techniques explained the source of the higher surface charge of BC compared with non-BC by mapping cross-sectional areas of BC particles with diameters of 10 to 50 {micro}m for C forms. The largest cross-sectional areas consisted of highly aromatic or only slightly oxidized organic C most likely originating from the BC itself with a characteristic peak at 286.1 eV, which could not be found in humic substance extracts, bacteria or fungi. Oxidation significantly increased from the core of BC particles to their surfaces as shown by the ratio of carboxyl-C/aromatic-C. Spotted and non-continuous distribution patterns of highly oxidized C functional groups with distinctly different chemical signatures on BC particle surfaces (peak shift at 286.1 eV to a higher energy of 286.7 eV) indicated that non-BC may be adsorbed on the surfaces of BC particles creating highly oxidized surface. As a consequence of both oxidation of the BC particles themselves and adsorption of organic matter to BC surfaces, the charge density (potential CEC per unit surface area) was greater in BC-rich Anthrosols than adjacent soils. Additionally, a high specific surface area was attributable to the presence of BC, which may contribute to the high CEC found in soils that are rich in BC.

  17. Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Biqing; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Solomon, Dawit; Sohi, Saran; Thies, Janice E.; Skjemstad, Jan O.; Luizao, Flavio J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Neves, Eduaro G.; Wirick, Sue

    2008-12-15

    Black carbon (BC) may play an important role in the global C budget, due to its potential to act as a significant removal (sink) of atmospheric CO2. In order to fully evaluate the influence of BC on the global C cycle, a sound understanding of the stability of BC is required. The biochemical stability of BC was assessed in a chronosequence of high-BC containing Anthrosols from the central Amazon, Brazil, using a range of spectroscopic and biological methods. Results revealed that the Anthrosols had 61-80% lower (P<0.05) CO2 evolution over 532 days compared to that in the corresponding adjacent soils with low BC contents. No significant (P>0.05) differences of CO2 respiration were observed between Anthrosols with contrasting ages of BC and soil textures. Molecular forms of core regions of micrometer-sized BC particles quantified by synchrotron-based near-edge x-ray fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled to scanning x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) remained similar regardless of their ages (600 to 8,700 years) and closely resembled the spectral characteristics of fresh BC. Deconvolution of NEXAFS spectra revealed greater oxidation on the surfaces of BC particles with little penetration into the core of the particles. The similar C mineralization between different BC-rich soils regardless of soil texture underpins the importance of chemical recalcitrance for the stability of BC, in contrast to adjacent soils which showed the highest mineralization in the sandiest soil. However, C distribution between free, intra-aggregate and organo-mineral pools was significantly different between soils with high and low BC contents, suggesting some degree of physical stabilization, and BC-rich Anthrosols had higher proportions (72-90%) of C in the organo-mineral fraction than BC-poor adjacent soils (2-70%).

  18. Evaluation of Airborne Particle Emissions from Commercial Products Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guannan; Park, Jae Hong; Cena, Lorenzo G.; Shelton, Betsy L.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    The emission of the airborne particles from epoxy resin test sticks with different CNT loadings and two commercial products were characterized while sanding with three grit sizes and three disc sander speeds. The total number concentrations, respirable mass concentrations, and particle size number/mass distributions of the emitted particles were measured using a condensation particle counter, an optical particle counter, and a scanning mobility particle sizer. The emitted particles were sampled on a polycarbonate filter and analyzed using electron microscopy. The highest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 4670 particles/cm3) were produced with coarse sandpaper, 2% (by weight) CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed, whereas the lowest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 92 particles/cm3) were produced with medium sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and slow disc sander speed. Respirable mass concentrations were highest (arithmetic mean = 1.01 mg/m3) for fine sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed and lowest (arithmetic mean = 0.20 mg/m3) for medium sandpaper, 0% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed. For CNT-epoxy samples, airborne particles were primarily micrometer-sized epoxy cores with CNT protrusions. No free CNTs were observed in airborne samples, except for tests conducted with 4% CNT epoxy. The number concentration, mass concentration, and size distribution of airborne particles generated when products containing CNTs are sanded depends on the conditions of sanding and the characteristics of the material being sanded. PMID:23204914

  19. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massling, A.; Nielsen, I. E.; Kristensen, D.; Christensen, J. H.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.; Skov, H.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of equivalent black carbon (EBC) in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS) at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in EBC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. Average measured concentrations were about 0.067 ± 0.071 for the winter and 0.011 ± 0.009 for the summer period. These data were obtained using a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP). A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. Here, measured average concentrations were about 0.485 ± 0.397 for the winter and 0.112 ± 0.072 for the summer period. A correlation between EBC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013 stating a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.72. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. BC and sulfate are known to have only partly similar sources with respect to their transport pathways when reaching the high Arctic. Aging processes may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon) based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to EBC measurements. EBC measurements were generally higher, but a correlation between EC and EBC resulted in a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.64. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and

  20. On the black carbon problem and its solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) warms air temperatures in at least seven major ways: (a) directly absorbing downward solar radiation, (b) absorbing upward reflected solar radiation when it is situated above bright surfaces, such as snow, sea ice, and clouds, (c) absorbing some infrared radiation, (d) absorbing additional solar and infrared radiation upon obtaining a coating, (e) absorbing radiation multiply reflected within clouds when situated interstitially between cloud drops, (f) absorbing additional radiation when serving as CCN or scavenged inclusions within cloud drops, and (g) absorbing solar radiation when deposited on snow and sea ice, reducing the albedos of both. Modeling of the climate effects of BC requires treatment of all these processes in detail. In particular, treatment of BC absorption interstitially between cloud drops and from multiply-dispersed cloud drop BC inclusions must be treated simultaneously with treatment of cloud indirect effects to determine the net effects of BC on cloud properties. Here, results from several simulations of the effects of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel sources on global and regional climate and air pollution health are summarized. The simulations account for all the processes mentioned. Results are found to be statistically significant relative to chaotic variability in the climate system. Over time and in steady state, fossil-fuel soot plus biofuel soot are found to enhance warming more than methane. The sum of the soots causes less steady-state warming but more short term warming than does carbon dioxide. Thus eliminating soot emissions from both sources may be the fastest method of reducing rapid climate warming and possibly the only method of saving the Arctic ice. Eliminating such emissions may also reduce over 1.5 million deaths worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Short term mitigation options include the targeting of fossil-fuel and biofuel BC sources with particle traps, new stove technologies, and rural

  1. Long-term Black Carbon Dynamics in Cultivated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Binh T; Lehmann, Johannes C; Kinyangi, James; Smernik, Ron; Riha, Susan J; Engelhard, Mark H

    2008-07-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a quantitatively important C pool in the global carbon cycle due to its relative recalcitrance against decay compared with other C pools. However, how rapidly BC is oxidized and in what way the molecular structure changes during decomposition over decadal time scales, is largely unknown. In the present study, the long-term dynamics in quality and quantity of BC were investigated in cultivated soil using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. BC particles, obtained from soil samples at 8 conversion ages stretching over 100 years and from a forest soil sample from Kenya, were manually picked under a light microscope for characterization and quantification. BC contents rapidly decreased from 12.7 to 3.8 mg C g⁻¹ soil during the first 30 years since conversion, after which they slowly decreased to a steady state at 3.51 mg C g ⁻¹soil. BC-derived C losses over 100 years were estimated at 6000 kg C ha⁻¹ to a depth of 0.1 m. The initial rapid changes in BC stocks resulted in a mean residence time of only around 8.3 years, which was likely a function of both decomposition as well as transport processes. The molecular properties of BC changed more rapidly on surfaces than in the interior of BC particles and more rapidly during the first 30 years than during the following 70 years. The Oc/C ratios (Oc is O bound to C) and carbonyl groups (C=O) increased over time by 133 and 192 %, respectively, indicating oxidation was an important degradation process controlling BC quality. Al, Si, polysaccharides, and to a lesser extent Fe were rapidly adsorbed on BC particle surfaces within the first few years after BC deposition to soil. The protection by physical and chemical stabilization was apparently sufficient to not only minimize decomposition below detection between 30 and 100 years after deposition, but also physical export by erosion and vertical transport below 0

  2. Black Carbon and Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Concentrations in New York City’s Subway Stations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The New York City (NYC) subway is the main mode of transport for over 5 million passengers on an average weekday. Therefore, airborne pollutants in the subway stations could have a significant impact on commuters and subway workers. This study looked at black carbon (BC) and particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in selected subway stations in Manhattan. BC and PM2.5 levels were measured in real time using a Micro-Aethalometer and a PDR-1500 DataRAM, respectively. Simultaneous samples were also collected on quartz filters for organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) analysis and on Teflon filters for gravimetric and trace element analysis. In the underground subway stations, mean real time BC concentrations ranged from 5 to 23 μg/m3, with 1 min average peaks >100 μg/m3, while real time PM2.5 levels ranged from 35 to 200 μg/m3. Mean EC levels ranged from 9 to 12.5 μg/m3. At street level on the same days, the mean BC and PM2.5 concentrations were below 3 and 10 μg/m3, respectively. This study shows that both BC soot and PM levels in NYC’s subways are considerably higher than ambient urban street levels and that further monitoring and investigation of BC and PM subway exposures are warranted. PMID:25409007

  3. Increased fire frequency optimization of black carbon mixing and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Lacey; Masiello, Caroline; Clark, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon makes up a substantial part of the global carbon budget and black carbon (BC - produced from incomplete combustion of biomass) can be significant fraction of soil carbon. Soil BC cycling is still poorly understood - very old BC is observed in soils, suggesting recalcitrance, yet in short term lab and field studies BC sometimes breaks down rapidly. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency of fires, which will increase global production of BC. As up to 80% of BC produced in wildfires can remain at the fire location, increased fire frequency will cause significant perturbations to soil BC accumulation. This creates a challenge in estimating soil BC storage, in light of a changing climate and an increased likelihood of fire. While the chemical properties of BC are relatively well-studied, its physical properties are much less well understood, and may play crucial roles in its landscape residence time. One important property is density. When BC density is less than 1 g/cm3 (i.e. the density of water), it is highly mobile and can easily leave the landscape. This landscape mobility following rainfall may inflate estimates of its degradability, making it crucial to understand both the short- and long term density of BC particles. As BC pores fill with minerals, making particles denser, or become ingrown with root and hyphal anchors, BC is likely to become protected from erosion. Consequently, how quickly BC is mixed deeper into the soil column is likely a primary controller on BC accumulation. Additionally the post-fire recovery of soil litter layers caps BC belowground, protecting it from erosional forces and re-combustion in subsequent fires, but still allowing bioturbation deeper into the soil column. We have taken advantage of a fire chronosequence in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey to investigate how density of BC particles change over time, and how an increase in fire frequency affects soil BC storage and soil column movement. Our plots have

  4. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    PubMed

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions. PMID:22663136

  5. Dynamac molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (Biochar)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration (“biochar”). Here we present a molecular-level assessment o...

  6. Is Carbon Black a Suitable Model Colloidal Substrate for Diesel Soot?

    PubMed

    Growney, David J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Middlemiss, Laurence; Fielding, Lee A; Derry, Matthew J; Aragrag, Najib; Lamb, Gordon D; Armes, Steven P

    2015-09-29

    Soot formation in diesel engines is known to cause premature engine wear. Unfortunately, genuine diesel soot is expensive to generate, so carbon blacks are often used as diesel soot mimics. Herein, the suitability of a commercial carbon black (Regal 250R) as a surrogate for diesel soot dispersed in engine base oil is examined in the presence of two commonly used polymeric lubricant additives. The particle size, morphology, and surface composition of both substrates are assessed using BET surface area analysis, TEM, and XPS. The extent of adsorption of a poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (dOCP) statistical copolymer or a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymer onto carbon black or diesel soot from n-dodecane is compared indirectly using a supernatant depletion assay technique via UV spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis is also used to directly determine the extent of copolymer adsorption. Degrees of dispersion are examined using optical microscopy, TEM, and analytical centrifugation. SAXS studies reveal some structural differences between carbon black and diesel soot particles. The mean radius of gyration determined for the latter is significantly smaller than that calculated for the former, and in the absence of any copolymer, diesel soot suspended in n-dodecane forms relatively loose mass fractals compared to carbon black. SAXS provides evidence for copolymer adsorption and indicates that addition of either copolymer transforms the initially compact agglomerates into relatively loose aggregates. Addition of dOCP or PS-PEP does not significantly affect the structure of the carbon black primary particles, with similar results being observed for diesel soot. In favorable cases, remarkably similar data can be obtained for carbon black and diesel soot when using dOCP and PS-PEP as copolymer dispersants. However, it is not difficult to identify simple copolymer-particle-solvent combinations for which substantial differences can be observed

  7. Is Carbon Black a Suitable Model Colloidal Substrate for Diesel Soot?

    PubMed

    Growney, David J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Middlemiss, Laurence; Fielding, Lee A; Derry, Matthew J; Aragrag, Najib; Lamb, Gordon D; Armes, Steven P

    2015-09-29

    Soot formation in diesel engines is known to cause premature engine wear. Unfortunately, genuine diesel soot is expensive to generate, so carbon blacks are often used as diesel soot mimics. Herein, the suitability of a commercial carbon black (Regal 250R) as a surrogate for diesel soot dispersed in engine base oil is examined in the presence of two commonly used polymeric lubricant additives. The particle size, morphology, and surface composition of both substrates are assessed using BET surface area analysis, TEM, and XPS. The extent of adsorption of a poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (dOCP) statistical copolymer or a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymer onto carbon black or diesel soot from n-dodecane is compared indirectly using a supernatant depletion assay technique via UV spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis is also used to directly determine the extent of copolymer adsorption. Degrees of dispersion are examined using optical microscopy, TEM, and analytical centrifugation. SAXS studies reveal some structural differences between carbon black and diesel soot particles. The mean radius of gyration determined for the latter is significantly smaller than that calculated for the former, and in the absence of any copolymer, diesel soot suspended in n-dodecane forms relatively loose mass fractals compared to carbon black. SAXS provides evidence for copolymer adsorption and indicates that addition of either copolymer transforms the initially compact agglomerates into relatively loose aggregates. Addition of dOCP or PS-PEP does not significantly affect the structure of the carbon black primary particles, with similar results being observed for diesel soot. In favorable cases, remarkably similar data can be obtained for carbon black and diesel soot when using dOCP and PS-PEP as copolymer dispersants. However, it is not difficult to identify simple copolymer-particle-solvent combinations for which substantial differences can be observed

  8. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vaporization with an Aerodyne high-resolution soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vaporizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial fullerene-enriched soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x < 6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For fullerene soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x ≫ 6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply charged ions (n > 1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C1 5 were present. When such signals were present, C1+ / C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+ / C3+ was < 0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake and heterogeneous chemistry. If atmospherically stable, these oxidized species may be useful for distinguishing

  9. Recent Increase in Black Carbon Concentrations from a Mt. Everest Ice Core Spanning 1860-2000 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Schwikowski, M.; Gysel, M.; Mayewski, P. A.; Kang, S.; Hou, S.

    2009-12-01

    Black carbon produced by the incomplete combustion of biomass, coal and diesel fuels can significantly contribute to climate change by altering the Earth’s radiative balance. Black carbon in the atmosphere absorbs light and causes atmospheric heating, whereas black carbon deposited on snow and ice can significantly reduce the surface albedo, resulting in rapid melting of snow and ice. Historical records of black carbon concentration and distribution in the atmosphere are needed to determine the role of black carbon in climate change, however most studies have relied on estimated inventories based on wood and/or fossil fuel consumption data. Reconstructing black carbon concentrations in Asia is particularly important because this region has some of the largest black carbon sources globally, which negatively impact climate, water resources, agriculture and human health. We analyzed a Mt. Everest ice core for black carbon using a single particle soot photometer (SP2). The high-resolution black carbon data demonstrates strong seasonality, with peak concentrations during the winter-spring, and low concentrations during the summer monsoon season. Black carbon concentrations from 1975-2000 relative to 1860-1975 have increased approximately threefold, and the timing of this increase is consistent with black carbon emission inventory data from South Asia. It is notable that there is no increasing trend in iron (used as a proxy for dust) since 1860. This is significant because it suggests that if the recent retreat of glaciers in the region is due, at least in part, to the effect of impurities on snow albedo, the reduced albedo is due to changes in black carbon emissions, not dust.

  10. Selection of Water-Dispersible Carbon Black for Fabrication of Uranium Oxicarbide Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Collins, Jack Lee; Burchell, Timothy D

    2008-01-01

    Fabrication of uranium oxicarbide (UCO) microspheres, a component of TRISO fuel particles for high temperature nuclear power systems, is based on the internal gelation process of uranium salts in presence of carbon black. In order to obtain a high quality product, carbon black should remain dispersed during all phases of the gelation process. In this study, the surface and structural properties of several commercial carbon black materials, and their use in combination with ionic and non-ionic dispersing agents was examined with the goal of finding optimal conditions for stabilizing submicron-sized carbon black dispersions. Traditional methods for stabilizing dispersions, based on the use of dispersing agents, failed to stabilize carbon dispersions against large pH variations, typical for the internal gelation process. An alternate dispersing method was proposed, based on using surface-modified carbons functionalized with strongly ionizing surface groups (sodium sulfonate). With a proper choice of surface modifiers, these advanced carbons disperse easily to particles in the range of 0.15 V0.20 m and the dispersions remain stable during the conditions of internal gelation.

  11. Airborne detection of diffuse carbon dioxide emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerlach, T.M.; Doukas, M.P.; McGee, K.A.; Kessler, R.

    1999-01-01

    We report the first airborne detection of CO2 degassing from diffuse volcanic sources. Airborne measurement of diffuse CO2 degassing offers a rapid alternative for monitoring CO2 emission rates at Mammoth Mountain. CO2 concentrations, temperatures, and barometric pressures were measured at ~2,500 GPS-referenced locations during a one-hour, eleven-orbit survey of air around Mammoth Mountain at ~3 km from the summit and altitudes of 2,895-3,657 m. A volcanic CO2 anomaly 4-5 km across with CO2 levels ~1 ppm above background was revealed downwind of tree-kill areas. It contained a 1-km core with concentrations exceeding background by >3 ppm. Emission rates of ~250 t d-1 are indicated. Orographic winds may play a key role in transporting the diffusely degassed CO2 upslope to elevations where it is lofted into the regional wind system.We report the first airborne detection of CO2 degassing from diffuse volcanic sources. Airborne measurement of diffuse CO2 degassing offers a rapid alternative for monitoring CO2 emission rates at Mammoth Mountain. CO2 concentrations, temperatures, and barometric pressures were measured at approximately 2,500 GPS-referenced locations during a one-hour, eleven-orbit survey of air around Mammoth Mountain at approximately 3 km from the summit and altitudes of 2,895-3,657 m. A volcanic CO2 anomaly 4-5 km across with CO2 levels approximately 1 ppm above background was revealed downwind of tree-kill areas. It contained a 1-km core with concentrations exceeding background by >3 ppm. Emission rates of approximately 250 t d-1 are indicated. Orographic winds may play a key role in transporting the diffusely degassed CO2 upslope to elevations where it is lofted into the regional wind system.

  12. Black carbon and the Himalayan cryosphere: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, Charles G.; Puppala, Siva Praveen; Panday, Arnico; Stumm, Dorothea; Shea, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The Himalayan cryosphere borders global hotspots for emissions of black carbon (BC), a carbonaceous aerosol with a short atmospheric lifespan and potentially significant impacts on glaciers and snow cover. BC in the atmosphere absorbs radiation efficiently, leading to localized positive climate forcing. BC may also be deposited onto snow and ice surfaces, thereby changing their albedo. This review presents up-to-date observational data of BC in the atmosphere and in snow and ice, as well as its effects on the cryosphere in the Hindu-Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region along the northern edge of South Asia. Significant spatial variation exists in the measured concentrations of BC in the atmosphere and cryosphere. A strong seasonal pattern exists, with highest concentrations in the pre-monsoon and lowest during the monsoon. Existing observations show bias towards certain areas, with a noticeable lack of measurements on the south side of the Himalaya. Significant uncertainty persists in the emissions estimates of BC in the HKH region, with a standard deviation of regional emissions from various emission inventories of 0.5150 × 10-9 kg m-2 s-1, or 47.1% of the mean (1.0931 × 10-9 kg m-2 s-1). This and other uncertainties, including poor model resolution, imprecision in deposition modeling, and incongruities among measurement types, propagate through simulations of BC concentration in atmosphere and cryosphere. Modeled atmospheric concentrations can differ from observations by as much as a factor of three with no systematic bias, and modeled concentrations in snow and ice can differ from observations by a factor of 60 in certain regions. In the Himalaya, estimates of albedo change due to BC range from about 2 to 10%, estimates of direct radiative forcing due to BC in the atmosphere from (-2)-7 W m-2, and surface forcing estimates from 0 to 28 W m-2, though every forcing estimate uses its own definition, with varying degrees of complexity and numbers of feedbacks. We find the

  13. Factors Controlling Black Carbon Deposition in Snow in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Li, Q.; He, C.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) concentration in snow in the Arctic to BC emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging efficiency using a 3D global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem driven by meteorological field GEOS-5. With all improvements, simulated median BC concentration in snow agrees with observation (19.2 ng g-1) within 10%, down from -40% in the default GEOS-Chem. When the previously missed gas flaring emissions (mainly located in Russia) are included, the total BC emission in the Arctic increases by 70%. The simulated BC in snow increases by 1-7 ng g-1, with the largest improvement in Russia. The discrepancy of median BC in snow in the whole Arctic reduces from -40% to -20%. In addition, recent measurements of BC dry deposition velocity suggest that the constant deposition velocity of 0.03 cm s-1 over snow and ice used in the GEOS-Chem is too low. So we apply resistance-in-series method to calculate the dry deposition velocity over snow and ice and the resulted dry deposition velocity ranges from 0.03 to 0.24 cm s-1. However, the simulated total BC deposition flux in the Arctic and BC in snow does not change, because the increased dry deposition flux has been compensated by decreased wet deposition flux. However, the fraction of dry deposition to total deposition increases from 16% to 25%. This may affect the mixing of BC and snow particles and further affect the radative forcing of BC deposited in snow. Finally, we reduced the scavenging efficiency of BC in mixed-phase clouds to account for the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process based on recent observations. The simulated BC concentration in snow increases by 10-100%, with the largest increase in Greenland (100%), Tromsø (50%), Alaska (40%), and Canadian Arctic (30%). Annual BC loading in the Arctic increases from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2 and the lifetime of BC increases from 9.2 to 16.3 days. This indicates that BC simulation in the Arctic is really sensitive to

  14. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  15. Migration of nanoparticles from plastic packaging materials containing carbon black into foodstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Johannes; Störmer, Angela; Franz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Carbon black was investigated to assess and quantify the possibility that nanoparticles might migrate out of plastic materials used in the food packaging industry. Two types of carbon black were incorporated in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polystyrene (PS) at 2.5% and 5.0% loading (w/w), and then subjected to migration studies. The samples were exposed to different food simulants according to European Union Plastics Regulation 10/2011, simulating long-term storage with aqueous and fatty foodstuffs. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a multi-angle laser light-scattering (MALLS) detector was used to separate, characterise and quantify the potential release of nanoparticles. The AF4 method was successful in differentiating carbon black from other matrix components, such as extracted polymer chains, in the migration solution. At a detection limit of 12 µg kg−1, carbon black did not migrate from the packaging material into food simulants. The experimental findings are in agreement with theoretical considerations based on migration modelling. From both the experimental findings and theoretical considerations, it can be concluded that carbon black does not migrate into food once it is incorporated into a plastics food contact material. PMID:25105506

  16. Aerosol light absorption, black carbon, and elemental carbon at the Fresno Supersite, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Doraiswamy, Prakash; Chen, Lung-Wen Antony; Sodeman, David A.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Park, Kihong; Arnott, W. Patrick; Motallebi, Nehzat

    2009-08-01

    Particle light absorption ( bap), black carbon (BC), and elemental carbon (EC) measurements at the Fresno Supersite during the summer of 2005 were compared to examine the equivalency of current techniques, evaluate filter-based bap correction methods, and determine the EC mass absorption efficiency (σ ap) and the spectral dependence of bap. The photoacoustic analyzer (PA) was used as a benchmark for in-situ bap. Most bap measurement techniques were well correlated ( r ≥ 0.95). Unadjusted Aethalometer (AE) and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) bap were up to seven times higher than PA bap at similar wavelengths because of absorption enhancement by backscattering and multiple scattering. Applying published algorithms to correct for these effects reduced the differences to 24 and 17% for the AE and PSAP, respectively, at 532 nm. The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP), which accounts for backscattering effects, overestimated bap relative to the PA by 51%. BC concentrations determined by the AE, MAAP, and Sunset Laboratory semi-continuous carbon analyzer were also highly correlated ( r ≥ 0.93) but differed by up to 57%. EC measured with the IMPROVE/STN thermal/optical protocols, and the French two-step thermal protocol agreed to within 29%. Absorption efficiencies determined from PA bap and EC measured with different analytical protocols averaged 7.9 ± 1.5, 5.4 ± 1.1, and 2.8 ± 0.6 m 2/g at 532, 670, and 1047 nm, respectively. The Angström exponent (α) determined from adjusted AE and PA bap ranged from 1.19 to 1.46. The largest values of α occurred during the afternoon hours when the organic fraction of total carbon was highest. Significant biases associated with filter-based measurements of bap, BC, and EC are method-specific. Correcting for these biases must take into account differences in aerosol concentration, composition, and sources.

  17. The use of airborne laser scanning to develop a pixel-based stratification for a verified carbon offset project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The voluntary carbon market is a new and growing market that is increasingly important to consider in managing forestland. Monitoring, reporting, and verifying carbon stocks and fluxes at a project level is the single largest direct cost of a forest carbon offset project. There are now many methods for estimating forest stocks with high accuracy that use both Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) and high-resolution optical remote sensing data. However, many of these methods are not appropriate for use under existing carbon offset standards and most have not been field tested. Results This paper presents a pixel-based forest stratification method that uses both ALS and optical remote sensing data to optimally partition the variability across an ~10,000 ha forest ownership in Mendocino County, CA, USA. This new stratification approach improved the accuracy of the forest inventory, reduced the cost of field-based inventory, and provides a powerful tool for future management planning. This approach also details a method of determining the optimum pixel size to best partition a forest. Conclusions The use of ALS and optical remote sensing data can help reduce the cost of field inventory and can help to locate areas that need the most intensive inventory effort. This pixel-based stratification method may provide a cost-effective approach to reducing inventory costs over larger areas when the remote sensing data acquisition costs can be kept low on a per acre basis. PMID:22004847

  18. Long-range transported dissolved organic matter, ions and black carbon deposited on Central Asian snow covered glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, Julia; Kang, Shichang; Peltier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Ninety percent of the Central Asian population depend on water precipitated in the mountains stored in glaciers and snow cover. Accelerated melting of the snow and ice can be induced by the deposition of airborne impurities such as mineral dust, black carbon and co-emitted species leading to significant reductions of the surface albedo. However, Central Asia is a relatively understudied region and data on the source regions, chemical and microphysical characteristics as well as modelling studies of long-range transported air pollution and dust to the Tien Shan mountains is very scarce. We studied the atmospheric aerosol deposited most likely between summer 2012 and summer 2013on three different glaciers in the Kyrgyz Republic. Samples were taken from four snow pits on the glaciers Abramov (2 pits, 39.59 °N, 71.56 °E, 4390 m elevation, 240 cm deep, and 39.62°N, 71.52 °E, 4275 m elevation, 125 cm deep), Ak-Shiirak (41.80 °N, 78.18 °E, 4325 m elevation, 75 cm deep) and Suek (41.78 °N, 77.75 °E, 4341 m elevation, 200 cm deep). The latter two glaciers are located roughly within 6 and 38 km of an operating gold mine. The snow was analyzed for black carbon, ions, metals and organic carbon. We here focus on the results of inorganic ion measurements and organic carbon speciation based on analysis with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and potential pollution sources that can be deduced from the chemical information as well as back trajectories. Average contributions of snow impurities measured by the HR-ToF-AMS were dominated by organic carbon. Relative concentrations of organic carbon, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium in snow were 86 %, 3 %, 9 % and 2 % respectively for Abramov, 92 %, 1 %, 5 % and 1 % for Suek, and 95 %, 1 %, 3 % and 1 % for Ak-Shiirak. Generally, impurities on Suek and Ak-Shiirak were three and five times higher than on Abramov. Mass concentrations of organic carbon were on average 6 times higher in samples

  19. Regional prediction of soil organic carbon content over temperate croplands using visible near-infrared airborne hyperspectral imagery and synchronous field spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, E.; Gilliot, J. M.; Bel, L.; Lefevre, J.; Chehdi, K.

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed at identifying the potential of Vis-NIR airborne hyperspectral AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soil types comprised haplic luvisols, calcaric cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle data (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks. Tracks were atmospherically corrected then mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution using a set of 24 synchronous field spectra of bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then calculation and thresholding of NDVI from an atmospherically corrected SPOT image acquired the same day enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. A total of 101 sites sampled either in 2013 or in the 3 previous years and in 2015 were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic AISA spectra which were related to topsoil SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples, considering 74 sites outside cloud shadows only, and different sampling strategies for selecting calibration samples. Validation root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were comprised between 3.73 and 4.49 g Kg-1 and were ∼4 g Kg-1 in median. The most performing models in terms of coefficient of determination (R2) and Residual Prediction Deviation (RPD) values were the calibration models derived either from Kennard-Stone or conditioned Latin Hypercube sampling on smoothed spectra. The most generalizable model leading to lowest RMSE value of 3.73 g Kg-1 at the regional scale and 1.44 g Kg-1 at the within-field scale and low bias was the cross-validated leave

  20. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J. E.

    2005-11-01

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3 to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources, or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of 2 lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  1. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis ofpublished data and implications for climate forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

    2005-07-11

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC)concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide, have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of two lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  2. Application of pyrolized carbon black from scrap tires in asphalt pavement design and construction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, T.; Coree, B.J.; Lovell, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    According to EPA reports (1991) of the over 242 million waste generated each year in the United State, 5% are exported, 6% recycled, 11% incinerated, and 78% are landfilled, stockpiled, or illegally dumped. A variety of uses for these tires are being studied. Among these is pyrolysis which produces 5 5% of oil, 25% of carbon black, 9% of steel, 5% of fiber and 6% of gas. Pyrolized carbon black contains 9 % of ash, 4% of sulfur, 12% of butadine copolymer and 75% of carbon black. The objective of this research is to investigate the viability of using PCB as an additive in hot mix asphalt. The use of PCB in asphalt pavement is expected not only to improve the performance of conventional asphalt, but also to provide a means for the mass disposal of waste fires.

  3. Electrical transport in carbon black-epoxy resin composites at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macutkevic, J.; Kuzhir, P.; Paddubskaya, A.; Maksimenko, S.; Banys, J.; Celzard, A.; Fierro, V.; Bistarelli, S.; Cataldo, A.; Micciulla, F.; Bellucci, S.

    2013-07-01

    Results of broadband electric/dielectric properties of different surface area—carbon black/epoxy resin composites above the percolation threshold are reported in a wide temperature range (25-500 K). At higher temperatures (above 400 K), the electrical conductivity of composites is governed by electrical transport in polymer matrix and current carriers tunneling from carbon black clusters to polymer matrix. The activation energy of such processes decreases when the carrier concentration increases, i.e., with the increase of carbon black concentration. At lower temperatures, the electrical conductivity is governed by electron tunneling and hopping. The electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of composites strongly decrease after annealing composites at high temperatures (500 K); at the same time potential barrier for carriers tunneling strongly increases. All the observed peculiarities can be used for producing effective low-cost materials on the basis of epoxy resin working at different temperatures for electrical applications.

  4. IMPORTANCE OF BLACK CARBON IN DISTRIBUTION AND BIOACCUMULATION MODELS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The roles and relative importance of nonpyrogenic organic carbon (NPOC) and black carbon (BC) as binding phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed by their ability to estimate pore water concentrations and biological uptake in various marine sediments. Sedim...

  5. Estimation of black carbon content for biomass burning aerosols from multi-channel Raman lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Marmureanu, Luminita; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Biomass burning due to natural processes (forest fires) or anthropical activities (agriculture, thermal power stations, domestic heating) is an important source of aerosols with a high content of carbon components (black carbon and organic carbon). Multi-channel Raman lidars provide information on the spectral dependence of the backscatter and extinction coefficients, embedding information on the black carbon content. Aerosols with a high content of black carbon have large extinction coefficients and small backscatter coefficients (strong absorption), while aerosols with high content of organic carbon have large backscatter coefficients (weak absorption). This paper presents a method based on radiative calculations to estimate the black carbon content of biomass burning aerosols from 3b+2a+1d lidar signals. Data is collected at Magurele, Romania, at the cross-road of air masses coming from Ukraine, Russia and Greece, where burning events are frequent during both cold and hot seasons. Aerosols are transported in the free troposphere, generally in the 2-4 km altitude range, and reaches the lidar location after 2-3 days. Optical data are collected between 2011-2012 by a multi-channel Raman lidar and follows the quality assurance program of EARLINET. Radiative calculations are made with libRadTran, an open source radiative model developed by ESA. Validation of the retrievals is made by comparison to a co-located C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, biomass burning, radiative model, black carbon Acknowledgment: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project no. 39/2012 - SIAFIM, and by Romanian Partnerships in priority areas PNII implemented with MEN-UEFISCDI support, project no. 309/2014 - MOBBE

  6. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  7. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM 2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  8. Commuter exposure to black carbon, carbon monoxide, and noise in the mass transport khlong boats of Bangkok, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A. D.; Velasco, E.; Ho, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Khlong (canal) boats are a unique mass transport alternative in the congested city of Bangkok. Canals and rivers provide exclusive transit-ways for reducing the commuting time of thousands of city residents daily. However, as a consequence of the service characteristics and boats design and state of repair, they can represent a potential public health risk and an important source of black carbon and greenhouse gases. This work quantifies commuter exposure to black carbon, CO and noise when waiting for and travelling in these diesel fueled boats. Exposure to toxic pollutants and acute noise is similar or worse than for other transportation modes. Mean black carbon concentrations observed at one busy pier and along the main canal were much higher than ambient concentrations at sites impacted by vehicular traffic. Concentrations of CO were similar to those reported for roadside areas of Bangkok. The equivalent continuous sound levels registered at the landing pier were similar to those reported for roadsides, but values recorded inside the boats were significantly higher. We believe that the boat service is a viable alternative mode of mass transport, but public safety could be improved to provide a high quality service, comparable to modern rail systems or emerging bus rapid transit systems. These investments would also contribute to reduce the emission of black carbon and other greenhouse and toxic pollutants.

  9. Airborne Observations of the Spatial and Temporal Variability of Tropospheric Carbon Dioxide during the INTEX-B Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vay, Stephanie A.; Choi, Younghoon; Woo, Jung-Hun; Barrick, John D.; Sachse, Glen W.; Blake, Donald; Avery, Melody A.; Fuelberg, Henry; Nolf, Scott

    2006-01-01

    The Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-North America (INTEX-NA) is an international field campaign envisioned to investigate the transport and transformation of gases and aerosols on transcontinental/intercontinental scales and assess their impact on air quality and climate. Phase B (INTEX-B) of the mission was conducted during a 10- week period from March 1 to May 15, 2006 and focused initially on pollution outflow from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, later addressing the transport of pollution from Asia to North America during springtime meteorological conditions. During the deployment, fast-response (1-s resolution) CO2 measurements were recorded aboard the NASA DC-8 providing valuable regional-scale information on carbon sources and sinks over sparsely sampled areas of North America and adjacent ocean basins. When coupled with the enormously sophisticated chemistry payload on the DC-8, these measurements collectively afford extremely powerful multi-tracer constraints for carbon source/sink attribution. Preliminary examination of the two data sets from the INTEX-B campaign, acquired one month apart, reveals not only the influence of the CO2 seasonal cycle, but also the preponderance of human population and industrial activity in the northern hemisphere. In this presentation, a synergy of the ensemble of airborne and surface observations, bottomup emission inventories, as well as transport history are invoked in a GIS framework to elucidate the source/sink processes reflected in the observations. The airborne CO2 data, along with simultaneous surface measurements (e.g. NOAA ESRL), are examined to establish the vertical distribution and variability of CO2 as a function of location. The role of localized sources, long-range transport, the biosphere, stratospheric exchange, and dynamical processes on the CO2 spatial variability observed throughout the tropospheric column will be discussed.

  10. Aerosol Absorption by Black Carbon and Dust: Implications of Climate Change and Air Quality in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the global model GOCART to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources. We show the seasonal and interannual variations of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere over Asia, mainly black carbon and dust. and their linkage to the changes of anthropogenic and dust emissions in the region. We compare our results with observations from satellite and ground-based networks, and estimate the importance of black carbon and dust on regional climate forcing and air quality.

  11. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Homer, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  12. Black carbon fractal morphology and short-wave radiative impact: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahnert, M.; Devasthale, A.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the impact of the morphological properties of freshly emitted black carbon aerosols on optical properties and on radiative forcing. To this end, we model the optical properties of fractal black carbon aggregates by use of numerically exact solutions to Maxwell's equations within a spectral range from the UVC to the mid-IR. The results are coupled to radiative transfer computations, in which we consider six realistic case studies representing different atmospheric pollution conditions and surface albedos. The spectrally integrated radiative impacts of black carbon are compared for two different fractal morphologies, which brace the range of recently reported experimental observations of black carbon fractal structures. We also gauge our results by performing corresponding calculations based on the homogeneous sphere approximation, which is commonly employed in climate models. We find that at top of atmosphere the aggregate models yield radiative impacts that can be as much as 2 times higher than those based on the homogeneous sphere approximation. An aggregate model with a low fractal dimension can predict a radiative impact that is higher than that obtained with a high fractal dimension by a factor ranging between 1.1-1.6. Although the lower end of this scale seems like a rather small effect, a closer analysis reveals that the single scattering optical properties of more compact and more lacy aggregates differ considerably. In radiative flux computations there can be a partial cancellation due to the opposing effects of different error sources. However, this cancellation effect can strongly depend on atmospheric conditions and is therefore quite unpredictable. We conclude that the fractal morphology of black carbon aerosols and their fractal parameters can have a profound impact on their radiative forcing effect, and that the use of the homogeneous sphere model introduces unacceptably high biases in radiative impact studies. We emphasise that there

  13. Asian Black Carbon Influence on East Asian Summer Monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, R.; Li, S.

    2011-12-01

    Since the black carbon (BC) emission in East and South Asia has increased significantly during the last decades of the 20th century, there is an ever growing concern about its impact on Asian monsoon. In this study we provide an in-depth analysis of the influence by performing several ensemble sensitive experiments with or without historical BC concentrations over East Asia, South Asia, and the combined East and South Asia in an atmospheric general circulation model, GFDL AM2.1. The results show that: (a) The East Asian summer climate is sensitive to the East Asian BC (EABC) concentrations in a sense that EABC contributes significantly to the frequently occurring north-drought and south-flood patterns in Eastern China. In detail, the large scale precipitation anomalies induced by EABC characterize more rainfalls over central/south China, East China Sea and southern Japan and less rainfall over northern China and the west Pacific region between 10N to 20N. These anomalous precipitation patterns are mainly attributed to the EABC induced large scale circulation changes including the weakened Western Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH), anomalous ascent motions over central-southern China (centering over the Yangtze River valley (YRV)) and the subsequent descent motions over northern China and the South China Sea. These modeled results suggest that the EABC experiment reproduces the climate shift event of eastern China during the late 1970s, including intensified rainfall in the YRV and the weakened summer monsoonal circulation. (b) The anomalous results of South Asian BC (SABC) experiment signify a tri-polar precipitation response over East Asia, with a reduction from the YRV to East China Sea and southern Japan sandwiched with increases over a northern domain from northern China/ Korea to northern Japan and over southern China. As for southern China, particularly the YRV, the impact of SABC is to offset a fraction of intensified rainfall induced by local BC of East Asia

  14. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-06

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth’s climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second

  15. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: a Scientific Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, P. M.; Bernsten, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, S.; Karcher, B.; Koch, D.; Kinne, S.; Kondo, Y.; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, M. C.; Schultz, M. G.; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, J. P.; Shindell, D.; Storelvmo, T.; Warren, S. G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth's climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption; influence on liquid, mixed phase, and ice clouds; and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with climate models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Predominant sources are combustion related, namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg/yr in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. However, global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models and should be increased by a factor of almost 3. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of atmospheric black carbon is +0.71 W/sq m with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.08, +1.27)W/sq m. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources, without subtracting the preindustrial background, is estimated as +0.88 (+0.17, +1.48) W/sq m. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings, including rapid adjustments. The best estimate of industrial-era climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms, including clouds and cryosphere forcing, is +1.1 W/sq m with 90% uncertainty bounds of +0.17 to +2.1 W/sq m. Thus, there is a very high probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing

  16. An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

    2012-01-10

    The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {<=} R{sub 50} < 0.70) or Class C (R{sub 50} < 0.50) recalcitrance/carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

  17. An index-based approach to assessing recalcitrance and soil carbon sequestration potential of engineered black carbons (biochars).

    PubMed

    Harvey, Omar R; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E; Herbert, Bruce E

    2012-02-01

    The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R(50), for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R(50) is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R(50), with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R(50) and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R(50) is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R(50) ≥ 0.70), Class B (0.50 ≤ R(50) < 0.70) or Class C (R(50) < 0.50) recalcitrance/carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, whereas Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R(50), to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

  18. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  19. Black Ink of Activated Carbon Derived From Palm Kernel Cake (PKC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamat, M. H.; Ahmad, A. H.

    2009-06-01

    Recycling the waste from natural plant to produce useful end products will benefit many industries and help preserve the environment. The research reported in this paper is an investigation on the use of the natural waste of palm kernel cake (PKC) to produce carbon residue as a black carbon for pigment source by using pyrolysis process. The activated carbons (AC) is produced in powder form using ball milling process. Rheological spectra in ink is one of quality control process in determining its performance properties. Findings from this study will help expand the scientific knowledge-base for black ink production and formulation base on PKC. Various inks with different weight percentage compositions of AC will be made and tested against its respective rheological properties in order to determine ideal ink printing system. The items in the formulation used comprised of organic and bio-waste materials with added additive to improve the quality of the black ink. Modified Polyurethane was used as binder. The binder's properties highlighted an ideal vehicle to be applied for good black ink opacity performance. The rheological behaviour is a general foundation for ink characterization where the wt% of AC-PKC resulted in different pseudoplastic behaviors, including the Newtonian behavior. The result found that Newtonian field was located in between 2 wt% and 10 wt% of AC-PKC composition with binder. Mass spectroscopy results shown that the carbon content in PKC is high and very suitable for black performance. In the ageing test, the pigment of PKC perform fairly according to the standard pigment of Black carbon (CB) of ferum oxide pigment. The contact angle for substrate's wettability of the ink system shown a good angle proven to be a water resistive coating on paper subtrates; an advantage of the PKC ink pigment performance.

  20. Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, P. M.; Berntsen, T.; Deangelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, S.; KäRcher, B.; Koch, D.; Kinne, S.; Kondo, Y.; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, M. C.; Schultz, M. G.; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, J. P.; Shindell, D.; Storelvmo, T.; Warren, S. G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-01

    carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth's climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption; influence on liquid, mixed phase, and ice clouds; and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with climate models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Predominant sources are combustion related, namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. However, global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models and should be increased by a factor of almost 3. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of atmospheric black carbon is +0.71 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.08, +1.27) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources, without subtracting the preindustrial background, is estimated as +0.88 (+0.17, +1.48) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings, including rapid adjustments. The best estimate of industrial-era climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms, including clouds and cryosphere forcing, is +1.1 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +0.17 to +2.1 W m-2. Thus, there is a very high probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm

  1. Contribution of Black Carbon, Brown Carbon and Lensing Effect to Total Aerosol Absorption in Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamjad, Pm; Tripathi, Sachchida; Bergin, Mike; Vreeland, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the optical and physical properties of atmospheric and denuded (heated at 300°C) aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during 20 December 2014 to 28 February 2015. A Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in real time respectively. During experiments large scale carbonaceous aerosol loading is observed in IGP. Multiple biomass burning events are observed with varying intensity and duration. Refractive index of brown carbon (BrC) is derived from filter extracts using Liquid Core Wave Capillary Cell (LWCC). Refractive index of BrC at 405 is 4 times higher in IGP when compared to studies conducted in USA. Through Mie modelling we identified the percentage contribution of black carbon, BrC and lensing effect to total aerosol absorption. On average 75% of absorption is from black carbon alone, while rest is contributed from volatile components. Within the volatile component contribution, at 405 nm BrC contributes around 20% and rest from lensing effect. But at 781 nm lensing contributed more than BrC. Overall results indicate the special characteristics on BrC aerosols in IGP and the importance of considering spectral absorption in global aerosol modelling studies.

  2. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  3. Evaluation of a pyroelectric detector with a carbon multiwalled nanotube black coating in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharous, E.; Deshpande, R.; Dillon, A. C.; Lehman, J.

    2006-02-01

    The performance of a pyroelectric detector with a carbon multiwalled nanotube coating was evaluated in the 0.9-14 µm wavelength range. The relative spectral responsivity of this detector was shown to be flat over most of the wavelength range examined, and the spectral flatness was shown to be comparable to the best infrared black coatings currently available. This finding is promising because black coatings with spectrally flat absorbance profiles are usually associated with the highest absorbance values. The performance of the detector (in terms of noise equivalent power and specific detectivity) was limited by the very thick (250 µm thick) LiNbO3 pyroelectric crystal onto which the coating was deposited. The responsivity of this detector was shown to be linear in the 0.06-2.8 mW radiant power range, and its spatial uniformity was comparable to that of other pyroelectric detectors that use different types of black coating. The carbon nanotube coatings were reported to be much more durable than other infrared black coatings, such as metal blacks, that are commonly used to coat thermal detectors in the infrared. This, in combination with their excellent spectral flatness, suggests that carbon nanotube coatings appear extremely promising for thermal detection applications in the infrared.

  4. High resolution of black carbon and organic carbon emissions in the Pearl River Delta region, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; He, Min; Shen, Xingling; Yin, Shasha; Yuan, Zibing

    2012-11-01

    A high-resolution regional black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) emission inventory for the year 2009 was developed for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based on the collected activity data and the latest emission factors. PM(2.5), BC and OC emissions were estimated to be 303 kt, 39 kt and 31 kt, respectively. Industrial processes were major contributing sources to PM(2.5) emissions. BC emissions were mainly from mobile sources, accounting for 65.0%, while 34.1% of OC emissions were from residential combustion. The primary OC/BC ratios for individual cities in the PRD region were dependent on the levels of economic development due to differences in source characteristics, with high ratios in the less developed cities and low ratios in the central and southern developed areas. The preliminary temporal profiles were established, showing the highest OC emissions in winter and relatively constant BC emissions throughout the year. The emissions were spatially allocated into grid cells with a resolution of 3 km × 3 km. Large amounts of BC emissions were distributed over the central-southern PRD city clusters, while OC emissions exhibited a relatively even spatial distribution due to the significant biomass burning emissions from the outlying area of the PRD region. Uncertainties in carbonaceous aerosol emissions were usually higher than in other primary pollutants like SO(2), NO(x), and PM(10). One of the key uncertainty sources was the emission factor, due to the absence of direct measurements of BC and OC emission rates. PMID:22995707

  5. Critical review of black carbon and elemental carbon source apportionment in Europe and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Nicole L.; Long, Christopher M.

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of air pollution source apportionment studies in Europe and the United States have focused on the black carbon (BC) fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) given its linkage with adverse public health and climate impacts. We conducted a critical review of European and US BC source apportionment studies published since 2003. Since elemental carbon (EC) has been used as a surrogate measure of BC, we also considered source apportionment studies of EC measurements. This review extends the knowledge presented in previous ambient PM source apportionment reviews because we focus on BC and EC and critically examine the differences between source apportionment results for different methods and source categories. We identified about 50 BC and EC source apportionment studies that have been conducted in either Europe or the US since 2003, finding a striking difference in the commonly used source apportionment methods between the two regions and variations in the assigned source categories. Using three dominant methodologies (radiocarbon, aethalometer, and macro-tracer methods) that only allow for BC to be broadly apportioned into either fossil fuel combustion or biomass burning source categories, European studies generally support fossil fuel combustion as the dominant ambient BC source, but also show significant biomass burning contributions, in particular in wintertime at non-urban locations. Among US studies where prevailing methods such as chemical mass balance (CMB) and positive matrix factorization (PMF) models have allowed for estimation of more refined source contributions, there are fewer findings showing the significance of biomass burning and variable findings on the relative proportion of BC attributed to diesel versus gasoline emissions. Overall, the available BC source apportionment studies provide useful information demonstrating the significance of both fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning BC emission sources in Europe and the US

  6. Black carbon exposure and extreme concentrations of residential economic and racial/ethnic privilege and deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Nancy; Waterman, Pamela D.; Gryparis, Alexandros; Coull, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Scant data quantify associations between economic and racial/ethnic spatial polarization and individual’s exposure to pollution. Methods We linked data on the socioeconomic position (SEP) of 1757 urban working class white, black, and Latino adults (age 25–64; Boston, MA: 2003–2004–2008–2010) to: (1) spatiotemporal model-based estimates of cumulative black carbon exposure at their exact residential address, and (2) their census tract values for the Index of Concentration at the Extremes (ICE) for SEP and race/ethnicity. Results ICE measures, but not individual- and household-SEP, remained independently associated with black carbon exposure. Conclusions The ICE may be useful for environmental health research. PMID:26093080

  7. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY TOXICITY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL.

    M Daniels, A Ranade* & MJ Selgrade & MI Gilmour.
    Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. * Particle Technology, College Par...

  8. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R.; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J.

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m‑3. The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions.

  9. CARBON BLACK DISPERSION PRE-PLATING TECHNOLOGY FOR PRINTED WIRE BOARD MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in replacing electroless copper with a carbon black dispersion technology. McCurdy Circuits of Orange County, California, currently has both processes in operation. McCurdy has found that...

  10. Quantifying the sensitivity of black carbon absorption to model representations of particle mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric black carbon is distributed across diverse aerosol populations, with individual particles exhibiting tremendous variation in their chemical composition and internal morphology. Absorption by an individual particle depends on both its constituent aerosol species and the arrangement of those species within the particle, but this particle-scale complexity cannot be tracked in global-scale simulations. Instead, large-scale aerosol models assume simple representations of particle composition, referred to here as inter-particle mixing, and simple representations of particle's internal morphology, referred to here as intra-particle mixing. This study quantifies the sensitivity of absorption by black carbon to these model approximations of particle mixing. A particle-resolved model was used to simulate the evolution of diverse aerosol populations and, as the simulations proceeded, absorption by black carbon was modeled using different representations of inter-particle mixing and intra-particle mixing. Although absorption by black carbon at the particle level is sensitive to the treatment of particles' internal morphology, at the population level absorption is only weakly sensitive to the treatment of intra-particle but depends strongly on model representations of inter-particle mixing.

  11. On-road black carbon instrument intercomparison and aerosol characteristics by driving environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large spatial variations of black carbon (BC) concentrations in the on-road and near-road environments necessitate measurements with high spatial resolution to assess exposure accurately. A series of measurements was made comparing the performance of several different BC instrume...

  12. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J

    2016-09-16

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m(-3). The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions.

  13. Nanoscale Interactions between Engineered Nanomaterials and Black Carbon (Biochar) in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the interactions between engineered nanomaterials (NMs) and soil constituents, and a comprehension of how these interactions may affect biological uptake and toxicity are currently lacking. Charcoal black carbon is a normal constituent of soils due to fire history, and can be pre...

  14. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m−3. The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions. PMID:27634102

  15. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m(-3). The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions. PMID:27634102

  16. Evaluation of Methods for the Determination of Black Carbon Emissions from an Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines consist of nanometer size black carbon (BC) particles plus gas-phase sulfur and organic compounds which undergo gas-to-particle conversion downstream of the engine as the plume cools and dilutes. In this study, four BC measurement ...

  17. MULTIYEAR REAL-TIME MONITORING OF PARTICLES, PAH, AND BLACK CARBON IN AN OCCUPIED HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and black carbon have been measured continuously (every 1 to 5 minutes) in an occupied townhouse for 2-3 years. Also, since the summer of 1999, temperature (outdoors...

  18. First Airborne IPDA Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the DLR Greenhouse Gas Sounder CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, A.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.; Quatrevalet, M.; Büdenbender, C.; Kiemle, C.; Loehring, J.; Gerbig, C.

    2015-12-01

    First airborne measurement using CHARM-F, the four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4, were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The lidar is designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between aircraft and ground. HALO's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, enable the CHARM-F system to be an airborne demonstrator for future spaceborne greenhouse gas lidars. Due to a high technological conformity this applies in particular to the French-German satellite mission MERLIN, the spaceborne methane IPDA lidar. The successfully completed flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. The flights covered different ground cover types, different orography types as well as the sea. Additionally, we captured different cloud conditions, at which the broken cloud case is a matter of particular interest. This dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on technical details of the system. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the lidar. Additionally the onboard instrumentation of HALO gives information about pressure and temperature for cross-checking the ECMWF data, which are intended to be used for calculating the weighting function, the key quantity for the retrieval of gas column mixing ratios from the measured gas optical depths. In combination with dedicated descents into the boundary layer and subsequent ascents, a self-contained dataset for characterizations of CHARM-F is available.

  19. Development and Preliminary Tests of an Open-Path Airborne Diode Laser Absorption Instrument for Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diskin, G. S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Yang, M. M.; Rana, M.; Slate, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is well known for its importance as an atmospheric greenhouse gas, with many sources and sinks around the globe. Understanding the fluxes of carbon into and out of the atmosphere is a complex and daunting challenge. One tool applied by scientists to measure the vertical flux of CO2 near the surface uses the eddy covariance technique, most often from towers but also from aircraft flying specific patterns over the study area. In this technique, variations of constituents of interest are correlated with fluctuations in the local vertical wind velocity. Measurement requirements are stringent, particularly with regard to precision, sensitivity to small changes, and temporal sampling rate. In addition, many aircraft have limited payload capability, so instrument size, weight, and power consumption are also important considerations. We report on the development and preliminary application of an airborne sensor for the measurement of atmospheric CO2. The instrument, modeled on the successful DLH (Diode Laser Hygrometer) series of instruments, has been tested in the laboratory and on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. Performance parameters such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity, and temporal response are discussed in the context of typical atmospheric variability and suitability for flux measurement applications. On-aircraft, in-flight intercomparison data have been obtained and will be discussed as well. Performance of the instrument has been promising, and continued flight testing is planned during 2016.

  20. Development and Preliminary Tests of an Open-Path Airborne Diode Laser Absorption Instrument for Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; DiGangi, Joshua P.; Yang, Melissa; Slate, Thomas A.; Rana, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is well known for its importance as an atmospheric greenhouse gas, with many sources and sinks around the globe. Understanding the fluxes of carbon into and out of the atmosphere is a complex and daunting challenge. One tool applied by scientists to measure the vertical flux of CO2 near the surface uses the eddy covariance technique, most often from towers but also from aircraft flying specific patterns over the study area. In this technique, variations of constituents of interest are correlated with fluctuations in the local vertical wind velocity. Measurement requirements are stringent, particularly with regard to precision, sensitivity to small changes, and temporal sampling rate. In addition, many aircraft have limited payload capability, so instrument size, weight, and power consumption are also important considerations. We report on the development and preliminary application of an airborne sensor for the measurement of atmospheric CO2. The instrument, modeled on the successful DLH (Diode Laser Hygrometer) series of instruments, has been tested in the laboratory and on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. Performance parameters such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity, and temporal response are discussed in the context of typical atmospheric variability and suitability for flux measurement applications. On-aircraft, in-flight data have been obtained and are discussed as well. Performance of the instrument has been promising, and continued flight testing is planned during 2016.

  1. Acute exposure of mice to high-dose ultrafine carbon black decreases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter from biomass combustion increases susceptibility to bacterial pneumonia. In vitro studies report that phagocytosis of carbon black by alveolar macrophages (AM) impairs killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have previously reported high levels of black carbon in AM from biomass smoke-exposed children and adults. We therefore aimed to use a mouse model to test the hypothesis that high levels of carbon loading of AM in vivo increases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Female outbred mice were treated with either intranasal phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or ultrafine carbon black (UF-CB in PBS; 500 μg on day 1 and day 4), and then infected with S. pneumoniae strain D39 on day 5. Survival was assessed over 72 h. The effect of UF-CB on AM carbon loading, airway inflammation, and a urinary marker of pulmonary oxidative stress was assessed in uninfected animals. Results Instillation of UF-CB in mice resulted a pattern of AM carbon loading similar to that of biomass-smoke exposed humans. In uninfected animals, UF-CB treated animals had increased urinary 8-oxodG (P = 0.055), and an increased airway neutrophil differential count (P < 0.01). All PBS-treated mice died within 72 h after infection with S. pneumoniae, whereas morbidity and mortality after infection was reduced in UF-CB treated animals (median survival 48 h vs. 30 h, P < 0.001). At 24 hr post-infection, UF-CB treated mice had lower lung and the blood S. pneumoniae colony forming unit counts, and lower airway levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine/growth-related oncogene (KC/GRO), and interferon gamma. Conclusion Acute high level loading of AM with ultrafine carbon black particles per se does not increase the susceptibility of mice to pneumococcal infection in vivo. PMID:20958976

  2. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  3. Estimating Carbon STOCK Changes of Mangrove Forests Using Satellite Imagery and Airborne LiDAR Data in the South Sumatra State, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Y.; Fukushima, A.; Imai, Y.; Tanahashi, Y.; Nakama, E.; Ohta, S.; Kawazoe, K.; Akune, N.

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to estimate the biomass in the mangrove forests using satellite imagery and airborne LiDAR data, and 2) to estimate the amount of carbon stock changes using biomass estimated. The study area is located in the coastal area of the South Sumatra state, Indonesia. This area is approximately 66,500 ha with mostly flat land features. In this study, the following procedures were carried out: (1) Classification of types of tree species using Satellite imagery in the study area, (2) Development of correlation equations between spatial volume based on LiDAR data and biomass stock based on field survey for each types of tree species, and estimation of total biomass stock and carbon stock using the equation, and (3) Estimation of carbon stock change using Chronological Satellite Imageries. The result showed the biomass and the amount of carbon stock changes can be estimated with high accuracy, by combining the spatial volume based on airborne LiDAR data with the tree species classification based on satellite imagery. Quantitative biomass monitoring is in demand for projects related to REDD+ in developing countries, and this study showed that combining airborne LiDAR data with satellite imagery is one of the effective methods of monitoring for REDD+ projects.

  4. Effect of Agglomeration on the Toxicity of Nano-sized Carbon Black in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingu; Han, Jeong-Hee; Yang, Jeong-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that nano-sized carbon black is more toxic than large respirable carbon black because of its higher surface area. However, it is not clear if carbon black made larger by agglomeration demonstrates decreased toxicity. The purpose of this study was to verify if agglomeration affects the toxicity of carbon black using three differently prepared nano-sized carbon black aerosols in nose-only inhalation chambers for 13 weeks. Methods Printex 90 was selected as a representative nano-sized carbon black. To generate aerosols of three different types of agglomerates, Printex 90 was dispersed in distilled water by three different methods: vortex, vortex+sonication, and vortex+sonication with dispersion in a stabilizer. Then, the three differently prepared solutions were aerosolized through venturi nozzles. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Printex 90 aerosols in a nose-only exposure chamber for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk for 13 weeks at a concentration of approximately 9 mg/m3. Results Numbers of total cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were increased and carbon black masses were clearly seen in BAL cells and lung tissues of rats exposed to Printex 90. However, few differences were found between the three differently agglomerated aerosols. In addition, there were no significant differences in other parameters, such as body weight, lung function or cytokine levels in BAL fluid following carbon black exposure. Conclusions Only mild to moderate respiratory effects were found in rats exposed to nano-sized carbon black at 9 mg/m3 for 13 weeks. Agglomeration did not affect the toxicity of nano-sized carbon particles. PMID:23106037

  5. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution.

  6. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution. PMID:24682452

  7. Exposure vs toxicity levels of airborne quartz, metal and carbon particles in cast iron foundries.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Beatrice; Viti, Cecilia; Cappelletti, David

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol dust samples and quartz raw materials from different working stations in foundry plants were characterized in order to assess the health risk in this working environment. Samples were analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy coupled with image analysis and microanalysis, and by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. In addition, the concentration and the solubility degree of Fe and other metals of potential health effect (Mn, Zn and Pb) in the bulk samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Overall, the results indicate substantial changes in quartz crystal structure and texture when passing from the raw material to the airborne dust, which include lattice defects, non-bridging oxygen hole centres and contamination of quartz grains by metal and/or graphite particles. All these aspects point towards the relevance of surface properties on reactivity. Exposure doses have been estimated based on surface area, and compared with threshold levels resulting from toxicology. The possible synergistic effects of concomitant exposure to inhalable magnetite, quartz and/or graphite particles in the same working environment have been properly remarked. PMID:23385294

  8. Exposure vs toxicity levels of airborne quartz, metal and carbon particles in cast iron foundries.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Beatrice; Viti, Cecilia; Cappelletti, David

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol dust samples and quartz raw materials from different working stations in foundry plants were characterized in order to assess the health risk in this working environment. Samples were analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy coupled with image analysis and microanalysis, and by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. In addition, the concentration and the solubility degree of Fe and other metals of potential health effect (Mn, Zn and Pb) in the bulk samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Overall, the results indicate substantial changes in quartz crystal structure and texture when passing from the raw material to the airborne dust, which include lattice defects, non-bridging oxygen hole centres and contamination of quartz grains by metal and/or graphite particles. All these aspects point towards the relevance of surface properties on reactivity. Exposure doses have been estimated based on surface area, and compared with threshold levels resulting from toxicology. The possible synergistic effects of concomitant exposure to inhalable magnetite, quartz and/or graphite particles in the same working environment have been properly remarked.

  9. Determining Sorption Properties of Pyrogenic Black Carbon for Some Heavy Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, P.; Cadol, D. D.; Galanter, A.

    2014-12-01

    There have been two major fires in the Valles Caldera, located in the Jemez Mountains of Northern New Mexico, within the last three years: the Thompson Ridge fire (June 2013) and the Las Conchas fire (July 2011). During forest fires, contaminants are released from the incomplete combustion of organic matter, from mineral assemblages of the natural soil, and from pre-existing contaminants that have accumulated in biomass and soils. The transport and sequestration of these contaminants is an important factor in determining environmental soil and water quality following fires. Soils containing black carbon (BC) have high sorption capacities for certain contaminants due to its high surface area and cation exchange capacity. The purpose of this project is to quantify the sorption properties of pyrogenic black carbon (PyC), or black carbon formed after the incomplete combustion of organic carbon during forest fires, and soils found in recently burned areas of Northern NM and to determine the environmental impact of soils containing PyC. We used batch equilibrium experiments to determine the sorption properties of BC for selected metals (chromium, lead, and arsenic). Samples tested include naturally occurring soils, concentrated PyC, mixtures of soil and PyC, industrial BC, and a control with low carbon and sorption. Contaminant concentrations were also measured from the soils sampled in the field site. Preliminary results suggest that industrial BC has the highest sorption capacity for heavy metals and the quickest time to equilibrium. As PyC concentrations in the soil increase, sorption capacity is expected to increase. With complete results, the environmental significance of black carbon in the soil, including how PyC affects the transport of solutes in soils, will be evaluated.

  10. Black (Pyrogenic) Carbon as a Component of Carbon Cycling and Ecosystem Function in Boreal Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, C. M.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    The carbon (C) cycle in boreal regions is strongly influenced by fire, which converts a small fraction (1-7% of mass) to pyrogenic C (PyC). PyC is mainly produced as solid charred residues including a black carbon (BC) fraction chemically defined by its oxidation resistance, plus much lower proportions of volatile soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). All PyC is characterized by fused aromatic rings, but varying in cluster sizes and degree of ordering, and presence of other elements (N, O) and functional groups. Char PyC is expected to be highly resistant to decomposition, and therefore to contribute to very stable C pools in soils and sediments. It also appears to influence soil processes, mainly through its sorption properties and contribution to cation exchange capacity. By contrast, soot aerosols absorb solar radiation, and may contribute to global warming. However, information is lacking to integrate PyC into C cycle and atmospheric models for boreal regions. Analytical methods are still under development and individual methods, which are mainly based on various measures of oxidation resistance, capture different fractions of the PyC ``continuum''. Short- term incubations indicate a small initial breakdown of solid PyC, leveling off after 1-2 years. Quantitative long-term field studies on PyC longevity are missing, but circumstantial evidence suggests turnover on a millennium timescale (5,000-10,000 y), depending on environmental conditions and PyC properties. Degraded, functionalized PyC becomes water soluble and has been detected in river water and sediments. We have synthesized the limited information available on production, stocks, characteristics, and loss processes of PyC in boreal forests (data on peatlands are almost non- existent). Annual production is estimated as 8 Tg PyC, including perhaps 2.4 Tg C of the more resistant BC fraction. The main limitation to the sink potential of PyC is likely its consumption by subsequent fires, but

  11. Preparation of highly dispersed NiMo catalysts supported on carbon black particles of hollow spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sakanishi, K.; Hasuo, H.; Mochida, I.

    1995-12-01

    One of unique carbon blacks, Ketjen Black (KB) which has extremely high surface area and low specific gravity, was selected as a catalyst support to prepare a highly dispersed NiMo catalyst with the function for recovery and the high activity for hydrogenation. KB-supported NiMo catalysts were prepared by means of impregnation, ion exchange, and incipient wetness methods from various kinds and amounts of Ni and Mo salts, and their activities were examined in the hydrogenation of 1-methyinaphthalene(1-MN) using a magnetic-stirred autoclave of 50 ml capacity at 380{degrees}C for 40 min under 10 MPa H{sub 2} reaction pressure. The catalyst, prepared from (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}MoS{sub 4} and Ni(OAc){sub 2} in their methanol solution by successive impregnations of Mo10% and Ni(2 wt%) in this order supported on nitric acid-treated carbon black(KB JD-O), provided the highest conversion of 86% to methyl-tetralins. Combinations of metal salts soluble in organic solvent, impregnation solvents, and surface properties of carbon black are suggested to be important for the preparation of highly active catalysts with higher dispersions of Ni and Mo on the carbon black, because they are easily agglomerated in impregnation solvent. It is also noted that KB-supported NiMo catalysts showed much higher activity for the hydrogenation than a commercial NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the smaller weight of catalyst.

  12. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  13. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane). PMID:26233751

  14. Using airborne HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) to evaluate model and remote sensing estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenberg, Christian; Kulawik, Susan S.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Chevallier, Frédéric; Daube, Bruce; Kort, Eric A.; O'Dell, Christopher; Olsen, Edward T.; Osterman, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, space-borne observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) have been increasingly used in global carbon-cycle studies. In order to obtain added value from space-borne measurements, they have to suffice stringent accuracy and precision requirements, with the latter being less crucial as it can be reduced by just enhanced sample size. Validation of CO2 column-averaged dry air mole fractions (XCO2) heavily relies on measurements of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Owing to the sparseness of the network and the requirements imposed on space-based measurements, independent additional validation is highly valuable. Here, we use observations from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) flights from 01/2009 through 09/2011 to validate CO2 measurements from satellites (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite - GOSAT, Thermal Emission Sounder - TES, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder - AIRS) and atmospheric inversion models (CarbonTracker CT2013B, Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) v13r1). We find that the atmospheric models capture the XCO2 variability observed in HIPPO flights very well, with correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.93 and 0.95 for CT2013B and MACC, respectively. Some larger discrepancies can be observed in profile comparisons at higher latitudes, in particular at 300 hPa during the peaks of either carbon uptake or release. These deviations can be up to 4 ppm and hint at misrepresentation of vertical transport. Comparisons with the GOSAT satellite are of comparable quality, with an r2 of 0.85, a mean bias μ of -0.06 ppm, and a standard deviation σ of 0.45 ppm. TES exhibits an r2 of 0.75, μ of 0.34 ppm, and σ of 1.13 ppm. For AIRS, we find an r2 of 0.37, μ of 1.11 ppm, and σ of 1.46 ppm, with latitude-dependent biases. For these comparisons at least 6, 20, and 50 atmospheric soundings have been averaged for GOSAT, TES, and AIRS

  15. Tracking airborne CO2 mitigation and low cost transformation into valuable carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiawen; Licht, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    Primary evidence of the direct uptake of atmospheric CO2 and direct transformation into carbon nanotubes, CNTs, is demonstrated through isotopic labeling, and provides a new high yield route to mitigate this greenhouse gas. CO2 is converted directly to CNTs and does not require pre-concentration of the airbone CO2. This C2CNT (CO2 to carbon nanotube) synthesis transforms CO2-gas dissolved in a 750 °C molten Li2CO3, by electrolysis, into O2-gas at a nickel electrode, and at a steel cathode into CNTs or carbon or nanofibers, CNFs. CNTs are synthesized at a 100-fold price reduction compared to conventional chemical vapour deposition, CVD, synthesis. The low cost conversion to a stable, value-added commodity incentivizes CO2 removal to mitigate climate change. The synthesis allows morphology control at the liquid/solid interface that is not available through conventional CVD synthesis at the gas/solid interface. Natural abundance 12CO2 forms hollow CNTs, while equivalent synthetic conditions with heavier 13CO2 favours closed core CNFs, as characterized by Raman, SEM and TEM. Production ease is demonstrated by the first synthesis of a pure 13C multiwalled carbon nanofiber.

  16. Tracking airborne CO2 mitigation and low cost transformation into valuable carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiawen; Licht, Stuart

    2016-06-09

    Primary evidence of the direct uptake of atmospheric CO2 and direct transformation into carbon nanotubes, CNTs, is demonstrated through isotopic labeling, and provides a new high yield route to mitigate this greenhouse gas. CO2 is converted directly to CNTs and does not require pre-concentration of the airbone CO2. This C2CNT (CO2 to carbon nanotube) synthesis transforms CO2-gas dissolved in a 750 °C molten Li2CO3, by electrolysis, into O2-gas at a nickel electrode, and at a steel cathode into CNTs or carbon or nanofibers, CNFs. CNTs are synthesized at a 100-fold price reduction compared to conventional chemical vapour deposition, CVD, synthesis. The low cost conversion to a stable, value-added commodity incentivizes CO2 removal to mitigate climate change. The synthesis allows morphology control at the liquid/solid interface that is not available through conventional CVD synthesis at the gas/solid interface. Natural abundance (12)CO2 forms hollow CNTs, while equivalent synthetic conditions with heavier (13)CO2 favours closed core CNFs, as characterized by Raman, SEM and TEM. Production ease is demonstrated by the first synthesis of a pure (13)C multiwalled carbon nanofiber.

  17. Tracking airborne CO2 mitigation and low cost transformation into valuable carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiawen; Licht, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Primary evidence of the direct uptake of atmospheric CO2 and direct transformation into carbon nanotubes, CNTs, is demonstrated through isotopic labeling, and provides a new high yield route to mitigate this greenhouse gas. CO2 is converted directly to CNTs and does not require pre-concentration of the airbone CO2. This C2CNT (CO2 to carbon nanotube) synthesis transforms CO2-gas dissolved in a 750 °C molten Li2CO3, by electrolysis, into O2-gas at a nickel electrode, and at a steel cathode into CNTs or carbon or nanofibers, CNFs. CNTs are synthesized at a 100-fold price reduction compared to conventional chemical vapour deposition, CVD, synthesis. The low cost conversion to a stable, value-added commodity incentivizes CO2 removal to mitigate climate change. The synthesis allows morphology control at the liquid/solid interface that is not available through conventional CVD synthesis at the gas/solid interface. Natural abundance (12)CO2 forms hollow CNTs, while equivalent synthetic conditions with heavier (13)CO2 favours closed core CNFs, as characterized by Raman, SEM and TEM. Production ease is demonstrated by the first synthesis of a pure (13)C multiwalled carbon nanofiber. PMID:27279594

  18. Tracking airborne CO2 mitigation and low cost transformation into valuable carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Licht, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Primary evidence of the direct uptake of atmospheric CO2 and direct transformation into carbon nanotubes, CNTs, is demonstrated through isotopic labeling, and provides a new high yield route to mitigate this greenhouse gas. CO2 is converted directly to CNTs and does not require pre-concentration of the airbone CO2. This C2CNT (CO2 to carbon nanotube) synthesis transforms CO2-gas dissolved in a 750 °C molten Li2CO3, by electrolysis, into O2-gas at a nickel electrode, and at a steel cathode into CNTs or carbon or nanofibers, CNFs. CNTs are synthesized at a 100-fold price reduction compared to conventional chemical vapour deposition, CVD, synthesis. The low cost conversion to a stable, value-added commodity incentivizes CO2 removal to mitigate climate change. The synthesis allows morphology control at the liquid/solid interface that is not available through conventional CVD synthesis at the gas/solid interface. Natural abundance 12CO2 forms hollow CNTs, while equivalent synthetic conditions with heavier 13CO2 favours closed core CNFs, as characterized by Raman, SEM and TEM. Production ease is demonstrated by the first synthesis of a pure 13C multiwalled carbon nanofiber. PMID:27279594

  19. Black carbon fractal morphology and short-wave radiative impact: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahnert, M.; Devasthale, A.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the impact of the morphological properties of freshly emitted black carbon aerosols on optical properties and on radiative forcing. To this end, we model the optical properties of fractal black carbon aggregates by use of numerically exact solutions to Maxwell's equations within a spectral range from the UVC to the mid-IR. The results are coupled to radiative transfer computations, in which we consider six realistic case studies representing different atmospheric pollution conditions and surface albedos. The spectrally integrated radiative impacts of black carbon are compared for two different fractal morphologies, which brace the range of recently reported experimental observations of black carbon fractal structures. We also gauge our results by performing corresponding calculations based on the homogeneous sphere approximation, which is commonly employed in climate models. We find that at top of atmosphere the aggregate models yield radiative impacts that can be as much as 2 times higher than those based on the homogeneous sphere approximation. An aggregate model with a low fractal dimension can predict a radiative impact that is higher than that obtained with a high fractal dimension by a factor ranging between 1.1-1.6. Although the lower end of this scale seems like a rather small effect, a closer analysis reveals that the single scattering optical properties of more compact and more lacy aggregates differ considerably. In radiative flux computations there can be a partial cancellation due to the opposing effects of differences in the optical cross sections and asymmetry parameters. However, this cancellation effect can strongly depend on atmospheric conditions and is therefore quite unpredictable. We conclude that the fractal morphology of black carbon aerosols and their fractal parameters can have a profound impact on their radiative forcing effect, and that the use of the homogeneous sphere model introduces unacceptably high biases in

  20. Organic Carbon Geochemistry in the North-western Black Sea Danube River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, E. M.; Kodina, L. A.; Zhiltsova, L. I.; Tokarev, V. G.; Vlasova, L. N.; Bogacheva, M. P.; Korobeinik, G. S.; Vaisman, T. I.

    2002-03-01

    The isotopic and chemical composition of organic matter from sediments collected on the north-western shelf of the Black Sea and the Danube River are discussed. The δ 13C distribution pattern in organic carbon from surface sediments (0-1 cm) of the western part of the Black Sea has been established. It reveals a rather complicated picture, reflecting the superposition of several factors: local marine primary productivity, terrestrial input to the Danube River discharge and possible contribution from anaerobic microbial activity. The analysis of organic carbon by a pyrolysis-chromatography technique showed that the H/O indices of organic matter from marine sediments are in correlation with δ 13C values. This is an indication of the mixed origin of the organic carbon in the littoral sediments. However, samples from the zone where H 2S conditions prevail deviate from the correlation line of δ 13C vs H/O indices. We believe that this is due to the contribution of the biomass of chemosynthetic bacteria in the sediments. Thus, we argue that in the Danube-Black Sea system several consecutive zones are distinguished. River discharge delivers organic carbon with δ 13C values from -28 to -26 (PSU is used). Mixing of the land-derived material with autochtonous marine primary production gives δ 13C values of about -26 to -23 for the organic carbon in coastal sediments. On the shelf area, beyond significant influence of both terrestrial and sulphide regime factors, plankton material dominates as a source of organic carbon in sediments. In the hydrogen sulphide zone, chemosynthetic bacteria produce additional amounts of organic matter with hydrogen to oxygen indices similar to those of plankton, but with different isotopic composition, which results in the appearance of relatively isotopically light organic carbon in the deep-sea sediments.

  1. Airborne remote sensing of photosynthetic light use efficiency and carbon uptake along an Arctic transect in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, J.; Hill, T. C.; Prieto-Blanco, A.; Wade, T.; Clement, R.; Moncrieff, J.; Williams, M. D.; Disney, M.; Nichol, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    It is critical to understand the dynamics of ecosystem carbon uptake through seasonal changes and in response to environmental drivers. In this study we utilised aircraft based remote sensing and CO2/H2O flux monitoring systems to quantify changes in photosynthesis along an Arctic transect. The University of Edinburgh's (UK) research aircraft (a Diamond HK 36 TTC-ECO Dimona) was deployed in the Arctic during summer 2008 to carry out a series of transect-flights over a birch-mire mosaic site near Kevo, Finland as part of the Arctic Biosphere Atmosphere Coupling at Multiple Scales (ABACUS) project. The aircraft is equipped with automated dual field-of-view (hyperspectral) radiometers and CO2/H2O flux and meteorological instrumentation. Vegetation indices known to be related to photosynthetic light use efficiency (LUE), including the well established Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and Solar-induced Fluorescence (SiF) as well as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were calculated from the spectral data and matched in space to the CO2 flux measurements. We explored spatial relationships between NDVI and CO2 flux, LUE (CO2 flux / Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation) and PRI and finally SiF (calculated using the Fraunhofer infilling method) and relevant environmental drivers. Our results highlight the unique ability of an airborne platform to quantify ecosystem physiology across a landscape and demonstrate how such measurements can bridge the spatial gap between ground and satellite-based observations.

  2. An Investigation of Black Carbon Degradation Potential in a Forest Soil Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William, H. C.; Lee, E.; Grannas, A.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2003-12-01

    Except for emission processes, there is currently little understanding of the mechanisms driving the degradation and biogeochemical cycling of black carbon (BC). Considering current estimates of the global BC pool (>2,500x1015gC), and its annual emission rates (55-205x1012 gC/year), BC represents roughly 16% of Earth's actively cycling organic carbon. Without significant chemical and biological degradation pathways, all of the actively cycling carbon on earth would have accumulated as charcoal in <100,000 years. This investigation show that charcoals recovered from experimental forest fires are altered significantly by microbial colonization, and mineral complexation during exposure to soil processes. Charcoal surface morphology and elemental composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and BET surface area measurements. The influence of 90 years aging upon carbon functionality was probed by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. The prevalence of fungal mycorhizae in these forest soil charcoals also motivated an investigation of black carbon degradation via extracellular enzymes and acids known be exuded by mycelia. Degradation is quantified by carbon loss, and soluble products are examined by mass spectrometry.

  3. Abundance, distribution, and isotopic composition of particulate black carbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weifeng; Guo, Laodong

    2014-11-01

    There exists increasing evidence supporting the important role of black carbon in global carbon cycles. Particulate black carbon (PBC) is allochthonous and has distinct reactivities compared to the bulk particulate organic carbon (tot-POC) in marine environments. However, the abundance, geochemical behavior of PBC and its importance in oceanic carbon budget remain poorly understood. Here we report the abundance, distribution, and stable isotopic signatures of BC derived from the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method (BCCTO) in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that BCCTO abundance decreased from shelf to basin, and more than a half of riverine BCCTO could be removed over the shelf. Moreover, BCCTO is much more refractory compared to the tot-POC and has δ13C values lower than those of BC-excluded POC. These results highlight the significance of PBC in marine carbon cycles and potentially suggest the need for a new end-member term in quantifying POC sources in the ocean.

  4. Black Carbon Concentrations in Urban and Rural Arid-Land Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, A.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2008-12-01

    This study examines black carbon (BC) in soils from central Arizona. Black carbon (BC) is the product of incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel. It has a wide range of physical structures from slightly charred biomass to soot carbon, that vary in size from millimeter-scale to submicrometer-scale, respectively. BC has been shown to make up a large portion (up to 50 %) of the soil organic carbon pool. However, many uncertainties exist in global and regional BC budgets that are directly related to the wide variety of experimental techniques used to measure BC. Although traditionally thought to be quite refractory, it is now known that more BC is produced than is stored in sinks annually. Because of this imbalance, a more dynamic role for BC in the environment must be considered. Very little is currently known about BC reactivity in soil. Examining soils with both fossil fuel derived and biomass derived BC inputs can reveal information about BC functionality and aid in the understanding of it's role in earth's reactive carbon pool. Soil samples were collected as a part of the 200-Point Survey conducted by the Central Arizona - Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (CAP-LTER) project. Soil samples from a range of sites around the Phoenix-metro area were classified by land cover and land use. Total carbon, weight % organic carbon, and weight % inorganic carbon were measured at each site. Forty-eight survey points ranging from rural desert soils to urban soils were sub-sampled and analyzed for BC concentration. BC was isolated from the bulk soil carbon using a chemo-thermal oxidation technique commonly known as CTO375. Concentrations of BC were measured using an elemental analyzer coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Our results show that BC makes up from 0.01 to 0.78 % of the total weight of soil. An amount that corresponds to between 1.65 and 62.86 % of the organic carbon pool. This indicates that a significant portion of the organic carbon in

  5. Isotopically Light Organic Carbon in Phanerozoic Black Shales: Diagenetic, Source, or Environmental Signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    A curious depletion of 13C in the organic matter of marine black shales has been widely recognized ever since the advent of carbon isotope measurements half a century ago. Paleozoic and Mesozoic black shales commonly have del13C values between -29 and -26 permil, whereas modern marine organic matter has values between -22 and -18 permil. The black shale values mimic those of continental organic matter, yet sedimentary settings and Rock-Eval results indicate that the organic matter is marine in origin. This presentation will overview and discuss hypotheses to explain the isotopically light values of the black shales. First, the preferential removal of isotopically heavier organic matter components such as carbohydrates by diagenesis will be examined and shown to be wanting. Second, the possible oxidation of isotopically light methane released from clathrates that would have altered the DIC pool available to phytoplankton will be considered and also be found unlikely. A third possibility - that greater concentrations of CO2 in the greenhouse atmospheres that corresponded with deposition of many black shales allowed greater discrimination against 13C during photosynthesis - will be evaluated from del13C values of bulk carbon and of algal and land-plant biomarker molecules. Finally, the possibility that stronger stratification of the surface ocean may have magnified photic zone recycling of organic matter and reincorporation of its isotopically light carbon into fresh biomass will be considered. Although the fourth possibility is contrary to the conditions of vertical mixing of nutrients that exist in modern upwelling systems and that are responsible for their high productivity, it is consistent with the strongly stratified conditions that accompanied the high productivity that produced the Pliocene-Pleistocene sapropels of the Mediterranean Sea. Because the sapropels and most Phanerozic black shales share del15N values near 0 permil, nitrogen fixation evidently was

  6. Net removal of dissolved organic carbon in the subsurface Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, A. R.; Gerringa, L. J.; Hansell, D. A.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the deep Black Sea are ~2.5 times higher than found in the global ocean. The two major external sources of DOC are rivers and the Mediterranean, while expansive phytoplankton blooms contribute autochthonous carbon to the Black Sea's ~800 Tg C DOC reservoir. Here, a basin-wide zonal section of DOC is explored using data from the 2013 Dutch GEOTRACES GA04-N "MedBlack" cruise 64PE373. DOC distributions are interpreted with respect to well-described hydrographic and biogeochemical layers of the Black Sea. DOC concentrations were >180 µmol kg-1 at the surface, decreasing to ~125 µmol kg-1 at the base of the oxic layer and reaching a minimum of ~113 µmol kg-1 in the upper anoxic layer between ~150 and 500 m. Maximum anoxic layer concentrations of 122 µmol kg-1 were found in the homogeneous benthic bottom layer (>1775 m). Determined from the relationship of DOC with salinity, we found that ~34-41 µmol kg-1 was removed from the basin's oxic layer in <5 years, and an additional 13 ± 5 µmol kg-1 was removed from the anoxic layer during its ~300-600 years residence time, given steady state. We find no evidence for DOC accumulation in the anoxic Black Sea, and suggest that concentrations are elevated relative to the ocean due to input of terrigenous DOC from rivers. The Black Sea's relatively elevated DOC pool may be analogous to the previously hypothesized anoxic Eocene ocean's elevated reservoir if the Eocene ocean received a substantial amount of terrigenous DOC from rivers.

  7. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  8. Investigating Seasonal Emissions of Carbon Dioxide and Methane in Northern California Using Airborne Measurements and Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Xi, X.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Potter, C. S.; Tanaka, T.; Tadic, J.; Loewenstein, M.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.; Gurney, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations have increased over the past decades and are linked to increasing global surface temperatures and climate change. To counteract the trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations of GHGs, the state of California has passed the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB-32). This requires that by 2020, GHG (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4)) emissions will be reduced to 1990 levels. Currently, California emits ~500 Tg yr-1 of CO2eq GHGs, with CO2 and CH4 contributing ~90% of the total. To quantify the success of AB-32, GHG emission rates must be more thoroughly quantified in California. Presently, uncertainties remain in the existing "bottom-up" emission inventories in California due to many contributing factors not being fully understood. To help alleviate these uncertainties, we have analyzed airborne GHG measurements and applied inverse modeling techniques to quantify GHG spatiotemporal concentration patterns and "top-down" emission rates. To assess the magnitude/spatial variation of GHGs, and to identify local emission "hot spots", airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4 were made by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) in the boundary layer of the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in Jan.-Feb. 2013 and July-Aug. 2014. To quantify/constrain GHG emissions we applied the WRF-STILT model and inverse modeling techniques, in conjunction with AJAX data, to estimate "top-down" SFBA/SJV GHG emission rates. Model simulations utilized source apportioned a priori CO2 and CH4 emission inventories from the Vulcan Project (including NASA Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach (NASA-CASA) model CO2 biosphere fluxes) and the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) Project, respectively. Results from the evaluation of a priori and posterior GHG concentrations/emissions in northern California using AJAX data, along with the analysis of CO2 and CH4 concentration spatiotemporal

  9. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Carbon and Sweetwater counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 151 square miles of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of twelve radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity

  10. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  11. Effect of pyrolyzed carbon black on asphalt cement. Part 2. Asphalt binder. Final report, September 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Lovell, C.W.

    1996-02-20

    Scrap tires derived from automobiles have become a large environmental problem in the United States. In the study, research is carried out to investigate the potential use of tire-derived pyrolyzed carbon black from scrap tires as an asphalt cement modifier. The asphlat cements used in the research were AC10 and AC20. Penetration and softening point tests were performed to obtain the consistency of the asphalt cements. The pyrolyzed carbon black, as provided by Wolf Industries, was combined with the asphalt cement in the following percentages: 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. Penetration, softening point and ductility tests were performed to determine the temperature susceptibility of the modified binder as altered by the pyrolyzed carbon black. In order that the results are comparable to previous testing, commercial carbon black purchased from CABOT Industry was also used as a modifier in the tests. The same test procedures were applied to the asphalt cements modified by commercial carbon black. The test results contained in the report illustrate the viability of the pyrolyzed carbon black as an asphalt modifier. Recommendations are provided to facilitate further research on this particular project. A preliminary assessment of a test road using the pyrolyzed carbon is appended.

  12. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures. PMID:27508218

  13. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures.

  14. Voltammetric studies of the behavior of carbon black during phenol oxidation on Ti/Pt electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Boudenne, J.L.; Cerclier, O.; Bianco, P.

    1998-08-01

    Oxidation of phenol on platinum electrodes rapidly leads to the formation of a passivating film on the surface of these electrodes. Studies of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses have shown that the presence of carbon black avoids these phenomena of passivation and thus allows the complete mineralization of phenol. The nature of carbon black and the pH value are two important factors which are studied here. VULCAN XC-72 R, an intrinsic p-type semiconductor, having a large specific area, showed all its efficiency when cyclic voltammetry experiments were carried out in an acid medium (pH 2.2). HPLC analyses revealed the appearance of several by-products such as hydroquinone and benzoquinone, and maleic and fumaric acids.

  15. Distribution of black carbon in Ponderosa pine litter and soils following the High Park wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, C. M.; Haddix, M.; Paustian, K.; Cotrufo, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), the heterogeneous product of burned biomass, is a critical component in the global carbon cycle, yet timescales and mechanisms for incorporation into the soil profile are not well understood. The High Park Fire, which took place in northwestern Colorado in the summer of 2012, provided an opportunity to study the effects of both fire intenstiy and geomorphology on properties of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and BC in the Cache La Poudre River drainage. We sampled montane Ponderosa pine litter, 0-5 cm soils, and 5-15 cm soils four months post-fire in order to examine the effects of slope and burn intensity on %C, C stocks, %N and black carbon (g kg-1 C, and g m-2). We developed and implemented the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method for quantifying BC. With regard to slope, we found that steeper slopes had higher C : N than shallow slopes, but that there was no difference in black carbon content or stocks. BC content was greatest in the litter in burned sites (19 g kg-1 C), while BC stocks were greatest in the 5-15 cm subsurface soils (23 g m-2). At the time of sampling, none of the BC deposited on the land surface post-fire had been incorporated into to either the 0-5 cm or 5-15 cm soil layers. The ratio of B5CA : B6CA (less condensed to more condensed BC) indicated there was significantly more older, more processed BC at depth. Total BC soil stocks were relatively low compared to other fire-prone grassland and boreal forest systems, indicating most of the BC produced in this system is likely transported off the surface through erosion events. Future work examining mechanisms for BC transport will be required for understanding the role BC plays in the global carbon cycle.

  16. Nitric Acid Uptake and Decomposition on Black Carbon (Soot) Surfaces: Its Implications for the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, W.; Leu, M. T.

    1998-01-01

    Black carbon particles (soot) are formed as a result of incomplete combustion processes and are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. The lower troposphere contains plenty of soot particles whose principal sources are fossil fuel and biomass combustion at the ground level.

  17. A 400-year record of black carbon flux in the Xisha archipelago, South China Sea and its implication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xu, Liqiang; Sun, Liguang; Liu, Fei; Wang, Yuhong; Yan, Hong; Liu, Yi; Luo, Yuhan; Huang, Jing

    2011-10-01

    We reconstructed the first long-term (∼ 400 years) records of black carbon (BC) deposition flux from three ornithogenic sediment profiles, which were collected from three remote, isolated islets of the Xisha archipelago, South China Sea. The significant correlations between black carbon, organic matter and excess (210)Pb suggested that black carbon was mainly derived from atmospheric deposition, and further enriched by plant-derived organic matter in sediments. During the past 400 years, the BC flux remained relatively low before the onset of 20th century; it started to increase from approximately 1900 AD, and peaked around the 1970s. In the recent 30 years, the BC flux seemed to display decreasing trend, very likely due to the change of energy structure and development of pollution control techniques. In comparison with marginal sea regions that are greatly impacted by anthropogenic activities, these pristine Xisha islands were not significantly influenced by black carbon of anthropogenic origin.

  18. Adsorption Behavior of Black Carbon for Radioactive Iodine Species in Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, S.; Kim, M.; Um, W.

    2012-12-01

    Releases of radioactive iodines (125/129/131I) into subsurface environments occur during nuclear power plant operations, nuclear weapons tests, and nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. Environmental concern is mostly for 129I due to high toxicity and long-half life, t1/2=1,600,000 years. The fate and transport of radioactive iodines depend on the speciation in the environments. Sorption of iodate (IO3-) is strongly affected by natural organic matter (NOM) in soil/sediments, while iodide (I-) sorption is less. Although there are numerous forms and compositions of NOM in soil/sediments, previous studies were mostly focused on general organic matter such as humic and fulvic acids. The objective of this study is addressed to evaluate the impact of black carbon as different NOM forms in subsurface environments. Laboratory-produced wood char was used as a representative of black carbon for sorption batch experiments. Commercial humic acid was added to experiments for comparison of iodine sorption behavior to black carbon material. Stable iodine isotope, 127I, was used as a surrogate of radioactive iodine. The 13C-NMR analyses indicated that the wood char consisted of dominantly aromatic chemical structures, while the humic acid exhibited relatively more aliphatic structures than aromaticity. The char and humic acid significantly increased iodide and iodate sorption, respectively. However, iodate sorption on char and iodide sorption on humic acid were negligible in this study. These observations implied different sorption mechanisms between black carbon and humic acid due to different pore structures and chemical compositions. Both of sorption isotherms are dependent on aqueous concentrations, following Freundlich isotherm with n~0.7. The sorption behavior and mechanism of iodine is significantly influenced by the NOM types in soils and sediments, which can enhance iodine retardation in the subsurface environment.

  19. Comment on "Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon".

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark Z

    2013-01-25

    Cappa et al. (Reports, 31 August 2012, p. 1078) suggest that black carbon (BC) in a mixture absorbs only ~6% more sunlight than when volatile chemicals are evaporated from the mixture, and state that "many climate models may overestimate warming by BC." However, the authors misinterpret at least some model results and omit optical focusing at high relative humidity and of involatile components. Thus, their conclusion about model error is not demonstrated.

  20. Comment on "Radiative Absorption Enhancements Due to the Mixing State of Atmospheric Black Carbon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2013-01-01

    Cappa et al. (Reports, 31 August 2012, p. 1078) suggest that black carbon (BC) in a mixture absorbs only ~6% more sunlight than when volatile chemicals are evaporated from the mixture, and state that "many climate models may overestimate warming by BC." However, the authors misinterpret at least some model results and omit optical focusing at high relative humidity and of involatile components. Thus, their conclusion about model error is not demonstrated.

  1. Black Carbon and Its Environmental Implications in the High Asia Atmosphere, Snow Cover, Lake, and Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, J.

    2014-12-01

    High Asia (HA), extensively including Tibetan Plateau, Pamir, Tienshan, and Altai, is a wide region characterized by high mean elevation over 4000 m. It is thought to be a remote area with less pollution, although surrounded by populous regions of strong pollutant-emission, like South Asia and China. However, evidences from in-situ air monitoring data, ice core records, snow sample analysis, and lake sediment record showed that the environment of HA is more and more severely under the threat of pollutant locally generated and exotic. A three-year-round aerosol sampling in Pamir during 2003-2006 showed the concentrations of black carbon seemed to increase by a factor of 2. Trajectory analysis suggested the pollutants from the eastern parts of China should contribute large to this. Inside Tibet, the atmospheric BC at Nam Co also showed a slight increasing trend during 2006-2009 associated with the pollutant penetration from South Asia. Ice core records along the Himalaya showed black carbon from South Asia can be transported into Tibet primarily through the Brahmaputra river valley, and secondly by the uplifted air stream. The deposition of black carbon in the surface of HA glaciers can cause a mean forcing of 6 W/m2. The darkening of the mid-Himalaya glaciers can be partly due to black carbon. The mean concentration of BC in HA glaciers is ~50 ppbw, and that in the snow cover of Xinjiang is ~70 ppbw. BC can be responsible for 30% reduction in the albedo of a winter snow cover observed at Nam Co. A 150-year record retrieved from the sediment of Nam Co Lake showed a significantly increasing trend of BC since 1860, which is consistent with the emissions of South Asia. We conclude that BC from exotic surroundings has impacted the environment of HA significantly.

  2. Online single particle measurements of black carbon coatings, structure and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, James; Liu, Dantong; Taylor, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael; Williams, Paul; Morgan, William; Whitehead, James; Alfarra, Rami; McFiggans, Gordon; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of black carbon on meteorology and climate remain a major source of uncertainty, owing in part to the complex relationship between the bulk composition of the particulates and their optical properties. A particular complication stems from how light interacts with particles in response to the microphysical configuration and any 'coatings', i.e. non-black carbon material that is either co-emitted or subsequently obtained through atmospheric processing. This may cause the particle to more efficiently absorb or scatter light and may even change the sign of its radiative forcing potential. While much insight has been gained through measurements of bulk aerosol properties, either while suspended or after collection on a filter or impactor substrate, this does not provide a complete picture and thus may not adequately constrain the system. Here we present an overview of recent work to better constrain the properties of black carbon using online, in situ measurements of single particles, primarily using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We have developed novel methods of inverting the data produced and combining the different metrics derived so as to give the most effective insights into black carbon sources, processes and properties. We have also used this measurement in conjunction with other instruments (sometimes in series) and used the data to challenge many commonly used models of optical properties such as core-shell Mie, Rayleigh-Debeye-Gans and effective medium. This work has been carried out in a variety of atmospheric environments and with laboratory-produced soots, e.g. from a diesel engine rig. Highlights include the finding that with real-world atmospheric aerosols, bulk optical measurements may be insufficient to derive brown carbon parameters without detailed morphological data. We also show that the enhancement of absorption for both ambient and laboratory generated particles only occurs after the coating mass fraction reaches a certain

  3. Multiwavelength absorbance of filter deposits for determination of environmental tobacco smoke and black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawless, Phil A.; Rodes, Charles E.; Ensor, David S.

    A multiwavelength optical absorption technique has been developed for Teflon filters used for personal exposure sampling with sufficient sensitivity to allow apportionments of environmental tobacco smoke and soot (black) carbon to be made. Measurements on blank filters show that the filter material itself contributes relatively little to the total absorbance and filters from the same lot have similar characteristics; this makes retrospective analysis of filters quite feasible. Using an integrating sphere radiometer and multiple wavelengths to provide specificity, the determination of tobacco smoke and carbon with reasonable accuracy is possible on filters not characterized before exposure. This technique provides a low cost, non-destructive exposure assessment alternative to both standard thermo-gravimetric elemental carbon evaluations on quartz filters and cotinine analyses from urine or saliva samples. The method allows the same sample filter to be used for assessment of mass, carbon, and tobacco smoke without affecting the deposit.

  4. Functionalized carbon nanoparticles, blacks and soots as electron-transfer building blocks and conduits.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Katherine; Baker, Charlotte L; James, Tony D; Bull, Steven D; Lawrence, Ruth; Mitchels, John M; Opallo, Marcin; Arotiba, Omotayo A; Ozoemena, Kenneth I; Marken, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized carbon nanoparticles (or blacks) have promise as novel active high-surface-area electrode materials, as conduits for electrons to enzymes or connections through lipid films, or as nano-building blocks in electroanalysis. With previous applications of bare nanoblacks and composites mainly in electrochemical charge storage and as substrates in fuel cell devices, the full range of benefits of bare and functionalized carbon nanoparticles in assemblies and composite (bio)electrodes is still emerging. Carbon nanoparticles are readily surface-modified, functionalized, embedded, or assembled into nanostructures, employed in bioelectrochemical systems, and incorporated into novel electrochemical sensing devices. This focus review summarizes aspects of a rapidly growing field and some of the recent developments in carbon nanoparticle functionalization with potential applications in (bio)electrochemical, photoelectrochemical, and electroanalytical processes.

  5. Recent Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion primarily driven by black carbon and tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert J; Sherwood, Steven C; Norris, Joel R; Zender, Charles S

    2012-05-16

    Observational analyses have shown the width of the tropical belt increasing in recent decades as the world has warmed. This expansion is important because it is associated with shifts in large-scale atmospheric circulation and major climate zones. Although recent studies have attributed tropical expansion in the Southern Hemisphere to ozone depletion, the drivers of Northern Hemisphere expansion are not well known and the expansion has not so far been reproduced by climate models. Here we use a climate model with detailed aerosol physics to show that increases in heterogeneous warming agents--including black carbon aerosols and tropospheric ozone--are noticeably better than greenhouse gases at driving expansion, and can account for the observed summertime maximum in tropical expansion. Mechanistically, atmospheric heating from black carbon and tropospheric ozone has occurred at the mid-latitudes, generating a poleward shift of the tropospheric jet, thereby relocating the main division between tropical and temperate air masses. Although we still underestimate tropical expansion, the true aerosol forcing is poorly known and could also be underestimated. Thus, although the insensitivity of models needs further investigation, black carbon and tropospheric ozone, both of which are strongly influenced by human activities, are the most likely causes of observed Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion.

  6. Black Carbon Emissions and Impacts on the South American Glacial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, L. T.; Gallardo, L.; Schmitt, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon is one of the key short-lived climate pollutants, which is a topic of growing interest for near-term mitigation of climate change and air quality improvement. In this presentation we will examine the emissions and impact of black carbon and co-pollutants on the South American glacial region and describe some recent measurements associated with the PISAC (Pollution and its Impacts on the South American Cryosphere) Initiative. The Andes is the longest continental mountain range in the world, extending about 7000 km along western South America through seven countries with complex topography and covering several climate zones, diversity of ecosystems and communities. Air pollution associated with biomass burning and urban emissions affects extensive areas in the region and is a serious public health concern. Scientific evidence indicates that the Andean cryosphere is changing rapidly as snow fields and glaciers generally recede, leading to changes in stream flow and water quality along the Andes. The challenge is to identify the principal causes of the observed changes so that action can be taken to mitigate this negative trend. Despite the paucity of systematic observations along the Andes, a few modeling and observational studies have indicated the presence of black carbon in the high Andes, with potentially significant impact on the Andean cryosphere.

  7. Implications of ammonia emissions from post-combustion carbon capture for airborne particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinhyok; McCoy, Sean T; Adams, Peter J

    2015-04-21

    Amine scrubbing, a mature post-combustion carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, could increase ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) due to its ammonia emissions. To capture 2.0 Gt CO2/year, for example, it could emit 32 Gg NH3/year in the United States given current design targets or 15 times higher (480 Gg NH3/year) at rates typical of current pilot plants. Employing a chemical transport model, we found that the latter emission rate would cause an increase of 2.0 μg PM2.5/m(3) in nonattainment areas during wintertime, which would be troublesome for PM2.5-burdened areas, and much lower increases during other seasons. Wintertime PM2.5 increases in nonattainment areas were fairly linear at a rate of 3.4 μg PM2.5/m(3) per 1 Tg NH3, allowing these results to be applied to other CCS emissions scenarios. The PM2.5 impacts are modestly uncertain (±20%) depending on future emissions of SO2, NOx, and NH3. The public health costs of CCS NH3 emissions were valued at $31-68 per tonne CO2 captured, comparable to the social cost of carbon itself. Because the costs of solvent loss to CCS operators are lower than the social costs of CCS ammonia, there is a regulatory interest to limit ammonia emissions from CCS.

  8. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF-carbon

  9. Spatial Variability in Black Carbon Mixing State Observed During The Multi-City NASA DISCOVER-AQ Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Corr, C.; Hudgins, C.; Martin, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols are known to be an important climatic driver with a global radiative forcing of about half (IPCC, 2013) to two-thirds (Bond et al., 2013) that of the dominant greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. While the mass absorption coefficient of pure black carbon (BC) is fairly well known, observational evidence suggests that BC rapidly mixes with other aerosol chemical components within hours of emission (Moffet and Prather, 2009; Moteki et al., 2007). These other components may include predominantly scattering organic, sulfate, and nitrate species, as well as light-absorbing, so-called "brown carbon" (BrC). It has been suggested that the presence of these BC-mixed components may induce mixing-state-dependent lensing effects that could potentially double the BC direct radiative forcing (Jacobson, 2001). The key to better understanding how BC-rich aerosols are distributed in the atmosphere is to examine an unbiased set of measurements covering broad spatial and temporal coverage; however, many past airborne field campaigns have specifically targeted source plumes or other scientifically-relevant emissions sources. The recent NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign is unique in that approximately the same flight pattern was performed over a month-long period in each of four different U.S. metropolitan areas, ensuring an unbiased, or at least less biased, data set with both wide horizontal and vertical (surface to 5 km altitude) coverage. We present a statistical analysis of BC-rich particle mixing state measured during DISCOVER-AQ by a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The SP2 measures the BC mass distribution via laser incandescence, and the non-BC coating thickness is inferred from the light scattering signal of particles greater than 200 nm in diameter (Gao et al., 2007; Moteki and Kondo, 2008). The SP2-derived size distributions are compared to optical scattering size distributions measured by an UHSAS in order determine 1) the externally

  10. Vertical and Spatial Profiling of Arctic Black Carbon on the North Slope of Alaska 2015: Comparison of Model and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Feng, Y.; Biraud, S.; Springston, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic Cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. One class of under measured radiative forcing agents in the Polar Region is the absorbing aerosol - black carbon and brown carbon. In particular, vertical profile information of BC is critical in reducing uncertainty in model assessment of aerosol radiative impact at high latitudes. During the summer of 2015, a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was deployed aboard the Department of Energy (DOE) Gultstream-1 (G-1) aircraft to measure refractory BC (rBC) concentrations as part of the DOE-sponsored ACME-V (ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements) campaign. This campaign was conducted from June through to mid-September along the North Slope of Alaska and was punctuated by vertical profiling over 5 sites (Atquasuk, Barrow, Ivotuk, Oliktok, and Toolik). In addition, measurement of CO, CO2 and CH4were also taken to provide information on the spatial and seasonal differences in GHG sources and how these sources correlate with BC. Lastly, these aerosol and gas measurements provide an important dataset to assess the representativeness of ground sites at regional scales. Comparisons between observations and a global climate model (CAM5) simulations will be agumented with a discussion on the capability of the model to capture observed monthly mean profiles of BC and stratified aerosol layers. Additionally, the ability of the SP2 to partition rBC-containing particles into nascent or aged species allows an evaluation of how well the CAM5 model captures aging of long distant transported carbonaceous aerosols. Finally model sensitivity studies will be aso be presented that investigated the relative importance of the different emission sectors to the summer Arctic

  11. Estimating absorbing black carbon and organic carbon optical properties from AERONET and MISR data over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Huang, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosols is one of the largest source of uncertainties in global and regional climate change. Black carbon and organic carbon from biomass and fossil fuel are two major types of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study we use available ground based and satellite observations to infer the optical properties of black and organic carbon. NASA's AERONET and MISR data over East Asia provide the observational basis. We use the spectral variations in the observed aerosol extinction optical depth and absorption optical depth to categorize the optical properties including their mixing state with other aerosols such as dust and other inorganic aerosols. We create 8 different categories of aerosol mixtures: Dust, Biomass Burning, Fossil Fuel, Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Dust with Biomass Burning, Mixed Dust with Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Biomass Burning with Fossil Fuel, and Mixed Dust, Biomass Burning, with Fossil Fuel, over the following 6 regions of East Asia: Nepal, Gobi, North Industrial China, South Industrial China, Southeast Asia, and Korea/Japan. Our results are compared with independent surface observations over China using Aethalometers and Single Particle Soot Photometers.

  12. TEM Observations of Corrosion Behaviors of Platinized Carbon Blacks under Thermal and Electrochemical Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.Y.; Zhang, J.L.; Yu, P.T.; Zhang, J.X.; Makharia, R.; More, Karren Leslie; Stach, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Carbon blacks such as Vulcan XC-72 are widely used to support platinum (Pt) or Pt alloy catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Despite their widespread use, carbon blacks are susceptible to corrosion during fuel cell operations. In this work, the corrosion behaviors of platinized Vulcan XC-72 nanoparticles under thermal and electrochemical conditions were monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal corrosion experiment was carried out in a gas-cell TEM, which allows for a direct observation of the thermal oxidation behavior of the nanoparticles. The electrochemical corrosion experiment was performed outside of the TEM by loading the nanoparticles on a TEM grid and then electrochemically corroding them step by step followed by taking TEM images from exactly the same nanoparticles after each step. This work revealed four types of structural changes: (i) total removal of structurally weak aggregates, (ii) breakdown of aggregates via neck-breaking, (iii) center-hollowed primary particles caused by an inside-out corrosion starting from the center to outer region, and (iv) gradual decrease in the size of primary particles caused by a uniform removal of material from the surface. These structural changes took place in sequence or simultaneously depending on the competition of carbon corrosion dynamical processes. The results obtained from this work provide insight on carbon corrosion and its effects on fuel cells' long-term performance and durability.

  13. Abiotic and microbial oxidation of laboratory-produced black carbon (biochar).

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Andrew R

    2010-02-15

    Pyrogenic or "black" carbon is a soil and sediment component that may control pollutant migration. Biochar, black carbon made intentionally by biomass pyrolysis, is increasingly discussed as a possible soil amendment to increase fertility and sequester carbon. Though thought to be extremely refractory, it must degrade at some rate. Better understanding of the rates and factors controlling its remineralization in the environment is needed. Release of CO(2) was measured over 1 year from microbial and sterile incubations of biochars made from a range of biomass types and combustion conditions. Carbon release from abiotic incubations was 50-90% that of microbially inoculated incubations, and both generally decreased with increasing charring temperature. All biochars displayed log-linearly decreasing mineralization rates that, when modeled, were used to calculate 100 year C losses of 3-26% and biochar C half-lives on orders ranging from 10(2) to 10(7) years. Because biochar lability was found to be strongly controlled by the relative amount of a more aliphatic and volatile component, measurements of volatile weight content may be a convenient predictor of biochar C longevity. These results are of practical value to those considering biochar as a tool for soil remediation, amelioration, or atmospheric C sequestration. PMID:20085259

  14. Black Carbon in Estuarine (Coastal) High-molecular-weight Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean constitutes one of the largest pools of organic carbon in the biosphere, yet much of its composition is uncharacterized. Observations of black carbon (BC) particles (by-products of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning) in the atmosphere, ice, rivers, soils and marine sediments suggest that this material is ubiquitous, yet the contribution of BC to the ocean s DOM pool remains unknown. Analysis of high-molecular-weight DOM isolated from surface waters of two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean finds that BC is a significant component of DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of BC to the ocean through DOM. We show that BC comprises 4-7% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at coastal ocean sites, which supports the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition. Flux calculations suggest that BC could be as important as vascular plant-derived lignin in terms of carbon inputs to the ocean. Production of BC sequesters fossil fuel- and biomass-derived carbon into a refractory carbon pool. Hence, BC may represent a significant sink for carbon to the ocean.

  15. Gasification behavior of carbon residue in bed solids of black liquor gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Preto, Fernando; Zhang, Xiaojie; Wang, Jinsheng

    2008-07-15

    Steam gasification of carbon residue in bed solids of a low-temperature black liquor gasifier was studied using a thermogravimetric system at 3 bar. Complete gasification of the carbon residue, which remained unreactive at 600 C, was achieved in about 10 min as the temperature increased to 800 C. The rate of gasification and its temperature dependence were evaluated from the non-isothermal experiment results. Effects of particle size and adding H{sub 2} and CO to the gasification agent were also studied. The rate of steam gasification could be taken as zero order in carbon until 80% of carbon was gasified, and for the rest of the gasification process the rate appeared to be first order in carbon. The maximum rate of carbon conversion was around 0.003/s and the activation energy was estimated to be in the range of 230-300 kJ/mol. The particle size did not show significant effect on the rate of gasification. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide appeared to retard the onset of the gasification process. (author)

  16. Ac conductance and capacitance of carbon black polymer composites during thermal cycling and isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, K.-M.; McQueen, D. H.; Vilcáková, J.

    2002-05-01

    The ac electrical properties of acetylene black composites mixed into ethylene butylacrylate copolymer (EBA) and into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) have been measured in thermal cycling and isothermal annealing experiments. The results show that changes in electrical properties are due to rearrangement of gaps between the carbon black aggregates. This has been concluded using an exponent z that relates the critical frequency ωc denoting the crossover of the conductivity from the dc-plateau to its frequency-dependent part to the dc conductivity, σdc, according to ωc ∝σdcz. Below the melting range of EBA and the glass transition of PMMA z is about one corresponding to strong variation of the conductivity and weak dependence of the permittivity on the gaps. Above the melting range of EBA z is about 1.5, indicating strong dependence of both the conductivity and the permittivity on the gaps, as predicted by percolation theory. This was not found in the PMMA composites above the glass transition. We conclude that the polymer matrix affects the nature of the gaps between carbon black aggregates, either allowing their size to vary continuously (z about 1) or letting them open and close (z about 1.5).

  17. Evaluating hydropyrolysis as a method for quantification and characterisation of Black Carbon in environmental matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascough, P. L.; Meredith, W.; Bird, M. I.; Large, D.; Snape, C.; Tilston, E.

    2012-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the highly aromatic, recalcitrant product of incomplete biomass and fossil fuel combustion. Black carbon is generally accepted to display extreme environmental longevity, whereas other products of biomass combustion often appear subject to environmental degradation on comparatively short timescales. It is clear that BC plays a key role within global biogeochemical cycles, and improved understanding of BC cycling is an important research goal. Currently a wide selection of thermal, chemical and optical methods are available for BC quantification in environmental matrices, and large method-dependant differences in results are apparent. We present results of a study to evaluate the efficacy of a new approach for BC isolation, known as hydropyrolysis (hypy). In this process sample pyrolysis is assisted by high hydrogen pressures (15 MPa), facilitating complete reductive removal of labile organic matter, while suppressing the neoformation of secondary char. The potential of hypy for both isolation and quantification of BC was evaluated using 12 reference materials of the International BC Ring Trial (http://www.geo.uzh.ch/en/units/physical-geography-soilbio/services/black-carbon-reference-materials/), including high-BC samples, BC-containing environmental matrices and potentially interfering materials. The results show that it is possible to identify hypy operating conditions whereby lignocellulosic, humic and other labile organic carbon is removed, while the sample BC is preserved for recovery. This is apparent for all of the environmental samples tested, facilitating BC quantification in a wide range of materials. The BC contents of all 12 samples are within the range of the inter-comparison study of the International BC Ring Trial, and the technique appears to reproducibly (±2%) isolate a carbonaceous fraction comprising a chemically well-defined polyaromatic structure from a wide range of different samples. Hypy therefore provides a means of

  18. Enhanced light absorption by mixed source black and brown carbon particles in UK winter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shang; Aiken, Allison C.; Gorkowski, Kyle; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Williams, Leah R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Massoli, Paola; Fortner, Edward C.; Chhabra, Puneet S.; Brooks, William A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; China, Swarup; Sharma, Noopur; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James D.; Lee, James D.; Fleming, Zoë L.; Mohr, Claudia; Zotter, Peter; Szidat, Sönke; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon, BrC) play key roles in warming the atmosphere, but the magnitude of their effects remains highly uncertain. Theoretical modelling and laboratory experiments demonstrate that coatings on BC can enhance BC's light absorption, therefore many climate models simply assume enhanced BC absorption by a factor of ∼1.5. However, recent field observations show negligible absorption enhancement, implying models may overestimate BC's warming. Here we report direct evidence of substantial field-measured BC absorption enhancement, with the magnitude strongly depending on BC coating amount. Increases in BC coating result from a combination of changing sources and photochemical aging processes. When the influence of BrC is accounted for, observationally constrained model calculations of the BC absorption enhancement can be reconciled with the observations. We conclude that the influence of coatings on BC absorption should be treated as a source and regionally specific parameter in climate models. PMID:26419204

  19. Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchstetter, Thomas; Preble, Chelsea; Hadley, Odelle; Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-11-05

    Traditional methods of cooking in developing regions of the world emit pollutants that endanger the lives of billions of people and contribute to climate change. This study quantifies the emission of pollutants from the Berkeley-Darfur Stove and the traditional three-stone fire at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cookstove testing facility. The Berkeley-Darfur Stove was designed as a fuel efficient alternative to the three-stone fire to aid refugees in Darfur, who walk long distances from their camps and risk bodily harm in search of wood for cooking. A potential co-benefit of the more fuel efficient stove may be reduced pollutant emissions. This study measured emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and sunlight-absorbing black carbon. It also measured climate-relevant optical properties of the emitted particulate matter. Pollutant monitors were calibrated specifically for measuring cookstove smoke.

  20. Enhanced light absorption by mixed source black and brown carbon particles in UK winter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shang; Aiken, Allison C; Gorkowski, Kyle; Dubey, Manvendra K; Cappa, Christopher D; Williams, Leah R; Herndon, Scott C; Massoli, Paola; Fortner, Edward C; Chhabra, Puneet S; Brooks, William A; Onasch, Timothy B; Jayne, John T; Worsnop, Douglas R; China, Swarup; Sharma, Noopur; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James D; Lee, James D; Fleming, Zoë L; Mohr, Claudia; Zotter, Peter; Szidat, Sönke; Prévôt, André S H

    2015-09-30

    Black carbon (BC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon, BrC) play key roles in warming the atmosphere, but the magnitude of their effects remains highly uncertain. Theoretical modelling and laboratory experiments demonstrate that coatings on BC can enhance BC's light absorption, therefore many climate models simply assume enhanced BC absorption by a factor of ∼1.5. However, recent field observations show negligible absorption enhancement, implying models may overestimate BC's warming. Here we report direct evidence of substantial field-measured BC absorption enhancement, with the magnitude strongly depending on BC coating amount. Increases in BC coating result from a combination of changing sources and photochemical aging processes. When the influence of BrC is accounted for, observationally constrained model calculations of the BC absorption enhancement can be reconciled with the observations. We conclude that the influence of coatings on BC absorption should be treated as a source and regionally specific parameter in climate models.

  1. Carbon nanowalls: the next step for physical manifestation of the black body coating

    PubMed Central

    Krivchenko, V. A.; Evlashin, S. A.; Mironovich, K. V.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Nefedov, A.; Wöll, C.; Kozmenkova, A. Ya.; Suetin, N. V.; Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Egorov, A. V.; Yashina, L. V.

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of carbon nanowall (CNW) films in the visible range have been studied and reported for the first time. Depending on the film structure, ultra-low total reflectance up to 0.13% can be reached, which makes the CNW films a promising candidate for the black body-like coating, and thus for a wide range of applications as a light absorber. We have estimated important trends in the optical property variation from sample to sample, and identified the presence of edge states and domain boundaries in carbon nanowalls as well as the film mass density variation as the key factors. Also we demonstrated that at much lower film thickness and density than for a carbon nanotube forest the CNWs yield one order higher specific light absorption. PMID:24270355

  2. [Environmental behavior and effect of biomass-derived black carbon in soil: a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Xue; Liu, Wei; Wu, Wei-Xiang; Zhong, Zhe-Ke; Chen, Ying-Xu

    2009-04-01

    Biomass-derived black carbon, also named biochar, has the characteristics of high stability against decay and high capability of adsorption, and can affect the environment through its interactions with climate and geology, playing a significant role in global climate change, carbon biogeochemical cycle, and environmental system. In recent years, more and more researchers in the fields of atmospheric sciences, geology, and environmental science focused on the environmental behavior and effect of biochar. As one possible source of the components with high aromatic structure in soil humus, biochar is of great importance in increasing soil carbon storage and improving soil fertility, and in maintaining the balance of soil ecosystem. This paper offered the latest information regarding the characteristics and biotic and abiotic oxidation mechanisms of biochar, its effects on global climate change, and the environmental effect of biochar in soil. Research prospects were briefly discussed on the environmental behavior and effect of biochar in soil ecosystem.

  3. Evaluation of a protocol for the quantification of black carbon in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Örjan; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Kukulska, Zofia; Andersson, Mette; Largeau, Claude; Rouzaud, Jean-NoëL.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2001-12-01

    Formation of highly condensed black carbon (BC) from vegetation fires and wood fuel combustion presumably transfers otherwise rapidly cycling carbon from the atmosphere-biosphere cycle into a much slower cycling geological form. Recently reported BC fractions of total organic carbon (TOC) in surficial marine sediments span a wide range (2-90%), leaving it presently unclear whether this variation reflects natural processes or is largely due to method differences. In order to elucidate the importance of BC to carbon burial the specificity of applied methods needs to be constrained. Here the operating range and applicability of a commonly used chemothermal oxidation (CTO) method is evaluated using putative BC standards, potentially interfering substances, and natural matrix standards. Test results confirm the applicability of the method to marine sediments. Integrity tests with model substrates suggest applicability to low-carbon soils but only with a lower specificity to seawater particulate matter. The BC content of marine sediment samples in a set of studies employing the CTO method proved to be consistent with associated geochemical information. The radiocarbon content of the BC isolate in an environmental matrix standard was shown to be similar to the radiocarbon signature of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), here serving as molecular markers of combustion (fraction modern fM of BC was 0.065 ± 0.014 and of PAHs 0.056 ± 0.020), while being clearly distinct from the radiocarbon content of the bulk TOC (fM = 0.61 ± 0.08). Urgent questions such as the global accumulation rate of black carbon in soils and sediments may prove approachable with the chemothermal oxidation technique of BC quantification.

  4. The origin of black carbon on speleothems in tourist caves in South Korea: Chemical characterization and source discrimination by radiocarbon measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sae Jung; Jeong, Gi Young; Kim, Soo Jin

    Since the Gosu, Ondal, and Sungryu karst caves in South Korea became open to the public several decades ago, the surface of their speleothems has been turning black due to pollutants. The black pollutant is concentrated at the surface of speleothems, and the surface black layer is 0.1 to several millimeters thick. Elemental measurements of three bulk, acid-dissolved and oxidized fractions of the surface black layer show that the black pigment is a black carbon. The black carbon correlates positively with sulfates, nitrates, manganese, and lead, which are typical tracers of industrial and urban emissions. The 14C-measurement of the black carbon, using accelerator mass spectrometry, shows that the black carbon was derived from both fossil-fuel combustion and biomass burning in roughly equal amounts, evidenced by fC value ranging from 0.340 to 0.592 (<±0.004, 1 σ). Therefore, protection of speleothems from black coloration requires control of anthropogenic black carbons carried by visitors. Suitable measures might include closure of caves, air cleaning of visitors and regulation of visitor numbers. The application of radiocarbon measurement of black carbon suggests that the fC is a valuable proxy for tracing the blackening phenomenon of natural and cultural heritage sites such as caves.

  5. Rethinking the Scope of Environmental Injustice: Perceptions of Health Hazards in a Rural Native American Community Exposed to Carbon Black

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, Thomas E.; Webb, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    We use in-depth interviews, participant observation, and document analysis to examine perceptions of environmental health and justice among Native Americans in a rural Oklahoma community. Residents live near the Continental Carbon Company, which manufactures a rubber compound know as "carbon black." Ponca tribal members believe their respiratory…

  6. Environmental Technology Verification Program Advanced Monitoring Systems Center Quality Assurance Project Plan for Verification of Black Carbon Monitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black carbon is a term that is commonly used to describe strongly light absorbing carbon (LAC), which is thought to play a significant role in global climate change through direct absorption of light, interaction with clouds, and by reducing the reflectivity of snow and ice. BC ...

  7. Light-absorbing properties of ambient black carbon and brown carbon from fossil fuel and biomass burning sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Willis, M. D.; Jaroudi, E.; Zimmerman, N.; Hilker, N.; Murphy, M.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Wenger, J. C.; Evans, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of ambient black carbon-containing particles and the composition of their associated coatings were investigated at a downtown site in Toronto, Canada, for 2 weeks in June 2013. The objective was to assess the relationship between black carbon (BC) coating composition/thickness and absorption. The site was influenced by emissions from local vehicular traffic, wildfires in Quebec, and transboundary fossil fuel combustion emissions in the United States. Mass concentrations of BC and associated nonrefractory coatings were measured using a soot particle-aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), while aerosol absorption and scattering were measured using a photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS). Absorption enhancement was investigated both by comparing ambient and thermally denuded PASS absorption data and by relating absorption data to BC mass concentrations measured using the SP-AMS. Minimal absorption enhancement attributable to lensing at 781 nm was observed for BC using both approaches. However, brown carbon was detected when the site was influenced by wildfire emissions originating in Quebec. BC coating to core mass ratios were highest during this period (~7), and while direct absorption by brown carbon resulted in an absorption enhancement at 405 nm (>2.0), no enhancement attributable to lensing at 781 nm was observed. The efficiency of BC coating removal in the denuder decreased substantially when wildfire-related organics were present and may represent an obstacle for future similar studies. These findings indicate that BC absorption enhancement due to lensing is minimal for downtown Toronto, and potentially other urban locations, even when impacted by long-range transport events.

  8. Carbon Dynamics of Forest Floor and Stem in Black Spruce Forest Soils, Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongwon; Kim, Seong-Deog; Kim, Woongji

    2010-05-01

    Our automated open/close chamber system (AOCC) consists of eight chambers, a pump, CO2 gas analyzer, and a datalogger for CO2 data on the lichen, tussock, feather moss, and sphagnum moss of a black spruce forest, Interior Alaska, during the growing seasons of 2007 and 2008. During the observing periods of 2007 and 2008, the seasonal NEE was 0.127±0.049 and -0.039±0.025 mgCO2/m2/s in tussock regime, and 0.006±0.011 and 0.028±0.017 mgCO2/m2/s in sphagnum moss, respectively. Air temperature is a more significant regulator than soil temperature in determining the GPP and Re of forest floor vegetations. Air temperature explained 77-95% of the variability in GPP and Re of the floor vegetations. The contributions (%) of simulated seasonal GPP to the black spruce forest during non-growing periods (DOY 1-120 and 244-365) and during the growing period (DOY 121-243) of 2007 are 63-72%, 20-25%, and 8-18%, respectively. This indicates that the floor CO2 exchange, as well as the contribution of winter carbon emission, is a component of the regional carbon budget that cannot be neglected. As the result of simulated GPP and Re in tussock during 2007, tussocks are found to have on atmospheric CO2 release, similar to results of observation for 63-day of 2007. On the other hand of stem respiration rates of black spruce (Picea Mariana), the continuous measurement of stem respiration was conducted in black spruce stands of different ages (4.3 to 13.5 cm in DBH) in Interior Alaska during the growing seasons of 2007 and 2008, using a pump, CO2 analyzer, chambers, and data-logger. The averaged whole stem respiration rate is 0.011±0.005 mgCO2/m2/s (range 0.005±0.002 to 0.015±0.008 mgCO2/m2/s, CV 45%) in black spruce stands, indicating remarkably diurnal and seasonal variations of stem respiration among the stems during the growing season. It is found that metabolism exhibits 1.5-fold higher in the younger black spruce stand than in the older. Temperatures in the air and stem are

  9. Evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed 2 μm IPDA lidar for simultaneous and independent atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide measurements.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael J; Davis, Kenneth J

    2015-02-20

    Water vapor and carbon dioxide are the most dominant greenhouse gases directly contributing to the Earth's radiation budget and global warming. A performance evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar system for simultaneous and independent monitoring of atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide column amounts is presented. This system leverages a state-of-the-art Ho:Tm:YLF triple-pulse laser transmitter operating at 2.05 μm wavelength. The transmitter provides wavelength tuning and locking capabilities for each pulse. The IPDA lidar system leverages a low risk and technologically mature receiver system based on InGaAs pin detectors. Measurement methodology and wavelength setting are discussed. The IPDA lidar return signals and error budget are analyzed for airborne operation on-board the NASA B-200. Results indicate that the IPDA lidar system is capable of measuring water vapor and carbon dioxide differential optical depth with 0.5% and 0.2% accuracy, respectively, from an altitude of 8 km to the surface and with 10 s averaging. Provided availability of meteorological data, in terms of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity vertical profiles, the differential optical depth conversion into weighted-average column dry-air volume-mixing ratio is also presented. PMID:25968204

  10. Evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed 2 μm IPDA lidar for simultaneous and independent atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide measurements.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael J; Davis, Kenneth J

    2015-02-20

    Water vapor and carbon dioxide are the most dominant greenhouse gases directly contributing to the Earth's radiation budget and global warming. A performance evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar system for simultaneous and independent monitoring of atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide column amounts is presented. This system leverages a state-of-the-art Ho:Tm:YLF triple-pulse laser transmitter operating at 2.05 μm wavelength. The transmitter provides wavelength tuning and locking capabilities for each pulse. The IPDA lidar system leverages a low risk and technologically mature receiver system based on InGaAs pin detectors. Measurement methodology and wavelength setting are discussed. The IPDA lidar return signals and error budget are analyzed for airborne operation on-board the NASA B-200. Results indicate that the IPDA lidar system is capable of measuring water vapor and carbon dioxide differential optical depth with 0.5% and 0.2% accuracy, respectively, from an altitude of 8 km to the surface and with 10 s averaging. Provided availability of meteorological data, in terms of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity vertical profiles, the differential optical depth conversion into weighted-average column dry-air volume-mixing ratio is also presented.

  11. Occupational exposure to carbon black in its manufacture: data from 1987 to 1992.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, K; Calvert, I A; van Tongeren, M J; Harrington, J M

    1996-02-01

    Carbon black is a very pure form of very finely divided particulate carbon used mainly in the automotive tyre industry. Its carbonaceous nature and submicron size (unpelleted) have raised concerns with regard to its ability to affect respiratory morbidity. This paper describes the exposure to carbon black dust in the first and second phase of a large multi-national epidemiological study investigating the magnitude of these exposure-related effects. In Phase I, 1278 respirable dust samples were taken (SIMPEDS cyclone) which increased to 2941 in Phase II with a similar rise in the number of total inhalable dust samples (IOM head) from 1288 in Phase I to 3433 Phase II. Exposure dropped markedly between the two phases with total inhalable dust showing a bigger reduction (49.9%) than respirable dust (42%), although the mean exposure for certain factories and job categories dropped more than others. The data are presented by the 14 job titles/numbers (21-34). The highest mean exposure in both phases and for both dust fractions is experienced by the warehouse packers and they are also most likely to exceed the OES of 3.5 mg m-3 (35.1% of samples in Phase I and 12.0% in Phase II). PMID:9054303

  12. Observations of Black Carbon and Aerosol Optical Depth in the Kali Gandaki Valley, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    During recent years there has been increasing concern about the deposition of black carbon from the Indo-Gangetic Plains onto the glaciers and snowfields of the Tibetan Plateau. There has also been increasing concern about the rapid increase in air temperature at high altitudes over the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya. To date, there is very little knowledge about the transport pathways for pollutants traveling from the Indo-Gangetic Plains across the Himalaya to the Tibetan Plateau. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from South Asia to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.). The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Observations of BC and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from Aeronet are analyzed and presented. Diurnal and seasonal patterns of BC have been observed with higher values during the day and lower at night and also highest during pre-monsoon and lowest during monsoon season, with observed BC concentrations exceeding 5 μg while average concentration around 3.7 μg.

  13. In vitro toxicity of carbon nanotubes, nano-graphite and carbon black, similar impacts of acid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Figarol, Agathe; Pourchez, Jérémie; Boudard, Delphine; Forest, Valérie; Akono, Céline; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Jean-Pierre; Cottier, Michèle; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Grosseau, Philippe

    2015-12-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nano-graphite (NG) are graphene-based nanomaterials which share exceptional physicochemical properties, but whose health impacts are unfortunately still not well understood. On the other hand, carbon black (CB) is a conventional and widely studied material. The comparison of these three carbon-based nanomaterials is thus of great interest to improve our understanding of their toxicity. An acid functionalization was carried out on CNT, NG and CB so that, after a thorough characterization, their impacts on RAW 264.7 macrophages could be compared for a similar surface chemistry (15 to 120 μg·mL(-1) nanomaterials, 90-min to 24-h contact). Functionalized nanomaterials triggered a weak cytotoxicity similar to the pristine nanomaterials. Acid functionalization increased the pro-inflammatory response except for CB which did not trigger any TNF-α production before or after functionalization, and seemed to strongly decrease the oxidative stress. The toxicological impact of acid functionalization appeared thus to follow a similar trend whatever the carbon-based nanomaterial. At equivalent dose expressed in surface and equivalent surface chemistry, the toxicological responses from murine macrophages to NG were higher than for CNT and CB. It seemed to correspond to the hypothesis of a platelet and fiber paradigm.

  14. Intravascular Perfusion of Carbon Black Ink Allows Reliable Visualization of Cerebral Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Herz, Josephine; Hermann, Dirk M.; Doeppner, Thorsten R.

    2013-01-01

    The anatomical structure of cerebral vessels is a key determinant for brain hemodynamics as well as the severity of injury following ischemic insults. The cerebral vasculature dynamically responds to various pathophysiological states and it exhibits considerable differences between strains and under conditions of genetic manipulations. Essentially, a reliable technique for intracranial vessel staining is essential in order to study the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Until recently, a set of different techniques has been employed to visualize the cerebral vasculature including injection of low viscosity resin, araldite F, gelatin mixed with various dyes1 (i.e. carmine red, India ink) or latex with2 or without3 carbon black. Perfusion of white latex compound through the ascending aorta has been first reported by Coyle and Jokelainen3. Maeda et al.2 have modified the protocol by adding carbon black ink to the latex compound for improved contrast visualization of the vessels after saline perfusion of the brain. However, inefficient perfusion and inadequate filling of the vessels are frequently experienced due to high viscosity of the latex compound4. Therefore, we have described a simple and cost-effective technique using a mixture of two commercially available carbon black inks (CB1 and CB2) to visualize the cerebral vasculature in a reproducible manner5. We have shown that perfusion with CB1+CB2 in mice results in staining of significantly smaller cerebral vessels at a higher density in comparison to latex perfusion5. Here, we describe our protocol to identify the anastomotic points between the anterior (ACA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA) to study vessel variations in mice with different genetic backgrounds. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of our technique in a transient focal cerebral ischemia model in mice by combining CB1+CB2-mediated vessel staining with TTC staining in various degrees of ischemic injuries. PMID:23328838

  15. Aerosol black carbon at five background measurement sites over Finland, a gateway to the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Kolmonen, P.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Virkkula, A.; Leskinen, A.; Komppula, M.; Hatakka, J.; Burkhart, J.; Stohl, A.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Viisanen, Y.; Lihavainen, H.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol equivalent black carbon (BC e) was measured at five different background stations in Finland, with the longest data set from Hyytiälä, December 2004-December 2008. Measurements were conducted either with an aethalometer or a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer, MAAP. Measured black carbon concentrations were highest in Virolahti in southeastern Finland, with annual averages ranging from 385 to 460 ng m -3, followed by Hyytiälä (250-370 ng m -3), Utö (230-270 ng m -3), Puijo (225-230 ng m -3), and Pallastunturi (60-70 ng m -3) in northern Finland. The BC e fractions of measured PM 2.5 concentrations were generally between 5 and 10%, with highest fractions at Virolahti close to the Eastern border. At all the stations, the highest concentrations were observed during the spring and the winter, and the lowest concentrations during the summer. The seasonal cycle could generally be attributed to the reaching of long-range-transported black carbon. Additional reasons were increasing domestic wood burning and reduced boundary-layer height during winter, and a more effective vertical mixing during summer. The highest concentrations for each station occurred with southerly winds, and on the basis of trajectory analyses, the source areas of BC e resided mostly in Central and Eastern Europe. Occasionally the long-range-transported BC e concentrations were elevated for short periods to fulfill the characteristics of pollution episodes. From these episodes, about 62% were a result of non-fire anthropogenic sources and 36% due to open biomass burning sources. Episodes from the biomass burning sources were most often observed during the spring.

  16. End of the Little Ice Age in the Alps forced by industrial black carbon.

    PubMed

    Painter, Thomas H; Flanner, Mark G; Kaser, Georg; Marzeion, Ben; VanCuren, Richard A; Abdalati, Waleed

    2013-09-17

    Glaciers in the European Alps began to retreat abruptly from their mid-19th century maximum, marking what appeared to be the end of the Little Ice Age. Alpine temperature and precipitation records suggest that glaciers should instead have continued to grow until circa 1910. Radiative forcing by increasing deposition of industrial black carbon to snow may represent the driver of the abrupt glacier retreats in the Alps that began in the mid-19th century. Ice cores indicate that black carbon concentrations increased abruptly in the mid-19th century and largely continued to increase into the 20th century, consistent with known increases in black carbon emissions from the industrialization of Western Europe. Inferred annual surface radiative forcings increased stepwise to 13-17 W⋅m(-2) between 1850 and 1880, and to 9-22 W⋅m(-2) in the early 1900s, with snowmelt season (April/May/June) forcings reaching greater than 35 W⋅m(-2) by the early 1900s. These snowmelt season radiative forcings would have resulted in additional annual snow melting of as much as 0.9 m water equivalent across the melt season. Simulations of glacier mass balances with radiative forcing-equivalent changes in atmospheric temperatures result in conservative estimates of accumulating negative mass balances of magnitude -15 m water equivalent by 1900 and -30 m water equivalent by 1930, magnitudes and timing consistent with the observed retreat. These results suggest a possible physical explanation for the abrupt retreat of glaciers in the Alps in the mid-19th century that is consistent with existing temperature and precipitation records and reconstructions.

  17. End of the Little Ice Age in the Alps forced by industrial black carbon

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Thomas H.; Flanner, Mark G.; Kaser, Georg; Marzeion, Ben; VanCuren, Richard A.; Abdalati, Waleed

    2013-01-01

    Glaciers in the European Alps began to retreat abruptly from their mid-19th century maximum, marking what appeared to be the end of the Little Ice Age. Alpine temperature and precipitation records suggest that glaciers should instead have continued to grow until circa 1910. Radiative forcing by increasing deposition of industrial black carbon to snow may represent the driver of the abrupt glacier retreats in the Alps that began in the mid-19th century. Ice cores indicate that black carbon concentrations increased abruptly in the mid-19th century and largely continued to increase into the 20th century, consistent with known increases in black carbon emissions from the industrialization of Western Europe. Inferred annual surface radiative forcings increased stepwise to 13–17 W⋅m−2 between 1850 and 1880, and to 9–22 W⋅m−2 in the early 1900s, with snowmelt season (April/May/June) forcings reaching greater than 35 W⋅m−2 by the early 1900s. These snowmelt season radiative forcings would have resulted in additional annual snow melting of as much as 0.9 m water equivalent across the melt season. Simulations of glacier mass balances with radiative forcing-equivalent changes in atmospheric temperatures result in conservative estimates of accumulating negative mass balances of magnitude −15 m water equivalent by 1900 and −30 m water equivalent by 1930, magnitudes and timing consistent with the observed retreat. These results suggest a possible physical explanation for the abrupt retreat of glaciers in the Alps in the mid-19th century that is consistent with existing temperature and precipitation records and reconstructions. PMID:24003138

  18. Effects of Floor Level and Building Type on Residential Levels of Outdoor and Indoor Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Black Carbon, and Particulate Matter in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Bernabé, Kerlly; Moors, Kathleen; Yan, Beizhan; Chillrud, Steven N.; Whyatt, Robin; Camann, David; Kinney, Patrick L.; Perera, Frederica P.; Miller, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    Consideration of the relationship between residential floor level and concentration of traffic-related airborne pollutants may predict individual residential exposure among inner city dwellers more accurately. Our objective was to characterize the vertical gradient of residential levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH; dichotomized into Σ8PAHsemivolatile (MW 178–206), and Σ8PAHnonvolatile (MW 228–278), black carbon (BC), PM2.5 (particulate matter) by floor level (FL), season and building type. We hypothesize that PAH, BC and PM2.5 concentrations may decrease with higher FL and the vertical gradients of these compounds would be affected by heating season and building type. PAH, BC and PM2.5 were measured over a two-week period outdoor and indoor of the residences of a cohort of 5–6 year old children (n = 339) living in New York City’s Northern Manhattan and the Bronx. Airborne-pollutant levels were analyzed by three categorized FL groups (0–2nd, 3rd–5th, and 6th–32nd FL) and two building types (low-rise versus high-rise apartment building). Indoor Σ8PAHnonvolatile and BC levels declined with increasing FL. During the nonheating season, the median outdoor Σ8PAHnonvolatile, but not Σ8PAHsemivolatile, level at 6th–2nd FL was 1.5–2 times lower than levels measured at lower FL. Similarly, outdoor and indoor BC concentrations at 6th–32nd FL were significantly lower than those at lower FL only during the nonheating season (p < 0.05). In addition, living in a low-rise building was associated significantly with higher levels of Σ8PAHnonvolatile and BC. These results suggest that young inner city children may be exposed to varying levels of air pollutants depending on their FL, season, and building type. PMID:21886868

  19. Corrosion behavior of modified nano carbon black/epoxy coating in accelerated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior and anticorrosion properties of modified carbon black (CB) nanoparticles in epoxy coatings were investigated in accelerated conditions. Nanoparticles of CB were modified by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Dispersion of nanoparticles into epoxy was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The accelerated condition was prepared at 65 °C. CB nanoparticles improved corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. The optimum concentration of CB in the epoxy coating was 0.75 wt%. Results showed that the CB hinder the corrosion due to its barrier properties. CB can decrease the diffusion coefficient of water in the coating with filling the micropores.

  20. Fractal morphology of black carbon aerosol enhances absorption in the thermal infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Heinson, William R; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-02-15

    In this Letter, we numerically calculate the mass absorption cross sections (MACs) of black carbon fractal aggregates in the thermal infrared solar spectrum. Compared to equivalent-size spheres, the MAC values of aggregates show a percent enhancement of ≈150 and 400 at small and large length scales, respectively. The absorption properties of aggregates with size parameters >1 surprisingly continued to remain in the Rayleigh optics regime. We explain this phenomenon using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory and the concept of phase shift parameter. PMID:26872194

  1. Nitrogen and carbon isotopic variations from Black Corals spanning the last 4.5kya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, S.; Komugabe-Dixson, A. K.; Thresher, R.

    2015-12-01

    The recent spin-up of the South Pacific subtropical gyre and the intensification of the East Australian Current (EAC) have caused the waters in the southwest Pacific Ocean to warm 4x faster than the global average. In an effort to understand the ecological significance of these changes we have examined nitrogen and carbon isotope variations recorded by black and bamboo corals. A series of corals have been collected and dated and provide a near continuous record over the past 4500 years. The data show increases in d15N since 1900s with concurrent decreases in d13C and longer-term variations over the entire dataset.

  2. Nonlinear scattering studies of carbon black suspensions using photoacoustic Z-scan technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakov, Ivan M.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear scattering properties of carbon black suspensions (CBS) are studied using nanosecond photoacoustic (PA) and optical z-scan techniques. When the laser is operated in multi-pulse mode, no nonlinear behavior is observed in PAZ-scans. However, in the single-pulse mode, we observed the nonlinear scattering in both PAZ and optical z- scans. Our results are in agreement with the well-known bleaching effect in CBS and demonstrate the importance of pulse repetition frequency for studying nonlinear scattering using photoacoustics. The effective nonlinear extinction coefficients of CBS were determined, and we found that PAZ-scan data are more sensitive and offer information on higher nonlinearities.

  3. Interaction between carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and graphene, have received considerable attention due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics, leading to mass production and widespread application in industrial, commercial, and environmental fields. During their life cycle from production to disposal, however, carbon nanomaterials are inevitably released into water and soil environments, which have resulted in concern about their health and environmental impacts. Carbon black is a nano-sized amorphous carbon powder that typically contains 90-99% elemental carbon. It can be produced from incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons in petroleum and coal. Carbon black is widely used in chemical and industrial products or applications such as ink pigments, coating plastics, the rubber industry, and composite reinforcements. Even though carbon black is strongly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in water, it can be dispersed in aqueous media through surface functionalization or surfactant use. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media. Column experiments were performed for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs under saturated flow conditions. Column experiments was conducted in duplicate using quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS) to examine the effect of metal (Fe, Al) oxide presence on the transport of CBNPs. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of CBNPs and chloride were obtained by monitoring effluent, and then mass recovery was quantified from these curves. Additionally, interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry. The BTCs of chloride had relative peak concentrations ranging from 0.895 to 0.990. Transport parameters (pore-water velocity v, hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient D) obtained by the model fit from the

  4. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Jacob, D.; Pozdun, R.; Petäjä, T.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-09-01

    The prediction skill of the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC) concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient OVL (the common area under two probability distributions curves) and Z-score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions). The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low, suggesting either an excessive loss of black carbon in the model, or missing emissions. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause for the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  5. Nanosized carbon black combined with Ni2O3 as "universal" catalysts for synergistically catalyzing carbonization of polyolefin wastes to synthesize carbon nanotubes and application for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Chen, Xuecheng; Tian, Nana; Gong, Jiang; Liu, Jie; Rümmeli, Mark H; Chu, Paul K; Mijiwska, Ewa; Tang, Tao

    2014-04-01

    The catalytic carbonization of polyolefin materials to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a promising strategy for the processing and recycling of plastic wastes, but this approach is generally limited due to the selectivity of catalysts and the difficulties in separating the polyolefin mixture. In this study, the influence of nanosized carbon black (CB) and Ni2O3 as a novel combined catalyst system on catalyzing carbonization of polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS) and their blends was investigated. We showed that this combination was efficient to promote the carbonization of these polymers to produce CNTs with high yields and of good quality. Catalytic pyrolysis and model carbonization experiments indicated that the carbonization mechanism was attributed to the synergistic effect of the combined catalysts rendered by CB and Ni2O3: CB catalyzed the degradation of PP, PE, and PS to selectively produce more aromatic compounds, which were subsequently dehydrogenated and reassembled into CNTs via the catalytic action of CB together with Ni particles. Moreover, the performance of the synthesized CNTs as the electrode of supercapacitor was investigated. The supercapacitor displayed a high specific capacitance as compared to supercapacitors using commercial CNTs and CB. This difference was attributed to the relatively larger specific surface areas of our synthetic CNTs and their more oxygen-containing groups. PMID:24611910

  6. Comparing black carbon types in sequestering polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fang; Gan, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely found in sediments, especially congeners from the penta-BDE formula. Due to their strong affinity for black carbon (BC), bioavailability of PBDEs may be decreased in BC-amended sediments. In this study, we used a matrix-SPME method to measure the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of PBDEs as a parameter of their potential bioavailability and evaluated the differences among biochar, charcoal, and activated carbon. Activated carbon displayed a substantially greater sequestration capacity than biochar or charcoal. At 1% amendment rate in sediment with low organic carbon (OC) content (0.12%), Cfree of six PBDEs was reduced by 47.5–78.0%, 47.3–77.5%, and 94.1–98.3% with biochar, charcoal, and activated carbon, respectively, while the sequestration was more limited in sediment with high OC content (0.87%). Therefore, it is important to consider the type and properties of the BC and the sediment in BC-based remediation or mitigation. PMID:24047549

  7. Radiocarbon source apportionment of urban and wildfire black and organic carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Fossil and non-fossil sources of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified unambiguously by radiocarbon (14C) measurements. However, accurate 14C-based source apportionment requires a clear and reproducible physical separation of OC and BC, as well as minimal sample contaminations with non-sample carbon. To achieve a clear separation, we used a thermo-optical aerosol analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc, USA) with a newly established protocol (Swiss_4S protocol, Zhang et al., 2012), specifically optimized to completely separate the OC and BC fractions with minimal charring and maximum BC recovery. A simple and efficient vacuum line was coupled to the analyzer to trap produced CO2 with high yields and low carbon blanks. Upon trapping, CO2 samples sealed into glass ampoules were converted to graphite and measured for their radiocarbon content at the Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at the University of California, Irvine. Here, we present the results from the radiocarbon analysis of a set of 14C reference materials, blanks and inter-comparison samples for both OC and BC with sample sizes as small as 5 μg C. We will also present initial results from a set of urban aerosol samples from Salt Lake City, collected throughout 2012 and 2013, and from interior Alaska, collected during the summer of 2013 near the Stuart Creek 2 wildfire.

  8. Black carbon contribution to stabilised SOM in soil under slash and burn agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpel, C.; Chaplot, V.; Valentin, C.

    2008-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) produced during slash and burn agriculture on tropical soils may enhance the soils organic matter content and hence their biological properties. However, once deposited on the soil surface, BC may be subject to erosion and/or microbial decomposition and thus not be preserved on site. Up to now, few studies have been carried out to assess the contribution of BC to the soils stable carbon pool on sites under slash and burn agriculture. The aim of the study was to assess the survival potential of BC in sloping tropical soils of clayey texture. The study was carried out in Northern Laos, where the soils are subjected to addition of black carbon produced by burning of agricultural crop residues. Our conceptual approach included the characterisation of (a) morphologically distinct BC forms and (b) chemical soil fractions. The samples were analysed for elemental content, chemical composition by 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy, carbon resistant to acid hydrolysis with HCl, carbon resistant to oxidation with acid dichromate solution and 14C activity. Our results indicated that BC produced by slash and burn agriculture was highly aromatic in nature. Its elemental composition as well as its susceptibility to be lost by chemical oxidation was dependent on its morphology. Acid hydrolysis did not lead to carbon loss from any BC form. We thus hypothesised that BC should be present in the hydrolysis resistant fraction isolated from soil. The charactersation of the chemical composition by 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy showed that the hydrolysis residue was composed of highly aromatic carbon. Considering the low lignin content of these soils and the good recovery of bulk soil aromatic carbon signal (80-100%) in the hydrolysis residue, we consider that this fraction may be suitable to assess BC contribution to clayey soils. We suggest that BC isolated as hydrolysis resistant C may represent up to 25% of the soils C as compared to 8% as isolated by acid dichromate oxidation

  9. Retrieval of Vegetation Structure and Carbon Balance Parameters Using Ground-Based Lidar and Scaling to Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Ni-Meister, W.; Woodcock, C. E.; Li, X.; Jupp, D. L.; Culvenor, D.

    2006-12-01

    This research uses a ground-based, upward hemispherical scanning lidar to retrieve forest canopy structural information, including tree height, mean tree diameter, basal area, stem count density, crown diameter, woody biomass, and green biomass. These parameters are then linked to airborne and spaceborne lidars to provide large-area mapping of structural and biomass parameters. The terrestrial lidar instrument, Echidna(TM), developed by CSIRO Australia, allows rapid acquisition of vegetation structure data that can be readily integrated with downward-looking airborne lidar, such as LVIS (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor), and spaceborne lidar, such as GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) on ICESat. Lidar waveforms and vegetation structure are linked for these three sensors through the hybrid geometric-optical radiative-transfer (GORT) model, which uses basic vegetation structure parameters and principles of geometric optics, coupled with radiative transfer theory, to model scattering and absorption of light by collections of individual plant crowns. Use of a common model for lidar waveforms at ground, airborne, and spaceborne levels facilitates integration and scaling of the data to provide large-area maps and inventories of vegetation structure and carbon stocks. Our research plan includes acquisition of Echidna(TM) under-canopy hemispherical lidar scans at North American test sites where LVIS and GLAS data have been or are being acquired; analysis and modeling of spatially coincident lidar waveforms acquired by the three sensor systems; linking of the three data sources using the GORT model; and mapping of vegetation structure and carbon-balance parameters at LVIS and GLAS resolutions based on Echidna(TM) measurements.

  10. The relationship between the black carbon and bisphenol A in sea and river sediments (Southern Baltic).

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Marta; Koniecko, Iga; Falkowska, Lucyna; Burska, Dorota; Kiełczewska, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    This study was derived from field investigations to assess bisphenol A (BPA) concentrations in the sea and river sediments of the Gulf of Gdansk. Black carbon (BC) and total organic carbon (TOC) were identified as influencing factors on the accumulation. As a result of the transportation of BC with organic matter via rivers into the Gulf of Gdansk, the highest mean concentrations (11.26ngBPA/(gdryweight (dw))), were determined in the sediments of river estuaries. Sediments in coastal stations were characterized by the lowest mean concentrations (5.73ngBPA/(gdw)). TOC content below 0.1% determined the sorption of BPA on BC particles in sediments, and statistically significant correlation between the concentration of BPA and the BC/TOC ratio was found in these cases. In addition, dependency between the concentration of BPA and the content of BC was discovered in sediments where the BC/TOC ratio was >0.33.

  11. Photoacoustic study of airborne and model aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebić-Juretić, A.; Zetzsch, C.; Dóka, O.; Bicanic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Airborne particulates of either natural or anthropogenic origin constitute a significant portion of atmospheric pollution. Environmental xenobiotics, among which are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides, often adsorb to aerosols and as such are transported through the atmosphere with the physicochemical properties of the aerosols determining the lifetime of these organic compounds. As an example, the resistance of some PAHs against the photolysis is explained by the effect of the aerosol's "inner filter" that reduces the intensity of incident light reaching the mineral particles. On the other hand, some constituents of the aerosols can act as catalytic and/or stoichiometric reagents in atmospheric reactions on the solid surfaces. In the study described here the photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy in the UV-Vis was used to investigate natural and model aerosols. The PA spectra obtained from coal and wood ashes and of Saharan sand, all three representatives of airborne aerosols, provide the evidence for the existence of the "inner filter." Furthermore, valuable information about the different nature of the interaction between the model aerosols and adsorbed organics (e.g., PAH-pyranthrene and silica, alumina, and MgO) has been obtained. Finally, the outcome of the study conducted with powdered mixtures of chalk and black carbon suggests that the PA method is a candidate method for determination of carbon content in stack ashes.

  12. Black and organic carbon emission inventories: review and application to California.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Chen, Lung-Wen Antony; Motallebi, Nehzat

    2010-04-01

    Particulate black or elemental carbon (EC) (black carbon [BC]) and organic carbon (OC) affect climate, visibility, and human health. Several "top-down" and "bottom-up" global emission inventories for these components have compiled country-wide emission factors, source profiles, and activity levels that do not necessarily reflect local conditions. Recent estimates of global BC and OC emissions range from 8 to 24 and 33 to 62 Tg (1012 g) per year, respectively. U.S. BC emissions account for 5.6% of the global total emissions. Uncertainties in global BC emission estimates are a factor of 2 or more. The U.S. National Emissions Inventory is well documented, but its major source categories are not easily related to EC- and OC-emitting source subcategories. California's bottom-up emission inventory is easily accessible at many levels of detail and provides an example of how sources can be regrouped for speciated emission rates. PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 microm) emissions from these categories are associated with EC and OC source profiles to generate California's speciated emissions. A BC inventory for California of 38,731 t/yr was comparable to the 33,281 t/yr estimated from a bottom-up global BC inventory. However, further examination showed substantial differences among subcategories, with the global inventory BC from fossil fuel combustion at two-thirds that from the California inventory and the remainder attributed to biomass burning. Major discrepancies were found for directly emitted OC, with the global inventory estimating more than twice that of the California inventory. Most of the discrepancy was due to differences in open biomass burning (wildfires and agricultural waste) for which carbon emissions are highly variable. BC and OC emissions are sensitive to the availability and variability of existing source profiles, and profiles more specific to fuels and operating conditions are needed to increase emission accuracy. PMID

  13. Estimating Aboveground Forest Carbon Stock of Major Tropical Forest Land Uses Using Airborne Lidar and Field Measurement Data in Central Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, R. B.; Watanabe, M.; Motohka, T.; Shiraishi, T.; shimada, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are providing environmental goods and services including carbon sequestration, energy regulation, water fluxes, wildlife habitats, fuel, and building materials. Despite the policy attention, the tropical forest reserve in Southeast Asian region is releasing vast amount of carbon to the atmosphere due to deforestation. Establishing quality forest statistics and documenting aboveground forest carbon stocks (AFCS) are emerging in the region. Airborne and satellite based large area monitoring methods are developed to compliment conventional plot based field measurement methods as they are costly, time consuming, and difficult to implement for large regions. But these methods still require adequate ground measurements for calibrating accurate AFCS model. Furthermore, tropical region comprised of varieties of natural and plantation forests capping higher variability of forest structures and biomass volumes. To address this issue and the needs for ground data, we propose the systematic collection of ground data integrated with airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne LiDAR enables accurate measures of vertical forest structure, including canopy height and volume demanding less ground measurement plots. Using an appropriate forest type based LiDAR sampling framework, structural properties of forest can be quantified and treated similar to ground measurement plots, producing locally relevant information to use independently with satellite data sources including synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In this study, we examined LiDAR derived forest parameters with field measured data and developed general and specific AFCS models for tropical forests in central Sumatra. The general model is fitted for all types of natural and plantation forests while the specific model is fitted to the specific forest type. The study region consists of natural forests including peat swamp and dry moist forests, regrowth, and mangrove and plantation forests

  14. Distribution and preservation of black carbon in the East China Sea sediments: Perspectives on carbon cycling at continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Ying; Wang, Jinlong

    2016-02-01

    We determined the concentrations and radiocarbon (14C) compositions of black carbon (BC) in the sediments of the East China Sea (ECS). The BC concentrations, which were in the range of 0.30-1.52 mg/g, accounted for 12-65% of the total organic carbon (TOC). The distribution of BC in ECS sediments was controlled by factors such as grain size, distance from the coast, and deposition rate. Radiocarbon measurements of BC yielded ages of 6350-10,440 years before present (BP), suggesting that the percentage of BC derived from biomass combustion was in the range of 29-48%. The BC burial flux in sediments of the ECS was estimated to be ∼1.39×106 t/yr, which was similar to burial fluxes reported for shelf sediments in other areas. However, the magnitude of the total BC sink was far greater than that of any other shelf regions studied to date, indicating the global importance of BC accumulation in the ECS, and the magnitude of BC input from large rivers (e.g., the Changjiang). The riverine delivery of BC to the ECS (73%) was far greater than that of atmospheric flux (27%). Further study of the BC cycle and the interactions of BC with other organic compounds in marginal seas was required to better understand the role of BC in the global carbon cycle.

  15. Intercomparison of thermal and optical measurement methods for elemental carbon and black carbon at an urban location.

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, R; Petzold, A; Bauer, H; Ctyroky, P; Pouresmaeil, P; Laskus, L; Puxbaum, H

    2006-10-15

    Despite intensive efforts during the past 20 years, no generally accepted standard method exists to measure black carbon (BC) or elemental carbon (EC). Data on BC and EC concentrations are method specific and can differ widely (e.g. Schmid et al., 2001, ten Brink et al., 2004). In this study, a comprehensive set of methods (both optical and thermal) is compared. Measurements were performed under urban background conditions in Vienna, Austria, a city heavily impacted by diesel emissions. Filter and impactor samples were taken during 3 weeks in summer 2002 and analyzed for EC with thermal methods: a modified Cachier method (Cachier et al., 1989), a thermal-optical method (Schmid et al., 2001), and the VDI method (VDI, 1996); for BC with optical methods: a filter transmission method and the integrating sphere method (Hitzenberger et al., 1996); and for total carbon (TC) with a combustion method (Puxbaum and Rendl, 1983). The online methods aethalometer (Hansen et al., 1984) and the multiangle absorption photometer MAAP (Petzold et al., 2002) to measure BC were also used. The average values of BC and EC obtained with the methods agreed within their standard deviations. A conversion table was set up to allow comparisons between data measured elsewhere under urban background conditions (with similar source characteristics) with different instruments. An approach to estimate the absorption coefficient from attenuation data is derived so that existing records of aethalometer data in urban environments may be used to obtain also the absorption coefficients.

  16. When smoke gets in our eyes: the multiple impacts of atmospheric black carbon on climate, air quality and health.

    PubMed

    Highwood, Eleanor J; Kinnersley, Robert P

    2006-05-01

    With both climate change and air quality on political and social agendas from local to global scale, the links between these hitherto separate fields are becoming more apparent. Black carbon, largely from combustion processes, scatters and absorbs incoming solar radiation, contributes to poor air quality and induces respiratory and cardiovascular problems. Uncertainties in the amount, location, size and shape of atmospheric black carbon cause large uncertainty in both climate change estimates and toxicology studies alike. Increased research has led to new effects and areas of uncertainty being uncovered. Here we draw together recent results and explore the increasing opportunities for synergistic research that will lead to improved confidence in the impact of black carbon on climate change, air quality and human health. Topics of mutual interest include better information on spatial distribution, size, mixing state and measuring and monitoring.

  17. When smoke gets in our eyes: the multiple impacts of atmospheric black carbon on climate, air quality and health.

    PubMed

    Highwood, Eleanor J; Kinnersley, Robert P

    2006-05-01

    With both climate change and air quality on political and social agendas from local to global scale, the links between these hitherto separate fields are becoming more apparent. Black carbon, largely from combustion processes, scatters and absorbs incoming solar radiation, contributes to poor air quality and induces respiratory and cardiovascular problems. Uncertainties in the amount, location, size and shape of atmospheric black carbon cause large uncertainty in both climate change estimates and toxicology studies alike. Increased research has led to new effects and areas of uncertainty being uncovered. Here we draw together recent results and explore the increasing opportunities for synergistic research that will lead to improved confidence in the impact of black carbon on climate change, air quality and human health. Topics of mutual interest include better information on spatial distribution, size, mixing state and measuring and monitoring. PMID:16513170

  18. Nanoparticulate carbon black in cigarette smoke induces DNA cleavage and Th17-mediated emphysema.

    PubMed

    You, Ran; Lu, Wen; Shan, Ming; Berlin, Jacob M; Samuel, Errol Lg; Marcano, Daniela C; Sun, Zhengzong; Sikkema, William Ka; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Song, Lizhen; Hendrix, Amanda Y; Tour, James M; Corry, David B; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-10-05

    Chronic inhalation of cigarette smoke is the major cause of sterile inflammation and pulmonary emphysema. The effect of carbon black (CB), a universal constituent of smoke derived from the incomplete combustion of organic material, in smokers and non-smokers is less known. In this study, we show that insoluble nanoparticulate carbon black (nCB) accumulates in human myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) from emphysematous lung and in CD11c(+) lung antigen presenting cells (APC) of mice exposed to smoke. Likewise, nCB intranasal administration induced emphysema in mouse lungs. Delivered by smoking or intranasally, nCB persisted indefinitely in mouse lung, activated lung APCs, and promoted T helper 17 cell differentiation through double-stranded DNA break (DSB) and ASC-mediated inflammasome assembly in phagocytes. Increasing the polarity or size of CB mitigated many adverse effects. Thus, nCB causes sterile inflammation, DSB, and emphysema and explains adverse health outcomes seen in smokers while implicating the dangers of nCB exposure in non-smokers.

  19. Simulation of the radiative effect of black carbon aerosols and the regional climate responses over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Jiang, Weimei; Fu, Congbin; Su, Bingkai; Liu, Hongnian; Tang, Jianping

    2004-08-01

    As part of the development work of the Chinese new regional climate model (RIEMS), the radiative process of black carbon (BC) aerosols has been introduced into the original radiative procedures of RIEMS, and the transport model of BC aerosols has also been established and combined with the RIEMS model. Using the new model system, the distribution of black carbon aerosols and their radiative effect over the China region are investigated. The influences of BC aerosole on the atmospheric radiative transfer and on the air temperature, land surface temperature, and total rainfall are analyzed. It is found that BC aerosols induce a positive radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), which is dominated by shortwave radiative forcing. The maximum radiative forcing occurs in North China in July and in South China in April. At the same time, negative radiative forcing is observed on the surface. Based on the radiative forcing comparison between clear sky and cloudy sky, it is found that cloud can enforce the TOA positive radiative forcing and decrease the negative surface radiative forcing. The responses of the climate system in July to the radiative forcing due to BC aerosols are the decrease in the air temperature in the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River and Huaihe area and most areas of South China, and the weak increase or decrease in air temperature over North China. The total rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River area is increased, but it decreased in North China in July.

  20. Sensitivity of Stratospheric Geoengineering with Black Carbon to Aerosol Size and Altitude of Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Shindell, Drew T.; Miller, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface temperatures show that the climate effects strongly depend on aerosol size and altitude of injection. 1 Tg BC/a injected into the lower stratosphere would cause little surface cooling for large radii but a large amount of surface cooling for small radii and stratospheric warming of over 60 C. With the exception of small particles, increasing the altitude of injection increases surface cooling and stratospheric warming. Stratospheric warming causes global ozone loss by up to 50% in the small radius case. The Antarctic shows less ozone loss due to reduction of polar stratospheric clouds, but strong circumpolar winds would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively expensive and infeasible. Although studying an absorbing aerosol is a useful counterpart to previous studies involving sulfate aerosols, black carbon geoengineering likely carries too many risks to make it a viable option for deployment.

  1. OSIRIS Detections of a Tropospheric Aerosol that Absorbs at Wavelengths Near 350 nm - Black Carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenstein, D. A.; Roth, C.; Bourassa, A. E.; Lloyd, N.

    2014-12-01

    The Canadian built OSIRIS instrument has been in operation onboard the Swedish spacecraft Odin since the autumn of 2001. During this 13 year period OSIRIS has recorded millions of spectra of the limb-scattered radiance in the wavelength range from 280 nm to 810 nm with approximately 1 nm spectral resolution. These measurements that scan tangents altitudes from 10 km to 65 km have primarily been used to retrieve stratospheric composition including vertical profiles of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulphate aerosol and bromine monoxide. The ozone retrieval is done is such a way that it uses the vertical radiance profile at 350 nm as a non-ozone absorbing reference measurement and it is these measurements that have serendipitously indicated the presence of an absorbing aerosol at tropospheric altitudes. At this time there is no indication of the exact composition of this absorber but it has characteristics that are curiously like those of black carbon. This poster will outline: the technique used to detect the black carbon from OSIRIS measurements; the wavelength dependence of a pseudo absorber used in the SASKTARN radiative transfer model to accurately simulate the OSIRIS measurements; and the geographical distribution of the detections of this pseudo absorber.

  2. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  3. Optics of water cloud droplets mixed with black-carbon aerosols.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Liu, Li; Cairns, Brian; Mackowski, Daniel W

    2014-05-01

    We use the recently extended superposition T-matrix method to calculate scattering and absorption properties of micrometer-sized water droplets contaminated by black carbon. Our numerically exact results reveal that, depending on the mode of soot-water mixing, the soot specific absorption can vary by a factor exceeding 6.5. The specific absorption is maximized when the soot material is quasi-uniformly distributed throughout the droplet interior in the form of numerous small monomers. The range of mixing scenarios captured by our computations implies a wide range of remote sensing and radiation budget implications of the presence of black carbon in liquid-water clouds. We show that the popular Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium approximation can be used to calculate the optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter for the quasi-uniform mixing scenario, but is likely to fail in application to other mixing scenarios and in computations of the elements of the scattering matrix.

  4. Mechanical and electrical characterization of self-sensing carbon black ECC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Vincent W. J.; Li, Mo; Lynch, Jerome P.; Li, Victor C.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the development of a new variation of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) that aims to combine tensile ductility with self-sensing ability is described. ECC is a new type of high-performance fiber reinforced cementitious composite that exhibits strain-hardening under applied tensile load while resisting fracture localization. The self-sensing ability is achieved by incorporating a small dosage of carbon black (CB) into the ECC system (hereafter known as CB-ECC) to enhance its piezoresistive behavior while maintaining its tensile strain-hardening behavior. The tensile stress-strain response of CB-ECC is studied with an emphasis on its tensile stress and strain capacity, as well as its cracking pattern. In addition, the piezoresistive behavior of CB-ECC under uniaxial tension is investigated. Specifically, the effect of carbon black content on the electrical properties of ECC including the sensitivity of changes in its bulk conductivity under applied tensile strain are explored in detail.

  5. Nanoparticulate carbon black in cigarette smoke induces DNA cleavage and Th17-mediated emphysema

    PubMed Central

    You, Ran; Lu, Wen; Shan, Ming; Berlin, Jacob M; Samuel, Errol LG; Marcano, Daniela C; Sun, Zhengzong; Sikkema, William KA; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Song, Lizhen; Hendrix, Amanda Y; Tour, James M; Corry, David B; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of cigarette smoke is the major cause of sterile inflammation and pulmonary emphysema. The effect of carbon black (CB), a universal constituent of smoke derived from the incomplete combustion of organic material, in smokers and non-smokers is less known. In this study, we show that insoluble nanoparticulate carbon black (nCB) accumulates in human myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) from emphysematous lung and in CD11c+ lung antigen presenting cells (APC) of mice exposed to smoke. Likewise, nCB intranasal administration induced emphysema in mouse lungs. Delivered by smoking or intranasally, nCB persisted indefinitely in mouse lung, activated lung APCs, and promoted T helper 17 cell differentiation through double-stranded DNA break (DSB) and ASC-mediated inflammasome assembly in phagocytes. Increasing the polarity or size of CB mitigated many adverse effects. Thus, nCB causes sterile inflammation, DSB, and emphysema and explains adverse health outcomes seen in smokers while implicating the dangers of nCB exposure in non-smokers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09623.001 PMID:26437452

  6. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Wenger, J. C.; Evans, G. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particles was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  7. Graphene/carbon black hybrid film for flexible and high rate performance supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaming; Chen, Junchen; Cao, Jianyun; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Yu; Ouyang, Jia-Hu; Jia, Dechang

    2014-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide/carbon black (rGO/CB) hybrid films with different carbon black (CB) contents are prepared by a simple vacuum filtration method. The CB particles evenly distribute between the graphene layers, not only preventing the compact restack of rGO sheets but also providing electrical contact between the base planes of rGO sheets. As expected, the as-prepared rGO/CB hybrid film shows enhanced rate capability when compared with rGO film. Furthermore, a solid-state flexible supercapacitor has been constructed with the optimized rGO/CB hybrid film by using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H2SO4 gel as electrolyte and Au coated PET film as current collector and mechanical support. The solid-state flexible supercapacitor shows a specific capacitance of 112 F g-1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s-1, and excellent rate performance with a specific capacitance of 79.6 F g-1 at a high scan rate of 1 V s-1. Moreover, the flexible solid-state supercapacitor exhibits good cycling stability with capacitance retention of 94% after 3000 cycles in normal state plus 2000 cycles in bent state.

  8. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGES

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  9. Optics of Water Cloud Droplets Mixed with Black-Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Cairns, Brian; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    We use the recently extended superposition T-matrix method to calculate scattering and absorption properties of micrometer-sized water droplets contaminated by black carbon. Our numerically exact results reveal that, depending on the mode of soot-water mixing, the soot specific absorption can vary by a factor exceeding 6.5. The specific absorption is maximized when the soot material is quasi-uniformly distributed throughout the droplet interior in the form of numerous small monomers. The range of mixing scenarios captured by our computations implies a wide range of remote sensing and radiation budget implications of the presence of black carbon in liquid-water clouds. We show that the popular Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium approximation can be used to calculate the optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter for the quasi-uniform mixing scenario, but is likely to fail in application to other mixing scenarios and in computations of the elements of the scattering matrix.

  10. Vertical dependence of black carbon, sulphate and biomass burning aerosol radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, Bjørn H.; Myhre, Gunnar

    2011-12-01

    A global radiative transfer model is used to calculate the vertical profile of shortwave radiative forcing from a prescribed amount of aerosols. We study black carbon (BC), sulphate (SO4) and a black and organic carbon mixture typical of biomass burning (BIO), by prescribing aerosol burdens in layers between 1000 hPa and 20 hPa and calculating the resulting direct radiative forcing divided by the burden (NDRF). We find a strong sensitivity in the NDRF for BC with altitude, with a tenfold increase between BC close to the surface and the lower part of the stratosphere. Clouds are a major contributor to this dependence with altitude, but other factors also contribute. We break down and explain the different physical contributors to this strong sensitivity. The results show a modest regional dependence of the altitudinal dependence of BC NDRF between industrial regions, while for regions with properties deviating from the global mean NDRF variability is significant. Variations due to seasons and interannual changes in cloud conditions are found to be small. We explore the effect that large altitudinal variation in NDRF may have on model estimates of BC radiative forcing when vertical aerosol distributions are insufficiently constrained, and discuss possible applications of the present results for reducing inter-model differences.