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Sample records for airborne cirrus properties

  1. An investigation of cirrus cloud properties using airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, John Edward

    The impact of cirrus clouds on the Earth's radiation budget remains a key uncertainty in assessing global radiative balance and climate change. Composed of ice, and located in the cold upper troposphere, cirrus clouds can cause large warming effects because they are relatively transmissive to short-wave solar radiation, but absorptive of long wave radiation. Our ability to model radiative effects of cirrus clouds is inhibited by uncertainties in cloud optical properties. Studies of mid-latitude cirrus properties have revealed notable differences compared to tropical anvil cirrus, likely a consequence of varying dynamic formation mechanisms. Cloud-aerosol lidars provide critical information about the vertical structure of cirrus for climate studies. For this dissertation, I helped develop the Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (ACATS), a Doppler wind lidar system at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). ACATS is also a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), uniquely capable of directly resolving backscatter and extinction properties of a particle from high-altitude aircraft. The first ACATS science flights were conducted out of Wallops Island, VA in September of 2012 and included coincident measurements with the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument. In this dissertation, I provide an overview of the ACATS method and instrument design, describe the ACATS retrieval algorithms for cloud and aerosol properties, explain the ACATS HSRL retrieval errors due to the instrument calibration, and use the coincident CPL data to validate and evaluate ACATS cloud and aerosol retrievals. Both the ACATS HSRL and standard backscatter retrievals agree well with coincident CPL retrievals. Mean ACATS and CPL extinction profiles for three case studies demonstrate similar structure and agree to within 25 percent for cirrus clouds. The new HSRL retrieval algorithms developed for ACATS have direct application to future spaceborne missions. Furthermore, extinction and particle wind

  2. New airborne retrieval approach for trade wind cumulus properties under overlying cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, F.; Siebert, H.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmeissner, T.; Shaw, R. A.; Wendisch, M.

    2013-05-01

    A new retrieval method is presented to derive the optical thickness τ and effective droplet radius reff of shallow cumulus in the presence of overlying thin cirrus. This new approach allows for a retrieval without a priori knowledge of the microphysical and optical properties of the overlying cirrus. The retrieval is applied to helicopter-borne solar spectral reflectivity measurements gathered by the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurements sysTem (SMART-HELIOS) above trade wind cumuli near Barbados. Collocated microphysical cumulus properties (liquid water content, effective droplet radius, droplet number concentration) were measured by in situ instruments installed on the Airborne Cloud Turbulence Observation System (ACTOS). Cloud inhomogeneities lead to an underestimation of retrieved τ of up to 114%, while reff is biased by up to 27%. Moreover, misrepresentation of the overlying cirrus may cause an overestimation of the classically retrieved cumulus reff of up to 50% and an underestimation of τof up to 6%. The new retrieval, effectively correcting for the influence of overlying cirrus, enables reliable estimates of τ of the cumuli for optically thin, overcast cirrus conditions and reduces the retrieval error for reff of the cumuli by almost 50%. Agreement between in situ measured and retrieved reff is in the range of ±1 μm. The retrieval can also reproduce the wide range of in situ measured mean reff (7-18 μm), which is a result of different aerosol load and cloud top heights on the different flight days. The observed τ ranges between 5 and 36.

  3. Spectral optical layer properties of cirrus from collocated airborne measurements - a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, F.; Werner, F.; Klingebiel, M.; Ehrlich, A.; Jäkel, E.; Voigt, M.; Borrmann, S.; Spichtinger, P.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-07-01

    Spectral optical layer properties of cirrus are derived from simultaneous and vertically collocated measurements of spectral upward and downward solar irradiance above and below the cloud layer and concurrent in situ microphysical sampling. From the irradiance data spectral transmissivity, absorptivity, reflectivity, and cloud top albedo of the observed cirrus layer are obtained. At the same time microphysical properties of the cirrus were sampled. The close collocation of the radiative and microphysical measurements, above, beneath and inside the cirrus, is obtained by using a research aircraft (Learjet 35A) in tandem with a towed platform called AIRTOSS (AIRcraft TOwed Sensor Shuttle). AIRTOSS can be released from and retracted back to the research aircraft by means of a cable up to a distance of 4 km. Data were collected in two field campaigns above the North and Baltic Sea in spring and late summer 2013. Exemplary results from one measuring flight are discussed also to illustrate the benefits of collocated sampling. Based on the measured cirrus microphysical properties, radiative transfer simulations were applied to quantify the impact of cloud particle properties such as crystal shape, effective radius reff, and optical thickness τ on cirrus optical layer properties. The effects of clouds beneath the cirrus are evaluated in addition. They cause differences in the layer properties of the cirrus by a factor of 2 to 3, and for cirrus radiative forcing by up to a factor of 4. If low-level clouds below cirrus are not considered the solar cooling due to the cirrus is significantly overestimated.

  4. New insights into the properties of contrail cirrus and their impact on climate from airborne experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Christiane; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Anderson, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Current growth rates in aviation demand a profound scientific data base of contrail cirrus properties in order to accurately assess their climate impact. In particular, the differentiation of contrail cirrus in natural cirrus fields is challenging. Direct observations of contrail cirrus throughout their life cycle are scarce and therefore limit our understanding of the climate effects from contrail cirrus. Here, we give new insights into the growth, life-cycle and climate impact from contrail cirrus based on results from suite of aircraft experiments. NASA's ACCESSII mission focused on the detection of aircraft emissions and initial contrail stages. Nascent contrails were detected at cruise altitudes at 100 m distance to the engine exit. Contrail growth to 10-min contrail age was investigated during DLR's CONCERT campaigns. Finally, the objective of the ML-CIRRUS experiment was to study the life cycle and climate impact of contrail cirrus. The contrail measurements are related to previous observations and discussed in the context of recent developments in contrail modeling. Highlights include the quantification of the effects of aircraft type on contrail microphysics, the analysis of ice particle shapes and the quantitative distinction of contrail cirrus and natural cirrus.

  5. Spectral optical layer properties of cirrus from collocated airborne measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Fanny; Werner, Frank; Klingebiel, Marcus; Ehrlich, André; Jäkel, Evelyn; Voigt, Matthias; Borrmann, Stephan; Spichtinger, Peter; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Spectral upward and downward solar irradiances from vertically collocated measurements above and below a cirrus layer are used to derive cirrus optical layer properties such as spectral transmissivity, absorptivity, reflectivity, and cloud top albedo. The radiation measurements are complemented by in situ cirrus crystal size distribution measurements and radiative transfer simulations based on the microphysical data. The close collocation of the radiative and microphysical measurements, above, beneath, and inside the cirrus, is accomplished by using a research aircraft (Learjet 35A) in tandem with the towed sensor platform AIRTOSS (AIRcraft TOwed Sensor Shuttle). AIRTOSS can be released from and retracted back to the research aircraft by means of a cable up to a distance of 4 km. Data were collected from two field campaigns over the North Sea and the Baltic Sea in spring and late summer 2013. One measurement flight over the North Sea proved to be exemplary, and as such the results are used to illustrate the benefits of collocated sampling. The radiative transfer simulations were applied to quantify the impact of cloud particle properties such as crystal shape, effective radius reff, and optical thickness τ on cirrus spectral optical layer properties. Furthermore, the radiative effects of low-level, liquid water (warm) clouds as frequently observed beneath the cirrus are evaluated. They may cause changes in the radiative forcing of the cirrus by a factor of 2. When low-level clouds below the cirrus are not taken into account, the radiative cooling effect (caused by reflection of solar radiation) due to the cirrus in the solar (shortwave) spectral range is significantly overestimated.

  6. Optical properties of cirrus derived from airborne measurements during FIRE IFO 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.; Pilewskie, Peter; Bucholtz, Anthony; Platnick, Steven

    1993-01-01

    The Radiation Measurement System (RAMS) on board the NASA ER-2 was used to acquire several optical parameters of interest during the FIRE Cirrus IFO 2. In this abstract we present results from the 26 Nov. IFO when the ER-2 flew over the Coffeyville airport hub site. We show retrieved optical thickness and cloud temperature, along with optical thickness obtained from RAMS instruments on the NCAR Sabreliner and at the surface site B. Independent retrieval of optical thickness, from the ER-2 and at the surface, are in agreement during the overpasses. Cirrus optical depths, derived from each platform, ranged between 1 and 2.

  7. Airborne retrieval of cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties using Airborne Remote Earth Sensing System 5.1-5.3 and 3.7-μm channel data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, S. C.; Liou, K. N.; Yang, P.; Rolland, P.; Caudill, T. R.; Lisowski, J.; Morrison, B.

    1998-09-01

    We present an airborne retrieval algorithm to infer cirrus cloud temperature, optical depth, and mean effective sizes using the Airborne Remote Earth Sensing System (ARES) hyperspectral spectrometer data for the 5.1-5.3 and 3.7 μm channels. The algorithm, development and the selection of the channels are based on the principle and parameterization of radiative transfer involving cirrus clouds and the associated atmospheric and surface properties. It has been applied to a selected case of the ARES data collected over the western Boston area on September 16, 1995. Validation of the retrieved parameters was carried out using the collocated and coincident ground-based 8.6-mm radar data and ice crystal size distribution measurements obtained from the 2D-P probe on board the high-altitude reconnaissance platform (HARP). We show that the retrieved cirrus cloud temperature, mean effective ice crystal size, and optical depth match closely with those derived from the observations.

  8. Microphysical properties of cirrus clouds between 75°N and 25°S derived from extensive airborne in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina

    2016-04-01

    Numerous airborne field campaigns were performed in the last decades to record cirrus clouds microphysical properties. Beside the understanding of the processes of cirrus formation and evolution, an additional motivation for those studies is to provide a database to evaluate the representation of cirrus clouds in global climate models. This is of importance for an improved certainty of climate predictions, which are affected by the poor understanding of the microphysical processes of ice clouds (IPCC, 2013). To this end, the observations should ideally cover the complete respective parameter range and not be influenced by instrumental artifacts. However, due to the difficulties in measuring cirrus properties on fast-flying, high-altitude aircraft, some issues with respect to the measurements %evolved have arisen. In particular, concerns about the relative humidity in and around cirrus clouds and the ice crystal number concentrations were under discussion. Too high ice supersaturations as well as ice number concentrations were often reported. These issues have made more challenging the goal of compiling a large database using data from a suite of different instruments that were used on different campaigns. In this study, we have have addressed these challenges and compiled a large data set of cirrus clouds, sampled during eighteen field campaigns between 75°N and 25°S, representing measurements fulfilling the above mentioned requirements. The most recent campaigns were performed in 2014; namely, the ATTREX campaign with the research aircraft Global Hawk and the ML-CIRRUS and ACRIDICON campaigns with HALO. % The observations include ice water content (IWC: 130 hours of observations), ice crystal numbers (N_ice: 83 hours), ice crystal mean mass size (Rice: 83 hours) and relative humidity (RH_ice) in- and outside of cirrus clouds (78 and 140 hours). % We will present the parameters as PDFs versus temperature and derive medians and core ranges (including the most

  9. Estimating cirrus cloud properties from MIPAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrok, J.; Schreier, F.; Höpfner, M.

    2007-04-01

    High resolution mid-infrared limb emission spectra observed by the spaceborne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) showing evidence of cloud interference are analyzed. Using the new line-by-line multiple scattering [Approximate] Spherical Atmospheric Radiative Transfer code (SARTre), a sensitivity study with respect to cirrus cloud parameters, e.g., optical thickness and particle size distribution, is performed. Cirrus properties are estimated by fitting spectra in three distinct microwindows between 8 and 12 μm. For a cirrus with extremely low ice water path (IWP = 0.1 g/m2) and small effective particle size (D e = 10 μm) simulated spectra are in close agreement with observations in broadband signal and fine structures. We show that a multi-microwindow technique enhances reliability of MIPAS cirrus retrievals compared to single microwindow methods.

  10. Retrieval of cirrus properties by Sun photometry: A new perspective on an old issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Ramachandran, S.; Redemann, Jens; Baum, Bryan A.

    2013-05-01

    Cirrus clouds are important modulators of the Earth radiation budget and continue to be one of the most uncertain components in weather and climate modeling. Sun photometers are widely accepted as one of the most accurate platforms for measuring clear sky aerosol optical depth (AOD). However, interpretation of their measurements is ambiguous in the presence of cirrus. Derivation of a valid AOD under cirrus conditions was focused previously on correction factors, rather than on derivation of cirrus cloud optical thickness (COT). In the present work, we propose a new approach that uses the total measured irradiance to derive cirrus COT and ice particle effective diameter (Deff). For this approach, we generate lookup tables (LUTs) of total transmittance for the Sun photometer field of view (FOV) due to the direct and scattered irradiance over the spectral range of 400-2200 nm, for a range of cirrus COT (0-4), and a range of ice cloud effective diameters (10-120 µm) by using explicit cirrus optical property models for (a) cirrus only and (b) a two-component model including cirrus and aerosols. The new approach is tested on two cases (airborne and ground-based) using measured transmittances from the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun photometer. We find that relative uncertainties in COT are much smaller than those for Deff. This study shows that for optically thin cirrus cases (COT < 1.0), the aerosol layer between the instrument and the cloud plays an important role, especially in derivation of Deff. Additionally, the choice of the cirrus model may introduce large differences in derived Deff.

  11. Airborne Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Observations of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the first radiometric measurements of cirrus clouds in the frequency range of 89-325 GHz from a high-altitude aircraft flight. The measurements are conducted with a Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft over a region in northern Oklahoma. Aboard the same aircraft are a cloud lidar system and a multichannel radiometer operating at the visible and infrared wavelengths. The instrument ensemble is well suited for identifying cirrus clouds. It is shown that the depressions in brightness temperatures associated with a few intense cirrus clouds occur at all frequency channels of the MIR. Estimates of total ice water path of the cirrus clouds are derived from comparisons of radiative transfer calculations and observed brightness depressions.

  12. Linear contrail and contrail cirrus properties determined from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Bedka, Sarah T.; Duda, David P.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Chee, Thad; Ayers, J. Kirk; Palikonda, Rabindra; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Khlopenkov, Konstantin V.; Boeke, Robyn

    2013-06-01

    properties of contrail cirrus clouds are retrieved through analysis of Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data for 21 cases of spreading linear contrails. For these cases, contrail cirrus enhanced the linear contrail coverage by factors of 2.4-7.6 depending on the contrail mask sensitivity. In dense air traffic areas, linear contrail detection sensitivity is apparently reduced when older contrails overlap and thus is likely diminished during the afternoon. The mean optical depths and effective particle sizes of the contrail cirrus were 2-3 times and 20% greater, respectively, than the corresponding values retrieved for the adjacent linear contrails. When contrails form below, in, or above existing cirrus clouds, the column cloud optical depth is increased and particle size is decreased. Thus, even without increased cirrus coverage, contrails will affect the radiation balance. These results should be valuable for refining model characterizations of contrail cirrus needed to fully assess the climate impacts of contrails.

  13. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Properties under Thin Cirrus from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew Mark.

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval of aerosol optical properties using shortwave bands from passive satellite sensors, such as MODIS, is typically limited to cloud-free areas. However, if the clouds are thin enough (i.e. thin cirrus) such that the satellite-observed reflectance contains signals under the cirrus layer, and if the optical properties of this cirrus layer are known, the TOA reflectance can be corrected for the cirrus layer to be used for retrieving aerosol optical properties. To this end, we first correct the TOA reflectances in the aerosol bands (0.47, 0.55, 0.65, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.12 micron for ocean algorithm and 0.412, 0.47, and 0.65 micron for deep blue algorithm) for the effects of thin cirrus using 1.38 micron reflectance and conversion factors that convert cirrus reflectance in 1.38 micron band to those in aerosol bands. It was found that the conversion factors can be calculated by using relationships between reflectances in 1.38 micron band and minimum reflectances in the aerosol bands (Gao et al., 2002). Refer to the example in the figure. Then, the cirrus-corrected reflectance can be calculated by subtracting the cirrus reflectance from the TOA reflectance in the optically thin case. A sensitivity study suggested that cloudy-sky TOA reflectances can be calculated with small errors in the form of simple linear addition of cirrus-only reflectances and clear-sky reflectances. In this study, we correct the cirrus signals up to TOA reflectance at 1.38 micron of 0.05 where the simple linear addition is valid without extensive radiative transfer simulations. When each scene passes the set of tests shown in the flowchart, the scene is corrected for cirrus contamination and passed into aerosol retrieval algorithms.

  14. Microphysical Ice Crystal Properties in Mid-Latitude Frontal Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlage, Romy; Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Minikin, Andreas; Weigel, Ralf; Molleker, Sergej; Klingebiel, Marcus; Borrmann, Stephan; Luebke, Anna; Krämer, Martina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schäfler, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds modulate the climate by reflection of shortwave solar radiation and trapping of longwave terrestrial radiation. Their net radiative effect can be positive or negative depending on atmospheric and cloud parameters including ice crystal number density, size and shape. Latter microphysical ice crystal properties have been measured during the mid-latitude cirrus mission ML-CIRRUS with a set of cloud instruments on the new research aircraft HALO. The mission took place in March/April 2014 with 16 flights in cirrus formed above Europe and the Atlantic. The ice clouds were encountered at altitudes from 7 to 14 km in the typical mid-latitude temperature range. A focus of the mission was the detection of frontal cirrus linked to warm conveyor belts (WCBs). Within WCBs, water vapor is transported in the warm sector of an extra-tropical cyclone from the humid boundary layer to the upper troposphere. Cirrus cloud formation can be triggered in the WCB outflow region at moderate updraft velocities and additionally at low updrafts within the high pressure system linked to the WCB. Due to their frequent occurrence, WCBs represent a major source for regions of ice supersaturation and cirrus formation in the mid-latitudes. Here, we use data from the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer with detection for POLarization (CAS-POL) and the Cloud Combination Probe (CCP), combining a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) and a greyscale Cloud Imaging Probe (CIPgs) to investigate the ice crystal distribution in the size range from 0.5 µm to 1 mm. We derive microphysical cirrus properties in mid-latitude warm front cirrus. Further, we investigate their variability and their dependence on temperature and relative humidity. Finally, we compare the microphysical properties of these frontal cirrus to cirrus clouds that formed at low updrafts within high pressure systems or at high updraft velocities in lee waves. We quantify statistically significant differences in cirrus properties formed in these

  15. Cirrus cloud detection from airborne imaging spectrometer data using the 1.38 micron water vapor band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1993-01-01

    Using special images acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) at 20 km altitude, we show that wavelengths close to the center of the strong 1.38 micron water vapor band are useful for detecting thin cirrus clouds. The detection makes use of the fact that cirrus clouds are located above almost all the atmospheric water vapor. Because of the strong water vapor absorption in the lower atmosphere, AVIRIS channels near 1.38 micron receive little scattered solar radiance from the surface of low level clouds. When cirrus clouds are present, however, these channels receive large amounts of scattered solar radiance from the cirrus clouds. Our ability to determine cirrus cloud cover using space-based remote sensing will be improved if channels near the center of the 1.38 micron water vapor band are added to future satellites.

  16. Sensitivity of Cirrus Properties to Ice Nuclei Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The relative importance of heterogeneous and homogeneous ice nucleation for cirrus formation remains an active area of debate in the cloud physics community. From a theoretical perspective, a number of modeling studies have investigated the sensitivity of ice number concentration to the nucleation mechanism and the abundance of ice nuclei. However, these studies typically only addressed ice concentration immediately after ice nucleation. Recent modeling work has shown that the high ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing may not persist very long, which is consistent with the low frequency of occurrence of high ice concentrations indicated by cirrus measurements. Here, I use idealized simulations to investigate the impact of ice nucleation mechanism and ice nuclei abundance on the full lifecycle of cirrus clouds. The primary modeling framework used includes different modes of ice nucleation, deposition growth/sublimation, aggregation, sedimentation, and radiation. A limited number of cloud-resolving simulations that treat radiation/dynamics interactions will also been presented. I will show that for typical synoptic situations with mesoscale waves present, the time-averaged cirrus ice crystal size distributions and bulk cloud properties are less sensitive to ice nucleation processes than might be expected from the earlier simple ice nucleation calculations. I will evaluate the magnitude of the ice nuclei impact on cirrus for a range of temperatures and mesoscale wave specifications, and I will discuss the implications for cirrus aerosol indirect effects in general.

  17. Cirrus Microphysical Properties from Stellar Aureole Measurements, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, J. G.; Kristl, J. A.; Rappaport, S. A.

    2012-04-20

    While knowledge of the impact of aerosols on climate change has improved significantly due to the routine, ground-based, sun photometer measurements of aerosols made at AERONET sites world-wide, the impact of cirrus clouds remains much less certain because they occur high in the atmosphere and are more difficult to measure. This report documents work performed on a Phase I SBIR project to retrieve microphysical properties of cirrus ice crystals from stellar aureole imagery. The Phase I work demonstrates that (1) we have clearly measured stellar aureole profiles; (2) we can follow the aureole profiles out to ~1/4 degree from stars (~1/2 degree from Jupiter); (3) the stellar aureoles from cirrus have very distinctive profiles, being flat out to a critical angle, followed by a steep power-law decline with a slope of ~-3; (4) the profiles are well modeled using exponential size distributions; and (5) the critical angle in the profiles is ~0.12 degrees, (6) indicating that the corresponding critical size ranges from ~150 to ~200 microns. The stage has been set for a Phase II project (1) to proceed to validating the use of stellar aureole measurements for retrieving cirrus particle size distributions using comparisons with optical property retrievals from other, ground-based instruments and (2) to develop an instrument for the routine, automatic measurement of thin cirrus microphysical properties.

  18. Role of Gravity Waves in Determining Cirrus Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OCStarr, David; Singleton, Tamara; Lin, Ruei-Fong

    2008-01-01

    Cirrus clouds are important in the Earth's radiation budget. They typically exhibit variable physical properties within a given cloud system and from system to system. Ambient vertical motion is a key factor in determining the cloud properties in most cases. The obvious exception is convectively generated cirrus (anvils), but even in this case, the subsequent cloud evolution is strongly influenced by the ambient vertical motion field. It is well know that gravity waves are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and occur over a wide range of scales and amplitudes. Moreover, researchers have found that inclusion of statistical account of gravity wave effects can markedly improve the realism of simulations of persisting large-scale cirrus cloud features. Here, we use a 1 -dimensional (z) cirrus cloud model, to systematically examine the effects of gravity waves on cirrus cloud properties. The model includes a detailed representation of cloud microphysical processes (bin microphysics and aerosols) and is run at relatively fine vertical resolution so as to adequately resolve nucleation events, and over an extended time span so as to incorporate the passage of multiple gravity waves. The prescribed gravity waves "propagate" at 15 m s (sup -1), with wavelengths from 5 to 100 km, amplitudes range up to 1 m s (sup -1)'. Despite the fact that the net gravity wave vertical motion forcing is zero, it will be shown that the bulk cloud properties, e.g., vertically-integrated ice water path, can differ quite significantly from simulations without gravity waves and that the effects do depend on the wave characteristics. We conclude that account of gravity wave effects is important if large-scale models are to generate realistic cirrus cloud property climatology (statistics).

  19. Spatial scales of cirrus cloud properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, Paul F.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    Research in studying the spatial scales of the cirrus, used data collected during the flight legs of the NCAR Sabreliner aircraft on four days during the FIRE Cirrus IFO to study the spatial scales of the cirrus, and will concentrate on the scales of horizontal wind. The spatial scales of the cloud features can be described by power spectra (or spectral density graphs) and cumulative variance graphs. The cumulative variance graphs were created by first using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to create variance spectra. The variances were then summed in a cumulative fashion from the largest scalelengths (wavelengths) to the smallest. No detrending was done to the original data, and no smoothing or averaging was done to the spectral points. All the spectral points were included. This means that the values of the first five to ten spectral points of the large scalelengths should only be considered to be qualitatively correct. The cumulative variance at smaller scalelengths should be correct because a more accurate representation of the variance at the larger scalelengths should only redistribute the energy amongst the larger scalelengths.

  20. Cloud properties and bulk microphysical properties of semi-transparent cirrus from IR Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubenrauch, Claudia; Feofilov, Artem; Armante, Raymond; Guignard, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    the AIRS observations at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time, giving information on the diurnal cycle of clouds. References: Baran, A.J. and Francis, P.N. and Havemann, S. and Yang, P: A study of the absorption and extinction properties of hexagonal ice columns and plates in random and preferred orientation, using exact T-matrix theory and aircraft observations of cirrus, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Ra., 70, 505-518, 2001 Baran, A. J. and Francis, P. N.: On the radiative properties of cirrus cloud at solar and thermal wavelengths:A test of model consistency using high-resolution airborne radiance measurements, Q. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc.,130, 763-778, 2004.

  1. Retrieval of Cirrus properties by Sunphotometry: A new perspective on an old issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Ramachandran, S.; Redemann, J.; Baum, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cirrus clouds are important modulators of the earth radiation budget and continue to be one of the most uncertain components in weather and climate modeling and in the estimations of cooling and warming effects. This is mainly due to the high uncertainty in the derivation of their optical thicknesses and ice crystal size, shape and amount. While sunphotometers are widely accepted as one of the most accurate platforms for measuring aerosol optical depth (AOD), such measurements under cirrus are still considered unreliable. The ease and the relatively widespread use of sunphotometers globally, both as airborne and ground-based platforms, can potentially contribute to our increased capability in quantifying some of the most important cirrus properties such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and ice crystal effective diameter. However, under cloudy conditions, the signal received at the sunphotometer FOV contains not only the direct attenuated solar irradiation, but also the forward scattered term, which interferes with the proper derivation of AOD via the simple Beer-Lambert relation. Solutions to this problem were previously suggested in the form of correction factors. In the present work we have proposed a new approach that utilizes the additional information content that lies within the total measured irradiance under a cloudy scene. Relatively thin cirrus clouds (i.e. COT<4.0) allow direct sun irradiation to reach the detector, and at the same time strongly scatter some of this radiation into the instrument FOV. This results in increased transmittance values due to both the direct and scattered components. This quantity was modeled for the spectral range of 400-2200 nm, for a range of COT (0-4), and a range of ice particle effective diameters using the explicit Baum and Yang cirrus optical properties data sets. This allowed the derivations of transmittance look-up tables that were used for the retrieval procedure. The new approach was tested on two cases; an

  2. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-07-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows to determine the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud anvil. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicates that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results

  3. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-11-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of the Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements, only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows the determination of the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicate that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results

  4. Properties of PSCs and Cirrus Determined from AVHRR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark; Pagan, Kathy; Foschi, Patricia G.

    1999-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCS) and cirrus have been investigated using thermal emission measurements at 10.8 and 12 micrometers wavelength (channels 4 and 5) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The AVHRR signal was evaluated from a theoretical basis to understand the emission from clear and cloudy skies, and models were developed to simulate the AVHRR signal. Signal simulations revealed that nitric acid PSCs are invisible to AVHRR, while ice PSCs and cirrus are readily detectable. Methods were developed to retrieve cloud optical depths, average temperatures, average effective radii, and ice water paths, from AVHRR channels 4 and 5. Properties of ice PSCs retrieved from AVHRR were compared to values derived from coincident radiosondes and from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement II instrument, showing good agreement.

  5. Connecting the Properties of Anvil Cirrus to the Properties of the Convective Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipser, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    This final grant report describes program in preparation for and participation in the CRYSTAL-FACE Field Program, results for a master's thesis, CRYSTAL-FACE Florida case studies, and using CRMS to relate convective intensity to cirrus properties.

  6. Investigation of tropical cirrus cloud properties using ground based lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaman, Reji K.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Krishnakumar, V.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Raghunath, K.; Venkat Ratnam, M.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds play a significant role in the Earths radiation budget. Therefore, knowledge of geometrical and optical properties of cirrus cloud is essential for the climate modeling. In this paper, the cirrus clouds microphysical and optical properties are made by using a ground based lidar measurements over an inland tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), Andhra Pradesh, India. The variation of cirrus microphysical and optical properties with mid cloud temperature is also studied. The cirrus clouds mean height is generally observed in the range of 9-17km with a peak occurrence at 13- 14km. The cirrus mid cloud temperature ranges from -81°C to -46°C. The cirrus geometrical thickness ranges from 0.9- 4.5km. During the cirrus occurrence days sub-visual, thin and dense cirrus were at 37.5%, 50% and 12.5% respectively. The monthly cirrus optical depth ranges from 0.01-0.47, but most (<80%) of the cirrus have values less than 0.1. Optical depth shows a strong dependence with cirrus geometrical thickness and mid-cloud height. The monthly mean cirrus extinction ranges from 2.8E-06 to 8E-05 and depolarization ratio and lidar ratio varies from 0.13 to 0.77 and 2 to 52 sr respectively. A positive correlation exists for both optical depth and extinction with the mid-cloud temperature. The lidar ratio shows a scattered behavior with mid-cloud temperature.

  7. Correlation Between Cirrus Particle Optical Properties: Microphysics and Implications for Spaceborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Hess, M.; Reichardt, S.; Behrendt, A.; McGee, T. J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 deg N in arctic winter reveal a strong correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio and extinction-to-backscatter ratio, for ambient cloud temperatures above approximately -45 C, and an anti-correlation for colder temperatures. Similar correlations are evident in a 2-year midlatitude (53.4 deg N) cirrus data set. Scattering calculations show that the observed dependences can be interpreted in terms of the shapes and sizes of the cirrus ice particles. These findings suggest a retrieval method for determining cirrus extinction profiles from spaceborne lidar polarization data.

  8. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus in the pilot radiation observation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.; Patterson, G.R.

    1996-04-01

    The development of a sensitive filter radiometer for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been reported. The aim was to develop a reliable and fast instrument that could be used alongside a lidar to obtain near realtime optical properties of clouds, particularly high ice clouds, as they drifted over an ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site allowing calculation of the radiation divergence in the atmosphere over the site. Obtaining cloud optical properties by the lidar/radiometer, or LIRAD, method was described by Platt et al.; the latter paper also describes a year`s data on mid-latitude cirrus. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus (i.e., cirrus within a few degrees of the equator) have hardly been studied at all. The same is true of tropical cirrus, although a few observations have been reported by Davis and Platt et al.This paper describes obersvations performed on cirrus clouds, analysis methods used, and results.

  9. Far-infrared remote sensing of cirrus cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolt, Ira G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Carli, Bruno; Evans, K. Franklin; Marshall, B. Thomas; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Park, Kwangjai; Russell, James M., III

    1997-01-01

    The lack of a global cirrus cloud database is a major deficiency in validating Global Circulation Models which are the basis for estimating long term climate change. Cirrus clouds being composed of ice particles act to reflect the incoming solar radiation and to block infrared energy radiation loss from the earth. The net effect can be either warming or cooling. The essential data are global distributions of the Ice Water Path (IWP) and effective particle size. We have modeled the outgoing earth radiance spectrum between 8 and 1000 micrometer as a function of IWP and effective particle size. The results are used to estimate cirrus retrieval accuracies for cirrus from far infrared/submm measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy. We describe the aircraft-based Far Infrared Sensor for Cirrus (FIRSC) instrument which is currently under construction. We also discuss the potential contribution of far infrared/submm measurements for the validation of cirrus products anticipated in the MTPE MODIS program.

  10. Reassessing properties and radiative forcing of contrail cirrus using a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Lisa; Burkhardt, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Contrail cirrus is the largest known component contributing to the radiative forcing associated with aviation. Despite major advances simulating contrail cirrus, their microphysical and optical properties and the associated radiative forcing remain largely uncertain. We use a contrail cirrus parameterization in a global climate model which was extended to include a microphysical two-moment scheme. This allows a more realistic representation of microphysical processes, such as deposition and sedimentation, and therefore of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. The simulated contrail microphysical and optical properties agree well with in situ and satellite observations. As compared to estimates using an older version of the contrail cirrus scheme, the optical depth of contrail cirrus is significantly higher, particularly in regions with high air traffic density, due to high ice crystal number concentrations on the main flight routes. Nevertheless, the estimated radiative forcing for the year 2002 supports our earlier results. The global radiative forcing of contrail cirrus for the year 2006 is estimated to be 56mW/m2. A large uncertainty of the radiative forcing estimate appears to be connected with the, on average, very small ice crystal radii simulated in the main air traffic areas, which make the application of a radiative transfer parameterization based on geometric optics questionable.

  11. Comparisons of cirrus cloud properties between polluted and pristine air based on in-situ observations from the NSF HIPPO, EU INCA and NASA ATTREX campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, M.; Schumann, U.; Jensen, J. B.; Minikin, A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing of cirrus clouds is influenced by microphysical (e.g., ice crystal number concentration and size distribution) and macroscopic properties. Currently it is still unclear how the formation of cirrus clouds and their microphysical properties are influenced by anthropogenic emissions. In this work, we use airborne in-situ observations to compare cirrus cloud properties between polluted and pristine regions. Our dataset includes: the NSF HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) Global campaign (2009-2011), the EU Interhemispheric Differences In Cirrus Properties from Anthropogenic Emissions (INCA) campaign (2000) and the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX) campaign (2014). The combined dataset include observations of both extratropical (HIPPO and INCA) and tropical (ATTREX) cirrus, over the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. We use the in-situ measured carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratio as a pollution indicator, and compare ice microphysical properties (i.e., ice crystal number concentration (Nc) and number-weighted mean diameter (Dc)) between air masses with higher and lower CO. All analyses are restricted to T ≤ -40°C. By analyzing ice crystals (Fast-2DC, 87.5-1600 µm) in HIPPO, we found that Dc decreases with increasing CO concentration at multiple constant pressure levels. In addition, analysis of INCA data shows that Nc and extinction of small ice particles (FSSP 3-20 µm) increases with increasing CO. Particles < 87.5 µm in Fast-2DC data are not considered due to uncertainty in sample volume, and the FSSP measurements are subject to possible shattering. We further analyze the ice crystals (SPEC FCDP, 1-50 µm) in the tropical tropopause layer in ATTREX. At -70°C to -90°C, we found that the average Nc (Dc) increases (decreases) at higher CO. Overall, our results suggest that extratropical and tropical cirrus are likely to have more numerous small ice particles, when sampled in the more polluted background. Back

  12. Impact of large-scale dynamics on the microphysical properties of midlatitude cirrus

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Diskin, G. S.; Evans, Stuart; Lawson, Paul; Marchand, Roger

    2014-04-16

    In situ microphysical observations 3 of mid-latitude cirrus collected during the Department of Energy Small Particles in Cirrus (SPAR-TICUS) field campaign are combined with an atmospheric state classification for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site to understand statistical relationships between cirrus microphysics and the large-scale meteorology. The atmospheric state classification is informed about the large-scale meteorology and state of cloudiness at the ARM SGP site by combining ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis data with 14 years of continuous observations from the millimeter-wavelength cloud radar. Almost half of the cirrus cloud occurrences in the vicinity of the ARM SGP site during SPARTICUS can be explained by three distinct synoptic condi- tions, namely upper-level ridges, mid-latitude cyclones with frontal systems and subtropical flows. Probability density functions (PDFs) of cirrus micro- physical properties such as particle size distributions (PSDs), ice number con- centrations and ice water content (IWC) are examined and exhibit striking differences among the different synoptic regimes. Generally, narrower PSDs with lower IWC but higher ice number concentrations are found in cirrus sam- pled in upper-level ridges whereas cirrus sampled in subtropical flows, fronts and aged anvils show broader PSDs with considerably lower ice number con- centrations but higher IWC. Despite striking contrasts in the cirrus micro- physics for different large-scale environments, the PDFs of vertical velocity are not different, suggesting that vertical velocity PDFs are a poor predic-tor for explaining the microphysical variability in cirrus. Instead, cirrus mi- crophysical contrasts may be driven by differences in ice supersaturations or aerosols.

  13. Cirrus cloud properties measurement using lidar in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chengli; Tao, Zongming; Hu, Shunxing; Che, Huizheng; Yu, Jie; Feng, Caiyun; Xie, Chenbo; Liu, Dong; Zhong, Zhiqing; Yuan, Ke'e.; Cao, Kaifa; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Yingjian; Chen, Zhenyi

    2016-01-01

    Cirrus cloud has an important effect on the radiation balance between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The vertical structures, optical depth and effective lidar ratio of cirrus cloud detected by Mie scattering-polarization-Raman lidar system in Beijing from April 11 to December 31, 2012 are analyzed. The results show that the cloud height in Beijing is lower in spring and higher in autumn, with a mean value of about 8km. The mean of cloud thickness is 0.74km. The mean of optical depth is 0.092, and most observed cirrus cloud is thin while optical depth is less than 0.3. The effective lidar ratio of cirrus is lower in summer and higher in winter, inversely related to local temperature, with a mean value of 32.29Sr.

  14. FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-26

    FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) II ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE II - Cirrus Home Page FIRE II - Cirrus Mission Summaries ...

  15. Cirrus Mammatus Properties Derived from an Extended Remote Sensing Dataset.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Likun; Sassen, Kenneth

    2006-02-01

    The first quantitative and statistical evaluation of cirrus mammatus clouds based on wavelet analysis of remote sensing data is made by analyzing the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) 10-yr high-cloud dataset. First, a case study of cirrus mammata combining a high-resolution lidar system and a W-band Doppler radar is presented, yielding an assessment of the thermodynamic environment and dynamic mechanisms. Then, 25 cirrus mammatus cases selected from the FARS lidar dataset are used to disclose their characteristic environmental conditions, and vertical and length scales. The results show that cirrus mammata occur in the transition zone from moist (cloudy) to dry air layers with weak wind shear, which suggests that cloud-induced thermal structures play a key role in their formation. Their maximum vertical and horizontal length scales vary from 0.3 to 1.1 km and 0.5 to 8.0 km, respectively. It is also found that small-scale structures develop between the large-scale protuberances. The spectral slopes of the lidar-returned power and mean radar Doppler velocity data extracted from the cirrus cloud-base region further indicate the presence of developed three-dimensional, locally isotropic, homogeneous turbulence generated by buoyancy. Finally, comparisons of anvil and cirrus mammata are made. Although both are generated in a similar environment, cirrus mammata generally do not form fallout fronts like their anvil counterparts, and so do not have their smooth and beautiful outlines.


  16. Evaluation of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Properties Derived from ECMWF Model Output and Ground Based Measurements over Nauru Island

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Jakob, Christian

    2004-05-26

    Cirrus clouds play an important role both radiatively and dynamically in the tropics. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the formation and persistence of tropical cirrus is an important step in accurately predicting cirrus in forecast models. In this study, we compare ground-based measurements of cloud properties with those predicted by the ECMWF model at a location in the tropical western Pacific. Our comparisons of cloud height and optical depth over an 8 month time period indicate that the model and measurements agree relatively well. The ECMWF model predicts cirrus anvils associated with deep convection during convectively active periods, and also isolated cirrus events that are influenced by large-scale vertical ascent. We also show through examination of an upper tropospheric cirrus case that the model produces tropospheric waves that appear to influence the morphology and maintenance of the cirrus layer.

  17. Airborne Differential Absorption and High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements for Cirrus Cloud Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Schaefler, Andreas; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol and water vapor measurements were performed with the lidar system WALES of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) onboard the German research aircraft G550-HALO during the HALO Techno-Mission in October and November 2010 and during the ML-Cirrus mission in March and April 2014 over Central Europe and the North Atlantic region. Curtains composed of lidar profiles beneath the aircraft show the water vapor mixing ratio and the backscatter ratio. Temperature data from ECMWF model analysis are used to calculate the relative humidity above ice (RHi) in the 2-D field along the flight track to study the RHi distribution inside and outside of cirrus clouds at different stages of cloud evolution.

  18. Evaluation of the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer during the airborne field study CIRRUS-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, P.; Smit, H. G. J.; Krämer, M.; Spelten, N.; Petzold, A.

    2015-03-01

    The MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) is usually operated aboard passenger aircraft in the framework of MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone by Airbus In-Service Aircraft) for measuring atmospheric relative humidity (RH). In order to evaluate the performance of the MCH, the instrument was operated aboard a Learjet 35A research aircraft as part of the CIRRUS-III field study together with a closed-cell Lyman-α fluorescence hygrometer (Fast in situ Stratospheric Hygrometer, or FISH) and an open-path tunable diode laser system (Open-path Jülich Stratospheric TDL ExpeRiment, or OJSTER) for water vapour measurement. After reducing the CIRRUS-III data set to data corresponding to MOZAIC aircraft operation conditions, the 1 Hz RH data cross correlation between the MCH and reference instruments FISH (clear sky) and OJSTER (in-cirrus) yielded a remarkably good agreement of R2 = 0.92 and slope m = 1.02 and provided a MCH uncertainty of 5% RH. Probability distribution functions of RH deduced from the MCH and reference instruments agreed well between 10 and 70% RH with respect to liquid water in the ambient temperature range of ca. -70 to -40 °C. The use of MCH data is limited to sensor temperatures above the calibration limit of Tsensor = -40 °C (corresponds to ambient temperature of Tambient = -70 °C at typical cruising speed of long-haul passenger aircraft). Good performance of the MCH for clear sky as well as for in-cirrus conditions demonstrated the sensor robustness also for operation inside ice clouds.

  19. Evaluation of the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer during the airborne field study CIRRUS-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, P.; Smit, H. G. J.; Krämer, M.; Spelten, N.; Petzold, A.

    2014-09-01

    The MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) is usually operated onboard of passenger aircraft in the framework of MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone by AIRBUS In-Service Aircraft). In order to evaluate the performance of the MCH, it was operated aboard a Learjet 35A aircraft as part of the CIRRUS-III field study together with a closed-cell Lyman-α fluorescence hygrometer (FISH) and an open path tunable diode laser system (OJSTER) for water vapour measurement. After reducing the data set to MOZAIC-relevant conditions, the 1Hz relative humidity (RH) cross correlation between MCH and reference instruments FISH (clear sky) and OJSTER (in-cirrus) yielded a remarkably good agreement of R2 = 0.97 and slope m = 0.96 and provided the MCH uncertainty of 5% RH. Probability distribution functions of RH deduced from MCH and reference instruments agreed well over the entire range of observations. The main limitation for the use of MCH data is related to sensor temperatures below the calibration limit of Tsensor = -40 °C (corresponds to ambient temperature of Tambient = -70 °C at typical cruising speed of long-haul passenger aircraft), which causes a delay in the sensor's time response. Good performance of MCH for clear sky as well as for in-cirrus conditions demonstrated the sensor robustness also for operation inside ice clouds.

  20. Subtropical Cirrus Properties Derived from GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements during CAMEX 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Wang, Z.; Demoz, B.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island, Bahamas for the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX 3) held in August - September, 1998 and acquired an extensive set of water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements (Whiteman et al., 2001). The cirrus data studied here have been segmented by generating mechanism. Distinct differences in the optical properties of the clouds are found when the cirrus are hurricane-induced versus thunderstom-induced. Relationships of cirrus cloud optical depth, mean cloud temperature, and layer mean extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S) are presented and compared with mid-latitude and tropical results. Hurricane-induced cirrus clouds are found to generally possess lower values of S than thunderstorm induced clouds. Comparison of these measurements of S are made with other studies revealing at times large differences in the measurements. Given that S is a required parameter for spacebased retrievals of cloud optical depth using backscatter lidar, these large diffaences in S measurements present difficulties for space-based retrievals of cirrus cloud extinction and optical depth.

  1. Properties of CIRRUS Overlapping Clouds as Deduced from the GOES-12 Imagery Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Fu-Lung; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Khaiyer, Mandana

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the impact of cirrus clouds on modifying both the solar reflected and terrestrial emitted radiations is crucial for climate studies. Unlike most boundary layer stratus and stratocumulus clouds that have a net cooling effect on the climate, high-level thin cirrus clouds can have a warming effect on our climate. Many research efforts have been devoted to retrieving cirrus cloud properties due to their ubiquitous presence. However, using satellite observations to detect and/or retrieve cirrus cloud properties faces two major challenges. First, they are often semitransparent at visible to infrared wavelengths; and secondly, they often occur over a lower cloud system. The overlapping of high-level cirrus and low-level stratus cloud poses a difficulty in determining the individual cloud top altitudes and optical properties, especially when the signals from cirrus clouds are overwhelmed by the signals of stratus clouds. Moreover, the operational satellite retrieval algorithms, which often assume only single layer cloud in the development of cloud retrieval techniques, cannot resolve the cloud overlapping situation properly. The new geostationary satellites, starting with the Twelfth Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12), are providing a new suite of imager bands that have replaced the conventional 12-micron channel with a 13.3-micron CO2 absorption channel. The replacement of the 13.3-micron channel allows for the application of a CO2-slicing retrieval technique (Chahine et al. 1974; Smith and Platt 1978), which is one of the important passive satellite methods for remote sensing the altitudes of mid to high-level clouds. Using the CO2- slicing technique is more effective in detecting semitransparent cirrus clouds than using the conventional infrared-window method.

  2. In Situ Measurements of Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Cirrus and Anvil Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P.; Baker, B.; Pilson, B.

    2003-12-01

    In situ microphysical and radiative properties of mid-latitude cirrus, anvil and tropical anvil clouds, based on research flights conducted with the SPEC Learjet, the NASA WB-57 and DC-8, and the University of North Dakota Citation research aircraft, are presented. The measurements were collected in Colorado, Utah, Oklahoma, Florida and Kwajalein. All of the research aircraft were equipped with a standard complement of microphysical sensors and optical probes, plus a cloud particle imager (CPI), which produces high-definition (2.3 micron pixel) digital images of ice particles. The CPI data provide improved measurements of particle shape and size, facilitating better calculations of radiative properties of cirrus and anvil clouds. Based on the measurements, average mid-latitude cirrus, and mid-latitude and tropical cirrus microphysical properties of particle size distribution, crystal habit, ice water content, extinction coefficient, effective radius and optical depth are derived. The data show a distinct difference between particle characteristics in mid-latitude cirrus and anvil clouds. In cirrus, the predominate crystal type (weighted by area or mass) is the bullet rosette, a polycrystalline structure typical of crystal formation at temperatures colder than -30 C. Conversely, although anvils occur at temperatures similar to cirrus, bullet rosettes are very rare in anvils. Instead crystal types in anvils are typical of those formed at temperatures warmer than - 30 C. There is also a notable difference in microphysical and radiative characteristics between mid-latitude, Florida, and tropical (Kwajalein) anvils. Tropical anvils are comprised mainly of single crystals, mostly irregular blocky-shapes. In mid-latitude and Florida anvils, there are more aggregates and often chains of small particles that may be formed as a result of the higher electric fields in continental clouds. The impact of crystal type on calculations of radiative transfer are also considered.

  3. Cirrus cloud microphysical and optical properties at southern and northern midlatitudes during the INCA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayet, Jean-FrançOis; Ovarlez, JoëLle; Shcherbakov, ValéRy; StröM, Johan; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Auriol, FréDéRique; Petzold, Andreas; Monier, Marie

    2004-10-01

    Microphysical and optical measurements were performed in midlatitude cirrus clouds at temperatures between -33°C and -60°C during southern and northern Interhemispheric Differences in Cirrus Properties From Anthropogenic Emissions (INCA) field experiments carried out at equivalent latitudes (53°S and 55°N) from Punta Arenas in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, Chile) and Prestwick in the Northern Hemisphere (NH, Scotland). The aim of this paper is to analyze the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds and to compare the results of the two campaigns. Compared with the mean properties of cirrus clouds in SH, the cirrus sampled in NH were characterized by a greater concentration of ice crystals (2.2 cm-3 versus 1.4 cm-3, respectively) with a lower effective diameter (36 μm versus 42 μm, respectively). A significant contrast in extinction coefficient was also evidenced with larger values in NH than in SH (0.61 km-1 versus 0.49 km1, respectively), whereas no significant differences in the ice water content were observed (8 mg m-3). The first measurements of the asymmetry parameter obtained in midlatitude cirrus clouds revealed rather uniform particle scattering properties (median g values between 0.76 and 0.78) with small differences between SH and NH (0.770 versus 0.767, respectively). No significant differences in crystal shape were evidenced between the two data sets. For similar environmental conditions (i.e., over a similar range of temperature and vertical velocity) and for given values of the relative humidity, the comparisons clearly show distinct differences between the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds sampled in the SH and NH field experiments. These differences may be related to the contrasts in cirrus freezing thresholds in terms of relative humidity over ice for onset of clouds, which is about 20% lower in NH than in SH, as reported in previous INCA data analyses. Nevertheless, definite conclusions are hampered by the

  4. Did the Eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo Volcano Affect Cirrus Properties?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Zhengzhao; Rossow, William B.; Inoue, Toshiro; Stubenrauch, Claudia J.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Some observations suggest that the volcanic aerosols produced by the Mt. Pinatubo eruption may have altered cirrus properties. We look for evidence that such modification of cirrus is extensive enough to be climatically significant by comparing three satellite-based cirrus datasets produced by the ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) analysis, the 'split-window' analysis, and 3I analysis. Since the former two have not been compared in detail before, we conduct such a comparison here. When applied to AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data, both the ISCCP and split-window analyses identify about 0.2 - 0.3 cirrus cloud amount in tropical latitudes; however, there are detailed differences of classification for about half of these clouds. The discrepancies are attributed to the simplified assumptions made by both methods. The latter two datasets are derived from infrared radiances, so they are much less sensitive to volcanic aerosols than the ISCCP analysis. After the Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the ISCCP results indicate a dramatic decrease of thin cirrus (cloud top pressure less than 440 mb and visible optical thickness less than 1.3) over ocean, accompanied by a comparable increase of altocumulus and cumulus clouds; over land, there are no significant changes. In contrast, results from the split-window and 3I analyses show little change in thin cirrus amount over either ocean or land that is associated with the volcanic eruption. The ISCCP results can, therefore, be understood as a misclassification of thin cirrus because the additional reflected sunlight by the volcanic aerosol makes the cirrus clouds appear to be optically thicker. Examination of the split-window signature and the infrared emissivities from 3I show no significant change in infrared emissivity (or optical thickness). These results indicate that the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic aerosol did not have a significant systematic effect on tropical cirrus properties, but rather

  5. Parameterizations of the Vertical Variability of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Microphysical and Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, Cynthia; Heymsfield, Andrew; Gerber, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    Our multi-investigator effort was targeted at the following areas of interest to CRYSTAL-FACE: (1) the water budgets of anvils, (2) parameterizations of the particle size distributions and related microphysical and optical properties (3) characterizations of the primary ice particle habits, (4) the relationship of the optical properties to the microphysics and particle habits, and (5) investigation of the ice-nuclei types and mechanisms in anvil cirrus. Dr. Twohy's effort focused on (l), (2), and (5), with the measurement and analysis of ice water content and cirrus residual nuclei using the counterflow virtual impactor (CVI).

  6. Climatological and radiative properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds derived by automatic evaluation of lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienast-Sjögren, Erika; Rolf, Christian; Seifert, Patric; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Bei P.; Krämer, Martina; Peter, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus, i.e., high, thin clouds that are fully glaciated, play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget as they interact with both long- and shortwave radiation and affect the water vapor budget of the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Here, we present a climatology of midlatitude cirrus clouds measured with the same type of ground-based lidar at three midlatitude research stations: at the Swiss high alpine Jungfraujoch station (3580 m a.s.l.), in Zürich (Switzerland, 510 m a.s.l.), and in Jülich (Germany, 100 m a.s.l.). The analysis is based on 13 000 h of measurements from 2010 to 2014. To automatically evaluate this extensive data set, we have developed the Fast LIdar Cirrus Algorithm (FLICA), which combines a pixel-based cloud-detection scheme with the classic lidar evaluation techniques. We find mean cirrus optical depths of 0.12 on Jungfraujoch and of 0.14 and 0.17 in Zürich and Jülich, respectively. Above Jungfraujoch, subvisible cirrus clouds (τ < 0.03) have been observed during 6 % of the observation time, whereas above Zürich and Jülich fewer clouds of that type were observed. Cirrus have been observed up to altitudes of 14.4 km a.s.l. above Jungfraujoch, whereas they have only been observed to about 1 km lower at the other stations. These features highlight the advantage of the high-altitude station Jungfraujoch, which is often in the free troposphere above the polluted boundary layer, thus enabling lidar measurements of thinner and higher clouds. In addition, the measurements suggest a change in cloud morphology at Jungfraujoch above ˜ 13 km, possibly because high particle number densities form in the observed cirrus clouds, when many ice crystals nucleate in the high supersaturations following rapid uplifts in lee waves above mountainous terrain. The retrieved optical properties are used as input for a radiative transfer model to estimate the net cloud radiative forcing, CRFNET, for the analyzed cirrus clouds. All cirrus detected

  7. The effects of small ice crystals on the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Asano, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Minnis, P.

    1990-01-01

    To be successful in the development of satellite retrieval methodologies for the determination of cirrus cloud properties, we must have fundamental scattering and absorption data on nonspherical ice crystals that are found in cirrus clouds. Recent aircraft observations (Platt et al. 1989) reveal that there is a large amount of small ice particles, on the order of 10 micron, in cirrus clouds. Thus it is important to explore the potential differences in the scattering and absorption properties of ice crystals with respect to their sizes and shapes. In this study the effects of nonspherical small ice crystals on the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds are investigated using light scattering properties of spheroidal particles. In Section 2, using the anomalous diffraction theory for spheres and results from the exact spheroid scattering program, efficient parameterization equations are developed for calculations of the scattering and absorption properties for small ice crystals. Parameterization formulas are also developed for large ice crystals using results computed from the geometric ray-tracing technique and the Fraunhofer diffraction theory for spheroids and hexagonal crystals. This is presented in Section 3. Finally, applications to the satellite remote sensing are described in Section 4.

  8. A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2001-08-01

    In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment, the visible and infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds over Salt Lake City, Utah, are examined. Using {approx}860 h of combined ruby (0.694 {micro}m) lidar and midinfrared (9.5-11.5 {micro}m) radiometer data collected between 1992 and 1999 from visually identified cirrus clouds, the visible optical depths {tau} and infrared layer emittance epsilon of the varieties of midlatitude cirrus are characterized. The mean and median values for the cirrus sample are 0.75 {+-} 0.91 and 0.61 for {tau}, and 0.30 {+-} 0.22 and 0.25 for epsilon. Other scattering parameters studied are the visible extinction and infrared absorption coefficients, and their ratio, and the lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which has a mean value of 0.041 sr{sup -1}. Differences among cirrus clouds generated by general synoptic (e.g., jet stream), thunderstorm anvil, and orographic mechanisms are found, reflecting basic cloud microphysical effects. The authors draw parameterizations in terms of midcloud temperature T{sub m} and physical cloud thickness {Delta}z for epsilon and {tau}: both macrophysical variables are needed to adequately address the impact of the adiabatic process on ice cloud content, which modulates radiative transfer as a function of temperature. For the total cirrus dataset, the authors find epsilon = 1 -exp [-8.5 x 10{sup -5} (T{sub m} + 80 C) {Delta}z]. These parameterizations, based on a uniquely comprehensive dataset, hold the potential for improving weather and climate model predictions, and satellite cloud property retrieval methods.

  9. MODIS airborne simulator visible and near-infrared calibration, 1991 FIRE-Cirrus field experiment. Calibration version: FIRE King 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, G. Thomas; Fitzgerald, Michael; Grant, Patrick S.; King, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of the visible and near-infrared channels of the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) is derived from observations of a calibrated light source. For the 1991 FIRE-Cirrus field experiment, the calibrated light source was the NASA Goddard 48-inch integrating hemisphere. Laboratory tests during the FIRE Cirrus field experiment were conducted to calibrate the hemisphere and from the hemisphere to the MAS. The purpose of this report is to summarize the FIRE-Cirrus hemisphere calibration, and then describe how the MAS was calibrated from observations of the hemisphere data. All MAS calibration measurements are presented, and determination of the MAS calibration coefficients (raw counts to radiance conversion) is discussed. Thermal sensitivity of the MAS visible and near-infrared calibration is also discussed. Typically, the MAS in-flight is 30 to 60 degrees C colder than the room temperature laboratory calibration. Results from in-flight temperature measurements and tests of the MAS in a cold chamber are given, and from these, equations are derived to adjust the MAS in-flight data to what the value would be at laboratory conditions. For FIRE-Cirrus data, only channels 3 through 6 were found to be temperature sensitive. The final section of this report describes comparisons to an independent MAS (room temperature) calibration by Ames personnel using their 30-inch integrating sphere.

  10. Retrieval and Validation of Cirrus Cloud Properties with the Far-Infrared Sensor for Cirrus (FIRSC) During CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K. Franklin

    2004-01-01

    This grant supported the principal investigator's analysis of data obtained during CRYSTAL-FACE by two submillimeter-wave radiometers: the Far-Infrared Sensor for Cirrus (FIRSC) and the Conical Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR). The PI led the overall FIRSC investigation, though Co-I Michael Vanek led the instrument component at NASA Langley. The overall CoSSIR investigation was led by James Wang at NASA Goddard, but the cirrus retrieval and validation was performed at the University of Colorado. The goal of this research was to demonstrate the submillimeter-wave cirrus cloud remote sensing technique, provide retrievals of ice water path (IWP) and median mass particle diameter (D(sub me)), and perform validation of the cirrus retrievals using other CRYSTAL-FACE datasets.

  11. Study of microphysical and radiative properties of contrail cirrus using large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Thouron, Odile; Cariolle, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Contrails are ice clouds that form by condensation of water vapor exhaust from aircraft engines and develop further in the wake as they are entrained by the airplane trailing vortices. When contrails spread to form contrail cirrus, they can persist for hours resulting in additional (artificial) cloud cover that adds to the cover due to natural cirrus. This talk presents recent results from large-eddy situations (LES) of contrail cirrus dispersion that are carried out using the atmospheric model Méso-NH. The objective is to investigate whether and how the ambient conditions and the microphysical and optical properties of ice crystals (e.g. shape, albedo), affect the three-dimensional structure and the overall microphysical and radiative characteristics of the contrail. The analysis is carried out by changing the radiative properties of the atmosphere (e.g. day/night conditions) for a given level of atmospheric turbulence. The turbulent field is generated by means of a stochastic forcing technique that reproduces the atmospheric conditions encountered in the upper troposphere. In addition to helping understanding the physics of contrails, the LES data retrieved from this study may provide useful inputs to the parameterization of contrail cirrus into global or climate models.

  12. Correlations among the Optical Properties of Cirrus-Cloud Particles: Microphysical Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 deg N in January 1997 reveal a strong positive correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio delta(sub par) and extinction- to-backscatter (lidar) ratio S, for delta(sub par) less than approximately 40%, and an anti-correlation for delta(sub par) greater than approximately 40%. Over the length of the measurements the particle properties vary systematically. Initially, delta (sub par) approximately equals 60% and S approximately equals 10sr are observed. Then, with decreasing delta(sub par), S first increases to approximately 27sr (delta(sub par) approximately equals 40%) before decreasing to values around 10sr again (delta(sub par) approximately equals 20%). The analysis of lidar humidity and radiosonde temperature data shows that the measured optical properties stem from scattering by dry solid ice particles, while scattering by supercooled droplets, or by wetted or subliming ice particles can be excluded. For the microphysical interpretation of the lidar measurements, ray-tracing computations of particle scattering properties have been used. The comparison with the theoretical data suggests that the observed cirrus data can be interpreted in terms of size, shape, and, under the assumption that the lidar measurements of consecutive cloud segments can be mapped on the temporal development of a single cloud parcel moving along its trajectory, growth of the cirrus particles: Near the cloud top in the early stage of cirrus development, light scattering by nearly isometric particles that have the optical characteristics of hexagonal columns (short, column-like particles) is dominant. Over time the ice particles grow, and as the cloud base height extends to lower altitudes characterized by warmer temperatures they become morphologically diverse. For large S and depolarization values of approximately 40%, the scattering contributions of column- and

  13. Comparisons of cirrus cloud microphysical properties between polluted and pristine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Minghui; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Jensen, Jorgen

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds occur in the upper troposphere at altitudes where atmospheric radiative forcing is most sensitive to perturbations of water vapor concentration and water phase. The formation of cirrus clouds influences the distributions of water in both vapor and ice forms. The radiative properties of cirrus depend strongly on particle sizes. Currently it is still unclear how the formation of cirrus clouds and their microphysical properties are influenced by anthropogenic emissions (e.g., industrial emission and biomass burning). If anthropogenic emissions influence cirrus formation in a significant manner, then one should expect a systematic difference in cirrus properties between pristine (clean) air and polluted air. Because of the pollution contrasts between the Southern (SH) and Northern Hemispheres (NH), cirrus properties could have hemispheric differences as well. Therefore, we study high-resolution (~200 m), in-situ observations from two global flight campaigns: 1) the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) global campaign in 2009-2011 funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), and 2) the Interhemispheric Differences In Cirrus Properties from Anthropogenic Emissions (INCA) campaign in 2000 funded by the European Union and participating research institutions. To investigate the changes of cirrus clouds by anthropogenic emissions, we compare ice crystal distributions in polluted and pristine air, in terms of their frequency occurrence, number concentration (Nc) and mean diameter (i.e., effective-mean Deff and volume-mean Dc). Total aerosol concentration is used to represent the combined influence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols. In addition, measured carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratio is used to discriminate between polluted and pristine air masses. All analyses are restricted to temperatures ≤ -40°C to exclude mixed-phased clouds. The HIPPO campaign observations were obtained over the North America continent and the central Pacific Ocean

  14. Cirrus structure and radiative parameters from airborne lidar and spectral radiometer observations - The 28 October 1986 FIRE study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Hart, William D.

    1990-01-01

    A description is presented of cirrus based on results from a FIRE observation flight in central Wisconsin on October 28, 1986. Cirrus structure and radiative parameters as determined by the ER-2 lidar and imaging spectral radiometers are presented. From the lidar observations a complex structure was shown with differing cloud layers extending over six kilometers of altitude range. Both thin and dense cirrus layers were present and mixed phase clouds were found at lower altitudes. As indicated by the cloud structure, precipitation of crystals from high, but vertically thin, layers produces a significant fraction of the lower cirrus. Multiple layers should be considered as normal for cirrus formations. It is noted that the cloud height is an important factor for satellite cloud retrievals and cloud climatology.

  15. Effects of cirrus near the tropopause on anvil cirrus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Zulauf, M. A.; Krueger, S. K.

    2006-09-01

    Recent space and airborne observations have noted tenuous cirrus near the tropopause and above deep convective anvil outflow. We use a cloud-resolving model, initialized with aircraft observations taken during the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment, to explore the effects of such cirrus layers on anvil evolution. Numerical simulations demonstrate that anvil cirrus spreads because strong absorption of thermal radiation and emission at cloud base and top creates horizontal heating gradients between the cloud and its environment. The presence of a second layer of cirrus near the tropopause forces the upper part of the anvil to equilibrate to warmer radiative temperatures than would normally be associated with a clear upper atmosphere. Compared to a case without thin cirrus, the associated reduction to heating gradients at anvil cloud top corresponds to reduced anvil spreading and turbulent kinetic energy, by as much as 19% and 40%, respectively. These results suggest that tropopause cirrus can affect climate indirectly, by altering anvil cirrus dynamics.

  16. An accurate parameterization of the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds for climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Sun, W.B.; Yang, P.

    1998-09-01

    An accurate parameterization is presented for the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds. For the single-scattering calculations, a composite scheme is developed for randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals by comparing results from Mie theory, anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), the geometric optics method (GOM), and the finite-difference time domain technique. This scheme employs a linear combination of single-scattering properties from the Mie theory, ADT, and GOM, which is accurate for a wide range of size parameters. Following the approach of Q. Fu, the extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and asymmetry factor are parameterized as functions of the cloud ice water content and generalized effective size (D{sub ge}). The present parameterization of the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds is validated by examining the bulk radiative properties for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Compared with reference results, the typical relative error in emissivity due to the parameterization is {approximately}2.2%. The accuracy of this parameterization guarantees its reliability in applications to climate models. The present parameterization complements the scheme for the solar radiative properties of cirrus clouds developed by Q. Fu for use in numerical models.

  17. An Accurate Parameterization of the Infrared Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds for Climate Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Yang, Ping; Sun, W. B.

    1998-09-01

    An accurate parameterization is presented for the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds. For the single-scattering calculations, a composite scheme is developed for randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals by comparing results from Mie theory, anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), the geometric optics method (GOM), and the finite-difference time domain technique. This scheme employs a linear combination of single-scattering properties from the Mie theory, ADT, and GOM, which is accurate for a wide range of size parameters. Following the approach of Q. Fu, the extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and asymmetry factor are parameterized as functions of the cloud ice water content and generalized effective size (Dge). The present parameterization of the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds is validated by examining the bulk radiative properties for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Compared with reference results, the typical relative error in emissivity due to the parameterization is 2.2%. The accuracy of this parameterization guarantees its reliability in applications to climate models. The present parameterization complements the scheme for the solar radiative properties of cirrus clouds developed by Q. Fu for use in numerical models.

  18. Laboratory study of microphysical and scattering properties of corona-producing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, E; Vochezer, P; Möhler, O; Schnaiter, M

    2014-11-01

    Corona-producing cirrus clouds were generated and measured under chamber conditions at the AIDA cloud chamber in Karlsruhe. We were able to measure the scattering properties as well as microphysical properties of these clouds under well-defined laboratory conditions in contrast with previous studies of corona-producing clouds, where the measurements were conducted by means of lidar and in situ aircraft measurements. Our results are in agreement with those of previous studies, confirming that corona-producing cirrus clouds consist of a narrow distribution of small (median Dp=19-32  μm) and compact ice crystals. We showed that the ice crystals in these clouds are most likely formed in homogeneous freezing processes. As a result of the homogeneous freezing process, the ice crystals grow uniformly in size; furthermore, the majority of the ice crystals have rough surface features.

  19. Laboratory study of microphysical and scattering properties of corona-producing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, E; Vochezer, P; Möhler, O; Schnaiter, M

    2014-11-01

    Corona-producing cirrus clouds were generated and measured under chamber conditions at the AIDA cloud chamber in Karlsruhe. We were able to measure the scattering properties as well as microphysical properties of these clouds under well-defined laboratory conditions in contrast with previous studies of corona-producing clouds, where the measurements were conducted by means of lidar and in situ aircraft measurements. Our results are in agreement with those of previous studies, confirming that corona-producing cirrus clouds consist of a narrow distribution of small (median Dp=19-32  μm) and compact ice crystals. We showed that the ice crystals in these clouds are most likely formed in homogeneous freezing processes. As a result of the homogeneous freezing process, the ice crystals grow uniformly in size; furthermore, the majority of the ice crystals have rough surface features. PMID:25402925

  20. Circcrex: A New Cirrus Dataset for Model Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, C.; Pickering, J. C.; Murray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Cirrus Coupled Cloud-Radiation Experiment (CIRCCREX), a new NERC-funded airborne research campaign, aims to understand the link between evolving ice cloud microphysical properties and cirrus radiative signatures at the macrophysical scale. CIRCCREX will obtain for the first time radiation measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum (visible to sub-mm wavelengths) together with state-of-the-art cloud microphysical measurements. These datasets will be utilised to achieve the overall goal of an accurate parameterisation of cirrus optical properties in global climate modelling and Numerical Weather Prediction, through testing and facilitating improvement of cirrus scattering models and investigation of the sensitivity of the radiance to Particle Size Distribution, habit types and crystal complexity. Presented here is an overview of CIRCCREX, the relevant background and previous results. Findings from the first stage of the research campaign, which took place over Prestwick, UK in November 2013, are reported with an emphasis on performance of cirrus radiative and scattering models. High resolution far- and mid-infrared spectra recorded over cirrus scenes are presented and linked to micro- and macro-physical cirrus properties. Uncertainties and challenges in both observations and model simulations are discussed, along with improvements for the next stages of the campaign.

  1. A microphysics guide to cirrus clouds - Part 1: Cirrus types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, M.; Rolf, C.; Luebke, A.; Afchine, A.; Spelten, N.; Costa, A.; Zöger, M.; Smith, J.; Herman, R.; Buchholz, B.; Ebert, V.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Klingebiel, M.; Avallone, L.

    2015-11-01

    The microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds continue to be beyond understanding and thus still represent one of the largest uncertainties in the prediction of the Earth's climate (IPCC, 2013). Our study aims to provide a guide to cirrus microphysics, which is compiled from an extensive set of model simulations, covering the broad range of atmospheric conditions for cirrus formation and evolution. The model results are portrayed in the same parameter space as field measurements, i.e. in the Ice Water Content-Temperature (IWC-T) parameter space. We validate this cirrus analysis approach by evaluating cirrus data sets from seventeen aircraft campaigns, conducted in the last fifteen years, spending about 94 h in cirrus over Europe, Australia, Brazil as well as Southern and Northern America. Altogether, the approach of this study is to track cirrus IWC development with temperature by means of model simulations, compare with observations and then assign, to a certain degree, cirrus microphysics to the observations. Indeed, the field observations show characteristics expected from the simulated cirrus guide. For example, high/low IWCs are found together with high/low ice crystal concentrations Nice. An important finding from our study is the classification of two types of cirrus with differing formation mechanisms and microphysical properties: the first cirrus type is rather thin with lower IWCs and forms directly as ice (in-situ origin cirrus). The second type consists predominantly of thick cirrus originating from mixed phase clouds (i.e. via freezing of liquid droplets - liquid origin cirrus), which are completely glaciated while lifting to the cirrus formation temperature region (< 235 K). In the European field campaigns, in-situ origin cirrus occur frequently at slow updrafts in low and high pressure systems, but also in conjunction with faster updrafts. Also, liquid origin cirrus mostly related to warm conveyor belts are found. In the US and tropical

  2. TTL cirrus ice water content--extinction relationships from ATTREX measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, Troy; Rollins, Andrew; Woods, Sarah; Bui, Thaopaul; Gao, Ru-Shan

    2016-04-01

    Cirrus clouds cover a large fraction of the globe and play a significant role in the radiative balance of the Earth system, but remain a source of uncertainty since their net radiative effect varies depending on their microphysical properties. Cirrus are particularly prevalent in the tropical central and western Pacific, where they form at the extremely cold temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and result in dehydration of air as it rises into the stratosphere. TTL cirrus typically exhibit low ice number concentrations and small particles relative to mid-latitude cirrus, resulting in significantly lower ice water contents (IWC). Lidar observations of TTL cirrus produce measurements of volume extinction (σ) and rely on empirically derived relationships to calculate cloud IWC. To date, TTL cirrus σ-IWC relationships have been extrapolated from measurements of mid-latitude, higher temperature clouds, or based on a limited number of observations within TTL cirrus. In this analysis we use measurements of cirrus extinction and IWC acquired during the Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX) mission in the TTL over the western Pacific to derive new relationships between these parameters for TTL cirrus that can be used to improve the determination of TTL IWC from satellite, airborne and ground-based lidar. ATTREX yielded more than 24 hours of sampling in TTL cirrus at temperatures below 203 K (-70° C). Cirrus clouds were encountered at altitudes between 14.5 km and 17.5 km with IWC down to the ˜2 μg m-3 detection limit of the NOAA Water instrument and water vapor mixing ratios as low as 1.5 ppm. Most TTL cirrus sampled had ice number concentrations (INC) less than 100 L-1, and very few had INC of more than 1000 L-1. σ values measured by the in situ cloud probes ranged from < 10-6 m-1 to ˜10-3 m-1.

  3. Optical and microphysical properties of a cold cirrus cloud - Evidence for regions of small ice particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. M. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Hart, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An airborne lidar and a scanning radiometer aboard an ER-2 aircraft were used to observe a cold cirrus cloud, and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) was used to obtain simultaneous in situ microphysical observations at two altitudes within the cloud. Lidar depolarization ratio data show that the clouds were composed predominantly of ice crystals. At an altitude where the temperature was -62.7 C, the lidar and radiometer analysis gave a visible extinction to infrared absorption ratio (alpha) of 2.3, while the cloud microphysics data provided an alpha value of 3.77. The discrepancy is attributed to undersizing of particles by the FSSP. Direct and remote measurements showed better agreement for a lower layer where the temperature was -47.3 C.

  4. The effects of small ice crystals on the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Asano, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Minnis, P.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nonspherical small ice crystals on the IR radiative properties of cirrus clouds are investigated utilizing light scattering properties of spheroidal particles. Employing the anomalous diffraction theory for spheres and results from the exact spheroid scattering program, efficient parameterization equations are developed for calculations of the absorption and scattering properties for small ice crystals. Parameterization formulas are developed for large ice crystals employing results computed from the geometric ray-tracing method and the Fraunhofer diffraction theory for hexagonal crystals and spheroids.

  5. Improved retrievals of the optical properties of cirrus clouds by a combination of lidar methods.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Bertrand; Giraud, Vincent; Haeffelin, Martial; Keckhut, Philippe; Rechou, Anne; Baldy, Serge

    2005-03-20

    We focus on improvement of the retrieval of optical properties of cirrus clouds by combining two lidar methods. We retrieve the cloud's optical depth by using independently the molecular backscattering profile below and above the cloud [molecular integration (MI) method] and the backscattering profile inside the cloud with an a priori effective lidar ratio [particle integration (PI) method]. When the MI method is reliable, the combined MI-PI method allows us to retrieve the optimal effective lidar ratio. We compare these results with Raman lidar retrievals. We then use the derived optimal effective lidar ratio for retrieval with the PI method for situations in which the MI method cannot be applied.

  6. A microphysics guide to cirrus clouds - Part 1: Cirrus types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina; Rolf, Christian; Luebke, Anna; Afchine, Armin; Spelten, Nicole; Costa, Anja; Meyer, Jessica; Zöger, Martin; Smith, Jessica; Herman, Robert L.; Buchholz, Bernhard; Ebert, Volker; Baumgardner, Darrel; Borrmann, Stephan; Klingebiel, Marcus; Avallone, Linnea

    2016-03-01

    The microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds continue to be beyond understanding and thus still represent one of the largest uncertainties in the prediction of the Earth's climate (IPCC, 2013). Our study aims to provide a guide to cirrus microphysics, which is compiled from an extensive set of model simulations, covering the broad range of atmospheric conditions for cirrus formation and evolution. The model results are portrayed in the same parameter space as field measurements, i.e., in the Ice Water Content-Temperature (IWC-T) parameter space. We validate this cirrus analysis approach by evaluating cirrus data sets from 17 aircraft campaigns, conducted in the last 15 years, spending about 94 h in cirrus over Europe, Australia, Brazil as well as South and North America. Altogether, the approach of this study is to track cirrus IWC development with temperature by means of model simulations, compare with observations and then assign, to a certain degree, cirrus microphysics to the observations. Indeed, the field observations show characteristics expected from the simulated Cirrus Guide. For example, high (low) IWCs are found together with high (low) ice crystal concentrations Nice. An important finding from our study is the classification of two types of cirrus with differing formation mechanisms and microphysical properties: the first cirrus type forms directly as ice (in situ origin cirrus) and splits in two subclasses, depending on the prevailing strength of the updraft: in slow updrafts these cirrus are rather thin with lower IWCs, while in fast updrafts thicker cirrus with higher IWCs can form. The second type consists predominantly of thick cirrus originating from mixed phase clouds (i.e., via freezing of liquid droplets - liquid origin cirrus), which are completely glaciated while lifting to the cirrus formation temperature region (< 235 K). In the European field campaigns, slow updraft in situ origin cirrus occur frequently in low- and high

  7. Simulation study of the remote sensing of optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds from satellite IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, J

    1995-05-20

    Improved ray-optics theory and Mie theory for single scattering and an adding-doubling method for multiple scattering have been used to study the interaction of radiation in NASA's Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder Satellite (VAS) IR channels and the microphysics of inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The simulation study shows that crystal shape has remarkable effects on scattering and on the radiative-transfer properties of cirrus clouds in IR spectra. The sensitivity of the brightness temperature, as observed with VAS-IR channels, to the hexagonal columns and plates in cirrus clouds is noticeable. A method that permits one to infer the optical thickness, crystal shape, ice-water content,and emittance of cirrus clouds by using a multi-IR window channel with a scanning observation technique is developed. Detailed error analyses are carried out, and the characteristics of VAS-IR window channels are investigated through the examination of the effects of sea-surface reflection and variations in the temperature and water-vapor profiles on the VAS measurements. It is shown that these effects are large and need to be considered. Some uncertainties that have risen from the theoretical model are studied; they demonstrate that the Mie-scattering theory should not be used to retrieve the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. A suitable cloud-microphysics model and a suitable scattering model are needed instead.

  8. Simulation study of the remote sensing of optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds from satellite IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, J

    1995-05-20

    Improved ray-optics theory and Mie theory for single scattering and an adding-doubling method for multiple scattering have been used to study the interaction of radiation in NASA's Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder Satellite (VAS) IR channels and the microphysics of inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The simulation study shows that crystal shape has remarkable effects on scattering and on the radiative-transfer properties of cirrus clouds in IR spectra. The sensitivity of the brightness temperature, as observed with VAS-IR channels, to the hexagonal columns and plates in cirrus clouds is noticeable. A method that permits one to infer the optical thickness, crystal shape, ice-water content,and emittance of cirrus clouds by using a multi-IR window channel with a scanning observation technique is developed. Detailed error analyses are carried out, and the characteristics of VAS-IR window channels are investigated through the examination of the effects of sea-surface reflection and variations in the temperature and water-vapor profiles on the VAS measurements. It is shown that these effects are large and need to be considered. Some uncertainties that have risen from the theoretical model are studied; they demonstrate that the Mie-scattering theory should not be used to retrieve the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. A suitable cloud-microphysics model and a suitable scattering model are needed instead. PMID:21052418

  9. Simulation study of the remote sensing of optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds from satellite IR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lisheng; Zhang, Jianyun

    1995-05-01

    Improved ray-optics theory and Mie theory for single scattering and an adding-doubling method for multiple scattering have been used to study the interaction of radiation in NASA's Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder Satellite (VAS) IR channels and the microphysics of inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The simulation study shows that crystal shape has remarkable effects on scattering and on the radiative-transfer properties of cirrus clouds in IR spectra. The sensitivity of the brightness temperature, as observed with VAS-IR channels, to the hexagonal columns and plates in cirrus clouds is noticeable. A method that permits one to infer the optical thickness, crystal shape, ice-water content, and emittance of cirrus clouds by using a multi-IR window channel with a scanning observation technique is developed. Detailed error analyses are carried out, and the characteristics of VAS-IR window channels are investigated through the examination of the effects of sea-surface reflection and variations in the temperature and water-vapor profiles on the VAS measurements. It is shown that these effects are large and need to be considered. Some uncertainties that have risen from the theoretical model are studied; they demonstrate that the Mie-scattering theory should not be used to retrieve the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. A suitable cloud-microphysics model and a suitable scattering model are needed instead.

  10. Macrophysical Properties of Tropical Cirrus Clouds from the CALIPSO Satellite and from Ground-based Micropulse and Raman Lidars

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, D.; Turner, David D.

    2013-08-27

    Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and In- frared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while the MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cy- cle is significantly different than zero only below about 11 km; where it is the opposite sign (i.e. more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geomet- rical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both datasets have signficantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the vast im- provement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds as well as a valuable ground-based lidar dataset for the validation of CALIPSO observations and to help im- prove our understanding of tropical cirrus clouds.

  11. Radiative and microphysical properties of cirrus cloud inferred from the MODIS infrared split-window measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, H.; Yamada, S.; Katagiri, S.; Yang, P.; Okamoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    An optimal estimation-based algorithm is developed for retrieval of radiative and microphysical properties of cirrus cloud from the measurements made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) at three infrared (IR) split-window bands with center wavelengths at 8.5, 11 and 12 μm. Prior information of cloud top and underlying surface temperatures are from the MODIS operational products. A fast forward model is based on semi-analytical equations for the brightness temperature assuming a single-layer homogeneous ice cloud with prescribed particle habit and size distributions. Modeling errors in the brightness temperature from the present approximate treatment of radiative transfer are insignificant, but relatively more substantial errors occur due to the uncertainties in model parameters including surface emissivity, precipitable water, and cloud bottom temperature. The total measurement-model errors are well correlated for the three bands, which is considered properly in the optimal estimation framework. Retrieval errors of cloud optical thickness and effective particle radius are mainly from uncertainties in a priori cloud top and surface temperatures and model parameters. The three-band IR method is suitable for retrieving optical thickness and effective particle radius for opaque and moderately thick cirrus clouds (with cloud optical thicknesses within a range of 0.5-6). The efficient retrieval algorithm enables global-scale remote sensing at a 1-km2 resolution. A tropical region case study demonstrates advantages of the method; particularly, the ability to be applied to more pixels in optically-thin cirrus in comparison with a solar-reflection based method, and the ability of the optimal estimation framework to produce useful diagnostics of retrieval uncertainties and the retrieval cost that denote the quantitative consistency between measurement and model calculation with several assumptions. The IR retrieval shows smaller optical thickness

  12. (abstract) Infrared Cirrus and Future Space Based Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the known properties of the distribution of infrared cirrus is followed by a discussion of the implications of cirrus on observations from space. Probable limitations on space observations due to IR cirrus.

  13. Comparison of Reflected Solar Radiance Using Aqua Modis and Airborne Remote Sensing (case : Deep Convective Clouds and Cirrus Clouds)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisna, T. C.; Ehrlich, A.; Werner, F.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-12-01

    Deep Convective Clouds (DCCs) have key role in the tropical region. Despite they only have small spatial coverage, but they account most of the total precipitation in these region which often make flooding. There are such of aviation accidents caused by strong vertical wind, hailing, icing and lightning inside the clouds. Pollutions caused by biomass burning and land degradation can change the aerosol properties as well as cloud properties, therefore will influence the radiation and formation of the DCCs. Those are the major reasons that better understanding of DCCs formation and life cycle are necessary. Between Sept. 01 - Oct. 14, ACRIDICON (Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Concevtive Clouds Systems) campaign was conducted over Amazonia. It is suitable area to be the site-study due to has strong contrast environtment (pristine and polluted), regular convection activities and stable meteorological condition. In this study we focus on the 2 satellite validation missions designed to fly collocated but in different altitude with A-TRAIN constellation. In order to study DCCs-solar radiation interaction, we use SMART (Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation Measurements System) installed on HALO (High Altitude and Long-Range Research Aircraft) which measures spectral Irradiance (F) and Radiance (I) at the wavelength between 300-2200 nm corresponding to satellite. Due to the limitation in spatial and temporal, airborne measurements only give snapshots of atmosphere condition and DCCs formation, therefore we use multi-satellite data as DCCs have high vertical and horizontal distance, long temporal development and complex form. The comparison of AQUA MODIS and SMART Radiance at 645 nm (non-absorbing) in the clear-sky condition gives strong agreement, but in the multilayer-cloud condition gives worse and results in high underestimation (-86%) in SMART data especially at lower altitude. The bias is caused by interference from clouds

  14. A Microphysics Guide to Cirrus Clouds - Part I: Cirrus Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina; Rolf, Christian; Anna, Luebke; Armin, Afchine; Nicole, Spelten; Anja, Costa; Jessica, Meyer; Martin, Zöger; Jessica, Smith; Robert, Herman; Bernhard, Buchholz; Volker, Ebert; Darrel, Baumgardner; Stephan, Borrmann; Marcus, Klingebiel; Linnea, Avallone

    2016-04-01

    The microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds continue to be beyond understanding and thus still represent one of the largest uncertainties in the prediction of the Earth's climate (IPCC, 2013). Our study provides a guide to cirrus microphysics, which is compiled from an extensive set of model simulations, covering the broad range of atmospheric conditions for cirrus formation and evolution (Krämer et al., 2015, ACPD). The model results are portrayed in the same parameter space as field measurements, i.e. in the Ice Water Content-Temperature (IWC-T) parameter space. We validate this cirrus analysis approach by evaluating cirrus data sets from seventeen aircraft campaigns, conducted in the last fifteen years, spending about 94 h in cirrus over Europe, Australia, Brazil as well as Southern and Northern America. Altogether, the approach of this study is to track cirrus IWC development with temperature by means of model simulations, compare with observations and then assign, to a certain degree, cirrus microphysics to the observations. Indeed, the field observations show characteristics expected from the simulated cirrus guide. For example, high/low IWCs are found together with high/low ice crystal concentrations. An important finding from our study is the classification of two types of cirrus with differing formation mechanisms and microphysical properties: the first cirrus type is rather thin with lower IWCs and forms directly as ice (in-situ origin cirrus). The second type consists predominantly of thick cirrus originating from mixed phase clouds (i.e. via freezing of liquid droplets - liquid origin cirrus), which are completely glaciated while lifting to the cirrus formation temperature region (< 235 K). In the European field campaigns, in-situ origin cirrus occur frequently at slow updrafts in low and high pressure systems, but also in conjunction with faster updrafts. Also, liquid origin cirrus mostly related to warm conveyor belts are found. In

  15. Tropical cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over Darwin from CALIPSO, the ARM MPL and the ARM Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.; Comstock, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical cirrus clouds occur frequently and are important for regulating radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer. From a remote sensing perspective, a significant number of tropical cirrus are sufficiently optical thin to be below the minimum threshold of passive imagers and contain small ice crystals making them undetectable by cloud radars. Detecting all tropical cirrus clouds requires the use of lidar observations. Thorsen et al. (JGR, 2011) compared CALIPSO and ARM MPL observations of cirrus clouds over the three ARM TWP sites. In general this study showed that statistics of cirrus properties agree well between the two sets of observations when comparisons where made with profiles transparent to the lidar. However differences exist between the MPL and CALIPSO observations. Specifically this study found that (1) the frequency of occurrence of cirrus in the MPL observations is significantly smaller, (2) the MPL is more frequently completely attenuated, particularly during the daytime (3) Transparent daytime MPL clouds boundaries are biased to lower altitudes relative to CALIPSO, presumably due to the poor sampling of transparent profiles and increased noise in the MPL observations. In the current study we intend to revisit these issues using the new ARM Raman lidar at Darwin. We will examine cloud occurrence profiles, cloud top height, base height and geometrical thicknesses from CALIPSO, the MPL and the Raman lidar to determine if the discrepancies between CALIPSO and the MPL are resolved by using the Raman lidar. In addition we'll examine the finding by Thorsen et al. (JGR, 2011) that both CALIPSO and the MPL show the same diurnal cycle of geometrical thickness with geometrically thicker cirrus clouds during the nighttime. It is not clear if this diurnal cycle is physical or an effect of improved single-to-noise at night, which allows for better detection of cloud top and base and therefore a thicker cloud. While CALIPSO and the MPL operate at

  16. [Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds Based on Hexagonal and Spherical Ice Crystals Models].

    PubMed

    Husltu; Bao, Yu-hai; Xu, Jian; Qing, Song; Bao, Gang

    2015-05-01

    Single scattering properties for spherical and hexagonal ice crystal models with different size parameters and wavelengths were employed to calculate satellite observed radiation and downward flux in ground surface using RSTAR radiative transfer model. Results indicated that simulated satellite observed radiation and ground surface downward radiant flux from different shapes of ice crystal models were different. The difference in the spectral radiation fluxes between 0. 4 and 1. 0 µm was largest, and particle shapes affected the downward radiant flux significantly. It was verified that the proper selection of the effective ice crystal model is not only important for retrieval of the microphysical and optical parameters of the cirrus cloud, but also important for obtaining the radiant flux on the earth's surface correctly. These results are important for retrieving cloud microphysical parameters and simulation of the ground surface downward radiant flux.

  17. A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing: Part V. Cloud Structural Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, Kenneth; Wang, Likun; Starr, David O.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Quante, Markus

    2007-07-31

    In this fifth of a series of papers describing the extended-time high cloud observation program from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, the structural properties of cirrus clouds over Salt Lake City, Utah, are examined. Wavelet analysis is applied as a function of cloud height to a 10-y record of ruby (0.694 um) lidar backscattering data collected from visually-identified cirrus clouds to study the presence of periodic cloud structures, such as Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, cirrus mammata, and uncinus cells (all with wavelengths of ~1-10 km), as well as longer mesoscale cloud organizations. Approximately 8.4% (18.8%, 30.8%) of the data display such periodic structures after passing a 95% (75%, 50%) confidence level test. This may signify that most cloud organizations are quasi-periodic in nature. The amount of lidar cloud data showing periodic structures does not change considerably with length scale between 0.2 to 200 km, although a preference for ~20-km mesoscale cloud structures is indicated. Using time series of vertically-integrated lidar backscattering profiles, we find a steady decrease in autocorrelation coefficients starting at a few kilometers as the length (or model grid) scale increases. Examining the variability of cirrus cloud optical depth t from an earlier LIRAD (combined lidar and infrared radiometer) analysis reveals that the standard deviation σ of t is related by σ = 0.36 t.

  18. Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds in the Infrared (8-13 microns) Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Gao, Bo-Cai; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Winker, Dave M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric radiation in the infrared (IR) 8-13 microns spectral region contains a wealth of information that is very useful for the retrieval of ice cloud properties from aircraft or space-borne measurements. To provide the scattering and absorption properties of nonspherical ice crystals that are fundamental to the IR retrieval implementation, we use the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method to solve for the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, and the asymmetry parameter of the phase function for ice crystals smaller than 40 microns. For particles larger than this size, the improved geometric optics method (IGOM) can be employed to calculate the asymmetry parameter with an acceptable accuracy, provided that we properly account for the inhomogeneity of the refracted wave due to strong absorption inside the ice particle. A combination of the results computed from the two methods provides the asymmetry parameter for the entire practical range of particle sizes between 1 micron and 10000 microns over wavelengths ranging from 8 microns to 13 microns. For the extinction and absorption efficiency calculations, several methods including the IGOM, Mie solution for equivalent spheres (MSFES), and the anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) can lead to a substantial discontinuity in comparison with the FDTD solutions for particle sizes on the order of 40 microns. To overcome this difficulty, we have developed a novel approach called the stretched scattering potential method (SSPM). For the IR 8-13 microns spectral region, we show that SSPM is a more accurate approximation than ADT, MSFES, and IGOM. The SSPM solution can be further refined numerically. Through a combination of the FDTD and SSPM, we have computed the extinction and absorption efficiency for hexagonal ice crystals with sizes ranging from 1 to 10000 microns at 12 wavelengths between 8 and 13 microns Calculations of the cirrus bulk scattering and absorption properties are performed for 30 size

  19. “Using Statistical Comparisons between SPartICus Cirrus Microphysical Measurements, Detailed Cloud Models, and GCM Cloud Parameterizations to Understand Physical Processes Controlling Cirrus Properties and to Improve the Cloud Parameterizations”

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The dual objectives of this project were improving our basic understanding of processes that control cirrus microphysical properties and improvement of the representation of these processes in the parameterizations. A major effort in the proposed research was to integrate, calibrate, and better understand the uncertainties in all of these measurements.

  20. Polar Cirrus Cloud Properties Through Long-Term Lidar and Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Campbell, James; Mahesh, Ashwin; Welton, Judd; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In comparison to mid latitude cloud cover, knowledge of polar cirrus and other cloud cover is limited. The interpretations of satellite-based cloud imaging and retrievals in polar regions have major problems due to factors such as darkness and extreme low temperatures. Beginning in 2002 a NASA orbiting lidar instrument, GLAS, (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) will unambiguously define cloud type and fraction with good coverage of polar regions. Active laser sensing gives the spatial and temporal distribution of clouds and diamond dust. In preparation for, and supplementing the GLAS measurements are ground based MP (micro pulse) lidar experiments providing continuous profiling. MP lidar installations have been operating at the South Pole since December 1999 and at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program arctic site since 1996. Both at the ARM Barrow, Alaska site and at the South Pole station, Fourier-transform interferometers also observe clouds in the wavelength intervals between approximately 5 and 18 microns. Spectral instruments can yield cloud microphysical properties with additional information from lidar about the vertical extent of clouds being modeled. We examine the simultaneous lidar and spectral data from both Barrow and South Pole, to obtain cloud properties (optical depth, particle size) by the use of both instruments. The results have applications to interpretation of current satellite data, and GLAS measurements when available.

  1. Inhomogeneous cirrus clouds during the AIRTOSS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Matthias; Spichtinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    . Clarifying the dominant sources and mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation. Science, 340(6138):1320-1324, June 2013. [2] W. Frey, H. Eichler, M. de Reus, R. Maser, M. Wendisch, and S. Borrmann. A new airborne tandem platform for collocated measurements of microphysical cloud and radiation properties. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 2(1):147-158, 2009. [3] P. Spichtinger and K. M. Gierens. Modelling of cirrus clouds part 1a: Model description and validation. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(2):685-706, 2009. [4] H. Wernli and H. C. Davies. A lagrangian-based analysis of extratropical cyclones .1. the method and some applications. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 123(538):467-489, January 1997.

  2. Dual-aureole and sun spectrometer system for airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Paul; Ruhtz, Thomas; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen

    2007-12-10

    We have designed an airborne spectrometer system for the simultaneous measurement of the direct sun irradiance and the aureole radiance in two different solid angles. The high-resolution spectral radiation measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties. Combined measurements in two solid angles provide better information about the aerosol type without additional and elaborate measuring geometries. It is even possible to discriminate between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol types. Furthermore, they allow to apply additional calibration methods and simplify the detection of contaminated data (e.g., by thin cirrus clouds). For the characterization of the detected aerosol type a new index is introduced that is the slope of the aerosol phase function in the forward scattering region. The instrumentation is a flexible modular setup, which has already been successfully applied in airborne and ground-based field campaigns. We describe the setup as well as the calibration of the instrument. In addition, example vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties--including the aureole measurements--are shown and discussed.

  3. Corona-producing cirrus cloud properties derived from polarization lidar and photographic analyses.

    PubMed

    Sassen, K

    1991-08-20

    Polarization lidar data are used to demonstrate that clouds composed of hexagonal ice crystals can generate multiple-ringed colored coronas. Although relatively uncommon in our mid-latitude cirrus sample (derived from Project FIRE extended time observations), the coronas are associated with unusual cloud conditions that appear to be effective in generating the displays. Invariably, the cirrus cloud tops are located at or slightly above elevated tropopauses (12.7-km MSL average height) at temperatures between -60 degrees and -70 degrees C. The cloud top region also generates relatively strong laser backscattering and unusually high 0.5-0.7 linear depolarization ratios. Color photograph analysis of corona ring angles indicates crystals with mean diameters of from 12 to 30 microm. The cirrus cloud types were mainly subvisual to thin (i.e., bluish-colored) cirrostratus, but also included fibrous cirrus. Estimated cloud optical thicknesses at the 0.694-microm laser wavelength ranged from 0.001 to 0.2, where the upper limit reflects the effects of multiple scattering and/or unfavorable changes in particle characteristics in deep cirrus clouds.

  4. Investigation on the monthly variation of cirrus optical properties over the Indian subcontinent using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observation (Calipso)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaman, Reji K.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds have been identified as one of the atmospheric component which influence the radiative processes in the atmosphere and plays a key role in the Earth Radiation Budget. CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) is a joint NASA-CNES satellite mission designed to provide insight in understanding of the role of aerosols and clouds in the climate system. This paper reports the study on the variation of cirrus cloud optical properties of over the Indian sub - continent for a period of two years from January 2009 to December 2010, using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observations (Calipso). Indian Ocean and Indian continent is one of the regions where cirrus occurrence is maximum particularly during the monsoon periods. It is found that during the south-west monsoon periods there is a large cirrus cloud distribution over the southern Indian land masses. Also it is observed that the north-east monsoon periods had optical thick clouds hugging the coast line. The summer had large cloud formation in the Arabian Sea. It is also found that the land masses near to the sea had large cirrus presence. These cirrus clouds were of high altitude and optical depth. The dependence of cirrus cloud properties on cirrus cloud mid-cloud temperature and geometrical thickness are generally similar to the results derived from the ground-based lidar. However, the difference in macrophysical parameter variability shows the limits of space-borne-lidar and dissimilarities in regional climate variability and the nature and source of cloud nuclei in different geographical regions.

  5. Infrared radiative properties of tropical cirrus clouds inferred with aircraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, K. T.; Cox, S. K.; Knollenberg, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    Longwave emissivities and the vertical profile of cooling rates of tropical cirrus clouds are determined using broadband hemispheric irradiance data. Additionally, a broadband mass absorption coefficient is defined and used to relate emissivity to water content. The data used were collected by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Sabreliner during the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) in the summer of 1974. Three case studies are analyzed showing that these tropical cirrus clouds approached an emissivity of 1.0 within a vertical distance of 1.0 km. Broadband mass absorption coefficients ranging from 0.076 to 0.096 sq m per g are derived. A comparison of these results with other work suggests that tropical cirrus cloud emissivities may be significantly larger than heretofore believed. Ice water content of the clouds were deduced from data collected by a one-dimensional particle spectrometer. Analyses of the ice water content and the observed particle size distributions are presented.

  6. Active Imaging through Cirrus Clouds.

    PubMed

    Landesman, B; Kindilien, P; Pierson, R; Matson, C; Mosley, D

    1997-11-24

    The presence of clouds of ice particles in the uplink and downlink path of an illumination beam can severely impede the performance of an active imaging system. Depending on the optical depth of the cloud, i.e., its density and depth, the beam can be completely scattered and extinguished, or the beam can pass through the cloud with some fraction attenuated, scattered, and depolarized. In particular, subvisual cirrus clouds, i.e., high, thin cirrus clouds that cannot be observed from the ground, can affect the properties and alignment of both uplink and downlink beams. This paper discusses the potential for active imaging in the presence of cirrus clouds. We document field data results from an active imaging experiment conducted several years ago, which the authors believe to show the effects of cirrus clouds on an active imaging system. To verify these conclusions, we include the results of a simulation of the interaction of a coherent illumination scheme with a cirrus cloud.

  7. Optical properties of contrail-induced cirrus: discussion of unusual halo phenomena.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, R

    1997-06-20

    Photographs of a 120 degrees parhelion and a 22 degrees parhelion within persistent contrails are presented. These phenomena result from hexagonal plate-shaped ice crystals oriented horizontally with diameters between 300 mum and 2 mm. From our observations and reinvestigation of previous reports, we conclude that a subset of the population in persistent contrails can consist of highly regular, oriented, hexagonal plates or columns comparable to the most regular crystals in natural cirrus clouds. This is explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation conditions of natural cirrus. The resulting strong azimuthal variability of the scattering phase function impacts the radiative transfer through persistent contrails.

  8. Optical properties of contrail-induced cirrus: discussion of unusual halo phenomena.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, R

    1997-06-20

    Photographs of a 120 degrees parhelion and a 22 degrees parhelion within persistent contrails are presented. These phenomena result from hexagonal plate-shaped ice crystals oriented horizontally with diameters between 300 mum and 2 mm. From our observations and reinvestigation of previous reports, we conclude that a subset of the population in persistent contrails can consist of highly regular, oriented, hexagonal plates or columns comparable to the most regular crystals in natural cirrus clouds. This is explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation conditions of natural cirrus. The resulting strong azimuthal variability of the scattering phase function impacts the radiative transfer through persistent contrails. PMID:18253447

  9. Cirrus Cloud Modeling: Overview and Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David OC.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A review of cirrus cloud modeling will be given with special attention to the role of dynamical processes in regulating cloud microphysical properties and the interactions with radiative process in determining cloud lifecycle. The talk will draw heavily on the papers by Starr and Quante, Quante and Starr and Demoz et al., as well as recent results from the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2) Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison and Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison projects, as described in Starr et al. and Lin et al. Key issues in current cirrus cloud modeling will be described and discussed.

  10. In Situ Observations of the Microphysical Properties of Subvisible Cirrus during CR- AVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P.; Baker, B.; Pilson, B.; Mo, Q.; Jensen, E.

    2006-12-01

    In situ microphysical observations of subvisible cirrus between 8 degrees north latitude and the equator were collected using the NASA WB-57F research aircraft during the Costa Rica - Aura Validation Experiment (CR- AVE) in January 2006. Subvisible cirrus was commonly observed between 75 and 85 C (about 16 and 18 km). The observations included ice particle size, shape, concentration and relative humidity. Instrumentation included a cloud particle imager (CPI), a 2D-S (stereo) probe, a forward and backward scattering probe (CAS) and a tunable diode laser (TDL) water vapor probe. These are the first in situ observations that include a large dataset of digital images of the size and shape of ice particles in tropical subvisible cirrus. The images reveal that 84 percent of the ice particles are quasi-spherical in shape, with only a small percentage of the crystals exhibiting crystalline shapes (e.g., plates and columns), and virtually no trigonal particles, contrary to the only other crystal shape measurements collected in 1973. The particle size distribution suggests a monotonic distribution ranging from a few microns out to 120 microns in diameter. In the denser regions of cloud, mean particle concentrations were on the order of 20 to 40 per liter, mean extinction 0.004 inverse kilometers, and mean ice water content 0.02 mg per cubic meter. The ice particles are almost always observed when the ambient relative humidity is between 140 and 200 percent w.r.t. ice. Particle growth simulations suggest that ice particles in subvisible cirrus require very high (order 200 percent ice saturation) relative humidity to grow to 100 microns. The unique ice particle measurements in subvisible cirrus are useful in constraining water vapor measurements, validation of satellite retrievals and in parameterizations of radiation models.

  11. Derivation of Physical and Optical Properties of Midlatitude Cirrus Ice Crystals for a Size-Resolved Cloud Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by approx. 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from approx. 0:05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  12. Lidar investigations on the structure and microphysical properties of cirrus at a tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N and 79.2° E), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayeshlal, Gloryselvan S.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Motty, Gopinathan Nair S.; Dhaman, Reji K.; Krishnakumar, Vasudevannair; Mahadevan Pillai, Vellara P.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds are mainly composed of ice crystals and are known to be the major natural contributors to radiative forcing in the Earth's atmosphere system. Describing the formation and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and their role in climate models remain a challenging study. Lidar is a unique instrument, which provides the information on the optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds with good spatial and temporal resolutions. In this study we present the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and their temporal variability, obtained using the ground based dual polarisation lidar at the tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N and 79.2° E), India, during the period January2009 to March 2011. Using the method developed in house for deriving range dependent lidar ratio (LR), the lidar measurements are used for deriving the extinction coefficient and to obtain the nature of the scatterers present in the cloud. It is noted that lidar ratio plays an important role and its measurements indicate directly the type of the ice nucleating aerosol particles present in the cloud. The long term data obtained on the structure of the cirrus in this regard are useful in the climate modelling studies.

  13. Tropical Anvil Cirrus Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Schmitt, C.; Baumgardner, D.; Poellot, M.; Twohy, C.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. T.; Sayres, D.; Avallone, L.; Hallar, G.

    2003-12-01

    This study synthesizes data collected during a number of field campaigns by in-situ aircraft to characterize the microphysical properties of tropical, convectively-generated cirrus. The field campaigns include the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission KWAJEX campaign near Kwajalein, M. I., KAMP (the Keys Area Microphysics Project) and the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE), both over southern Florida, and CAMEX-4 (the fourth convection and moisture experiment), studying hurricanes off the east coast of Florida. The measurements include particle size distribution and particle shape information, direct measurements of the condensed water content (CRYSTAL-FACE), and radar imagery. We examine the temperature dependence and vertical variability of the ice water content (IWC), extinction, and effective radii, and deduce the ensemble-mean ice particle densities. Data obtained in quiescent regions outside of convection are compared to observations within convective cells. The relationship between the properties of the particle size distributions and proximity to convection are examined. The IWCs show a strong temperature dependence and dependence on distance below cloud top. The IWCs are larger in the convective regions than in the quiescent regions, and the particle size distributions are markedly broader. Ensemble-mean ice particle densities are a strong function of the breadth of the particle size distributions.

  14. Retrieval of cirrus cloud optical thickness and top altitude from geostationary remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kox, S.; Bugliaro, L.; Ostler, A.

    2014-04-01

    A novel approach for the detection of cirrus clouds and the retrieval of optical thickness and top altitude based on the measurements of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) aboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite is presented. Trained with 8 000 000 co-incident measurements of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission the new "cirrus optical properties derived from CALIOP and SEVIRI algorithm during day and night" (COCS) algorithm utilizes a backpropagation neural network to provide accurate measurements of cirrus optical depth τ at λ =532 nm and top altitude z every 15 min covering almost one third of Earth's atmosphere. The retrieved values are validated with independent measurements of CALIOP and the optical thickness derived by an airborne high spectral resolution lidar.

  15. Retrieval of cirrus cloud optical thickness and top altitude from geostationary remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kox, S.; Bugliaro, L.; Ostler, A.

    2014-10-01

    A novel approach for the detection of cirrus clouds and the retrieval of optical thickness and top altitude based on the measurements of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) aboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite is presented. Trained with 8 000 000 co-incident measurements of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission the new "cirrus optical properties derived from CALIOP and SEVIRI algorithm during day and night" (COCS) algorithm utilizes a backpropagation neural network to provide accurate measurements of cirrus optical depth τ at λ = 532 nm and top altitude z every 15 min covering almost one-third of the Earth's atmosphere. The retrieved values are validated with independent measurements of CALIOP and the optical thickness derived by an airborne high spectral resolution lidar.

  16. Cirrus Clouds Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Properties Observed During Crystal-Face Experiment: I. A Radar-Lidar Retrieval System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrescu, C.; Haynes, J. M.; Stephens, G. L.; Heymsfield, G. M.; McGill, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    A method of retrieving cloud microphysical properties using combined observations from both cloud radar and lidar is introduced. This retrieval makes use of an improvement to the traditional optimal estimation retrieval method, whereby a series of corrections are applied to the state vector during the search for an iterative solution. This allows faster convergence to a solution and is less processor intensive. The method is first applied to a synthetic cloud t o demonstrate its validity, and it is shown that the retrieval reliably reproduces vertical profiles of ice water content. The retrieval method is then applied to radar and lidar observations from the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment, and vertical profiles of ice crystal diameter, number concentration, and ice water content are retrieved for a cirrus cloud layers observed one day of that experiment. The validity of the relationship between visible extinction coefficient and radar reflectivity was examined. While synthetic tests showed such a functional relationship, the measured data only partially supported such a conclusion. This is due to errors in the forward model (as explained above) as well as errors in the data sets, including possible mismatch between lidar and radar profiles or errors in the optical depth. Empirical relationships between number concentrations and mean particle diameter were also examined. The results indicate that a distinct and robust relationship exists between these retrieved quantities and it is argued that such a relationship is more than an artifact of the retrieval process offering insight into the nature of the microphysical processes taking place in cirrus.

  17. Subvisual Cirrus cloud properties derived from a FIRE IFO case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Griffin, M. K.; Dodd, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    From the central Wisconsin IFO field at Wausau, the Mobile Polarization Lidar and a surface radiation station from the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory observed two very tenuous cirrus clouds on 21 October 1986. The clouds were present just below the height of the tropopause, between -60 to -70 C. The first cloud was not detected visually, and is classified as subvisual cirrus. The second, a relatively narrow cloud band that was probably the remnants of an aircraft contrail, can be termed zenith-subvisual since, although it was invisible in the zenith direction, it could be discerned when viewed at lower elevation angles and also due to strong solar forward-scattering and corona effects. The observations provide an opportunity to assess the threshold cloud optical thickness associated with cirrus cloud visibility. Ruby lidar backscattered signals were converted to isotropic volume backscatter coefficients by applying the pure-molecular scattering assumption just below the cloud base. The backscattering coefficient due to the cloud is then obtained and expressed in relation to the molecular backscattering coefficient in terms of the scattering ratio R. The linear depolarization ratio for the cloud is computed after removing the essentially parallel-polarized scattering contribution from air molecules. The values are also applied to determine the cloud optical thickness through the use of backscatter-to-extinction ratio, and the concentration of cloud particles using the backscattering gain, and the effective diameter of the particles obtained from the analysis of solar corona photographs. The sizes of the particles generating the corona are related to the angular separations between the centers of the red bands and the sun, yielding diameters of approximately 25 microns. The direct and diffuse components of shortwave radiation fluxes, measured by full hemispheric pyranometers, were used to compute the nadir optical thickness of the total atmosphere.

  18. Microphysical properties of the November 26 cirrus cloud retrieved by Doppler radar/IR radiometer technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Kropfli, Robert A.; Orr, Brad W.; Snider, Jack B.

    1993-01-01

    Gaining information about cirrus cloud microphysics requires development of remote sensing techniques. In an earlier paper. Matrosov et al. (1992) proposed a method to estimate ice water path (IWP) (i.e., vertically integrated ice mass content IMC) and characteristic particle size averaged through the cloud from combined groundbased measurements of radar reflectivities and IR brightness temperatures of the downwelling thermal radiation in the transparency region of 10-12 mu m. For some applications, the vertically averaged characteristic particle sizes and IWP could be the appropriate information to use. However, vertical profiles of cloud microphysical parameters can provide a better understanding of cloud structure and development. Here we describe a further development of the previous method by Matrosov et al. (1992) for retrieving vertical profiles of cirrus particle sizes and IMC rather than their vertically averaged values. In addition to measurements of radar reflectivities, the measurements of Doppler velocities are used in the new method. This provides us with two vertical profiles of measurements to infer two vertical profiles of unknowns, i.e., particle characteristic sizes and IMC. Simultaneous measurements of the IR brightness temperatures are still needed to resolve an ambiguity in particle size-fall velocity relationships.

  19. Infrared transmission through cirrus clouds: a radiative model for target detection.

    PubMed

    Liou, K N; Takano, Y; Ou, S C; Heymsfield, A; Kreiss, W

    1990-05-01

    An IR transmission model for thin and subvisual cirrus clouds composed of hexagonal ice crystals with a specific use for target detection has been developed. The present model includes parameterizations of the ice crystal size distribution and the position of cirrus clouds in terms of ambient temperature. To facilitate the scattering and absorption calculations for hexagonal column and plate crystals in connection with transmission calculations, we have developed parameterized equations for their single scattering properties by using the results computed from a geometric ray-tracing program. The successive order-of-scattering approach has been used to account for multiple scattering of ice crystals associated with a target-detector system. The direct radiance, path radiance, and radiances produced by multiple scattering and background radiation involving cirrus clouds have been computed for 3.7- and 10-,microm wavelengths. We show that the background radiance at the 3.7-,microm wavelength is relatively small so that a high contrast may be obtained using this wavelength for the detection of airborne and ground-based objects in the presence of thin cirrus clouds. Finally, using the present model, including a simple prediction scheme for the ice crystal size distribution and cloud position, the transmission of infrared radiation through cirrus clouds can be efficiently evaluated if the target-detector geometry is defined.

  20. Development and Comparison of Ground and Satellite-based Retrievals of Cirrus Cloud Physical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David L

    2009-10-14

    This report is the final update on ARM research conducted at DRI through May of 2006. A relatively minor amount of work was done after May, and last month (November), two journal papers partially funded by this project were published. The other investigator on this project, Dr. Bob d'Entremont, will be submitting his report in February 2007 when his no-cost extension expires. The main developments for this period, which concludes most of the DRI research on this project, are as follows: (1) Further development of a retrieval method for cirrus cloud ice particle effective diameter (De) and ice water path (IWP) using terrestrial radiances measured from satellites; (2) Revision and publication of the journal article 'Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation'; and (3) Revision and publication of our radar retrieval method for IWC and snowfall rate.

  1. Macrophysical and optical properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds from four ground-based lidars and collocated CALIOP observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Keckhut, P.; Winker, D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Chervet, P.; Roblin, A.

    2010-05-27

    Ground-based lidar and CALIOP datasets gathered over four mid-latitude sites, two US and two French sites, are used to evaluate the consistency of cloud macrophysical and optical property climatologies that can be derived by such datasets. The consistency in average cloud height (both base and top height) between the CALIOP and ground datasets ranges from -0.4km to +0.5km. The cloud geometrical thickness distributions vary significantly between the different datasets, due in part to the original vertical resolutions of the lidar profiles. Average cloud geometrical thicknesses vary from 1.2 to 1.9km, i.e. by more than 50%. Cloud optical thickness distributions in subvisible, semi-transparent and moderate intervals differ by more than 50% between ground and space-based datasets. The cirrus clouds with 2 optical thickness below 0.1 (not included in historical cloud climatologies) represent 30-50% of the non-opaque cirrus class. The differences in average cloud base altitude between ground and CALIOP datasets of 0.0-0.1 km, 0.0-0.2 km and 0.0-0.2 km can be attributed to irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without low-level clouds in ground-based data, respectively. The cloud geometrical thicknesses are not affected by irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, while up to 0.0-0.2 km and 0.1-0.3 km differences can be attributed to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without lowlevel clouds in ground-based data, respectively.

  2. A model predicting the evolution of ice particle size spectra and radiative properties of cirrus clouds. Part 2: Dependence of absorption and extinction on ice crystal morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David L.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    1994-01-01

    This study builds upon the microphysical modeling described in Part 1 by deriving formulations for the extinction and absorption coefficients in terms of the size distribution parameters predicted from the micro-physical model. The optical depth and single scatter albedo of a cirrus cloud can then be determined, which, along with the asymmetry parameter, are the input parameters needed by cloud radiation models. Through the use of anomalous diffraction theory, analytical expressions were developed describing the absorption and extinction coefficients and the single scatter albedo as functions of size distribution parameters, ice crystal shapes (or habits), wavelength, and refractive index. The extinction coefficient was formulated in terms of the projected area of the size distribution, while the absorption coefficient was formulated in terms of both the projected area and mass of the size distribution. These properties were formulated as explicit functions of ice crystal geometry and were not based on an 'effective radius.' Based on simulations of the second cirrus case study described in Part 1, absorption coefficients predicted in the near infrared for hexagonal columns and rosettes were up to 47% and 71% lower, respectively, than absorption coefficients predicted by using equivalent area spheres. This resulted in single scatter albedos in the near-infrared that were considerably greater than those predicted by the equivalent area sphere method. Reflectances in this region should therefore be underestimated using the equivalent area sphere approach. Cloud optical depth was found to depend on ice crystal habit. When the simulated cirrus cloud contained only bullet rosettes, the optical depth was 142% greater than when the cloud contained only hexagonal columns. This increase produced a doubling in cloud albedo. In the near-infrared (IR), the single scatter albedo also exhibited a significant dependence on ice crystal habit. More research is needed on the

  3. The Dependence of Cirrus Gamma Size Distributions Expressed as Volumes in N(sub 0)-Lambda-Mu Phase Space and Bulk Cloud Properties on Environmental Conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N(sub 0), lambda, mu) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D greater than15 micrometers collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N(sub 0), mu, and lambda from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension D(sub mm) as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N(sub 0), mu, and lambda, bulk extinction, IWC, and D(sub mm) with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 micrometers, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N(sub 0), mu, and lambda between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  4. Contrail Cirrus Forecasts for the ML-CIRRUS Experiment and Some Comparison Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Bugliaro, Luca; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Giez, Andreas; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Krämer, Martina; Minikin, Andreas; Schäfler, Andreas; Voigt, Christiane; Wirth, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Model simulations with the contrail cirrus prediction model CoCiP driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) data provided from the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF) and global aircraft waypoint data show a mean computed cover (for optical depth larger than 0.1) of 0.23% globally, and 5.4% over mid Europe (Schumann and Graf, JGR, 2013). The computed mean longwave radiative forcing (RF) reaches 3 W m-2 over mid Europe (10°W-20°E and 40°N-55°N), and 0.13 W m-2 globally. The global net RF is about 40-60% smaller because of compensating shortwave cooling induced by contrails during daytime. The results depend on several model details such as the number of ice particles forming from aircraft soot emissions, the contrail plume dispersion, ice particle sedimentation etc., all influencing contrail life time and their optical properties. The quantitative results depend also strongly on ambient relative humidity, vertical motion and on ice water content of other cirrus predicted by the NWP model. In order to test and possibly improve this and other contrail models, high-quality observations are needed to which multi-parameter model output can be compared. The Mid-Latitude Cirrus Experiment ML-CIRRUS was performed (see C. Voigt et al., this conference) with a suite of in-situ and Lidar instruments for airborne measurements on the research aircraft HALO. Before and during the mission, CoCiP was run daily to provide 3-days forecasts of contrail cover using operational ECMWF forecasts and historical traffic data. CoCiP forecast output was made available in an internet tool twice a day for experiment planning. The one-day and two-day contrail forecasts often showed only small differences. Still, most recent forecasts and detailed satellite observations results were transmitted via satellite link to the crew for onboard campaign optimization. After the campaign, a data base of realistic air traffic data has been setup from various sources, and CoCiP was

  5. Study of cloud properties using airborne and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Stefan, Sabina; Vajaiac, Sorin Nicolae

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates cloud microphysics properties using aircraft and satellite measurements. Cloud properties were drawn from data acquired both from in situ measurements with state of the art airborne instrumentation and from satellite products of the MODIS06 System. The used aircraft was ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research, property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS), Bucharest, Romania, which is specially equipped for this kind of research. The main tool of the airborne laboratory is a Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer - CAPS (30 bins, 0.51- 50 μm). The data was recorded during two flights during the winter 2013-2014, over a flat region in the south-eastern part of Romania (between Bucharest and Constanta). The analysis of cloud particle size variations and cloud liquid water content provided by CAPS can explain cloud processes, and can also indicate the extent of aerosols effects on clouds. The results, such as cloud coverage and/or cloud types, microphysical parameters of aerosols on the one side and the cloud microphysics parameters obtained from aircraft flights on the other side, was used to illustrate the importance of microphysics cloud properties for including the radiative effects of clouds in the regional climate models.

  6. Aircraft measurements of microphysical properties of subvisible cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, R. P.; Pilson, B.; Baker, B.; Mo, Q.; Jensen, E.; Pfister, L.; Bui, P.

    2008-03-01

    Subvisible cirrus (SVC) clouds are often observed within the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Some studies suggest that SVC has a significant impact on the earth radiation budget. The Costa Rica Aura Validation Experiment (CR-AVE) sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) took place near San Jose, Costa Rica from 14 January-15 February 2006. The NASA WB-57F sampled SVC in the TTL from -75°C to -90°C with an improved set of cloud particle probes. The first digital images of ice particles in the TTL are compared with replicator images of ice particles collected in 1973 by a WB-57F in the TTL. The newer measurements reveal larger particles, on the order of 100 μm compared with <50 μm from the earlier measurements, and also different particle shapes. The 1973 particles were mainly columnar and trigonal, whereas the newer measurements are quasi-spherical and hexagonal plates. The WB-57F also measured very high water vapor contents with some instruments, up to 4 ppmv, and aerosols with mixed organics and sulfates. It is unknown whether these ambient conditions were present in the 1973 studies, and whether such conditions have an influence on particle shape and the development of the large particles. A companion paper (Jensen et al., 2008) presents crystal growth calculations that suggest that the high water vapor measurements are required to grow ice particles to the observed sizes of 100 μm and larger.

  7. Aircraft measurements of microphysical properties of subvisible cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, R. P.; Pilson, B.; Baker, B.; Mo, Q.; Jensen, E.; Pfister, L.; Bui, P.

    2007-05-01

    Subvisible cirrus (SVC) clouds are often observed within the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and have been shown to have a significant impact on the earth radiation budget. The Costa Rica Aura Validation Experiment (CR-AVE) sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) took place near San Jose, Costa Rica from 14 January-15 February 2006. The NASA WB-57F sampled SVC in the TTL from -75°C to -90°C with an improved set of cloud particle probes. The first digital images of ice particles in the TTL are compared with replicator images of ice particles collected in 1973 by a WB-57F in the TTL. The newer measurements reveal larger particles, on the order of 100 μm compared with <50 μm from the earlier measurements, and also different particle shapes. The 1973 particles were mainly columnar and trigonal, whereas the newer measurements are quasi-spherical and hexagonal plates. The WB-57F also measured very high water vapor contents with some instruments, up to 4 ppmv, and aerosols with mixed organics and sulfates. It is unknown whether these ambient conditions were present in the 1973 studies, and whether such conditions have an influence on particle shape and the development of the large particles. A companion paper (Jensen et al., 2007) presents crystal growth calculations that suggest that the high water vapor measurements are required to grow ice particles to the observed sizes of 100 μm and larger.

  8. Polarimetric Retrievals of Surface and Cirrus Clouds Properties in the Region Affected by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, Matteo; Cairns, Brian; Chowdhary, Jacek; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Burton, Sharon; Hair, John; Obland, Michael D.; Rogers, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) performed several aerial surveys over the region affected by the oil spill caused by the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon offshore platform. The instrument was deployed on the NASA Langley B200 aircraft together with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), which provides information on the distribution of the aerosol layers beneath the aircraft, including an accurate estimate of aerosol optical depth. This work illustrates the merits of polarization measurements in detecting variations of ocean surface properties linked to the presence of an oil slick. In particular, we make use of the degree of linear polarization in the glint region, which is severely affected by variations in the refractive index but insensitive to the waviness of the water surface. Alterations in the surface optical properties are therefore expected to directly affect the polarization response of the RSP channel at 2264 nm, where both molecular and aerosol scattering are negligible and virtually all of the observed signal is generated via Fresnel reflection at the surface. The glint profile at this wavelength is fitted with a model which can optimally estimate refractive index, wind speed and direction, together with aircraft attitude variations affecting the viewing geometry. The retrieved refractive index markedly increases over oil-contaminated waters, while the apparent wind speed is significantly lower than in adjacent uncontaminated areas, suggesting that the slick dampens high-frequency components of the ocean wave spectrum. The constraint on surface reflectance provided by the short-wave infrared channels is a cornerstone of established procedures to retrieve atmospheric aerosol microphysical parameters based on the inversion of the RSP multispectral measurements. This retrieval, which benefits from the ancillary information provided by the HSRL, was in this specific case hampered by

  9. Are tropical cirrus brighter than mid-latitude cirrus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David L.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Sassen, Kenneth; Dong, Yayi; Hallett, John

    1993-01-01

    Recent measurements during FIRE II, in the tropics and elsewhere, support an emerging hypothesis about the role of stratospheric mixing in determining the microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds. This is only a working hypothesis, and may change as new measurements become available. This report reviews the conditions under which certain types of ice crystals form.

  10. Spectral emissivity of cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Gordon H.; Davis, John M.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1993-01-01

    The inference of cirrus cloud properties has many important applications including global climate studies, radiation budget determination, remote sensing techniques and oceanic studies from satellites. Data taken at the Parsons Kansas site during the FIRE II project are used for this study. On November 26 there were initially clear sky conditions gradually giving way to a progressively thickening cirrus shield over a period of a few hours. Interferometer radiosonde and lidar data were taken throughout this event. Two techniques are used to infer the downward spectral emittance of the observed cirrus layer. One uses only measurements and the other involves measurements and FASCODE III calculations. FASCODE III is a line-by line radiance/transmittance model developed at the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory.

  11. A Microphysics Guide to Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina; Rolf, Christian; Luebke, Anna; Afchine, Armin; Spelten, Nicole; Costa, Anja; Zöger, Martin; Smith, Jessica; Herman, Robert; Buchholz, Bernhard; Ebert, Volker; Baumgardner, Darrel; Borrmann, Stephan; Klingebiel, Marcus; Avallone, Linnea

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds still represent one of the largest uncertainties in the prediction of the Earth's climate (IPCC, 2013) since their microphysical and radiative properties remain poorly or only partially characterized. One major reason is that it is difficult to measure these properties on fast-flying, high altitude aircraft. Another problem is that aircraft measurements cannot capture the evolution of the cirrus clouds properties with time. The most common parameters that are measured in cirrus clouds -besides the meteorological variables- are ice water content (IWC), number of ice crystals (Nice) and relative humidity (with respect to ice, RHice), and sometimes vertical velocity. However, it is difficult to deduce on the history of ice nucleation and development of microphysical properties from these observations. Our study aims to provide a guide to cirrus microphysics, which is compiled from an extensive set of model simulations covering the broad range of atmospheric conditions for cirrus formation and evolution. The model results are portrayed in the same parameter space as the field measurements, i.e. in the temperature - IWC parameter space. From this representation of simulated cirrus, we can relate the formation mechanism and history to specific combinations of IWC, Nice and RHice inside of cirrus as a function of temperature. We validate this analysis approach by evaluating measurements of about 60h in cirrus during fifteen aircraft campaigns conducted in the last fifteen years over Europe, Australia and Southern and Northern America. It can be shown that the field observations indeed show the characteristics expected from the cirrus guide. For example, high/low IWCs are found together with high/low Nice. As a result it is now possible to track, to a certain degree, the formation mechanism and history of the observed cirrus clouds only from the measurement of IWC and RHice. Important findings from our study are that (i) a substantial part of thick cirrus

  12. Light scattering by cirrus cloud layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, K.-N.

    1972-01-01

    The properties of the reflection, transmission, and absorption of the cirrus cloud layers are calculated under the assumption that the ice crystals in cirrus clouds may be approximated long circular cylinders randomly oriented in space. The phase function, the single scattering albedo, and the extinction cross section are obtained on the basis of Liou's (1972) calculations of light scattering by ice clouds in the visible and infrared. A modified two-stream approximation for radiative transfer is developed and is used to evaluate the radiative properties of the cirrus cloud layers.

  13. The relationship of cirrus ice water content, crystal number, and size to vertical velocity: First results from the MACPEX field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, Anna; Avallone, Linnea; Kraemer, Martina

    2013-04-01

    The role of ice clouds in the radiation budget of the atmosphere is difficult to determine owing to the number and variability of the microphysical, and thus radiative, properties involved, as well as the current lack of understanding of how and why some of those variations occur. The microphysical properties of an individual cirrus cloud, such as the ice crystal number, size, and water content (IWC) are vital components for determining that role. However, without the proper understanding, these properties continue to be challenging to describe and parameterize. In this study we will present observations obtained during the 2011 Midlatitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) that was based in Houston, Texas. Specifically we will compare the microphysical properties of the cirrus observed during MACPEX with the extensive cirrus in situ data sets of Schiller et al. (2008), Krämer et al. (2009), and Luebke et al. (2012). A first look into the data shows that MACPEX is different from the earlier cirrus data sets: higher IWCs were observed together with higher ice crystal numbers at temperatures around 215K, while at around 225K average IWCs were found, but were accompanied by low ice crystal numbers. Further investigation of the meteorological situation and of the role of vertical velocity, freezing mechanism (heterogeneous/homogeneous ice nucleation), and sedimentation of ice crystals will be included to explain the MACPEX observations.

  14. Validation of POLDER/ADEOS data using a ground-based lidar network: Preliminary results for semi-transparent and cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chepfer, H.; Sauvage, L.; Flamant, P. H.; Pelon, J.; Goloub, P.; Brogniez, G.; spinhirne, J.; Lavorato, M.; Sugimoto, N.

    1998-01-01

    At mid and tropical latitudes, cirrus clouds are present more than 50% of the time in satellites observations. Due to their large spatial and temporal coverage, and associated low temperatures, cirrus clouds have a major influence on the Earth-Ocean-Atmosphere energy balance through their effects on the incoming solar radiation and outgoing infrared radiation. At present the impact of cirrus clouds on climate is well recognized but remains to be asserted more precisely, for their optical and radiative properties are not very well known. In order to understand the effects of cirrus clouds on climate, their optical and radiative characteristics of these clouds need to be determined accurately at different scales in different locations i.e. latitude. Lidars are well suited to observe cirrus clouds, they can detect very thin and semi-transparent layers, and retrieve the clouds geometrical properties i.e. altitude and multilayers, as well as radiative properties i.e. optical depth, backscattering phase functions of ice crystals. Moreover the linear depolarization ratio can give information on the ice crystal shape. In addition, the data collected with an airborne version of POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances) instrument have shown that bidirectional polarized measurements can provide information on cirrus cloud microphysical properties (crystal shapes, preferred orientation in space). The spaceborne version of POLDER-1 has been flown on ADEOS-1 platform during 8 months (October 96 - June 97), and the next POLDER-2 instrument will be launched in 2000 on ADEOS-2. The POLDER-1 cloud inversion algorithms are currently under validation. For cirrus clouds, a validation based on comparisons between cloud properties retrieved from POLDER-1 data and cloud properties inferred from a ground-based lidar network is currently under consideration. We present the first results of the validation.

  15. Analysis of Cirrus Cloud Microphysical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Grainger, Cedric A.

    1999-01-01

    The First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment (FIRE) program has the goal of improving our capabilities to understand, model and detect the properties of climatically-important clouds. This is being undertaken through a three-pronged effort of modeling, long-term observations and short-term intensive field studies. Through examination of satellite and other data it is apparent that stratus and cirrus cloud types have the greatest impact on climate due to their radiative effects and ubiquitous nature. As a result, the FIRE program has developed two paths of investigation, each having its own subset of research objectives and measurement programs. The work conducted under this grant was directed toward furthering our understanding of cirrus cloud systems. While it is known that cirrus are climatically important, the magnitude and even sign of the impact is unclear. Cirrus clouds affect the transfer of radiation according to their physical depth and location in the atmosphere and their microphysical composition. However, significant uncertainties still exist in how cirrus clouds form and how they are maintained, what their physical properties are and how they can be parameterized in numerical models. Better remote sensing techniques for monitoring cirrus cloud systems and improved modeling of radiative transfer through ice particles are also needed. A critical element in resolving these issues is a better understanding of cirrus cloud microphysical properties and how they vary. The focus of the research to be conducted under this grant was th data collected in situ by the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft. The goals of this research were to add to the body of knowledge of cirrus cloud microphysics, particularly at the small end of the size spectrum; and analyze the spatial variation of cirrus clouds.

  16. Optical-Microphysical Cirrus Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Lin, R.-F.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Starr, D. O.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that permits the simulation of the optical properties of cirrus clouds as measured with depolarization Raman lidars. It comprises a one-dimensional cirrus model with explicit microphysics and an optical module that transforms the microphysical model output to cloud and particle optical properties. The optical model takes into account scattering by randomly oriented or horizontally aligned planar and columnar monocrystals and polycrystals. Key cloud properties such as the fraction of plate-like particles and the number of basic crystals per polycrystal are parameterized in terms of the ambient temperature, the nucleation temperature, or the mass of the particles. The optical-microphysical model is used to simulate the lidar measurement of a synoptically forced cirrostratus in a first case study. It turns out that a cirrus cloud consisting of only monocrystals in random orientation is too simple a model scenario to explain the observations. However, good agreement between simulation and observation is reached when the formation of polycrystals or the horizontal alignment of monocrystals is permitted. Moreover, the model results show that plate fraction and morphological complexity are best parameterized in terms of particle mass, or ambient temperature which indicates that the ambient conditions affect cirrus optical properties more than those during particle formation. Furthermore, the modeled profiles of particle shape and size are in excellent agreement with in situ and laboratory studies, i.e., (partly oriented) polycrystalline particles with mainly planar basic crystals in the cloud bottom layer, and monocrystals above, with the fraction of columns increasing and the shape and size of the particles changing from large thin plates and long columns to small, more isometric crystals from cloud center to top. The findings of this case study corroborate the microphysical interpretation of cirrus measurements with lidar as suggested previously.

  17. Sampling the composition of cirrus ice residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.

    2014-06-01

    Cirrus are high altitude clouds composed of ice crystals. They are the first tropospheric clouds that can scatter incoming solar radiation and the last which can trap outgoing terrestrial heat. Considering their extensive global coverage, estimated at between 25 and 33% of the Earth's surface, cirrus exert a measurable climate forcing. The global radiative influence depends on a number of properties including their altitude, ice crystal size and number density, and vertical extent. These properties in turn depend on the ability of upper tropospheric aerosol particles to initiate ice formation. Because aerosol populations, and therefore cirrus formation mechanisms, may change due to human activities, the sign of cirrus forcing (a net warming or cooling) due to anthropogenic effects is not universally agreed upon although most modeling studies suggest a positive effect. Cirrus also play a major role in the water cycle in the tropopause region, affecting not only redistribution in the troposphere but also the abundance of vapor entering the stratosphere. Both the current lack of understanding of cirrus properties and the need to improve our ability to project changes due to human activities in the future highlight the critical need to determine the aerosol particles on which cirrus form. This review addresses what is currently known about the abundance, size and composition of cirrus-forming particles. We review aircraft-based field studies which have either collected cirrus ice residuals for off-line analysis or determined their size, composition and other properties in situ by capturing ice crystals and sublimating/removing the condensed phase water. This review is predominantly restricted to cirrus clouds. Limited comparisons are made to other ice-containing (e.g., mixed-phase) cloud types. The findings of recent reviews on laboratory measurements that mimic upper tropospheric cirrus formation are briefly summarized. The limitations of the current state of the art

  18. The 27-28 October 1986 FIRE IFO Cirrus Case Study: Cloud Optical Properties Determined by High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grund, C. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1996-01-01

    During the First ISCCP Region Experiment (FIRE) cirrus intensive field observation (IFO) the High Spectral Resolution Lidar was operated from a roof top site on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Because the HSRL technique separately measures the molecular and cloud particle backscatter components of the lidar return, the optical thickness is determined independent of particle backscatter. This is accomplished by comparing the known molecular density distribution to the observed decrease in molecular backscatter signal with altitude. The particle to molecular backscatter ratio yields calibrated measurements of backscatter cross sections that can be plotted ro reveal cloud morphology without distortion due to attenuation. Changes in cloud particle size, shape, and phase affect the backscatter to extinction ratio (backscatter-phase function). The HSRL independently measures cloud particle backscatter phase function. This paper presents a quantitative analysis of the HSRL cirrus cloud data acquired over an approximate 33 hour period of continuous near zenith observations. Correlations between small scale wind structure and cirrus cloud morphology have been observed. These correlations can bias the range averaging inherent in wind profiling lidars of modest vertical resolution, leading to increased measurement errors at cirrus altitudes. Extended periods of low intensity backscatter were noted between more strongly organized cirrus cloud activity. Optical thicknesses ranging from 0.01-1.4, backscatter phase functions between 0.02-0.065 sr (exp -1) and backscatter cross sections spanning 4 orders of magnitude were observed. the altitude relationship between cloud top and bottom boundaries and the cloud optical center altitude was dependent on the type of formation observed Cirrus features were observed with characteristic wind drift estimated horizontal sizes of 5-400 km. The clouds frequently exhibited cellular structure with vertical to horizontal dimension

  19. Mission Investigates Tropical Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenson, Eric; Starr, David; Toon, Owen B.

    2004-02-01

    It has been a year since NASA conducted the highly successful Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment Study (CRYSTAL-FACE). The measurement campaign was designed to investigate the physical properties and formation processes of tropical cirrus clouds. CRYSTAL-FACE was sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise as an integral component of its Earth observation research strategy, and included substantial collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the Naval Research Laboratory. During July 2002, the mission's six aircraft (NASA ER-2, NASA WB-57, Scaled Composites Proteus, University of North Dakota Citation, NSF-supported NRL P-3, and NRL Twin Otter) operated from the Key West Naval Air Facility. In addition, ground sites were located at the Tamiami airport on the east coast of Florida and near Everglades City on the west coast of Florida. Aircraft and ground site measurements are listed in Table 1. Data archiving is complete, and the data are now available to the general scientific community. Detailed instrument descriptions as well as the final data can be found on the CRYSTAL-FACE Web site (http://cloud1.arc.nasa.gov/crystalface/).

  20. The origin of midlatitude ice clouds and the resulting influence on their microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, Anna E.; Afchine, Armin; Costa, Anja; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Meyer, Jessica; Rolf, Christian; Spelten, Nicole; Avallone, Linnea M.; Baumgardner, Darrel; Krämer, Martina

    2016-05-01

    The radiative role of ice clouds in the atmosphere is known to be important, but uncertainties remain concerning the magnitude and net effects. However, through measurements of the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds, we can better characterize them, which can ultimately allow for their radiative properties to be more accurately ascertained. Recently, two types of cirrus clouds differing by formation mechanism and microphysical properties have been classified - in situ and liquid origin cirrus. In this study, we present observational evidence to show that two distinct types of cirrus do exist. Airborne, in situ measurements of cloud ice water content (IWC), ice crystal concentration (Nice), and ice crystal size from the 2014 ML-CIRRUS campaign provide cloud samples that have been divided according to their origin type. The key features that set liquid origin cirrus apart from the in situ origin cirrus are higher frequencies of high IWC ( > 100 ppmv), higher Nice values, and larger ice crystals. A vertical distribution of Nice shows that the in situ origin cirrus clouds exhibit a median value of around 0.1 cm-3, while the liquid origin concentrations are slightly, but notably higher. The median sizes of the crystals contributing the most mass are less than 200 µm for in situ origin cirrus, with some of the largest crystals reaching 550 µm in size. The liquid origin cirrus, on the other hand, were observed to have median diameters greater than 200 µm, and crystals that were up to 750 µm. An examination of these characteristics in relation to each other and their relationship to temperature provides strong evidence that these differences arise from the dynamics and conditions in which the ice crystals formed. Additionally, the existence of these two groups in cirrus cloud populations may explain why a bimodal distribution in the IWC-temperature relationship has been observed. We hypothesize that the low IWC mode is the result of in situ origin cirrus and the

  1. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by ˜ 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from ˜ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  2. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    DOE PAGES

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-10

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette massesmore » are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5–2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by  ∼  0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from  ∼ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.« less

  3. The lifecycle and climate-impact of contrail cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The lifecycle of contrail cirrus has to be understood as a prerequisite to compute its weather and climate impact for given airtraffic and meteorology. As a new concept, this study distinguishes between: 1) Externally limited contrail cirrus, where contrails form in moderately ice-supersaturated air, but ice particles stay small and contrails end by sublimation because of drying of the ambient air, e.g., when the ambient air subsides; 2) Internally limited contrail cirrus, where contrails form at high humidity with strong supersaturation or form in rising air masses, so that the ice particles grow until their fall speed gets large, and the ice particles finally fall to lower levels (e.g. in fall streaks). For both kinds of contrail cirrus, scaling laws are set up which show how the "Surface Forcing" (SF), i.e. the time-integral of optical depth times width (integral of ice particle number per flight distance times ice particle cross-section area times extinction efficiency) depends on the lifetime, on the number of ice particles per unit length, ambient humidity, uplift velocity, wind shear, turbulent mixing, and temperature. SF can be converted into an energy forcing (EF), from which the global radiative forcing can be evaluated, for given radiative Earth-atmosphere properties and traffic density. The scaling laws are tested by comparison to global contrail simulations with the most recent version of CoCiP (as in Schumann, 2012; and some changes), using ECMWF data and a global traffic data bases (ACCRI). The model assumes that contrail ice particles form initially mainly on soot, that the ice particles consume the ice supersaturation in the contrail plume, that the ice particle number decreases slightly with lifetime, and that interactions of contrails with ambient cirrus are weak. The scaling laws and the model allow estimating the climate impact of contrails as a function of a given aircraft and weather parameters. The results are compared to available results

  4. Thin and Subvisual Tropopause Tropical Cirrus: Observations and Radiative Impacts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Spinhirne, James; Hart, Bill

    2000-06-01

    In situ microphysical, remote sensing, and satellite observations of thin and subvisible cirrus have been used to establish their frequency of occurrence, determine their mean optical depths and radiative forcings, and to analyze their association with deep convection. A spatially thin layer of cirrus, with both base and top above 15 km, was observed in the central Pacific Tropics 29% of the time, with a mean thickness of 0.47 km, using a nadir-pointing Nd:YAG lidar operating at 1.064 m during the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). In situ microphysical data collected in the mid-1970s and mid-1980s by a WB-57 and Learjet near Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, are revisited to determine typical ice crystal sizes and shapes that occur in this cloud type. Three observed vertical profiles, obtained from ascents/descents through cloud, are used with a -four-stream radiative transfer model to calculate observed heating rates of up to 1.0 K day1, principally in the infrared, and cloud radiative forcings of up to 1.2 W m2. These calculations are extended using remotely sensed optical depths acquired with the airborne lidar on four days during CEPEX; the average estimated was 0.01, and the corresponding heating rates and cloud radiative forcings were 1.66 K day1 and 1.6 W m2, respectively. Using a visibility threshold for of 0.03, this suggests that the majority of the thin cirrus observed are subvisible. The calculated radiative effects depend principally on the observed optical thickness of the cloud layers.Altitude-dependent average extinction coefficients between 0.001 and 0.004 km1 were calculated from the limb-viewing Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II satellite, confirming that the lidar estimated is representative for the Tropics. A comparison of the SAGE II observed occurrence times with cloud properties estimated from collocated International Satellite Cloud and Climatology Project retrievals for the closest time shows that 28% of the

  5. Scattering properties of horizontally oriented ice crystal columns in cirrus clouds. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Rockwitz, K D

    1989-10-01

    A ray tracing technique is presented based on the fundamental laws of ray and wave optics; it has been used to calculate the scattering properties of hexagonal ice crystals. These crystals were assumed to be oriented preferably horizontal, and, therefore, the resulting phase functions have been plotted vs direction in 3-D space contrary to earlier calculations of other authors. The anisotropy of the scattered radiation is clearly shown; on the average the phase function varies over ~2 orders of magnitude. From these single scattering results the multiple scattering between various ice crystals has also been calculated.

  6. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  7. Ice water content of arctic, midlatitude, and tropical cirrus - Part 2: Extension of the database and new statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, A. E.; Avallone, L. M.; Schiller, C.; Rolf, C.; Krämer, M.

    2012-11-01

    Ice clouds are known to be major contributors to radiative forcing in the Earth's atmosphere, yet describing their microphysical properties in climate models remains challenging. Among these properties, the ice water content (IWC) of cirrus clouds is of particular interest both because it is measurable and because it can be directly related to a number of other radiatively important variables such as extinction and effective radius. This study expands upon the work of Schiller et al. (2008), extending a climatology of IWC by combining datasets from several European and US airborne campaigns and ground-based lidar measurements over Jülich, Germany. The relationship between IWC and temperature is further investigated using the new merged dataset and probability distribution functions (PDFs). A PDF-based formulation allows for representation of not only the mean values of IWC, but also the variability of IWC within a temperature band. The IWC-PDFs are found to be bimodal over the whole cirrus temperature range, which might be attributed to different cirrus formation mechanisms such as heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing. The PDFs of IWC are further compared to distributions of cirrus ice crystal number and mass mean radius, which show that the general relationship between IWC and temperature appears to be influenced much more by particle number than by particle size.

  8. Perturbed Physics Ensemble Simulations of Cirrus on the Cloud System-resolving Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlbauer, Andreas; Berry, Elizabeth; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mace, Gerald G.

    2014-04-16

    In this study, the effect of uncertainties in the parameterization of ice microphysical processes and initial conditions on the variability of cirrus microphysical and radiative properties are investigated in a series of cloud system-resolving perturbed physics ensemble (PPE) and initial condition ensemble (ICE) simulations. Three cirrus cases representative of mid-latitude, subtropical and tropical cirrus are examined. It is found that the variability in cirrus properties induced by perturbing uncertain parameters in ice microphysics parameterizations outweighs the variability induced by perturbing the initial conditions in midlatitude and subtropical cirrus. However, in tropical anvil cirrus the variability in the PPE and ICE simulations is about the same order of magnitude. The cirrus properties showing the largest sensitivity are ice water content (IWC) and cloud thickness whereas the averaged high cloud cover is only marginally affected. Changes in cirrus ice water path and outgoing longwave radiation are controlled primarily by changes in IWC and cloud thickness but not by changes is the averaged high cloud cover. The change in the vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud thickness is caused by changes in cirrus cloud base whereas cloud top is not sensitive to either perturbed physics or perturbed initial conditions. In all cirrus cases, the top three parameters controlling the microphysical variability and radiative impact of cirrus clouds are ice fall speeds, ice autoconversion size thresholds and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Changes in the ice deposition coefficient do not affect the ice water path and outgoing longwave radiation. Similarly, changes in the number concentration of aerosols available for homogeneous freezing have virtually no effect on the microphysical and radiative properties of midlatitude and subtropical cirrus but only little impact on tropical anvil cirrus. Overall, the sensitivity of cirrus microphysical and radiative

  9. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor, Cirrus Clouds and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Potter, John R.; Tola, Rebecca; Rush, Kurt; Veselovskii, Igor; Cadirola, Martin; Comer, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band interference filters with improved transmission in the ultraviolet have been developed under NASA-funded research and used in the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) in ground- based, upward-looking tests. RASL is an airborne Raman Lidar system designed to measure water vapor mixing ratio, and aerosol backscatter/extinction/depolarization. It also possesses the capability to make experimental measurements of cloud liquid water and carbon dioxide. It is being prepared for first flight tests during the summer of 2006. With the newly developed filters installed in RASL, measurements were made of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus cloud optical properties and carbon dioxide that improve upon any previously demonstrated using Raman lidar. Daytime boundary layer profiling of water vapor mixing ratio is performed with less than 5% random error using temporal and spatial resolution of 2-minutes and 60 - 210, respectively. Daytime cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction- to-backscatter ratio measurements are made using 1-minute average. Sufficient signal strength is demonstrated to permit the simultaneous profiling of carbon dioxide and water vapor mixing ratio into the free troposphere during the nighttime. Downward-looking from an airborne RASL should possess the same measurement statistics with approximately a factor of 5 - 10 decrease in averaging time. A description of the technology improvements are provided followed by examples of the improved Raman lidar measurements.

  10. The temporal evolution of a long-lived contrail cirrus cluster: Simulations with a global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Lisa; Burkhardt, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    The representation of contrail cirrus in climate models has advanced in the last years tremendously. Nevertheless, uncertainties in particular regarding the representation of contrail microphysics still remain. Properties of young contrail cirrus differ from those of natural cirrus due to the large ice crystal number concentration common in contrails. Consequently, microphysical process rates in contrail cirrus, which control its lifetime, can be very different to those in natural cirrus. We extend a contrail cirrus scheme within a climate model by implementing a microphysical two-moment scheme and study the life cycle of a contrail cirrus cluster. In an idealized experiment we study the properties and microphysical process rates of a contrail cirrus cluster in a large and long-lived ice supersaturated region. We find that at flight level contrail cirrus display their typical high ice crystal number concentration (of about 10-100 cm-3) for a few hours with far lower densities in lower levels caused by sedimentation. After about 7 h contrail cirrus have spread considerably so that even at flight level associated ice crystal number concentrations have dropped to values that prohibit fast relaxation of ice supersaturation. The reduced ice crystal number and the resulting limited water uptake in the contrail cirrus limit the lifetime of the contrail cirrus cluster to about 10 h even though surrounding conditions would be still favorable for contrail cirrus persistence. In our case studies, contrail cirrus resembles natural cirrus regarding their ice crystal number concentration and size after 5-7 h.

  11. Spectral variation of scattering and absorption by cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, Paul F.; Davis, John M.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1993-01-01

    The impact of cirrus clouds on the radiative budget of the earth depends on the microphysics and scattering properties of the clouds. Cirrus clouds have been especially difficult to observe because of their high altitude and complex tenuous structure. Observations by Abakumova et. al. (1991) show that the near infrared wavelengths are more sensitive to the cirrus cloud properties than the shorter ultraviolet wavelengths. Anikin (1991) was able to show that collimated spectral measurements can be used to determine an effective particle size of the cirrus clouds. Anikin (1991) also showed that the effect of scattering through cloud causes the apparent optical depth of a 10 degrees field of view pyrheliometer to be roughly half the actual optical depth. Stackhouse and Stephens (1991) have shown that the existence of small ice crystals do dramatically affect the radiative properties of the cirrus, though observations taken during the 1986 FIRE were not totally explained by their presence.

  12. Microphysical Interpretation of Cirrus Measurements With Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Reichardt, Susanne; McGee, Thomas J.; Starr, David OC.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 N in January 1997 reveal a strong correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio delta and extinct ion-to-backscatter ratio S, for ambient cloud temperatures above approximately -45 C (delta less than approximately 40%), and an anti-correlation for colder temperatures (delta greater than approximately 40%). Over the length of the measurements (4-7.5 hours) the particle properties vary systematically: Initially, delta approximately equal to 60% and S approximately equal to 10sr are observed. Then, with decreasing delta, S first increases to approximately 27 sr(delta approximately equal to 40%) before decreasing to values around 10 sr again (delta approximately equal to 20%). The particle optical properties distinctly depend on the ambient temperature. For the microphysical analysis of the lidar observations. ray-tracing computations of particle scattering properties and a size-distribution resolving cirrus model with explicit microphysics have been used. The theoretical studies show that the optical properties and their temporal evolution can be interpreted in terms of size, shape, and growth of the cirrus particles: Near the cloud top in the early stage of the cirrus development, light scattering by small hexagonal columns with aspect ratios close to one is dominant. Over time the cloud base height extends to lower altitudes with warmer temperatures, the ice particles grow and get morphologically diverse (the scattering contributions of hexagonal columns and plates are roughly the same for large S and depolarization values of approximately 40%). In the lower ranges of the cirrus clouds, light scattering is predominantly by plate-like or complex ice particles. Mid-latitude cirrus data measured with the same instrument at 53.4 N between 1994 and 1996 follow closely the correlation between delta and S found in the warmer regions of the Arctic

  13. Evolution of a Florida Cirrus Anvil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Navarro, B.C.; Twohy, C. H.; Jensen, E. J.; Bui, P. T.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Gerber, H.; Herman, R. L.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Lawson, P.; Minnis, P.; Nguyen, L.; Poellot, M.; Pope, S. K.; Valero, F. P. J.; Weinstock, E. M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of a single thunderstorm anvil cirrus cloud measured on 21 July 2002 near southern Florida during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers--Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). NASA WB-57F and University of North Dakota Citation aircraft tracked the microphysical and radiative development of the anvil for 3 h. Measurements showed that the cloud mass that was advected downwind from the thunderstorm was separated vertically into two layers: a cirrus anvil with cloud-top temperatures of -45?C lay below a second, thin tropopause cirrus (TTC) layer with the same horizontal dimensions as the anvil and temperatures near -70?C. In both cloud layers, ice crystals smaller than 50 ?m across dominated the size distributions and cloud radiative properties. In the anvil, ice crystals larger than 50 ?m aggregated and precipitated while small ice crystals increasingly dominated the size distributions; as a consequence, measured ice water contents and ice crystal effective radii decreased with time. Meanwhile, the anvil thinned vertically and maintained a stratification similar to its environment. Because effective radii were small, radiative heating and cooling were concentrated in layers approximately 100 m thick at the anvil top and base. A simple analysis suggests that the anvil cirrus spread laterally because mixing in these radiatively driven layers created horizontal pressure gradients between the cloud and its stratified environment. The TTC layer also spread but, unlike the anvil, did not dissipate--perhaps because the anvil shielded the TTC from terrestrial infrared heating. Calculations of top-of-troposphere radiative forcing above the anvil and TTC showed strong cooling that tapered as the anvil evolved.

  14. Effects of observed horizontal inhomogeneities within cirrus clouds on solar radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, Nicole; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2002-10-01

    In situ microphysical and combined radar and radiometer measurements of 11 cirrus clouds from Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX), European Cloud and Radiation Experiment (EUCREX), investigation of Clouds by Ground-Based and Airborne Radar and Lidar (CARL), and First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE) are used to investigate effects of horizontal cloud inhomogeneities on solar radiative transfer. A three-dimensional ray-tracing model (GRIMALDI), based on the Monte Carlo method, is used to calculate upward and downward flux densities and absorption for the spectral range from 0.38 to 4.0 μm. Radiative flux densities are calculated using the inhomogeneous clouds derived from the observations and for horizontally and vertically averaged homogeneous clouds. Horizontally averaged values of radiative flux densities and absorption for heterogeneous clouds can differ by up to 30% from those calculated for the homogeneous clouds for convectively induced tropical cirrus clouds. The midlatitude cases examined tended to be more homogeneous, and hence differences between radiative properties for the homogeneous and heterogeneous clouds did not exceed 10%. For cirrus clouds with mean optical thicknesses smaller than 5 and with relative variances of optical thickness smaller than 0.2, errors caused by the homogeneous assumption are smaller than ±10%.

  15. Detecting Thin Cirrus in Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer Aerosol Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Davis, Matt R.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Thin cirrus clouds (optical depth (OD) < 03) are often undetected by standard cloud masking in satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms. However, the Mu]tiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) aerosol retrieval has the potential to discriminate between the scattering phase functions of cirrus and aerosols, thus separating these components. Theoretical tests show that MISR is sensitive to cirrus OD within Max{0.05 1 20%l, similar to MISR's sensitivity to aerosol OD, and MISR can distinguish between small and large crystals, even at low latitudes, where the range of scattering angles observed by MISR is smallest. Including just two cirrus components in the aerosol retrieval algorithm would capture typical MISR sensitivity to the natural range of cinus properties; in situations where cirrus is present but the retrieval comparison space lacks these components, the retrieval tends to underestimate OD. Generally, MISR can also distinguish between cirrus and common aerosol types when the proper cirrus and aerosol optical models are included in the retrieval comparison space and total column OD is >-0.2. However, in some cases, especially at low latitudes, cirrus can be mistaken for some combinations of dust and large nonabsorbing spherical aerosols, raising a caution about retrievals in dusty marine regions when cirrus is present. Comparisons of MISR with lidar and Aerosol Robotic Network show good agreement in a majority of the cases, but situations where cirrus clouds have optical depths >0.15 and are horizontally inhomogeneous on spatial scales shorter than 50 km pose difficulties for cirrus retrieval using the MISR standard aerosol algorithm..

  16. Orographic cirrus in the future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, H.; Spichtinger, P.; Lohmann, U.

    2009-04-01

    A cloud resolving model (CRM) is used to investigate the formation of orographic cirrus clouds in the current and future climate. The formation of cirrus clouds depends on a variety of dynamical and thermodynamical processes, which act on different scales. First, the capability of the CRM in realistically simulating orographic cirrus clouds has been tested by comparing the simulated results to aircraft measurements of an orographic cirrus cloud. The influence of a warmer climate on the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds has been investigated by initializing the CRM with vertical profiles of horizontal wind, temperature and moisture from IPCC A1B simulations for the current climate and for the period 2090-2099 for two regions representative for North and South America. In a future climate, the increase in moisture dampens the vertical propagation of gravity waves and the occurring vertical velocities. Together with higher temperatures fewer ice crystals nucleate homogeneously. Assuming that the relative humidity does not change in a warmer climate the specific humidity in the model is increased. This increase in specific humidity in a warmer climate results in a higher ice water content. The net effect of a reduced ice crystal number concentration and a higher ice water content is an increased optical depth.

  17. Airborne observations of cloud properties on HALO during NARVAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konow, Heike; Hansen, Akio; Ament, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The representation of cloud and precipitation processes is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate and weather predictions. To validate model predictions of convective processes over the Atlantic ocean, usually satellite data are used. However, satellite products provide just a coarse view with poor temporal resolution of convective maritime clouds. Aircraft-based observations offer a more detailed insight due to lower altitude and high sampling rates. The research aircraft HALO (High Altitude Long Range Research Aircraft) is operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). With a ceiling of 15 km, and a range of 10,000 km and more than 10 hours it is able to reach remote regions and operate from higher altitudes than most other research aircraft. Thus, it provides the unique opportunity to exploit regions of the atmosphere that cannot be easily accessed otherwise. Measurements conducted on HALO provide more detailed insights than achievable from satellite data. Therefore, this measurement platform bridges the gap between previous airborne measurements and satellites. The payload used for this study consists of, amongst others, a suite of passive microwave radiometers, a cloud radar, and a water vapor DIAL. To investigate cloud and precipitation properties of convective maritime clouds, the NARVAL (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies) campaign was conducted in winter 2013/2014 out of Barbados and Keflavik (Iceland). This campaign was one of the first that took place on the HALO aircraft. During the experiment's two parts 15 research flights were conducted (8 flights during NARVAL-South out of Barbados to investigate trade-wind cumuli and 7 flights out of Keflavik with focus on mid-latitude cyclonic systems). Flight durations were between five and nine hours, amounting to roughly 118 flight hours overall. 121 dropsondes were deployed. In fall 2016 two additional aircraft campaigns with the same payload will take place: The

  18. Principal component and sensitivity analysis of cirrus clouds using high-resolution IR radiance spectra: simulations and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, A.; Braverman, A.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2003-01-01

    A set of simulated and observed nadir-oriented high-resolution infrared emission spectra of synthetic cirrus clouds is analyzed to assess the spectrally dependent variability of radiance from the adjustment of some microphysical and bulk cirrus cloud properties.

  19. Seasonal and optical characterisation of cirrus clouds over Indian sub-continent using LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jayeshlal, G. S. Satyanarayana, Malladi Dhaman, Reji K. Motty, G. S.

    2014-10-15

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is an important remote sensing technique to study about the cirrus clouds. The subject of cirrus clouds and related climate is challenging one. The received scattered signal from Lidar contains information on the physical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. The Lidar profile of the cirrus cloud provides information on the optical characteristics like depolarisation ratio, lidar ratio and optical depth, which give knowledge about possible phase, structure and orientation of cloud particle that affect the radiative budgeting of cirrus clouds. The findings from the study are subjected to generate inputs for better climatic modelling.

  20. The analysis of in situ and retrieved aerosol properties measured during three airborne field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Chelsea A.

    Aerosols can directly influence climate, visibility, and photochemistry by scattering and absorbing solar radiation. Aerosol chemical and physical properties determine how efficiently a particle scatters and/or absorbs incoming short-wave solar radiation. Because many types of aerosol can act as nuclei for cloud droplets (CCN) and a smaller population of airborne particles facilitate ice crystal formation (IN), aerosols can also alter cloud-radiation interactions which have subsequent impacts on climate. Thus aerosol properties determine the magnitude and sign of both the direct and indirect impacts of aerosols on radiation-dependent Earth System processes. This dissertation will fill some gaps in our understanding of the role of aerosol properties on aerosol absorption and cloud formation. Specifically, the impact of aerosol oxidation on aerosol spectral (350nm < lambda< 500nm) absorption was examined for two biomass burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-S aircraft during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission in Spring and Summer 2008. Spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved using actinic flux measured aboard the NASA DC-8 was used to calculate the aerosol absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE) for a 6-day-old plume on April 17 th and a 3-hour old plume on June 29th. Higher AAE values for the April 17th plume (6.78+/-0.38) indicate absorption by aerosol was enhanced in the ultraviolet relative to the visible portion of the short-wave spectrum in the older plume compared to the fresher plume (AAE= 3.34 0.11). These differences were largely attributed to the greater oxidation of the organic aerosol in the April 17th plume which can arise either from the aging of primary organic aerosol or the formation of spectrally-absorbing secondary organic aerosol. The validity of the actinic flux retrievals used above were also evaluated in this work by the comparison of SSA retrieved using

  1. Cirrus radiative characteristics and the radiative impact of small particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    An understanding of the way radiation interacts with clouds is vital for understanding the sensitivity of the earth's climate to both natural and anthropogenic changes in the atmosphere. Cirrus clouds are thought to be an important modulator of climate sensitivity. The feedback effect of cirrus on climate can be positive or negative depending upon the microphysics and scattering properties of the cloud. These properties of cirrus clouds are not well understood partly because of their thin tenuous nature and partly because of their microphysical properties. The high altitude and cold temperatures within these clouds along with their transparency greatly increase the difficulty in which accurate measurements can be obtained and interpreted both by aircraft and remote sensing. Therefore, the understanding of the interaction of radiation in cirrus clouds is crucial to determining the ways in which these clouds interact with climate forcings. The sensitivity of the radiative budgets of cirrus cloudiness to their microphysical composition and the environments in which they occur is examined. Especially important is the impact of small particles on the radiative properties of cirrus. Remote sensing estimates of the effective crystal size of cirrus and in situ measurements show large differences up to 100 microns. Thus it becomes important to identify the sources of these differences. For this reason, simulations of actual FIRE cases are compared with the in situ radiative observations and inferences are made concerning the cause of the discrepancies.

  2. Solar glint from oriented crystals in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Claire; Roblin, Antoine; Chervet, Patrick

    2008-11-20

    Solar scattering on oriented cirrus crystals near the specular reflection direction is modeled using a mix method combining geometric optics and diffraction effects at three wavelengths in the visible and infrared domains. Different potential sources of phase function broadening around the specular direction, such as multiple scattering, solar disk, or tilt effects, are studied by means of a Monte Carlo method. The radiance detected by an airborne sensor located a few kilometers above the cirrus cloud and pointing in the specular scattering direction is calculated at four solar zenith angles showing a dramatic increase of the signal in relation to the usual assumption of random crystal orientation.

  3. Inferring Cirrus Size Distributions Through Satellite Remote Sensing and Microphysical Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David; D'Entremont, Robert P.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Since cirrus clouds have a substantial influence on the global energy balance that depends on their microphysical properties, climate models should strive to realistically characterize the cirrus ice particle size distribution (PSD), at least in a climatological sense. To date, the airborne in situ measurements of the cirrus PSD have contained large uncertainties due to errors in measuring small ice crystals (D<60 m). This paper presents a method to remotely estimate the concentration of the small ice crystals relative to the larger ones using the 11- and 12- m channels aboard several satellites. By understanding the underlying physics producing the emissivity difference between these channels, this emissivity difference can be used to infer the relative concentration of small ice crystals. This is facilitated by enlisting temperature-dependent characterizations of the PSD (i.e., PSD schemes) based on in situ measurements. An average cirrus emissivity relationship between 12 and 11 m is developed here using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument and is used to retrieve the PSD based on six different PSD schemes. The PSDs from the measurement-based PSD schemes are compared with corresponding retrieved PSDs to evaluate differences in small ice crystal concentrations. The retrieved PSDs generally had lower concentrations of small ice particles, with total number concentration independent of temperature. In addition, the temperature dependence of the PSD effective diameter De and fall speed Vf for these retrieved PSD schemes exhibited less variability relative to the unmodified PSD schemes. The reduced variability in the retrieved De and Vf was attributed to the lower concentrations of small ice crystals in the retrieved PSD.

  4. Characterization of mechanical properties of leather with airborne ultrasonics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nondestructive method to accurately evaluate the quality of hides and leather is urgently needed by leather and hide industries. We previously reported the research results for airborne ultrasonic (AU) testing using non-contact transducers to evaluate the quality of hides and leather. The abilit...

  5. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  6. Distribution and Radiative Forcing of Tropical Thin Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Joonsuk; Yang, Ping; Dessler, Andrew E.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven

    2009-01-01

    To understand the radiative impact of tropical thin cirrus clouds, the frequency of occurrence and optical depths of these clouds have been derived. Thin cirrus clouds are defined here as being those that are not detected by the operational Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask, corresponding to an optical depth value of approximately 0.3 or smaller, but that are detectable in terms of the cirrus reflectance product based on the MODIS 1.375-micron channel. With such a definition, thin cirrus clouds were present in more than 40% of the pixels flagged as clear sky by the operational MODIS cloud mask algorithm. It is shown that these thin cirrus clouds are frequently observed in deep convective regions in the western Pacific. Thin cirrus optical depths were derived from the cirrus reflectance product. Regions of significant cloud fraction and large optical depths were observed in the Northern Hemisphere during the boreal spring and summer and moved southward during the boreal autumn and winter. The radiative effects of tropical thin cirrus clouds were studied on the basis of the retrieved cirrus optical depths, the atmospheric profiles derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations, and a radiative transfer model in conjunction with a parameterization of ice cloud spectral optical properties. To understand how these clouds regulate the radiation field in the atmosphere, the instantaneous net fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface were calculated. The present study shows positive and negative net forcings at the TOA and at the surface, respectively. The positive (negative) net forcing at the TOA (surface) is due to the dominance of longwave (shortwave) forcing. Both the TOA and surface forcings are in a range of 0-20 W/sq m, depending on the optical depths of thin cirrus clouds.

  7. Orographic cirrus in a future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, H.; Spichtinger, P.; Lohmann, U.

    2009-10-01

    A cloud resolving model (CRM) is used to investigate the formation of orographic cirrus clouds in the current and future climate. The formation of cirrus clouds depends on a variety of dynamical and thermodynamical processes, which act on different scales. First, the capability of the CRM in realistically simulating orographic cirrus clouds has been tested by comparing the simulated results to aircraft measurements of an orographic cirrus cloud. The influence of a warmer climate on the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds has been investigated by initializing the CRM with vertical profiles of horizontal wind, potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature, respectively. The vertical profiles are extracted from IPCC A1B simulations for the current climate and for the period 2090-2099 for two regions representative for North and South America. The influence of additional moisture in a future climate on the propagation of gravity waves and the formation of orographic cirrus could be estimated. In a future climate, the increase in moisture dampens the vertical propagation of gravity waves and the occurring vertical velocities in the moist simulations. Together with higher temperatures fewer ice crystals nucleate homogeneously. Assuming that the relative humidity does not change in a warmer climate the specific humidity in the model is increased. This increase in specific humidity in a warmer climate results in a higher ice water content. The net effect of a reduced ice crystal number concentration and a higher ice water content is an increased optical depth. However, in some moist simulations dynamical changes contribute to changes in the ice water content, ice crystal number concentration and optical depth. For the corresponding dry simulations dynamical changes are more pronounced leading to a decreased optical depth in a future climate in some cases.

  8. SPARTICUS: Small Particles in Cirrus Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J.; Jensen, E.; McFarquhar, G.; Comstock, J.; Ackerman, T.; Mitchell, D.; Liu, X.; Garrett, T.

    2009-10-31

    From a mass-weighted perspective, cirrus clouds exert an enormous influence on the radiative energy budget of the earth’s climate system. Owing to their location in the cold upper troposphere, cirrus can significantly reduce the outgoing longwave radiation while, at the same time, remaining relatively transmissive to solar energy. Thus, cirrus clouds are the only cloud genre that can exert a direct radiative warming influence on the climate system (Ackerman et al. 1988). It is not surprising, therefore, that general circulation models (GCMs) are especially sensitive to the presence of cirrus in the model atmosphere. Lohmann and Roeckner (1995), for instance, show that the climate sensitivity can vary by as much as 40% due to the properties of cirrus varying between transparent and opaque limits. Lohmann and Roeckner (1995) also identify a key feedback by cirrus that is often overlooked; on longer time scales cloud heating in the upper troposphere can act to maintain and modulate the general circulation of the atmosphere through accelerating the subtropical and polar jet streams. Understanding these mechanisms and representing them in models is complicated by the fact that cirrus properties vary over an enormous dynamic range compared to most other clouds.

  9. FIRE Cirrus on October 28, 1986: LANDSAT; ER-2; King Air; theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Suttles, John T.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Welch, Ronald M.; Spinhirne, James D.; Parker, Lindsay; Arduini, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A simultaneous examination was conducted of cirrus clouds in the FIRE Cirrus IFO-I on 10/28/86 using a multitude of remote sensing and in-situ measurements. The focus is cirrus cloud radiative properties and their relationship to cloud microphysics. A key element is the comparison of radiative transfer model calculations and varying measured cirrus radiative properties (emissivity, reflectance vs. wavelength, reflectance vs. viewing angle). As the number of simultaneously measured cloud radiative properties and physical properties increases, more sharply focused tests of theoretical models are possible.

  10. Midlatitude cirrus classification at Rome Tor Vergata through a multichannel Raman-Mie-Rayleigh lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisi, D.; Keckhut, P.; Liberti, G. L.; Cardillo, F.; Congeduti, F.

    2013-12-01

    range between 10-60 sr, and the estimated mean value is 31 ± 15 sr, similar to LR values of lower latitude cirrus measurements. The obtained results are consistent with previous studies conducted with different systems and confirm that cirrus classification based on a statistical approach seems to be a good tool both to validate the height-resolved cirrus fields calculated by models and to investigate the key processes governing cirrus formation and evolution. However, the lidar ratio and optical depth analyses are affected by some uncertainties (e.g., lidar error noise, multiple scattering effects, supercooled water clouds) that reduce the confidence of the results. Future studies are needed to improve the characterization of the cirrus optical properties and, thus, the determination of their radiative impact.

  11. Ice water content of Arctic, midlatitude, and tropical cirrus - Part 2: Extension of the database and new statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, A. E.; Avallone, L. M.; Schiller, C.; Meyer, J.; Rolf, C.; Krämer, M.

    2013-07-01

    Ice clouds are known to be major contributors to radiative forcing in the Earth's atmosphere, yet describing their microphysical properties in climate models remains challenging. Among these properties, the ice water content (IWC) of cirrus clouds is of particular interest both because it is measurable and because it can be directly related to a number of other radiatively important variables such as extinction and effective radius. This study expands upon the work of Schiller et al. (2008), extending a climatology of IWC by combining datasets from several European and US airborne campaigns and ground-based lidar measurements over Jülich, Germany. The relationship between IWC and temperature is further investigated using the new merged dataset and probability distribution functions (PDFs). A PDF-based formulation allows for representation of not only the mean values of IWC, but also the variability of IWC within a temperature band. The IWC-PDFs are observed to be bimodal over the whole cirrus temperature range. This bimodality is also found in ice crystal number PDFs and might be attributed to different cirrus formation mechanisms such as heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing.

  12. Influence of Nucleation Mechanisms on the Radiative Properties of Deep Convective Clouds and Subvisible Cirrus in CRYSTAL/FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    2005-01-01

    During the past few years we have conducted work on several different topics, as reflected by our publications. As one of the Co-Project scientists for The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL FACE) we worked to help design the mission and then conduct it in the field. Another major activity during the past two years has been to pull together various groups to formulate plans for follow on missions to CRYSTAL FACE. We organized a workshop at the University of Colorado during the summer of 2003 to assess the best locations for future missions. Working with a group of about 10 scientists from around the country we prepared a science-planning document (Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC(sup 4)) that outlined the rationale, locations, strategy to accomplish the goals, and possible payloads for a set of three tropical missions. We also prepared background materials for various NRAs being prepared at NASA Headquarters for missions in Costa Rica, Darwin and Guam. In conjunction with the group at NASA Ames we have helped build a new numerical model for deep convection and have applied that model to simulate the CRYSTAL data. Our goal in particular has been to better understand how convection distributes water vapor isotopes. CRYSTAL observations of water isotopes are very different from those suggested by previous workers who assumed the isotopes would obey Rayleigh fractionation. The water isotope study has several implications. First it is a check on the realism of the deep convection model. Second, the isotopes are a measure of the precipitation removal in the atmosphere. Hence they provide a constraint on a parameter that is difficult to otherwise measure. Finally it has been suggested that isotopes may be the key to unraveling the water transport into the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Such transport is critical both for the radiation balance and for stratospheric

  13. Dynamical States of Low Temperature Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Low ice crystal concentration and sustained in-cloud supersaturation, commonly found in cloud observations at low temperature, challenge our understanding of cirrus formation. Heterogeneous freezing from effloresced ammonium sulfate, glassy aerosol, dust and black carbon are proposed to cause these phenomena; this requires low updrafts for cirrus characteristics to agree with observations and is at odds with the gravity wave spectrum in the upper troposphere. Background temperature fluctuations however can establish a dynamical equilibrium between ice production and sedimentation loss (as opposed to ice crystal formation during the first stages of cloud evolution and subsequent slow cloud decay) that explains low temperature cirrus properties. This newly-discovered state is favored at low temperatures and does not require heterogeneous nucleation to occur (the presence of ice nuclei can however facilitate its onset). Our understanding of cirrus clouds and their role in anthropogenic climate change is reshaped, as the type of dynamical forcing will set these clouds in one of two preferred microphysical regimes with very different susceptibility to aerosol.

  14. CRYSTAL-FACE: A Field Experiment and Modeling Program Focused on Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenson, Eric; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) is a measurement campaign designed to investigate tropical Cirrus cloud physical properties and formation processes. Understanding the production of upper tropospheric cirrus clouds is essential for the successful modeling of 'he Earth's climate. The deployment phase will occur in July, 2002 in southern Florida, USA. Several aircraft will be used, including the ER-2 and Proteus for cloud remote sensing, the WB-57 and Citation for in situ cloud measurements, the P-3 with a Doppler radar for characterization of convective systems, and the Twin otter for sampling of inflow airmasses. In addition, numerous ground-based and satellite remote sensing measurements will be contributing. A central focus of the mission is improvement of our ability to model cirrus clouds with numerical models. Several research groups with a variety of model types (cloud-resolving models, mesoscale models, weather-prediction models, and general circulation models) will be participating. Our hope is to fully characterize several mulonimbus/cirrus anvil systems that can be used as case studies for testing and improvement of the models. The models will be used for investigating cirrus generation and dissipation processes and the sensitivity of tropical cirrus to convective intensity and aerosol properties. Ultimately, we expect this effort to improve our ability to represent tropical cirrus in GCMs. A general description of the CRYSTAL-FACE program will be presented, with an emphasis on the cloud modeling approach.

  15. Changes in Cirrus Cloudiness and their Relationship to Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; Palikonda, Rabindra; Doelling, David R.; Schumann, Ulrich; Gierens, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Condensation trails, or contrails, formed in the wake of high-altitude aircraft have long been suspected of causing the formation of additional cirrus cloud cover. More cirrus is possible because 10 - 20% of the atmosphere at typical commercial flight altitudes is clear but ice-saturated. Since they can affect the radiation budget like natural cirrus clouds of equivalent optical depth and microphysical properties, contrail -generated cirrus clouds are another potential source of anthropogenic influence on climate. Initial estimates of contrail radiative forcing (CRF) were based on linear contrail coverage and optical depths derived from a limited number of satellite observations. Assuming that such estimates are accurate, they can be considered as the minimum possible CRF because contrails often develop into cirrus clouds unrecognizable as contrails. These anthropogenic cirrus are not likely to be identified as contrails from satellites and would, therefore, not contribute to estimates of contrail coverage. The mean lifetime and coverage of spreading contrails relative to linear contrails are needed to fully assess the climatic effect of contrails, but are difficult to measure directly. However, the maximum possible impact can be estimated using the relative trends in cirrus coverage over regions with and without air traffic. In this paper, the upper bound of CRF is derived by first computing the change in cirrus coverage over areas with heavy air traffic relative to that over the remainder of the globe assuming that the difference between the two trends is due solely to contrails. This difference is normalized to the corresponding linear contrail coverage for the same regions to obtain an average spreading factor. The maximum contrail-cirrus coverage, estimated as the product of the spreading factor and the linear contrail coverage, is then used in the radiative model to estimate the maximum potential CRF for current air traffic.

  16. Ice Nuclei in Mid-Latitude Cirrus: Preliminary Results from a New Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) Aircraft Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Cziczo, D. J.; Murphy, D. M.; Kulkarni, G.; Lawson, P.

    2011-12-01

    Cirrus cloud properties are strongly governed by the mechanism of ice particle formation and by the number and effectiveness of ambient ice nuclei. Airborne measurements of ice nuclei reveal new nucleation mechanisms, provide constraints on microphysical models, and guide laboratory investigations. For over two decades the Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) inlet has remained the prevailing approach for sampling cloud particles to measure ice nuclei from an aircraft platform. However, traditional CVI inlets have fundamental limitations when operating on high speed aircraft, where only a small fraction of ambient cloud particles are typically sampled. A novel 'folded' CVI was constructed and deployed during the NASA MACPEX 2011 campaign. The flow design of this inlet effectively doubles the CVI length and thereby increases the size range of captured cirrus particles. Additional design elements such as an internal vortex flow, a neon carrier gas, and an infrared laser further improve the capture and evaporation of ice crystals. Preliminary results of ice nuclei composition measured by the PALMS single-particle mass spectrometer are presented from the MACPEX campaign. Examples of ice nuclei from mid-latitude cirrus are shown, including mineral dust, organic-rich aerosol with amine and diacid components, and lead-containing aerosol.

  17. Detection of soil properties with airborne hyperspectral measurements of bare fields.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airborne remote sensing data, using a hyperspectral (HSI) camera, were collected for a flight over two fields with a total of 128 ha. of recently seeded and nearly bare soil. The within-field spatial distribution of several soil properties was found by using multiple linear regression to select the ...

  18. Lidar cirrus cloud retrieval - methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroza, Eliane; Keckhut, Philippe; Nakaema, Walter; Brogniez, Gérard; Dubuisson, Philippe; Pelon, Jacques; Duflot, Valentin; Marquestaut, Nicolas; Payen, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades numerical modeling has experimented sensitive improvements on accuracy and capability for climate predictions. In the same time it has demanded the reduction of uncertainties related with the respective input parameters. In this context, high altitude clouds (cirrus) have attracted special attention for their role as radiative forcing. Also such clouds are associated with the vertical transport of water vapor from the surface to upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (URLS) in form of ice crystals with variability of concentration and morphology. Still cirrus formation can occur spatially and temporally in great part of the globe due to horizontal motion of air masses and circulations. Determining accurately the physical properties of cirrus clouds still represents a challenge. Especially the so-called subvisible cirrus clouds (optical depth inferior to 0.03) are invisible for space-based passive observations. On the other hand, ground based active remote sensing as lidar can be used to suppress such deficiency. Lidar signal can provide spatial and temporal high resolution to characterize physically (height, geometric thickness, mean temperature) and optically (optical depth, extinction-to-scattering ratio or lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) the cirrus clouds. This report describes the evolution of the methodology initially adopted to retrieval systematically the lidar ratio and the subsequent application on case studies and climatology on the tropical sites of the globe - São Paulo, Brazil (23.33 S, 46.44 W) and OPAR observatory at Ille de La Réunion (21.07 S, 55.38 W). Also is attempting a synergy between different instrumentations and lidar measurements: a infrared radiometer to estimate the kind of ice crystals compounding the clouds; CALIPSO satellite observations and trajectory model (HYSPLIT) for tracking air masses potentially responsible for the horizontal displacement of cirrus. This last approach is particularly interesting to

  19. Invisible Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MODIS') cloud detection capability is so sensitive that it can detect clouds that would be indistinguishable to the human eye. This pair of images highlights MODIS' ability to detect what scientists call 'sub-visible cirrus.' The image on top shows the scene using data collected in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum-the part our eyes can see. Clouds are apparent in the center and lower right of the image, while the rest of the image appears to be relatively clear. However, data collected at 1.38um (lower image) show that a thick layer of previously undetected cirrus clouds obscures the entire scene. These kinds of cirrus are called 'sub-visible' because they can't be detected using only visible light. MODIS' 1.38um channel detects electromagnetic radiation in the infrared region of the spectrum. These images were made from data collected on April 4, 2000. Image courtesy Mark Gray, MODIS Atmosphere Team

  20. Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals from eMAS during SEAC4RS using bi-spectral reflectance measurements within the 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, G. Thomas; Holz, Robert E.; Veglio, Paolo; Yorks, John; Wang, Chenxi

    2016-04-01

    Previous bi-spectral imager retrievals of cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) based on the Nakajima and King (1990) approach, such as those of the operational MODIS cloud optical property retrieval product (MOD06), have typically paired a non-absorbing visible or near-infrared wavelength, sensitive to COT, with an absorbing shortwave or mid-wave infrared wavelength sensitive to CER. However, in practice it is only necessary to select two spectral channels that exhibit a strong contrast in cloud particle absorption. Here it is shown, using eMAS observations obtained during NASA's SEAC4RS field campaign, that selecting two absorbing wavelength channels within the broader 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band, namely the 1.83 and 1.93 µm channels that have sufficient differences in ice crystal single scattering albedo, can yield COT and CER retrievals for thin to moderately thick single-layer cirrus that are reasonably consistent with other solar and IR imager-based and lidar-based retrievals. A distinct advantage of this channel selection for cirrus cloud retrievals is that the below-cloud water vapor absorption minimizes the surface contribution to measured cloudy top-of-atmosphere reflectance, in particular compared to the solar window channels used in heritage retrievals such as MOD06. This reduces retrieval uncertainty resulting from errors in the surface reflectance assumption and reduces the frequency of retrieval failures for thin cirrus clouds.

  1. Modulation of Cloud Optical Properties by Vertical Circulations Associated with a Jet Streak Exit Region: The November 26 FIRE Cirrus Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David OC.; Minnis, Patrick; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    The period from 18 UTC 26 November 1991 to roughly 23 UTC 26 November 1991 has become a focal case study of the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) Cirrus-11 field campaign. The middle and upper tropospheric cloud data that were collected have allowed FIRE scientists to learn a great deal about the morphological structure and microphysical and radiative characteristics of the mid-latitude cirrus that occurred during that time. An important component of this effort in determining the synoptic scale forcing that existed during this time. By forcing, we mean the coupling between the background vertical air motions and the large scale moisture budget that initiated and maintained cirrus cloud in the study region. Defining the synoptic scale forcing is one of the stated scientific objectives of the FIRE program.

  2. Cirrus cloud spectra and layers observed during the FIRE and GASP projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr J.; Gultepe, I.; Nastrom, G.; Cotton, William R.; Heymsfield, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    A general characterization is developed for cirrus clouds in terms of their spectra, shapes, optical thicknesses, and radiative properties for use in numerical models. Data sets from the Global Atmospheric Sampling Project (GASP) of the upper troposphere and the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) are combined and analyzed to study general traits of cirrus clouds. A definition is given for 2D turbulence, and the GASP and FIRE data sets are examined with respect to cirrus layers and entrainment and to dominant turbulent scales. The approach employs conditional sampling in cloudy and clear air, power-spectral analysis, and mixing-line-type diagrams. Evidence is given for a well mixed cloud deck and for the tendency of cirrus to be formed in multilayer structures. The results are of use in mesoscale and global circulation models which predict cirrus, in small-scale cirrus modeling, and in studying the role of gravity waves in the horizontal structure of upper tropospheric clouds.

  3. Characterization of residuals from ice particles and droplets sampled in mid-latitude natural and aviation-influenced cirrus and in tropical deep convective cloud systems during ML-CIRRUS and ACRIDICON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertes, Stephan; Kästner, Udo; Schulz, Christiane; Klimach, Thomas; Krüger, Mira; Schneider, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Airborne sampling of cloud particles inside different cirrus cloud types and inside deep convective clouds was conducted during the HALO missions ML-CIRRUS over Europe in March/April 2014 and ACRIDICON over Amazonia in September 2014. ML-CIRRUS aims at the investigation of the for-mation, evolution, microphysical state and radiative effects of different natural and aviation-induced cirrus clouds in the mid-latitudes. The main objectives of ACRIDICON are the microphysical vertical profiling, vertical aerosol transport and the cloud processing of aerosol particles (compari-son in- and outflow) of tropical deep convective cloud systems in clean and polluted air masses and over forested and deforested regions. The hydrometeors (drops and ice particles) are sampled by a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) which has to be installed in the front part of the upper fuselage of the HALO aircraft. Such an intake position implies a size dependent abundance of cloud particles with respect to ambient conditions that was studied by particle trajectory simulations (Katrin Witte, HALO Technical Note 2008-003-A). On the other hand, this sampling location avoids that large ice crystals which could potentially bias the cloud particle sampling by shattering and break-up at the inlet shroud and tip enter the inlet. Both aspects as well as the flight conditions of HALO were taken into account for an optimized CVI design for HALO (HALO-CVI). Interstitial particles are pre-segregated and the condensed phase is evaporated/sublimated by the CVI, such that the residuals from cloud droplets and ice particles (CDR and IPR) can be microphysically and chemically analyzed by respective aerosol sensors located in the cabin. Although an even more comprehensive characterization of CDR and IPR was carried out, we like to report on the following measurements of certain aerosol properties. Particle number concentra-tion and size distribution are measured by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an

  4. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    S, Motty G Satyanarayana, M. Krishnakumar, V. Dhaman, Reji k.

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  5. Ground-Based Lidar and Radar Remote Sensing of Tropical Cirrus Clouds at Nauru Island: Cloud Statistics and Radiative Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Mace, Gerald G.

    2002-12-12

    Ground based active and passive remote sensing instrumentation are combined to derive radiative and macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds. Eight months of cirrus observations at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site located on Nauru Island provide independent retrieval of cloud height and visible optical depth using lidar and radar techniques. Comparisons reveal the millimeter cloud radar does not detect 13% of cirrus clouds with a cloud base higher than 15 km that are detected by the lidar. Lidar and radar cloud heights demonstrate good agreement when the cloud lies below 15 km. Radar and lidar retrievals of visible optical depth also compare well for all but the optically thinnest clouds. Cloud occurrence at Nauru as measured by lidar, reveal clear sky conditions occur on average 40%, low clouds 16%, and high clouds 44% of the time. Analysis of observed cirrus macrophysical and radiative properties suggests that two different types of cirrus exist in the tropical western Pacific: high, thin, laminar cirrus with cloud base higher than 15 km, and lower, physically thicker, more structured cirrus clouds. Differences in cirrus types are likely linked to their formation mechanisms. Radiosonde profiles of temperature and equivalent potential temperature near the tropical tropopause show a clear transition between neutrally stable and stable air at ~15 km, which may also explain the presence of two distinct cirrus types. Radiative heating rate and cloud forcing calculations for specific cirrus cases reveal the impact of tropical cirrus clouds on the earth?s radiation budget.

  6. GCM Simulations of Cirrus Clouds and Cloud Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelGenio, Anthony D.

    1998-01-01

    Cirrus clouds are a particularly uncertain component of general circulation model (GCM simulations of long-term climate change for a variety of reasons: (1) They encompass a wide range of optical thicknesses and altitudes, from thin tropopause cirrus to thick anvil cirrus that descend to the freezing level, and thus can exert both positive and negative forcing and feedback on the climate; (2) The dynamical processes that create them are poorly resolved in climate GCMs and different in the tropics and midlatitudes; (3) Predictions of their formation and microphysical properties depend on the accuracy of dynamical transports of small concentrations of water vapor to and within the upper troposphere; (4) The relative humidity conditions at which they form depends on the nature and concentration of nucleating particles and is poorly understood; (5) They are more difficult to observe than other cloud types, and hence their parameterization is more loosely constrained by available data. We will illustrate the potential sensitivity of the perturbed climate to uncertainties in cirrus cloud formulation. We will also examine the processes that form cirrus in climate models and discuss the accuracy with which climate GCMs represent these processes. We will also discuss ways in which GCM grid-scale parameterizations might be derived from cloud-scale observations. Finally, we will emphasize the types of global observations needed to constrain parameterizations of cirrus in climate GCMs.

  7. The Prospect for Remote Sensing of Cirrus Clouds with a Submillimeter-Wave Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, Aaron H.; Nolt, Ira G.; Marshall, B. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Given the substantial radiative effects of cirrus clouds and the need to validate cirrus cloud mass in climate models, it is important to measure the global distribution of cirrus properties with satellite remote sensing. Existing cirrus remote sensing techniques, such as solar reflectance methods, measure cirrus ice water path (IWP) rather indirectly and with limited accuracy. Submillimeter/wave radiometry is an independent method of cirrus remote sensing based on ice particles scattering the upwelling radiance emitted by the lower atmosphere. A new aircraft instrument, the Far Infrared Sensor for Cirrus (FIRSC), is described. The FIRSC employs a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). which measures the upwelling radiance across the whole submillimeter region (0.1 1.0-mm wavelength). This wide spectral coverage gives high sensitivity to most cirrus particle sizes and allows accurate determination of the characteristic particle size. Radiative transfer modeling is performed to analyze the capabilities of the submillimeter FTS technique. A linear inversion analysis is done to show that cirrus IWP, particle size, and upper-tropospheric temperature and water vapor may be accurately measured, A nonlinear statistical algorithm is developed using a database of 20000 spectra simulated by randomly varying most relevant cirrus and atmospheric parameters. An empirical orthogonal function analysis reduces the 500-point spectrum (20 - 70/cm) to 15 "pseudo-channels" that are then input to a neural network to retrieve cirrus IWP and median particle diameter. A Monte Carlo accuracy study is performed with simulated spectra having realistic noise. The retrieval errors are low for IWP (rms less than a factor of 1.5) and for particle sizes (rins less than 30%) for IWP greater than 5 g/sq m and a wide range of median particle sizes. This detailed modeling indicates that there is good potential to accurately measure cirrus properties with a submillimeter FTS.

  8. Laser transmission through thin cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Liou, K N; Takano, Y; Ou, S C; Johnson, M W

    2000-09-20

    A near-infrared airborne-laser transmission model for thin cirrus clouds has been developed on the basis of the successive-order-of-scattering approach to account for multiple scattering by randomly and horizontally oriented ice crystals associated with an aircraft-target system. Direct transmission and transmission due to multiple scattering are formulated specifically for this geometric system, in which scattering and absorption associated with aerosols, water vapor, and air are accounted for. A number of sensitivity experiments have been performed for investigation of the effect of aircraft-target position, cirrus cloud optical depth, and ice crystal size on laser transmission for tactical applications. We show that transmission contributions produced by orders of scattering higher than 1 are small and can be neglected. The possibility of horizontal orientation of ice crystals can enhance transmission of laser beams in the aircraft-target geometry. Transmitted energy is strongly dependent on the horizontal distance between the aircraft and the target and on the cloud optical depth as well as on whether the cloud is above or below the aircraft.

  9. Laser transmission through thin cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Liou, K N; Takano, Y; Ou, S C; Johnson, M W

    2000-09-20

    A near-infrared airborne-laser transmission model for thin cirrus clouds has been developed on the basis of the successive-order-of-scattering approach to account for multiple scattering by randomly and horizontally oriented ice crystals associated with an aircraft-target system. Direct transmission and transmission due to multiple scattering are formulated specifically for this geometric system, in which scattering and absorption associated with aerosols, water vapor, and air are accounted for. A number of sensitivity experiments have been performed for investigation of the effect of aircraft-target position, cirrus cloud optical depth, and ice crystal size on laser transmission for tactical applications. We show that transmission contributions produced by orders of scattering higher than 1 are small and can be neglected. The possibility of horizontal orientation of ice crystals can enhance transmission of laser beams in the aircraft-target geometry. Transmitted energy is strongly dependent on the horizontal distance between the aircraft and the target and on the cloud optical depth as well as on whether the cloud is above or below the aircraft. PMID:18350081

  10. Measurements of Ocean Surface Scattering Using an Airborne 94-GHz Cloud Radar: Implication for Calibration of Airborne and Spaceborne W-band Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li-Hua; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Racette, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering properties of the Ocean surface have been widely used as a calibration reference for airborne and spaceborne microwave sensors. However, at millimeter-wave frequencies, the ocean surface backscattering mechanism is still not well understood, in part, due to the lack of experimental measurements. During the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE), measurements of ocean surface backscattering were made using a 94-GHz (W-band) cloud radar onboard a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The measurement set includes the normalized Ocean surface cross section over a range of the incidence angles under a variety of wind conditions. Analysis of the radar measurements shows good agreement with a quasi-specular scattering model. This unprecedented dataset enhances our knowledge about the Ocean surface scattering mechanism at 94 GHz. The results of this work support the proposition of using the Ocean surface as a calibration reference for airborne millimeter-wave cloud radars and for the ongoing NASA CloudSat mission, which will use a 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar for global cloud measurements.

  11. Lidar measurement of winter time cirrus clouds at a tropical coastal station in Trivandrum, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, Malladi; Veerabuthiran, Sangaipillai; Sreeja, Rajappan; Presennakumar, Bhargavan; Muraleedharen Nair, Sivarama Pillai; Ramakrishna Rao, Duggirala; Pillai Mohankumar, Santhibhavan Vasudevan

    2006-12-01

    The cirrus clouds which are global in nature have been identified as one of the important constituents if the atmosphere. They play a dual role in the earth radiation budget increasing the Earth's albedo while simultaneously decreasing the emission of Infrared radiation to space. Tropical cirrus clouds come in a variety of forms ranging from optically thick anvil cirrus closely associated with deep convection to optically thin cirrus layers frequently observed near the tropopause. For better understanding of the formation, subsistence and dissipation of cirrus clouds extended studies are necessary. From earlier investigations it is realized that the climatology of cirrus clouds is distinctly different at the low latitude coastal station at the west coast of India. Some of the important characteristics of the cirrus clouds like time history of formation and dissipation, geometrical and optical properties during the winter time have been investigated using the ground based Mutiwavelength Lidar system designed and developed in house at the Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Trivandrum, India. The lidar provides a vertical resolution of 3.75m by making use of the modified receiver electronics of the MWL system. The high resolution measurements have facilitated the study of the fine internal structure, optical depth extinction coefficient and other parameters of importance of cirrus clouds. The present paper describes lidar system and the results obtained over a period of one year covering all the seasons and the peculiar characteristics of the cirrus during winter time at this coastal station.

  12. "Plane tracks" in cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesche, M.; Achtert, P.; Glantz, P.; Noone, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the effects of aircraft emissions on cirrus clouds already present in the atmosphere has proven to be challenging. Quantifying any such effects is necessary if we are to properly account for the influence of aviation on climate. Here we quantify the effect of aircraft on the optical thickness of already-existing cirrus clouds by matching actual aircraft flight tracks to satellite lidar measurements. We show that there are systematic, statistically significant increases in normalized cirrus cloud optical thickness inside mid-latitude flight corridors compared with adjacent areas immediately outside the corridors.

  13. Airborne measurements of cloud condensation nuclei using a new continuous-flow streamwise thermal-gradient CCN chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Nenes, A.; Vanreken, T.; Rissman, T.; Conant, W. C.; Varutbangkul, V.; Jonsson, H. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Ramanathan, V.

    2003-04-01

    A light-weight continuous-flow thermal gradient diffusion chamber was developed for autonomous operation in airborne studies employing a novel technique of generating a supersaturation along the streamwise axis of the instrument. A vertical cylindrical column, whose surfaces are wetted and exposed to an increasing temperature gradient along the vertical axis, constitutes the chamber volume. This design exploits the differences in diffusion between water vapor and heat to maintain a uniform supersaturation along the streamwise axis of the chamber, which maximizes the growth rate of activated droplets; thereby enhancing the performance of the instrument. The current CCN instrument provides measurements of CCN between 0.13% and 3% supersaturation at a sampling rate sufficient for airborne operation. We have successfully tested the instrument on airborne experiments during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) in July 2002. The results from the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign have yielded a remarkably good aerosol/CCN closure at 0.2 and 0.8% supersaturation. CCN concentrations were measured with a sampling resolution of 1Hz at a fixed supersaturation and compared to dry aerosol size distributions on one-minute intervals. An aerosol-cloud microphysical closure was also performed using the observed updraft velocity and below-cloud aerosol properties in a detailed adiabatic cloud activation model. The model accurately predicts the cloud drop concentration 100 m above cloud base in warm tropical cumulus.

  14. Formation of low-temperature cirrus from H2SO4/H2O aerosol droplets.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, A; Molina, M J; Sassen, K; Kulmala, M

    2006-11-23

    We present experimental results obtained with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) that indicate the small ice particles in low-temperature cirrus clouds are not completely solid but rather coated with an unfrozen H2SO4/H2O overlayer. Our results provide a new look on the formation, development, and microphysical properties of low-temperature cirrus clouds.

  15. Simulation of the optical properties of plate aggregates for application to the remote sensing of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W; Baum, Bryan A; Hu, Yongxiang

    2011-03-10

    In regions of deep tropical convection, ice particles often undergo aggregation and form complex chains. To investigate the effect of the representation of aggregates on electromagnetic scattering calculations, we developed an algorithm to efficiently specify the geometries of aggregates and to compute some of their geometric parameters, such as the projected area. Based on in situ observations, ice aggregates are defined as clusters of hexagonal plates with a chainlike overall shape, which may have smooth or roughened surfaces. An aggregate representation is developed with 10 ensemble members, each consisting of between 4-12 hexagonal plates. The scattering properties of an individual aggregate ice particle are computed using either the discrete dipole approximation or an improved geometric optics method, depending upon the size parameters. Subsequently, the aggregate properties are averaged over all geometries. The scattering properties of the aggregate representation closely agree with those computed from 1000 different aggregate geometries. As a result, the aggregate representation provides an accurate and computationally efficient way to represent all aggregates occurring within ice clouds. Furthermore, the aggregate representation can be used to study the influence of these complex ice particles on the satellite-based remote sensing of ice clouds. The computed cloud reflectances for aggregates are different from those associated with randomly oriented individual hexagonal plates. When aggregates are neglected, simulated cloud reflectances are generally lower at visible and shortwave-infrared wavelengths, resulting in smaller effective particle sizes but larger optical thicknesses.

  16. Cirrus clouds in convective outflow during the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierli, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Cairo, F.; Zampieri, M.; Orlandi, E.

    2007-05-01

    Light-weight microlidar measurements were taken on-board a stratospheric balloon during the HIBISCUS 2004 campaign, held in Bauru, Brazil (22 S, 49 W). Tropical cirrus observations showed high mesoscale variability in optical and microphysical properties. The cirrus clouds were observed throughout the flight between 12 and 15 km height. It was found that the clouds were composed of different layers, characterized by a marked variability in height, thickness and optical properties. Trajectory analysis and mesoscale transport simulations clearly revealed that the clouds had formed in the outflow of a large and persistent convective region, while the observed optical properties and cloud structure variability could be linked to different residence times of convective-processed air in the upper troposphere. Mesoscale simulations were able to reproduce the supersaturation due to recent outflow, while it was necessary to consider the presence of other formation processes than convective hydration for cirrus forming in aged detrained anvils.

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ting; Cotton, William R.

    1999-01-01

    of large ice crystals, and consequently, both radiative and dynamic properties of the cirrus cloud are significantly affected. A complete description of this research has been submitted as a paper to the Journal of Atmospheric Science (Wu et al., 1999), and included as Appendix 3.

  18. Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Kucera, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of North Dakota (UND) under NASA Grant NAG5-11509, titled Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE. This work focused on the collection of data by two key platforms: the UND Citation II research aircraft and the NASA NPOL radar system. The CRYSTAL-FACE (C-F) mission addresses several key issues from the NASA Earth System Enterprise, including the variability of water in the atmosphere, the forcing provided by tropical cirrus and the response of the Earth system to this forcing. In situ measurements and radar observations of tropical convection, cirrus clouds and their environment are core elements of C-F. One of the primary issues that C-F is addressing is the relationship of tropical cirrus anvils to precipitating deep convection. The in situ measurements from C-F are being used to validate remote sensing of Earth-Atmosphere properties, increase our knowledge of upper tropospheric water vapor and its distribution, and increase our knowledge of tropical cirrus cloud morphology and composition. Radar measurements, especially polarimetric diversity observations available fiom the NASA NPOL radar, are providing essential information about the initiation, modulation, and dissipation of convective cores and the generation of associated anvils in tropical convection. Specifically, NPOL radar measurements contain information about convective intensity and its vertical structure for comparison with thermodynamic and kinematic environmental measurements observed from soundings. Because of the polarimetric diversity of MOL, statistics on bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved and compared to the other characteristics of convection and associated cirrus anvils. In summary, the central objectives of this proposal were to deploy the UND Citation research aircraft as an in situ sensing platform for this mission and to provide collaborative

  19. Analysis of Aircraft, Radiosonde and Radar Observations in Cirrus Clouds Observed During FIRE II: The Interactions Between Environmental Structure, Turbulence and Cloud Microphysical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samantha A.; DelGenio, Anthony D.

    1999-01-01

    Ways to determine the turbulence intensity and the horizontal variability in cirrus clouds have been investigated using FIRE-II aircraft, radiosonde and radar data. Higher turbulence intensities were found within some, but not all, of the neutrally stratified layers. It was also demonstrated that the stability of cirrus layers with high extinction values decrease in time, possibly as a result of radiative destabilization. However, these features could not be directly related to each other in any simple manner. A simple linear relationship was observed between the amount of horizontal variability in the ice water content and its average value. This was also true for the extinction and ice crystal number concentrations. A relationship was also suggested between the variability in cloud depth and the environmental stability across the depth of the cloud layer, which requires further investigation.

  20. Ubiquitous influence of waves on tropical high cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Alexander, M. Joan; Bui, T. Paul; Dean-Day, Jonathan M.; Lawson, R. Paul; Woods, Sarah; Hlavka, Dennis; Pfister, Leonhard; Jensen, Eric J.

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and water vapor transported into the stratosphere have significant impacts on the global radiation budget and circulation patterns. Climate models, however, have large uncertainties in representing dehydration and cloud processes in the TTL, and thus their feedback on surface climate, prohibiting an accurate projection of future global and regional climate changes. Here we use unprecedented airborne measurements over the Pacific to reveal atmospheric waves as a strong modulator of ice clouds in the TTL. Wave-induced cold and/or cooling conditions are shown to exert a nearly ubiquitous influence on cirrus cloud occurrence at altitudes of 14-18 km, except when air was very recently influenced by convective hydration. We further observe that various vertical scales of cloud layers are associated with various vertical scales of waves, suggesting the importance of representing TTL waves in models.

  1. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO II jet stream cirrus case study: Possible influences of volcanic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.; Starr, D.O.C.; Melfi, S.H.; Spinhirne, J.D.; Poellot, M.R.; Eberhard, W.L.; Eloranta, E.W.; Hagen, D.E.; Hallett, J.

    1995-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5-6 December 1992 Project FIRE IFO II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols from the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions may have significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur-based particles that became effective cloud-forming nuclei in cirrus clouds. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded within the upper-level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol-enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to {approximately}600 L{sup {minus}1}), complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between {minus}40{degrees} and {minus}50{degrees}C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects and usual (nonvolcanic aerosol) jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed. 42 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO 2 Jet Stream Cirrus Case Study: Possible Influences of Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Starr, David OC.; Mace, Gerald G.; Poellot, Michael R.; Melfi, S. H.; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hagen, Donald E.; Hallett, John

    1996-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5-6 December 1992 First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) intensive field observation (IFO) case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols from the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions may have significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur based particles that became effective cloud forming nuclei in cirrus clouds. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded with the upper level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to approximately 600 L(exp. 1)), complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between -40 and -50 degrees C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects and unusual (nonvolcanic) aerosol jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  3. Evaluating The Indirect Effect of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbie, S.; Jonas, P. R.

    What effect would an increase in nucleating aerosols have on the radiative and cloud properties? What error would be incurred by evaluating the indirect effect by taking an evolved cloud and fixing the integrated water content and vary the number of ice crystals? These questions will be addressed in this work. We will use the UK LES cloud resolving model to perform a sensitivity study for cirrus clouds to the indirect effect, and will evaluate approximate methods in the process. In this work, we will initialize the base (no increase of aerosol) cirrus clouds so that the double moment scheme is constrained to agree with observations through the ef- fective radius. Effective radius is calculated using the local concentration and the ice water content. We then perform a sensitivity experiment to investigate the dependence of the average IWC, effective size, and radiative properties (including heating rates) to variations in the nucleation rate. Conclusions will be draw as to the possible ef- fect of changes in aerosol amounts on cirrus. We will determine how sensitive the cloud and radiative properties are to various aerosol increases. We will also discuss the applicability of the Meyer et al. (1992) nucleation formulae for our simulations. It is important to stress that in this work we only change the nucleation rate for the newly forming cloud. By doing this, we are not fixing the total water content and redistributing the water amongst increased ice crystals. We increase the number of aerosols available to be nucleated and allow the model to evolve the size distributions. In this way, there is competition for the water vapour, the ice particles are evolved dynamically with different fall speeds, the conversion rates to other hydrometers (such as aggregates) are affected, and the heating rates are different due to the different size distributions that evolve. We will look at how the water content, the distribution of water, and the radiative properties are affected

  4. Surface scattering properties estimated from modeling airborne multiple emission angle reflectance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, Edward A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Irons, J. R.; Harding, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Here, researchers apply the Hapke function to airborne bidirectional reflectance data collected over three terrestrial surfaces. The objectives of the study were to test the range of natural surfaces that the Hapke model fits and to evaluate model parameters in terms of known surface properties. The data used are multispectral and multiple emission angle data collected during the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over a mud-cracked playa, an artificially roughened playa, and a basalt cobble strewn playa at Lunar Lake Playa in Nevada. Airborne remote sensing data and associated field measurements were acquired at the same time. The airborne data were acquired by the Advanced Solid State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) instrument, a 29-spectral band imaging system. ASAS reflectance data for a cobble-strewn surface and an artificially rough playa surface on Lunar Lake Playa can be explained with the Hanke model. The cobble and rough playa sites are distinguishable by a single scattering albedo, which is controlled by material composition; by the roughness parameter, which appears to be controlled by the surface texture and particle size; and the symmetry factor of the single particle phase function, which is controlled by particle size and shape. A smooth playa surface consisting of compacted, fine-grained particles has reflectance variations that are also distinct from either the cobble site or rough playa site. The smooth playa appears to behave more like a Lambertian surface that cannot be modeled with the Hapke function.

  5. Lidar studies on climate sensitivity characteristics of tropical cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motty, G. S.; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget due to their high frequency of occurrence, non-spherical ice crystal formations, and variability in the scattering/absorption characteristics. Mostly, the tropical cirrus clouds are considered as greenhouse modulators. Thus the parameterization of tropical cirrus clouds in terms of the micro- physical properties and the corresponding radiative effects are highly important for the climate studies. For characterizing the radiative properties of cirrus clouds, which depend on the size, shape and number of the ice crystals, the knowledge of extinction coefficient (σ) and optical depth (τ) are necessary. The σ provides information needed for understanding the influence of the scatterers on the radiative budget whereas the τ gives an indication on the composition and thickness of the cloud. Extensive research on the tropical cirrus clouds has been carried out by using a ground based and satellite based lidar systems. In this work, the characteristics of tropical cirrus cloud derived by using the data from the ground based lidar system over the tropical site Gadanki [13.5°N, 79.2°E], India during 2010 are presented. Some of the results are compared with those obtained by us from satellite based CALIOP lidar observations of the CALIPSO mission. It is observed that there is a strong dependence of the some of the physical properties such as occurrence height, cloud temperature and the geometrical thickness on the microphysical parameters in terms of extinction coefficient and optical depth. The correlation of both the σ and τ with temperature is also observed.

  6. A four-lidar view of Cirrus from the FIRE IFO: 27-28 October 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Grund, Christian John; Alvarez, Jose M.; Hall, Freeman F.

    1990-01-01

    The four ground-based lidar systems that participated in the 1986 FIRE IFO were configured in a diamond-shaped array across central and southern Wisconsin. Data were generally collected in the zenith pointing mode, except for the Doppler lidar, which regularly operated in a scanning mode with intermittent zenith observations. As a component of the cirrus case study of 27 and 28 October 1986 selected for initial analysis, data collected by the remote sensor ensemble from 1600 (on the 27th) to 2400 UTC (on the 28th) is described and compared. In general, the cirrus studied on the 27th consisted of intermittent layers of thin and subvisual cirrus clouds. Particularly at Wausau, subvisual cirrus was detected from 11.0 to 11.5 km MSL, just below the tropopause. At lower levels, occasional cirrus clouds between approx. 8.0 to 9.5 km were detected from all ground sites. Preliminary analysis of the four-lidar dataset reveals the passage of surprisingly consistent cloud features across the experiment area. A variety of types and amounts of middle and high level clouds occurred, ranging from subvisual cirrus to deep cloud bands. It is expected that the ground-based lidar measurements from this case study, as well as the airborne observations, will provide an excellent data base for comparison to satellite observations.

  7. Chemistry and microphysics of polar stratospheric clouds and cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Zondlo, M A; Hudson, P K; Prenni, A J; Tolbert, M A

    2000-01-01

    Ice particles found within polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and upper tropospheric cirrus clouds can dramatically impact the chemistry and climate of the Earth's atmosphere. The formation of PSCs and the subsequent chemical reactions that occur on their surfaces are key components of the massive ozone hole observed each spring over Antarctica. Cirrus clouds also provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions and significantly modify the Earth's climate by changing the visible and infrared radiation fluxes. Although the role of ice particles in climate and chemistry is well recognized, the exact mechanisms of cloud formation are still unknown, and thus it is difficult to predict how anthropogenic activities will change cloud abundances in the future. This article focuses on the nucleation, chemistry, and microphysical properties of ice particles composing PSCs and cirrus clouds. A general overview of the current state of research is presented along with some unresolved issues facing scientists in the future.

  8. Far infrared measurements of cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolt, Ira G.; Vanek, Michael D.; Tappan, N. D.; Minnis, Patrick; Alltop, J. L.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Lee, C.; Hamilton, Peter A.; Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, A. H.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Baran, Anthony J.

    1999-12-01

    Improved techniques for remote sensing of cirrus are needed to obtain global data for assessing the effect of cirrus in climate change models. Model calculations show that the far infrared/sub-millimeter spectral region is well suited for retrieving cirrus Ice Water Path and particle size parameters. Especially useful cirrus information is obtained at frequencies below 60 cm-1 where single particle scattering dominates over thermal emission for ice particles larger than about 50 micrometer. Earth radiance spectra have been obtained for a range of cloud conditions using an aircraft-based Fourier transform spectrometer. The Far InfraRed Sensor for Cirrus (FIRSC) is a Martin-Puplett interferometer which incorporates a polarizer for the beamsplitter and can be operated in either intensity or linear polarization measurement mode. Two detector channels span 10 to 140 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm-1; achieving a Noise Equivalent Temperature of approximately 1K at 30 cm-1 in a 4 sec scan. Examples are shown of measured and modeled Earth radiance for a range of cloud conditions from 1998 and 1999 flights.

  9. Far Infrared Measurements of Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolt, I. G.; Vanek, M. D.; Tappan, N. D.; Minnis, P.; Alltop, J. L.; Ade, A. R.; Lee, C.; Hamilton, P. A.; Evans, K. F.; Evans, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    Improved techniques for remote sensing of cirrus are needed to obtain global data for assessing the effect of cirrus in climate change models. Model calculations show that the far infrared/sub-millimeter spectral region is well suited for retrieving cirrus Ice Water Path and particle size parameters. Especially useful cirrus information is obtained at frequencies below 60 cm-1 where single particle scattering dominates over thermal emission for ice particles larger than about 50 m. Earth radiance spectra have been obtained for a range of cloud conditions using an aircraft-based Fourier transform spectrometer. The Far InfraRed Sensor for Cirrus (FIRSC) is a Martin-Puplett interferometer which incorporates a polarizer for the beamsplitter and can be operated in either intensity or linear polarization measurement mode. Two detector channels span 10 to 140 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm-1; achieving a Noise Equivalent Temperature of approximately 1K at 30 cm-1 in a 4 sec scan. Examples are shown of measured and modeled Earth radiance for a range of cloud conditions from 1998 and 1999 flights.

  10. Comparison of Cirrus height and optical depth derived from satellite and aircraft measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, M.; Kriebel, K.T.; Meerkoetter, R.; Renger, W.; Ruppersberg, G.H.; Wendling, P. )

    1993-10-01

    During the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE'89) simultaneous measurements of cirrus cloud-top height and optical depth by satellite and aircraft have been taken. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the NOAA polar-orbiting meteorological satellite system have been used together with the algorithm package AVHRR processing scheme over clouds, land and ocean (APOLLO) to derive optical depth. NOAA High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) data have been used together with a bispectral technique to derive cloud-top height. Also, the optical depth of some contrails could be estimated. Airborne measurements have been performed simultaneously by using the Airborne Lidar Experiment (ALEX), a backscatter lidar. Comparison of satellite data with airborne data showed agreement of the top heights to about 500 m and of the optical depths to about 30%. These uncertainties are within the limits obtained from error estimates. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Atmospheric Corerection of Aviris Data of Monterey Bay Contaminated by Thin Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Bosch, Jeannette; Davis, Curtiss O.; Mobley, Curtis D.; Rhea, W. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Aviris scenes are often rejected when cloud cover exceeds 10 percent. However, if the cloud cover is determined to be primarily cirrus rather than cumulus, inwater optical properties may still be extracted over open ocean.

  12. Dust aerosol optical properties using ground-based and airborne lidar in the framework of FENNEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnas, Fabien; Chazette, Patrick; Flamant, Cyrille; Royer, Philippe; Boytard, Mai-Lan; Genau, Pascal; Doira, Pascal; Bruneau, Didier; Pelon, Jacques; Sanak, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    The FENNEC program aims to improve our knowledge of both the role of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) on the West African monsoon and the interactions between the African continent and the Mediterranean basin through the Saharan dust transport. The Saharan desert is the major source of mineral dust in the world and may significantly impact the air quality over the Western Europe by increasing the particular matter content. Two lidar systems were operated by the French component of the FENNEC project: an airborne lidar which was flown aboard the French Falcon 20 research aircraft and a ground-based lidar which was located in the southeastern part of Spain, close to Marbella. The presence of dust in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer has been easily highlighted using the lidars and confirmed by ground-based sunphotometer and observations from both MODIS and SEVIRI spaceborne instruments. The simultaneous use of the sunphotometer-derived Angstrom exponent and the lidar-derived backscatter to extinction ratio is appeared to be a good approach to separate the optical contribution of dust from local aerosols for the coastal site. Over Spain, the dust layer was mainly located above the planetary boundary layer with several kilometers thick. Over the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Mauritania the airborne lidar shows a high planetary boundary layer (~5 km above the mean sea level) associated to strong aerosol optical thickness (> 0.8 at 532 nm). The airborne lidar data have been inverted using both MODIS and SEVIRI-derived aerosol optical thickness. The differences between dust optical properties close to and remote from the sources will be discussed.

  13. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnaiter, Martin; Järvinen, Emma; Vochezer, Paul; Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Wagner, Robert; Jourdan, Olivier; Mioche, Guillaume; Shcherbakov, Valery N.; Schmitt, Carl G.; Tricoli, Ugo; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    This study reports on the origin of small-scale ice crystal complexity and its influence on the angular light scattering properties of cirrus clouds. Cloud simulation experiments were conducted at the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the -40 to -60 °C range. The experiments were performed for ice clouds generated via homogeneous and heterogeneous initial nucleation. Small-scale ice crystal complexity was deduced from measurements of spatially resolved single particle light scattering patterns by the latest version of the Small Ice Detector (SID-3). It was found that a high crystal complexity dominates the microphysics of the simulated clouds and the degree of this complexity is dependent on the available water vapor during the crystal growth. Indications were found that the small-scale crystal complexity is influenced by unfrozen H2SO4 / H2O residuals in the case of homogeneous initial ice nucleation. Angular light scattering functions of the simulated ice clouds were measured by the two currently available airborne polar nephelometers: the polar nephelometer (PN) probe of Laboratoire de Métérologie et Physique (LaMP) and the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS-HALO) probe of KIT. The measured scattering functions are featureless and flat in the side and backward scattering directions. It was found that these functions have a rather low sensitivity to the small-scale crystal complexity for ice clouds that were grown under typical atmospheric conditions. These results have implications for the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and for the radiative transfer through these clouds.

  14. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnaiter, M.; Järvinen, E.; Vochezer, P.; Abdelmonem, A.; Wagner, R.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Shcherbakov, V. N.; Schmitt, C. G.; Tricoli, U.; Ulanowski, Z.; Heymsfield, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    This study reports on the origin of ice crystal complexity and its influence on the angular light scattering properties of cirrus clouds. Cloud simulation experiments were conducted at the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the -40 to -60 °C range. The experiments were performed for ice clouds generated via homogeneous and heterogeneous initial nucleation. Ice crystal complexity was deduced from measurements of spatially resolved single particle light scattering patterns by the latest version of the Small Ice Detector (SID-3). It was found that a high ice crystal complexity is dominating the microphysics of the simulated clouds and the degree of this complexity is dependent on the available water vapour during the crystal growth. Indications were found that the crystal complexity is influenced by unfrozen H2SO4/H2O residuals in the case of homogeneous initial ice nucleation. Angular light scattering functions of the simulated ice clouds were measured by the two currently available airborne polar nephelometers; the Polar Nephelometer (PN) probe of LaMP and the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS-HALO) probe of KIT. The measured scattering functions are featureless and flat in the side- and backward scattering directions resulting in low asymmetry parameters g around 0.78. It was found that these functions have a rather low sensitivity to the crystal complexity for ice clouds that were grown under typical atmospheric conditions. These results have implications for the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and for the radiative transfer through these clouds.

  15. Development of a Detailed Microphysics Cirrus Model Tracking Aerosol Particles’ Histories for Interpretation of the Recent INCA Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, Marie; Wobrock, Wolfram; Gayet, Jean-François; Flossmann, Andrea

    2006-02-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in the earth’s energy balance. To quantify their impact, information is needed on their microstructure and more precisely on the number and size of the ice crystals. With the anthropogenic activity, more and more aerosol particles and water vapor are released even at the altitude where cirrus clouds are formed. Cirrus clouds formed in a polluted air mass may have different microphysical properties and, therefore, a different impact on the climate system via the changed radiative properties compared to background cirrus clouds. To study this aspect, the European project called the Interhemispheric Differences in Cirrus Properties due to Anthropogenic Emissions (INCA) measured the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds together with the physical and chemicals properties of aerosol particles in clean air (at Punta Arenas, Chile) and polluted air (at Prestwick, Scotland). The goal of the present work was to develop a detailed microphysics model for cirrus clouds for the interpretation and the generalization of the INCA observations. This model considers moist aerosol particles through the Externally Mixed (EXMIX) model, so that the chemical composition of solution droplets can be followed. Ice crystal formation is described through homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. The crystals then grow by deposition. With this model, the interactions between the microphysical processes, simulated ice crystal concentrations, and dimensional distributions of the INCA observations were studied, and explanations were provided for the observed differences between background and polluted cirrus clouds.


  16. A survey of natural aggregate properties and characteristics important in remote sensing and airborne geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H.; Langer, W.H.; Miller, S.

    1995-01-01

    Natural aggregate is vital to the construction industry. Although natural aggregate is a high volume/low value commodity that is abundant, new sources are becoming increasingly difficult to find and develop because of rigid industry specifications, political considerations, development and transportation costs, and environmental concerns. There are two primary sources of natural aggregate: (1) exposed or near-surface bedrock that can be crushed, and (2) deposits of sand and gravel. Remote sensing and airborne geophysics detect surface and near-surface phenomena, and may be useful for detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources; however, before a methodology for applying these techniques can be developed, it is necessary to understand the type, distribution, physical properties, and characteristics of natural aggregate deposits. The distribution of potential aggregate sources is closely tied to local geologic history. Conventional exploration for natural aggregate deposits has been largely a ground-based operation, although aerial photographs and topographic maps have been extensively used to target possible deposits. Today, the exploration process also considers factors such as the availability of the land, space and water supply for processing, political and environmental factors, and distance from the market; exploration and planning cannot be separated. There are many physical properties and characteristics by which to judge aggregate material for specific applications; most of these properties and characteristics pertain only to individual aggregate particles. The application of remote sensing and airborne geophysical measurements to detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources, however, is based on intrinsic bulk physical properties and extrinsic characteristics of the deposits that can be directly measured, mathematically derived from measurement, or interpreted with remote sensing and geophysical data. ?? 1995 Oxford UniversityPress.

  17. Retrieval of Topsoil Properties of Vegetation-Covered Terrain Using Airborne Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanfa; Buchroithner, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Soil spectroscopy is a promising technique for topsoil analysis, and has been successfully utilized in the laboratory. When it is applied from airborne platforms, the presence of vegetation significantly affects imaging spectroscopy or hyperspectral imaging when retrieving topsoil properties. A Forced Invariance Approach has been proved to be able to effectively suppress the vegetation signal in mixed pixels. However, the approach is still mainly limited to lithological mapping. In this paper, we attempted to apply it to the retrieval of topsoil properties (soil moisture and soil salinity at depths 4 cm and 10 cm) using airborne hyperspectral data. The corresponding ground truth data was obtained from an eco-hydrological wireless sensing network in the Zhangye Oasis in the middle stream of the Heihe River Basin, China. The General Linear Model with Logit Link Function was adopted to model the relationships between measured soil properties and the spectra. The vegetation suppression result demonstrates that the spectral response curves of hyperspectral image pixels are flattened and the shapes are rather similar to the soil endmenber spectrum. From the modelling results it can be seen that the Forced Invariance Approach is more effective for soil moisture than for soil salinity at depth 10 cm, as the salt content is comparatively lower than the water content in soil, and the corresponding spectral response is weaker. This approach did not work for soil at a depth of 4 cm. The reason for this is that surface soil is significantly influenced by exterior factors like irrigation and wind, and landscape fragmentation and cultivation activities also contribute to the high spatial heterogeneity of the surface soil properties.

  18. Impact of geoengineering on cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, Ana; Spichtinger, Peter; Weisenstein, Debra; Lohmann, Ulrike; Wernli, Heini; Peter, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    background aerosol mass and number concentrations in response to geoengineering measures. In order to obtain qualitative and quantitative estimations of troposphere-stratosphere air mixing (intrusions, tropopause folds etc.) trajectory studies are done using ECMWF data. The results of this conceptual study suggest that an enhancement of sulphuric acid in the tropopause and upper troposphere region may impact the ice crystal number concentrations in cirrus clouds formed via homogeneous nucleation. The global impact can not be estimated, but on the local level, this could lead to change of cloud lifetime and thickness. It would further influence the albedo and radiative properties of cirrus clouds, i.e. modifying the net warming impact of cirrus clouds. Budyko, M.I. (1977), Global Ecology. Mysl, Moscow, 327 pp. (in Russian). Crutzen, P.J. (2006), Albedo enhancement by stratospheric sulfur injections: A contribution to resolve a policy dilemma?, Climate Change, 77(3-4), 211-219. Nordhaus, W.D. (2007), A Question of Balance: Economic Modeling of Global Warming, Yale University Press, 2007. Polborn, S. and Tintelnot, F. (2009), How Geoengineering May Encourage Carbon Dioxide Abatement (June 2, 2009). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1413106 Spichtinger, P. and Gierens, K. (2009), Modelling of cirrus clouds - Part 1a: Model description and validation, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 685-706. Spichtinger, P. and Cziczo, D. (2009), Impact of heterogeneous ice nuclei on homogeneous freezing events, J. Geophys. Res., in revision. Weisenstein, D.K., Penner, J.E., Herzog, M., and Liu, X., (2007), Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7(9), 2339-2355.

  19. Cloud shortwave radiative effect and cloud properties estimated from airborne measurements of transmitted and reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Samuel E.; Redemann, Jens; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Kacenelenbogen, Meloë; Shinozuka, Yohei; Flynn, Connor; Russell, Philip; Schmid, Beat; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Pilewskie, Peter; Song, Shi

    2015-04-01

    from aircraft by using the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument. The 4STAR instrument was deployed on an airborne platform during SEAC4RS and TCAP. During SEAC4RS, the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) was also deployed alongside 4STAR. The cloud optical thickness and effective radius from the retrieval based on transmitted shortwave radiation are compared to cloud properties obtained from above the cloud by using reflected shortwave radiation measured with SSFR, with the enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS), with the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), and from in situ cloud probes. For TCAP, we compare cloud properties retrieved using 4STAR and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS).

  20. Preliminary analysis of University of North Dakota aircraft data from the FIRE Cirrus IFO-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    The stated goals of the First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment (FIRE) are 'to promote the development of improved cloud and radiation parameterization for use in climate models, and to provide for assessment and improvement of ISCCP projects'. FIRE Phase 2 has focused on the formation, maintenance and dissipation of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems. These objectives have been approached through a combination of modeling, extended-time observations and intensive field observation (IFO) periods. The work under this grant was associated with the FIRE Cirrus IFO 2. This field measurement program was conducted to obtain observations of cirrus cloud systems on a range of scales from the synoptic to the microscale, utilizing simultaneous measurements from a variety of ground-based, satellite and airborne platforms. By combining these remote and in situ measurements a more complete picture of cirrus systems can be obtained. The role of the University of North Dakota in Phase 2 was three-fold: to collect in situ microphysical data during the Cirrus IFO 2; to process and archive these data; and to collaborate in analyses of IFO data. This report will summarize the activities and findings of the work performed under this grant; detailed description of the data sets available and of the analyses are contained in the Semi-annual Status Reports submitted to NASA.

  1. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Zelinka, M. D.; Yang, P.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-28

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate, but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (optical depth <3.6, cloud top pressure <440 hPa) increase in response to inter-annual surface warming. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on short-term climate fluctuations, by reducing the planet’s ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20±0.21W/m2/°C, which is comparable to the surface albedo feedback. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  2. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Zelinka, M. D.; Yang, P.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (cloud optical depth < 3.6, cloud top pressure < 440 hPa) increase in response to interannual surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of the interannual cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20 ± 0.21 W/m2/°C, which represents an important component of the cloud feedback. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on interannual climate fluctuations, by reducing the Earth's ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  3. Influence of cirrus clouds on the VISSR atmospheric sounder-derived sea surface temperature determinations.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Sun, B

    1991-04-20

    Using a more realistic cirrus cloud model, the characteristics of transmittance, emittance, and optical thickness and their relationships to cirrus in a diverse set of cases are studied by solving the equation of transfer of IR radiation. The doubling method is employed in the multiple scattering calculation. The satellite-observed brightness temperatures for different cases are computed, and stepwise regression analyses are performed to yield retrieval equations for sea surface temperature (SST). It is shown that the radiative properties of cirrus depend strongly on particle concentration, thus on the optical thickness of clouds. For clear atmospheres, channel 8 (11.2 microm) is more transparent than other channels. For cirrus clouds only, when the optical thickness of cirrus tau(c) is <0.10, channel 8 is still more transparent, while, with tau(c) increasing from 0.2 to between 4 and 8, channel 12 (4 microm) becomes the most transparent. When tau(c) >/= 8, the transparency of channel 12 decreases and those of other channels increase. For a very large r, the transparency of VAS channels will become almost equal. In addition, the IR absorption emittance of cirrus and the brightness temperatures also have sensitivities to different cloud optical thicknesses. The general retrieval equation for the determinations of SST, which is suitable for the clear air model as well as for the cirrus cloud atmospheres (with our definition of cirrus), is obtained through a combination of channels 12, 8, 6 (4.5 microm), and 5 (13.3 microm).The retrieval error is <1.0 K. The error analyses indicate that the clear air retrieval equations should not be used for SST determination in cirrus conditions.

  4. CLaMS-Ice: Large-scale cirrus cloud simulations in comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anja; Rolf, Christian; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Spichtinger, Peter; Afchine, Armin; Spelten, Nicole; Dreiling, Volker; Zöger, Martin; Krämer, Martina

    2016-04-01

    Cirrus clouds are an element of uncertainty in the climate system and have received increasing attention since the last IPCC reports. The interactions of different freezing mechanisms, sedimentation rates, updraft velocity fluctuations and other factors that determine the formation and evolution of those clouds is still not fully understood. Thus, a reliable representation of cirrus clouds in models representing real atmospheric conditions is still a challenging task. At last year's EGU, Rolf et al. (2015) introduced the new large-scale microphysical cirrus cloud model CLaMS-Ice: based on trajectories calculated with CLaMS (McKenna et al., 2002 and Konopka et al. 2007), it simulates the development of cirrus clouds relying on the cirrus bulk model by Spichtinger and Gierens (2009). The qualitative agreement between CLaMS-Ice simulations and observations could be demonstrated at that time. Now we present a detailed quantitative comparison between standard ECMWF products, CLaMS-Ice simulations, and in-situ measurements obtained during the ML-Cirrus campaign 2014. We discuss the agreement of the parameters temperature (observational data: BAHAMAS), relative humidity (SHARC), cloud occurrence, cloud particle concentration, ice water content and cloud particle radii (all NIXE-CAPS). Due to the precise trajectories based on ECMWF wind and temperature fields, CLaMS-Ice represents the cirrus cloud vertical and horizontal coverage more accurately than the ECMWF ice water content (IWC) fields. We demonstrate how CLaMS-Ice can be used to evaluate different input settings (e.g. amount of ice nuclei, freezing thresholds, sedimentation settings) that lead to cirrus clouds with the microphysical properties observed during ML-Cirrus (2014).

  5. An Airborne A-Band Spectrometer for Remote Sensing Of Aerosol and Cloud Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael; Hostetler, Chris; Poole, Lamont; Holden, Carl; Rault, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric remote sensing with the O2 A-band has a relatively long history, but most of these studies were attempting to estimate surface pressure or cloud-top pressure. Recent conceptual studies have demonstrated the potential of spaceborne high spectral resolution O2 A-band spectrometers for retrieval of aerosol and cloud optical properties. The physical rationale of this new approach is that information on the scattering properties of the atmosphere is embedded in the detailed line structure of the O2 A-band reflected radiance spectrum. The key to extracting this information is to measure the radiance spectrum at very high spectral resolution. Instrument performance requirement studies indicate that, in addition to high spectral resolution, the successful retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties from A-band radiance spectra will also require high radiometric accuracy, instrument stability, and high signal-to-noise measurements. To experimentally assess the capabilities of this promising new remote sensing application, the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an airborne high spectral resolution A-band spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a plane holographic grating with a folded Littrow geometry to achieve high spectral resolution (0.5 cm-1) and low stray light in a compact package. This instrument will be flown in a series of field campaigns beginning in 2001 to evaluate the overall feasibility of this new technique. Results from these campaigns should be particularly valuable for future spaceborne applications of A-band spectrometers for aerosol and cloud retrievals.

  6. What are cirrus point sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, Carl; Mccarthy, Patrick J.; Reach, William; Strauss, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    Most cirrus point sources are associated with interstellar gas. A subset of these was isolated, together with other sources showing large band 4 to 3 flux density ratios, that are not associated with interstellar gas. Most of the point sources are associated with diffuse cirrus emissions. The sources appear to be distributed randomly on the sky, with the exception of six clusters, one of which is not associated with any known object. Six sources out of seventeen that were observed for redshifted H I at Arecibo were found to be associated with relatively nondescript external galaxies. Most of the sources do not appear on the Palomar Sky Survey. Deep optical observations of eight fields revealed some fairly distant galaxies, one object with a very peculiar optical spectrum, and several blank fields.

  7. GCSS Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David OC.; DeMott, Paul J.; Cotton, Richard; Jensen, Eric; Sassen, Kenneth; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project, a project of GCSS Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2), involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal nucleation and growth for specified, typical, cirrus cloud environments. The goal of this project is to document and understand the factors resulting in significant inter-model differences. The intent is to foment research leading to model improvement and validation. In Phase 1 of the project reported here, simulated cirrus cloud microphysical properties are compared for situations of "warm" (-40 C) and "cold" (-60 C) cirrus subject to updrafts of 4, 20 and 100 cm/s, respectively. Five models participated. These models employ explicit microphysical schemes wherein the size distribution of each class of particles (aerosols and ice crystals) is resolved into bins. Simulations are made including both homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms. A single initial aerosol population of sulfuric acid particles is prescribed for all simulations. To isolate the treatment of the homogeneous freezing (of haze drops) nucleation process, the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is disabled for a second parallel set of simulations. Qualitative agreement is found for the homogeneous-nucleation-only simulations, e.g., the number density of nucleated ice crystals increases with the strength of the prescribed updraft. However, non-negligible quantitative differences are found. Detailed analysis reveals that the homogeneous nucleation formulation, aerosol size, ice crystal growth rate (particularly the deposition coefficient), and water vapor uptake rate are critical components that lead to differences in predicted microphysics. Systematic bias exists between results based on a modified classical theory approach and models using an effective freezing temperature approach to the treatment of nucleation. Each approach is constrained by critical freezing data from laboratory studies, but each includes

  8. Analysing the health effects of simultaneous exposure to physical and chemical properties of airborne particles

    PubMed Central

    Pirani, Monica; Best, Nicky; Blangiardo, Marta; Liverani, Silvia; Atkinson, Richard W.; Fuller, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Airborne particles are a complex mix of organic and inorganic compounds, with a range of physical and chemical properties. Estimation of how simultaneous exposure to air particles affects the risk of adverse health response represents a challenge for scientific research and air quality management. In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach that can tackle this problem within the framework of time series analysis. Methods We used Dirichlet process mixture models to cluster time points with similar multipollutant and response profiles, while adjusting for seasonal cycles, trends and temporal components. Inference was carried out via Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. We illustrated our approach using daily data of a range of particle metrics and respiratory mortality for London (UK) 2002–2005. To better quantify the average health impact of these particles, we measured the same set of metrics in 2012, and we computed and compared the posterior predictive distributions of mortality under the exposure scenario in 2012 vs 2005. Results The model resulted in a partition of the days into three clusters. We found a relative risk of 1.02 (95% credible intervals (CI): 1.00, 1.04) for respiratory mortality associated with days characterised by high posterior estimates of non-primary particles, especially nitrate and sulphate. We found a consistent reduction in the airborne particles in 2012 vs 2005 and the analysis of the posterior predictive distributions of respiratory mortality suggested an average annual decrease of − 3.5% (95% CI: − 0.12%, − 5.74%). Conclusions We proposed an effective approach that enabled the better understanding of hidden structures in multipollutant health effects within time series analysis. It allowed the identification of exposure metrics associated with respiratory mortality and provided a tool to assess the changes in health effects from various policies to control the ambient particle matter mixtures. PMID:25795926

  9. [Retrieval of the Optical Thickness and Cloud Top Height of Cirrus Clouds Based on AIRS IR High Spectral Resolution Data].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ya-nan; Wei, He-li; Dai, Cong-ming; Zhang, Xue-hai

    2015-05-01

    A study was carried out to retrieve optical thickness and cloud top height of cirrus clouds from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) high spectral resolution data in 1070~1135 cm-1 IR band using a Combined Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model (CART) by brightness temperature difference between model simulation and AIRS observation. The research is based on AIRS LIB high spectral infrared observation data combined with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud product data. Brightness temperature spectra based, on the retrieved cirrus optical thickness and cloud top height were simulated and compared with brightness temperature spectra of AIRS observation in the 650~1150 cm-1 band. The cirrus optical thickness and cloud top height retrieved were compared with brightness temperature of AIRS for channel 760 (900.56 cm-1, 11. 1 µm) and cirrus reflectance of MODIS cloud product. And cloud top height retrieved was compared with cloud top height from MODIS. Results show that the brightness temperature spectra simulated were basically consistent with AIRS observation under the condition of retrieval in the 650~1150 cm-1 band. It means that CART can be used to simulate AIRS brightness temperature spectra. The retrieved cirrus parameters are consistent with brightness temperature of AIRS for channel 11. 1 µm with low brightness temperature corresponding to large cirrus optical thickness and high cloud top height. And the retrieved cirrus parameters are consistent with cirrus reflectance of MODIS cloud product with high cirrus reflectance corresponding to large cirrus optical thickness and high cloud top height. Correlation coefficient of brightness temperature between retrieved cloud top height and MODIS cloud top height was relatively high. They are mostly located in the range of 8. 5~11.5 km, and their probability distribution trend is approximately identical. CART model is feasible to retrieve cirrus properties, and the retrieval is reliable.

  10. Separation of cirrus cloud from clear surface from AVIRIS data using the 1.38 micron water vapor band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1992-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in climate systems because of their large area coverage, persistence, and radiative effects. Thin cirrus clouds are difficult to detect in visible images and infrared images in the 10-12 micron atmospheric window region, particularly over land, because these clouds are partially transparent. Ackerman recently developed a method for detecting cirrus clouds using three narrow channels centered near 8, 11, and 12 microns, respectively, based on the analysis of IR emission spectra measured with a high spectral resolution interferometer. Barton also described a method for estimating cirrus cloud height and amount from measurements with two narrow channel radiometers of the Selective Chopper Radiometer on Nimbus 5. Both channels are located within the strong 2.7 micron water vapor band absorption region. One of the channels includes additional carbon dioxide absorption. A differential absorption technique with sets of empirical coefficients was used in the estimation of cirrus cloud heights and amounts. A technique using narrow channels in the strong 1.38 micron water vapor band absorption region for detecting cirrus clouds from spectral imaging data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) on 5 Dec. 1991 during the FIRE (The First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment) Phase 2 Field Experiment is described.

  11. Effect of Thin Cirrus Clouds on Dust Optical Depth Retrievals From MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Qian; Hsu, N. Christina; Yang, Ping; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    The effect of thin cirrus clouds in retrieving the dust optical depth from MODIS observations is investigated by using a simplified aerosol retrieval algorithm based on the principles of the Deep Blue aerosol property retrieval method. Specifically, the errors of the retrieved dust optical depth due to thin cirrus contamination are quantified through the comparison of two retrievals by assuming dust-only atmospheres and the counterparts with overlapping mineral dust and thin cirrus clouds. To account for the effect of the polarization state of radiation field on radiance simulation, a vector radiative transfer model is used to generate the lookup tables. In the forward radiative transfer simulations involved in generating the lookup tables, the Rayleigh scattering by atmospheric gaseous molecules and the reflection of the surface assumed to be Lambertian are fully taken into account. Additionally, the spheroid model is utilized to account for the nonsphericity of dust particles In computing their optical properties. For simplicity, the single-scattering albedo, scattering phase matrix, and optical depth are specified a priori for thin cirrus clouds assumed to consist of droxtal ice crystals. The present results indicate that the errors in the retrieved dust optical depths due to the contamination of thin cirrus clouds depend on the scattering angle, underlying surface reflectance, and dust optical depth. Under heavy dusty conditions, the absolute errors are comparable to the predescribed optical depths of thin cirrus clouds.

  12. Midlatitude Cirrus Clouds Derived from Hurricane Nora: A Case Study with Implications for Ice Crystal Nucleation and Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Arnott, W. Patrick; OCStarr, David; Mace, Gerald G.; Wang, Zhien; Poellot, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Hurricane Nora traveled up the Bala Peninsula coast in the unusually warm El Nino waters of September 1997, until rapidly decaying as it approached Southern California on 24 September. The anvil cirrus blowoff from the final surge of tropical convection became embedded in subtropical flow that advected the cirrus across the western US, where it was studied from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) in Salt Lake City, Utah. A day later, the cirrus shield remnants were redirected southward by midlatitude circulations into the Southern Great Plains, providing a case study opportunity for the research aircraft and ground-based remote sensors assembled at the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. Using these comprehensive resources and new remote sensing cloud retrieval algorithms, the microphysical and radiative cloud properties of this unusual cirrus event are uniquely characterized. Importantly, at both the FARS and CART sites the cirrus generated spectacular optical displays, which acted as a tracer for the hurricane cirrus, despite the limited lifetimes of individual ice crystals. Lidar polarization data indicate widespread regions of uniform ice plate orientations, and in situ particle masticator data show a preponderance of pristine, solid hexagonal plates and columns. It is suggested that these unusual aspects are the result of the mode of cirrus particle nucleation, presumably involving the lofting of sea-salt nuclei in thunderstorm updrafts into the upper troposphere. This created a reservoir of haze particles that continued to produce halide-saltcontaminated ice crystals during the extended period of cirrus cloud maintenance. The reference that marine microliters are embedded in the replicas of ice crystals collected over the CART site points to the longevity of marine effects. Various nucleation scenarios proposed for cirrus clouds based on this and other studies, and the implications for understanding cirrus radiative

  13. University of Wisconsin Cirrus Remote Sensing Pilot Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Eloranta, Ed W.; Grund, Chris J.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Wylie, Donald P.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of 26 October 1989 through 6 December 1989 a unique complement of measurements was made at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to study the radiative properties of cirrus clouds. Simultaneous observations were obtained from a scanning lidar, two interferometers, a high spectral resolution lidar, geostationary and polar orbiting satellites, radiosonde launches, and a whole-sky imager. This paper describes the experiment, the instruments deployed, and, as an example, the data collected during one day of the experiment.

  14. Impact of nucleation schemes on cirrus cloud formation in a GCM with sectional microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, C.; Gettelman, A.; Jensen, E. J.; Heymsfield, A.; Delanoe, J.; Deng, M.

    2012-12-01

    We have implemented a sectional microphysics scheme for ice clouds based upon the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), which allows for a size resolved treatment of ice particle nucleation, condensational growth, coagulation, sedimentation and detrainment. Detrained and in situ formed ice particles are tracked separately in the model allowing for different microphysical assumptions and separate analysis. Cloud ice from CAM5/CARMA simulations compare better with satellite observations than those with the standard CAM5 two-moment microphysics. CAM5/CARMA has a prognostic treatment for snow, which results in improved ice mass and representation of a melting layer that is absent in CAM5. Here we explore the sensitivity of the simulations to different nucleation schemes including: homogeneous freezing based on Koop et al. (2000), homogeneous freezing based upon Aerosols Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber measurement (Möhler et al., 2010), heterogeneous nucleation with dust aerosols, and heterogeous nucleation with glassy aerosols (Murray et al. 2010). The initial size for detrained ice particles in CAM5/CARMA is temperature dependent based upon a fits to observations from Heymsfield et al. (2010). We explore the sensitivity of the model to different choices for these fits. Results from these simulations are compared to retrievals of water vapor from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), ice cloud properties from CloudSat-CALIPSO observations (Delanoë and Hogan, 2010; Deng et al. 2010) and to aircraft observations from several field campaigns including: the Costa Rica Aura Validation Experiment (CR-AVE), the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4), the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) and the Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX).

  15. The FIRE Cirrus Science Results 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, David S. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    FIRE (First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment) is a U.S. cloud-radiation research program that seeks to improve our basic understanding and parameterizations of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems and ISCCP data products. The FIRE Cirrus Science Conference was held in Breckenridge, CO, 14-17 Jun. 1993, to present results of cirrus research for the second phase of FIRE (1989-present) and to refine cirrus research goals and priorities for the next phase of FIRE (1994-future). This Conference Publication contains the text of short papers presented at the conference. The papers describe research analyses of data collected at the Cirrus Intensive Field Observations-2 field experiment conducted in Kansas, 13 Nov. - 7 Dec. 1991.

  16. [The estimation of cirrus cloud particulate shape using combined simulation and a three-wavelength lidar measurement].

    PubMed

    Tao, Zong-Ming; Liu, Dong; Wei, He-Li; Ma, Xiao-Min; Shi, Bo; Nie, Miao; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Ying-Jian

    2013-07-01

    The global occurrence of cirrus clouds can reach as high as 30%, whose scattering properties are essential impact on the climatic model, radiative transfer, and remote sensing. Their scattering properties are determined by the ice crystal shape, size distribution, refractive index and so on. Retrieval of the backscattering color ratios of cirrus cloud using a 355, 532 and 1 064 nm three-wavelength lidar, combined with the simulation of the three backscattering color ratios of different ice crystal shape, the shape of the lidar-measured ice crystal can be estimated. The results indicate that the shape of cirrus cloud over Hefei city is mostly composed by aggregates.

  17. A New Way to Measure Cirrus Ice Water Content by Using Ice Raman Scatter with Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Whiteman, David N.; Demoz, Belay; Veselovskii, Igor

    2004-01-01

    High and cold cirrus clouds mainly contain irregular ice crystals, such as, columns, hexagonal plates, bullet rosettes, and dendrites, and have different impacts on the climate system than low-level clouds, such as stratus, stratocumulus, and cumulus. The radiative effects of cirrus clouds on the current and future climate depend strongly on cirrus cloud microphysical properties including ice water content (IWC) and ice crystal sizes, which are mostly an unknown aspect of cinus clouds. Because of the natural complexity of cirrus clouds and their high locations, it is a challenging task to get them accurately by both remote sensing and in situ sampling. This study presents a new method to remotely sense cirrus microphysical properties by using ice Raman scatter with a Raman lidar. The intensity of Raman scattering is fundamentally proportional to the number of molecules involved. Therefore, ice Raman scattering signal provides a more direct way to measure IWC than other remote sensing methods. Case studies show that this method has the potential to provide essential information of cirrus microphysical properties to study cloud physical processes in cirrus clouds.

  18. Measurements of the concentration and composition of nuclei for cirrus formation.

    PubMed

    DeMott, P J; Cziczo, D J; Prenni, A J; Murphy, D M; Kreidenweis, S M; Thomson, D S; Borys, R; Rogers, D C

    2003-12-01

    This article addresses the need for new data on indirect effects of natural and anthropogenic aerosol particles on atmospheric ice clouds. Simultaneous measurements of the concentration and composition of tropospheric aerosol particles capable of initiating ice in cold (cirrus) clouds are reported. Measurements support that cirrus formation occurs both by heterogeneous nucleation by insoluble particles and homogeneous (spontaneous) freezing of particles containing solutions. Heterogeneous ice nuclei concentrations in the cirrus regime depend on temperature, relative humidity, and the concentrations and physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles. The cirrus-active concentrations of heterogeneous nuclei measured in November over the western U.S. were <0.03 cm-3. Considering previous modeling studies, this result suggests a predominant potential impact of these nuclei on cirrus formed by slow, large-scale lifting or small cooling rates, including subvisual cirrus. The most common heterogeneous ice nuclei were identified as relatively pure mineral dusts and metallic particles, some of which may have origin through anthropogenic processes. Homogeneous freezing of large numbers of particles was detected above a critical relative humidity along with a simultaneous transition in nuclei composition toward that of the sulfate-dominated total aerosol population. The temperature and humidity conditions of the homogeneous nucleation transition were reasonably consistent with expectations based on previous theoretical and laboratory studies but were highly variable. The strong presence of certain organic pollutants was particularly noted to be associated with impedance of homogeneous freezing.

  19. Development of a submillimeter/far-infrared radiometer for cirrus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayton, Darren; Ade, Peter A. R.; Lee, Clare; Evans, K. Franklin

    2004-02-01

    We introduce a low cost, lightweight and compact polarisation sensitive radiometer for the measurement of Cirrus clouds in the submilimeter and far-infrared region (10-50 cm-1). It is widely recognised that enhanced global measurements of cirrus properties are essential to the development of General Circulation and Climate Prediction Models (GCMs) since cirrus clouds have a strong effect on the Earths Global Radiation Budget. We introduce a project currently under development in Cardiff, to design and build a novel instrument suitable for aircraft deployment in order to measure Ice Water Path (IWP) along with cirrus particle size and shape. The radiometer will capitalise on the on going measurements of the NASA led, Fourier Transform interferometer based, Far-Infrared Sensor for Cirrus (FIRSC) instrument for which Cardiff has been closely associated. Data from FIRSC campaigns is being used to select optimum radiometer channels that exhibit good sensitivity to specific cirrus. This new multi-channel radiometer will however have some key advantages over similar spectroscopic instruments for example: portability, increased optical efficiency, a multi-angle field of view and a reduced integration period leading to an improved spatial resolution. The radiometer will benefit from the application of state-of-the-art submm/FIR polariser and solid filter technology currently being developed in Cardiff.

  20. Measurements of the concentration and composition of nuclei for cirrus formation

    PubMed Central

    DeMott, P. J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Murphy, D. M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Thomson, D. S.; Borys, R.; Rogers, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses the need for new data on indirect effects of natural and anthropogenic aerosol particles on atmospheric ice clouds. Simultaneous measurements of the concentration and composition of tropospheric aerosol particles capable of initiating ice in cold (cirrus) clouds are reported. Measurements support that cirrus formation occurs both by heterogeneous nucleation by insoluble particles and homogeneous (spontaneous) freezing of particles containing solutions. Heterogeneous ice nuclei concentrations in the cirrus regime depend on temperature, relative humidity, and the concentrations and physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles. The cirrus-active concentrations of heterogeneous nuclei measured in November over the western U.S. were <0.03 cm–3. Considering previous modeling studies, this result suggests a predominant potential impact of these nuclei on cirrus formed by slow, large-scale lifting or small cooling rates, including subvisual cirrus. The most common heterogeneous ice nuclei were identified as relatively pure mineral dusts and metallic particles, some of which may have origin through anthropogenic processes. Homogeneous freezing of large numbers of particles was detected above a critical relative humidity along with a simultaneous transition in nuclei composition toward that of the sulfate-dominated total aerosol population. The temperature and humidity conditions of the homogeneous nucleation transition were reasonably consistent with expectations based on previous theoretical and laboratory studies but were highly variable. The strong presence of certain organic pollutants was particularly noted to be associated with impedance of homogeneous freezing. PMID:14657330

  1. Measurements of the concentration and composition of nuclei for cirrus formation.

    PubMed

    DeMott, P J; Cziczo, D J; Prenni, A J; Murphy, D M; Kreidenweis, S M; Thomson, D S; Borys, R; Rogers, D C

    2003-12-01

    This article addresses the need for new data on indirect effects of natural and anthropogenic aerosol particles on atmospheric ice clouds. Simultaneous measurements of the concentration and composition of tropospheric aerosol particles capable of initiating ice in cold (cirrus) clouds are reported. Measurements support that cirrus formation occurs both by heterogeneous nucleation by insoluble particles and homogeneous (spontaneous) freezing of particles containing solutions. Heterogeneous ice nuclei concentrations in the cirrus regime depend on temperature, relative humidity, and the concentrations and physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles. The cirrus-active concentrations of heterogeneous nuclei measured in November over the western U.S. were <0.03 cm-3. Considering previous modeling studies, this result suggests a predominant potential impact of these nuclei on cirrus formed by slow, large-scale lifting or small cooling rates, including subvisual cirrus. The most common heterogeneous ice nuclei were identified as relatively pure mineral dusts and metallic particles, some of which may have origin through anthropogenic processes. Homogeneous freezing of large numbers of particles was detected above a critical relative humidity along with a simultaneous transition in nuclei composition toward that of the sulfate-dominated total aerosol population. The temperature and humidity conditions of the homogeneous nucleation transition were reasonably consistent with expectations based on previous theoretical and laboratory studies but were highly variable. The strong presence of certain organic pollutants was particularly noted to be associated with impedance of homogeneous freezing. PMID:14657330

  2. Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds During The Passage of Hurricane Bonnie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Demoz, B.; Starr, D OC.; Eloranta, E. W.; Tobin, D.; Feltz, W.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Gutman, S. I.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island in the Bahamas during August - September, 1998 as a part of the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) which focussed on hurricane development and tracking. During the period August 21 - 24, hurricane Bonnie passed near Andros Island and influenced the water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements acquired by the SRL. Two drying signatures related to the hurricane were recorded by the SRL and other sensors. Cirrus cloud optical depths (at 351 nm) were also measured during this period. Optical depth values ranged from less than 0.01 to 1.5. The influence of multiple scattering on these optical depth measurements was studied. A correction technique is presented which minimizes the influences of multiple scattering and derives information about cirrus cloud optical and physical properties. The UV/IR cirrus cloud optical depth ratio was estimated based on a comparison of lidar and GOES measurements. Simple radiative transfer model calculations compared with GOES satellite brightness temperatures indicate that satellite radiances are significantly affected by the presence of cirrus clouds if IR optical depths are approximately 0.005 or greater. Using the ISCCP detection threshold for cirrus clouds on the GOES data presented here, a high bias of up to 40% in the GOES precipitable water retrieval was found.

  3. Vertical velocity in cirrus case obtained from wind profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Ran; Cox, Stephen K.

    1993-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in the climate and general circulation because they significantly modulate the radiation properties of the atmosphere. However understanding the processes that govern their presence is made difficult by their high altitude, variable thickness, complex microphysical structure, and relatively little knowledge of the vertical motion field. In the FIRE 2 (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) experiment, a 404 MHz wind profiler was set up to provide continuous measurements of clear air wind field at Parsons, Kansas. Simultaneously, the NOAA wind profiler network supplied a wider spacial scale observation. On 26 Nov. 1991, the most significant cirrus cloud phenomena during the experiment with a jet streak at 250 Mb occurred. Analyses of the vertical wind velocity are made by utilizing different methods based on wind profiler data, among them the direct measurements from CSU wind profiler and NOAA network wind profilers, VAD (Velocity Azimuth Display) technique and the kinematic method.

  4. Analysis of in situ measurements of cirrus anvil outflow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, J. I.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The airborne campaign, EMERALD 2 (Egrett Microphysics Experiment with Radiation, Lidar, and Dynamics,) was conducted out of Darwin, Australia in 2002. Objectives included characterization of the dynamics in the cirrus anvil outflow from tropical deep convection. Two aircraft, the Egrett and King Air, were flown in tandem in the upper troposphere (7 km - 15 km) to collect in situ measurements in the anvil outflow from a storm named "Hector" that occurs on a regular basis over the Tiwi Islands north of Darwin during November and December. Turbulence probes mounted on the wings of the Egrett aircraft were used to measure the wind fluctuations across the anvil and along its length with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. The in situ measurements from the Egrett were coincident with lidar measurements of the cloud structure from the King Air aircraft flying directly below. The presentation will show results of the analysis of the measurements with an emphasis on the turbulence, gravity waves, and coherent structures that are particular to the cirrus anvil outflow environment. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics associated with the generation of mammatus formations at the base of the anvil clouds.

  5. Statistics of Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity in the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; DelGenio, Anthony D.

    1999-01-01

    Variability of cloud properties on scales smaller than that of a GCM grid is potentially important both for realistic parameterizations of microphysical processes and for the prediction of the large-scale radiative effects of clouds, have suggested that a simple model of marine stratocumulus variability, based on the assumption of Gaussian variation statistics of cloud depth, can explain the liquid water path histogram shapes observed in Landsat data. In advance of ARM SGP MMCR ice water path climatologies, we have examined aircraft ice water content statistics for cirrus clouds observed over Coffeyville, Kansas during FIRE 2. We find similar associations of histogram shape and cloud cover for these clouds, and we show that a simple modification of the model for cirrus combined with observed mean cloud depths, their standard deviations, and ambient thermodynamic conditions predicts both the histogram shape and cirrus cloud cover fairly well. This suggests that subgrid variability of cloud properties may be similar for vastly different cloud types, and that a universal parameterization of the effects of subgrid variability in GCMs as a function of only a few parameters may be a realistic goal.

  6. Airborne Sunphotometer Studies of Aerosol Properties and Effects, Including Closure Among Satellite, Suborbital Remote, and In situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russlee, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne sunphotometry has been used to measure aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa in coordination with satellite and in situ measurements in TARFOX (1996), ACE-2 (1997), PRIDE (2000), and SAFARI 2000. Similar coordinated measurements of Asian aerosols are being conducted this spring in ACE-Asia and are planned for North American aerosols this summer in CLAMS. This paper summarizes the approaches used, key results, and implications for aerosol properties and effects, such as single scattering albedo and regional radiative forcing. The approaches exploit the three-dimensional mobility of airborne sunphotometry to access satellite scenes over diverse surfaces (including open ocean with and without sunglint) and to match exactly the atmospheric layers sampled by airborne in situ measurements and other radiometers. These measurements permit tests of the consistency, or closure, among such diverse measurements as aerosol size-resolved chemical composition; number or mass concentration; light extinction, absorption, and scattering (total, hemispheric back and 180 deg.); and radiative fluxes. In this way the airborne sunphotometer measurements provide a key link between satellite and in situ measurements that helps to understand any discrepancies that are found. These comparisons have led to several characteristic results. Typically these include: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements than between remote and in situ measurements. (2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements. (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from in situ measurements. Aerosol intensive properties derived from these closure studies have been combined with satellite-retrieved fields of optical depth to produce fields of regional radiative forcing. We show results for the North Atlantic derived from AVHRR optical depths and aerosol intensive properties from TARFOX and ACE-2. Companion papers

  7. Retrieval of Snow and Rain From Combined X- and W-B and Airborne Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    2008-01-01

    Two independent airborne dual-wavelength techniques, based on nadir measurements of radar reflectivity factors and Doppler velocities, respectively, are investigated with respect to their capability of estimating microphysical properties of hydrometeors. The data used to investigate the methods are taken from the ER-2 Doppler radar (X-band) and Cloud Radar System (W-band) airborne Doppler radars during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment campaign in 2002. Validity is assessed by the degree to which the methods produce consistent retrievals of the microphysics. For deriving snow parameters, the reflectivity-based technique has a clear advantage over the Doppler-velocity-based approach because of the large dynamic range in the dual-frequency ratio (DFR) with respect to the median diameter Do and the fact that the difference in mean Doppler velocity at the two frequencies, i.e., the differential Doppler velocity (DDV), in snow is small relative to the measurement errors and is often not uniquely related to Do. The DFR and DDV can also be used to independently derive Do in rain. At W-band, the DFR-based algorithms are highly sensitive to attenuation from rain, cloud water, and water vapor. Thus, the retrieval algorithms depend on various assumptions regarding these components, whereas the DDV-based approach is unaffected by attenuation. In view of the difficulties and ambiguities associated with the attenuation correction at W-band, the DDV approach in rain is more straightforward and potentially more accurate than the DFR method.

  8. Detailed microphysics modelling of cirrus clouds observed during the european flight campaign INCA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, M.; Wobrock, W. W.; Flossmann, A. I.

    2004-05-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in the Earth energy balance. To quantify their impact, we need the information on their microstructure and more precisely on the number and the size of the ice crystal. With the increase of air traffic, more and more aerosol particles and water vapour are released at the altitude where cirrus clouds are formed. So we should understand the formation mechanisms of these clouds, to foresee if a cirrus cloud formed in a polluted air mass will have different microphysics properties and therefore a different impact on the climate system compared to a natural cirrus cloud. In order to study this aspect, the European project INCA measured the microphysics properties of cirrus clouds together with the physical and chemicals properties of aerosol particles in clean air (at Punta Arenas, Chile) and polluted air (at Prestwick, Scotland). The goal of this thesis was to develop a detailed microphysics model for cirrus clouds for the interpretation and the generalisation of the INCA observations. This model considers the moist aerosol particles through the ExMix model (Externally MIXed, Wobrock 1986), so that the chemical composition of these solution droplets can be followed. The ice crystals formation is described through homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation, the crystals, then, grow by deposition or riming processes. With this model, we studied the interactions between all these microphysics processes and simulated ice crystal concentrations and dimensional distributions of the INCA observations. We were able to provide explanations for the observed differences between natural and polluted cirrus clouds. We reproduced the role of aerosol particles in the initiation of ice phase by considering the nucleation as heterogeneous.

  9. A Study of Cirrus Clouds and Aerosols in the Upper Troposphere using Models and Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1213. It is a compilation of publications produced under this Cooperative Agreement and conference presentations. The tasks for the Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere include: Task 1: To compare APCM predictions against the SUCCESS data and other aircraft campaigns and to investigate the role of aerosol composition on cirrus cloud nucleation; Task 2: To study the seasonal evolution and spatial distribution of upper-tropospheric tropical and polar cirrus; Task 3: To investigate CLAES cirrus data with other complementary (TOGA-COARE and CEPEX) data. Tasks for Upper Tropospheric Cirrus Clouds include: Task 1: Assemble 3-hourly (or more frequent) meteorological satellite data fiom geostationary satellites to obtain a global, or nearly global, dataset of infiared brightness temperatures as a function of time for airborne experimental periods; Task 2: Explore methods to improve the cloud top altitude distributions calculated fiom meteorological satellite data. This will focus on linlung the 6.5 micron channel geostationary brightness temperatures and the 10.5 micron brightness temperatures; Task 3: Explore methods to differentiate convective fiom stratiform cloudiness; Task 4: Perform trajectory analyses using an existing trajectory modeling package that links the cloud data with air mass histories; Task 5: Apply techniques from tasks 1 through 4 to provide meteorological support to the CRYSTAL-FACE mission, both in its preparation and deployment phases. The report include four published articles and two slide presentations.

  10. Small-Scale Spatial Variability of Ice Supersaturation and Cirrus in the TTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGangi, J. P.; Podolske, J. R.; Rana, M.; Slate, T. A.; Diskin, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The processes controlling cloud formation and evolution represent a significant uncertainty in models of global climate change. High altitude cirrus clouds contribute a large portion of this uncertainty due to their altitude and abundance. The mechanism behind the formation of cirrus clouds depends on the characteristics and composition of ice supersaturation (ISS) regions, regions where the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) is greater than 100%. Small-scale dynamics have recently been shown to have a strong effect on the RHi of the UT/LS, and therefore on cirrus cloud formation. Until now, there has been insufficient data in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) to investigate these effects. The Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) was a series of campaigns focused on improving our understanding of humidity in the TTL. During this campaign, the NASA Langley/Ames Diode Laser Hygrometer was part of the payload on the NASA Global Hawk, resulting in measurements of humidity with as low as 1-2 m vertical resolution at altitudes up to 19 km. We will present observations from ATTREX describing the small scale spatial variability of water vapor along transects of ISSRs and cirrus clouds, as well as the dynamics driving the formation of ISS regions. These results will be discussed in context with results from prior UT/LS campaigns, such as DC3 and HIPPO.

  11. Wavelet analysis applied to the IRAS cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Wilson, Robert W.; Anderson, Charles H.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of infrared cirrus clouds is analyzed with Laplacian pyramid transforms, a form of non-orthogonal wavelets. Pyramid and wavelet transforms provide a means to decompose images into their spatial frequency components such that all spatial scales are treated in an equivalent manner. The multiscale transform analysis is applied to IRAS 100 micrometer maps of cirrus emission in the north Galactic pole region to extract features on different scales. In the maps we identify filaments, fragments and clumps by separating all connected regions. These structures are analyzed with respect to their Hausdorff dimension for evidence of the scaling relationships in the cirrus clouds.

  12. Sensitivity of Cirrus Bidirectional Reflectance at MODIS Bands to Vertical Inhomogeneity of Ice Crystal Habits and Size Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P.; Gao, B.-C.; Baum, B. A.; Wiscombe, W.; Hu, Y.; Nasiri, S. L.; Soulen, P. F.; Heymsfield, A. J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Miloshevich, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    A common assumption in satellite imager-based cirrus retrieval algorithms is that the radiative properties of a cirrus cloud may be represented by those associated with a specific ice crystal shape (or habit) and a single particle size distribution. However, observations of cirrus clouds have shown that the shapes and sizes of ice crystals may vary substantially with height within the clouds. In this study we investigate the sensitivity of the top-of-atmosphere bidirectional reflectances at two MODIS bands centered at 0.65 micron and 2.11 micron to the cirrus models assumed to be either a single homogeneous layer or three distinct but contiguous, layers. First, we define the single- and three-layer cirrus cloud models with respect to ice crystal habit and size distribution on the basis of in situ replicator data acquired during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE-II), held in Kansas during the fall of 1991. Subsequently, fundamental light scattering and radiative transfer theory is employed to determine the single scattering and the bulk radiative properties of the cirrus cloud. Regarding the radiative transfer computations, we present a discrete form of the adding/doubling principle by introducing a direct transmission function, which is computationally straightforward and efficient an improvement over previous methods. For the 0.65 micron band, at which absorption by ice is negligible, there is little difference between the bidirectional reflectances calculated for the one- and three-layer cirrus models, suggesting that the vertical inhomogeneity effect is relatively unimportant. At the 2.11 micron band, the bidirectional reflectances computed for both optically thin (tau = 1) and thick (tau = 10) cirrus clouds show significant differences between the results for the one- and three-layer models. The reflectances computed for the three-layer cirrus model are substantially larger than those computed for the single-layer cirrus. Finally, we find that cloud

  13. Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1; The Critical Components to Simulate Cirrus Initiation Explicitly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David OC; DeMott, Paul J.; Cotton, Richard; Sassen, Kenneth; Jensen, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project, a project of the GCSS (GEWEX Cloud System Studies) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems, involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal nucleation and growth for specified, typical, cirrus cloud environments. In Phase I of the project reported here, simulated cirrus cloud microphysical properties are compared for situations of "warm" (40 C) and "cold" (-60 C) cirrus, both subject to updrafts of 4, 20 and 100 centimeters per second. Five models participated. The various models employ explicit microphysical schemes wherein the size distribution of each class of particles (aerosols and ice crystals) is resolved into bins or treated separately. Simulations are made including both the homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms. A single initial aerosol population of sulfuric acid particles is prescribed for all simulations. To isolate the treatment of the homogeneous freezing (of haze droplets) nucleation process, the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is disabled for a second parallel set of simulations. Qualitative agreement is found for the homogeneous-nucleation- only simulations, e.g., the number density of nucleated ice crystals increases with the strength of the prescribed updraft. However, significant quantitative differences are found. Detailed analysis reveals that the homogeneous nucleation rate, haze particle solution concentration, and water vapor uptake rate by ice crystal growth (particularly as controlled by the deposition coefficient) are critical components that lead to differences in predicted microphysics. Systematic bias exists between results based on a modified classical theory approach and models using an effective freezing temperature approach to the treatment of nucleation. Each approach is constrained by critical freezing data from laboratory studies, but each includes assumptions that can only be justified by further laboratory research. Consequently, it is not yet

  14. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W), located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW) in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio) and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness) properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable) LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  15. Tropical cirrus cloud radiative forcing: Sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Kinne, S.; Toon, O.B.

    1994-09-01

    We have performed one dimensional radiative transfer calculations to evaluate the impact of cirrus clouds on the tropical radiation budget. We investigate the sensitivity of solar and infrared fluxes to cloud optical depth, particle size distributions, and cloud height. If the observed solar cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m is to be attributed to cirrus anvils alone, then the optical depth of these anvils must be at least 5 (assuming 50% cloud cover and an ice crystal effective radius of 15 microns). The net radiative forcing of cirrus near the tropical tropopause is positive (heating) for cloud optical depths less than about 16 and negative (cooling) for larger optical depths. If cirrus clouds alone are responsible for the equal and opposite shortwave and longwave cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m observed by Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), then the cirrus must typically take the form of deep, optically thick clouds with relatively small particles (radii of 10-20 microns) and cloud-tops well below the tropopause. The maintenance of this balance on monthly time scales can be attributed to a variety of correlations: The cloud cover of optically thick cirrus or thin cirrus overlying low-level stratus clouds could vary; or cirrus anvil height cloud increase along with a decrease in the ice crystal effective radius and an increase in optical depth. It would be of great interest to determine observationally which of these correlations is responsible for the observed lack of variation in cloud forcing.

  16. Validation of the CALIPSO-CALIOP extinction coefficients from in situ observations in midlatitude cirrus clouds during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioche, Guillaume; Josset, Damien; Gayet, Jean-FrançOis; Pelon, Jacques; Garnier, Anne; Minikin, Andreas; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of combined Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) extinction retrievals with airborne lidar and in situ cirrus cloud measurements. Specially oriented research flights were carried out in western Europe in May 2007 during the Cirrus Cloud Experiment (CIRCLE-2) with the German Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and the French Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement (SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft equipped for remote and in situ measurements, respectively. Four cirrus cloud situations including thin cirrus layers and outflow cirrus linked to midlatitude fronts and convective systems were chosen to perform experimental collocated observations along the satellite overpasses. The measurements were carried out with temperatures ranging between -38°C and -60°C and with extinction coefficients no larger than 2 km-1. Comparisons between CALIOP and airborne lidar (LEANDRE New Generation (LNG)) attenuated backscatter coefficients reveal much larger CALIOP values for one frontal cirrus situation which could be explained by oriented pristine ice crystals. During the four selected cases the CALIOP cirrus extinction profiles were compared with in situ extinction coefficients derived from the Polar Nephelometer. The results show a very good agreement for two situations (frontal and outflow cases) despite very different cloud conditions. The slope parameters of linear fittings of CALIOP extinction coefficients with respect to in situ measurements are 0.90 and 0.94, with correlation coefficients of 0.69 and only 0.36 for the latter case because of a small number of measurements. On the contrary, significant differences are evidenced for two other situations. In thin frontal cirrus at temperatures ranging between -58°C and -60°C, systematic larger CALIOP extinctions can be explained by horizontally

  17. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  18. Aerosol properties derived from airborne sky radiance and direct beam measurements in recent NASA and DoE field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and airmass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance observations.

  19. Classification of particle effective shape ratios in cirrus clouds based on the lidar depolarization ratio.

    PubMed

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Helene; Ledanois, Guy; Delaval, Arnaud; Flamant, Pierre H

    2002-07-20

    A shape classification technique for cirrus clouds that could be applied to future spaceborne lidars is presented. A ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate backscattered and depolarized lidar signals from cirrus clouds made of hexagonal-based crystals with various compositions and optical depth, taking into account multiple scattering. This code was used first to study the sensitivity of the linear depolarization rate to cloud optical and microphysical properties, then to classify particle shapes in cirrus clouds based on depolarization ratio measurements. As an example this technique has been applied to lidar measurements from 15 mid-latitude cirrus cloud cases taken in Palaiseau, France. Results show a majority of near-unity shape ratios as well as a strong correlation between shape ratios and temperature: The lowest temperatures lead to high shape ratios. The application of this technique to space-borne measurements would allow a large-scale classification of shape ratios in cirrus clouds, leading to better knowledge of the vertical variability of shapes, their dependence on temperature, and the formation processes of clouds.

  20. Cirrus clouds and climate feedback: Is the sky falling and should we go tell the king

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely believed that thin cirrus clouds act to enhance the greenhouse effect owing to a particular combination of their optical properties. It is demonstrated how this effect is perhaps based on inadequate resolution of the physics of cirrus clouds and that the more likely impact of cirrus clouds to climate change remains somewhat elusive. These conclusions are developed within the context of a specific feedback mechanism incorporated into a simple mechanistic climate model. A specific scientific question addressed is whether or not the observed relationship between the ice water content and temperature of cirrus provides any significant feedback to the CO2 greenhouse warming. A related question also examined concerns the specific role of cloud microphysics and radiation in this feedback. This raises several pertinent issues about the understanding of cirrus clouds and their likely role in climate change as there presently exists a considerable uncertainty about the microphysics of these clouds (size and shape of ice crystals) and their radiative influences.

  1. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing observations reveal the frequent occurrence of tropopause cirrus, thin cirrus layers located near the tropical cold-point tropopause. Here, we present a theory in which tropical convection plays several important roles in tropopause cirrus formation. First, tropical convection is the primary means by which the moisture required for tropopause cirrus formation is transported into the upper troposphere. However, previous studies suggest that this convection rarely penetrates to the altitudes at which tropopause cirrus layers are observed, suggesting that additional vertical moisture transport is required to explain tropopause cirrus formation. We propose a mechanism for explaining this transport in which tropical convection plays the key role. According to this hypothesis, the transport is accomplished by meridional circulations that develop within the tropopause transition layer (TTL) in response to momentum transport by Rossby waves generated by tropical convection. Results of a series of global scale model runs designed to test this hypothesis will be presented. In addition, reanalyses vertical velocity data will be examined for evidence of the expected correlation between large-scale rising motion within the TTL and tropical convection. Once moisture is present near the cold-point tropopause, large-scale cooling is required to initiate tropopause cirrus formation. One source of this cooling is stratospheric tropical waves induced by tropical convection, as we will show using a time series of radiosonde temperature data superimposed with data on cloud occurrence from the DOE ARM Nauru99 field experiment. Observations of the global characteristics of these waves from a longer time series of reanalysis data will also be presented.

  2. A comparison of cirrus cloud observations from the NASA ATTREX-3 field mission with simulations from the NCAR atmospheric CESM model (CAM5) coupled with an advanced cirrus cloud model (CARMA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, C.; Toon, O. B.; Bardeen, C.; Diskin, G. S.; McGill, M. J.; Rollins, A. W.; Thornberry, T. D.; Woods, S.

    2014-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in the vertical transport of water vapor between the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Unfortunately, the physical limitations of observing the TTL and the model uncertainty surrounding cirrus clouds prevent a full understanding of the properties of cirrus and their role in water vapor transport. However, recently NASA's ATTREX 3 field mission was undertaken to observe water vapor and cirrus properties in the TTL. The high altitude Global Hawk aircraft gathered a unique in-situ data set from the tropical Western Pacific. This region is known to be crucial for the upward motion of water vapor and chemical transport in the atmosphere, but has been observed infrequently. With the ATTREX data, we investigate the differences between in situ and anvil cirrus, and we assess the relative frequency of heterogeneous and homogenous ice nucleation. Alongside the observational data, we ran NCAR's CESM model and coupled it to an advanced cirrus model (CARMA). The model was run at a 1x1 degree resolution along the aircraft's flight track to simulate the observations. We compare the CAM5/CARMA simulations to the aircraft observations to investigate the effectiveness of the model in reproducing the aircraft data.

  3. Development and application of an interactive cirrus cloud radiative parameterization for global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Everette David

    1997-12-01

    An interactive cirrus cloud radiative parameterization for global climate models is developed and applied. Specifically, a parameterization is presented that predicts the solar cloud optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor in terms of cloud effective particle diameter and ice water content. A simple parameterization is developed to predict the infrared cloud emissivity in terms of effective particle diameter and ice water content. Both the solar and infrared parameterizations derive from analytical solutions that treat cirrus cloud particles as hexagonal ice crystals. The cloud microphysical properties, cloud ice content and effective particle diameter, are parameterized in terms of cloud temperature. This interactive cirrus cloud radiative parameterization is incorporated into the NCAR/SUNYA GENESIS atmospheric general circulation model and evaluated in model-to- observation comparisons with a comprehensive set of cloud and radiation data derived from space-based and surface- based measurements obtained during the April 1994 Intensive Observation Period of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. It is shown that the model simulates more realistic solar and infrared radiation incident at the surface with the new cirrus parameterization than with the old. In particular, biases in simulated solar direct and diffuse fluxes are reduced by 60% and 30%, respectively, and that in simulated infrared flux is reduced by 40%. The potential climatic impact of the new cirrus parameterization in a full simulation of the general circulation model is evaluated through instantaneous radiative forcing experiments. The new cirrus parameterization reduces the global annual mean forcing of the surface-atmosphere system by 2.26 Wm-2. This reduction in forcing occurs mainly in the upper troposphere and is dominated by the loss of solar energy in the high latitudes of the summer hemisphere and loss of infrared energy in the tropics during both winter and summer

  4. Extinction coefficient measurements on clear atmospheres and thin cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A

    1968-12-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to determine possible differences in visible light extinction properties of continental and maritime air. Urban, desert, and oceanic atmospheres were probed by means of a stable photodiode radiometer using direct sunlight as the source. No major differences were found for the three locations. Experimental coefficients generally lie slightly below model data, though significantly higher than would be expected from purely molecular scattering. Day-to-day variations of up to 40% were found to be nearly constant over the entire visible spectrum. Results of similar extinction measurements on thin cirrus clouds show a slight increase in scattering coefficient in going from 4000 A to 7000 A wavelength.

  5. Can cirrus clouds produce glories?

    PubMed

    Sassen, K; Arnott, W P; Barnett, J M; Aulenbach, S

    1998-03-20

    A vague glory display was photographed over central Utah from an airplane beginning its descent through a cirrus cloud layer with an estimated cloud top temperature of -45 and -55 degrees C. Photographic analysis reveals a single reddish-brown ring of 2.5-3.0 degrees radius around the antisolar point, although a second ring appeared visually to have been present over the brief observation period. Mie and approximate nonspherical theory scattering simulations predict a population of particles with modal diameters between 9 and 15 mum. Although it is concluded that multiple-ringed glories can be accounted for only through the backscattering of light from particles that are strictly spherical in shape, the poor glory colorization in this case could imply the presence of slightly aspherical ice particles. The location of this display over mountainous terrain suggests that it was generated by an orographic wave cloud, which we speculate produced numerous frozen cloud droplets that only gradually took on crystalline characteristics during growth.

  6. Cirrus cloud iridescence: a rare case study.

    PubMed

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2003-01-20

    On the evening of 25 November 1998, a cirrus cloud revealing the pastel colors of the iridescence phenomenon was photographed and studied by a polarization lidar system at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS). The diffraction of sunlight falling on relatively minute cloud particles, which display spatial gradients in size, is the cause of iridescence. According to the 14-year study of midlatitude cirrus clouds at FARS, cirrus rarely produce even poor iridescent patches, making this particularly long-lived and vivid occurrence unique. In this unusually high (13.2-14.4-km) and cold (-69.7 degrees to -75.5 degrees) tropopause-topped cirrus cloud, iridescence was noted from approximately 6.0 degrees to approximately 13.5 degrees from the Sun. On the basis of simple diffraction theory, this indicates the presence of particles of 2.5-5.5-microm effective diameter. The linear depolarization ratios of delta = 0.5 measured by the lidar verify that the cloud particles were nonspherical ice crystals. The demonstration that ice clouds can generate iridescence has led to the conclusion that iridescence is rarely seen in midlatitude cirrus clouds because populations of such small particles do not exist for long in the presence of the relatively high water-vapor supersaturations needed for ice-particle nucleation. PMID:12570270

  7. Cirrus cloud iridescence: a rare case study.

    PubMed

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2003-01-20

    On the evening of 25 November 1998, a cirrus cloud revealing the pastel colors of the iridescence phenomenon was photographed and studied by a polarization lidar system at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS). The diffraction of sunlight falling on relatively minute cloud particles, which display spatial gradients in size, is the cause of iridescence. According to the 14-year study of midlatitude cirrus clouds at FARS, cirrus rarely produce even poor iridescent patches, making this particularly long-lived and vivid occurrence unique. In this unusually high (13.2-14.4-km) and cold (-69.7 degrees to -75.5 degrees) tropopause-topped cirrus cloud, iridescence was noted from approximately 6.0 degrees to approximately 13.5 degrees from the Sun. On the basis of simple diffraction theory, this indicates the presence of particles of 2.5-5.5-microm effective diameter. The linear depolarization ratios of delta = 0.5 measured by the lidar verify that the cloud particles were nonspherical ice crystals. The demonstration that ice clouds can generate iridescence has led to the conclusion that iridescence is rarely seen in midlatitude cirrus clouds because populations of such small particles do not exist for long in the presence of the relatively high water-vapor supersaturations needed for ice-particle nucleation.

  8. Cirrus cloud iridescence: a rare case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    On the evening of 25 November 1998, a cirrus cloud revealing the pastel colors of the iridescence phenomenon was photographed and studied by a polarization lidar system at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS). The diffraction of sunlight falling on relatively minute cloud particles, which display spatial gradients in size, is the cause of iridescence. According to the 14-year study of midlatitude cirrus clouds at FARS, cirrus rarely produce even poor iridescent patches, making this particularly long-lived and vivid occurrence unique. In this unusually high (13.2-14.4-km) and cold (-69.7 ° to -75.5°) tropopause-topped cirrus cloud, iridescence was noted from ~6.0° to ~13.5° from the Sun. On the basis of simple diffraction theory, this indicates the presence of particles of 2.5-5.5-μm effective diameter. The linear depolarization ratios of δ = 0.5 measured by the lidar verify that the cloud particles were nonspherical ice crystals. The demonstration that ice clouds can generate iridescence has led to the conclusion that iridescence is rarely seen in midlatitude cirrus clouds because populations of such small particles do not exist for long in the presence of the relatively high water-vapor supersaturations needed for ice-particle nucleation.

  9. Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O'C.; DeMott, Paul J.; Cotton, Richard; Jensen, Eric; Sassen, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison (CPMC) is a project of the GEWEX Cloud System Study Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (GCSS WG2). The primary goal of this project is to identify cirrus model sensitivities to the state of our knowledge of nucleation and microphysics. Furthermore, the common ground of the findings may provide guidelines for models with simpler cirrus microphysics modules. We focus on the nucleation regimes of the warm (parcel starting at -40 C and 340 hPa) and cold (-60 C and 170 hPa) cases studied in the GCSS WG2 Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project. Nucleation and ice crystal growth were forced through an externally imposed rate of lift and consequent adiabatic cooling. The background haze particles are assumed to be lognormally-distributed H2SO4 particles. Only the homogeneous nucleation mode is allowed to form ice crystals in the HN-ONLY runs; all nucleation modes are switched on in the ALL-MODE runs. Participants were asked to run the HN-lambda-fixed runs by setting lambda = 2 (lambda is further discussed in section 2) or tailoring the nucleation rate calculation in agreement with lambda = 2 (exp 1). The depth of parcel lift (800 m) was set to assure that parcels underwent complete transition through the nucleation regime to a stage of approximate equilibrium between ice mass growth and vapor supplied by the specified updrafts.

  10. Height-resolved Scaling Properties of Tropospheric Water Vapour based on Airborne Lidar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Fischer, Lucas; Craig, George C.

    2013-04-01

    Two-dimensional vertical water vapour cross sections of the free troposphere between altitudes of 2 and 10 km, measured by nadir-viewing airborne differential-absorption lidar with high spatial resolution, were analyzed using structure functions up to the fifth order. We found scale invariance, i.e. a power-law dependency of structure function on length scale, for scales between 5 and 100 km, for the horizontal time series of water vapour mixing ratio. In contrast to one-dimensional in situ measurements, the two-dimensional water vapor lidar observations allow height-resolved analyses of power-law scaling exponents at a vertical resolution of 200 m. The data reveal significantly different scaling properties above and below an air-mass boundary. They stem from three very dissimilar aircraft campaigns: COPS/ETReC over middle and southern Europe in summer 2007, T-PARC around Japan mostly over sea in late summer 2008, and T-IPY around Spitsbergen over sea in winter 2008. After discarding flight segments with low lidar signals or large data gaps, and after averaging horizontally to a resolution of between 1 and 5 km to obtain a high signal to noise ratio, structure functions were computed for 20 flights at various heights, adding up to a length of more than 300,000 km. The power-law scaling exponents of the structure functions do not show significant latitudinal, seasonal or land/sea dependency, but they do differ between air masses influenced by moist convection and air masses aloft, not influenced. A classification of the horizontal water vapour time series into two groups according to whether the series occurred above or below the level of nearby convective cloud tops could be performed by detecting the cloud top height from the lidar backscatter signal in the corresponding flight segment. We found that the scaling exponents can be divided into two groups depending on the respective air mass: The smoothness of the time series, expressed by the first-order scaling

  11. Height-resolved Scaling Properties of Water Vapor in the Mesoscale using Airborne Lidar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, L.; Craig, G. C.; Kiemle, C.

    2012-12-01

    Free tropospheric water vapor variability, measured by long-range airborne differential-absorption lidar, has been analyzed by using structure functions of different orders at altitudes from 2 to 10 km. It is shown that the water vapor field exhibits scale invariance at spatial scales ranging from 5km to 100km, where scaling behavior is defined as a power law dependence of structure functions on length scale. In contrast to one-dimensional in situ measurements, two-dimensional water vapor lidar observations allow height-resolved analysis of scaling exponents with a vertical resolution of 200m. Using this data a clear distinction was found between scaling properties above and below an air-mass boundary. Data has been analysed from three campaigns, COPS/ETReC (2007) collected during summertime in middle and south Europe, T-PARC (2008) collected during late summer around Japan mostly over sea and T-IPY (2008) collected during winter around Spitsbergen mostly over sea. After discarding flights with low lidar signals or large data gaps, and after horizontal averaging to a resolution of 1-5km to obtain a high signal to noise ratio, structure functions were computed for 20 flights at various heights with a total length of more than 300,000 km. Scaling exponents were obtained for structure functions up to fifth order, and results will be presented for first and second order structure functions and for intermittency (variation of the scaling exponent with increasing order). The scaling exponents show no significant latitudinal, seasonal and land/sea dependence, but show significantly different behavior depending on whether the time series occured in an air mass influenced by cumulus convection or not. A classification of the time series into two groups according to whether the series occurred above or below the level of nearby convective cloud tops was performed by detecting the cloud height from the lidar backscatter signal of the corresponding flight. It was found that

  12. Subvisual cirrus detection via a multi-spectral decomposition method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Eric O.; Faust, Nickolaus; Baum, Bryan

    1990-01-01

    Lidar data collected on September 15, 1988 over Dayton (Ohio) were synchronized with NOAA satellite observations in order to investigate the feasibility of discriminating between observations of subvisual cirrus, other cirrus, and clear sky. It is concluded that the detection of subvisual cirrus currently requires 'ground-truth' information, such as lidar measurements, for cloud height determinations and for verification.

  13. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Distributions and Properties during the NASA DISCOVER-AQ Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Scarino, A. J.; Burton, S. P.; Harper, D. B.; Cook, A. L.; Berkoff, T.; Rogers, R. R.; Seaman, S. T.; Fenn, M. A.; Sawamura, P.; Clayton, M.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidars, HSRL-1 and HSRL-2, were deployed for the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) missions. DISCOVER-AQ provided systematic and concurrent observations of column-integrated, surface, and vertically-resolved distributions of aerosols and trace gases to improve the interpretation of satellite observations related to air quality. HSRL-1, deployed during the first DISCOVER-AQ mission over the Washington DC-Baltimore region, measured profiles of aerosol backscatter and depolarization (532, 1064 nm) and aerosol extinction and optical thickness (AOT) (532 nm). HSRL-2, the first airborne multiwavelength HSRL, was deployed for the following three DISCOVER-AQ missions over the California Central Valley, Houston, and Denver. HSRL-2 measures profiles of aerosol backscatter and depolarization (355, 532, 1064 nm) and aerosol extinction and AOT (355, 532 nm). Additional HSRL-2 data products include aerosol type, mixed layer depth, and range-resolved aerosol microphysical parameters. The HSRL measurements reveal the temporal, spatial, and vertical variability of aerosol optical properties over these locations. HSRL measurements show that surface PM2.5 concentrations were better correlated with near surface aerosol extinction than AOT scaled by the mixed layer height. During the missions over Washington DC-Baltimore, Houston, and Denver, only about 20-65% of AOT was within the mixed layer. In contrast, nearly all of the AOT was within the mixed layer over the California Central Valley. HSRL-2 retrievals of aerosol fine mode volume concentration and effective radius compare well with coincident airborne in situ measurements and vary with relative humidity. HSRL-2 retrievals of aerosol fine mode volume concentration were also used to derive PM2.5 concentrations which compare well with surface PM2.5 measurements.

  14. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  15. The Polarization Signature of Cirrus Clouds At Mm and Sub-mm Wavelength: Effect of Particle Size, Shape, and Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, J.

    Cirrus clouds can be found globally from the tropics to polar regions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. They are composed primarily of ice crystals in various shapes, with or without preferred orientation. Research shows that they have significant effects on the radiation budget of the Earth, on the water budget of the atmosphere, and therefore on the global climate. Information on the microphysical parameters of cirrus clouds is crucial to the understanding of the cirrus clouds impact on our climate. Recent work in both simulations and measurements has demonstrated the usefulness of passive millimeter and sub-millimeter radiometric measurements from space in determining cirrus cloud parameters such as the integrated ice water content (or ice water path) and the characteristic size of ice particles. However, these studies were mainly concerned with the information content of the radiometric inten- sity measurements, albeit some brief discussions on the potential of the polarization measurements were given in some literature. Frankly speaking, there is a shortage of systematic studies on the polarization signature from cirrus clouds at the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, i.e., how the polarization difference measured at two orthogonal polarizations is related to the ice particle size, the shape, and the orienta- tion. Here we present some results of a systematic analysis on the polarization effect of non-spherical ice particles. Three types of particles are considered: nearly spherical, cylindrical, and plate-like particles. Studies are carried out at the following 7 frequen- cies: 90, 157, 220, 340, 463, 683, and 874 GHz. Among these frequencies some (e.g. 90, 157, 220, and 340 GHz) have been tested in space-borne or air-borne sensors and some (e.g. 463, 683, and 874 GHz) are proved by simulations to be well suited for cirrus clouds measurements and therefore planned currently for a future satellite mis- sion.

  16. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    The results presented here show that tropical convection plays a role in each of the three primary processes involved in the in situ formation of tropopause cirrus. First, tropical convection transports moisture from the surface into the upper troposphere. Second, tropical convection excites Rossby waves that transport zonal momentum toward the ITCZ, thereby generating rising motion near the equator. This rising motion helps transport moisture from where it is detrained from convection to the cold-point tropopause. Finally, tropical convection excites vertically propagating tropical waves (e.g. Kelvin waves) that provide one source of large-scale cooling near the cold-point tropopause, leading to tropopause cirrus formation.

  17. Small particle cirrus observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Eldering, A.; Fishbein, E. F.

    2003-04-01

    , Accelerated monochromatic radiative transfer for scattering atmospheres: Application of a new model to spectral radiance observations. J. Geophys. Res., 102, 21,853-21,866, 1997. Rathke, C., and J. Fischer, Retrieval of cloud microphysical properties from thermal infrared observations by a fast iterative radiance fitting method, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 17, 1509-1524, 2000. Smith, W.L., S. Ackerman, H. Revercomb, H. Huang, D.H. DeSlover, W. Feltz, L. Gumley, and A. Collard, Infrared spectral absorption of nearly invisible cirrus clouds. Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 1137-1140, 1998. Strabala, K.I., S.A. Ackerman, and W.P. Menzel, Cloud properties inferred from 8-12 micron data. J. Appl. Meteor., 33, 212-229, 1994.

  18. The origin of midlatitude ice clouds and the resulting influence on their microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, Anna; Rolf, Christian; Costa, Anja; Afchine, Armin; Avallone, Linnea; Borrmann, Stephan; Baumgardner, Darrel; Klingebiel, Marcus; Kraemer, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Ice clouds are known to play an important role in the radiative balance of the atmosphere. The nature of this role is determined by the macrophysical and microphysical properties of a cloud. Thus, it is crucial that we have an accurate understanding of properties such as the ice water content (IWC), ice crystal concentration (Ni), and ice crystal size (Ri). However, these properties are difficult to parameterize due to their large variability and the fact that they are influenced by a number of other factors such as temperature, vertical velocity, relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), and the available ice nuclei. The combination of those factors ultimately establishes whether heterogeneous or homogeneous nucleation will lead to ice crystal formation. The aforementioned factors are largely determined by the dynamics of the environment in which the ice cloud forms, collectively contained in a meteorological situation. Ice clouds have been observed in a variety of situations such as frontal systems, jet streams, gravity waves, and convective systems. Most recently, the concept of the influence of large-scale dynamics on midlatitude cirrus properties has been demonstrated in the work of Muehlbauer et al. (2014). In the work presented here, we explore this concept further by examining how differences in dynamics are translated into the differences in IWC, Ni, and Ri that are found within and between datasets. Data from two American-based campaigns, the 2004 Midlatitude Cirrus Experiment (MidCiX) and the 2011 Midlatitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX), as well as some European-based campaigns, the 2004 and 2006 CIRRUS campaigns, the 2013 AIRTOSS-ICE campaign, and the 2014 ML-CIRRUS campaign are combined to form a large, and more latitudinally comprehensive database of Northern Hemisphere in-situ, midlatitude ice cloud observations. We have divided the data by meteorological situation and explored the differences and similarities between

  19. Understanding Ice Supersaturation, Particle Growth, and Number Concentration in Cirrus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O.; Yang, P.

    2008-12-10

    Many factors control the ice supersaturation and microphysical properties in cirrus clouds. We explore the effects of dynamic forcing, ice nucleation mechanisms, and ice crystal growth rate on the evolution and distribution of water vapor and cloud properties in cirrus clouds using a detailed microphysical model and remote sensing measurements obtained at the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility located near Lamont, OK. To help understand dynamic scales important in cirrus formation, we force the model using both large-scale forcing derived using ARM variational analysis, and mean mesoscale velocity derived from radar Doppler velocity measurements. Both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation processes are explored, where we have implemented a rigorous classical theory heterogeneous nucleation scheme to compare with empirical representations. We evaluate model simulations by examining both bulk cloud properties and distributions of measured radar reflectivity, lidar extinction, and water vapor profiles, as well as retrieved cloud microphysical properties. This approach allows for independent verification of both the large and small particle modes of the particle size distribution. Our results suggest that mesoscale variability is the primary mechanism needed to reproduce observed quantities, while nucleation mechanism is secondary. Slow ice crystal growth tends to overestimate the number of small ice crystals, but does not seem to influence bulk properties such as ice water path and cloud thickness. The most realistic simulations as compared with observations are forced using mesoscale waves, include fast ice crystal growth, and initiate ice by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. Ice crystal number concentrations on the order of 10-100 L-1 produce results consistent with both lidar and radar observations during a cirrus event observed on 7 December 1999, which has an optical depth range typical of

  20. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 μm) and angular range (180°) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  1. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  2. The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, D.; DeMott, P.; Cotten, R.; Jensen, E.; Sassen, K.

    2000-01-01

    The cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal nucleation and growth for specified, typical, cirrus cloud environments. In Phase 1 of the project reported here, simulated cirrus cloud microphysical properties are compared for situations of "warm" (-40 C) and "cold" (-60 C) cirrus subject to updrafts of 4, 20 and 100 centimeters per second, respectively. Five models are participating in the project. These models employ explicit microphysical schemes wherein the size distribution of each class of particles (aerosols and ice crystals) is resolved into bins. Simulations are made including both homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms. A single initial aerosol population of sulfuric acid particles is prescribed for all simulations. To isolate the treatment of the homogeneous freezing (of haze drops) nucleation process, the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is disabled for a second parallel set of simulations. Qualitative agreement is found amongst the models for the homogeneous-nucleation-only simulations, e.g., the number density of nucleated ice crystals increases with the strength of the prescribed updraft. However, non-negligible quantitative differences are found. Systematic bias exists between results of a model based on a modified classical theory approach and models using an effective freezing temperature approach to the treatment of nucleation. Each approach is constrained by critical freezing data from laboratory studies. This information is necessary, but not sufficient, to construct consistent formulae for the two approaches. Large haze particles may deviate considerably from equilibrium size in moderate to strong updrafts (20-100 centimeters per second) at -60 C when the commonly invoked equilibrium assumption is lifted. The resulting difference in particle-size-dependent solution concentration of haze particles may significantly affect the ice nucleation rate during the initial

  3. Ground Based Lidar Characterization of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents cirrus cloud observations made with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and the Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL). The HSRL was redesigned to use an iodine absorption filter in place of the Fabry-Perot etalon that was used for spectral separation of the aerosol and molecular lidar returns. These modifications, which improve both sensitivity and calibration stability, are described.

  4. Sub-visual Cirrus detection and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E.; Grams, G.; Patterson, E.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of archived cold optics (COR) radiometer data is yielding useful information on the diurnal, geographic, seasonal and altitude variability of atmospheric background radiance levels in the 11 micron window region. This database is a compilation of Kuiper Infrared Technology Experiment (KITE) and Atmospheric Radiance Study (ARS) observations under a wide variety of conditions. Correlating the measurements from these two studies with the LOWTRAN model code has revealed several important results. First, the 11 micron window appears to be filled-in, i.e., the troughs on either side of the nitric acid peak are shallower than expected. Second, the amplitude of the background radiances measured exceeds the model predictions by a factor of 2 to 3 or more. This is thought to be due to the existence of thin, high altitude cirrus clouds (sub-visual cirrus) above the sensor platform. These high background levels are observed under quiescent conditions in the South Pacific (Marshall Islands), as well as over the continental United States (the West Coast). In the tropics, there appears to be little diurnal variability, a plausible seasonal variation and a linear dependence between 7.2 and 11.4 micron band data, indicating possible multi-spectral approaches to detection of sub-visual cirrus clouds. Theoretical analysis of the magnitude of the effects of a sub-visual cirrus cloud on atmospheric background radiances measured by a near-horizontal sensor is in progress.

  5. Studying the influence of temperature and pressure on microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreea, Boscornea; Sabina, Stefan; Sorin-Nicolae, Vajaiac; Mihai, Cimpuieru

    2015-04-01

    One cloud type for which the formation and evolution process is not well-understood is the mixed-phase type. In general mixed-phase clouds consist of liquid droplets and ice crystals. The temperature interval within both liquid droplets and ice crystals can potentially coexist is limited to 0 °C and - 40 °C. Mixed-phase clouds account for 20% to 30% of the global cloud coverage. The need to understand the microphysical characteristics of mixed-phase clouds to improve numerical forecast modeling and radiative transfer calculation is of major interest in the atmospheric community. In the past, studies of cloud phase composition have been significantly limited by a lack of aircraft instruments capable of discriminating between the ice and liquid phase for a wide range of particle sizes. Presently, in situ airborne measurements provide the most accurate information about cloud microphysical characteristics. This information can be used for verification of both numerical models and cloud remote-sensing techniques. The knowledge of the temperature and pressure variation during the airborne measurements is crucial in order to understand their influence on the cloud dynamics and also their role in the cloud formation processes like accretion and coalescence. Therefore, in this paper is presented a comprehensive study of cloud microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds in focus of the influence of temperature and pressure variation on both, cloud dynamics and the cloud formation processes, using measurements performed with the ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research in property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS). The airborne laboratory equipped for special research missions is based on a Hawker Beechcraft - King Air C90 GTx aircraft and is equipped with a sensors system CAPS - Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (30 bins, 0.51-50 µm) and a HAWKEYE cloud probe. The analyzed data in this

  6. Comparison of CALIPSO-Like, LaRC, and MODIS Retrievals of Ice Cloud Properties over SIRTA in France and Florida during CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiriaco, M.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Minnis, P.; Noel, V.; Platnick, S.; McGill, M.; Baumgardner, D.; Dubuisson, P.; Pelon, J.; Spangenberg, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Wind, G.

    2007-01-01

    This study compares cirrus particle effective radius retrieved by a CALIPSO-like method with two similar methods using MODIS, MODI Airborne Simulator (MAS), and GOES imagery. The CALIPSO-like method uses lidar measurements coupled with the split-window technique that uses the infrared spectral information contained at the 8.65-micrometer, 11.15-micrometer and 12.05-micrometer bands to infer the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds. The two other methods, sing passive remote sensing at visible and infrared wavelengths, are the operational MODIS cloud products (referred to by its archival product identifier MOD06 for MODIS Terra) and MODIS retrievals performed by the CERES team at LaRC (Langley Research Center) in support of CERES algorithms; the two algorithms will be referred to as MOD06- and LaRC-method, respectively. The three techniques are compared at two different latitudes: (i) the mid-latitude ice clouds study uses 18 days of observations at the Palaiseau ground-based site in France (SIRTA: Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique) including a ground-based 532 nm lidar and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) overpasses on the Terra Platform, (ii) the tropical ice clouds study uses 14 different flight legs of observations collected in Florida, during the intensive field experiment CRYSTAL-FACE (Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment), including the airborne Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the MAS. The comparison of the three methods gives consistent results for the particle effective radius and the optical thickness, but discrepancies in cloud detection and altitudes. The study confirms the value of an active remote-sensing method (CALIPSO-like) for the study of sub-visible ice clouds, in both mid-latitudes and tropics. Nevertheless, this method is not reliable in optically very thick tropical ice clouds.

  7. SUCCESS Evidence for Cirrus Cloud Ice Nucleation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    During the SUCCESS mission, several measurements were made which should improve our understanding of ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. Temperature and water vapor concentration were made with a variety of instruments on the NASA DC-8. These observations should provide accurate upper tropospheric humidities. In particular, we will evaluate what humidities are required for ice nucleation. Preliminary results suggest that substantial supersaturations frequently exist in the upper troposphere. The leading-edge region of wave-clouds (where ice nucleation occurs) was sampled extensively at temperatures near -40 and -60C. These observations should give precise information about conditions required for ice nucleation. In addition, we will relate the observed aerosol composition and size distributions to the ice formation observed to evaluate the role of soot or mineral particles on ice nucleation. As an alternative technique for determining what particles act as ice nuclei, numerous samples of aerosols inside ice crystals were taken. In some cases, large numbers of aerosols were detected in each crystal, indicating that efficient scavenging occurred. Analysis of aerosols in ice crystals when only one particle per crystal was detected should help with the ice nucleation issue. Direct measurements of the ice nucleating activity of ambient aerosols drawn into airborne cloud chambers were also made. Finally, measurements of aerosols and ice crystals in contrails should indicate whether aircraft exhaust soot particles are effective ice nuclei.

  8. Estimation of cirrus cloud particle fallspeeds from vertically pointing Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Brad W.; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment 2 (FIRE 2) was conducted in Coffeyville, Kansas in late 1991 to study the microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds. A variety of active and passive remote sensors were employed, including an 8-mm-wavelength cloud-sensing Doppler radar developed at the Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL). The radar, having excellent sensitivity to cloud particles (-30 dBZ at 10 km), good spatial resolution (37 m), and velocity precision (.05 ms -1), is an excellent tool for observing cirrus clouds. Having this radar directed toward the zenith for long periods of time during FIRE 2 permitted the reflectivity-weighted particle fallspeed to be related to reflectivity which allowed a separation of ice particle fallspeeds from vertical air motions. Additionally, such relationships proved useful in other multi-sensor techniques for determining vertical profiles of ice particle characteristic size and ice water content in cirrus clouds. The analysis method and the results of applying it to cirrus cloud reflectivity and velocity data collected during FIRE 2 are discussed.

  9. Cirrus Cloud Seeding has Potential to Cool Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storelvmo, T.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Muri, H.; Pfeffer, M.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2013-01-01

    Cirrus clouds, thin ice clouds in the upper troposphere, have a net warming effect on Earth s climate. Consequently, a reduction in cirrus cloud amount or optical thickness would cool the climate. Recent research indicates that by seeding cirrus clouds with particles that promote ice nucleation, their lifetimes and coverage could be reduced. We have tested this hypothesis in a global climate model with a state-of-the-art representation of cirrus clouds and find that cirrus cloud seeding has the potential to cancel the entire warming caused by human activity from pre-industrial times to present day. However, the desired effect is only obtained for seeding particle concentrations that lie within an optimal range. With lower than optimal particle concentrations, a seeding exercise would have no effect. Moreover, a higher than optimal concentration results in an over-seeding that could have the deleterious effect of prolonging cirrus lifetime and contributing to global warming.

  10. Microphysical fundamentals governing cirrus cloud growth: Modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Dodd, Gregory C.; Starr, David

    1990-01-01

    For application to Global Climate Models, large scale numerical models of cirrus cloud formation and maintenance need to be refined to more reliably simulate the effects and feedbacks of high level clouds. A key aspect is how ice crystal growth is initiated in cirrus, which has started a cloud microphysical controversy between camps either believing that heterogeneous or homogeneous drop freezing is predominantly responsible for cold cirrus ice crystal nucleation. In view of convincing evidence for the existence of highly supercooled cloud droplets in the middle and upper troposphere, however, it is concluded that active ice nuclei are rather scarce at cirrus cloud altitudes, and so a new understanding of cirrus cloud formation is needed. This understanding is sought through an examination of cirrus cloud growth models.

  11. Long-term trend analysis and climatology of tropical cirrus clouds using 16 years of lidar data set over Southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, A. K.; Gadhavi, H. S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Raghunath, K.; Rao, S. V. B.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Sixteen-year (1998-2013) climatology of cirrus clouds and their macrophysical (base height, top height and geometrical thickness) and optical properties (cloud optical thickness) observed using a ground-based lidar over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India, is presented. The climatology obtained from the ground-based lidar is compared with the climatology obtained from 7 and a half years (June 2006-December 2013) of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations. A very good agreement is found between the two climatologies in spite of their opposite viewing geometries and the differences in sampling frequencies. Nearly 50-55 % of cirrus clouds were found to possess geometrical thickness less than 2 km. Ground-based lidar is found to detect a higher number of sub-visible clouds than CALIOP which has implications for global warming studies as sub-visible cirrus clouds have significant positive radiative forcing. Cirrus clouds with mid-cloud temperatures between -50 to -70 °C have a mean geometrical thickness greater than 2 km in contrast to the earlier reported value of 1.7 km. Trend analyses reveal a statistically significant increase in the altitude of sub-visible cirrus clouds which is consistent with the recent climate model simulations. The mid-cloud altitude of sub-visible cirrus clouds is found to be increasing at the rate of 41 ± 21 m year-1. Statistically significant decrease in optical thickness of sub-visible and thick cirrus clouds is observed. Also, the fraction of sub-visible cirrus cloud is found to have increased by 9 % in the last 16 years (1998 to 2013). This increase is mainly compensated by a 7 % decrease in thin cirrus cloud fraction. This has implications for the temperature and water vapour budget in the tropical tropopause layer.

  12. The NOAA Water Instrument: A Two-Channel, Tunable Diode Laser-Based Hygrometer for Measurement of Water Vapor and Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed-phase) from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. Combining the measurements from the two channels allows the determination of cloud ice water content (IWC), an important metric for evaluating the radiative properties of cirrus clouds. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An on-board calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cirrus IWC sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on board the Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1 σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol/mol), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33-48 for ice particles larger than 8 µm in diameter, depending primarily

  13. Seeding cirrus clouds could drive global net cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    Cirrus clouds—thin, wispy streamers that form in the upper troposphere when ice crystals nucleate around small dust or metallic particles—have a net warming effect on climate. Previous studies have suggested that seeding cirrus clouds with an overload of dust particles reduces their formation and lifespan, thus leading to a net cooling effect on global climate. Recently, however, research has raised questions regarding how exactly cirrus clouds form, which has implications for seeding strategies.

  14. Seasonal and interannual changes in cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    Statistics on cirrus clouds using the multispectral data from the GOES/VAS satellite have been collected since 1985. The method used to diagnose cirrus clouds and a summary of the first two years of data was given in Wylie and Menzel (1989) and at the 1988 FIRE meeting in Vail, CO. This study was expanded to three years of data which allows a more detailed discussion of the geographical and seasonal changes in cloud cover. Interannual changes in cloud cover also were studied. GOES/VAS cloud retrievals also were compared to atmospheric dynamic parameters and to radiative attenuation data taken by a lidar. Some of the highlights of these studies are discussed.

  15. Variability of cirrus clouds in a convective outflow during the Hibiscus campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierli, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Cairo, F.; Marécal, V.; Zampieri, M.; Orlandi, E.; Durry, G.

    2008-08-01

    Light-weight microlidar and water vapour measurements were taken on-board a stratospheric balloon during the HIBISCUS 2004 campaign, held in Bauru, Brazil (49° W, 22° S). Cirrus clouds were observed throughout the flight between 12 and 15 km height with a high mesoscale variability in optical and microphysical properties. It was found that the cirrus clouds were composed of different layers characterized by marked differences in height, thickness and optical properties. Simultaneous water vapour observations show that the different layers are characterized by different values of the saturation with respect to ice. A mesoscale simulation and a trajectory analysis clearly revealed that the clouds had formed in the outflow of a large and persistent convective region and that the observed variability of the optical properties and of the cloud structure is likely linked to the different residence times of the convectively-processed air in the upper troposphere.

  16. Glassy aerosols heterogeneously nucleate cirrus ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Dobbie, Steven; Cui, Zhiqiang; Al-Jumur, Sardar M. R. K.; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin; Wagner, Robert; Benz, Stefan; Niemand, Monika; Saathoff, Harald; Ebert, Volker; Wagner, Steven; Kärcher, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Ice clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, ~12-18 km, ~180-200 K) play a key role in dehydrating air entering the stratosphere. However, in-situ measurements show that air within these clouds is unexpectedly supersaturated(1); normally the growth of ice crystals rapidly quenches any supersaturation. A number of explanations for high in-cloud humidity have been put forward, but recent research suggests high humidity may be related to the low numbers of ice crystals found within these clouds(1). Low ice number densities can be produced through selective nucleation by a small subset of aerosol particles. This is inconsistent with homogeneous nucleation of ice in liquid aerosols. However, droplets rich in organic material, ubiquitous in the TTL, are known to become glassy (amorphous, non-crystalline solid) under TTL conditions(2,3). Here we show, using a large cloud simulation chamber, that glassy solution droplets nucleate ice heterogeneously at low supersaturations. Using a one-dimensional cirrus model we also show that nucleation by glassy aerosol in the TTL may explain low TTL ice number densities and high in-cloud humidity. Recent measurements of the composition of TTL cirrus residues are consistent with our findings(4). (1) Krämer, M. et al. Ice supersaturations and cirrus cloud crystal numbers. Atm. Chem. Phys. 9, 3505-3522 (2009). (2) Murray, B. J. Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid droplets. Atm. Chem. Phys. 8, 5423-5433 (2008). (3) Zobrist, B., Marcolli, C., Pedernera, D. A. & Koop, T. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses? Atm. Chem. Phys. 8, 5221-5244 (2008). (4) Froyd, K. D., Murphy, D. M., Lawson, P., Baumgardner, D. & Herman, R. L. Aerosols that form subvisible cirrus at the tropical tropopause. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 209-218 (2010).

  17. Nitric acid depressions in and near midlatitude cirrus clouds during TRACE-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zondlo, M. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Clarke, A.; Kosciuch, E.; Mauldin, R. L.; Eisele, F. L.

    2003-12-01

    Cirrus cloud ice particles have been implicated in scavenging a wide variety soluble and semisoluble species. Species removed by an ice surface can undergo a number of significant processes including heterogeneous reactions with other adsorbed species, vertical redistribution in the troposphere from sedimenting particles, or modifying the microphysical properties of the ice particle. Nitric acid (HNO3) has been shown in the laboratory to readily adsorb onto ice surfaces, and modeling studies suggest significant perturbations to its distribution can result. Unfortunately, field observations of HNO3 within and near cirrus clouds have shown mixed and sometimes contradictory results. The NASA P-3B aircraft sampled numerous upper tropospheric, mid-latitude ice clouds during Flight 24 of the NASA TRACE-P field experiment. In contrast to tropical cirrus clouds, the cirrus ice clouds sampled by the P-3B were at warmer temperatures of -17 to -32 degrees Celsius and at pressures of 365-436 mb. The clouds' origins ranged from jet stream induced cirrostratus clouds to convectively-induced cirrus anvils. Nitric acid levels decreased 60-70 pptv (35-60%) within the clouds compared to areas just outside of it. Slight asymmetries in the HNO3 profiles around the cloud were noted, with the lee or downwind sides of clouds containing more gradual returns from inside cloud levels to "background" levels, potentially due to greater mixing as the cloud evaporated. If HNO3 removed inside the cloud were distributed evenly onto ice surfaces, approximately one tenth of a monolayer of HNO3 was adsorbed onto ice (based on estimates of ice surface area density of 5000 microns squared per cubic centimeter). The incorporation of HNO3 into existing liquid quaternary NH3/H2SO4/HNO3/H2O aerosols within the cloud could also be important due to the sampling location over central North America where elevated NH3 emissions exist. The midlatitude HNO3/cirrus cases observed on the P-3B will be contrasted to

  18. Formation of a Tropopause Cirrus Layer Observed over Florida during CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Thaopaul; Weinheimer, Andrew; Weinstock, Elliot; Smith, Jessica; Pittman, Jasna; Baumgardner, Darrel; Lawson, Paul; McGill, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    On July 13, 2002 a widespread, subvisible tropopause cirrus layer occurred over the Florida region. This cloud was observed in great detail with the NASA Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) instrumentation, including in situ measurements with the WB-57 aircraft. In this paper, we use the 13 July cloud as a case study to evaluate the physical processes controlling the formation and evolution of tropopause cirrus layers. Microphysics measurements indicate that ice crystal diameters in the cloud layer ranged from about 7 to 50 microns, and the peak number mode was about 10-25 microns. In situ water vapor and temperature measurements in the cloud indicated supersaturation with respect to ice throughout, with ice saturation ratios as large as 1.8. Even when the ice surface area density was as high as about 500 sq microns/cu cm, ice supersaturations of 20-30% were observed. Trajectory analysis shows that the air sampled near the tropopause on this day generally came from the north and cooled considerably during the previous few days. Examination of infrared satellite imagery along air parcel back trajectories from the WB-57 flight track indicates that the tropopause cloud layer formation was, in general, not simply left over ice from recently generated anvil cirrus. Simulations of cloud formation using time-height curtains of temperature along the trajectory paths show that the cloud could have formed in situ near the tropopause as the air was advected into the south Florida region and cooled to unusually low temperatures. If we assume a high threshold for ice nucleation via homogeneous freezing of aqueous sulfate aerosols, the model reproduces the observed cloud structure, ice crystal size distributions, and ice supersaturation statistics. Inclusion of observed gravity wave temperature perturbations in the simulations is essential to reproduce the observed cloud properties. Without waves, crystal

  19. SUCCESS Studies of the Impact of Aircraft on Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    During April of 1996 NASA will sponsor the SUCCESS project to better understand the impact of subsonic aircraft on the Earth's radiation budget. We plan to better determine the radiative properties of cirrus clouds and of contrails so that satellite observations can better determine their impact on Earth's radiation budget. We hope to determine how cirrus clouds form, whether the exhaust from subsonic aircraft presently affects the formation of cirrus clouds, and if the exhaust does affect the clouds whether the changes induced are of climatological significance. We seek to pave the way for future studies by developing and testing several new instruments. We also plan to better determine the characteristics of gaseous and particulate exhaust products from subsonic aircraft and their evolution in the region near the aircraft. In order to achieve our experimental objectives we plan to use the DC-8 aircraft as an in situ sampling platform. It will carry a wide variety of gaseous, particulate, radiative, and meteorological instruments. We will also use a T-39 aircraft primarily to sample the exhaust from other aircraft. It will carry a suite of instruments to measure particles and gases. We will employ an ER-2 aircraft as a remote sensing platform. The ER-2 will act as a surrogate satellite so that remote sensing observations can be related to the in situ parameters measured by the DC-8 and T-39. The mission strategy calls for a 5 week deployment beginning on April 8, 1996, and ending on May 10, 1996. During this time all three aircraft will be based in Salina, Kansas. A series of flights, averaging one every other day during this period, will be made mainly near the Department of Energy's Climate and Radiation Testbed site (CART) located in Northern Oklahoma, and Southern Kansas. During this same time period an extensive set of ground based measurements will be made by the DOE, which will also be operating several aircraft in the area to better understand the

  20. The influence of coal physical and mechanical properties and mining energy consumption factor on airborne respirable dust level

    SciTech Connect

    Koziel, A.; Malec, M.; Wardas, E.

    1999-07-01

    The fact that there are not any explicitly defined relationships describing the influence of physical and mechanical properties of coal and of energy consumption factor on dust level prompted Polish and American investigators to carry out a joint research project within the framework of the US-Poland Maria Sklodowska-Curie Joint Fund II. The paper presents methods used to perform tests under laboratory conditions at the Pittsburgh Research Laboratory as well as under real conditions in the course of coal cutting in Polish coal mines. Measuring systems and results of the tests are described. The analysis carried out has provided a basis for determining the influence of specified operational parameters, i.e., coal compression strength R{sub c}, coal cuttability factor A, energy consumption factor of mining E{sub uc}, load of cutting drums as well as of laboratory parameters, i.e., grindability, coal breakage characteristics (product size distribution), moisture content, volatile and fixed carbon content, specific energy of crushing on a level of generated dust (total dust, specific dust and airborne respirable dust). The effect of technical parameters, i.e., face height, airflow velocity in a face, amount and pressure of water in spraying systems of longwall shearers, depth of cut taken by a cutting drum and application of powered cowls on dust level under operating conditions are also presented. Results of the tests made it possible to work out guidelines relating to methods and technology for effective reduction of dust emission on longwall faces.

  1. Can cirrus clouds warm early Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of the ancient valley networks on Mars indicates a climate 3.8 Ga that was warm enough to allow substantial liquid water to flow on the martian surface for extended periods of time. However, the origin of these enigmatic features is hotly debated and discussion of their formation has been focused on how warm such a climate may have been and for how long. Recent warm and wet solutions using single-column radiative convective models involve supplementing CO2-H2O atmospheres with other greenhouse gases, such as H2 (i.e. Ramirez et al., 2014; Batalha et al., 2015). An interesting recent proposal, using the CAM 3-D General Circulation model, argues that global cirrus cloud decks in CO2-H2O atmospheres with at least 0.25 bar of CO2 , consisting of 10-micron (and larger) sized particles, could have generated the above-freezing temperatures required to explain the early martian surface geology (Urata and Toon, 2013). Here, we use our single-column radiative convective climate model to check these 3-D results and analyze the likelihood that such warm atmospheres, with mean surface pressures of up to 3 bar, could have supported cirrus cloud decks at full and fractional cloud cover for sufficiently long durations to form the ancient valleys. Our results indicate that cirrus cloud decks could have provided the mean surface temperatures required, but only if cloud cover approaches 100%, in agreement with Urata and Toon (2013). However, even should cirrus cloud coverage approach 100%, we show that such atmospheres are likely to have been too short-lived to produce the volumes of water required to carve the ancient valleys. At more realistic early Mars cloud fractions (~50%, Forget et al., 2013), cirrus clouds do not provide the required warming. Batalha, N., Domagal-Goldman, S. D., Ramirez, R.M., & Kasting, J. F., 2015. Icarus, 258, 337-349. Forget, F., Wordsworth, R., Millour, E., Madeleine, J. B., Kerber, L., Leconte, J., ... & Haberle, R. M., 2013. Icarus, 222

  2. Effects of cirrus composition on atmospheric radiation budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    1988-01-01

    A radiative transfer model that can be used to determine the change in solar and infrared fluxes caused by variations in the composition of cirrus clouds was used to investigate the importance of particle size and shape on the radiation budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. Even though the cloud optical thickness dominates the radiative properties of ice clouds, the particle size and nonsphericity of ice crystals are also important in calculations of the transfer of near-IR solar wavelengths. Results show that, for a given optical thickness, ice clouds composed of larger particles would produce larger greenhouse effects than those composed of smaller particles. Moreover, spherical particles with equivalent surface areas, frequently used for ice crystal clouds, would lead to an overestimation of the greenhouse effect.

  3. Understanding Ice Supersaturation, Particle Growth, and Number Concentration in Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O'C.; Yang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Many factors control the ice supersaturation and microphysical properties in cirrus clouds. We explore the effects of dynamic forcing, ice nucleation mechanisms, and ice crystal growth rate on the evolution and distribution of water vapor and cloud properties in nighttime cirrus clouds using a one-dimensional cloud model with bin microphysics and remote sensing measurements obtained at the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility located near Lamont, OK. We forced the model using both large-scale vertical ascent and, for the first time, mean mesoscale velocity derived from radar Doppler velocity measurements. Both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation processes are explored, where a classical theory heterogeneous scheme is compared with empirical representations. We evaluated model simulations by examining both bulk cloud properties and distributions of measured radar reflectivity, lidar extinction, and water vapor profiles, as well as retrieved cloud microphysical properties. Our results suggest that mesoscale variability is the primary mechanism needed to reproduce observed quantities. Model sensitivity to the ice growth rate is also investigated. The most realistic simulations as compared with observations are forced using mesoscale waves, include fast ice crystal growth, and initiate ice by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. Simulated ice crystal number concentrations (tens to hundreds particles per liter) are typically two orders of magnitude smaller than previously published results based on aircraft measurements in cirrus clouds, although higher concentrations are possible in isolated pockets within the nucleation zone.

  4. Atmospheric correction of AVIRIS data of Monterey Bay contaminated by thin cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbosch, Jeannette; Davis, Curtiss O.; Mobley, Curtis D.; Rhea, W. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Point source measurements (e.g. sun photometer data, weather station observations) are often used to constrain radiative transfer models such as MODTRAN/LOWTRAN7 when atmospherically correcting AVIRIS imagery. The basic assumption is that the atmosphere is horizontally homogeneous throughout the entire area. If the target area of interest is isolated a distance away from the point measurement position, the calculated visibility and atmospheric profiles may not be characteristic of the atmosphere over the target. AVIRIS scenes are often rejected when cloud cover exceeds 10%. However, if the cloud cover is determined to be primarily cirrus rather than cumulus, in-water optical properties may still be extracted over open ocean. High altitude cirrus clouds are non-absorbing at 744 nm. If the optical properties of the AVIRIS scene can be determined from the 744 nm band itself, the atmospheric conditions during the overflight may be deduced.

  5. Airborne Transparencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Lois Thommason

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a science project on flight, art students discussed and investigated various means of moving in space. Then they made acetate illustrations which could be used as transparencies. The projection phenomenon made the illustrations look airborne. (CS)

  6. Retrieve Optically Thick Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties by Using Airborne Dual-Wavelength Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm to retrieve optically thick ice cloud microphysical property profiles is developed by using the GSFC 9.6 GHz ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) and the 94 GHz Cloud Radar System (CRS) measurements aboard the high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. In situ size distribution and total water content data from the CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign are used for the algorithm development. To reduce uncertainty in calculated radar reflectivity factors (Ze) at these wavelengths, coincident radar measurements and size distribution data are used to guide the selection of mass-length relationships and to deal with the density and non-spherical effects of ice crystals on the Ze calculations. The algorithm is able to retrieve microphysical property profiles of optically thick ice clouds, such as, deep convective and anvil clouds, which are very challenging for single frequency radar and lidar. Examples of retrieved microphysical properties for a deep convective clouds are presented, which show that EDOP and CRS measurements provide rich information to study cloud structure and evolution. Good agreement between IWPs derived from an independent submillimeter-wave radiometer, CoSSIR, and dual-wavelength radar measurements indicates accuracy of the IWC retrieved from the two-frequency radar algorithm.

  7. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  8. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, T.; McMeeking, G.; Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Coe, H.; Krejci, R.

    2012-08-01

    In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm-3 stp. Nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C) to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  9. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, T.; McMeeking, G.; Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Coe, H.; Krejci, R.

    2012-12-01

    In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm-3 stp. Ultra-fine particles as indicators for nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C) to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  10. Measurements of Ice Particles in Tropical Cirrus Anvils: Importance in Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Theodore; Arnott, William P.; Hallett, John; Pueschel, Rudi; Strawn, Anthony W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cirrus is important in the radiation balance of the global atmosphere, both at solar and thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths. In particular cirrus produced by deep convection over the oceans in the tropics may be critical in controlling processes whereby energy from warm tropical oceans is injected to different levels in the tropical atmosphere to subsequently influence not only tropical but mid latitude climate. Details of the cloud composition may differentiate between a net cooling or warming at these levels. The cloud composition may change depending on the input of nuclei from volcanic or other sources. Observations of cirrus during the FIRE-2 Project over Coffeyville, Kansas and by satellite demonstrate that cirrus, on occasion, is composed not only of larger particles with significant fall velocity (few hundred micrometers, 0.5 m/s) but much more numerous small particles, size 10-20 micrometers, with small fall velocity (cm/s), which may sometimes dominate the radiation field. This is consistent with emissivity measurements. In the thermal IR, ice absorption is strong, so that ice particles only 10 micrometers thick are opaque, at some wavelengths; on the other hand at other wavelengths and in the visible, ice is only moderately to weakly absorbing. It follows that for strongly absorbing wavelengths the average projected area of the ice particles is the important parameter, in weakly absorbing regions it is the volume (mass) of ice which is important. The shape of particles and also their internal structure may also have significant effect on their radiative properties. In order to access the role of cirrus in the radiation budget it is necessary to measure the distribution of ice particles sizes, shapes and concentrations in the regions of interest. A casual observation of any cirrus cloud shows that there is variability down to a scale of at least a few 100 m; this is confirmed by radar and lidar remote sensing. Thus aircraft measurements designed to give

  11. GCSS Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David OC.; Benedetti, Angela; Boehm, Matt; Brown, Philip R. A.; Gierens, Klaus; Girard, Eric; Giraud, Vincent; Jakob, Christian; Jensen, Eric; Khvorostyanov, Vitaly; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The GCSS Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2) is conducting a systematic comparison and evaluation of cirrus cloud models. This fundamental activity seeks to support the improvement of models used for climate simulation and numerical weather prediction through assessment and improvement of the "process" models underlying parametric treatments of cirrus cloud processes in large-scale models. The WG2 Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project is an initial comparison of cirrus cloud simulations by a variety of cloud models for a series of idealized situations with relatively simple initial conditions and forcing. The models (16) represent the state-of-the-art and include 3-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) models, two-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs), and single column model (SCM) versions of GCMs. The model microphysical components are similarly varied, ranging from single-moment bulk (relative humidity) schemes to fully size-resolved (bin) treatments where ice crystal growth is explicitly calculated. Radiative processes are included in the physics package of each model. The baseline simulations include "warm" and "cold" cirrus cases where cloud top initially occurs at about -47C and -66C, respectively. All simulations are for nighttime conditions (no solar radiation) where the cloud is generated in an ice supersaturated layer, about 1 km in depth, with an ice pseudoadiabatic thermal stratification (neutral). Continuing cloud formation is forced via an imposed diabatic cooling representing a 3 cm/s uplift over a 4-hour time span followed by a 2-hour dissipation stage with no cooling. Variations of these baseline cases include no-radiation and stable-thermal-stratification cases. Preliminary results indicated the great importance of ice crystal fallout in determining even the gross cloud characteristics, such as average vertically-integrated ice water path (IWP). Significant inter-model differences were found. Ice water fall speed is directly

  12. Directly Measured Heating Rates of a Tropical Subvisible Cirrus Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucholtz, Anthongy; Hlavka, Dennis L.; McGill, Matthew J.; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Pilewskie, Peter; Davis, Sean M.; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Walker, Annette L.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first direct measurements of the infrared and solar heating rates of a tropical subvisible cirrus (SVC) cloud sampled off the east coast of Nicaragua on 25 July 2007 by the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4). On this day a persistent thin cirrus layer, with mostly clear skies underneath, was detected in real time by the cloud lidar on the ER-2, and the aircraft was directed to profile down through the SVC. Measurements of the net broadband infrared irradiance and spectrally integrated solar irradiance above, below, and through the SVC are used to determine the infrared and solar heating rates of the cloud. The lidar measurements show that the variable SVC layer was located between approximately 13 and 15 km. Its midvisible optical depth varied from 0.01 to 0.10 with a mean of 0.034 +/- 0.033. Its depolarization ratio was approximately 0.4, indicative of ice clouds. From the divergence of the measured net irradiances the infrared heating rate of the SVC was determined to be approximately 2.50 - 3.24 K/d and the solar heating rate was found to be negligible. These values are consistent with previous indirect observations of other SVC and with model-generated heating rates of SVC with similar optical depths. This study illustrates the utility and potential of the profiling sampling strategy employed here. A more fully instrumented high-altitude aircraft that also included in situ cloud and aerosol probes would provide a comprehensive data set for characterizing both the radiative and microphysical properties of these ubiquitous tropical clouds

  13. 16 year climatology of cirrus clouds over a tropical station in southern India using ground and space-based lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, A. K.; Gadhavi, H. S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Raghunath, K.; Rao, S. V. B.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-06-01

    16 year (1998-2013) climatology of cirrus clouds and their macrophysical (base height, top height and geometrical thickness) and optical properties (cloud optical thickness) observed using a ground-based lidar over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India, is presented. The climatology obtained from the ground-based lidar is compared with the climatology obtained from seven and half years (June 2006-December 2013) of Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations. A very good agreement is found between the two climatologies in spite of their opposite viewing geometries and difference in sampling frequencies. Nearly 50-55% of cirrus clouds were found to possess geometrical thickness less than 2 km. Ground-based lidar is found to detect more number of sub-visible clouds than CALIOP which has implications for global warming studies as sub-visible cirrus clouds have significant positive radiative forcing. Cirrus clouds with mid-cloud temperatures between -50 to -70 °C have a mean geometrical thickness greater than 2 km in contrast to the earlier reported value of 1.7 km. Trend analyses reveal a statistically significant increase in the altitude of sub-visible cirrus clouds which is consistent with the recent climate model simulations. Also, the fraction of sub-visible cirrus cloud is found to be increasing during the last sixteen years (1998 to 2013) which has implications to the temperature and water vapour budget in the tropical tropopause layer.

  14. What Controls Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, J. E.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.; Turner, D.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the controls on cirrus cloud optical depth distributions [P(σ)] is critical for calculating cirrus cloud radiative impacts. Using an adiabatic parcel model with binned ice microphysics, we assess the influence of microphysical (nucleation, growth and fallout) and dynamical (constant updraft, idealized waves) processes on P(σ). For various sets of model initial conditions, we find P(σ) shape depends primarily on the ice crystal fallout timescale. At small updraft velocities, short fallout timescales allow ice crystals to fall out before depleting the ice super-saturation (Si). Thus, regardless of the ice nuclei (IN) concentration, high Si persists and multiple homogeneous nucleation events occur. In this fallout-dominated regime, P(σ) has a monotonically decreasing shape. In contrast, at large updraft velocities, long fallout timescales resulting from large homogeneous nucleation rates allow complete depletion of the Si and limited ice crystal fallout. In this limited-fallout regime, P(σ) has a skewed peak at high optical depth values. When glaciated IN are added to the limited-fallout regime evolution, they do not inhibit homogeneous nucleation, but they can reduce the maximum Si and number concentration of ice crystals. The limited-fallout P(σ) with glaciated IN has an additional monotonically decreasing tail at low optical depth values. Superimposed oscillations in vertical velocity can broaden P(σ) for limited-fallout regime cirrus. With large temperature displacements, vertical velocity waves can also generate the high Si required for new homogeneous nucleation events that influence P(σ). To complement our parcel model results, we calculate cirrus timescales, thicknesses, and P(σ) using 4000+ hours of raman lidar depolarization and optical depth observations from Lamont, OK (USA). Preliminary results indicate modeled P(σ) resemble P(σ) observations, suggesting P(σ) shapes can be explained in terms of microphysical and dynamical

  15. Aggregation of ice crystals in cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajikawa, Masahiro; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are given from analysis of the aggregation of thick plate, columnar, and bullet rosette ice crystals in cirrus. Data were obtained from PMS 2D-C images, oil coated slides, and aircraft meteorological measurements. Crystal size ranged from 100 to 900 microns in temperatures from -30 to -45 C. The results indicate that the ratio of the sizes of aggregating crystals and the difference of their terminal velocities are important in aggregation. The collection efficiency was calculated for the thick plate crystals from the same data.

  16. Sensitivity of thin cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer to ice crystal shape and radiative absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, R. D.; Ackerman, T. P.; Durran, D. R.

    2016-03-01

    Subvisible cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) play potentially important roles in Earth's radiation budget and in the transport of water into the stratosphere. Previous work on these clouds with 2-D cloud-resolving models has assumed that all ice crystals were spherical, producing too few crystals greater than 60 μm in length compared with observations. In this study, the System for Atmospheric Modeling cloud-resolving model is modified in order to calculate the fall speeds, growth rates, and radiative absorption of nonspherical ice crystals. This extended model is used in simulations that aim to provide an upper bound on the effects of ice crystal shape on the time evolution of thin cirrus clouds and to identify the physical processes responsible for any such effects. Model runs assuming spheroidal crystals result in a higher center of cloud ice mass than in the control, spherical case, while the total mass of ice is little affected by the shape. Increasing the radiative heating results in less total cloud ice mass relative to the control case, an effect which is robust with more extreme perturbations to the absorption coefficients. This is due to higher temperatures reducing the relative humidity in the cloud and its environment, and greater entrainment of dry air due to dynamical changes. Comparisons of modeled ice crystal size distributions with recent airborne observations of TTL cirrus show that incorporating nonspherical shape has the potential to bring the model closer to observations.

  17. Cloud clearing with a CO(2) laser in a cirrus cloud simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, A P; Radke, L F; Buonadonna, V; Dowling, D R

    1992-09-20

    We report experiments that confirm our prediction that clouds consisting of ice crystals with properties similar to those of cirrus clouds can be cleared with relatively low pulsed CO(2) laser energy density and that the cleared channel is resistant to obscuration by recondensation of the evaporated water. For the experiments reported here, we use a unique cloud-generating apparatus consisting of a low-speed wind tunnel with water spray injectors to generate water droplets or, with ice nucleus seeding at low temperatures, ice crystals. The air temperature can be controlled over the range of ambient to -40 degrees C. A significant clearing of ice crystal clouds was observed with pulsed CO(2) laser fluence in the range 0.2 to 1.5 J/cm(2) and, as expected, recondensation was found to depend on ice particle mass concentration. At ice particle concentrations similar to those found in cirrus clouds, recondensation did not occur.

  18. Evidence that nitric acid increases relative humidity in low-temperature cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Fahey, D W; Marcy, T P; Herman, R L; Weinstock, E M; Baumgardner, D G; Garrett, T J; Rosenlof, K H; Thompson, T L; Bui, P T; Ridley, B A; Wofsy, S C; Toon, O B; Tolbert, M A; Kärcher, B; Peter, Th; Hudson, P K; Weinheimer, A J; Heymsfield, A J

    2004-01-23

    In situ measurements of the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) and of nitric acid (HNO3) were made in both natural and contrail cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere. At temperatures lower than 202 kelvin, RHi values show a sharp increase to average values of over 130% in both cloud types. These enhanced RHi values are attributed to the presence of a new class of HNO3-containing ice particles (Delta-ice). We propose that surface HNO3 molecules prevent the ice/vapor system from reaching equilibrium by a mechanism similar to that of freezing point depression by antifreeze proteins. Delta-ice represents a new link between global climate and natural and anthropogenic nitrogen oxide emissions. Including Delta-ice in climate models will alter simulated cirrus properties and the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor.

  19. Evidence That Nitric Acid Increases Relative Humidity in Low-Temperature Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Popp, P. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Marcy, T. P.; Herman, R. L.; Weinstock, E. M.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Garrett, T. J.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Thompson, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    In situ measurements of the relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(sub(i)) and of nitric acid (HNO3) were made in both natural and contrail cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere. At temperatures lower than 202 kelvin, RH(sub i) values show a sharp increase to average values of over 130% in both cloud types. These enhanced RH(sub i) values are attributed to the presence of a new class of NHO3- containing ice particles (Delta-ice). We propose that surface HNO3 molecules prevent the ice/vapor system from reaching equilibrium by a mechanism similar to that of freezing point depression by antifreeze proteins. Delta-ice represents a new link between global climate and natural and anthropogenic nitrogen oxide emissions. Including Delta-ice in climate models will alter simulated cirrus properties and the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor.

  20. Evidence that nitric acid increases relative humidity in low-temperature cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Fahey, D W; Marcy, T P; Herman, R L; Weinstock, E M; Baumgardner, D G; Garrett, T J; Rosenlof, K H; Thompson, T L; Bui, P T; Ridley, B A; Wofsy, S C; Toon, O B; Tolbert, M A; Kärcher, B; Peter, Th; Hudson, P K; Weinheimer, A J; Heymsfield, A J

    2004-01-23

    In situ measurements of the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) and of nitric acid (HNO3) were made in both natural and contrail cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere. At temperatures lower than 202 kelvin, RHi values show a sharp increase to average values of over 130% in both cloud types. These enhanced RHi values are attributed to the presence of a new class of HNO3-containing ice particles (Delta-ice). We propose that surface HNO3 molecules prevent the ice/vapor system from reaching equilibrium by a mechanism similar to that of freezing point depression by antifreeze proteins. Delta-ice represents a new link between global climate and natural and anthropogenic nitrogen oxide emissions. Including Delta-ice in climate models will alter simulated cirrus properties and the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor. PMID:14739457

  1. Cirrus cloud characteristics derived from volume imaging lidar, high spectral resolution lidar, HIS radiometer, and satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grund, Christian J.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Eloranta, Edwin W.; Knutsen, Robert O.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary measurement results are presented from the Cirrus Remote Sensing Pilot Experiment which used a unique suite of instruments to simultaneously retrieve cirrus cloud visible and IR optical properties, while addressing the disparities between satellite volume averages and local point measurements. The experiment employed a ground-based high resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) and a second Fourier transform spectrometer to measure the spectral radiance in the 4-20 micron band, a correlated high spectral resolution lidar, a volume imaging lidar, a CLASS radiosonde system, the Scripps Whole Sky Imager, and multispectral VAS, HIRS, and AVHRR satellite data from polar orbiting and geostationary satellites. Data acquired during the month long experiment included continuous daytime monitoring with the Whole Sky Imager.

  2. Stratospheric ion and aerosol chemistry and possible links with cirrus cloud microphysics - A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of stratospheric ion chemistry and physics are assessed as they relate to aerosol formation and the transport of aerosols to upper tropospheric regions to create conditions favorable for cirrus cloud formation. It is found that ion-induced nucleation and other known phase transitions involving ions and sulfuric acid vapor are probably not efficient processes for stratospheric aerosol formation, and cannot compete with condensation of sulfuric acid on preexisting particles of volcanic or meteoritic origin which are larger than about 0.15 micron in radius. Thus, galactic cosmic rays cannot have a significant impact on stratospheric aerosol population. Changes in the stratospheric aerosol burden due to volcanos are up to two orders of magnitude larger than changes in ion densities. Thus, volcanic activity may modulate the radiative properties of cirrus clouds.

  3. Observing cirrus halos to constrain in-situ measurements of ice crystal size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Kimball, M. B.; Mace, G. G.; Baumgardner, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, characteristic optical sizes of ice crystals in synoptic cirrus are determined using airborne measurements of ice crystal size distributions, optical extinction and water content. The measurements are compared with coincident visual observations of ice cloud optical phenomena, in particular the 22° and 46° halos. In general, the scattering profiles derived from the in-situ cloud probe measurements are consistent with the observed halo characteristics. It is argued that this implies that the measured ice crystals were small, probably with characteristic optical radii between 10 and 20 μm. There is a current contention that in-situ measurements of high concentrations of small ice crystals reflect artifacts from the shattering of large ice crystals on instrument inlets. Significant shattering cannot be entirely excluded using this approximate technique, but it is not indicated. On the basis of the in-situ measurements, a parameterization is provided that relates the optical effective radius of ice crystals to the temperature in mid-latitude synoptic cirrus.

  4. Thin cirrus clouds - Seasonal distribution over oceans deduced from Nimbus-4 IRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Fraser, R. S.; Dalu, G.; Wu, Man-Li C.; Curran, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral differences in the extinction of the 10.8- and 12.6-micron bands of the IR window region, due to optically thin clouds, were found in the measurements made by both an airborne broadband IR radiometer and the IR interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) aboard the Nimbus-4 satellite; the extinction at 12.6 microns was significantly larger than that at 10.8 microns; both water and ice particles in the clouds can account for such spectral difference in extinction. Multiple scattering radiative transfer calculations of IRIS data revealed this spectral feature about 100 to 20 km away from the high-altitude cold clouds; it is assumed that this feature is related to the spreading of cirrus clouds. Based on this assumption, mean seasonal maps of the distribution of thin cirrus clouds over the oceans were deduced from the IRIS data. The maps show that such clouds are often present over the convectively active areas, such as ITCZ, SPCZ, and the Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon.

  5. Modeling of scattering and absorption by nonspherical cirrus ice particles at thermal infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Sun, W.B.; Yang, P.

    1999-08-15

    This paper examines a number of commonly used methods for the calculation of the scattering and absorption properties of nonspherical ice crystals at thermal infrared wavelengths. It is found that, for randomly oriented nonspherical particles, Mie theory using equivalent ice spheres tends to overestimate the absorption efficiency while the anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) and the geometric optics method (GOM) tend to underestimate it. The absorption efficiency is not sensitive to the particle shape when the size parameter is large. Herein a composite scheme is used that is valid for nonspherical particles with a wide range of size parameters. This scheme is a composite of Mie theory, GOM, and ADT to fit the single-scattering properties of hexagonal particles derived from the GOM for large size parameters and the finite-difference time domain technique for small size parameters. Applying this composite technique, errors in the broadband emissivity of cirrus clouds associated with conventional approaches are examined. It is shown that, when the projected area is preserved, Mie results overestimate the emissivity of cirrus clouds while, when the volume is preserved, Mie results underestimate the emissivity. Mie theory yields the best results when both projected area and volume are preserved (the relative errors are less than 10%). It is also shown that the ADT underestimates cirrus cloud emissivity. In some cases, the relative errors can be as large as 20%. The errors in the GOM are also significant and are largely a result of nonspherical particles with size parameters smaller than 40.

  6. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  7. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  8. The effects of ice crystal shape on the evolution of optically thin cirrus clouds in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, Rick

    Thin cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) play potentially important roles in Earth's radiation budget and in the transport of water into the stratosphere. Radiative heating of these clouds results in mesoscale circulations that maintain them against sedimentation and redistribute water vapor. In this study, the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) cloud-resolving model is modified in order to calculate the fall speeds, growth rates, and radiative absorption coefficients of non-spherical ice crystals. This extended model is used in simulations that aim to constrain the effects of ice crystal shape on the time evolution of thin cirrus clouds and to identify the physical processes responsible. Model runs assuming spheroidal crystals result in a higher center of cloud ice mass than in the control, spherical case, which is roughly 60% due to a reduction in fall speeds and 40% due to stronger updrafts caused by stronger radiative heating. Other effects of ice crystal shape on the cloud evolution include faster growth and sublimation in supersaturated and subsaturated environments, respectively, and local temperature increases caused by diabatic heating. Effects of ice crystal shape on the total and mean ice crystal masses are within about 10% but do not appear to be entirely negligible. Comparisons of modeled ice crystal size distributions with recent airborne observations of TTL cirrus show that incorporating non-spherical shape has the potential to bring the model closer to observations. It is hoped that this work will eventually lead towards a more realistic physical representation of thin tropical cirrus in global climate models.

  9. High Albedos of Cirrus in the Tropical Pacific Warm Pool: Microphysical Interpretations from CEPEX and from Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; McFarquhar, Greg M.

    1996-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that extensive shields of cirrus clouds over the equatorial Pacific `warn pool' may have a significant influence on the global climate, yet details of the links between cloud microphysical properties, upper-tropospheric latent and radiative heating rates, and climate are poorly understood. This study addresses whether relatively reflective ice crystals with dimensions smaller than about 100 µm near the tops of tropical cirrus clouds, produced by deep convection when the sea surface temperature exceeds 300 K, are principally responsible for the high albedos observed in this region.In situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions and shapes, acquired during the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX), are used to derive cloud ice water content (IWC), particle cross-sectional area (A), and other microphysical and optical properties from particles with sizes down to 5 µm. These measurements are needed to ascertain the microphysical properties primarily responsible for determining cloud optical depth and albedo in visible wavelengths and were acquired by a Learjet flying in tropical cirrus and occasionally in convection between altitudes of 8 and 14 km (20°C to 70°C). Previously unanalyzed microphysical measurements in the vicinity of Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, acquired in the mid-1970s from a WB57F aircraft between altitudes of 5 and 17 km, are also used to study the variation in microphysical properties from cirrus base to top, using a combination of constant-altitude penetrations and steep ascents and descents through cloud.Analysis shows that IWC, A, and various measures of particle size all tend to decrease with decreasing temperature and increasing altitude, although considerable scatter is observed. Small ice crystals make up more than half the mass and cause more than half the extinction on average in the upper, colder parts of the cirrus; however, the predominantly large particles in the lower, warmer parts of the cirrus

  10. Aviation effects on already-existing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Tesche, Matthias; Achtert, Peggy; Glantz, Paul; Noone, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Determining the effects of the formation of contrails within natural cirrus clouds has proven to be challenging. Quantifying any such effects is necessary if we are to properly account for the influence of aviation on climate. Here we quantify the effect of aircraft on the optical thickness of already-existing cirrus clouds by matching actual aircraft flight tracks to satellite lidar measurements. We show that there is a systematic, statistically significant increase in normalized cirrus cloud optical thickness inside mid-latitude flight tracks compared with adjacent areas immediately outside the tracks. PMID:27327838

  11. Aviation effects on already-existing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Tesche, Matthias; Achtert, Peggy; Glantz, Paul; Noone, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Determining the effects of the formation of contrails within natural cirrus clouds has proven to be challenging. Quantifying any such effects is necessary if we are to properly account for the influence of aviation on climate. Here we quantify the effect of aircraft on the optical thickness of already-existing cirrus clouds by matching actual aircraft flight tracks to satellite lidar measurements. We show that there is a systematic, statistically significant increase in normalized cirrus cloud optical thickness inside mid-latitude flight tracks compared with adjacent areas immediately outside the tracks.

  12. Small, highly reflective ice crystals in low-latitude cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Gerber, H.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Twohy, C. H.; Weinstock, E. M.

    2003-11-01

    At low latitudes, cirrus are ubiquitous and can be in excess of 100°C colder than the surface, limiting the amount of sunlight absorbed by the earth's atmosphere and surface, and reducing its loss of heat. Here we present aircraft measurements within cirrus over southern Florida indicating that ice crystals have smaller sizes and are more reflective than is assumed in most current climate models. If the measurements are generally representative of low-latitude cirrus, they point to a first-order correction to representations of how these clouds affect the earth's climate.

  13. Aviation effects on already-existing cirrus clouds

    PubMed Central

    Tesche, Matthias; Achtert, Peggy; Glantz, Paul; Noone, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the effects of the formation of contrails within natural cirrus clouds has proven to be challenging. Quantifying any such effects is necessary if we are to properly account for the influence of aviation on climate. Here we quantify the effect of aircraft on the optical thickness of already-existing cirrus clouds by matching actual aircraft flight tracks to satellite lidar measurements. We show that there is a systematic, statistically significant increase in normalized cirrus cloud optical thickness inside mid-latitude flight tracks compared with adjacent areas immediately outside the tracks. PMID:27327838

  14. Aviation effects on already-existing cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesche, Matthias; Achtert, Peggy; Glantz, Paul; Noone, Kevin J.

    2016-06-01

    Determining the effects of the formation of contrails within natural cirrus clouds has proven to be challenging. Quantifying any such effects is necessary if we are to properly account for the influence of aviation on climate. Here we quantify the effect of aircraft on the optical thickness of already-existing cirrus clouds by matching actual aircraft flight tracks to satellite lidar measurements. We show that there is a systematic, statistically significant increase in normalized cirrus cloud optical thickness inside mid-latitude flight tracks compared with adjacent areas immediately outside the tracks.

  15. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  16. The Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System. Part I; Overview and Description of the Instrument and Retrival Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorks, John E.; Mcgill, Matthew J.; Scott, V. Stanley; Kupchock, Andrew; Wake, Shane; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Selmer, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (ACATS) is a multi-channel Doppler lidar system recently developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). A unique aspect of the multi-channel Doppler lidar concept such as ACATS is that it is also, by its very nature, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL). Both the particulate and molecular scattered signal can be directly and unambiguously measured, allowing for direct retrievals of particulate extinction. ACATS is therefore capable of simultaneously resolving the backscatterextinction properties and motion of a particle from a high altitude aircraft. ACATS has flown on the NASA ER-2 during test flights over California in June 2012 and science flights during the Wallops Airborne Vegetation Experiment (WAVE) in September 2012. This paper provides an overview of the ACATS method and instrument design, describes the ACATS retrieval algorithms for cloud and aerosol properties, and demonstrates the data products that will be derived from the ACATS data using initial results from the WAVE project. The HSRL retrieval algorithms developed for ACATS have direct application to future spaceborne missions such as the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS). Furthermore, the direct extinction and particle wind velocity retrieved from the ACATS data can be used for science applications such 27 as dust or smoke transport and convective outflow in anvil cirrus clouds.

  17. LIDAR and Millimeter-Wave Cloud RADAR (MWCR) techniques for joint observations of cirrus in Shouxian (32.56°N, 116.78°E), China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Lingbing; Pan, Honglin; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Huang, Xingyou; Gao, Haiyang; Qin, Yanqiu; Liu, Xinbo; Kim, Dukhyeon

    2016-10-01

    Cirrus plays an important role in the regulation of the Earth-atmosphere radiation budget. The joint observation using both the LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) and Millimeter-Wave Cloud RADAR (MWCR) was implemented in this study to obtain properties of cirrus at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility in Shouxian (32.56°N, 116.78°E, 21 m above sea level), China during May-December 2008. We chose the simultaneous measurements of LIDAR and MWCR with effective data days, and the days must with cirrus. Hence, the cirrus properties based on 37 days of data between October 18th and December 13th, 2008 were studied in the present work. By comparing the LIDAR data with the MWCR data, we analyzed the detection capabilities of both instruments quantitatively for measuring the cirrus. The LIDAR cannot penetrate through the thicker cirrus with optical depth (τ) of more than 1.5, while the MWCR cannot sense the clouds with an optical depth of less than 0.3. Statistical analysis showed that the mean cloud base height (CBH) and cloud thickness (CT) of cirrus were 6.5±0.8 km and 2.1±1.1 km, respectively. Furthermore, we investigated three existing inversion methods for deriving the ice water content (IWC) by using the separate LIDAR, MWCR, and the combination of both, respectively. Based on the comparative analysis, a novel joint method was provided to obtain more accurate IWC. In this joint method, cirrus was divided into three different categories according to the optical depth (τ≤0.3, τ≥1.5, and 0.3<τ<1.5). Based on the joint method used in this study, the mean IWC was calculated by means of the statistics, which showed that the mean IWC of cirrus was 0.011±0.008 g m-3.

  18. A scheme for parameterizing cirrus cloud ice water content in general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Donner, Leo J.

    1990-01-01

    Clouds strongly influence th earth's energy budget. They control th amount of solar radiative energy absorbed by the climate system, partitioning the energy between the atmosphere and the earth's surface. They also control the loss of energy to space by their effect on thermal emission. Cirrus and altostratus are the most frequent cloud types, having an annual average global coverage of 35 and 40 percent, respectively. Cirrus is composed almost entirely of ice crystals and the same is frequently true of the upper portions of altostratus since they are often formed by the thickening of cirrostratus and by the spreading of the middle or upper portions of thunderstorms. Thus, since ice clouds cover such a large portion of the earth's surface, they almost certainly have an important effect on climate. With this recognition, researchers developing climate models are seeking largely unavailable methods for specifying the conditions for ice cloud formation, and quantifying the spatial distribution of ice water content, IWC, a necessary step in deriving their radiative characteristics since radiative properties are apparently related to IWC. A method is developed for specifying IWC in climate models, based on theory and measurements in cirrus during FIRE and other experiments.

  19. High albedos of cirrus in the tropical Pacific warm pool: Microphysical interpretation from CEPEX and from Kwajalein, Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Heymsfield, A.J.; McFarquhar, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that extensive shields of cirrus clouds over the equatorial Pacific {open_quotes}warm pool{close_quotes} may have a significant influence on the global climate, yet details of the links between cloud microphysical properties, upper-tropospheric latent and radiative beating rates, and climate are poorly understood. This study addresses whether relatively reflective ice crystals with dimensions smaller than about 100 {mu}m near the tops of tropical cirrus clouds, produced by deep convection when the sea surface temperature exceeds 300 K, are principally responsible for the high albedos observed in this region. In situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions and shapes, acquired during the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX), are used to derive cloud ice water content (IWC), particle cross-sectional area (A), and other microphysical and optical properties from particles with sizes down to 5 {mu}m. These measurements are needed to ascertain the microphysical properties primarily responsible for determining cloud optical depth and albedo in visible wavelengths. Analysis shows that IWC, A, and various measures of particle size all tend to decrease with decreasing temperature and increasing altitude, although considerable scatter is observed. Small ice crystals make up more than half the mass and cause more than half the extinction on average in the upper, colder parts of the cirrus; however, the predominantly large particles in the lower, warmer parts of the cirrus contain at least an order of magnitude greater mass and are dominant in producing the high observed albedos. An examination of the lidar and radiometer data acquired onboard the NASA ER-2, which overflew the Learjet during CEPEX, supports the conclusion that the higher, colder regions of the cirrus typically have volume extinction coefficients that are only about 10% of those in the lower, warmer regions. 36 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Effects of stratospheric aerosols and thin cirrus clouds on the atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: simulations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Zhang, T; He, F; Ding, K

    1997-01-20

    Using simulations, we determine the influence of stratospheric aerosol and thin cirrus clouds on the performance of the proposed atmospheric correction algorithm for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data over the oceans. Further, we investigate the possibility of using the radiance exiting the top of the atmosphere in the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to remove their effects prior to application of the algorithm. The computations suggest that for moderate optical thicknesses in the stratosphere, i.e., tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, the stratospheric aerosol-cirrus cloud contamination does not seriously degrade the MODIS except for the combination of large (approximately 60 degrees) solar zenith angles and large (approximately 45 degrees) viewing angles, for which multiple-scattering effects can be expected to be particularly severe. The performance of a hierarchy of stratospheric aerosol/cirrus cloud removal procedures for employing the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to correct for stratospheric aerosol/cirrus clouds, ranging from simply subtracting the reflectance at 1.38 microm from that in the visible bands, to assuming that their optical properties are known and carrying out multiple-scattering computations of their effect by the use of the 1.38-microm reflectance-derived concentration, are studied for stratospheric aerosol optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 0.15 and for cirrus cloud optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 1.0. Typically, those procedures requiring the most knowledge concerning the aerosol optical properties (and also the most complex) performed the best; however, for tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, their performance is usually not significantly better than that found by applying the simplest correction procedure. A semiempirical algorithm is presented that permits accurate correction for thin cirrus clouds with tau(s) as large as unity when an accurate estimate of the cirrus cloud

  1. Effects of stratospheric aerosols and thin cirrus clouds on the atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: simulations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Zhang, T; He, F; Ding, K

    1997-01-20

    Using simulations, we determine the influence of stratospheric aerosol and thin cirrus clouds on the performance of the proposed atmospheric correction algorithm for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data over the oceans. Further, we investigate the possibility of using the radiance exiting the top of the atmosphere in the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to remove their effects prior to application of the algorithm. The computations suggest that for moderate optical thicknesses in the stratosphere, i.e., tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, the stratospheric aerosol-cirrus cloud contamination does not seriously degrade the MODIS except for the combination of large (approximately 60 degrees) solar zenith angles and large (approximately 45 degrees) viewing angles, for which multiple-scattering effects can be expected to be particularly severe. The performance of a hierarchy of stratospheric aerosol/cirrus cloud removal procedures for employing the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to correct for stratospheric aerosol/cirrus clouds, ranging from simply subtracting the reflectance at 1.38 microm from that in the visible bands, to assuming that their optical properties are known and carrying out multiple-scattering computations of their effect by the use of the 1.38-microm reflectance-derived concentration, are studied for stratospheric aerosol optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 0.15 and for cirrus cloud optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 1.0. Typically, those procedures requiring the most knowledge concerning the aerosol optical properties (and also the most complex) performed the best; however, for tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, their performance is usually not significantly better than that found by applying the simplest correction procedure. A semiempirical algorithm is presented that permits accurate correction for thin cirrus clouds with tau(s) as large as unity when an accurate estimate of the cirrus cloud

  2. High fidelity remote sensing of snow properties from MODIS and the Airborne Snow Observatory: Snowflakes to Terabytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T.; Mattmann, C. A.; Brodzik, M.; Bryant, A. C.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Ramirez, P.; Rittger, K. E.; Seidel, F. C.; Zimdars, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The response of the cryosphere to climate forcings largely determines Earth's climate sensitivity. However, our understanding of the strength of the simulated snow albedo feedback varies by a factor of three in the GCMs used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, mainly caused by uncertainties in snow extent and the albedo of snow-covered areas from imprecise remote sensing retrievals. Additionally, the Western US and other regions of the globe depend predominantly on snowmelt for their water supply to agriculture, industry and cities, hydroelectric power, and recreation, against rising demand from increasing population. In the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, dust radiative forcing in snow shortens snow cover duration by 3-7 weeks. Extended to the entire upper basin, the 5-fold increase in dust load since the late-1800s results in a 3-week earlier peak runoff and a 5% annual loss of total runoff. The remotely sensed dynamics of snow cover duration and melt however have not been factored into hydrological modeling, operational forecasting, and policymaking. To address these deficiencies in our understanding of snow properties, we have developed and validated a suite of MODIS snow products that provide accurate fractional snow covered area and radiative forcing of dust and carbonaceous aerosols in snow. The MODIS Snow Covered Area and Grain size (MODSCAG) and MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) algorithms, developed and transferred from imaging spectroscopy techniques, leverage the complete MODIS surface reflectance spectrum. The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. We have created the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete

  3. Towards Improved Cirrus Cloud Optical Depths from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Anne; Vaughan, Mark; Pelon, Jacques; Winker, David; Trepte, Chip; Young, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    This paper reviews recent advances regarding the retrieval of optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds using synergetic analyses of perfectly collocated observations from the CALIOP lidar and the IIR infrared radiometer aboard the CALIPSO satellite.

  4. (abstract) An All Sky Cirrus Confusion Noise Map for WIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, T. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) is a Small Explorer (SMEX) satellite scheduled for launch in 1998 which will carry out a sky survey of at least 100 square degrees in the wavelength regions of 9-15(micro)m and 21-27(micro)m with spatial resolution of approximately 20 arcsec and sensitivity exceeding 0.6mJy. At this sensitivity level WIRE observations can be seriously affected by the confusion noise contribution from the infrared cirrus emission, so the WIRE survey must be planned with some knowledge of the expected level of cirrus confusion. Production of a cirrus confusion noise map with 0.5 degree resolution based on the spatial power spectral density of the cirrus emission in the IRAS ISSA data is in progess using the method described by Gauthier, et al. Spectrally resolved power spectra density data is obtained from the ISSA maps with a wavelet transform technique.

  5. 3D reconstruction of tropospheric cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouahla, M. N.; Faivre, M.; Moreels, G.; Seridi, H.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present a series of results from stereo-imagery of cirrus clouds in the troposphere. These clouds are either of natural origin or are created by aircraft exhausts. They are presently considered to be a major cause for the climate change. Two observation campaigns were conducted in France in 2013 and 2014. The observing sites were located in Marnay (47°17‧31.5″ N, 5°44‧58.8″ E; altitude 275 m) and in Mont Poupet (46°58‧31.5″ N, 5°52‧22.7″ E; altitude 600 m). The distance between both sites was 36 km. We used numeric CMOS photographic cameras. The image processing sequence included a contrast enhancement and a perspective inversion to obtain a satellite-type view. Finally, the triangulation procedure was used in an area that is a common part of both fields of view.

  6. Cirrus Clouds on Mars: Data Analysis and GCM Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the investigation was to obtain a better retrieval of cirrus ice concentrations [to] gain a quantitative understanding of the cirrus clouds in the upper atmosphere by analyzing The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). We study the global distribution of dust and ice for a Martian year to address the fundamental question of the importance of ice in the Martian atmosphere.

  7. The Development of Midlatitude Cirrus Models for MODIS Using FIRE-I, FIRE-II, and ARM In Situ Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nasiri, Shaima L.; Baum, Bryan A.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Yang, Ping; Poellot, Michael R.; Kratz, David P.; Hu, Yong-Xiang

    2002-01-01

    Detailed in situ data from cirrus clouds have been collected during dedicated field Campaigns, but the use of the size and habit distribution data has been lagging in the development of more realistic cirrus scattering models. In this study, the authors examine the use of in situ cirrus data collected during three field campaigns to develop more realistic midlatitude cirrus microphysical models. Data are used from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)-I (1986) and FIRE-II (1991) campaigns and from a recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program campaign held in March-April of 2000. The microphysical models are based on measured vertical distributions of both particle size and particle habit and are used to develop new scattering models for a suite of moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) bands spanning visible. near-infrared, and infrared wavelengths. The sensitivity of the resulting scattering properties to the underlying assumptions of the assumed particle size and habit distributions are examined. It is found that the near-infrared bands are sensitive not only to the discretization of the size distribution but also to the assumed habit distribution. In addition. the results indicate that the effective diameter calculated from a given size distribution tends to be sensitive to the number of size bins that are used to discretize the data and also to the ice-crystal habit distribution.

  8. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and sun photometers during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment. Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scanning Raman lidar system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W); are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and root-mean-square differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a) = 60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements. The lidar measurements of AOT are found to be generally within 25% of the AOT measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6). However, during certain periods the lidar and Sun photometer measurements of AOT differed significantly, possibly because of variations in the aerosol physical characteristics (e.g., size, composition) which affect S(sub a). Estimates of PWV, derived from water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured by LASE, are within 5-10% of PWV derived from the airborne Sun photometer. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by both lidars show that aerosols were generally concentrated in the lowest 2-3 km.

  9. Modification of cirrus clouds to reduce global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, David L.; Finnegan, William

    2009-10-01

    Greenhouse gases and cirrus clouds regulate outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and cirrus cloud coverage is predicted to be sensitive to the ice fall speed which depends on ice crystal size. The higher the cirrus, the greater their impact is on OLR. Thus by changing ice crystal size in the coldest cirrus, OLR and climate might be modified. Fortunately the coldest cirrus have the highest ice supersaturation due to the dominance of homogeneous freezing nucleation. Seeding such cirrus with very efficient heterogeneous ice nuclei should produce larger ice crystals due to vapor competition effects, thus increasing OLR and surface cooling. Preliminary estimates of this global net cloud forcing are more negative than -2.8 W m-2 and could neutralize the radiative forcing due to a CO2 doubling (3.7 W m-2). A potential delivery mechanism for the seeding material is already in place: the airline industry. Since seeding aerosol residence times in the troposphere are relatively short, the climate might return to its normal state within months after stopping the geoengineering experiment. The main known drawback to this approach is that it would not stop ocean acidification. It does not have many of the drawbacks that stratospheric injection of sulfur species has.

  10. Implications of Enhanced Relative Humidity in Cold Tropical Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Pfister, Leonhard

    2004-01-01

    In situ measurements of water vapor concentration and temperature in tropical cirrus during the CRYSTAL-FACE and Pre-AVE missions indicate that the steady-state relative humidity within cirrus at T less than 200 K is about 20-30% higher than ice saturation. These measurements challenge the conventional belief, that any water vapor in excess of ice saturation should be depleted by crystal growth given sufficient time. Detailed simulations of thin cirrus near the tropopause indicate that this enhanced steady-state relative humidity increases ice number densities, decreases crystal sizes and extends cloud lifetimes. The areal coverage of thin cirrus in the tropics is increased rather than decreased as indicated by simpler conceptual models. Perhaps most significantly, the increased steady-state H2O saturation mixing ratio over ice in thin cirrus near the tropopause results in about a 0.5-1 ppmv increase in the amount of water that can enter the stratosphere across the tropical tropopause cold trap. Hence, the enhanced steady-state relative humidity in cold cirrus implies that lower tropopause temperatures are required to explain the observed stratospheric water vapor mixing ratios than previously assumed.

  11. The microphysical properties of small ice particles measured during MACPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; Schnaiter, M.; Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Hirst, E.

    2012-12-01

    During the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) field campaign, the Small Ice Detector version 3 (SID-3) and the NCAR Video Ice Particle Sampler (VIPS) probes were operated onboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft to measure the microphysical properties of small ice particles in midlatitude cirrus clouds. The VIPS was optimized to measure the particle size distribution and projected area properties of ice particles between 20 and 200 microns and measurements agreed well with other microphysical probes. SID-3 measures the forward light scattering pattern from ice particles in the 1 to 100 micron size range. Forward scattering patterns can be used to characterize ice particle shape as well as surface roughness. Scattering patterns appear to be 'speckled' when particles have surface roughness and/or are polycrystalline. Scattering patterns can be used to identify quasi-spherical ice particles as well as particles which are sublimating. Sublimating crystals, spherical ice particles, and particles with surface roughness were all observed by SID-3 during MACPEX. Observed particle properties will be correlated to concurrent atmospheric observations. Measurements from the controlled environment of the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber will be related to atmospheric particle measurements.

  12. Cirrus clouds in a global climate model with a statistical cirrus cloud scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.

    2010-06-21

    A statistical cirrus cloud scheme that accounts for mesoscale temperature perturbations is implemented in a coupled aerosol and atmospheric circulation model to better represent both subgrid-scale supersaturation and cloud formation. This new scheme treats the effects of aerosol on cloud formation and ice freezing in an improved manner, and both homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are included. The scheme is able to better simulate the observed probability distribution of relative humidity compared to the scheme that was implemented in an older version of the model. Heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) are shown to decrease the frequency of occurrence of supersaturation, and improve the comparison with observations at 192 hPa. Homogeneous freezing alone can not reproduce observed ice crystal number concentrations at low temperatures (<205 K), but the addition of heterogeneous IN improves the comparison somewhat. Increases in heterogeneous IN affect both high level cirrus clouds and low level liquid clouds. Increases in cirrus clouds lead to a more cloudy and moist lower troposphere with less precipitation, effects which we associate with the decreased convective activity. The change in the net cloud forcing is not very sensitive to the change in ice crystal concentrations, but the change in the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere is still large because of changes in water vapor. Changes in the magnitude of the assumed mesoscale temperature perturbations by 25% alter the ice crystal number concentrations and the net radiative fluxes by an amount that is comparable to that from a factor of 10 change in the heterogeneous IN number concentrations. Further improvements on the representation of mesoscale temperature perturbations, heterogeneous IN and the competition between homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are needed.

  13. A comparison of lidar inversion methods for cirrus applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elouragini, Salem; Flamant, Pierre H.

    1992-01-01

    Several methods for inverting the lidar equation are suggested as means to derive the cirrus optical properties (beta backscatter, alpha extinction coefficients, and delta optical depth) at one wavelength. The lidar equation can be inverted in a linear or logarithmic form; either solution assumes a linear relationship: beta = kappa(alpha), where kappa is the lidar ratio. A number of problems prevent us from calculating alpha (or beta) with a good accuracy. Some of these are as follows: (1) the multiple scattering effect (most authors neglect it); (2) an absolute calibration of the lidar system (difficult and sometimes not possible); (3) lack of accuracy on the lidar ratio k (taken as constant, but in fact it varies with range and cloud species); and (4) the determination of boundary condition for logarithmic solution which depends on signal to noise ration (SNR) at cloud top. An inversion in a linear form needs an absolute calibration of the system. In practice one uses molecular backscattering below the cloud to calibrate the system. This method is not permanent because the lower atmosphere turbidity is variable. For a logarithmic solution, a reference extinction coefficient (alpha(sub f)) at cloud top is required. Several methods to determine alpha(sub f) were suggested. We tested these methods at low SNR. This led us to propose two new methods referenced as S1 and S2.

  14. Evaluation of Various Spectral Inputs for Estimation of Forest Biochemical and Structural Properties from Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homolová, L.; Janoutová, R.; Malenovský, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this study we evaluated various spectral inputs for retrieval of forest chlorophyll content (Cab) and leaf area index (LAI) from high spectral and spatial resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy data collected for two forest study sites in the Czech Republic (beech forest at Štítná nad Vláří and spruce forest at Bílý Kříž). The retrieval algorithm was based on a machine learning method - support vector regression (SVR). Performance of the four spectral inputs used to train SVR was evaluated: a) all available hyperspectral bands, b) continuum removal (CR) 645 - 710 nm, c) CR 705 - 780 nm, and d) CR 680 - 800 nm. Spectral inputs and corresponding SVR models were first assessed at the level of spectral databases simulated by combined leaf-canopy radiative transfer models PROSPECT and DART. At this stage, SVR models using all spectral inputs provided good performance (RMSE for Cab < 10 μg cm-2 and for LAI < 1.5), with consistently better performance for beech over spruce site. Since application of trained SVRs on airborne hyperspectral images of the spruce site produced unacceptably overestimated values, only the beech site results were analysed. The best performance for the Cab estimation was found for CR bands in range of 645 - 710 nm, whereas CR bands in range of 680 - 800 nm were the most suitable for LAI retrieval. The CR transformation reduced the across-track bidirectional reflectance effect present in airborne images due to large sensor field of view.

  15. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Marcy, T. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Hudson, P. K.; Thompson, T. L.; Kaercher, B.; Ridley, B. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Baumgardner, D.; Garrett, T. J.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Pittman, J. V.; Dhaniyala, S.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward and downward facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197-224 K and pressures of 122-224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4 # 10(exp 14) molecules/ square cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 ?m and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  16. Cirrus cloud model parameterizations: Incorporating realistic ice particle generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Dodd, G. C.; Starr, David OC.

    1990-01-01

    Recent cirrus cloud modeling studies have involved the application of a time-dependent, two dimensional Eulerian model, with generalized cloud microphysical parameterizations drawn from experimental findings. For computing the ice versus vapor phase changes, the ice mass content is linked to the maintenance of a relative humidity with respect to ice (RHI) of 105 percent; ice growth occurs both with regard to the introduction of new particles and the growth of existing particles. In a simplified cloud model designed to investigate the basic role of various physical processes in the growth and maintenance of cirrus clouds, these parametric relations are justifiable. In comparison, the one dimensional cloud microphysical model recently applied to evaluating the nucleation and growth of ice crystals in cirrus clouds explicitly treated populations of haze and cloud droplets, and ice crystals. Although these two modeling approaches are clearly incompatible, the goal of the present numerical study is to develop a parametric treatment of new ice particle generation, on the basis of detailed microphysical model findings, for incorporation into improved cirrus growth models. For example, the relation between temperature and the relative humidity required to generate ice crystals from ammonium sulfate haze droplets, whose probability of freezing through the homogeneous nucleation mode are a combined function of time and droplet molality, volume, and temperature. As an example of this approach, the results of cloud microphysical simulations are presented showing the rather narrow domain in the temperature/humidity field where new ice crystals can be generated. The microphysical simulations point out the need for detailed CCN studies at cirrus altitudes and haze droplet measurements within cirrus clouds, but also suggest that a relatively simple treatment of ice particle generation, which includes cloud chemistry, can be incorporated into cirrus cloud growth.

  17. Influence of thermodynamic properties of a thermo-acoustic emitter on the efficiency of thermal airborne ultrasound generation.

    PubMed

    Daschewski, M; Kreutzbruck, M; Prager, J

    2015-12-01

    In this work we experimentally verify the theoretical prediction of the recently published Energy Density Fluctuation Model (EDF-model) of thermo-acoustic sound generation. Particularly, we investigate experimentally the influence of thermal inertia of an electrically conductive film on the efficiency of thermal airborne ultrasound generation predicted by the EDF-model. Unlike widely used theories, the EDF-model predicts that the thermal inertia of the electrically conductive film is a frequency-dependent parameter. Its influence grows non-linearly with the increase of excitation frequency and reduces the efficiency of the ultrasound generation. Thus, this parameter is the major limiting factor for the efficient thermal airborne ultrasound generation in the MHz-range. To verify this theoretical prediction experimentally, five thermo-acoustic emitter samples consisting of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) coatings of different thicknesses (from 65 nm to 1.44 μm) on quartz glass substrates were tested for airborne ultrasound generation in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 800 kHz. For the measurement of thermally generated sound pressures a laser Doppler vibrometer combined with a 12 μm thin polyethylene foil was used as the sound pressure detector. All tested thermo-acoustic emitter samples showed a resonance-free frequency response in the entire tested frequency range. The thermal inertia of the heat producing film acts as a low-pass filter and reduces the generated sound pressure with the increasing excitation frequency and the ITO film thickness. The difference of generated sound pressure levels for samples with 65 nm and 1.44 μm thickness is in the order of about 6 dB at 50 kHz and of about 12 dB at 500 kHz. A comparison of sound pressure levels measured experimentally and those predicted by the EDF-model shows for all tested emitter samples a relative error of less than ±6%. Thus, experimental results confirm the prediction of the EDF-model and show that the model can

  18. Ground Based Retrievals of Small Ice Crystals and Water Phase in Arctic Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subhashree; Mitchell, David L.; DeSlover, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    The microphysical properties of cirrus clouds are uncertain due to the problem of ice particles shattering at the probe inlet upon sampling. To facilitate better estimation of small ice crystal concentrations in cirrus clouds, a new ground-based remote sensing technique has been used in combination with in situ aircraft measurements. Data from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted at the north slope of Alaska (winter 2004), have been used to test a new method for retrieving the liquid water path (LWP) and ice water path (IWP) in mixed phase clouds. The framework of the retrieval algorithm consists of the modified anomalous diffraction approximation or MADA (for mixed phase cloud optical properties), a radar reflectivity-ice microphysics relationship and a temperature-dependent ice particle size distribution (PSD) scheme. Cloud thermal emission measurements made by the ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) yield information on the total water path (TWP) while reflectivity measurements from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) are used to derive the IWP. The AERI is also used to indicate the concentration of small ice crystals (D<50 μm) relative to the larger ice particles. Combining this small crystal information with the PSD scheme describing the larger particle concentrations yields the retrieved PSD. Small ice crystals are evaluated using the absorption properties of photon tunneling or wave resonance while the liquid water fraction is evaluated using classical Beer's law absorption. While this is still a work in progress, the anticipated products from this AERI-radar retrieval scheme are the IWP, LWP, small-to-large ice crystal number concentration ratio and effective diameter for cirrus, as well as the ice particle number concentration for a given ice water content (IWC).

  19. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Holben, B.; Remer, L.; Smirnov, A.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and Sun photometers during TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment). Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W), are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and rms differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a)=60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements.

  20. Modification of cirrus clouds to reduce global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. L.

    2009-12-01

    Since both greenhouse gases and cirrus clouds strongly affect outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) with no affect or less affect on solar radiation, respectively, an attempt to delay global warming to buy time for emission reduction strategies to work might naturally target cirrus clouds. Cirrus having optical depths < 3.6 cover 13% of the globe and have a net warming effect on climate, with the coldest cirrus having the strongest warming effect. Roughly 2/3 of predicted global warming is due to the feedback effect of water vapor and clouds from an initial greenhouse gas forcing, and a recent study indicates water vapor and clouds in the upper troposphere (UT) have the greatest impact on climate sensitivity (the equilibrium response of global-mean surface temperature to a CO2 doubling). Thus altering UT water vapor and cirrus may be a good strategy for climate engineering. Cirrus cloud coverage is predicted to be sensitive to the ice fall speed which depends on ice crystal size. The higher the cirrus, the greater their impact is on OLR. Thus by changing ice crystal size in the coldest cirrus, OLR and climate might be modified. Fortunately the coldest cirrus have the highest ice supersaturation due to the dominance of homogeneous freezing nucleation. Seeding such cirrus with very efficient heterogeneous ice nuclei should produce larger ice crystals due to vapor competition effects, thus increasing OLR and surface cooling. Preliminary estimates of this global net cloud forcing via GCM simulations are more negative than -2.8 W m-2 and could neutralize the radiative forcing due to a CO2 doubling (3.7 W m-2). This cirrus engineered net forcing is due to (1) reduced cirrus coverage and (2) reduced upper tropospheric water vapor, due to enhanced ice sedimentation. The implementation of this climate engineering could use the airline industry to disperse the seeding material. Commercial airliners typically fly at temperatures between -40 and -60 deg. C (where homogeneous

  1. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon: airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition, microphysical properties, mixing state and optical properties during SAMBBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Hodgson, A.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Szpek, K.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. On regional scales, the impacts are substantial, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado

  2. Laser transmission-backscattering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Ou, Szu-Cheng; Takano, Yoshihide; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Lefevre, Randy J; Johnson, Michael W

    2002-09-20

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) model for inhomogeneous cirrus clouds in plane-parallel and spherical geometries for the analysis of the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams. The 2D extinction-coefficient and mean effective ice-crystal size fields for cirrus clouds can be determined from a combination of the remote sensing of cirrus clouds by use of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites and the vertical profiling of ice-crystal size distributions available from limited measurements. We demonstrate that satellite remote sensing of the position and the composition of high cirrus can be incorporated directly in the computer model developed for the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams in realistic atmospheres. The results of laser direct transmission, forward scattering, and backscattering are analyzed carefully with respect to aircraft height, cirrus cloud optical depth, and ice-crystal size and orientation. Uncertainty in laser transmission that is due to errors in the retrieved ice-crystal size is negligible. But uncertainty of the order of 2% can be produced if the retrieved optical depth has errors of +/-0.05. With both the aircraft and the target near the cloud top, the direct transmission decreases, owing to the propagation of the laser beam through the curved portion of the cloud top. This effect becomes more pronounced as the horizontal distance between the aircraft and the target increases.

  3. Why cirrus cloud seeding cannot substantially cool the planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Blaž; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    The net warming effect of cirrus clouds has driven part of the geoengineering research toward the idea of decreasing their occurrence frequency by seeding them with efficient ice nucleating particles. We study responses of cirrus clouds to simplified global seeding strategies in terms of their radiative fluxes with the help of the ECHAM-HAM general circulation model. Our cirrus scheme takes into account the competition between homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing, preexisting ice crystals, and the full spectrum of updraft velocities. While we find that the cirrus cloud radiative effect evaluated from our model is positive and large enough (5.7 W/m2) to confirm their geoengineering potential, none of the seeding strategies achieves a significant cooling due to complex microphysical mechanisms limiting their climatic responses. After globally uniform seeding is applied, we observe an increase in cirrus cloud cover, a decrease in ice crystal number concentration, and a decrease in ice crystal radius. An analysis of their respective radiative contributions points to the ice crystal radius decrease as the main factor limiting seeding effectiveness.

  4. Cirrus Removal in Multispectral Datawithout 1.38μM Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarau, Aliaksei; Richter, Rudolf; Zekoll, Viktoria; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus is one of the most common artifacts in the remotely sensed optical data. Contrary to the low altitude (1-3 km) cloud the cirrus cloud (8-20 km) is semitransparent and the extinction (cirrus influence) of the upward reflected solar radiance can be compensated. The widely employed and almost 'de-facto' method for cirrus compensation is based on the 1.38μm spectral channel measuring the upwelling radiance reflected by the cirrus cloud. The knowledge on the cirrus spatial distribution allows to estimate the per spectral channel cirrus attenuation and to compensate the spectral channels. A wide range of existing and expected sensors have no 1.38μm spectral channel. These sensors data can be corrected by the recently developed haze/cirrus removal method. The additive model of the estimated cirrus thickness map (CTM) is applicable for cirrus-conditioned extinction compensation. Numeric and statistic evaluation of the CTM-based cirrus removal on more than 80 Landsat-8 OLI and 30 Sentinel-2 scenes demonstrates a close agreement with the 1.38μm channel based cirrus removal.

  5. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles.

  6. Halos in cirrus clouds: why are classic displays so rare?

    PubMed

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2005-09-20

    Upper tropospheric cirrus clouds consist of hexagonal ice crystals, which geometrical ray-tracing-theory predicts should regularly produce a variety of optical phenomena such as vivid 22 degrees and 46 degrees halos. Yet, cirrus inconsistently generate such optical displays, while a class of more exotic displays are reported, albeit rarely. I review current knowledge of the cirrus cloud microphysical factors that control ice crystal shape, and hence halo/arc formation, but also appeal to halo enthusiasts to help investigate the causes of unusually complex, brilliant, or rare optical displays. Currently, a wealth of meteorological information can be tapped from the Internet to help advance our knowledge of the basic meteorological factors leading to these rare events.

  7. The effect of cirrus clouds on 118-GHz brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinman, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A microwave radiative transfer model that describes the effect of scattering by cirrus clouds on the brightness temperatures that may be measured by a geostationary temperature-sounding radiometer has been developed. The model assumes that cirrus clouds are situated at an altitude where the temperature is about 230 K above completely absorbing land surfaces. It is shown that the brightness temperature at 118.75 + or - 3.9 GHz is depressed by 0.3-0.4 K per g per sq m of ice. The channels that operate at frequencies closer to 118.75 GHz are less affected by cirrus clouds. The brightness temperature reduction is most pronounced in warm temperate and tropical conditions.

  8. Cloud-radiation interactions - Effects of cirrus optical thickness feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, Richard C. J.; Iacobellis, Sam

    1987-01-01

    The paper is concerned with a cloud-radiation feedback mechanism which may be an important component of the climate changes expected from increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other trace greenhouse gases. A major result of the study is that cirrus cloud optical thickness feedbacks may indeed tend to increase the surface warming due to trace gas increases. However, the positive feedback from cirrus appears to be generally weaker than the negative effects due to lower clouds. The results just confirm those of earlier research indicating that the net effect of cloud optical thickness feedbacks may be a negative feedback which may substantially (by a factor of about 2) reduce the surface warming due to the doubling of CO2, even in the presence of cirrus clouds.

  9. Cirrus and aerosol lidar profilometer - analysis and results

    SciTech Connect

    Spinhirne, J.D.; Scott, V.S.; Reagan, J.A.; Galbraith, A.

    1996-04-01

    A cloud and aerosol lidar set from over a year of near continuous operation of a micro pulse lidar (MPL) instrument at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site has been established. MPL instruments are to be included in the Ames Research Center (ARC) instrument compliments for the SW Pacific and Arctic ARM sites. Operational processing algorithms are in development for the data sets. The derived products are to be cloud presence and classification, base height, cirrus thickness, cirrus optical thickness, cirrus extinction profile, aerosol optical thickness and profile, and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height. A cloud presence and base height algorithm is in use, and a data set from the CART site is available. The scientific basis for the algorithm development of the higher level data products and plans for implementation are discussed.

  10. Transmittance ratio constrained retrieval technique for lidar cirrus measurements.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; McCormick, M Patrick; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lee, Robert B; Leavor, Kevin R; Lei, Liqiao

    2012-05-01

    This letter describes a lidar retrieval technique that uses the transmittance ratio as a constraint to determine an average lidar ratio as well as extinction and backscatter coefficients of transparent cirrus clouds. The cloud transmittance ratio is directly obtained from two adjacent elastic lidar backscatter signals. The technique can be applied to cirrus measurements where neither the molecular scattering dominant signals above and below the cloud layer are found nor cloudfree reference profiles are available. The technique has been tested with simulated lidar signals and applied to backscatter lidar measurements at Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia.

  11. In-situ Balloon Measurements of Small Ice Particles in High-Latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, T.; Heymsfield, A.

    2015-12-01

    Thin cirrus clouds at high latitudes are often composed of small ice particles not larger than 100 μm. Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions (PSD) and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating/validating passive and active remote sensors. We report on a series of balloon-borne in-situ measurements that is carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The measurements target upper tropospheric, cold cirrus clouds. The measurements are ongoing, and the method and first results are presented here. Ice particles in these clouds are predominantly very small, with a median size of measured particles of around 50 μm. Ice particles at these sizes are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. These probes also suffer from problems with shattering of larger ice particles at the typically high aircraft speeds. The method used here avoids these issues. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always un-used section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 μm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 μm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 μm and larger. For particles that are 20 μm (12

  12. Secondary sulphate aerosols and cirrus clouds detection with SEVIRI during Nabro volcano eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Sèze, Geneviève; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can perturb the upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols by the injection of volatile sulphur compounds, like sulphur dioxide, and the subsequent conversion to secondary sulphate aerosols (SSA). The volcanically-produced sulphates can act as ice nuclei, at these altitudes, and modify the occurrence and microphysical/optical properties of cirrus clouds in the upper-troposphere. Sulphate aerosols and cirrus clouds have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget from the regional to the global scale, and then on the Earth's climate. The Nabro volcano (Eritrea, 13.37°N, 41.70°E) erupted violently on 12 June 2011. The eruption, which lasted almost 1 month, is responsible for the most important injection of sulfur dioxide in the upper-troposphere and stratosphere since the eruption of Mount Pinatubo (1991), significantly perturbing the aerosol layer at these altitudes. The detailed study of this eruption and its atmospheric impact is of particular interest because this event is spatially and temporally coincident with the Asian summer monsoon dynamics, during 2011. The volcanic effluents were captured in the monsoon anticyclone; the interaction of the eruption with the monsoon dynamics is debated and still not clear. In this contribution, we present new SSA measurements, based on the work of Sellitto and Legras (2015), and cirrus clouds classification (Derrien and LeGléau, 2005), using SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) observations. We use these observations to characterize the evolution of Nabro eruption at a very high temporal resolution. The role of the volcanic SSA on the occurrence of cirrus clouds at the regional scale is also analysed and discussed for this event. References: (Derrien and LeGléau, 2005) Derrien, M. and LeGléau, H.: MSG/SEVIRI cloud mask and type from SAFNWC, Int. J. Rem. Sens., 26, 4707-4732, doi: 10.1080/01431160500166128, 2005. (Sellitto and Legras, 2015) Sellitto, P. and Legras, B

  13. Estimation of the cirrus cloud scattering phase function from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenxi; Yang, Ping; Dessler, Andrew; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yongxiang

    2014-05-01

    Optical and microphysical properties for optically thin ice clouds are retrieved from one year of collocated Aqua/MODIS and CALIPSO/CALIOP measurements in 2008. The values of optical thickness τ and effective particle size Deff are inferred from MODIS measurements at three infrared (IR) bands located at 8.5, 11, and 12 μm in conjunction with collocated CALIOP cloud boundary altitudes and the MERRA atmospheric profile datasets. The τ values inferred from MODIS IR window measurements are insensitive to the pre-assumed particle and habit distributions. Based on near-IR measurements at 1.38 μm and the IR-based τ, a new method is developed to infer the scattering phase functions over both ocean and land. A comparison between theoretically calculated phase functions and the retrieved counterparts demonstrates that roughened solid columns provide the best match for cirrus clouds over ocean, whereas droxtals may exist in optically thin cirrus clouds. The best-fitted phase functions are generated using appropriate habit mixtures to match the inferred phase functions. The phase function resulting from a mixture of 55% severely roughened solid columns, 35% severely roughened droxtals, and 10% smooth aggregates almost perfectly matches the mean phase function value retrieved over ocean. The asymmetry factor based on the oceanic best-fitted phase functions is 0.778 at a wavelength of 0.65 μm. However, it is difficult to find an appropriate habit recipe to fit the inferred phase function over land. This may be caused by the relatively large uncertainties associated with τ retrievals over land. The retrieval of Deff shows that optically thin cirrus clouds consist of smaller ice particles in comparison with optically thicker ice clouds. The mean Deff values of optically thin ice clouds over land and ocean are 41 μm and 48 μm, respectively.

  14. Evaluation of cloud resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-Train observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlbauer, A. D.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates cloud resolving model (CRM) and cloud system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations of a midlatitude cirrus case with comprehensive observations collected under the auspices of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program and with spaceborne observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) A-train satellites. Vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity and wind speeds are reasonably well simulated by the CSRM and CRM but there are remaining biases in the temperature, wind speeds and relative humidity, which can be mitigated through nudging the model simulations toward the observed radiosonde profiles. Simulated vertical velocities are underestimated in all simulations except in the CRM simulations with grid spacings of 500m or finer, which suggests that turbulent vertical air motions in cirrus clouds need to be parameterized in GCMs and in CSRM simulations with horizontal grid spacings on the order of 1km. The simulated ice water content and ice number concentrations agree with the observations in the CSRM but are underestimated in the CRM simulations. The underestimation of ice number concentrations is consistent with the overestimation of radar reflectivity in the CRM simulations and suggests that the model produces too many large ice particles especially toward cloud base. Simulated cloud profiles are rather insensitive to perturbations in the initial conditions or the dimensionality of the model domain but the treatment of the forcing data has a considerable effect on the outcome of the model simulations. Despite considerable progress in observations and microphysical parameterizations, simulating the microphysical, macrophysical and radiative properties of cirrus remains challenging. Comparing model simulations with observations from multiple instruments and observational platforms is important for revealing model deficiencies and for providing rigorous benchmarks. However, there still is considerable

  15. Evaluations of Thin Cirrus Contamination and Screening in Ground Aerosol Observations Using Collocated Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly sub visual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to be screened in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to thin cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the CALIPSO vertical feature mask (VFM) and the MODIS-derived thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating thin cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) Quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted. Although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons, (2) Challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed, and (3) Estimation of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  16. Selected topics on the interaction between cirrus clouds and embedded contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.

    2012-12-01

    Persistent contrails and natural cirrus clouds often coexist in the upper troposphere and contrails can be embedded within cirrus clouds. The present paper deals with some questions regarding the interaction of cirrus clouds and embedded contrails. I have selected only questions that can be answered by analytical means. I find that (1) the emission index for water vapour is only slightly changed when an aircraft crosses a cirrus cloud, (2) that contrail formation is not affected by an ambient cirrus, (3) that cirrus ice crystals entrained into the trailing wing tip vortex do not efficiently retard the sublimation of contrail ice crystals, and (4) that cirrus can start to dissolve an embedded contrail after a couple of hours by aggregation.

  17. Medium-Range Predictability of Contrail-Cirrus Demonstrated during Experiments Ml-Cirrus and Access-Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Contrail Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP (doi:10.5194/gmd-5-543-2012) has been applied quasi operationally to predict contrails for flight planning of ML-CIRRUS (C. Voigt, DLR, et al.) in Europe and for ACCESS II in California (B. Anderson, NASA, et al.) in March-May 2014. The model uses NWP data from ECMWF and past airtraffic data (actual traffic data are used for analysis). The forecasts provided a sequence of hourly forecast maps of contrail cirrus optical depth for 3.5 days, every 12 h. CoCiP has been compared to observations before, e.g. within a global climate-aerosol-contrail model (Schumann, Penner et al., ACPD, 2015, doi:10.5194/acpd-15-19553-2015). Good predictions would allow for climate optimal routing (see, e.g., US patent by Mannstein and Schumann, US 2012/0173147 A1). The predictions are tested by: 1) Local eyewitness reports and photos, 2) satellite observed cloudiness, 3) autocorrelation analysis of predictions for various forecast periods, 4) comparisons of computed with observed optical depth from COCS (doi:10.5194/amt-7-3233-2014, 2014) by IR METEOSAT-SEVIRI observations over Europe. The results demonstrate medium-range predictability of contrail cirrus to a useful degree for given traffic, soot emissions, and high-quality NWP data. A growing set of satellite, Lidar, and in-situ data from ML-CIRRUS and ACCENT are becoming available and will be used to further test the forecast quality. The autocorrelation of optical depth predictions is near 70% for 3-d forecasts for Europe (outside times with high Sahara dust loads), and only slightly smaller for continental USA. Contrail cirrus is abundant over Europe and USA. More than 1/3 of all cirrus measured with the research aircraft HALO during ML-CIRRUS was impacted by contrails. The radiative forcing (RF) is strongly daytime and ambience dependent. The net annual mean RF, based on our global studies, may reach up to 0.08 W/m2 globally, and may well exceed 1 W/m2 regionally, with maximum over Europe

  18. Impact of Albedo Contrast Between Cirrus and Boundary-Layer Clouds on Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, R. S.; Hou, A. Y.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In assessing the iris effect suggested by Lindzen et al. (2001), Fu et al. (2001) found that the response of high-level clouds to the sea surface temperature had an effect of reducing the climate sensitivity to external radiative forcing, but the effect was not as strong as LCH found. This weaker reduction in climate sensitivity was due to the smaller contrasts in albedos and effective emitting temperatures between cirrus clouds and the neighboring regions. FBH specified the albedos and the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in the LCH 3.5-box radiative-convective model by requiring that the model radiation budgets at the top of the atmosphere be consistent with that inferred from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). In point of fact, the constraint by radiation budgets alone is not sufficient for deriving the correct contrast in radiation properties between cirrus clouds and the neighboring regions, and the approach of FBH to specifying those properties is, we feel inappropriate for assessing the iris effect.

  19. a Brief Climatology of Cirrus LIDAR Ratios Measured by High Spectral Resolution LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, R.; Holz, R.; Hair, J. W.; Vaughan, M. A.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    Our ability to detect and probe the vertical extent of cirrus was hugely improved with the launch of the NASA-CNES CALIPSO mission in April 2006. However, our skill at retrieving the optical properties of the cirrus detected by the CALIPSO lidar is not yet commensurate with our detection abilities. As with any new observing system, CALIPSO faces challenges and uncertainties in the retrieval of the geophysical parameters from its fundamental measurements. Specifically, extinction and optical depth retrievals for elastic backscatter lidars like CALIPSO typically rely on a priori assumptions about layer-mean extinction-to-backscatter ratios (AKA lidar ratios), which can vary regionally and for which uncertainties are high. To improve CALIPSO optical properties retrievals, we show High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements acquired with systems from the University of Wisconsin and NASA Langley. HSRLs can directly determine ice cloud extinction and lidar ratio by separately measuring the molecular and particulate components of the total backscattered signal, thus largely eliminating many of the uncertainties inherent in elastic backscatter retrievals. These measurements were acquired during the SEAC4RS (Huntsville, AL, USA and Singapore), and FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ 2014 (BAO tower near Boulder, CO, USA) field campaigns, and an intensive operations period in Hampton, VA, USA.

  20. In-situ aircraft observations of ice supersaturation and cirrus clouds in global field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, M.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    cirrus cloud formation into three stages: 1) clear-sky ice supersaturated regions (ISSRs), 2) ISSRs with ice crystals, and 3) subsaturated cirrus clouds. Analyses of the maximum RHi inside the clear-sky ISSRs show a wider range of RHi distributions in NH than SH for the same lengths of ISSRs. These findings demonstrate a large difference in cirrus cloud formation processes between the two hemispheres, indicating different ice nucleation thresholds between the two hemispheres. The difference in nucleation thresholds could be influenced by the different aerosol loading in the two hemispheres in terms of number concentration, size and chemical contents, but direct linkage between the ISS distributions, the aerosol properties, and the representativeness of the flight tracks need more investigation.

  1. Comparing Cirrus Cloud Formation and Evolution Using in Situ Aircraft Observations and a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, M.; Jensen, J. B.; Bryan, G. H.; Morrison, H.; Stern, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Cirrus clouds, covering ~30% of the Earth, play important roles in Earth's climate and weather. As a major uncertainty in climate models, cirrus clouds' radiative forcing (cooling or warming) is influenced by both the microphysical properties (such as ice crystal concentration and size) and the larger scale structure (such as horizontal and vertical extent). Recent studies (Diao et al. 2013; Diao et al. 2014), based on in situ observations with ~200 m horizontal resolution, showed that the initial conditions of cirrus formation - ice supersaturated regions (ISSRs, where ISS is spatially continuous) - occur mostly at horizontal scales around 1 km, in contrast to the ~100 km scales by previous observations (Gierens et al. 2000). Yet it is still unknown whether current cloud resolving models can capture these small-scale ISSR features. In this work, we compare the observed characteristics of the ice supersaturation (ISS) with an idealized, cloud-resolving simulation of a squall line (Bryan and Morrison, 2012). The model (CM1) was run with 250 m grid spacing using a double-moment microphysics scheme (Morrison et al. 2005). Our comparisons show that the CM1 model has captured the majority of the small-scale ISSRs (~1 km). In addition, the simulated ISSRs are dominated by water vapor horizontal heterogeneities (~90%) as opposed to temperature heterogeneities (~10%). This result is comparable to the observed values of ~88% and ~9%, respectively. However, when comparing the evolution phases of cirrus clouds (clear-sky ISS, nucleation/freezing, growth and sedimentation/sublimation; Diao et al. 2013), the CM1 simulation does not have sufficient amount of ISS in clear-sky and nucleation phases. This disagreement indicates a shortcoming of the idealized model setup. Overall, the observations show more ISS at higher magnitude (up to ~150% of RHi) than CM1 (~up to 130% of RHi). Also the largest ISSRs in the observations are up to ~100 km, compared with those in CM1 of up to ~10

  2. Quantifying the Amount of Ice in Cold Tropical Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Melody A.; Winker, David M.; Garnier, Anne; Lawson, R. Paul; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Mo, Qixu; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Woods, Sarah; Lance, Sara; Young, Stuart A.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Trepte, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    How much ice is there in the Tropical Tropopause layer, globally? How does one begin to answer that question? Clouds are currently the largest source of uncertainty in climate models, and the ice water content (IWC) of cold cirrus clouds is needed to understand the total water and radiation budgets of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, originally a "pathfinder" mission only expected to last for three years, has now been operational for more than eight years. Lidar data from CALIPSO can provide information about how IWC is vertically distributed in the UT/LS, and about inter-annual variability and seasonal changes in cloud ice. However, cloud IWC is difficult to measure accurately with either remote or in situ instruments because IWC from cold cirrus clouds is derived from the particle cross-sectional area or visible extinction coefficient. Assumptions must be made about the relationship between the area, volume and density of ice particles with various crystal habits. Recently there have been numerous aircraft field campaigns providing detailed information about cirrus ice water content from cloud probes. This presentation evaluates the assumptions made when creating the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) global IWC data set, using recently reanalyzed aircraft particle probe measurements of very cold, thin TTL cirrus from the 2006 CR-AVE.

  3. Parameterization of Infrared Absorption in Midlatitude Cirrus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, Kenneth; Wang, Zhien; Platt, C.M.R.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2003-01-01

    Employing a new approach based on combined Raman lidar and millimeter-wave radar measurements and a parameterization of the infrared absorption coefficient {sigma}{sub a}(km{sup -1}) in terms of retrieved cloud microphysics, we derive a statistical relation between {sigma}{sub a} and cirrus cloud temperature. The relations {sigma}{sub a} = 0.3949 + 5.3886 x 10{sup -3} T + 1.526 x 10{sup -5} T{sup 2} for ambient temperature (T,{sup o}C), and {sigma}{sub a} = 0.2896 + 3.409 x 10{sup -3} T{sub m} for midcloud temperature (T{sub m}, {sup o}C), are found using a second order polynomial fit. Comparison with two {sigma}{sub a} versus T{sub m} relations obtained primarily from midlatitude cirrus using the combined lidar/infrared radiometer (LIRAD) approach reveals significant differences. However, we show that this reflects both the previous convention used in curve fitting (i. e., {sigma}{sub a} {yields} 0 at {approx} 80 C), and the types of clouds included in the datasets. Without such constraints, convergence is found in the three independent remote sensing datasets within the range of conditions considered valid for cirrus (i.e., cloud optical depth {approx} 3.0 and T{sub m} < {approx}20 C). Hence for completeness we also provide reanalyzed parameterizations for a visible extinction coefficient {sigma}{sub a} versus T{sub m} relation for midlatitude cirrus, and a data sample involving cirrus that evolved into midlevel altostratus clouds with higher optical depths.

  4. Inherent optical properties of the ocean: retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter from airborne laser spectral fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Vodacek, Anthony; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Blough, Neil V.

    1995-10-01

    The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 355 nm has been retrieved from airborne laser-induced and water Raman-normalized CDOM fluorescence. Four combined airborne and ship field experiments have demonstrated that (1) the airborne CDOM fluorescence-to--water Raman ratio is linearly related to concurrent quinine-sulfate-standardized CDOM shipboard fluorescence measurements over a wide range of water masses (coastal to blue water); (2) the vicarious calibration of the airborne fluorosensor in units traceable to a fluorescence standard can be established and then maintained over an extended time period by tungsten lamp calibration; (3) the vicariously calibrated airborne CDOM fluorescence-to-water Raman ratio can be directly applied to previously developed

  5. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-01

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are done with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.

  6. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  7. Parameterization of ice fall speeds in midlatitude cirrus: Results from SPartICus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subhashree; Mitchell, David L.; Turner, David D.; Lawson, R. P.

    2014-04-01

    The climate sensitivity predicted in general circulation models can be sensitive to the treatment of the ice particle fall velocity. In this study, the mass-weighted ice fall speed (Vm) and the number concentration ice fall speed (Vn) in midlatitude cirrus clouds are computed from in situ measurements of ice particle area and number concentration made by the two-dimensional stereo probe during the Small Particles In Cirrus field campaign. For single-moment ice microphysical schemes, Vm and the ice particle size distribution effective diameter De were parameterized in terms of cloud temperature (T) and ice water content (IWC). For two-moment schemes, Vm and Vn were related to De and the mean maximum dimension¯D, respectively. For single-moment schemes, although the correlations of Vm and De with T were higher than the correlations of Vm and De with IWC, it is demonstrated that Vm and De are better predicted by using both T and IWC. The parameterization relating Vm to T and IWC is compared with another scheme relating Vm to T and IWC, with the latter based on millimeter cloud radar measurements. Regarding two-moment ice microphysical schemes, a strong correlation was found between De and Vm and between¯D and Vn owing to their similar weightings by ice particle mass and number concentration, respectively. Estimating Vm from De makes Vm a function of IWC and projected area, realistically coupling Vm with both the cloud microphysics and radiative properties.

  8. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Under Thin Cirrus from MODIS: Application to an Ocean Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Sayer, Andrew Mark; Bettenhausen, Corey

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for retrieving aerosol optical depth (AOD) under conditions of thin cirrus coverage from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is presented. We adopt an empirical method that derives the cirrus contribution to measured reflectance in seven bands from the visible to shortwave infrared (0.47, 0.55, 0.65, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.12 µm, commonly used for AOD retrievals) by using the correlations between the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance at 1.38 micron and these bands. The 1.38 micron band is used due to its strong absorption by water vapor and allows us to extract the contribution of cirrus clouds to TOA reflectance and create cirrus-corrected TOA reflectances in the seven bands of interest. These cirrus-corrected TOA reflectances are then used in the aerosol retrieval algorithm to determine cirrus-corrected AOD. The cirrus correction algorithm reduces the cirrus contamination in the AOD data as shown by a decrease in both magnitude and spatial variability of AOD over areas contaminated by thin cirrus. Comparisons of retrieved AOD against Aerosol Robotic Network observations at Nauru in the equatorial Pacific reveal that the cirrus correction procedure improves the data quality: the percentage of data within the expected error +/-(0.03 + 0.05 ×AOD) increases from 40% to 80% for cirrus-corrected points only and from 80% to 86% for all points (i.e., both corrected and uncorrected retrievals). Statistical comparisons with Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrievals are also carried out. A high correlation (R = 0.89) between the CALIOP cirrus optical depth and AOD correction magnitude suggests potential applicability of the cirrus correction procedure to other MODIS-like sensors.

  9. Setup and first airborne application of an aerosol optical properties package for the In-service Aircraft Global Observing System IAGOS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, Ulrich; Freedman, Andrew; Herber, Andreas; Mattis, Ina; Berg, Marcel; De Faira, Julia; Petzold, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    different spectral information. The number of CAPS units to be used will depend on the size of the final electronic boards which are currently under development. The Sky OPC measures the size distribution theoretically up to 32 μm covering the relevant size information for calculation of aerosol optical properties. Because of the inlet cut off diameter of D50 = 3μm we are using the 16 channel mode in the range of 250 nm - 2.5 μm at 1 Hz resolution. In this presentation the setup of the IAGOS Aerosol package P2E is presented and characterized for pressure levels relevant for the planned application, down to cruising level of 150 hPa. In our aerosol lab we have tested the system against standard instrumentation with different aerosol test substances. In addition first results for airborne measurements are shown from a first airborne field campaign where in situ profiles are compared to LIDAR measurements over Bornholm (Denmark) and Lindenberg (Germany).

  10. Clarifying the dominant sources and mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Cziczo, Daniel J; Froyd, Karl D; Hoose, Corinna; Jensen, Eric J; Diao, Minghui; Zondlo, Mark A; Smith, Jessica B; Twohy, Cynthia H; Murphy, Daniel M

    2013-06-14

    Formation of cirrus clouds depends on the availability of ice nuclei to begin condensation of atmospheric water vapor. Although it is known that only a small fraction of atmospheric aerosols are efficient ice nuclei, the critical ingredients that make those aerosols so effective have not been established. We have determined in situ the composition of the residual particles within cirrus crystals after the ice was sublimated. Our results demonstrate that mineral dust and metallic particles are the dominant source of residual particles, whereas sulfate and organic particles are underrepresented, and elemental carbon and biological materials are essentially absent. Further, composition analysis combined with relative humidity measurements suggests that heterogeneous freezing was the dominant formation mechanism of these clouds.

  11. Two Years of Global Cirrus Cloud Statistics Using HIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wylie, Donald; Menzel, W. Paul; Woolf, H. M.

    1991-01-01

    A climatology of upper tropospheric semi-transparent cirrus clouds has been compiled using HIRS multispectral infrared data, sensitive to CO2 absorption, from the NOAA polar orbiting satellites. This is a report on the two years of data analyzed (June 1989 - May 1991). Semi-transparent clouds were found in 36% of the observations. Large seasonal changes were found in these clouds in many geographical areas; large changes occur in areas dominated by the ITCZ, the sub-tropical high pressure systems, and the mid-latitude storm belts. Semi-transparent clouds associated with these features move latitudinally with the seasons. These clouds also are more frequent in the summer hemisphere than the winter hemisphere. They appear to be linked to convective cloud development and the mid-latitudinal frontal weather systems. However, very thin semi-transparent cirrus has less seasonal movement than other cloud forms.

  12. Parameterization of cirrus optical depth and cloud fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, B.

    1995-09-01

    This research illustrates the utility of combining satellite observations and operational analysis for the evaluation of parameterizations. A parameterization based on ice water path (IWP) captures the observed spatial patterns of tropical cirrus optical depth. The strong temperature dependence of cirrus ice water path in both the observations and the parameterization is probably responsible for the good correlation where it exists. Poorer agreement is found in Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes where the temperature dependence breaks down. Uncertainties in effective radius limit quantitative validation of the parameterization (and its inclusion into GCMs). Also, it is found that monthly mean cloud cover can be predicted within an RMS error of 10% using ECMWF relative humidity corrected by TOVS Upper Troposphere Humidity. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  13. Clarifying the dominant sources and mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Cziczo, Daniel J; Froyd, Karl D; Hoose, Corinna; Jensen, Eric J; Diao, Minghui; Zondlo, Mark A; Smith, Jessica B; Twohy, Cynthia H; Murphy, Daniel M

    2013-06-14

    Formation of cirrus clouds depends on the availability of ice nuclei to begin condensation of atmospheric water vapor. Although it is known that only a small fraction of atmospheric aerosols are efficient ice nuclei, the critical ingredients that make those aerosols so effective have not been established. We have determined in situ the composition of the residual particles within cirrus crystals after the ice was sublimated. Our results demonstrate that mineral dust and metallic particles are the dominant source of residual particles, whereas sulfate and organic particles are underrepresented, and elemental carbon and biological materials are essentially absent. Further, composition analysis combined with relative humidity measurements suggests that heterogeneous freezing was the dominant formation mechanism of these clouds. PMID:23661645

  14. Measurements of Terminal Velocities of Cirrus Clouds in the Upper Trosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai Nee, Jan; Chen, W. N.; Chiang, C. W.; Das, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are composed of ice crystals condensed from humidity due to low temperature condition in the upper atmosphere. The microphysics of cirrus clouds including sizes and shapes of ice particles are not well understood but are important in climate modeling. Ice crystal will fall under gravitational sedimentation to reach terminal velocities which depend on the size, mass, and ice habit. We studied here the terminal velocity of cirrus clouds by using lidar observations at Chungli (25N, 121E). The terminal velocities for a few cases of stable cirrus clouds are measured to determine the ice particle sizes and processes in the upper atmosphere.

  15. On Cirrus Cloud Fields Measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Liou, Kuo Nan

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation showing trends in clouds measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is given. The topics include: 1) Trends in clouds measured by AIRS: Are they reasonable? 2) Single and multilayered cloud trends; 3) Retrievals of thin cirrus D(sub e) and tau: Single-layered cloud only; 4) Relationships between ECF, D(sub e), tau, and T(sub CLD); and 5) MODIS vs. AIRS retrievals.

  16. Highly supercooled cirrus cloud water: confirmation and climatic implications.

    PubMed

    Sassen, K; Liou, K N; Kinne, S; Griffin, M

    1985-01-25

    Liquid cloud droplets supercooled to temperatures approaching -40 degrees C have been detected at the base of a cirrostratus cloud through a combination of ground-based, polarization laser radar (lidar) and in situ aircraft measurements, Solar and thermal infrared radiative budget calculations based on these observatoins indicate that significant changes in the atmospheric heating distribution and the surface radiative budget may be attributed to liquid layers in cirrus clouds.

  17. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during CRYSTAL-FACE were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward- and downward-facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197 K - 224 K and pressures of 122 hPa - 224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4- 10(exp 14) molecules/sq cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 pm and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  18. Can cirrus cloud seeding be used for geoengineering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Xiaohong

    2015-10-01

    Cirrus cloud seeding has been proposed as a possible technique that might thin cirrus clouds leading to reduced heating. The technique was shown to be viable in one model evaluation. Here we use an updated version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) and reevaluate whether seeding is a viable mechanism for cooling. We explore different model setups (with and without secondary organic aerosols acting as heterogeneous ice nuclei). None of the updated versions of the CAM5 lead to a significant amount of negative climate forcing and hence do not lead to cooling. We only calculate a net negative cloud forcing (-0.74 ± 0.25 W m-2) if we restrict the modeled subgrid-scale updraft velocity during nucleation to <0.2 m s-1 and if the deposition of water vapor onto preexisting ice crystals during nucleation is not included. Hence, we do not find that cirrus cloud seeding is a viable climate intervention technique.

  19. Effective Ice Particle Densities for Cold Anvil Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Schmitt, Carl G.; Bansemer, Aaron; Baumgardner, Darrel; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Smith, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    This study derives effective ice particle densities from data collected from the NASA WB-57F aircraft near the tops of anvils during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE) in southern Florida in July 2002. The effective density, defined as the ice particle mass divided by the volume of an equivalent diameter liquid sphere, is obtained for particle populations and single sizes containing mixed particle habits using measurements of condensed water content and particle size distributions. The mean effective densities for populations decrease with increasing slopes of the gamma size distributions fitted to the size distributions. The population-mean densities range from near 0.91 g/cu m to 0.15 g/cu m. Effective densities for single sizes obey a power-law with an exponent of about -0.55, somewhat less steep than found from earlier studies. Our interpretations apply to samples where particle sizes are generally below 200-300 microns in maximum dimension because of probe limitations.

  20. Simulated radiative forcing from contrails and contrail cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-C.; Gettelman, A.

    2013-04-01

    A comprehensive general circulation model including ice supersaturation is used to estimate the climate impact of aviation induced contrails. The model uses a realistic aviation emissions inventory for 2006 to initiate contrails, and allows them to evolve consistently with the model hydrologic cycle. The radiative forcing from linear contrails is very sensitive to the diurnal cycle of flights. For linear contrails, including the diurnal cycle of flights reduces the estimated global radiative forcing by 55%, and for contrails cirrus estimates, the global radiative forcing is reduced by 25%. Estimated global radiative forcing from linear contrails is 0.0029±0.00125 W m-2. The instantaneous radiative forcing for contrails is found to exhibit a strong diurnal cycle. The integrated effect of contrail cirrus is much less sensitive to the diurnal cycle of flights. The estimated global radiative forcing from contrail cirrus is 0.012±0.01 W m-2. Over regions with the highest air traffic, the regional effect can be as large as 1 W m-2.

  1. Simulated radiative forcing from contrails and contrail cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-C.; Gettelman, A.

    2013-12-01

    A comprehensive general circulation model including ice supersaturation is used to estimate the climate impact of aviation induced contrails. The model uses a realistic aviation emissions inventory for 2006 to initiate contrails, and allows them to evolve consistently with the model hydrologic cycle. The radiative forcing from linear contrails is very sensitive to the diurnal cycle. For linear contrails, including the diurnal cycle of air traffic reduces the estimated radiative forcing by 29%, and for contrail cirrus estimates, the radiative forcing is reduced by 25%. Estimated global radiative forcing from linear contrails is 0.0031 ± 0.0005 Wm-2. The linear contrail radiative forcing is found to exhibit a strong diurnal cycle. The contrail cirrus radiative forcing is less sensitive to the diurnal cycle of flights. The estimated global radiative forcing from contrail cirrus is 0.013 ± 0.01 Wm-2. Over regions with the highest air traffic, the regional effect can be as large as 1 Wm-2.

  2. 3D reconstruction of tropospheric cirrus clouds by stereovision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadjib Kouahla, Mohamed; Moreels, Guy; Seridi, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    A stereo imaging method is applied to measure the altitude of cirrus clouds and provide a 3D map of the altitude of the layer centroid. They are located in the high troposphere and, sometimes in the lower stratosphere, between 6 and 10 km high. Two simultaneous images of the same scene are taken with Canon cameras (400D) in two sites distant of 37 Km. Each image processed in order to invert the perspective effect and provide a satellite-type view of the layer. Pairs of matched points that correspond to a physical emissive point in the common area are identified in calculating a correlation coefficient (ZNCC: Zero mean Normalized Cross-correlation or ZSSD: as Zero mean Sum of Squared Differences). This method is suitable for obtaining 3D representations in the case of low-contrast objects. An observational campaign was conducted in June 2014 in France. The images were taken simultaneously at Marnay (47°17'31.5" N, 5°44'58.8" E; altitude 275 m) 25 km northwest of Besancon and in Mont poupet (46°58'31.5" N, 5°52'22.7" E; altitude 600 m) southwest of Besancon at 43 km. 3D maps of the Natural cirrus clouds and artificial like "aircraft trails" are retrieved. They are compared with pseudo-relief intensity maps of the same region. The mean altitude of the cirrus barycenter is located at 8.5 ± 1km on June 11.

  3. Examination of the observed synoptic scale cirrus cloud environment: The December 3-6 FIRE cirrus case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, Sassen provided evidence for supercooled water droplets in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between 40 and -50 C. Chemistry related to volcanic aerosol of stratospheric origin was evoked as an explanation for this phenomenon. Sassen speculated that injections of sulfuric acid droplets into the upper troposphere were accomplished by tropopause folds associated with subtropical jet streams. He also postulated global climatic perturbations due to the effect of these cirrus microphysical perturbations on radiative fluxes. Using data processing and objective analysis techniques described by Mace and Ackerman, the synoptic scale environment was examined for evidence of tropopause folds that may have served as a source mechanism of stratospheric aerosol in the upper troposphere.

  4. Comparison of physicochemical properties between fine (PM2.5) and coarse airborne particles at cold season in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Oh, Jungsun; Han, Weon Shik; Chon, Chul-Min; Kwon, Youngsang; Kim, Do Yeon; Shin, Woosik

    2016-01-15

    Although it has been well-known that atmospheric aerosols affect negatively the local air quality, human health, and climate changes, the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols are not fully understood yet. This study experimentally measured the physiochemical characteristics of fine and coarse aerosol particles at the suburban area to evaluate relative contribution to environmental pollution in consecutive seasons of autumn and winter, 2014-2015, using XRD, SEM-EDX, XNI, ICP-MS, and TOF-SIMS. For these experimental works, the fine and coarse aerosols were collected by the high volume air sampler for 7 days each season. The fine particles contain approximately 10 μg m(-3) of carbonaceous aerosols consisting of 90% organic and 10% elemental carbon. The spherical-shape carbonaceous particles were observed for the coarse samples as well. Interestingly, the coarse particles in winter showed the increased frequency of carbon-rich particles with high contents of heavy metals. These results suggest that, for the cold season, the coarse particles could contribute relatively more to the conveyance of toxic contaminants compared to the fine particles in the study area. However, the fine particles showed acidic properties so that their deposition to surface may cause facilitate the increase of mobility for toxic heavy metals in soil and groundwater environments. The fine and coarse particulate matters, therefore, should be monitored separately with temporal variation to evaluate the impact of atmospheric aerosols to environmental pollution and human health. PMID:26476059

  5. Aerosol effects on cirrus through ice nucleation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5 with a statistical cirrus scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2014-09-01

    A statistical cirrus scheme that tracks ice saturation ratio in the clear-sky and cloudy portion of a grid box separately has been implemented into the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5 to provide a consistent treatment of ice nucleation and cloud formation. Simulated ice supersaturation and ice crystal number concentrations strongly depend on the number concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN), subgrid temperature formulas, and the number concentration of sulfate particles participating in homogeneous freezing, while simulated ice water content is insensitive to these perturbations. Allowing 1-10% of dust particles to serve as heterogeneous IN is found to produce ice supersaturation in better agreement with observations. Introducing a subgrid temperature perturbation based on long-term aircraft observations produces a better hemispheric contrast in ice supersaturation compared to observations. Heterogeneous IN from dust particles alter the net radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) (-0.24 to -1.59 W m-2) with a significant clear-sky longwave component (0.01 to -0.55 W m-2). Different cirrus treatments significantly perturb the net TOA anthropogenic aerosol forcing from -1.21 W m-2 to -1.54 W m-2, with a standard deviation of 0.10 W m-2. Aerosol effects on cirrus exert an even larger impact on the atmospheric component of the radiative fluxes (2 or 3 times the changes in the TOA radiative fluxes) and therefore through the fast atmosphere response on the hydrological cycle. This points to the urgent need to quantify aerosol effects on cirrus through ice nucleation and how these further affect the hydrological cycle.

  6. Aerosol Effects on Cirrus through Ice Nucleation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5 with a Statistical Cirrus Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2014-09-01

    A statistical cirrus cloud scheme that tracks ice saturation ratio in the clear-sky and cloudy portion of a grid box separately has been implemented into NCAR CAM5 to provide a consistent treatment of ice nucleation and cloud formation. Simulated ice supersaturation and ice crystal number concentrations strongly depend on the number concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN), subgrid temperature formulas and the number concentration of sulfate particles participating in homogeneous freezing, while simulated ice water content is insensitive to these perturbations. 1% to 10% dust particles serving as heterogeneous IN is 20 found to produce ice supersaturaiton in better agreement with observations. Introducing a subgrid temperature perturbation based on long-term aircraft observations of meso-scale motion produces a better hemispheric contrast in ice supersaturation compared to observations. Heterogeneous IN from dust particles significantly alter the net radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) (-0.24 to -1.59 W m-2) with a significant clear-sky longwave component (0.01 to -0.55 W m-2). Different cirrus treatments significantly perturb the net TOA anthropogenic aerosol forcing from -1.21 W m-2 to -1.54 W m-2, with a standard deviation of 0.10 W m-2. Aerosol effects on cirrus clouds exert an even larger impact on the atmospheric component of the radiative fluxes (two or three times the changes in the TOA radiative fluxes) and therefore on the hydrology cycle through the fast atmosphere response. This points to the urgent need to quantify aerosol effects on cirrus clouds through ice nucleation and how these further affect the hydrological cycle.

  7. Support for the Harvard University Water Vapor and Total Water Instruments for the 2004 NASA WB57 Middle Latitude Cirrus Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the role clouds play in the climate system, NASA is investing considerable effort in characterizing clouds with instruments ranging from passive remote sensors on board the EOS platforms, to the forthcoming active remote sensors on Cloudsat and Calipso. These missions, when taken together, have the capacity to advance our understanding of the coupling between various components of the hydrologic cycle and the atmospheric circulation, and hold the additional potential of leading to significant improvements in the characterization of cloud feedbacks in global models. This is especially true considering that several of these platforms will be flown in an identical orbit within several minutes of one another-a constellation of satellites known as the A-Train. The algorithms that are being implemented and developed to convert these new data streams from radiance and reflectivity measurements into geophysical parameters invariably rely on some set of simplifymg assumptions and empirical constants. Uncertainties in these relationships lead to poorly understood random and systematic errors in the retrieved properties. This lack of understanding introduces ambiguity in interpreting the data and in using the global data sets for their intended purposes. In light of this, a series of flights with the W57F was proposed to address certain specific issues related to the basic properties of mid latitude cirrus clouds: the NASA WE357 Middle Latitude Cirrus Experiment ("MidCiX"). The science questions addressed are: 1) Can cloud property retrieval algorithms developed for A-Train active and passive remote sensing measurements accurately characterize the microphysical properties of synoptic and convectively generated cirrus cloud systems? 2) What are the relationships between the cirrus particle mass, projected area, and particle size spectrum in various genre of cirrus clouds? 3) Does the present compliment of state of the art in situ cloud

  8. Radiative diffusivity factors in cirrus and stratocumulus clouds: Application to two-stream models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Flatau, P. J.; Tsay, S.-C.; Hein, Paul F.

    1990-01-01

    A diffusion-like description of radiative transfer in clouds and the free atmosphere is often used. The two stream model is probably the best known example of such a description. The main idea behind the approach is that only the first few moments of radiance are needed to describe the radiative field correctly. Integration smooths details of the angular distribution of specific intensity and it is assumed that the closure parameters of the theory (diffusivity factors) are only weakly dependent on the distribution. The diffusivity factors are investigated using the results obtained from both Stratocumulus and Cirrus phases of FIRE experiment. A new theoretical framework is described in which two (upwards and downwards) diffusivity factors are used and a detailed multistream model is used to provide further insight about both the diffusivity factors and their dependence on scattering properties of clouds.

  9. Microphysics and Radiative Properties of Cirrus: Instrumentation and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John

    2002-01-01

    Work under this grant has involved further development of a new aircraft instrument (the cloudscope) for real time characterization of atmospheric particulates together with field observations of such particulates, both in the form of ice and also as nuclei responsible for nucleation of both ice and water cloud particles. Part of the work involving assessment of the frequency of ice crystal shapes has been carried out in collaboration with the Meteorological Service of Canada; part of the work in a field program with the NCAR C-130. Part of the work has been interpreted in terms of laboratory simulation of ice crystal growth under a wide variety of conditions carried out under a grant from Physical Meteorology Program, National Science Foundation.

  10. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-08-31

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  11. Combining multiple remote sensors with reanalysis and a radiative transfer model to assess the microphysical impact of smoke on cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablick, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    A multi-spectral technique for retrieving properties of smoke contaminated ice clouds is evaluated. This method utilizes Earth orbiting active and passive remote sensors combined with atmospheric reanalysis and a multiple scattering, single column radiative transfer algorithm. This study focuses on a specific type of cirrus cloud that exhibits IR radiances, lidar backscatter values, color ratios and depolarization ratios comparable to thick cirrus as observed by MODIS and CALIPSO. However, the radar reflectivities as determined by CloudSat are significantly lower than expected for clouds with such large visible optical depths. This work also demonstrates the sensitivity of retrievals to a priori assumptions by using a few notable cases. Collocated data observed during the boreal fire season of 2010 is analyzed using this methodology as a first step to ascertain the impact that pyroconvection may have on ice cloud properties.

  12. Backscattering Mueller matrix for quasi-horizontally oriented ice plates of cirrus clouds: application to CALIPSO signals.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia; Okamoto, Hajime

    2012-12-17

    A general view of the backscattering Mueller matrix for the quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds has been obtained in the case of tilted and scanning lidars. It is shown that the main properties of this matrix are caused by contributions from two qualitatively different components referred to the specular and corner-reflection terms. The numerical calculation of the matrix is worked out in the physical optics approximation. These matrices calculated for two wavelengths and two tilt angles (initial and present) of CALIPSO lidar are presented as a data bank. The depolarization and color ratios for these data have been obtained and discussed.

  13. Backscattering Mueller matrix for quasi-horizontally oriented ice plates of cirrus clouds: application to CALIPSO signals.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia; Okamoto, Hajime

    2012-12-17

    A general view of the backscattering Mueller matrix for the quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds has been obtained in the case of tilted and scanning lidars. It is shown that the main properties of this matrix are caused by contributions from two qualitatively different components referred to the specular and corner-reflection terms. The numerical calculation of the matrix is worked out in the physical optics approximation. These matrices calculated for two wavelengths and two tilt angles (initial and present) of CALIPSO lidar are presented as a data bank. The depolarization and color ratios for these data have been obtained and discussed. PMID:23263056

  14. ETO lidar studies of cirrostratus altocumulogenitus: Another role for supercooled liquid water in cirrus cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    Cirrus clouds have traditionally been viewed as cold, wispy, or stratiform ice clouds, typically displaying optical phenomena such as haloes. A composition entirely of hexagonal ice crystals, of one habit or another could only have a transitory existence in cirrus, since the concentrations of ice nuclei (IN) measured by various techniques (at the surface or in the lower troposphere) indicate an enormous number of IN that should be active at cirrus cloud temperatures. In light of recent instrumental aircraft and polarization lidar studies of cirrus clouds, it is clear that highly supercooled cloud droplets can sometimes be a component of cirrus clouds. It remains to be determined if supercooled liquid water (SLW) is present abundantly enough in cirrus to play a significant role in earth's radiance balance, or is merely a curious, infrequent occurrence. To help evaluate this issue, the UH polarization lidar FIRE Extended Time Observation (ETO) of cirrus clouds are being utilized to compile, among other parameters, a climatological record of SLW clouds associated with and within cirrus.

  15. Airborne lidar observations of clouds in the Antarctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Bruce M.; Uthe, Edward E.; Viezee, William

    1989-06-01

    In January 1986, SRI International made exploratory airborne observations of Antarctic tropospheric clouds with a downward-viewing lidar onboard an LC-130 supply aircraft. Frequency of observations depended upon the schedule of supply missions. Two types of clouds were observed: relatively opaque, midlevel cloud layers 3.0 to 4.0 km below flight level (about 4.0 to 4.5 km MSL); and higher altitude optically transparent cirrus clouds exhibiting long trails or curtains of ice crystals that extended from flight level downward to the top of the midlevel clouds and, frequently, to ground level. The midlevel clouds were often multilayered and, at times, showed wave or cellular structure associated with cloud streets. The ice crystal trails from the cirrus clouds showed evidence of the presence of strong vertical wind shear, and were observed to “seed” the midlevel cloud layers, producing large breaks in the overcast. These exploratory observations attest to the utility of lidar for atmospheric research studies in the Antarctic region.

  16. Airborne Observations of Drizzle in Marine Sc during VOCALS-REx: quantification, and implications for boundary-layer dynamics and cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, D.; Snider, J. R.; Wang, Z.; Zuidema, P.; Wood, R.

    2009-12-01

    Airborne radar, lidar, and radiometric measurements together with in situ measurements of cloud- and precipitation-particle distributions collected onboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Land-Atmosphere Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) are used to derive drizzle rates and accretion/evaporation profiles for the variety of marine Sc conditions encountered during VOCALS-REx. These measurements not only reconfirm the importance of drizzle as an essential feature of marine Sc (consistent with results from previous field studies including EPIC and DYCOMS-II), but also provide a comprehensive dataset for investigation of the links between drizzle, cloud properties, and the dynamics and organization the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL). Radar-lidar retrievals of drizzle rate from sub-cloud legs and conditional-sampling of in situ droplet size distributions are used to develop a Reflectivity-Rainrate (Z-R) relationship which is applied to radar reflectivity measurements from the Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) and to examine the sensitivity of the resulting drizzle rate estimates to the underlying approach used to determine a family of Z-R relationships. These relationships are known to be a function of height, since the droplet spectrum shifts towards larger sizes below cloud base as a result of evaporation, but may also depend on cloud properties such as droplet number concentration. For instance, in Pockets of Open Cells (POC) where droplet concentrations are very low, the size spectrum of drizzle droplets shifts to smaller sizes. Vertical profiles of the drizzle rate are used to infer profiles of accretion (in cloud) and evaporation (sub cloud). Knowledge of the accretion profiles is necessary for quantifying the coalescence-scavenging rate, while the evaporation profile is of interest from the boundary-layer dynamics perspective. Finally, we examine the spatial distribution of drizzle to grasp the factors influencing the degree to which drizzle is

  17. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Below-canopy Surface Water Height , Slope and Optical Properties in the Florida Everglades Shark River Slough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabney, P.; Harding, D. J.; Valett, S. R.; Yu, A. W.; Feliciano, E. A.; Neuenschwander, A. L.; Pitts, K.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the presence, persistence, optical properties and variation in height and slope of surface water beneath the dense canopies of flooded forests and mangrove stands could contribute to studies of the acquisition of water and nutrients by plant roots. NASA's airborne Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) provides unique capabilities that can identify below-canopy surface water, measure its height with respect to vegetation constituents with sub-decimeter precision and quantify its slope. It also provides information on canopy structure and closure, the water column extinction profile as a proxy for turbidity and water depth, with the penetration depth constrained by turbidity. It achieves this by using four laser beams operating at two wavelengths with measurements of water surface elevation at 1064 nm (near infrared) and water column properties at 532 nm (green), analogous to a bathymetric lidar. Importantly the instrument adds a polarimetry function, like some atmospheric lidars, which measures the amount of depolarization determined by the degree to which the plane-parallel transmitted laser pulse energy is converted to the perpendicular state. The degree of depolarization is sensitive to the number of photon multiple-scattering events. For the water surface, which is specular consisting only of single-scattering events, the near-infrared received signal retains the parallel polarization state. Absence of the perpendicular signal uniquely identifies surface water. Penetration of green light and the depth profile of photons converted to the perpendicular state compared to those in the parallel state is a measure of water-column multiple scattering, providing a relative measure of turbidity. The amount of photons reflected from the canopy versus the water provides a wavelength-dependent measure of canopy closure. By rapidly firing laser pulses (11,400 pulses per second) with a narrow width (1 nsec) and detecting single photons

  18. GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David

    2002-01-01

    Status, progress and plans will be given for current GCSS (GEWEX Cloud System Study) WG2 (Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems) projects, including: (a) the Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project, (b) the Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project (Phase 2), and (c) the developing Hurricane Nora extended outflow model case study project. Past results will be summarized and plans for the upcoming year described. Issues and strategies will be discussed. Prospects for developing improved cloud parameterizations derived from results of GCSS WG2 projects will be assessed. Plans for NASA's CRYSTAL-FACE (Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment) potential opportunities for use of those data for WG2 model simulations (future projects) will be briefly described.

  19. Remote sensing of cirrus clouds and aerosols by a sun photometer in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtioui, H.; Mansour, F. B.; Elouragini, S.; Flamant, P. H.

    2006-04-01

    Some ground based measurements of solar radiation by using a sun photometer, have been conducted in Tunisia during the period of November 2000-February 2002. Five key measurement sites were selected: Three Sites (Tunis, Sousse, Gabes) are located on the Mediterranean coast and Two sites (Gafsa, Tozeur) on the boarder of Sahara. Over a total of 149 measurement days, 21 days are identified as clear sky, 114 days as Cirrus clouds and 14 days as aerosols. Aerosols and Cirrus clouds Optical Thickness (AOT) are derived from photometric measurements at 532 nm wavelength. Spatial and temporal variabilities of AOT are presented and discussed in this paper. Cirrus clouds were frequently observed at Gafsa and Tozeur where saharan aerosol events are expected to be more frequent than cirrus clouds. The mediterranean sea and saharan aerosols are suspected to have the main role in cirrus clouds formation, by providing water vapor and high concentrations of cloud condensation and ice forming nuclei.

  20. Investigating In-cloud Relative Humidity and Thin Cirrus in the Upper Tropical Atmosphere Using AIRS, CALIPSO, and MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C. K.; Kahn, B. H.; Eldering, A.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate vertical and horizontal distributions of tropical oceanic thin cirrus optical and microphysical properties observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). These properties are related to thermodynamic quantities, i.e., relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi), and cloud top temperature derived from the AIRS Level 2 operational soundings. Differences between all sky and in-cloud RHi are explored and possible mechanisms that explain these anomalies are discussed. Furthermore, we evaluate the hypothesis that many of the observed clouds are physically much thinner than the nominal resolution of AIRS, which may lead to dry biases of in-cloud RHi. To test this we exploit the co-located AIRS RHi and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) cloud thickness. Finally, we diagnose the ability of AIRS to measure water vapor in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) using co- located observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). From this, a combined AIRS-MLS RHi product is used to investigate joint distributions of cirrus microphysical and optical properties, and RHi in the TTL.

  1. Lidar observations of high-altitude aerosol layers (cirrus clouds)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleva, Atanaska D.; Grigorov, Ivan V.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosols, clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions are recognized as the key factors influencing the climate. Clouds are the primary modulators of the Earth's radiative budget. This paper focuses on the detection of high-altitude aerosol layers in the troposphere over mid-latitude lidar station in Sofia, Bulgaria. They are situated in the height-region 6 km÷16 km, with thickness in the range 0.2 km÷5 km and have varying optical characteristics. On the basis of the general utilized classification of the Cirrus clouds, high values of the calculated atmospheric backscatter coefficient and Angströmexponent estimation results we conclude that the registered strongly scattered aerosol layers are Cirrus clouds. Lidar measurements are performed with an aerosol lidar, equipped with Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths 532 nm and 1064 nm. Mainly, lidar data are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles. We also include 2Dcolormap in height-time coordinates build on the basis of so called range corrected signals. It shows in general changes of the aerosol stratification over the lidar station during the measurement period. We employed HYSPLIT backward trajectories and DREAM forecasts to analyze the lidar profile outlines and characterize the events during which Cirrus cloud samples were observed. So was remarked that most of the results were obtained during Saharan dust long-way transport over the city of Sofia. Reported experimental examples are extracted from regular lidar investigations of the atmosphere within the frame of European project EARLINET.

  2. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Konoshonkin, Alexander

    2015-09-21

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed within the physical-optics approximation by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simple model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals.

  3. Lidar effective multiple-scattering coefficients in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, F O; Bissonnette, L R; Flamant, P H

    1997-05-20

    We delimit a regime, valid for most ground-based lidar probings of cirrus clouds, in which the field-of-view dependence of multiple scattering reaches a plateau. In this regime and assuming the phase function to be constant around pi, we formally demonstrate Platt's modification of the single-scattering lidar equation, with a parameter eta(P) accounting for the reduction of the effective scattering coefficient defined so that (1 - eta(P)) is the amount of energy scattered in the forward peak. Then, to cope with nonconstant backscattering functions, we discuss the introduction of an effective backscattering coefficient that is an average of the scattering probabilities around pi.

  4. Backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2013-08-01

    Light backscattering by randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is considered within the framework of the physical-optics approximation. The fine angular structure of all elements of the Mueller matrix in the vicinity of the exact backward direction is first calculated and discussed. In particular, an approximate equation for the differential scattering cross section is obtained. Its simple spectral dependence is discussed. Also, a hollow of the linear depolarization ratio around the exact backward direction inherent to the long hexagonal columns is revealed.

  5. Modeled Impact of Cirrus Cloud Increases Along Aircraft Flight Paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David; Lonergan, P.; Shah, K.

    1999-01-01

    The potential impact of contrails and alterations in the lifetime of background cirrus due to subsonic airplane water and aerosol emissions has been investigated in a set of experiments using the GISS GCM connected to a q-flux ocean. Cirrus clouds at a height of 12-15km, with an optical thickness of 0.33, were input to the model "x" percentage of clear-sky occasions along subsonic aircraft flight paths, where x is varied from .05% to 6%. Two types of experiments were performed: one with the percentage cirrus cloud increase independent of flight density, as long as a certain minimum density was exceeded; the other with the percentage related to the density of fuel expenditure. The overall climate impact was similar with the two approaches, due to the feedbacks of the climate system. Fifty years were run for eight such experiments, with the following conclusions based on the stable results from years 30-50 for each. The experiments show that adding cirrus to the upper troposphere results in a stabilization of the atmosphere, which leads to some decrease in cloud cover at levels below the insertion altitude. Considering then the total effect on upper level cloud cover (above 5 km altitude), the equilibrium global mean temperature response shows that altering high level clouds by 1% changes the global mean temperature by 0.43C. The response is highly linear (linear correlation coefficient of 0.996) for high cloud cover changes between 0. 1% and 5%. The effect is amplified in the Northern Hemisphere, more so with greater cloud cover change. The temperature effect maximizes around 10 km (at greater than 40C warming with a 4.8% increase in upper level clouds), again more so with greater warming. The high cloud cover change shows the flight path influence most clearly with the smallest warming magnitudes; with greater warming, the model feedbacks introduce a strong tropical response. Similarly, the surface temperature response is dominated by the feedbacks, and shows

  6. Cirrus crystal nucleation by homogeneous freezing of solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Sabin, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical model consisting of a system of differential equations is used to study cirrus crystal nucleation in a rising parcel containing a distribution of cloud condensation nuclei. The evolution of the particle population and the thermodynamic variables in the parcel are examined. The results suggest that, if homogeneous freezing is not considered, liquid water should be detected below -40 C. If homogeneous freezing is considered, the rapid growth of ice crystals and vapor depletion prevent water saturation from being reached. It is shown that the likelihood of a droplet being frozen is increased by lower temperatures, larger droplet diameter, or lower solution density.

  7. A test of cirrus ice crystal scattering phase functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, P. R.; Baran, A. J.; Kaye, P. H.; Hirst, E.; Greenaway, R.

    2003-07-01

    In-situ ice crystal scattering has been measured in cirrus cloud with the Small Ice Detector laser scattering probe. Using light scattered from single particles (maximum dimension ~<100 μm) at 4-10° and 20-40° we have tested ice crystal scattering phase functions for spheres, hexagonal columns, hexagonal plates, polycrystals an aggregate of columns and an analytic function. We find that phase functions that lack a pronounced 22° halo are the best representatives for the example data presented here. Spherical ice particle phase functions do not satisfy the measurements.

  8. A Study of Tropical thin Cirrus Clouds with Supervised Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodier, S. D.; Hu, Y.; Vaughan, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    ABSTRACT Accurate knowledge of the temporal frequency and spatial extent of optically thin cirrus is crucial to climate feedback analysis. Current global warming theory asserts that when the atmospheric concentration of CO2 increases, the outgoing longwave radiation at non-window wavelengths is reduced. If the Earth's net radiative balance is to remain stable, ground temperatures must rise in response, thereby increasing thermal emission to space. Current models do not account for subsequent changes in cloud cover, because this aspect of the climate feedback system is so poorly understood. One possible response of the cloud-climate feedback process is an increase in the global occurrence of thin cirrus clouds, driven by the increase in longwave cooling in the upper troposphere that results from higher CO2 concentrations. Exacerbating the difficulty of assessing the situation is the fact that passive remote sensing instruments cannot reliably detect cirrus clouds with optical depths less than ~0.3, because these clouds do not reflect enough sunlight to create a sufficient contrast with the Earth's surface. Now, however, the presence of thin cirrus can for the first time be accurately detected and systematically monitored by the combination of active and passive sensors onboard the CALIPSO satellite. Nevertheless, the data record is still quite limited, as CALIPSO has been in orbit for only 16 months. We have therefore initiated a multi-platform data fusion study to establish a methodology for extending the limited set of CALIPSO measurements to the existing 30-year record of passive remote sensing data, and thus improve our understanding of cloud feedback mechanisms. Using nighttime data from the first 10 days in April 2007 as a training set, we applied a general regression neural network (GRNN) to collocated samples of sea surface temperature (SST) reported by AMSR, brightness temperatures (BT) from the CALIPSO imaging infrared radiometer (IIR), and optical depths

  9. Cirrus and Polar Stratospheric Cloud Studies using CLAES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mergenthaler, John L.; Douglass, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We've concluded a 3 year (Period of Performance- January 21, 1998 to February 28, 2001) study of cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds using CLAES (Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer) data. We have described the progress of this study in monthly reports, UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) science team meetings, American Geophysical Society Meetings, refereed publications and collaborative publications. Work undertaken includes the establishment of CLAES cloud detection criteria, the refinement of CLAES temperature retrieval techniques, compare the findings of CLAES with those of other instruments, and present findings to the larger community. This report describes the progress made in these areas.

  10. Sensitivity Studies of Dust Ice Nuclei Effect on Cirrus Clouds with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaohong; Shi, Xiangjun; Zhang, Kai; Jensen, Eric; Gettelman, A.; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios; Lawson, Paul

    2012-12-19

    In this study the effect of dust aerosol on upper tropospheric cirrus clouds through heterogeneous ice nucleation is investigated in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) with two ice nucleation parameterizations. Both parameterizations consider homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and the competition between the two mechanisms in cirrus clouds, but differ significantly in the number concentration of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) from dust. Heterogeneous nucleation on dust aerosol reduces the occurrence frequency of homogeneous nucleation and thus the ice crystal number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) cirrus clouds compared to simulations with pure homogeneous nucleation. Global and annual mean shortwave and longwave cloud forcing are reduced by up to 2.0 ± 0.1 W m-2 (1σ uncertainty) and 2.4 ± 0.1 W m-2, respectively due to the presence of dust IN, with the net cloud forcing change of -0.40 ± 0.20 W m-2. Comparison of model simulations with in situ aircraft data obtained in NH mid-latitudes suggests that homogeneous ice nucleation may play an important role in the ice nucleation at these regions with temperatures of 205–230 K. However, simulations overestimate observed ice crystal number concentrations in the tropical tropopause regions with temperatures of 190–205 K, and overestimate the frequency of occurrence of high ice crystal number concentration (> 200 L-1) and underestimate the frequency of low ice crystal number concentration (< 30 L-1) at NH mid-latitudes. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the number concentrations and properties of heterogeneous IN (including dust aerosol) in the upper troposphere from the global perspective.

  11. Sensitivity Studies of Dust Ice Nuclei Effect on Cirrus Clouds with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Jensen, Eric J.; Gettelman, Andrew; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios; Lawson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this study the effect of dust aerosol on upper tropospheric cirrus clouds through heterogeneous ice nucleation is investigated in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) with two ice nucleation parameterizations. Both parameterizations consider homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and the competition between the two mechanisms in cirrus clouds, but differ significantly in the number concentration of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) from dust. Heterogeneous nucleation on dust aerosol reduces the occurrence frequency of homogeneous nucleation and thus the ice crystal number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) cirrus clouds compared to simulations with pure homogeneous nucleation. Global and annual mean shortwave and longwave cloud forcing are reduced by up to 2.0+/-0.1Wm (sup-2) (1 uncertainty) and 2.4+/-0.1Wm (sup-2), respectively due to the presence of dust IN, with the net cloud forcing change of -0.40+/-0.20W m(sup-2). Comparison of model simulations with in situ aircraft data obtained in NH mid-latitudes suggests that homogeneous ice nucleation may play an important role in the ice nucleation at these regions with temperatures of 205-230 K. However, simulations overestimate observed ice crystal number concentrations in the tropical tropopause regions with temperatures of 190- 205 K, and overestimate the frequency of occurrence of high ice crystal number concentration (greater than 200 L(sup-1) and underestimate the frequency of low ice crystal number concentration (less than 30 L(sup-1) at NH mid-latitudes. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the number concentrations and properties of heterogeneous IN (including dust aerosol) in the upper troposphere from the global perspective.

  12. The origin of the gullwing-shaped cirrus above an Argentinian thunderstorm as seen in CALIPSO images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pao K.; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Setvak, Martin; Wang, Chen-Kang

    2016-04-01

    Gullwing-shaped cirrus layers are observed on an image above a severe thunderstorm occurred in Argentina taken by the instrument CALIOP on board of the CALIPSO satellite. The cirrus layers extended into a level in the stratosphere even higher than the above-anvil cirrus plumes that had been studied previously. This paper utilized the cloud model simulation results of a similar storm to explain the formation of such gullwing cirrus. It is shown that these cirrus layers can form from the moisture transported upward by successive internal gravity wave breaking at levels higher than the above-anvil plumes. The vertical locus of the wave crests where wave breaking occurs is itself gullwing-shaped which is the main reason why the thin cirrus layers are also gullwing shaped. Model results indicate that wave breaking can transport materials irreversibly into higher stratospheric layers and the gullwing-shaped cirrus is an evidence of this transport process.

  13. From HYSOMA to ENSOMAP - A new open source tool for quantitative soil properties mapping based on hyperspectral imagery from airborne to spaceborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrillat, Sabine; Guillaso, Stephane; Rabe, Andreas; Foerster, Saskia; Guanter, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Soil spectroscopy from the visible-near infrared to the short wave infrared has been shown to be a proven method for the quantitative prediction of key soil surface properties in the laboratory, field, and up to airborne studies for exposed soils in appropriate surface conditions. With the upcoming launch of the next generation of spaceborne hyperspectral sensors within the next 3 to 5 years (EnMAP, HISUI, PRISMA, SHALOM), a great potential for the global mapping and monitoring of soil properties is appearing. This potential can be achieved only if adequate software tools are available, as shown by the increasing demand for the availability/accessibility of hyperspectral soil products from the geoscience community that have neither the capacity nor the expertise to deliver these soil products. In this context, recently many international efforts were tuned toward the development of robust and easy-to-access soil algorithms to allow non-remote sensing experts to obtain geoscience information based on non-expensive software packages where repeatability of the results is an important prerequisite. In particular, several algorithms for geological and mineral mapping were recently released such as the U.S. Geological Survey Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements (PRISM) software, or the GFZ EnMAP Geological Mapper. For quantitative soil mapping and monitoring, the HYSOMA (Hyperspectral Soil Mapper) software interface was developed at GFZ under the EUFAR (www.eufar.net) and the EnMAP (www.enmap.org) programs. HYSOMA was specifically oriented toward digital soil mapping applications and has been distributed since 2012 for free as IDL plug-ins under the IDL-virtual machine at www.gfz-potsdam.de/hysoma under a close source license. The HYSOMA interface focuses on fully automatic generation of semi-quantitative soil maps such as soil moisture, soil organic matter, iron oxide, clay content, and carbonate content. With more than 100 users around the world

  14. A Simple Model of Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samantha A.; DelGenio, Anthony D.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model of horizontal inhomogeneity and cloud fraction in cirrus clouds has been formulated on the basis that all internal horizontal inhomogeneity in the ice mixing ratio is due to variations in the cloud depth, which are assumed to be Gaussian. The use of such a model was justified by the observed relationship between the normalized variability of the ice water mixing ratio (and extinction) and the normalized variability of cloud depth. Using radar cloud depth data as input, the model reproduced well the in-cloud ice water mixing ratio histograms obtained from horizontal runs during the FIRE2 cirrus campaign. For totally overcast cases the histograms were almost Gaussian, but changed as cloud fraction decreased to exponential distributions which peaked at the lowest nonzero ice value for cloud fractions below 90%. Cloud fractions predicted by the model were always within 28% of the observed value. The predicted average ice water mixing ratios were within 34% of the observed values. This model could be used in a GCM to produce the ice mixing ratio probability distribution function and to estimate cloud fraction. It only requires basic meteorological parameters, the depth of the saturated layer and the standard deviation of cloud depth as input.

  15. The Effect of Cirrus Clouds on 8-13-micro Infrared Sky Radiance.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F

    1968-05-01

    An experimental investigation of ir sky radiance and radiance fluctuations in the 8-13-micro atmospheric window is reported. Measurements were made with ground-based, filtered bolometer detector radiometers under clear sky and cirrus overcast conditions. Sky radiance was measured very close to the limb of the sun to permit detection of the solar aureole caused by forward scattering by cirrus ice crystals. Polarized sky radiance was found at large zenith angles and is attributed to scattering by cirrus of thermal emission from the earth. The radiance due to tropospheric water vapor is predicted by means of a radiation chart. Measurements of clear sky radiance exceeded that predicted by the chart in all but one case. The radiance of visible cirrus greatly exceeds the radiation chart prediction. Diffraction about cirrus cloud particles leads to a prediction of a solar aureole of a size that corresponds to the measured aureole. It is concluded that even a cirrus haze, which is quite difficult for an unaided, observer to detect, can cause an excess zenith radiance of 0.1 mW cm(-2)sr(-1), which increases to twice this value at a zenith angle of 60 degrees . Even thin but visible cirrus clouds can easily produce an excess zenith radiance of 1 mW cm(-2)sr(-1), which increases by a factor 1.4 at a zenith angle of 60 degrees .

  16. A morphological filter for removing 'Cirrus-like' emission from far-infrared extragalactic IRAS fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Siqueira, P. R.; Basart, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of diffuse extended IR emission from the Galaxy in the form of the so called 'Galactic Cirrus' emission has hampered the exploration of the extragalactic sky at long IR wavelengths. We describe the development of a filter based on mathematical morphology which appears to be a promising approach to the problem of cirrus removal. The method of Greyscale Morphology was applied to a 100 micron IRAS image of the M81 group of galaxies. This is an extragalactic field which suffers from serious contamination from foreground Galactic 'cirrus'. Using a technique called 'sieving', it was found that the cirrus emission has a characteristic behavior which can be quantified in terms of an average spatial structure spectrum or growth function. This function was then used to attempt to remove 'cirrus' from the entire image. The result was a significant reduction of cirrus emission by an intensity factor of 15 compared with the original input image. The method appears to preserve extended emission in the spatially extended IR disks of M81 and M82 as well as distinguishing fainter galaxies within bright regions of galactic cirrus. The techniques may also be applicable to IR databases obtained with the Cosmic Background Explorer.

  17. Analysis of cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer from CALIPSO and MLS data: A water perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Dessler, Andrew E.

    2012-02-01

    Two mechanisms are thought to be primarily responsible for the formation of cirrus in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL): detrainment from deep convective anvils and in situ initiation. By analyzing water vapor (H2O) measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and ice water content (IWC) measurements from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), we identify TTL cirrus that contain too much ice to have been formed in situ—and therefore must be of convective origin. Analyzing 3 years of CALIPSO measurements (2008-2010), we found three maxima in the occurrence of convective cirrus: equatorial Africa, the tropical western Pacific, and South America. Over the entire tropics, we found that convective cirrus occur more frequently during boreal winter-spring and less frequently during boreal summer-fall. The convective fractions of cirrus also increase until the cold point tropopause is reached in most seasons—implying higher probabilities of cirrus around the tropopause being of convective origin. Averaged over 3 years, we find that at least ˜30% of cirrus in the TTL are definitely of convective origin.

  18. Balloon-borne match measurements of midlatitude cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, A.; Luo, B. P.; Engel, I.; Wienhold, F. G.; Sprenger, M.; Krieger, U. K.; Weers, U.; Romanens, G.; Levrat, G.; Jeannet, P.; Ruffieux, D.; Philipona, R.; Calpini, B.; Spichtinger, P.; Peter, T.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of high supersaturations with respect to ice inside cirrus clouds with high ice water content (> 0.01 g kg-1) and high crystal number densities (> 1 cm-3) are challenging our understanding of cloud microphysics and of climate feedback processes in the upper troposphere. However, single measurements of a cloudy air mass provide only a snapshot from which the persistence of ice supersaturation cannot be judged. We introduce here the "cirrus match technique" to obtain information about the evolution of clouds and their saturation ratio. The aim of these coordinated balloon soundings is to analyze the same air mass twice. To this end the standard radiosonde equipment is complemented by a frost point hygrometer, "SnowWhite", and a particle backscatter detector, "COBALD" (Compact Optical Backscatter AerosoL Detector). Extensive trajectory calculations based on regional weather model COSMO (Consortium for Small-Scale Modeling) forecasts are performed for flight planning, and COSMO analyses are used as a basis for comprehensive microphysical box modeling (with grid scale of 2 and 7 km, respectively). Here we present the results of matching a cirrus cloud to within 2-15 km, realized on 8 June 2010 over Payerne, Switzerland, and a location 120 km downstream close to Zurich. A thick cirrus cloud was detected over both measurement sites. We show that in order to quantitatively reproduce the measured particle backscatter ratios, the small-scale temperature fluctuations not resolved by COSMO must be superimposed on the trajectories. The stochastic nature of the fluctuations is captured by ensemble calculations. Possibilities for further improvements in the agreement with the measured backscatter data are investigated by assuming a very slow mass accommodation of water on ice, the presence of heterogeneous ice nuclei, or a wide span of (spheroidal) particle shapes. However, the resulting improvements from these microphysical refinements are moderate and comparable in

  19. Evaluation of cloud-resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-train observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlbauer, A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, R. P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    the microphysical, macrophysical, and radiative properties of cirrus remains challenging. Comparing model simulations with observations from multiple instruments and observational platforms is important for revealing model deficiencies and for providing rigorous benchmarks. However, there still is considerable need for reducing observational uncertainties and providing better observations especially for relative humidity and for the size distribution and chemical composition of aerosols in the upper troposphere.

  20. Evidence for liquid-phase cirrus cloud formation from volcanic aerosols - Climatic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Supercooled droplets in cirrus uncinus cell heads between -40 and -50 C are identified from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment polarization lidar measurements. Although short-lived, complexes of these small liquid cells seem to have contributed importantly to the formation of the cirrus. Freezing-point depression effects in solution droplets, apparently resulting from relatively large cloud condensation nuclei of volcanic origin, can be used to explain this rare phenomenon. An unrecognized volcano-cirrus cloud climate feedback mechanism is implied by these findings.

  1. Evidence for Liquid-Phase Cirrus Cloud Formation from Volcanic Aerosols: Climatic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1992-07-01

    Supercooled droplets in cirrus uncinus cell heads between -40^circ and -50^circC are identified from Project FIRE [First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment] polarization lidar measurements. Although short-lived, complexes of these small liquid cells seem to have contributed importantly to the formation of the cirrus. Freezing-point depression effects in solution droplets, apparently resulting from relatively large cloud condensation nuclei of volcanic origin, can be used to explain this rare phenomenon. An unrecognized volcano-cirrus cloud climate feedback mechanism is implied by these findings.

  2. The Three-Dimensional Spatial Structure of Cirrus Clouds Determined from Lidar Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Wylie, D.; Wolf, W.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous imagery from the University of Wisconsin Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL) and meteorological satellites were used to quantify the spatial structure of cirrus clouds with 60 m resolution. This data was used to determine the spatial distributions of cloud base altitude, cloud top altitude, and mid-cloud altitude. Two dimensional auto-correlation functions describing the mean shape of cirrus clouds were computed. Because cirrus clouds seldom have distinct edges, these correlation functions are derived as a function of a threshold value which defines the cloud edge.

  3. Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Characteristics as Estimated by A Micropulse Ground-Based Lidar and A Spaceborne Lidar CALIOP Datasets Over Lille, France (50.60 °N, 3.14 ° E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohra, Rita; Parol, Frédéric; Dubuisson, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Our goal is to establish a climatology of cirrus cloud properties over Lille, France (50.60°N, 3.14 °E) using a ground-based lidar. A statistical analysis of mid-latitude cirrus clouds from lidar data in Lille over the period 2008-2013 is presented and discussed. The macrophysical properties (cloud base altitude, cloud top altitude, geometrical thickness, mid-cloud temperature) and optical properties (cloud optical thickness and lidar ratio) are evaluated and compared between the ground-based and the spaceborne lidar CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) measurements for the period 2008-2013. We found similar results of macrophysical properties derived from both lidars. In addition a difference in the optical properties results is due to the multiple scattering and the heterogeneity of the observed scenes.

  4. The 27-28 October 1986 FIRE IFO cirrus case study: Cirrus parameter relationships derived from satellite and lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Young, David F.; Sassen, Kenneth; Alvarez, Joseph M.; Grund, Christian J.

    1989-01-01

    Cirrus cloud radiative and physical characteristics are determined using a combination of ground-based, aircraft, and satellite measurements taken as part of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO) during October and November 1986. Lidar backscatter data are used to define cloud base, center, and top heights and the corresponding temperatures. Coincident GOES 4 km visible (0.65 microns) and 8 km infrared window (11.5 microns) radiances are analyzed to determine cloud emittances and reflectances. Infrared optical depth is computed from the emittance results. Visible optical depth is derived from reflectance using a theoretical ice crystal scattering model and an empirical bidirectional reflectance mode. No clouds with visible optical depths greater than 5 or infrared optical depths less than 0.1 were used in the analysis. Average cloud thickness ranged from 0.5 km to 8 km for the 71 scenes. An average visible scattering efficiency of 2.1 was found for this data set. The results reveal a significant dependence of scattering efficiency on cloud temperature.

  5. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  6. In Situ Balloon-Borne Ice Particle Imaging in High-Latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time, these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from the Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating and validating passive and active remote sensors. Ice particles of sizes below 100 µm are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. Furthermore, artefacts are produced by shattering of particles on the leading surfaces of the aircraft probes when particles several hundred microns or larger are present. Here, we report on a series of balloon-borne in situ measurements that were carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The method used here avoids these issues experienced with the aircraft probes. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument, data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always unused section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 µm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 µm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 µm and larger. For particles that are 20 µm (12 pixel) in size or larger, the shape can be recognized. The sampling volume, 130 cm3 s-1, is well defined and independent of particle size. With the encountered number concentrations of between 4 and 400 L-1, this required about 90- to 4-s sampling times to

  7. In Situ Balloon-Borne Ice Particle Imaging in High-Latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time, these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from the Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating and validating passive and active remote sensors. Ice particles of sizes below 100 µm are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. Furthermore, artefacts are produced by shattering of particles on the leading surfaces of the aircraft probes when particles several hundred microns or larger are present. Here, we report on a series of balloon-borne in situ measurements that were carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The method used here avoids these issues experienced with the aircraft probes. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument, data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always unused section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 µm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 µm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 µm and larger. For particles that are 20 µm (12 pixel) in size or larger, the shape can be recognized. The sampling volume, 130 cm3 s-1, is well defined and independent of particle size. With the encountered number concentrations of between 4 and 400 L-1, this required about 90- to 4-s sampling times to

  8. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  9. Using laboratory and field measurements to constrain a single habit shortwave optical parameterization for cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Helen R.; Baran, Anthony J.; Hesse, Evelyn; Hill, Peter G.; Connolly, Paul J.; Webb, Ann

    2016-11-01

    A single habit parameterization for the shortwave optical properties of cirrus is presented. The parameterization utilizes a hollow particle geometry, with stepped internal cavities as identified in laboratory and field studies. This particular habit was chosen as both experimental and theoretical results show that the particle exhibits lower asymmetry parameters when compared to solid crystals of the same aspect ratio. The aspect ratio of the particle was varied as a function of maximum dimension, D, in order to adhere to the same physical relationships assumed in the microphysical scheme in a configuration of the Met Office atmosphere-only global model, concerning particle mass, size and effective density. Single scattering properties were then computed using T-Matrix, Ray Tracing with Diffraction on Facets (RTDF) and Ray Tracing (RT) for small, medium, and large size parameters respectively. The scattering properties were integrated over 28 particle size distributions as used in the microphysical scheme. The fits were then parameterized as simple functions of Ice Water Content (IWC) for 6 shortwave bands. The parameterization was implemented into the GA6 configuration of the Met Office Unified Model along with the current operational long-wave parameterization. The GA6 configuration is used to simulate the annual twenty-year short-wave (SW) fluxes at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and also the temperature and humidity structure of the atmosphere. The parameterization presented here is compared against the current operational model and a more recent habit mixture model.

  10. A Hierarchical Modeling Study of the Interactions Among Turbulence, Cloud Microphysics, and Radiative Transfer in the Evolution of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Judith; Khvorostyanov, V. I.

    2005-01-01

    This project used a hierarchy of cloud resolving models to address the following science issues of relevance to CRYSTAL-FACE: What ice crystal nucleation mechanisms are active in the different types of cirrus clouds in the Florida area and how do these different nucleation processes influence the evolution of the cloud system and the upper tropospheric humidity? How does the feedback between supersaturation and nucleation impact the evolution of the cloud? What is the relative importance of the large-scale vertical motion and the turbulent motions in the evolution of the crystal size spectra? How does the size spectra impact the life-cycle of the cloud, stratospheric dehydration, and cloud radiative forcing? What is the nature of the turbulence and waves in the upper troposphere generated by precipitating deep convective cloud systems? How do cirrus microphysical and optical properties vary with the small-scale dynamics? How do turbulence and waves in the upper troposphere influence the cross-tropopause mixing and stratospheric and upper tropospheric humidity? The models used in this study were: 2-D hydrostatic model with explicit microphysics that can account for 30 size bins for both the droplet and crystal size spectra. Notably, a new ice crystal nucleation scheme has been incorporated into the model. Parcel model with explicit microphysics, for developing and evaluating microphysical parameterizations. Single column model for testing bulk microphysics parameterizations

  11. The Occurrence of Particle Size Distribution Bimodality in Midlatitude Cirrus as Inferred from Ground-Based Remote Sensing Data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yang; Mace, Gerald G; Comstock, Jennifer M

    2011-06-01

    To better understand the role of small particles in the microphysical processes and the radiative properties of cirrus, the reliability of historical in-situ data must be understood. Recent studies call into question the validity of that data because of shattering of large crystals on probe and aircraft surfaces thereby artificially amplifying the concentration of crystals smaller than approximately 50 μm. We contend that the general character of the in-situ measurements must be consistent, in a broad sense, with statistics derived from long-term remote sensing data. To examine this consistency, an algorithm using Doppler radar moments and Raman lidar extinction is developed to retrieve a bimodal particle size distribution and its uncertainty. Using case studies and statistics compiled over one year we show that the existence of high concentrations (> 1 cm-3 ) of small (sub 50 μm) particles in cirrus are not consistent with any reasonable interpretation of the remote sensing data. We conclude that the high concentrations of small particles found in many aircraft data sets are therefore likely an artifact of the in situ measurement process.

  12. NASA's Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Hooker, S.; Myers, J.; Kudela, R. M.; Dunagan, S.; Soulage, M.; Ellis, T.; Clinton, N. E.; Lobitz, B.; Martin, K.; Zell, P.; Berthold, R. W.; Smith, C.; Andrew, D.; Gore, W.; Torres, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) Project is a NASA Earth-science flight mission that will advance coastal ecosystems research by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. Teaming NASA Ames scientists and engineers with Biospherical Instruments, Inc. (San Diego) and UC Santa Cruz, the airborne COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data will be accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Based on optical detectors called microradiometers, the NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Calibration and Validation (cal/val) Office team has deployed advanced commercial off-the-shelf instrumentation that provides in situ measurements of the apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, estuaries, coral reefs). A complimentary microradiometer instrument package (Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), optimized for use above water, will be flown for the first time with the airborne instrument suite. Details of the October 2011 COAST airborne mission over Monterey Bay demonstrating this new airborne instrument suite capability will be presented, with associated preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  13. Dual Wavelength Lidar Observation of Tropical High-Altitude Cirrus Clouds During the ALBATROSS 1996 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Schafer, J.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    Dual wavelength aerosol lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds were performed during the ALBATROSS 1996 campaign aboard the research vessel POLARSTERN on the Atlantic ocean in October-November 1996.

  14. Measurements of cirrus cloud backscatter color ratio with a two-wavelength lidar.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zongming; McCormick, M Patrick; Wu, Dong; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A

    2008-04-01

    We present observations of cirrus clouds from June 2006 to July 2007 performed by using a two-wavelength lidar located at Hampton University. For this time period, cirrus clouds were observed mostly in 7-13.5 km altitudes. Data analyses have been performed focusing on a color-ratio retrieval. In total, 86,369 samples from 1,689 profiles (1 min average and 15 m range resolution) containing cirrus clouds with attenuated backscatter ratio (ratio of attenuated total backscatter to the molecular backscatter) larger than 10 have been selected. The cirrus color ratio distribution shows a peak value at about 0.88 and a full width at half-maximum of 0.12.

  15. Subvisual-thin cirrus lidar dataset for satellite verification and climatological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Cho, Byung S.

    1992-01-01

    A polarization (0.694 microns wavelength) lidar dataset for subvisual and thin (bluish-colored) cirrus clouds is drawn from project FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) extended time observations. The clouds are characterized by their day-night visual appearance; base, top, and optical midcloud heights and temperatures; measured physical and estimated optical cloud thicknesses; integrated linear depolarization ratios; and derived k/2 eta ratios. A subset of the data supporting 30 NOAA polar-orbiting satellite overpasses is given in tabular form to provide investigators with the means to test cloud retrieval algorithms and establish the limits of cirrus detectability from satellite measurements under various conditions. Climatologically, subvisual-thin cirrus appear to be higher, colder, and more strongly depolarizing than previously reported multilatitude cirrus, although similar k/2 eta that decrease with height and temperature are found.

  16. CRYSTAL: The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E.; Cox, Stephen K.; Curran, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    CRYSTAL the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Layers is part of the ongoing series of field experiments to study clouds and their impact on world weather and climate, and will attempt to improve the application of cloud effects in global climate models. CRYSTAL is being planned as two parts: a limited CRYSTAL field campaign in 2001 to examine towering clouds and anvil genesis over the Everglades of Florida, and the main CRYSTAL field campaign in the summer of 2003 in the Tropical Western Pacific. The latter is timed to take advantage of several cloud measurement satellites that will be operational at that time. This paper discusses some of the issues to be addressed in CRYSTAL, gives a brief description of the research plan, and describes its relationship to other important field experiments.

  17. Replicator for characterization of cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Purcell, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A formvar replicator for installation in an aircraft pod has been designed, built, and flight tested on the NASA DC-8. The system incorporates a deicing capability (which can be pressure activated) to enable climb out through icing situations prior to deployment. The system can be operated at preselected speeds such that data can be recorded over a period of one to ten hours on 200 ft of 16mm film. A x2 speed control can be used during flight. Capability exists for detection of chemical constituents by appropriate doping of the formvar solution. An article entitled 'Measurements of ice particles in tropical cirrus anvils: importance in radiation balance' is attached as appendix A.

  18. The analysis of lidar signatures of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Davis, P A

    1969-10-01

    The terminology of light scattering pertinent to a simple form of the lidar equation and the approximate analytical solution of the lidar equation are reviewed without specific restriction on the nature of the cloud scatterers. A boundary value of the volume backscattering coefficient and the relationship between extinction and backscattering are required for the solution. Given the boundary value of the backscattering coefficient and the total transmittance through a cloud, it is possible to derive (by successive approximation) an extinction/ backscatter ratio empirically. Application of the method to the ruby lidar return from a cirrus cloud led to a ratio of 28 sr, and to reasonable profiles of the backscatter coefficient and the transmittance through the cloud.

  19. A modelling study of moisture redistribution by thin cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, T.; Fueglistaler, S.; Durran, D.; Ackerman, T.

    2014-05-01

    A high resolution 2-dimensional numerical model is used to study the moisture redistribution following homogeneous ice nucleation induced by Kelvin waves in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). We compare results for dry/moist initial conditions, and three levels of complexity for the representation of cloud processes: full bin microphysics and radiative effects of the ice, ditto but without radiative effects, and instantaneous removal of moisture in excess of saturation upon nucleation. Cloud evolution and the profiles of moisture redistribution are found to be sensitive to initial conditions and cloud processes. Ice sedimentation leads to a downward flux of water. On the other hand, the cloud radiative heating induces upward advection of the cloudy air. This results in an upward flux of water vapour if the cloudy air is moister (or drier) than the environment, which is typically when the environment is subsaturated (or supersaturated). The numerical results show that only a small fraction (less than 25%) of the cloud experiences nucleation. Sedimentation and reevaporation are important, and hydrated layers in observation may be as good an indicator as dehydrated layers for the occurrence of thin cirrus clouds. The calculation with instantaneous removal of condensates misses the hydration by construction, but also underestimates dehydration due to lack of moisture removal from sedimenting particles below the nucleation level, and due to nucleation before reaching the minimum saturation mixing ratio. The sensitivity to initial conditions and cloud processes suggests that it is difficult to reach generic, quantitative conclusions regarding the role of thin cirrus clouds for the moisture distribution in the TTL and stratosphere.

  20. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals.

  1. Cirrus cloud retrieval using infrared sounding data: Multilevel cloud errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    In this study we perform an error analysis for cloud-top pressure retrieval using the High-Resolution Infrared Radiometric Sounder (HIRS/2) 15-microns CO2 channels for the two-layer case of transmissive cirrus overlying an overcast, opaque stratiform cloud. This analysis includes standard deviation and bias error due to instrument noise and the presence of two cloud layers, the lower of which is opaque. Instantaneous cloud pressure retrieval errors are determined for a range of cloud amounts (0.1-1.0) and cloud-top pressures (850-250 mb). Large cloud-top pressure retrieval errors are found to occur when a lower opaque layer is present underneath an upper transmissive cloud layer in the satellite field of view (FOV). Errors tend to increase with decreasing upper-cloud effective cloud amount and with decreasing cloud height (increasing pressure). Errors in retrieved upper-cloud pressure result in corresponding errors in derived effective cloud amount. For the case in which a HIRS FOV has two distinct cloud layers, the difference between the retrieved and actual cloud-top pressure is positive in all cases, meaning that the retrieved upper-cloud height is lower than the actual upper-cloud height. In addition, errors in retrieved cloud pressure are found to depend upon the lapse rate between the low-level cloud top and the surface. We examined which sounder channel combinations would minimize the total errors in derived cirrus cloud height caused by instrument noise and by the presence of a lower-level cloud. We find that while the sounding channels that peak between 700 and 1000 mb minimize random errors, the sounding channels that peak at 300-500 mb minimize bias errors. For a cloud climatology, the bias errors are most critical.

  2. Midlatitude cirrus cloud climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. IV. Optical displays.

    PubMed

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhu, Jiang; Benson, Sally

    2003-01-20

    In this fourth of a series of papers that describe long-term cloud research at the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing at Salt Lake City, Utah, an approximately 10-year record of polarization lidar and photographic observations is analyzed to characterize the occurrence of optical displays in our local varieties of midlatitude cirrus clouds. The frequencies of occurrence of various types of halo, arc, and corona displays are evaluated according to their appearance and longevity over nominal 1-h observation periods and to the meteorological source of the cirrus. We find that complex halo-arc displays are rare at our locale and that even the so-called common 22 degree halo occurs infrequently as a complete long-lived ring. For example, only approximately 6% of the 1561-h daytime cirrus periods have bright and prolonged 22 degree halos, although a total of 37.3% have some indications of this halo, even if they are brief and fragmentary. Other fairly frequent features are the 22 degree upper tangent arc (8.6%), 22 degree parhelia (8.5%), and solar corona (7.2%). Of the optical displays observed, 83.6% are refraction based, only 1.9% are due to reflection phenomena, and a surprising 15.4% are caused by diffraction. Complex halo-arc displays are disproportionally associated with cirrus formed in tropical or subtropical airflow and also contain more horizontally oriented planar ice crystals. Lidar linear depolarization ratios from a subset of vivid displays show significant differences between halo- and the corona-producing cirrus, reflecting the effects of particle shape. Halos are associated with relatively warm cirrus that contain randomly and horizontally oriented planar ice crystals, whereas the colder corona cirrus produce much stronger depolarization from crystals too small to be uniformly oriented. Comparisons are made with available information from other locales, and we attempt to explain the geographical differences in terms of basic cirrus cloud processes.

  3. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  4. Cirrus cloud transmittance and backscatter in the infrared measured with a CO(2) lidar.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F; Cupp, R E; Troxel, S W

    1988-06-15

    Two independent methods of measuring the transmittance of cirrus clouds are compared. Both used a CO(2) pulsed Doppler lidar at a wavelength of 10.59 microm. The first method used backscatter from the calibration target El Chichon stratospheric cloud that was present over Boulder in 1982 and 1983. The second method used conical lidar scans at different zenith angles when uniform cirrus decks were present. Extinction coefficients measured from both methods average 0.1 km(-1) for tenuous cirrus 1.0 km thick to 0.78 km(-1) for cirrus several kilometers thick. There is a wide standard deviation in extinction values. Extinction-tobackscatter ratios S vary from <1000 sr for tenuous clouds to 2600 sr for dense clouds. Mie scattering and extinction calculations for spherical ice particles of 10-50 microm in radius lead to ratios S > 2000 sr, so long as the ice absorption is entered into the calculations. The backscattering ratio for ice cylinders is 1 order of magnitude lower than for spheres. Backscatter in the IR may, therefore, be reasonably well modeled by some combination of spheres and cylinders. Cloud thickness statistics from lidar returns show that cirrus decks average ~500 m thick. Clouds thinner than 300 m were often overlooked by the unaided surface-based observer. These preliminary results are in rather close agreement with the LOWTRAN 6 cirrus cloud model predictions.

  5. Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Models: A Project of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David OC.; Benedetti, Angela; Boehm, Matt; Brown, Philip R. A.; Gierens, Klaus M.; Girard, Eric; Giraud, Vincent; Jakob, Christian; Jensen, Eric; Khvorostyanov, Vitaly; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS, GEWEX is the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) is a community activity aiming to promote development of improved cloud parameterizations for application in the large-scale general circulation models (GCMs) used for climate research and for numerical weather prediction (Browning et al, 1994). The GCSS strategy is founded upon the use of cloud-system models (CSMs). These are "process" models with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to represent individual cloud elements, but spanning a wide range of space and time scales to enable statistical analysis of simulated cloud systems. GCSS also employs single-column versions of the parametric cloud models (SCMs) used in GCMs. GCSS has working groups on boundary-layer clouds, cirrus clouds, extratropical layer cloud systems, precipitating deep convective cloud systems, and polar clouds.

  6. Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Models: A Project of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Benedetti, Angela; Boehm, Matt; Brown, Philip R. A.; Gierens, Klaus M.; Girard, Eric; Giraud, Vincent; Jakob, Christian; Jensen, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS, GEWEX is the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) is a community activity aiming to promote development of improved cloud parameterizations for application in the large-scale general circulation models (GCMs) used for climate research and for numerical weather prediction. The GCSS strategy is founded upon the use of cloud-system models (CSMs). These are "process" models with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to represent individual cloud elements, but spanning a wide range of space and time scales to enable statistical analysis of simulated cloud systems. GCSS also employs single-column versions of the parametric cloud models (SCMs) used in GCMs. GCSS has working groups on boundary-layer clouds, cirrus clouds, extratropical layer cloud systems, precipitating deep convective cloud systems, and polar clouds.

  7. Cirrus cloud development in a mobile upper tropospheric trough: The November 26th FIRE cirrus case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1993-01-01

    The period from 18 UTC 26 Nov. 1991 to roughly 23 UTC 26 Nov. 1991 is one of the study periods of the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) 2 field campaign. The middle and upper tropospheric cloud data that was collected during this time allowed FIRE scientists to learn a great deal about the detailed structure, microphysics, and radiative characteristics of the mid latitude cirrus that occurred during that time. Modeling studies that range from the microphysical to the mesoscale are now underway attempting to piece the detailed knowledge of this cloud system into a coherent picture of the atmospheric processes important to cirrus cloud development and maintenance. An important component of the modeling work, either as an input parameter in the case of cloud-scale models, or as output in the case of meso and larger scale models, is the large scale forcing of the cloud system. By forcing we mean the synoptic scale vertical motions and moisture budget that initially send air parcels ascending and supply the water vapor to allow condensation during ascent. Defining this forcing from the synoptic scale to the cloud scale is one of the stated scientific objectives of the FIRE program. From the standpoint of model validation, it is also necessary that the vertical motions and large scale moisture budget of the case studies be derived from observations. It is considered important that the models used to simulate the observed cloud fields begin with the correct dynamics and that the dynamics be in the right place for the right reasons.

  8. A comparison of cirrus clouds determined by ISCCP and SAGE-II and their relation to convection in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    Results of tropical thin cirrus cloud retrievals using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gaseous Experiment (SAGE-II) data from January 1985 are presented. A preliminary analysis of the results shows that thin cirrus increases with increasing height in both data sets, and SAGE-II exhibits a high frequency of occurrence. The thin cirrus extinction coefficient shows maxima around the convective regions of South America and the western Pacific Ocean.

  9. Airborne data acquisition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Arro, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The introduction of standards on acceptable procedures for assessing building heat loss has created a dilemma for the contractor performing airborne thermographic surveys. These standards impose specifications on instrumentation, data acquisition, recording, interpretation, and presentation. Under the standard, the contractor has both the obligation of compliance and the requirement of offering his services at a reasonable price. This paper discusses the various aspects of data acquisition for airborne thermographic surveys and various techniques to reduce the costs of this operation. These techniques include the calculation of flight parameters for economical data acquisition, the selection and use of maps for mission planning, and the use of meteorological forecasts for flight scheduling and the actual execution of the mission. The proper consideration of these factors will result in a cost effective data acquisition and will place the contractor in a very competitive position in offering airborne thermographic survey services.

  10. Part A: Cirrus ice crystal nucleation and growth. Part B: Automated analysis of aircraft ice particle data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnott, William P.; Hallett, John; Hudson, James G.

    1995-01-01

    Specific measurement of cirrus crystals by aircraft and temperature modified CN are used to specify measurements necessary to provide a basis for a conceptual model of cirrus particle formation. Key to this is the ability to measure the complete spectrum of particles at cirrus levels. The most difficult regions for such measurement is from a few to 100 microns, and uses a replicator. The details of the system to automate replicator data analysis are given, together with an example case study of the system provided from a cirrus cloud in FIRE 2, with particles detectable by replicator and FSSP, but not 2DC.

  11. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  12. Airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Parks, G. S.; Li, F. K.; Im, K. E.; Howard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne scanning radar system for remote rain mapping is described. The airborne rain mapping radar is composed of two radar frequency channels at 13.8 and 24.1 GHz. The radar is proposed to scan its antenna beam over + or - 20 deg from the antenna boresight; have a swath width of 7 km; a horizontal spatial resolution at nadir of about 500 m; and a range resolution of 120 m. The radar is designed to be applicable for retrieving rainfall rates from 0.1-60 mm/hr at the earth's surface, and for measuring linear polarization signatures and raindrop's fall velocity.

  13. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  14. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  15. Radiative Transfer and Satellite Remote Sensing of Cirrus Clouds Using FIRE-2-IFO Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Under the support of the NASA grant, we have developed a new geometric-optics model (GOM2) for the calculation of the single-scattering and polarization properties for arbitrarily oriented hexagonal ice crystals. From comparisons with the results computed by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, we show that the novel geometric-optics can be applied to the computation of the extinction cross section and single-scattering albedo for ice crystals with size parameters along the minimum dimension as small as approximately 6. We demonstrate that the present model converges to the conventional ray tracing method for large size parameters and produces single-scattering results close to those computed by the FDTD method for size parameters along the minimum dimension smaller than approximately 20. We demonstrate that neither the conventional geometric optics method nor the Lorenz-Mie theory can be used to approximate the scattering, absorption, and polarization features for hexagonal ice crystals with size parameters from approximately 5 to 20. On the satellite remote sensing algorithm development and validation, we have developed a numerical scheme to identify multilayer cirrus cloud systems using AVHRR data. We have applied this scheme to the satellite data collected over the FIRE-2-IFO area during nine overpasses within seven observation dates. Determination of the threshold values used in the detection scheme are based on statistical analyses of these satellite data.

  16. Coincident Occurrences of Tropical Individual Cirrus Clouds and Deep Convective Systems Derived from TRMM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Xu, Kuan-Man; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Chambers, Lin; Fan, Alice; Sun, Wenbo

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of cloud properties and atmospheric radiation taken between January and August 1998 by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite were used to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal scales on the coincident occurrences of tropical individual cirrus clouds (ICCs) and deep convective systems (DCSs). It is found that there is little or even negative correlation between instantaneous occurrences of ICC and DCS in small areas, in which both types of clouds cannot grow and expand simultaneously. When spatial and temporal domains are increased, ICCs become more dependent on DCSs due to the origination of many ICCs from DCSs and moisture supply from the DCS in the upper troposphere for the ICCs to grow, resulting in significant positive correlation between the two types of tropical high clouds in large spatial and long temporal scales. This result may suggest that the decrease of tropical high clouds with SST from model simulations is likely caused by restricted spatial domains and limited temporal periods. Finally, the radiative feedback due to the change in tropical high cloud area coverage with sea surface temperature appears small and about -0.14 W/sq m per degree Kelvin.

  17. Comparisons Between the Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of lidar data taken during the 1989 AASE I program show that polar stratospheric clouds most often contain frozen particles, but sometimes contain spherical, presumably liquid, particles. In this paper the mechanisms that lead to the freezing of particles, and to the formation of liquid particles will be discussed based largely upon analyses of existing data. For example, trajectory studies help shed light on the conditions that lead to particle freezing. During April of 1996 an experiment using the NASA DC-8 and ER-2 aircraft will be conducted over the central U.S. Some of the goals of the project are to better understand the mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation, and to investigate the properties of freezing nuclei in the upper troposphere. Results from this field program will be presented as they apply to the topic of ice crystal nucleation. Comparisons will be drawn between the mechanisms that lead to new particle formation in the polar stratosphere, and the mechanisms that lead to new particles formation in the upper troposphere.

  18. Ice nucleation in sulfuric acid/organic aerosols: implications for cirrus cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, M. R.; Elrod, M. J.; Garland, R. M.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2006-03-01

    Using an aerosol flow tube apparatus, we have studied the effects of aliphatic aldehydes (C3 to C10) and ketones (C3 and C9) on ice nucleation in sulfuric acid aerosols. Mixed aerosols were prepared by combining an organic vapor flow with a flow of sulfuric acid aerosols over a small mixing time (~60 s) at room temperature. No acid-catalyzed reactions were observed under these conditions, and physical uptake was responsible for the organic content of the sulfuric acid aerosols. In these experiments, aerosol organic content, determined by a Mie scattering analysis, was found to vary with the partial pressure of organic, the flow tube temperature, and the identity of the organic compound. The physical properties of the organic compounds (primarily the solubility and melting point) were found to play a dominant role in determining the mode of nucleation (homogenous or heterogeneous) and the specific freezing temperatures observed. Overall, very soluble, low-melting organics, such as acetone and propanal, caused a decrease in aerosol ice nucleation temperatures when compared with aqueous sulfuric acid aerosol. In contrast, sulfuric acid particles exposed to organic compounds of eight carbons and greater, of much lower solubility and higher melting temperatures, nucleate ice at temperatures above aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Organic compounds of intermediate carbon chain length, C4-C7, (of intermediate solubility and melting temperatures) nucleated ice at the same temperature as aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Interpretations and implications of these results for cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  19. Ice nucleation in sulfuric acid/organic aerosols: implications for cirrus cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, M. R.; Elrod, M. J.; Garland, R. M.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2006-08-01

    Using an aerosol flow tube apparatus, we have studied the effects of aliphatic aldehydes (C3 to C10) and ketones (C3 and C9) on ice nucleation in sulfuric acid aerosols. Mixed aerosols were prepared by combining an organic vapor flow with a flow of sulfuric acid aerosols over a small mixing time (~60 s) at room temperature. No acid-catalyzed reactions were observed under these conditions, and physical uptake was responsible for the organic content of the sulfuric acid aerosols. In these experiments, aerosol organic content, determined by a Mie scattering analysis, was found to vary with the partial pressure of organic, the flow tube temperature, and the identity of the organic compound. The physical properties of the organic compounds (primarily the solubility and melting point) were found to play a dominant role in determining the inferred mode of nucleation (homogenous or heterogeneous) and the specific freezing temperatures observed. Overall, very soluble, low-melting organics, such as acetone and propanal, caused a decrease in aerosol ice nucleation temperatures when compared with aqueous sulfuric acid aerosol. In contrast, sulfuric acid particles exposed to organic compounds of eight carbons and greater, of much lower solubility and higher melting temperatures, nucleate ice at temperatures above aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Organic compounds of intermediate carbon chain length, C4-C7, (of intermediate solubility and melting temperatures) nucleated ice at the same temperature as aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Interpretations and implications of these results for cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  20. Variability of aerosol properties and Planetary Boundary Layer heights from airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, ground-based measurements, and the WRF model during CalNex and CARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Swanson, A. J.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R.; Fast, J. D.; Berg, L. K.; Pekour, M. S.; Shaw, W. J.; Zaveri, R. A.; Haman, C. L.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on board the NASA Langley Research Center's B200 aircraft to California in May and June of 2010 to aid in characterizing aerosol properties during the CalNex and CARES field missions. Measurements of aerosol extinction (at 532 nm), backscatter (at 532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (at 532 and 1064 nm) during 31 flights and nearly 100 hours, many in coordination with other participating research aircraft, satellites, and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as properties and variability of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). This work examines the variability of the extensive (dependent on aerosol type and number density) and intensive (dependent on aerosol type only) aerosol properties to aid in describing the broader context of aerosol behavior within and nearby the Sacramento and Los Angeles Basin regions. PBL heights derived from HSRL measurements will be compared with those produced by local ceilometers, radiosondes, and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Spatial and temporal averages of aerosol properties will be presented.

  1. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  2. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  3. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  4. Lidar data inversion for Cirrus clouds: An approach based on a statistical analysis of in situ microphysical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Febvre, G.

    1994-10-01

    The problem of the lidar equation inversion lies in the fact that it requires a lidar calibration or else a reference value from the studied medium. This paper presents an approach to calibrate the lidar by calculating the constant Ak (lidar constant A multiplied by the ratio of backscatter coefficient to extinction coefficient k). This approach is based on statistical analysis of in situ measurements. This analysis demonstrates that the extinction coefficient has a typical probablility distribution in cirrus clouds. The property of this distribution, as far as the attenuation of laser beam in the cloud, is used as a constraint to calculate the value of Ak. The validity of this method is discussed and results compared with two other inversion methods.

  5. Dual channel airborne hygrometer for climate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatrai, David; Gulyas, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-04-01

    Airborne hygrometry has an increasing role in climate research and nowadays the determination of cloud content especially of cirrus clouds is gaining high interest. The greatest challenges for such measurements are being used from ground level up to the lower stratosphere with appropriate precision and accuracy the low concentration and varying environment pressure. Such purpose instrument was probably presented first by our research group [1-2]. The development of the system called WaSUL-Hygro and some measurement results will be introduced. The measurement system is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and contains two measuring cells, one is used to measure water vapor concentration which is typically sampled by a sideward or backward inlet, while the second one measures total water content (water vapor plus ice crystals) after evaporation in a forward facing sampler. The two measuring cells are simultaneously illuminated through with one distributed feedback diode laser (1371 or 1392 nm). Two early versions have been used within the CARIBIC project. During the recent years, efforts were made to turn the system into a more reliable and robust one [3]. The first important development was the improvement of the wavelength stabilization method of the applied laser. As a result the uncertainty of the wavelength is less than 40fm, which corresponds to less than 0.05% of PA signal uncertainty. This PA signal uncertainty is lower than the noise level of the system itself. The other main development was the improvement of the concentration determination algorithm. For this purpose several calibration and data evaluation methods were developed, the combination of the latest ones have made the system traceable to the humidity generator applied during the calibration within 1.5% relative deviation or within noise level, whichever is greater. The improved system was several times blind tested at the Environmental Simulation Facility (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany) in

  6. NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Instrument Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John W.; Mack, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) recently developed the LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make measurements of aerosol and cloud distribution and optical properties. The Airborne HSRL has undergone as series of test flights and was successfully deployed on the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field mission in March 2006 (see Hair et al. in these proceedings). This paper provides an overview of the design of the Airborne HSRL and descriptions of some key subsystems unique to this instrument.

  7. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  8. Estimation of Cirrus and Stratus Cloud Heights Using Landsat Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inomata, Yasushi; Feind, R. E.; Welch, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A new method based upon high-spatial-resolution imagery is presented that matches cloud and shadow regions to estimate cirrus and stratus cloud heights. The distance between the cloud and the matching shadow pattern is accomplished using the 2D cross-correlation function from which the cloud height is derived. The distance between the matching cloud-shadow patterns is verified manually. The derived heights also are validated through comparison with a temperature-based retrieval of cloud height. It is also demonstrated that an estimate of cloud thickness can be retrieved if both the sunside and anti-sunside of the cloud-shadow pair are apparent. The technique requires some intepretation to determine the cloud height level retrieved (i.e., the top, base, or mid-level). It is concluded that the method is accurate to within several pixels, equivalent to cloud height variations of about +/- 250 m. The results show that precise placement of the templates is unnecessary, so that the development of a semi-automated procedure is possible. Cloud templates of about 64 pixels on a side or larger produce consistent results. The procedure was repeated for imagery degraded to simulate lower spatial resolutions. The results suggest that spatial resolution of 150-200 m or better is necessary in order to obtain stable cloud height retrievals.

  9. Daytime Land Surface Temperature Extraction from MODIS Thermal Infrared Data under Cirrus Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiwei; Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Yan, Guangjian; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Simulated data showed that cirrus clouds could lead to a maximum land surface temperature (LST) retrieval error of 11.0 K when using the generalized split-window (GSW) algorithm with a cirrus optical depth (COD) at 0.55 μm of 0.4 and in nadir view. A correction term in the COD linear function was added to the GSW algorithm to extend the GSW algorithm to cirrus cloudy conditions. The COD was acquired by a look up table of the isolated cirrus bidirectional reflectance at 0.55 μm. Additionally, the slope k of the linear function was expressed as a multiple linear model of the top of the atmospheric brightness temperatures of MODIS channels 31–34 and as the difference between split-window channel emissivities. The simulated data showed that the LST error could be reduced from 11.0 to 2.2 K. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the total errors from all the uncertainties of input parameters, extension algorithm accuracy, and GSW algorithm accuracy were less than 2.5 K in nadir view. Finally, the Great Lakes surface water temperatures measured by buoys showed that the retrieval accuracy of the GSW algorithm was improved by at least 1.5 K using the proposed extension algorithm for cirrus skies. PMID:25928059

  10. Daytime Land Surface Temperature Extraction from MODIS Thermal Infrared Data under Cirrus Clouds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiwei; Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Yan, Guangjian; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Simulated data showed that cirrus clouds could lead to a maximum land surface temperature (LST) retrieval error of 11.0 K when using the generalized split-window (GSW) algorithm with a cirrus optical depth (COD) at 0.55 μm of 0.4 and in nadir view. A correction term in the COD linear function was added to the GSW algorithm to extend the GSW algorithm to cirrus cloudy conditions. The COD was acquired by a look up table of the isolated cirrus bidirectional reflectance at 0.55 μm. Additionally, the slope k of the linear function was expressed as a multiple linear model of the top of the atmospheric brightness temperatures of MODIS channels 31-34 and as the difference between split-window channel emissivities. The simulated data showed that the LST error could be reduced from 11.0 to 2.2 K. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the total errors from all the uncertainties of input parameters, extension algorithm accuracy, and GSW algorithm accuracy were less than 2.5 K in nadir view. Finally, the Great Lakes surface water temperatures measured by buoys showed that the retrieval accuracy of the GSW algorithm was improved by at least 1.5 K using the proposed extension algorithm for cirrus skies.

  11. Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds During the Passage of Hurricane Bonnie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Demoz, B.; Starr, O C.; Tobin, D.; Feltz, W.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Gutman, S. I.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Cadirola, M.; Melfi, S. H.; Schmidlin, F.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island in the Bahamas during August - September, 1998 as a part of the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) which focussed on hurricane development and tracking. During the period August 21 - 24, hurricane Bonnie passed near Andros Island and influenced the water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements acquired by the SRL. Two drying signatures related to the hurricane were recorded by the SRL and other sensors. Cirrus cloud optical depths (at 351 nm) were also measured during this period. Optical depth values ranged from approximately 0.01 to 1.4. The influence of multiple scattering on these optical depth measurements was studied with the conclusion that the measured values of optical depth are less than the actual value by up to 20%. The UV/lR cirrus cloud optical depth ratio was estimated based on a comparison of lidar and GOES measurements. Simple radiative transfer model calculations compared with GOES satellite brightness temperatures indicate that satellite radiances are significantly affected by the presence of cirrus clouds if IR optical depths are approximately 0.02 or greater. This has implications for satellite cirrus detection requirements.

  12. New insights into nucleation, life cycle and climate impact of contrail cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Current growth rates in aviation demand a profound scientific data base in order to accurately assess the aviation impact on climate. A major contribution results from contrail cirrus and their radiative forcing is suggested to outbalance aviation CO2 and NOx effects. Direct observations of contrail cirrus throughout their life cycle are scarce and prone to substantial ambiguities currently limiting our understanding of the climate impact by aviation. Here, we give new insights into the nucleation, growth, life cycle and climate impact from contrail cirrus based on results from suite of aircraft experiments. NASA's ACCESSII mission focusses on aircraft emissions and initial stages of contrail formation. Nascent contrails were detected at cruise altitudes near 100 m distance to the engine exit. Contrail growth to 10-min contrail age is investigated during DLR's CONCERT campaigns. Finally, the objective of ML-CIRRUS with the HALO research aircraft is to study the life cycle and climate impact of contrail cirrus with a novel in-situ/remote sensing payload. The contrail measurements are related to previous observations and discussed in the context of recent developments in contrail modeling. Highlights include the quantification of the effects of aircraft type, engine technology and alternative fuels on contrail microphysics and climate.

  13. Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds During the Passage of Hurricane Bonnie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Demoz, B.; Starr, D. OC; Tobin, D.; Feltz, W.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Gutman, S. I.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Cardirola, M.; Melfi, S. H.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island in the Bahamas during August - September, 1998 as a part of the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) which focussed on hurricane development and tracking. During the period August 21 - 24, hurricane Bonnie passed near Andros Island and influenced the water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements acquired by the SRL. Two drying signatures related to the hurricane were recorded by the SRL (Scanning Raman Lidar) and other sensors. Cirrus cloud optical depths (at 351 nm) were also measured during this period. Optical depth values ranged from approximately 0.01 to 1.4. The influence of multiple scattering on these optical depth measurements was studied with the conclusion that the measured values of optical depth are less than the actual value by up to 20% . The UV/IR cirrus cloud optical depth ratio was estimated based on a comparison of lidar and GOES measurements. Simple radiative transfer model calculations compared with GOES satellite brightness temperatures indicate that satellite radiances are significantly affected by the presence of cirrus clouds if IR optical depths are approximately 0.02 or greater. This has implications for satellite cirrus detection requirements.

  14. Cirrus, contrails, and ice supersaturated regions in high pressure systems at northern mid latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, F.; Treffeisen, R.; Engelbart, D.; Krüger, K.; Schrems, O.

    2008-03-01

    During the European heat wave summer 2003 with predominant high pressure conditions we performed a detailed study of upper tropospheric humidity and ice particles which yielded striking results concerning the occurrence of ice supersaturated regions (ISSR), cirrus, and contrails. Our study is based on lidar observations and meteorological data obtained at Lindenberg/Germany (52.2° N, 14.1° E) as well as the analysis of the European centre for medium range weather forecast (ECMWF). Cirrus clouds were detected in 55% of the lidar profiles and a large fraction of them were subvisible (optical depth <0.03). Thin ice clouds were particularly ubiquitous in high pressure systems. The radiosonde data showed that the upper troposphere was very often supersaturated with respect to ice. Relating the radiosonde profiles to concurrent lidar observations reveals that the ISSRs almost always contained ice particles. Persistent contrails observed with a camera were frequently embedded in these thin or subvisible cirrus clouds. The ECMWF cloud parametrisation reproduces the observed cirrus clouds consistently and a close correlation between the ice water path in the model and the measured optical depth of cirrus is demonstrated.

  15. Daytime Land Surface Temperature Extraction from MODIS Thermal Infrared Data under Cirrus Clouds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiwei; Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Yan, Guangjian; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Simulated data showed that cirrus clouds could lead to a maximum land surface temperature (LST) retrieval error of 11.0 K when using the generalized split-window (GSW) algorithm with a cirrus optical depth (COD) at 0.55 μm of 0.4 and in nadir view. A correction term in the COD linear function was added to the GSW algorithm to extend the GSW algorithm to cirrus cloudy conditions. The COD was acquired by a look up table of the isolated cirrus bidirectional reflectance at 0.55 μm. Additionally, the slope k of the linear function was expressed as a multiple linear model of the top of the atmospheric brightness temperatures of MODIS channels 31-34 and as the difference between split-window channel emissivities. The simulated data showed that the LST error could be reduced from 11.0 to 2.2 K. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the total errors from all the uncertainties of input parameters, extension algorithm accuracy, and GSW algorithm accuracy were less than 2.5 K in nadir view. Finally, the Great Lakes surface water temperatures measured by buoys showed that the retrieval accuracy of the GSW algorithm was improved by at least 1.5 K using the proposed extension algorithm for cirrus skies. PMID:25928059

  16. Initial Validation and Results of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Optical Properties Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, W. D.; Pal, S. P.; McGill, M.; Spinhirne, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    Verification of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) optical retrievals is . problematic in that passage over ground sites is both instantaneous and sparse plus space-borne passive sensors such as MODIS are too frequently out of sync with the GLAS position. In October 2003, the GLAS Validation Experiment was executed from NASA Dryden Research Center, California to greatly increase validation possibilities. The high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft and onboard instrumentation of Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL), MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS), and/or MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) under-flew seven orbit tracks of GLAS for cirrus, smoke, and urban pollution optical properties inter-comparisons. These highly calibrated suite of instruments are the best data set yet to validate GLAS atmospheric parameters. In this presentation, we will focus on the inter-comparison with GLAS and CPL and draw preliminary conclusions about the accuracies of the GLAS 532nm retrievals of optical depth, extinction, backscatter cross section, and calculated extinction-to-backscatter ratio. Comparisons to an AERONET/MPL ground-based site at Monterey, California will be attempted. Examples of GLAS operational optical data products will be shown.

  17. BOREAS RSS-12 Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Wrigley, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-12 team collected both ground and airborne sunphotometer measurements for use in characterizing the aerosol optical properties of the atmosphere during the BOREAS data collection activities. These measurements are to be used to: 1) measure the magnitude and variability of the aerosol optical depth in both time and space; 2) determine the optical properties of the boreal aerosols; and 3) atmospherically correct remotely sensed data acquired during BOREAS. This data set contains airborne tracking sunphotometer data that were acquired from the C-130 aircraft during