Science.gov

Sample records for airborne coherent lidar

  1. Coherent lidar airborne windshear sensor: performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Targ, R; Kavaya, M J; Huffaker, R M; Bowles, R L

    1991-05-20

    National attention has focused on the critical problem of detecting and avoiding windshear since the crash on 2 Aug. 1985 of a Lockheed L-1011 at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. As part of the NASA/FAA National Integrated Windshear Program, we have defined a measurable windshear hazard index that can be remotely sensed from an aircraft, to give the pilot information about the wind conditions he will experience at some later time if he continues along the present flight path. A technology analysis and end-to-end performance simulation measuring signal-to-noise ratios and resulting wind velocity errors for competing coherent laser radar (lidar) systems have been carried out. The results show that a Ho:YAG lidar at a wavelength of 2.1 microm and a CO(2) lidar at 10.6 microm can give the pilot information about the line-of-sight component of a windshear threat from his present position to a region extending 2-4 km in front of the aircraft. This constitutes a warning time of 20-40 s, even in conditions of moderately heavy precipitation. Using these results, a Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS) that uses a Q-switched CO(2) laser at 10.6 microm is being designed and developed for flight evaluation in the fall of 1991.

  2. CLASS: Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor. Windshear avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Targ, Russell

    1991-01-01

    The coherent lidar airborne shear sensor (CLASS) is an airborne CO2 lidar system being designed and developed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) under contract to NASA Langley Research Center. The goal of this program is to develop a system with a 2- to 4-kilometer range that will provide a warning time of 20 to 40 seconds, so that the pilot can avoid the hazards of low-altitude wind shear under all weather conditions. It is a predictive system which will warn the pilot about a hazard that the aircraft will experience at some later time. The ability of the system to provide predictive warnings of clear air turbulence will also be evaluated. A one-year flight evaluation program will measure the line-of-sight wind velocity from a wide variety of wind fields obtained by an airborne radar, an accelerometer-based reactive wind-sensing system, and a ground-based Doppler radar. The success of the airborne lidar system will be determined by its correlation with the windfield as indicated by the onboard reactive system, which indicates the winds actually experienced by the NASA Boeing 737 aircraft.

  3. All-Fiber Airborne Coherent Doppler Lidar to Measure Wind Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiqiao; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Diao, Weifeng; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Bi, Decang; Jiang, Liyuan; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2016-06-01

    An all-fiber airborne pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (CDL) prototype at 1.54μm is developed to measure wind profiles in the lower troposphere layer. The all-fiber single frequency pulsed laser is operated with pulse energy of 300μJ, pulse width of 400ns and pulse repetition rate of 10kHz. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest pulse energy of all-fiber eye-safe single frequency laser that is used in airborne coherent wind lidar. The telescope optical diameter of monostatic lidar is 100 mm. Velocity-Azimuth-Display (VAD) scanning is implemented with 20 degrees elevation angle in 8 different azimuths. Real-time signal processing board is developed to acquire and process the heterodyne mixing signal with 10000 pulses spectra accumulated every second. Wind profiles are obtained every 20 seconds. Several experiments are implemented to evaluate the performance of the lidar. We have carried out airborne wind lidar experiments successfully, and the wind profiles are compared with aerological theodolite and ground based wind lidar. Wind speed standard error of less than 0.4m/s is shown between airborne wind lidar and balloon aerological theodolite.

  4. Aerosol Backscatter and Extinction Retrieval from Airborne Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Groß, S.; Rahm, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Toledano, C.; Weinzierl, B.

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for coherent Doppler wind lidars (DWLs) calibration is shown in this work. Concurrent measurements of a ground based aerosol lidar operating at 532 nm and an airborne DWL at 2 μm are used in combination with sun photometer measurements for the retrieval of backscatter and extinction profiles. The presented method was successfully applied to the measurements obtained during the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace), which aimed to characterize the Saharan dust long range transport between Africa and the Caribbean.

  5. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithms for the Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Ray, Taylor J.

    2013-01-01

    Two versions of airborne wind profiling algorithms for the pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. Each algorithm utilizes different number of line-of-sight (LOS) lidar returns while compensating the adverse effects of different coordinate systems between the aircraft and the Earth. One of the two algorithms APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) estimates wind products using two LOSs. The other algorithm utilizes five LOSs. The airborne lidar data were acquired during the NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010. The wind profile products from the two algorithms are compared with the dropsonde data to validate their results.

  6. Compact, Engineered 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  7. Noise Whitening in Airborne Wind Profiling With a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Arthur, Grant E.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Two different noise whitening methods in airborne wind profiling with a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. In order to provide accurate wind parameter estimates from the airborne lidar data acquired during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010, the adverse effects of background instrument noise must be compensated properly in the early stage of data processing. The results of the two methods are presented using selected GRIP data and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes.

  8. Airborne Wind Profiling With the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia flew on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) during the summer of 2010. The participation was part of the project Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Air. Selected results of airborne wind profiling are presented and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes. Panoramic presentations of different wind parameters over a nominal observation time span are also presented for selected GRIP data sets. The realtime data acquisition and analysis software that was employed during the GRIP campaign is introduced with its unique features.

  9. Data Acquisition and Processing System for Airborne Wind Profiling with a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, J. Y.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A data acquisition and signal processing system is being developed for a 2-micron airborne wind profiling coherent Doppler lidar system. This lidar, called the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN), is based on a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser transmitter and 15-cm diameter telescope. It is being packaged for flights onboard the NASA DC-8, with the first flights in the summer of 2010 in support of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The data acquisition and processing system is housed in a compact PCI chassis and consists of four components such as a digitizer, a digital signal processing (DSP) module, a video controller, and a serial port controller. The data acquisition and processing software (DAPS) is also being developed to control the system including real-time data analysis and display. The system detects an external 10 Hz trigger pulse and initiates the data acquisition and processing process, and displays selected wind profile parameters such as Doppler shift, power distribution, wind directions and velocities. Doppler shift created by aircraft motion is measured by an inertial navigation/GPS sensor and fed to the signal processing system for real-time removal of aircraft effects from wind measurements. A general overview of the system and the DAPS as well as the coherent Doppler lidar system is presented in this paper.

  10. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  11. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  12. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  13. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  14. Airborne cw Doppler lidar (ADOLAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Stefan; Werner, Christian; Nagel, E.; Herrmann, H.; Klier, M.; Knott, H. P.; Haering, R.; Wildgruber, J.

    1994-12-01

    During the last 10 years the DLR container LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometer) was used for many wind related measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The experience out of this were used to construct an airborne Doppler lidar ADOLAR. Based on the available Doppler lidars it is now proposed to perform a campaign to demonstrate the concept of the spaceborne sensor ALADIN, and to answer some questions concerning the signal quality from clouds, water and land. For the continuous wave CO2 laser, the energy is focused by the telescope into the region of investigation. Some of the radiation is back scattered by small aerosol particles drifting with the wind speed through the sensing volume. The back scattered radiation is collected by the telescope and detected by coherent technique. With the laser Doppler method one gets the radial wind component. To determine the magnitude and direction of the horizontal wind, some form of scanning in azimuth and elevation is required. To keep the airborne system compact, the transceiver optics is directly coupled to a wedge scanner which provides the conical scan with the axis in Nadir direction from the aircraft. The system ADOLAR was tested in 1994. Results of the flight over the lake Ammersee are presented and are compared with the data of the inertial reference system of the aircraft.

  15. Remote Sensing of Multi-Level Wind Fields with High-Energy Airborne Scanning Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  16. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  17. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  18. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Validation: Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN). Interim Review #1 (6 months)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent DWL breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent DWL system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid DWL solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  19. A compact high repetition rate CO2 coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alejandro, S.; Frelin, R.; Dix, B.; Mcnicholl, P.

    1992-01-01

    As part of its program to develop coherent heterodyne detection lidar technology for space, airborne, and ground based applications, the Optical Environment Division of the USAF's Phillips Laboratory developed a compact coherent CO2 TEA lidar system. Although originally conceived as a high altitude balloon borne system, the lidar is presently integrated into a trailer for ground based field measurements of aerosols and wind fields. In this role, it will also serve as a testbed for signal acquisition and processing development for planned future airborne and space based solid state lidar systems. The system has also found significance in new areas of interest to the Air Force such as cloud studies and coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems.

  20. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  1. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  2. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor: Recent Measurements and Future Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Howell, Burgess F.; Hardesty, Robert M.; Tratt, David M.; Darby, Lisa S.

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center jointly developed an airborne scanning coherent Doppler Lidar. We describe the system, present recent measurement (including the first wind fields measured within a hurricane using Doppler lidar), and describe prospective instrument improvements and research applications.

  3. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; Mcvicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  4. Flight results for the airborne Raman lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Burris, John F.

    1995-01-01

    The airborne Raman lidar recently completed a series of flight tests aboard a C-130 aircraft operated by the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The Raman lidar is intended to make simultaneous remote measurements of methane, water vapor, temperature, and pressure. The principal purpose of the measurements is to aid in the investigation of polar phenomena related to the formation of ozone 'holes' by permitting the identification of the origin of air parcels using methane as a tracer.

  5. Coherent Lidar Turbulence Measurement for Gust Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. J.; Soreide, David; Bagley, Hal

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence adversely affects operation of commercial and military aircraft and is a design constraint. The airplane structure must be designed to survive the loads imposed by turbulence. Reducing these loads allows the airplane structure to be lighter, a substantial advantage for a commercial airplane. Gust alleviation systems based on accelerometers mounted in the airplane can reduce the maximum gust loads by a small fraction. These systems still represent an economic advantage. The ability to reduce the gust load increases tremendously if the turbulent gust can be measured before the airplane encounters it. A lidar system can make measurements of turbulent gusts ahead of the airplane, and the NASA Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) program is developing such a lidar. The ACLAIM program is intended to develop a prototype lidar system for use in feasibility testing of gust load alleviation systems and other airborne lidar applications, to define applications of lidar with the potential for improving airplane performance, and to determine the feasibility and benefits of these applications. This paper gives an overview of the ACLAIM program, describes the lidar architecture for a gust alleviation system, and describes the prototype ACLAIM lidar system.

  6. Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning holographic lidar receivers are currently in use in two operational lidar systems, PHASERS (Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing) and now HARLIE (Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment). These systems are based on volume phase holograms made in dichromated gelatin (DCG) sandwiched between 2 layers of high quality float glass. They have demonstrated the practical application of this technology to compact scanning lidar systems at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths, the ability to withstand moderately high laser power and energy loading, sufficient optical quality for most direct detection systems, overall efficiencies rivaling conventional receivers, and the stability to last several years under typical lidar system environments. Their size and weight are approximately half of similar performing scanning systems using reflective optics. The cost of holographic systems will eventually be lower than the reflective optical systems depending on their degree of commercialization. There are a number of applications that require or can greatly benefit from a scanning capability. Several of these are airborne systems, which either use focal plane scanning, as in the Laser Vegetation Imaging System or use primary aperture scanning, as in the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar or the Large Aperture Scanning Airborne Lidar. The latter class requires a large clear aperture opening or window in the aircraft. This type of system can greatly benefit from the use of scanning transmission holograms of the HARLIE type because the clear aperture required is only about 25% larger than the collecting aperture as opposed to 200-300% larger for scan angles of 45 degrees off nadir.

  7. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  8. Coherent Lidar Design and Performance Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1996-01-01

    This final report summarizes the investigative results from the 3 complete years of funding and corresponding publications are listed. The first year saw the verification of beam alignment for coherent Doppler lidar in space by using the surface return. The second year saw the analysis and computerized simulation of using heterodyne efficiency as an absolute measure of performance of coherent Doppler lidar. A new method was proposed to determine the estimation error for Doppler lidar wind measurements without the need for an independent wind measurement. Coherent Doppler lidar signal covariance, including wind shear and turbulence, was derived and calculated for typical atmospheric conditions. The effects of wind turbulence defined by Kolmogorov spatial statistics were investigated theoretically and with simulations. The third year saw the performance of coherent Doppler lidar in the weak signal regime determined by computer simulations using the best velocity estimators. Improved algorithms for extracting the performance of velocity estimators with wind turbulence included were also produced.

  9. Airborne LIDAR Data Processing and Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne LIDAR technology allows accurate and inexpensive measurements of topography, vegetation canopy heights, and buildings over large areas. In order to provide researchers high quality data, NSF has created the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) to collect, archive, and distribute the LIDAR data. However, the LIDAR systems collect voluminous irregularly-spaced, three-dimensional point measurements of ground and non-ground objects scanned by the laser beneath the aircraft. To advance the use of the technology and data, NCALM is developing public domain algorithms for ground and non-ground measurement classification and tools for data retrieval and transformation. We present the main functions of the ALDPAT (Airborne LIDAR Data Processing and Analysis Tools) developed by NCALM. While Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide a useful platform for storing, analyzing, and visualizing most spatial data, the shear volume of raw LIDAR data makes most commercial GIS packages impractical. Instead, we have developed a suite of applications in ALDPAT which combine self developed C++ programs with the APIs of commercial remote sensing and GIS software. Tasks performed by these applications include: 1) transforming data into specified horizontal coordinate systems and vertical datums; 2) merging and sorting data into manageable sized tiles, typically 4 square kilometers in dimension; 3) filtering point data to separate measurements for the ground from those for non-ground objects; 4) interpolating the irregularly spaced elevations onto a regularly spaced grid to allow raster based analysis; and 5) converting the gridded data into standard GIS import formats. The ALDPAT 1.0 is available through http://lidar.ihrc.fiu.edu/.

  10. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor: Recent Measurements and Future Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Darby, Lisa S.; Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    The coherent Doppler lidar, when operated from an airborne platform, offers a unique measurement capability for study of atmospheric dynamical and physical properties. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are at a disadvantage in terms of spatial resolution and coverage. Recent experience suggests airborne coherent Doppler lidar can yield unique wind measurements of--and during operation within--extreme weather phenomena. This paper presents the first airborne coherent Doppler lidar measurements of hurricane wind fields. The lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory jointly developed an airborne lidar system, the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS). The centerpiece of MACAWS is the lidar transmitter from the highly successful NOAA Windvan. Other field-tested lidar components have also been used, when feasible, to reduce costs and development time. The methodology for remotely sensing atmospheric wind fields with scanning coherent Doppler lidar was demonstrated in 1981; enhancements were made and the system was reflown in 1984. MACAWS has potentially greater scientific utility, compared to the original airborne scanning lidar system, owing to a factor of approx. 60 greater energy-per-pulse from the NOAA transmitter. MACAWS development was completed and the system was first flown in 1995. Following enhancements to improve performance, the system was re-flown in 1996 and 1998. The scientific motivation for MACAWS is three-fold: obtain fundamental measurements of subgrid scale (i.e., approx. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in hydrological, climate, and general

  11. Experimental evaluation of an airborne depth sounding lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Koppari, Kurt; Karlsson, Ulf

    1992-12-01

    An experimental evaluation of an airborne depth sounding lidar called FLASH (FOA Laser Airborne Sounder for Hydrography) is presented. The lidar is based on a scanning frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser and is borne by a helicopter. An example of measured waveforms is compared with those obtained by analytical and Monte Carlo modeling.

  12. Airborne lidar experiments at the Savannah River Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, William B.; Swift, Robert N.

    1985-01-01

    The results of remote sensing experiments at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Nuclear Facility utilizing the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are presented. The flights were conducted in support of the numerous environmental monitoring requirements associated with the operation of the facility and for the purpose of furthering research and development of airborne lidar technology. Areas of application include airborne laser topographic mapping, hydrologic studies using fluorescent tracer dye, timber volume estimation, baseline characterization of wetlands, and aquatic chlorophyll and photopigment measurements. Conclusions relative to the usability of airborne lidar technology for the DOE for each of these remote sensing applications are discussed.

  13. Shuttle Coherent Atmospheric Lidar Experiment (SCALE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J.; Beranek, R.; Fitzjarrald, D.; Mabry, J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study to design and accommodate a simplified version of a coherent lidar system capable of performing tropospheric wind measurements are outlined. The following topics are addressed: system sensitivity, orbital analysis, science experiments, preliminary system design, accommodations, and the space qualification of a 2J CO2 laser.

  14. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  15. Overlap Correction Function For an Airborne Based Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Mariana; Marenco, Franco

    2016-06-01

    The present research envisages the estimation of the overlap correction function for an airborne nadir-mounted lidar using multi-angle measurements. We have scanned a series of offnadir angles and after data processing we have been able to determine the instrument's overlap function down to 95m from the lidar. This function can be used for the correction of lidar profiles and hence reduce the near-range uncertainty of lidar measurements. To our knowledge, the estimation of the overlap function using multi-angle method for a nadir pointing lidar is a première.

  16. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y. (Inventor); Koch, Grady J. (Inventor); Kavaya, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices of the present invention enable airborne Doppler Wind LIDAR system measurements and INS/GPS measurements to be combined to estimate wind parameters and compensate for instrument misalignment. In a further embodiment, the wind speed and wind direction may be computed based on two orthogonal line-of-sight LIDAR returns.

  17. Analyses of Coherent Lidar Wind Measurement Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1996-01-01

    Activities carried out during this reporting period are summarized. Much of the work undertaken involved additions to the space-based coherent lidar model, including the addition of performance as a function of altitude; a receiver design section; the development of a simple orbit model suitable for use in plotting orbits, swath and shot patterns and estimating power availability; and the inclusion of Fascode derived atmospheric extinction. Assistance was also given to NASA MSFC in the design and analysis of lidar instruments, both for the AEOLUS conceptual designs within MSFC (one such analysis is included in an appendix) and of proposed NASA MSFC instruments for the New Millennium Program.

  18. Experimental evaluation of an airborne depth-sounding lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove K.; Koppari, Kurt R.; Karlsson, Ulf C.

    1993-06-01

    An experimental evaluation of an airborne depth-sounding lidar is described. The system, called FLASH (FOA laser airborne sounder for hydrography), is based on a scanning frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser carried by a helicopter. An in-situ profiling instrument for measuring water parameters is also described. This system, called HOSS (hydro-optical sensor system), is also carried by a helicopter and has been used to collect data in parallel with the lidar measurements. A discussion of the lidar performance coupled to the measured water and instrumental parameters is included. Examples of measured wave forms are compared with those obtained by analytical and Monte Carlo modeling.

  19. Coherent lidar design and performance verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1993-01-01

    The verification of LAWS beam alignment in space can be achieved by a measurement of heterodyne efficiency using the surface return. The crucial element is a direct detection signal that can be identified for each surface return. This should be satisfied for LAWS but will not be satisfied for descoped LAWS. The performance of algorithms for velocity estimation can be described with two basic parameters: the number of coherently detected photo-electrons per estimate and the number of independent signal samples per estimate. The average error of spectral domain velocity estimation algorithms are bounded by a new periodogram Cramer-Rao Bound. Comparison of the periodogram CRB with the exact CRB indicates a factor of two improvement in velocity accuracy is possible using non-spectral domain estimators. This improvement has been demonstrated with a maximum-likelihood estimator. The comparison of velocity estimation algorithms for 2 and 10 micron coherent lidar was performed by assuming all the system design parameters are fixed and the signal statistics are dominated by a 1 m/s rms wind fluctuation over the range gate. The beam alignment requirements for 2 micron are much more severe than for a 10 micron lidar. The effects of the random backscattered field on estimating the alignment error is a major problem for space based lidar operation, especially if the heterodyne efficiency cannot be estimated. For LAWS, the biggest science payoff would result from a short transmitted pulse, on the order of 0.5 microseconds instead of 3 microseconds. The numerically errors for simulation of laser propagation in the atmosphere have been determined as a joint project with the University of California, San Diego. Useful scaling laws were obtained for Kolmogorov atmospheric refractive turbulence and an atmospheric refractive turbulence characterized with an inner scale. This permits verification of the simulation procedure which is essential for the evaluation of the effects of

  20. Performance Modeling of an Airborne Raman Water Vapor Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Schwemmer, G.; Berkoff, T.; Plotkin, H.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2000-01-01

    A sophisticated Raman lidar numerical model had been developed. The model has been used to simulate the performance of two ground-based Raman water vapor lidar systems. After tuning the model using these ground-based measurements, the model is used to simulate the water vapor measurement capability of an airborne Raman lidar under both day-and night-time conditions for a wide range of water vapor conditions. The results indicate that, under many circumstances, the daytime measurements possess comparable resolution to an existing airborne differential absorption water vapor lidar while the nighttime measurement have higher resolution. In addition, a Raman lidar is capable of measurements not possible using a differential absorption system.

  1. Comparison of Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Calibration Using Earth Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1999-01-01

    Routine backscatter, beta, measurements by an airborne or space-based lidar from designated earth surfaces with known and fairly uniform beta properties can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities. This can in turn be used to obtain accurate atmospheric aerosol and cloud beta measurements on large spatial scales. This is important because achieving a precise calibration factor for large pulsed lidars then need not rest solely on using a standard hard target procedure. Furthermore, calibration from designated earth surfaces would provide an inflight performance evaluation of the lidar. Hence, with active remote sensing using lasers with high resolution data, calibration of a space-based lidar using earth's surfaces will be extremely useful. The calibration methodology using the earth's surface initially requires measuring beta of various earth surfaces simulated in the laboratory using a focused continuous wave (CW) CO2 Doppler lidar and then use these beta measurements as standards for the earth surface signal from airborne or space-based lidars. Since beta from the earth's surface may be retrieved at different angles of incidence, beta would also need to be measured at various angles of incidences of the different surfaces. In general, Earth-surface reflectance measurements have been made in the infrared, but the use of lidars to characterize them and in turn use of the Earth's surface to calibrate lidars has not been made. The feasibility of this calibration methodology is demonstrated through a comparison of these laboratory measurements with actual earth surface beta retrieved from the same lidar during the NASA/Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on NASA's DC8 aircraft from 13 - 26 September, 1995. For the selected earth surface from the airborne lidar data, an average beta for the surface was established and the statistics of lidar efficiency was determined. This was compared with the actual lidar efficiency

  2. A multiprocessor airborne lidar data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. W.; Bailey, S. A.; Heath, G. E.; Piazza, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A new multiprocessor data acquisition system was developed for the existing Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL). This implementation simultaneously utilizes five single board 68010 microcomputers, the UNIX system V operating system, and the real time executive VRTX. The original data acquisition system was implemented on a Hewlett Packard HP 21-MX 16 bit minicomputer using a multi-tasking real time operating system and a mixture of assembly and FORTRAN languages. The present collection of data sources produce data at widely varied rates and require varied amounts of burdensome real time processing and formatting. It was decided to replace the aging HP 21-MX minicomputer with a multiprocessor system. A new and flexible recording format was devised and implemented to accommodate the constantly changing sensor configuration. A central feature of this data system is the minimization of non-remote sensing bus traffic. Therefore, it is highly desirable that each micro be capable of functioning as much as possible on-card or via private peripherals. The bus is used primarily for the transfer of remote sensing data to or from the buffer queue.

  3. Simulation of the Performances of WIND, an Airborne CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, D.; Dabas, A.; Lieutaud, F.; Loth, C.; Flamant, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    An airborne Doppler coherent lidar is under development as a joint project between France and Germany. The instrument is designed around CO2 laser technology, heterodyne detection, and a conical scanning of the line-of-site. The 10 micron domain is suitable for long range measurements due to the maturity of the technology and because it corresponds to an atmospheric window. The objectives of WIND are twofold: (1) to conduct mesoscale scientific studies in particular over oceanic and inhomogeneous terrain areas; and (2) to support the Earth-orbiting wind lidar projects.

  4. Photonic-lantern-based coherent LIDAR system.

    PubMed

    Ozdur, Ibrahim; Toliver, Paul; Woodward, T K

    2015-02-23

    In this work, a photonic-lantern-based coherent LIDAR system is experimentally demonstrated and the voltage signal-to-noise ratio improvement is analyzed. A voltage signal-to-noise ratio (SNR(V)) improvement of 2.8 is demonstrated experimentally for photonic-lantern-based coherent receivers relative to single-mode coherent receivers. The voltage signal-to-noise ratio improvement is obtained when other parameters are kept constant. We have also analyzed the effect of random optical power distribution among the single-mode fibers. We found that the distribution does not significantly impact the SNR(V) improvement. The mean value of voltage signal-to-noise ratio improvement is found to be ~ 2.4.

  5. Geoscience Applications of Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding David J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in lidar altimetry technology have enabled new methods to describe the vertical structure of the Earth's surface with great accuracy. Application of these methods in several geoscience disciplines will be described. Airborne characterization of vegetation canopy structure will be illustrated, including a validation of lidar-derived Canopy Height Profiles for closed-canopy, broadleaf forests. Airborne detection of tectonic landforms beneath dense canopy will also be illustrated, with an application mapping active fault traces in the Puget Lowland of Washington state for earthquake hazard assessment purposes. Application of data from the first and second flights of the Shuttle Laser Altimeter will also be discussed in an assessment of global digital elevation model accuracy and error characteristics. Two upcoming space flight missions will be described, the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) and the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Mission (ICESat), which will provide comprehensive lidar altimeter observations of the Earth's topography and vegetation cover.

  6. Airborne Lidar Point Cloud Density Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, P. T.; Huang, C.-M.

    2006-12-01

    Airborne lidar is useful for collecting a large volume and high density of points with three dimensional coordinates. Among these points are terrain points, as well as those points located aboveground. For DEM production, the density of the terrain points is an important quality index. While the penetration rate of laser points is dependent on the surface type characteristics, there are also different ways to present the point density. Namely, the point density could be measured by subdividing the surveyed area into cells, then computing the ratio of the number of points in each respective cell to its area. In this case, there will be one density value for each cell. The other method is to construct the TIN, and count the number of triangles in the cell, divided by the area of the cell. Aside from counting the number of triangles, the area of the largest, or the 95% ranking, triangle, could be used as an index as well. The TIN could also be replaced by Voronoi diagrams (Thiessen Polygon), and a polygon with even density could be derived from human interpretation. The nature of these indices is discussed later in this research paper. Examples of different land cover types: bare earth, built-up, low vegetation, low density forest, and high density forest; are extracted from point clouds collected in 2005 by ITRI under a contract from the Ministry of the Interior. It is found that all these indices are capable of reflecting the differences of the land cover type. However, further investigation is necessary to determine which the most descriptive one is.

  7. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  8. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distributions with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The coherent Doppler lidar, when operated from an airborne platform, offers a unique measurement capability for study of atmospheric and surface processes and feature. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are at a disadvantage in terms of spatial resolution and coverage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of about a 1 Joule/pulse (eyesafe) lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and operations control system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (on an order of 1 micron in diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and concentration. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be about 1 m/s. A variety of applications has been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; an upper tropospheric jet stream; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the

  9. IIP Update: A Packaged Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver. Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  10. Turbulence and Mountain Wave Conditions Observed with an Airborne 2-Micron Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Ehernberger, Jack; Bogue, Rodney; Ashburn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Joint efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense, and industry partners are enhancing the capability of airborne wind and turbulence detection. The Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) was flown on three series of flights to assess its capability over a range of altitudes, air mass conditions, and gust phenomena. This paper describes the observation of mountain waves and turbulence induced by mountain waves over the Tehachapi and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges in southern California by lidar onboard the NASA Airborne Science DC-8 airplane. The examples in this paper compare lidar-predicted mountain waves and wave-induced turbulence to subsequent aircraft-measured true airspeed. Airplane acceleration data is presented describing the effects of the wave-induced turbulence on the DC-8 airplane. Highlights of the lidar-predicted airspeed from the two flights show increases of 12 m/s at the mountain wave interface and peak-to-peak airspeed changes of 10 m/s and 15 m/s in a span of 12 s in moderate turbulence.

  11. Turbulence and mountain wave conditions observed with an airborne 2-micron lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Ashburn, Chris; Ehernberger, Jack; Bogue, Rodney

    2006-01-01

    Joint efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense, and industry partners are enhancing the capability of airborne wind and turbulence detection. The Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) was flown on three series of flights to assess its capability over a range of altitudes, air mass conditions, and gust phenomena. This paper describes the observation of mountain waves and turbulence induced by mountain waves over the Tehachapi and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges (California, USA) by lidar onboard the NASA Airborne Science DC-8 airplane. The examples in this paper compare lidar-predicted mountain waves and wave-induced turbulence to subsequent aircraft-measured true airspeed. Airplane acceleration data is presented describing the effects of the wave-induced turbulence on the DC-8 airplane. Highlights of the lidar-predicted airspeed from the two flights show increases of 12 meters per second (m/s) at the mountain wave interface and peak-to-peak airspeed changes of 10 m/s and 15 m/s in a span of 12 seconds in moderate turbulence.

  12. Turbulence and Mountain Wave Conditions Observed with an Airborne 2-Micron Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Ashburn, Chris; Ehernberger, L. J.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2006-01-01

    Joint efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Defense, and industry partners are enhancing the capability of airborne wind and turbulence detection. The Airborne Coherent Lidar (light detection and ranging) for Advanced In-Flight Measurements was flown on three series of flights to assess its capability over a range of altitudes, air mass conditions, and gust phenomena. This report describes the observation of mountain waves and turbulence induced by mountain waves over the Tehachapi and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges by lidar on board the NASA Airborne Science DC-8 (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, Long Beach, California) airplane during two flights. The examples in this report compare lidar-predicted mountain waves and wave-induced turbulence to subsequent airplane-measured true airspeed. Airplane acceleration data is presented describing the effects of the wave-induced turbulence on the DC-8 airplane. Highlights of the lidar-predicted airspeed from the two flights show increases of 12 m/s at the mountain wave interface and peak-to-peak airspeed changes of 10 m/s and 15 m/s in a span of 12 s in moderate turbulence.

  13. NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Instrument Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John W.; Mack, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) recently developed the LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make measurements of aerosol and cloud distribution and optical properties. The Airborne HSRL has undergone as series of test flights and was successfully deployed on the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field mission in March 2006 (see Hair et al. in these proceedings). This paper provides an overview of the design of the Airborne HSRL and descriptions of some key subsystems unique to this instrument.

  14. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Kawa, S. Randoph; Biraud, Sebastien

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT We report initial measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density using a pulsed airborne lidar operating at 1572 nm. It uses a lidar measurement technique being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a candidate for the CO2 measurement in the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission. The pulsed multiple-wavelength lidar approach offers several new capabilities with respect to passive spectrometer and other lidar techniques for high-precision CO2 column density measurements. We developed an airborne lidar using a fibre laser transmitter and photon counting detector, and conducted initial measurements of the CO2 column absorption during flights over Oklahoma in December 2008. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals. These follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 1.5 to 7.1 km, and are in good agreement with column number density estimates calculated from nearly coincident airborne in-situ measurements.

  15. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype: A New NASA Instrument Incubator Program Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Wang, Jinxue; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The packaged DWL will utilize the numerous advances in pulsed, solid-state, 2-micron laser technology at NASA s Langley Research Center (LaRC) in such areas as crystal composition, architecture, efficiency, cooling techniques, pulse energy, and beam quality. The extensive experience of Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (RSAS) in coherent lidar systems, in spacebased sensors, and in packaging rugged lidar systems will be applied to this project. The packaged transceiver will be as close to an envisioned space-based DWL system as the resources and technology readiness allow. We will attempt to facilitate a future upgrade to a coherent lidar system capable of simultaneous wind and CO2 concentration profile measurements. Since aerosol and dust concentration is also available from the lidar signal, the potential for a triple measurement lidar system is attractive for both Earth and Mars remote sensing. A key follow on step after the IIP will be to add a telescope, scanner, and software for aircraft validation. This IIP should also put us in a position to begin a parallel formulation study in the 2006-2007 timeframe for a space-based DWL demonstration mission early next decade.

  16. Airborne lidar detection of subsurface oceanic scattering layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Krabill, William B.; Buntzen, Rodney R.; Gilbert, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    The airborne lidar detection and cross-sectional mapping of submerged oceanic scattering layers are reported. The field experiment was conducted in the Atlantic Ocean southeast of Assateague Island, VA. NASA's Airborne Oceanographic Lidar was operated in the bathymetric mode to acquire on-wavelength 532-nm depth-resolved backscatter signals from shelf/slope waters. Unwanted laser pulse reflection from the air-water interface was minimized by spatial filtering and off-nadir operation. The presence of thermal stratification over the shelf was verified by the deployment of airborne expendable bathythermographs. Optical beam transmission measurements acquired from a surface truthing vessel indicated the presence of a layer of turbid water near the sea floor over the inner portion of the shelf.

  17. Potential scientific research which will benefit from an airborne Doppler lidar measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    Areas of research which can be significantly aided by the Doppler lidar airborne system are described. The need for systematic development of the airborne Doppler lidar is discussed. The technology development associated with the systematic development of the system will have direct application to satellite systems for which the lidar also promises to be an effective instrument for atmospheric research.

  18. Investigation of airborne lidar for avoidance of windshear hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Targ, Russell; Bowles, Roland L.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized windshear hazard index is defined, which is derived from considerations of wind conditions at the present position of an aircraft and from remotely sensed information along the extended flight path. Candidate airborne sensor technologies based on microwave Doppler radar, Doppler lidar, and infrared radiometric techniques are discussed in the context of overall system functional requirements. Initial results of a performance and technology assessment study for competing lidars are presented. Based on a systems approach to the windshear threat, lidar appears to be a viable technology for windshear detection and avoidance, even in conditions of moderately heavy precipitation. The proposed airborne CO2 and Ho:YAG lidar windshear-detection systems analyzed here can give the pilot information about the line-of-sight component of windshear threat from his present position to a region extending 1 to 3 km in front of the aircraft. This constitutes a warning time of 15 to 45 seconds. The technology necessary to design, build, and test such a brassboard 10.6 micron CO2 lidar is now available. However, for 2-micron systems, additional analytical and laboratory investigations are needed to arrive at optimum 2-micron rare-earth-based laser crystals.

  19. Cloud top remote sensing by airborne lidar.

    PubMed

    Spinhirne, J D; Hansen, M Z; Caudill, L O

    1982-05-01

    Observations of cloud top height, backscattering, and signal depolarization have been obtained by a lidar system operating onboard a high-altitude research aircraft. The transmitter for the cloud lidar system is a doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 5 Hz. The system functions as a fully automated sensor under microprocessor control and operates from a nominal 19-km altitude. Measurements have been acquired over a wide variety of cloud cover in conjunction with passive visible and infrared measurements. Initial observation results are reported.

  20. Application of coherent lidar to ion measurements in plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A coherent lidar system has been constructed for the measurement of alpha particles in a burning plasma. The lidar system consists of a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser transmitter and a heterodyne receiver. The receiver local oscillator is a cw, sequence-band CO{sub 2} laser operating with a 63.23 GHz offset from the transmitter.

  1. Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1998-10-23

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

  2. Medium altitude airborne Geiger-mode mapping LIDAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, William E.; Steele, Bradley; Nelson, Graham; Truscott, Antony; Itzler, Mark; Entwistle, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Over the past 15 years the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and private industry have been developing airborne LiDAR systems based on arrays of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) detectors capable of detecting a single photon. The extreme sensitivity of GmAPD detectors allows operation of LiDAR sensors at unprecedented altitudes and area collection rates in excess of 1,000 km2/hr. Up until now the primary emphasis of this technology has been limited to defense applications despite the significant benefits of applying this technology to non-military uses such as mapping, monitoring critical infrastructure and disaster relief. This paper briefly describes the operation of GmAPDs, design and operation of a Geiger-mode LiDAR, a comparison of Geiger-mode and traditional linear mode LiDARs, and a description of the first commercial Geiger-mode LiDAR system, the IntelliEarth™ Geospatial Solutions Geiger-mode LiDAR sensor.

  3. Airborne lidar intensity calibration and application for land use classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Wang, Cheng; Luo, She-Zhou; Zuo, Zheng-Li

    2014-11-01

    Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology which can acquire the topographic information efficiently. It can record the accurate 3D coordinates of the targets and also the signal intensity (the amplitude of backscattered echoes) which represents reflectance characteristics of targets. The intensity data has been used in land use classification, vegetation fractional cover and leaf area index (LAI) estimation. Apart from the reflectance characteristics of the targets, the intensity data can also be influenced by many other factors, such as flying height, incident angle, atmospheric attenuation, laser pulse power and laser beam width. It is therefore necessary to calibrate intensity values before further applications. In this study, we analyze the factors affecting LiDAR intensity based on radar range equation firstly, and then applying the intensity calibration method, which includes the sensor-to-target distance and incident angle, to the laser intensity data over the study area. Finally the raw LiDAR intensity and normalized intensity data are used for land use classification along with LiDAR elevation data respectively. The results show that the classification accuracy from the normalized intensity data is higher than that from raw LiDAR intensity data and also indicate that the calibration of LiDAR intensity data is necessary in the application of land use classification.

  4. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  5. Sea floor classification with satellite data and airborne lidar bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulldahl, H. Michael; Philipson, Petra; Kautsky, Hans; Wikström, Sofia A.

    2013-06-01

    While land maps of vegetation cover and substrate types exist, similar underwater maps are rare or almost non-existing. We developed the use of airborne bathymetric lidar mapping and high resolution satellite data to a combined method for shallow sea floor classification. A classification accuracy of about 80% is possible for six classes of substrate and vegetation, when validated against field data taken from underwater video recordings. The method utilizes lidar data directly (topography, slopes) and as means for correction of image data for water depth and turbidity. In this paper we present results using WorldView-2 imagery and data from the HawkEye II lidar system in a Swedish archipelago area.

  6. Investigation of airborne lidar for avoidance of windshear hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Targ, Russell; Bowles, Roland L.

    1988-01-01

    The present generalized windshear hazard index is formulated in terms of wind conditions at the given aircraft position and of remotely-sensed information obtained along the extended flight path. Overall system functional requirements are addressed by comparing microwave Doppler radar, Doppler lidar, and IR radiometry candidate techniques, giving attention to airborne CO2 and Ho:YAG lidar windshear-detection systems; these furnish pilots with data on the line-of-sight component of windshear threats over as much as 1-3 km, for a warning time of 15-45 sec. While the technology for a 10.6-micron, CO2 laser-based lidar is available, additional development is required for 2-micron, Ho:YAG laser-based systems.

  7. Simultaneous Red - Blue Lidar and Airborne Impactor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Blifford, I. H.; Fuller, W. H.; Grams, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneous two-color (0.6943 micrometers and 0.3472 micrometers) LIDAR measurements were made in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over Boulder, Colorado during March 1973. In addition, on the evening of March 26, airborne single-stage impactor measurements were made at four altitudes-- 10,500, 25,000, 33,000 and 43,000 feet MSL. These data were integrated at constant altitude for 15,45, 45, and 60 minutes respectively. The LIDAR data were taken with Langley's 48" LIDAR using a dichroic beamsplitter to separate the return at 0.6943 micrometers and 0.3472 micrometers. The analog waveforms for both colors were digitized simultaneously; one on an NCAR data acquisition system and the other on the 48" Langley data acquisition system. A discussion of the preliminary results from these measurements will be presented.

  8. Diode - Pumped Nd:YAG Lidar for Airborne Cloud Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehnert, A.; Halldorsson, TH.; Herrmann, H.; Haering, R.; Krichbaumer, W.; Streicher, J.; Werner, CH.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental method used to separate scattering and to use it for the determination of cloud microphysical parameters. It is also the first airborne test of a lidar version related to the ATLID Program - ESA's scheduled spaceborne lidar. The already tested DLR microlidar was modified with the new diode-pumped laser and a faster data recording system was added. The system was used during the CLEOPATRA campaign in the DLR research aircraft Falcon 20 to measure cloud parameters. The diode pumped Nd:YAG laser we developed for the microlidar is a modification of the laser we introduced at the Lidar Congress at 'Laser 1991' in Munich. Various aspects of this work are discussed.

  9. Airborne Lidar Simulator for the Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Cavanaugh, John; Valett, Susan; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the National Research Council (NRC) completed its first decadal survey for Earth science at the request of NASA, NOAA, and USGS. The Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) mission is one of fifteen missions recommended by NRC, whose primary objectives are to map global topography and vegetation structure at 5 m spatial resolution, and to acquire global surface height mapping within a few years. NASA Goddard conducted an initial mission concept study for the LIST mission in 2007, and developed the initial measurement requirements for the mission.

  10. Terrestrial Method for Airborne Lidar Quality Control and Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N. M.; Badawy, H. M.; Elhabiby, M. M.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2014-11-01

    Most of LiDAR systems do not provide the end user with the calibration and acquisition procedures that can use to validate the quality of the data acquired by the airborne system. Therefore, this system needs data Quality Control (QC) and assessment procedures to verify the accuracy of the laser footprints and mainly at building edges. This research paper introduces an efficient method for validating the quality of the airborne LiDAR point clouds data using terrestrial laser scanning data integrated with edge detection techniques. This method will be based on detecting the edge of buildings from these two independent systems. Hence, the building edges are extracted from the airborne data using an algorithm that is based on the standard deviation of neighbour point's height from certain threshold with respect to centre points using radius threshold. The algorithm is adaptive to different point densities. The approach is combined with another innovative edge detection technique from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds that is based on the height and point density constraints. Finally, statistical analysis and assessment will be applied to compare these two systems in term of edge detection extraction precision, which will be a priori step for 3D city modelling generated from heterogeneous LiDAR systems

  11. Algorithms used in the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagle, David B.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2016-05-23

    The Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS) analyzes Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data—digitized laser-return waveforms, position, and attitude data—to derive point clouds of target surfaces. A full-waveform airborne lidar system, the EAARL seamlessly and simultaneously collects mixed environment data, including submerged, sub-aerial bare earth, and vegetation-covered topographies.ALPS uses three waveform target-detection algorithms to determine target positions within a given waveform: centroid analysis, leading edge detection, and bottom detection using water-column backscatter modeling. The centroid analysis algorithm detects opaque hard surfaces. The leading edge algorithm detects topography beneath vegetation and shallow, submerged topography. The bottom detection algorithm uses water-column backscatter modeling for deeper submerged topography in turbid water.The report describes slant range calculations and explains how ALPS uses laser range and orientation measurements to project measurement points into the Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system. Parameters used for coordinate transformations in ALPS are described, as are Interactive Data Language-based methods for gridding EAARL point cloud data to derive digital elevation models. Noise reduction in point clouds through use of a random consensus filter is explained, and detailed pseudocode, mathematical equations, and Yorick source code accompany the report.

  12. Algorithms used in the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagle, David B.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS) analyzes Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data—digitized laser-return waveforms, position, and attitude data—to derive point clouds of target surfaces. A full-waveform airborne lidar system, the EAARL seamlessly and simultaneously collects mixed environment data, including submerged, sub-aerial bare earth, and vegetation-covered topographies.ALPS uses three waveform target-detection algorithms to determine target positions within a given waveform: centroid analysis, leading edge detection, and bottom detection using water-column backscatter modeling. The centroid analysis algorithm detects opaque hard surfaces. The leading edge algorithm detects topography beneath vegetation and shallow, submerged topography. The bottom detection algorithm uses water-column backscatter modeling for deeper submerged topography in turbid water.The report describes slant range calculations and explains how ALPS uses laser range and orientation measurements to project measurement points into the Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system. Parameters used for coordinate transformations in ALPS are described, as are Interactive Data Language-based methods for gridding EAARL point cloud data to derive digital elevation models. Noise reduction in point clouds through use of a random consensus filter is explained, and detailed pseudocode, mathematical equations, and Yorick source code accompany the report.

  13. The NASA/MSFC Coherent Lidar Technology Advisory Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) mission was proposed as a low cost technology demonstration mission, using a 2-micron, 100-mJ, 6-Hz, 25-cm, coherent lidar system based on demonstrated technology. SPARCLE was selected in late October 1997 to be NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) second earth-observing (EO-2) mission. To maximize the success probability of SPARCLE, NASA/MSFC desired expert guidance in the areas of coherent laser radar (CLR) theory, CLR wind measurement, fielding of CLR systems, CLR alignment validation, and space lidar experience. This led to the formation of the NASA/MSFC Coherent Lidar Technology Advisory Team (CLTAT) in December 1997. A threefold purpose for the advisory team was identified as: 1) guidance to the SPARCLE mission, 2) advice regarding the roadmap of post-SPARCLE coherent Doppler wind lidar (CDWL) space missions and the desired matching technology development plan 3, and 3) general coherent lidar theory, simulation, hardware, and experiment information exchange. The current membership of the CLTAT is shown. Membership does not result in any NASA or other funding at this time. We envision the business of the CLTAT to be conducted mostly by email, teleconference, and occasional meetings. The three meetings of the CLTAT to date, in Jan. 1998, July 1998, and Jan. 1999, have all been collocated with previously scheduled meetings of the Working Group on Space-Based Lidar Winds. The meetings have been very productive. Topics discussed include the SPARCLE technology validation plan including pre-launch end-to-end testing, the space-based wind mission roadmap beyond SPARCLE and its implications on the resultant technology development, the current values and proposed future advancement in lidar system efficiency, and the difference between using single-mode fiber optical mixing vs. the traditional free space optical mixing.

  14. Tunable, Highly Stable Lasers for Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; EEpagnier, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Practical space-based coherent laser radar systems envisioned for global winds measurement must be very efficient and must contend with unique problems associated with the large platform velocities that the instruments experience in orbit. To compensate for these large platform-induced Doppler shifts in space-based applications, agile-frequency offset-locking of two single-frequency Doppler reference lasers was thoroughly investigated. Such techniques involve actively locking a frequency-agile master oscillator (MO) source to a comparatively static local oscillator (LO) laser, and effectively producing an offset between MO (the lidar slave oscillator seed source, typically) and heterodyne signal receiver LO that lowers the bandwidth of the receiver data-collection system and permits use of very high-quantum-efficiency, reasonably- low-bandwidth heterodyne photoreceiver detectors and circuits. Recent work on MO/LO offset locking has focused on increasing the offset locking range, improving the graded-InGaAs photoreceiver performance, and advancing the maturity of the offset locking electronics. A figure provides a schematic diagram of the offset-locking system.

  15. Vertical Aerosol Backscatter Variability from an Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a continuous wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1 micron wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during 13 - 26 September, 1995 as part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on board the NASA DC8 aircraft. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 25,000 km in the troposphere. Quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents which ranged between approximately 0.1 to 12.0 km altitude. Aerosol haze layers were encountered at different altitudes. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and over ocean were observed. A mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was found with modal value approximately 1O(exp -10)/m/sr, consistent with previous airborne and ground-based datasets.

  16. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) flight mission participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1988-01-01

    From February 1986 to the present, the AOL participated in six interagency flight missions. (1) Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP II) (Department of Energy). The SEEP experiments are designed to assess the assimilative capacity of the Continental Shelf to absorb the energy by-products introduced into the near-shore ocean environment from coastal communities and marine activities such as energy production plants and offshore oil operations. (2) BIOWATT II (Office of Naval Research). The major objective of this study was to provide a better understanding of the relationships between ocean physics, biology, bioluminescence, and optics in oligotrophic portions of the Atlantic Ocean. (3) Fall Experiment (FLEX) (Department of Energy). The FLEX studies were designed to determine the fate of low salinity water in the coastal boundary zone that is advected south towards the Florida coast during autumn. (4) Greenland Sea and Icelandic Marine Biological Experiments (NASA). The investigations were designed to evaluate the distribution of surface layer chlorophyll in the Greeland Sea and in the coastal waters in the vicinity of Iceland. (5) Submerged Oceanic Scattering Layer Experiment (Naval Ocean Systems Center). This flight experiment demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of detecting and metrically measuring the depth to submerged layers of particulate matter in the shelf break region and in the inner coastal zone. (6) Microbial Exchanges and Coupling in Coastal Atlantic Systems (National Science Foundation). This investigation was designed to study the transportation and fate of particulates in coastal waters and in particular the Chesapeake Bay/coastal Atlantic Ocean. Shortly after the conduct of the flight experiments, airborne laser-induced chlorophyll a and phycoerythrin fluorescence data, as well as sea surface temperature and airborne expendable bathythermograph water column temperature profiles are supplied to cooperating institutions.

  17. DAWN Coherent Wind Profiling Lidar Flights on NASA's DC-8 During GRIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Creary, Garfield A.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Trieu, Bo C.; Yu, Jirong

    2011-01-01

    Almost from their invention, lasers have been used to measure the velocity of wind and objects; over distances of cm to 10s of km. Long distance (remote) sensing of wind has been accomplished with continuous-wave (CW), focused pulsed, and collimated pulsed lasers; with direct and coherent (heterodyne) optical detection; and with a multitude of laser wavelengths. Airborne measurement of wind with pulsed, coherent-detection lidar was first performed in 1971 with a CW CO2 laser1, in 1972 with a pulsed CO2 laser2, in 1993 with a pulsed 2-micron laser3, and in 1999 with a pulsed CO2 laser and nadir-centered conical scanning4. Of course there were many other firsts and many other groups doing lidar wind remote sensing with coherent and direct detection. A very large FOM coherent wind lidar has been built by LaRC and flown on a DC-8. However a burn on the telescope secondary mirror prevented the full demonstration of high FOM. Both the GRIP science product and the technology and technique demonstration from aircraft are important to NASA. The technology and technique demonstrations contribute to our readiness for the 3D Winds space mission. The data analysis is beginning and we hope to present results at the conference.

  18. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  19. Coherent Doppler lidar signal spectrum with wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Frehlich, R; Cornman, L

    1999-12-20

    The average signal spectrum (periodogram) for coherent Doppler lidar is calculated for a turbulent wind field. Simple approximations are compared with the exact calculation. The effects of random errors in the zero velocity reference, the effects of averaging spectral estimates by use of multiple lidar pulses, and the effects of the range dependence of the lidar signal power over the range gate are included. For high spatial resolution measurements the lidar signal power is concentrated around one spectral estimate (spectral bin), and correct interpretation of the contribution from turbulence is difficult because of the effects of spectral leakage. For range gates that are larger than the lidar pulse volume, the signal power is contained in many spectral bins and the effects of turbulence can be determined accurately for constant signal power over the range gate and for the far-field range dependence of the signal power.

  20. Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

    2003-01-01

    A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future

  1. A Two Micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-micron coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument measures atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) from a ground platform. It allows the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop. Keywords: Differential Absorption Lidar, Near Infrared Laser,

  2. Simplified signal processing for an airborne CO2 Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwiesow, R. L.; Spowart, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    In the development of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) airborne infrared lidar system (NAILS), we have emphasized a simple, modular design to suit the instrument to its mission of providing measurements of atmospheric structure and dynamics from an aircraft platform. Based on our research to this point, we believe that a significant simplification of the signal processing approach compared to that now used is possible by using high speed digitization of the signal. The purpose here is to place signal processing in the context of the overall system design and to explore the basis of the alternative technique so that the community can comment on the approach.

  3. NASA airborne Doppler lidar program: Data characteristics of 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The first flights of the NASA/Marshall airborne CO2 Doppler lidar wind measuring system were made during the summer of 1981. Successful measurements of two-dimensional flow fields were made to ranges of 15 km from the aircraft track. The characteristics of the data obtained are examined. A study of various artifacts introduced into the data set by incomplete compensation for aircraft dynamics is summarized. Most of these artifacts can be corrected by post processing, which reduces velocity errors in the reconstructed flow field to remarkably low levels.

  4. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  5. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  6. Coherent lidar solution for the HSCT supersonic engine inlet unstart problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Bagley, Harold R.; Soreide, David C.; Bowdle, David A.

    1995-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence environments can adversely affect the operation of both commercial and military supersonic aircraft. Future aircraft designs, such as the High Speed Civil Transport will aim to alleviate the effects of supersonic engine inlet unstart. Fluctuations in air temperature, longitudinal and transverse velocity all can trigger inlet unstarts. With fore- knowledge of the turbulence, a feed-forward control system can be used to re-configure the propulsion systems to avoid unstarts. The same technology can be used to counteract gust effects to improve ride quality and reduce gust loads. A coherent lidar sensor is being developed to demonstrate that the atmospheric turbulence can be measured with sufficient reliability, fidelity, and pre-encounter time for these feed-forward control solutions. The NASA Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-flight Measurements (ACLAIM) program will develop and flight test a sensor on NASA research aircraft, including the SR-71, and investigate the atmospheric environment to establish the feasibility of a lidar sensor. The paper will present an overview of the ACLAIM program including: the scope and content of the program, lidar measurement challenges, atmospheric environment, technology choices, and anticipated problem areas.

  7. Coherent Doppler Lidar Data Products from Space-Based Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1999-01-01

    Coherent Doppler lidar is a promising technique for the global measurements of winds using a space-based platform. Doppler lidar produces estimates of the radial component of the velocity vector averaged over the resolution volume of the measurement. Profiles of the horizontal vector winds are produced by scanning the lidar beam or stepping the lidar beam through a sequence of different angles (step-stare). The first design for space-based measurements proposed a conical scan which requires a high power laser to produce acceptable signal levels for every laser pulse. Performance is improved by fixing the laser beam and accumulating the signal from many lidar pulses for each range-gate. This also improves the spatial averaging of the wind estimates and reduces the threshold signal energy required for a good estimate. Coherent Doppler lidar performance for space-based operation is determined using computer simulations and including the wind variability over the measurement volume as well as the variations of the atmospheric aerosol backscatter.

  8. Validation of CALIPSO Lidar Observations Using Data From the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetler, Chris; Hair, Johnathan; Liu, Zhaoyan; Ferrare, Rich; Harper, David; Cook, Anthony; Vaughan, Mark; Trepte, Chip; Winker, David

    2006-01-01

    This poster focuses on preliminary comparisons of data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft with data acquired by the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). A series of 20 aircraft validation flights was conducted from 14 June through 27 September 2006, under both day and night lighting conditions and a variety of aerosol and cloud conditions. This poster presents comparisons of CALIOP measurements of attenuated backscatter at 532 and 1064 nm and depolarization at 532 nm with near coincident measurements from the Airborne HSRL as a preliminary assessment of CALIOP calibration accuracy. Note that the CALIOP data presented here are the pre-release version. These data have known artifacts in calibration which have been corrected in the December 8 CALIPSO data release which was not available at the time the comparisons were conducted for this poster. The HSRL data are also preliminary. No artifacts are known to exist; however, refinements in calibration and algorithms are likely to be implemented before validation comparisons are made final.

  9. Coherent Lidar Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing and using coherent lidar systems for many years. The current projects at LaRC are the Global Wind Observing Sounder (GWOS) mission preparation, the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) compact, rugged Doppler wind lidar project, the Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project for lunar landing, and the Skywalker project to find and use thermals to extend UAV flight time. These five projects encompass coherent lidar technology development; characterization, validation, and calibration facilities; compact, rugged packaging; computer simulation; trade studies; data acquisition, processing, and display development; system demonstration; and space mission design. This paper will further discuss these activities at LaRC.

  10. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA). In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  11. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Dixit, S. N.; Shore, B. W.; Chambers, D. M.; Britten, J. A.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    LIDAR systems require a light transmitting system for sending a laser light pulse into space and a receiving system for collecting the retro-scattered light, separating it from the outgoing beam and analyzing the received signal for calculating wind velocities. Currently, a shuttle manifested coherent LIDAR experiment called SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) includes a silicon wedge (or prism) in its design in order to deflect the outgoing beam 30 degrees relative to the incident direction. The intent of this paper is to present two optical design approaches that may enable the replacement of the optical wedge component (in future, larger aperture, post-SPARCLE missions) with a surface relief transmission diffraction grating. Such a grating could be etched into a lightweight, flat, fused quartz substrate. The potential advantages of a diffractive beam deflector include reduced weight, reduced power requirements for the driving scanning motor, reduced optical sensitivity to thermal gradients, and increased dynamic stability.

  12. Tunable narrowband semiconductor reference oscillator technology for coherent detection lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, D. M.; Mansour, K.; Menzies, R. T.; Qiu, Y.; Forouhar, S.; Maker, P. D.; Muller, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler lidar approach for acquiring global profilometry of tropospheric winds from Earth orbit is reliant on off-nadir beam scanning geometry for retrieval of vector winds by Doppler analysis of laser radiation backscattered by entrained aerosols and cloud particles.

  13. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Precision Navigation of Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Petway, Larry; Hines, Glenn; Lockhard, George; Barnes, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-based coherent Doppler lidar, utilizing an FMCW technique, has been developed and its capabilities demonstrated through two successful helicopter flight test campaigns. This Doppler lidar is expected to play a critical role in future planetary exploration missions because of its ability in providing the necessary data for soft landing on the planetary bodies and for landing missions requiring precision navigation to the designated location on the ground. Compared with radars, the Doppler lidar can provide significantly higher precision velocity and altitude data at a much higher rate without concerns for measurement ambiguity or target clutter. Future work calls for testing the Doppler lidar onboard a rocket-powered free-flyer platform operating in a closed-loop with the vehicle s guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) unit.

  14. Airborne lidar and radiometric observations of PBL- and low clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Valentin, R.; Pelon, J.

    1992-01-01

    Boundary layer- and low altitude clouds over open ocean and continent areas have been studied during several field campaigns since mid-1990 using the French airborne backscatter lidar LEANDRE in conjunction with on-board IR and visible radiometers. LEANDRE is an automatic system, and a modification of the instrumental parameters, when airborne, is computer controlled through an operator keyboard. The vertical range squared lidar signals and instrument status are displayed in real time on two dedicated monitors. The lidar is used either down- or up-looking while the aircraft is flying above or below clouds. A switching of the viewing configuration takes about a minute. The lidar measurements provide a high resolution description of cloud morphology and holes in cloud layers. The flights were conducted during various meteorological conditions on single or multilayer stratocumulus and cumulus decks. Analysis on a single shot basis of cloud top (or bottom) altitude and a plot of the corresponding histogram allows one to determine a probability density function (PDF). The preliminary results show the PDFs for cloud top are not Gaussian and symmetric about the mean value. The skewness varies with atmospheric conditions. An example of results recorded over the Atlantic ocean near Biarritz is displayed, showing: (1) the range squared lidar signals as a function of time (here 100 s corresponds to about 8 km, 60 shots are averaged on horizontal); the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) - up to 600 m - is observed at the beginning of the leg as well as on surface returns, giving an indication of the porosity; (2) the cloud top altitude variation between 2.4 to 2.8 km during the 150 to 320 s section; and (3) the corresponding PDF. Similar results are obtained on stratocumulus over land. Single shot measurements can be used also to determine an optical porosity at a small scale as well as a fractional cloudiness at a larger scale. A comparison of cloud top altitude retrieved from

  15. Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar Post Data Processing Software DAPS-LV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y. (Inventor); Koch, Grady J. (Inventor); Kavaya, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices of the present invention enable post processing of airborne Doppler wind LIDAR data. In an embodiment, airborne Doppler wind LIDAR data software written in LabVIEW may be provided and may run two versions of different airborne wind profiling algorithms. A first algorithm may be the Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind LIDAR ("APOLO") using airborne wind LIDAR data from two orthogonal directions to estimate wind parameters, and a second algorithm may be a five direction based method using pseudo inverse functions to estimate wind parameters. The various embodiments may enable wind profiles to be compared using different algorithms, may enable wind profile data for long haul color displays to be generated, may display long haul color displays, and/or may enable archiving of data at user-selectable altitudes over a long observation period for data distribution and population.

  16. Analysis of Technology for Solid State Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1997-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable advances have been made in the areas of the diode-pumped, eye-safe, solid state lasers, wide bandwidth, semiconductor detectors operating in the near-infrared region. These advances have created new possibilities for the development of low-cost, reliable, and compact coherent lidar systems for measurements of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscattering from a space-based platform. The work performed by the UAH personnel concentrated on design and analyses of solid state pulsed coherent lidar systems capable of measuring atmospheric winds from space, and design and perform laboratory experiments and measurements in support of solid state laser radar remote sensing systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used by NASA to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. A lidar testbed system was designed and analyzed by considering the major space operational and environmental requirements, and its associated physical constraints. The lidar optical system includes a wedge scanner and the compact telescope designed by the UAH personnel. The other major optical components included in the design and analyses were: polarizing beam splitter, routing mirrors, wave plates, signal beam derotator, and lag angle compensator. The testbed lidar optical train was designed and analyzed, and different design options for mounting and packaging the lidar subsystems and components and support structure were investigated. All the optical components are to be mounted in a stress-free and stable manner to allow easy integration and alignment, and long term stability. This lidar system is also intended to be used for evaluating the performance of various lidar subsystems and components that are to be integrated into a flight unit and for demonstrating the integrity of the signal processing algorithms by performing actual atmospheric measurements from a ground station.

  17. Eyesafe coherent detection wind lidar based on a beam-combined pulsed laser source.

    PubMed

    Lombard, L; Valla, M; Planchat, C; Goular, D; Augère, B; Bourdon, P; Canat, G

    2015-03-15

    We report on a coherent wind lidar built with two coherently-beam-combined fiber amplifiers. The lidar performances of the combined-amplifier and the single-amplifier are compared using two criterions: carrier-to-noise ratio and wind speed noise floor. In both cases, lidar performances are not degraded with a combined source and are close to the theoretical optimum. Combined sources are well suited to improve coherent wind lidar accuracy, range, and integration time.

  18. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement. PMID:25321266

  19. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement.

  20. Comparison of airborne lidar measurements with 420 kHz echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Thorne, Richard E

    2005-09-10

    Airborne lidar has the potential to survey large areas quickly and at a low cost per kilometer along a survey line. For this reason, we investigated the performance of an airborne lidar for surveys of zooplankton. In particular, we compared the lidar returns with echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Data from eight regions of the Sound were compared, and the correlation between the two methods was 0.78. To obtain this level of agreement, a threshold was applied to the lidar return to remove the effects of scattering from phytoplankton. PMID:16161666

  1. The detection and measurement of microburst wind shear by an airborne lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul A.; Bowles, Roland L.; Targ, Russell

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS) employs coherent lidar technology as a basis for a forward-looking predictive wind shear detection system. Line of sight wind velocities measured ahead of the aircraft are combined with aircraft state parameters to relate the measured wind change (or shear) ahead of an aircraft to its performance loss or gain. In this way the system can predict whether a shear detected ahead of the aircraft poses a significant threat to the aircraft and provide an advance warning to the flight crew. Installed aboard NASA's Boeing 737 research aircraft, the CLASS system is flown through convective microburst wind shears in Denver, Co., and Orlando, Fl. Some preliminary flight test results are presented. It is seen that the system was able to detect and measure wind shears ahead of the aircraft in the relatively dry Denver environment, but its performance was degraded in the high humidity and heavy rain in Orlando.

  2. Atmospheric correlation time measurements using coherent CO2 lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, G. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed TEA-CO2 lidar with coherent detection was used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter return signal is important in studies of atmospheric turbulence and its effects on optical propagation and backscatter. If the temporal coherence of the pulse is large enough, then the temporal coherence of the return signal is dominated by the turbulence and shear for a variety of interesting atmospheric conditions. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed and evaluated.

  3. The effects of wavelength on coherent Doppler lidar performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Hitherto, long-range wind-sensing coherent (heterodyne) lidars have utilized CO2 lasers (operating at a 10-micrometer wavelength) since these were the only high-power single-mode (spatial and axial) pulsed sources available. This property ensures temporal coherence over the required spatial resolution, e.g., the pulse length. Recent developments in Nd:YAG lasers makes possible the consideration of a 1.06-micrometer source (Kane et al., 1984). The relative merit of operation at various wavelengths is a function of system parameter, backscattering cross section, signal processing, beam propagation, and practical and eye safety considerations. These factors are discussed in the context of a global wind-sensing coherent lidar.

  4. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Backscatter and Earth Surface Targets By Use of An Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar systems are used to determine wind velocity and to measure aerosol or cloud backscatter variability. Atmospheric aerosols, being affected by local and regional sources, show tremendous variability. Continuous wave (cw) lidar can obtain detailed aerosol loading with unprecedented high resolution (3 sec) and sensitivity (1 mg/cubic meter) as was done during the 1995 NASA Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission over western North America and the Pacific Ocean. Backscatter variability was measured at a 9.1 micron wavelength cw focused CO2 Doppler lidar for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/ms/r, consistent with previous lidar datasets. While these atmospheric measurements were made, the lidar also retrieved a distinct backscatter signal from the Earth's surface from the unfocused part of the focused cw lidar beam during aircraft rolls. Atmospheric backscatter can be highly variable both spatially and temporally, whereas, Earth-surface backscatter is relatively much less variant and can be quite predictable. Therefore, routine atmospheric backscatter measurements by an airborne lidar also give Earth surface backscatter which can allow for investigating the Earth terrain. In the case where the Earth's surface backscatter is coming from a well-known and fairly uniform region, then it can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities during flight. These Earth surface measurements over varying Californian terrain during the mission were compared with laboratory backscatter measurements using the same lidar of various

  5. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-Micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael J.; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2-micron lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250 millijoules in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2-micron Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hours of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meters to 8000 meters. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a

  6. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael; Remus, Ruben

    2015-04-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2 µm lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2 µm lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250-mJ in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hrs of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meter to 8000 meter. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and NOAA airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a triple-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA

  7. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar results. Spring removal experiments, April 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hoge, F.

    1985-06-21

    This document contains the preliminary results from the analysis of data acquired with the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) during the recent Spring Removal Experiment (SPREX). A total of four flights were made with the NASA P-3A aircraft in direct support of the SPREX studies. In addition, a single pass extending from the Sargasso Sea, across the Gulf Stream, and into Savannah was flown as the final leg of the ONR sponsored BIOWATT experiment. The relative distribution of surface temperature and the concentration of chlorophyll and phycoerythrin photopigments across the study area are provided. Also included are along track profiles of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll and phycoerythrin fluorescence emission for each of the individual flight lines. Both the chlorophyll and phycoerythrin laser induced fluorescence signals have been normalized by the water Raman backscatter signal and are each expressed as relative ratio's.

  8. Aerosol classification by airborne high spectral resolution lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, S.; Esselborn, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Wirth, M.; Fix, A.; Petzold, A.

    2013-03-01

    During four aircraft field experiments with the DLR research aircraft Falcon in 1998 (LACE), 2006 (SAMUM-1) and 2008 (SAMUM-2 and EUCAARI), airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and in situ measurements of aerosol microphysical and optical properties were performed. Altogether, the properties of six different aerosol types and aerosol mixtures - Saharan mineral dust, Saharan dust mixtures, Canadian biomass burning aerosol, African biomass burning mixture, anthropogenic pollution aerosol, and marine aerosol have been studied. On the basis of this extensive HSRL data set, we present an aerosol classification scheme which is also capable to identify mixtures of different aerosol types. We calculated mixing lines that allowed us to determine the contributing aerosol types. The aerosol classification scheme was supported by backward trajectory analysis and validated with in-situ measurements. Our results demonstrate that the developed aerosol mask is capable to identify complex stratifications with different aerosol types throughout the atmosphere.

  9. Aerosol classification by airborne high spectral resolution lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, S.; Esselborn, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Wirth, M.; Fix, A.; Petzold, A.

    2012-10-01

    During four aircraft field experiments with the DLR research aircraft Falcon in 1998 (LACE), 2006 (SAMUM-1) and 2008 (SAMUM-2 and EUCAARI), airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and in situ measurements of aerosol microphysical and optical properties were performed. Altogether, the properties of six different aerosol types and aerosol mixtures - Saharan mineral dust, Saharan dust mixtures, Canadian biomass burning aerosol, African biomass burning aerosol, anthropogenic pollution aerosol, and marine aerosol have been studied. On the basis of this extensive HSRL data set, we present an aerosol classification scheme which is also capable to identify mixtures of different aerosol types. We calculated mixing lines that allowed us to determine the contributing aerosol types. The aerosol classification scheme was validated with in-situ measurements and backward trajectory analyses. Our results demonstrate that the developed aerosol mask is capable to identify complex stratifications with different aerosol types throughout the atmosphere.

  10. Airborne compact rotational Raman lidar for temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Decheng; Wang, Zhien; Wechsler, Perry; Mahon, Nick; Deng, Min; Glover, Brent; Burkhart, Matthew; Kuestner, William; Heesen, Ben

    2016-09-01

    We developed an airborne compact rotational Raman lidar (CRL) for use on the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) aircraft to obtain two-dimensional (2D) temperature disman tributions. It obtained fine-scale 2D temperature distributions within 3 km below the aircraft for the first time during the PECAN (Plains Elevated Convection At Night) campaign in 2015. The CRL provided nighttime temperature measurements with a random error of <0.5 K within 800 m below aircraft at 45 m vertical and 1000 m horizontal resolution. The temperatures obtained by the CRL and a radiosonde agreed. Along with water vapor and aerosol measurements, the CRL provides critical parameters on the state of the lower atmosphere for a wide range of atmospheric research. PMID:27607724

  11. a Matlab Geodetic Software for Processing Airborne LIDAR Bathymetry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, M.; Prezioso, G.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to build three-dimensional models through technologies based on satellite navigation systems GNSS and the continuous development of new sensors, as Airborne Laser Scanning Hydrography (ALH), data acquisition methods and 3D multi-resolution representations, have contributed significantly to the digital 3D documentation, mapping, preservation and representation of landscapes and heritage as well as to the growth of research in this fields. However, GNSS systems led to the use of the ellipsoidal height; to transform this height in orthometric is necessary to know a geoid undulation model. The latest and most accurate global geoid undulation model, available worldwide, is EGM2008 which has been publicly released by the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) EGM Development Team. Therefore, given the availability and accuracy of this geoid model, we can use it in geomatics applications that require the conversion of heights. Using this model, to correct the elevation of a point does not coincide with any node must interpolate elevation information of adjacent nodes. The purpose of this paper is produce a Matlab® geodetic software for processing airborne LIDAR bathymetry data. In particular we want to focus on the point clouds in ASPRS LAS format and convert the ellipsoidal height in orthometric. The algorithm, valid on the whole globe and operative for all UTM zones, allows the conversion of ellipsoidal heights using the EGM2008 model. Of this model we analyse the slopes which occur, in some critical areas, between the nodes of the undulations grid; we will focus our attention on the marine areas verifying the impact that the slopes have in the calculation of the orthometric height and, consequently, in the accuracy of the in the 3-D point clouds. This experiment will be carried out by analysing a LAS APRS file containing topographic and bathymetric data collected with LIDAR systems along the coasts of Oregon and Washington (USA).

  12. Solid-state coherent LIDAR technology for space-based wind measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark W.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Henderson, Sammy W.; Gatt, Philip; Huffaker, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed coherent solid-state 2 micron laser radar systems have been developed at Coherent Technologies, Inc. for ground- and airborne-based applications. Ground-based measurements of wind profiles and aerosol backscatter have been performed for several years. Examples of wind and aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements will be presented which cover a variety of weather conditions. Airborne measurements of wind profiles below the aircraft have been performed by Wright Laboratories, operating in a VAD measurement mode and will be reviewed. An engineered flight-worthy coherent lidar system is under development at CTI for flight on the SR-71 aircraft, in support of the High Speed Civil Transport program. Flights will be conducted by NASA-Dryden Flight Research Center at altitudes above 60,000 feet for the measurement of atmospheric turbulence ahead of the aircraft. Efforts are also underway at CTI for the development of high power coherent laser radar systems. Extensive detailed physical optics models of diode-pumped solid-state laser performance have been developed to characterize transient thermo-optic aberrations and the overall efficiency of lasers intended for space-based applications. We are currently developing a 2 micron 0.5 J/pulse transmitter with a 10 Hz PRF and a pulse duration of 400 - 500 ns. The status and expected space-based wind measuring performance for this system will be presented.

  13. Airborne lidar observations of clouds in the Antarctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Bruce M.; Uthe, Edward E.; Viezee, William

    1989-06-01

    In January 1986, SRI International made exploratory airborne observations of Antarctic tropospheric clouds with a downward-viewing lidar onboard an LC-130 supply aircraft. Frequency of observations depended upon the schedule of supply missions. Two types of clouds were observed: relatively opaque, midlevel cloud layers 3.0 to 4.0 km below flight level (about 4.0 to 4.5 km MSL); and higher altitude optically transparent cirrus clouds exhibiting long trails or curtains of ice crystals that extended from flight level downward to the top of the midlevel clouds and, frequently, to ground level. The midlevel clouds were often multilayered and, at times, showed wave or cellular structure associated with cloud streets. The ice crystal trails from the cirrus clouds showed evidence of the presence of strong vertical wind shear, and were observed to “seed” the midlevel cloud layers, producing large breaks in the overcast. These exploratory observations attest to the utility of lidar for atmospheric research studies in the Antarctic region.

  14. Identifying Colluvial Slopes by Airborne LiDAR Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, M.; Marutani, T.; Yoshida, H.

    2015-12-01

    Colluvial slopes are one of major sources of landslides. Identifying the locations of the slopes will help reduce the risk of disasters, by avoiding building infrastructure and properties nearby, or if they are already there, by applying appropriate counter measures before it suddenly moves. In this study, airborne LiDAR data was analyzed to find their geomorphic characteristics to use for extracting their locations. The study site was set in the suburb of Sapporo City, Hokkaido in Japan. The area is underlain by Andesite and Tuff and prone to landslides. Slope angle and surface roughness were calculated from 5 m resolution DEM. These filters were chosen because colluvial materials deposit at around the angle of repose and accumulation of loose materials was considered to form a peculiar surface texture differentiable from other slope types. Field survey conducted together suggested that colluvial slopes could be identified by the filters with a probability of 80 percent. Repeat LiDAR monitoring of the site by an unmanned helicopter indicated that those slopes detected as colluviums appeared to be moving at a slow rate. In comparison with a similar study from the crushed zone in Japan, the range of slope angle indicative of colluviums agreed with the Sapporo site, while the texture was rougher due to larger debris composing the slopes.

  15. Using airborne LIDAR to measure tides and river slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talke, S. A.; Hudson, A.; Chickadel, C. C.; Farquharson, G.; Jessup, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial variability of tides and the tidally-averaged water-level is often poorly resolved in shallow waters, despite its importance in validating models and interpreting dynamics. In this contribution we explore using airborne LIDAR to remotely observe tides and along-river slope in the Columbia River estuary (CRE). Using an airplane equipped with LIDAR, differential GPS, and an infra-red camera, we flew 8 longitudinal transects over a 50km stretch of the CRE over a 14 hour period in June 2013. After correcting for airplane elevation, pitch and roll and median filtering over 1km blocks, a spatially-resolved data set of relative water level was generated. Results show the tide (amplitude 2m) propagating upstream at the expected phase velocity. A sinusoid with 2 periods (12.4 and 24 hours) was next fit to data to produce a smooth tide and extract the mean slope. Comparison with 4 tide gauges indicates first order agreement with measured tides (rms error 0.1m), and confirms that a substantial sub-tidal gradient exists in the CRE. This proof-of-concept experiment indicates that remote sensing of tides in coastal areas is feasible, with possible applications such as improving bathymetric surveys or inferring water depths.

  16. Narrow Line-width, High-energy, 2-micron Laser for Coherent Wind Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U.; Yu, J.

    2 micron solid-state lasers are the primary choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. As wind lidars, they are used for wake vortex and clear air turbulence detection providing air transport safety. In addition, 2 micron lasers are one of the candidates for CO2 detection lidars. The rich CO2 absorption line around 2 micron, combined with the long upper state lifetime, has made Ho based 2 micron lasers a viable candidate for CO2 sensing DIAL instrument. As a transmitter for a coherent wind lidar, this laser has stringent spectral line width and beam quality requirements. The laser architecture is composed of a seed laser, a ring oscillator, and a double pass amplifier. The seed laser is a single longitudinal mode with a line width of 13 KHz. The 100mJ class oscillator is stretched to 3 meters to accommodate the line-width requirement without compromising the range resolution of the instrument. The amplifier is double passed to produce greater than 300mJ energy. This system is hardened for ground as well as airborne applications.

  17. 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar Instrument Advancements for Tropospheric Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Koch, G.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge derived from global tropospheric wind measurement is an important constituent of our overall understanding of climate behavior [1]. Accurate weather prediction saves lives and protects properties from destructions. High-energy 2-micron laser is the transmitter of choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. In addition to the eye-safety, the wavelength of the transmitter suitably matches the aerosol size in the lower troposphere. Although the technology of the 2-micron laser has been maturing steadily, lidar derived wind data is still a void in the global weather database. In the last decade, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been engaged in this endeavor, contributing to the scientific database of 2-micron lidar transmitters. As part of this effort, an in depth analysis of the physics involved in the workings of the Ho: Tm laser systems have been published. In the last few years, we have demonstrated lidar transmitter with over1Joule output energy. In addition, a large body of work has been done in characterizing new laser materials and unique crystal configurations to enhance the efficiency and output energy of the 2-micron laser systems. At present 2-micron lidar systems are measuring wind from both ground and airborne platforms. This paper will provide an overview of the advancements made in recent years and the technology maturity levels attained.

  18. An investigation of cirrus cloud properties using airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, John Edward

    The impact of cirrus clouds on the Earth's radiation budget remains a key uncertainty in assessing global radiative balance and climate change. Composed of ice, and located in the cold upper troposphere, cirrus clouds can cause large warming effects because they are relatively transmissive to short-wave solar radiation, but absorptive of long wave radiation. Our ability to model radiative effects of cirrus clouds is inhibited by uncertainties in cloud optical properties. Studies of mid-latitude cirrus properties have revealed notable differences compared to tropical anvil cirrus, likely a consequence of varying dynamic formation mechanisms. Cloud-aerosol lidars provide critical information about the vertical structure of cirrus for climate studies. For this dissertation, I helped develop the Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (ACATS), a Doppler wind lidar system at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). ACATS is also a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), uniquely capable of directly resolving backscatter and extinction properties of a particle from high-altitude aircraft. The first ACATS science flights were conducted out of Wallops Island, VA in September of 2012 and included coincident measurements with the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument. In this dissertation, I provide an overview of the ACATS method and instrument design, describe the ACATS retrieval algorithms for cloud and aerosol properties, explain the ACATS HSRL retrieval errors due to the instrument calibration, and use the coincident CPL data to validate and evaluate ACATS cloud and aerosol retrievals. Both the ACATS HSRL and standard backscatter retrievals agree well with coincident CPL retrievals. Mean ACATS and CPL extinction profiles for three case studies demonstrate similar structure and agree to within 25 percent for cirrus clouds. The new HSRL retrieval algorithms developed for ACATS have direct application to future spaceborne missions. Furthermore, extinction and particle wind

  19. Analyses of Technology for Solid State Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1997-01-01

    Over past few years, considerable advances have been made in the areas of the diode-pumped, eye-safe, solid state lasers and room temperature, wide bandwidth, semiconductor detectors operating in the near-infrared region. These advances have created new possibilities for the development of reliable and compact coherent lidar systems for a wide range of applications. This research effort is aimed at further developing solid state coherent lidar technology for remote sensing of atmospheric processes such as wind, turbulence and aerosol concentration. The work performed by the UAH personnel under this Delivery Order concentrated on design and analyses of laboratory experiments and measurements, and development of advanced lidar optical subsystems in support of solid state laser radar remote sensing systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. Under this delivery order, a lidar breadboard system was designed and analyzed by considering the major aircraft and space operational requirements. The lidar optical system was analyzed in detail using SYNOPSIS and Code V optical design packages. The lidar optical system include a wedge scanner and the compact telescope designed by the UAH personnel. The other major optical components included in the design and analyses were: polarizing beam splitter, routing mirrors, wave plates, signal beam derotator, and lag angle compensator. This lidar system is to be used for demonstrating all the critical technologies for the development of a reliable and low-cost space-based instrument capable of measuring global wind fields. A number of laboratory experiments and measurements were performed at the NASA/MSFC Detector Characterization Facility, previously developed by the UAH personnel. These laboratory measurements include the characterization of a 2-micron InGaAs detectors suitable for use in coherent lidars and characterization of Holographic Optical Element Scanners. UAH

  20. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  1. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2016-06-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new instrument has been flown in spring of 2014 for a total of ten flights with 27 flight hours. This IPDA lidar provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the results.

  2. Investigation of Space Based Solid State Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the work performed over the period of October 1, 1997 through March 31, 2001. Under this contract, UAH/CAO participated in defining and designing the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) mission, and developed the instrument's optical subsystem. This work was performed in collaborative fashion with NASA/MSFC engineers at both UAH/CAO and NASA/MSFC facilities. Earlier work by the UAH/CAO had produced a preliminary top-level system design for the Shuttle lidar instrument meeting the proposed mission performance requirements and the Space Shuttle Hitchhiker canister volume constraints. The UAH/CAO system design efforts had concentrated on the optical and mechanical designs of the instrument. The instrument electronics were also addressed, and the major electronic components and their interfaces defined. The instrument design concept was mainly based on the state of the transmitter and local oscillator laser development at NASA Langley Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and utilized several lidar-related technologies that were either developed or evaluated by the NASA/MSFC and UAH/CAO scientists. UAH/CAO has developed a comprehensive coherent lidar numerical model capable of analyzing the performance of different instrument and mission concepts. This model uses the instrument configuration, atmospheric conditions and current velocity estimation theory to provide prediction of instrument performance during different phases of operation. This model can also optimize the design parameters of the instrument.

  3. Wind Measurements with High Energy 2 Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce W.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Ji-Rong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar based on an injection seeded Ho:Tm:YLF pulsed laser was developed for wind measurements. A transmitted pulse energy over 75 mJ at 5 Hz repetition rate has been demonstrated. Designs are presented on the laser, injection seeding, receiver, and signal processing subsystems. Sample data of atmospheric measurements are presented including a wind profile extending from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to the free troposphere.

  4. Evaluation of the MV (CAPON) Coherent Doppler Lidar Velocity Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lottman, B.; Frehlich, R.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of the CAPON velocity estimator for coherent Doppler lidar is determined for typical space-based and ground-based parameter regimes. Optimal input parameters for the algorithm were determined for each regime. For weak signals, performance is described by the standard deviation of the good estimates and the fraction of outliers. For strong signals, the fraction of outliers is zero. Numerical effort was also determined.

  5. Understanding Beam Alignment in a Coherent Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Roychoudhari, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam alignment in a coherent lidar (or ladar) receiver system plays a critical role in optimizing its performance. Optical alignment in a coherent lidar system dictates the wavefront curvature (phase front) and Poynting vector) matching of the local oscillator beam with the incoming receiver beam on a detector. However, this alignment is often not easy to achieve and is rarely perfect. Furthermore, optical fibers are being increasingly used in coherent lidar system receivers for transporting radiation to achieve architectural elegance. Single mode fibers also require stringent mode matching for efficient light coupling. The detector response characteristics vary with the misalignment of the two pointing vectors. Misalignment can lead to increase in DC current. Also, a lens in front of the detector may exasperate phase front and Poynting vector mismatch. Non-Interaction of Waves, or the NIW property indicates the light beams do not interfere by themselves in the absence of detecting dipoles. In this paper, we will analyze the extent of misalignment on the detector specifications using pointing vectors of mixing beams in light of the NIW property.

  6. Design and Development of a Scanning Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2005 we began developing an airborne scanning direct detection molecular Doppler lidar. The instrument is being built as part of the Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE), a three year project selected by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office under the Instrument Incubator Program. The TWiLiTE project is a collaboration involving scientists and engineers from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab, Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. The TWiLiTE instrument will leverage significant research and development investments made by NASA Goddard and it's partners in the past several years in key lidar technologies and sub-systems (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. These sub-systems will be integrated into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57. The WB57 flies at an altitude of 18 km and from this vantage point the nadir viewing Doppler lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a future spaceborne tropospheric wind system. In addition to being a technology testbed for space based tropospheric wind lidar, when completed the TWiLiTE high altitude airborne lidar will be used for studying mesoscale dynamics and storm research (e.g. winter storms, hurricanes) and could be used for calibration and validation of satellite based wind systems such as ESA's Aeolus Atmospheric Dynamics Mission. The TWiLiTE Doppler lidar will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 km to the surface with 250 m vertical resolution and < 2mls

  7. a Min-Cut Based Filter for Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ural, Serkan; Shan, Jie

    2016-06-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is a routinely employed technology as a 3-D data collection technique for topographic mapping. Conventional workflows for analyzing LiDAR data require the ground to be determined prior to extracting other features of interest. Filtering the terrain points is one of the fundamental processes to acquire higher-level information from unstructured LiDAR point data. There are many ground-filtering algorithms in literature, spanning several broad categories regarding their strategies. Most of the earlier algorithms examine only the local characteristics of the points or grids, such as the slope, and elevation discontinuities. Since considering only the local properties restricts the filtering performance due to the complexity of the terrain and the features, some recent methods utilize global properties of the terrain as well. This paper presents a new ground filtering method, Min-cut Based Filtering (MBF), which takes both local and global properties of the points into account. MBF considers ground filtering as a labeling task. First, an energy function is designed on a graph, where LiDAR points are considered as the nodes on the graph that are connected to each other as well as to two auxiliary nodes representing ground and off-ground labels. The graph is constructed such that the data costs are assigned to the edges connecting the points to the auxiliary nodes, and the smoothness costs to the edges between points. Data and smoothness terms of the energy function are formulated using point elevations and approximate ground information. The data term conducts the likelihood of the points being ground or off-ground while the smoothness term enforces spatial coherence between neighboring points. The energy function is optimized by finding the minimum-cut on the graph via the alpha-expansion algorithm. The resulting graph-cut provides the labeling of the point cloud as ground and off-ground points. Evaluation of the proposed method on

  8. Low-pass parabolic FFT filter for airborne and satellite lidar signal processing.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhongke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Enhai; Yue, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce random errors of the lidar signal inversion, a low-pass parabolic fast Fourier transform filter (PFFTF) was introduced for noise elimination. A compact airborne Raman lidar system was studied, which applied PFFTF to process lidar signals. Mathematics and simulations of PFFTF along with low pass filters, sliding mean filter (SMF), median filter (MF), empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and wavelet transform (WT) were studied, and the practical engineering value of PFFTF for lidar signal processing has been verified. The method has been tested on real lidar signal from Wyoming Cloud Lidar (WCL). Results show that PFFTF has advantages over the other methods. It keeps the high frequency components well and reduces much of the random noise simultaneously for lidar signal processing. PMID:26473881

  9. Low-pass parabolic FFT filter for airborne and satellite lidar signal processing.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhongke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Enhai; Yue, Yongjian

    2015-10-14

    In order to reduce random errors of the lidar signal inversion, a low-pass parabolic fast Fourier transform filter (PFFTF) was introduced for noise elimination. A compact airborne Raman lidar system was studied, which applied PFFTF to process lidar signals. Mathematics and simulations of PFFTF along with low pass filters, sliding mean filter (SMF), median filter (MF), empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and wavelet transform (WT) were studied, and the practical engineering value of PFFTF for lidar signal processing has been verified. The method has been tested on real lidar signal from Wyoming Cloud Lidar (WCL). Results show that PFFTF has advantages over the other methods. It keeps the high frequency components well and reduces much of the random noise simultaneously for lidar signal processing.

  10. Low-Pass Parabolic FFT Filter for Airborne and Satellite Lidar Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Zhongke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Enhai; Yue, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce random errors of the lidar signal inversion, a low-pass parabolic fast Fourier transform filter (PFFTF) was introduced for noise elimination. A compact airborne Raman lidar system was studied, which applied PFFTF to process lidar signals. Mathematics and simulations of PFFTF along with low pass filters, sliding mean filter (SMF), median filter (MF), empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and wavelet transform (WT) were studied, and the practical engineering value of PFFTF for lidar signal processing has been verified. The method has been tested on real lidar signal from Wyoming Cloud Lidar (WCL). Results show that PFFTF has advantages over the other methods. It keeps the high frequency components well and reduces much of the random noise simultaneously for lidar signal processing. PMID:26473881

  11. Subtropical Forest Biomass Estimation Using Airborne LiDAR and Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yong; Li, Zengyuan

    2016-06-01

    Forests have complex vertical structure and spatial mosaic pattern. Subtropical forest ecosystem consists of vast vegetation species and these species are always in a dynamic succession stages. It is very challenging to characterize the complexity of subtropical forest ecosystem. In this paper, CAF's (The Chinese Academy of Forestry) LiCHy (LiDAR, CCD and Hyperspectral) Airborne Observation System was used to collect waveform Lidar and hyperspectral data in Puer forest region, Yunnan province in the Southwest of China. The study site contains typical subtropical species of coniferous forest, evergreen broadleaf forest, and some other mixed forests. The hypersectral images were orthorectified and corrected into surface reflectance with support of Lidar DTM product. The fusion of Lidar and hyperspectral can classify dominate forest types. The lidar metrics improved the classification accuracy. Then forest biomass estimation was carried out for each dominate forest types using waveform Lidar data, which get improved than single Lidar data source.

  12. Flight Tests of the DELICAT Airborne LIDAR System for Remote Clear Air Turbulence Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrancken, Patrick; Wirth, Martin; Ehret, Gerhard; Witschas, Benjamin; Veerman, Henk; Tump, Robert; Barny, Hervé; Rondeau, Philippe; Dolfi-Bouteyre, Agnès; Lombard, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    An important aeronautics application of lidar is the airborne remote detection of Clear Air Turbulence which cannot be performed with onboard radar. We report on a DLR-developed lidar system for the remote detection of such turbulent areas in the flight path of an aircraft. The lidar, consisting of a high-power UV laser transmitter and a direct detection system, was installed on a Dutch research aircraft. Flight tests executed in 2013 demonstrated the performance of the lidar system to detect local subtle variations in the molecular backscatter coefficient indicating the turbulence some 10 to 15 km ahead.

  13. Quantification of L-band InSAR decorrelation in volcanic terrains using airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedze, M.; Heggy, E.; Jacquemoud, S.; Bretar, F.

    2011-12-01

    Repeat-pass InSAR LOS measurements of the Piton de La Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France) suffer from substantial phase decorrelation due to the occurrence of vegetation and ash deposits on the caldera and slopes of the edifice. To correct this deficiency, we combine normalized airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) intensity data with spaceborne InSAR coherence images from ALOS PALSAR L-band acquired over the volcano in 2008 and 2009, following the 2007 major eruption. The fusion of the two data sets improves the calculation of coherence and the textural classification of different volcanic surfaces. For future missions considering both InSAR and/or LiDAR such as DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice), such data fusion studies can provide a better analysis of the spatiotemporal variations in InSAR coherence in order to enhance the monitoring of pre-eruptive ground displacements. The airborne surveys conducted in 2008 and 2009, cover different types of vegetation and terrain roughness on the central and western parts of the volcano. The topographic data are first processed to generate a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) of the volcanic edifice with elevation accuracy better than 1 m. For our purposes, the phase variations caused by the surface relief can be eliminated using the LiDAR-derived DTM. Then normalized LiDAR intensities are correlated to the L-band polarimetric coherence for different zones of the volcano to assess the LiDAR-InSAR statistical behavior of different lava flows, pyroclastics, and vegetated surfaces. Results suggest that each volcanic terrain type is characterized by a unique LiDAR-InSAR histogram pattern. We identified four LiDAR-InSAR distinguished relations: (1) pahoehoe lava flow surfaces show an agglomerate histogram pattern which may be explained by low surface scattering and low wave penetration into the geological medium; (2) eroded a'a lava surfaces is characterized by high standard deviation

  14. Relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudimetla, V. S. Rao

    1996-01-01

    An effort was initiated last year in the Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to examine and incorporate, if necessary, the effects of relativity in the design of space-based lidar systems. A space-based lidar system, named AEOLUS, is under development at Marshall Space Flight Center and it will be used to accurately measure atmospheric wind profiles. Effects of relativity were also observed in the performance of space-based systems, for example in case of global positioning systems, and corrections were incorporated into the design of instruments. During the last summer, the effects of special relativity on the design of space-based lidar systems were studied in detail, by analyzing the problem of laser scattering off a fixed target when the source and a co-located receiver are moving on a spacecraft. Since the proposed lidar system uses a coherent detection system, errors even in the order of a few microradians must be corrected to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio. Previous analysis assumed that the ground is flat and the spacecraft is moving parallel to the ground, and developed analytical expressions for the location, direction and Doppler shift of the returning radiation. Because of the assumptions used in that analysis, only special relativity effects were involved. In this report, that analysis is extended to include general relativity and calculate its effects on the design.

  15. Next-Generation NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System.

    PubMed

    Wright, C W; Hoge, F E; Swift, R N; Yungel, J K; Schirtzinger, C R

    2001-01-20

    The complete design and flight test of the next-generation Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL-3) is detailed. The application of new technology has allowed major reductions in weight, volume, and power requirements compared with the earlier AOL sensor. Subsystem designs for the new AOL sensor include new technology in fiber optics, spectrometer detector optical train, miniature photomultiplier modules, dual-laser wavelength excitation from a single small laser source, and new receiver optical configuration. The new design reduced telescope size and maintained the same principal fluorescence and water Raman bands but essentially retained a comparable measurement accuracy. A major advancement is the implementation of single-laser simultaneous excitation of two physically separate oceanic target areas: one stimulated by 532 nm and the other by 355 nm. Backscattered fluorescence and Raman signals from both targets are acquired simultaneously by use of the same telescope and spectrometer-detector system. Two digital oscilloscopes provide temporal- and depth-resolved data from each of seven spectral emission bands.

  16. An evaluation of PBL parameterizations utilizing compact airborne raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, Rebecca

    The water vapor structure within and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays an essential role in many weather and climate phenomena including the water vapor feedback, thunderstorm formation and maintenance, and precipitation amounts. As a result, the accurate modeling of the PBL and its water vapor structure is critical for accurate climate and weather predictions. The University of Wyoming Compact Airborne Raman Lidar (CARL) is an ideal instrument with which to conduct model evaluation studies because of its ability to measure the fine scale water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) on a mobile platform. A PBL scheme comparison and sensitivity study was conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and CARL data from two days in June 2010. The three PBL schemes used were the Mellor, Yamada, Janjic (MYJ) scheme, Yonsei University (YSU) scheme, and the Asymmetric Convective Model Version 2 (ACM2) scheme. The analysis revealed that the MYJ scheme performed best on modeling the magnitude of WVMR in the PBL but that the ACM2 and YSU schemes modeled the vertical structure better. Sensitivity studies modifying the assumptions made to determine the PBL top, k-diffusivity profiles, and surface heat fluxes were conducted. The magnitude of WVMR was improved within the YSU and ACM2 schemes by modifying the vertical diffusivity as well as in the YSU scheme by decreasing the surface sensible heat flux. The convective storms, which formed in each case, were also studied, and results show that runs with higher magnitudes of WVMR modeled these storms more accurately.

  17. Development of a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar for Range Resolved Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulgueta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo. C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffery J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-m coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument will measure atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) initially from a ground platform, and then be prepared for aircraft installation to measure the atmospheric CO2 column densities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere. The airborne prototype CO2 lidar can measure atmospheric CO2 column density in a range bin of 1km with better than 1.5% precision at horizontal resolution of less than 50km. It can provide the image of the pooling of CO2 in lowlying areas and performs nighttime mass balance measurements at landscape scale. This sensor is unique in its capability to study the vertical ABL-free troposphere exchange of CO2 directly. It will allow the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop.

  18. Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) Data Processing Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Brock, John C.; Nagle, David

    2009-01-01

    The Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) is an example of a Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) system that utilizes a blue-green wavelength (532 nanometers) to determine the distance to an object. The distance is determined by recording the travel time of a transmitted pulse at the speed of light (fig. 1). This system uses raster laser scanning with full-waveform (multi-peak) resolving capabilities to measure submerged topography and adjacent coastal land elevations simultaneously (Nayegandhi and others, 2009). This document reviews procedures for the post-processing of EAARL data using the custom-built Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS). ALPS software was developed in an open-source programming environment operated on a Linux platform. It has the ability to combine the laser return backscatter digitized at 1-nanosecond intervals with aircraft positioning information. This solution enables the exploration and processing of the EAARL data in an interactive or batch mode. ALPS also includes modules for the creation of bare earth, canopy-top, and submerged topography Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). The EAARL system uses an Earth-centered coordinate and reference system that removes the necessity to reference submerged topography data relative to water level or tide gages (Nayegandhi and others, 2006). The EAARL system can be mounted in an array of small twin-engine aircraft that operate at 300 meters above ground level (AGL) at a speed of 60 meters per second (117 knots). While other systems strive to maximize operational depth limits, EAARL has a narrow transmit beam and receiver field of view (1.5 to 2 milliradians), which improves the depth-measurement accuracy in shallow, clear water but limits the maximum depth to about 1.5 Secchi disk depth (~20 meters) in clear water. The laser transmitter [Continuum EPO-5000 yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG)] produces up to 5,000 short-duration (1.2 nanosecond), low-power (70 microjoules) pulses each second

  19. The Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE): An Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Instrument Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Global measurement of tropospheric winds is a key measurement for understanding atmospheric dynamics and improving numerical weather prediction. Global wind profiles remain a high priority for the operational weather community and also for a variety of research applications including studies of the global hydrologic cycle and transport studies of aerosols and trace species. In addition to space based winds, a high altitude airborne system flown on UAV or other advanced platforms would be of great interest for studying mesoscale dynamics and hurricanes. The Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE) project was selected in 2005 by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office as part of the Instrument Incubator Program. TWiLiTE will leverage significant research and development investments in key technologies made in the past several years. The primary focus will be on integrating these sub-systems into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57, so that the nadir viewing lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. TWiLiTE is a collaboration involving scientists and technologists from NASA Goddard, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab and industry partners Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. NASA Goddard and it's partners have been at the forefront in the development of key lidar technologies (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a fixture spaceborne tropospheric wind system. The completed system will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 h to the surface with 250 m vertical

  20. Modern fibre-optic coherent lidars for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Chris

    2015-10-01

    This paper surveys some growth areas in optical sensing that exploit near-IR coherent laser sources and fibreoptic hardware from the telecoms industry. Advances in component availability and performance are promising benefits in several military and commercial applications. Previous work has emphasised Doppler wind speed measurements and wind / turbulence profiling for air safety, with recent sharp increases in numbers of lidar units sold and installed, and with wider recognition that different lidar / radar wavebands can and should complement each other. These advances are also enabling fields such as microDoppler measurement of sub-wavelength vibrations and acoustic waves, including non-lineof- sight acoustic sensing in challenging environments. To shed light on these different applications we review some fundamentals of coherent detection, measurement probe volume, and parameter estimation - starting with familiar similarities and differences between "radar" and "laser radar". The consequences of changing the operating wavelength by three or four orders of magnitude - from millimetric or centimetric radar to a typical fibre-optic lidar working near 1.5 μm - need regular review, partly because of continuing advances in telecoms technology and computing. Modern fibre-optic lidars tend to be less complicated, more reliable, and cheaper than their predecessors; and they more closely obey the textbook principles of easily adjusted and aligned Gaussian beams. The behaviours of noises and signals, and the appropriate processing strategies, are as expected different for the different wavelengths and applications. For example, the effective probe volumes are easily varied (e.g. by translating a fibre facet) through six or eight orders of magnitude; as the average number of contributing scatterers varies, from <<1 through ~1 to >>1, we should review any assumptions about "many" scatterers and Gaussian statistics. Finally, some much older but still relevant scientific

  1. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-07-10

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with an integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.

  2. Aerosol/Cloud Measurements Using Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Boquet, Matthieu; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Sauvage, Laurent; Parmentier, Rémy

    2016-06-01

    The accurate localization and characterization of aerosol and cloud layers is crucial for climate studies (aerosol indirect effect), meteorology (Planetary Boundary Layer PBL height), site monitoring (industrial emissions, mining,…) and natural hazards (thunderstorms, volcanic eruptions). LEOSPHERE has recently developed aerosol/cloud detection and characterization on WINDCUBE long range Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars (CWDL). These new features combine wind and backscatter intensity informations (Carrier-to-Noise Ratio CNR) in order to detect (aerosol/cloud base and top, PBL height) and to characterize atmospheric structures (attenuated backscatter, depolarization ratio). For each aerosol/cloud functionality the method is described, limitations are discussed and examples are given to illustrate the performances.

  3. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  4. Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Terje; Næsset, Erik; Ohlson, Mikael; Bolstad, Paul V.; Kolka, Randall

    2015-01-01

    A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C. PMID:26426532

  5. Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Terje; Næsset, Erik; Ohlson, Mikael; Bolstad, Paul V; Kolka, Randall

    2015-01-01

    A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C.

  6. Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Terje; Næsset, Erik; Ohlson, Mikael; Bolstad, Paul V; Kolka, Randall

    2015-01-01

    A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C. PMID:26426532

  7. Radiometric Calibration of an Airborne CO2 Pulsed Doppler Lidar Using a Natural Earth Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, Dean R.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Tratt, David M.; Srivastava, Vandana; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar has been accomplished using surface retro-reflection signals from the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico, USA. Two circular passes were made at altitudes of 6.26 and 9.26 km. The computed calibration factors for both altitudes are in excellent agreement with the value derived from standard ground-based measurements involving a fixed sandpaper target of known reflectance. This finding corroborates a previous study that successfully calibrated an airborne continuous-wave Doppler lidar using a variety of natural Earth surfaces. The present results indicate that relatively uniform Earth-surface targets can be used for in-flight calibration of pulsed airborne, and, in principal, spaceborne lidars.

  8. Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar with a natural earth surface.

    PubMed

    Cutten, Dean R; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A; Hardesty, R Michael; Howell, James N; Tratt, David M; Srivastava, Vandana

    2002-06-20

    Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar has been accomplished with surface retroreflection signals from the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. Two circular passes were made at altitudes of 6.3 and 9.3 km. The computed calibration factors for both altitudes are in excellent agreement with the value derived from standard ground-based measurements involving a fixed sandpaper target of known reflectance. This finding corroborates a previous study that successfully calibrated an airborne cw Doppler lidar with a variety of natural Earth surfaces. The present results indicate that relatively uniform Earth surface targets can be used for in-flight calibration of CO2 pulsed airborne and, in principal, other infrared lidars.

  9. Airborne lidar measurements of pollution transport in central and southern California during CalNEX 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J., II; Hardesty, R.; Langford, A. O.; Banta, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Davies, F.; Sandberg, S.; Marchbanks, R.; Weickmann, A.

    2010-12-01

    During the CalNEX experiment from May through July 2010, we co-deployed NOAA’s airborne ozone and aerosol lidar TOPAZ and the University of Leeds scanning Doppler wind lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. We flew a total of 46 missions over central and southern California, focusing primarily on the Los Angeles Basin and Sacramento areas. The downward-looking lidars provided highly resolved measurements of ozone concentration, aerosol backscatter, and wind speed and direction in the boundary layer and lower free troposphere. We will use the airborne lidar data to characterize transport of ozone and aerosols on regional and local scales. In particular, we will focus on pollutant transport between air basins and the role of flow patterns in complex terrain, such as gap flows and orographic lifting and venting along mountain slopes, on pollutant distribution.

  10. Frequency-resolved coherent lidar using a femtosecond fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Swann, W C; Newbury, N R

    2006-03-15

    We demonstrate a coherent lidar that uses a broadband femtosecond fiber laser as a source and resolves the returning heterodyne signal into N spectral channels by using an arrayed-waveguide grating. The data are processed incoherently to yield an N-times improvement in the Doppler measurement of a surface vibration. For N=6, we achieve a sensitivity of 153 Hz, corresponding to a 0.12 mm/s motion, in 10 ms despite a signal that is speckle broadened to 14 kHz. Alternatively, the data are processed coherently to form a range image. For a flat target, we achieve a 60 microm range resolution, limited mainly by the source bandwidth, despite the dispersion of 1 km of optical fiber in the signal path.

  11. The Novel Nonlinear Adaptive Doppler Shift Estimation Technique and the Coherent Doppler Lidar System Validation Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The signal processing aspect of a 2-m wavelength coherent Doppler lidar system under development at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia is investigated in this paper. The lidar system is named VALIDAR (validation lidar) and its signal processing program estimates and displays various wind parameters in real-time as data acquisition occurs. The goal is to improve the quality of the current estimates such as power, Doppler shift, wind speed, and wind direction, especially in low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) regime. A novel Nonlinear Adaptive Doppler Shift Estimation Technique (NADSET) is developed on such behalf and its performance is analyzed using the wind data acquired over a long period of time by VALIDAR. The quality of Doppler shift and power estimations by conventional Fourier-transform-based spectrum estimation methods deteriorates rapidly as SNR decreases. NADSET compensates such deterioration in the quality of wind parameter estimates by adaptively utilizing the statistics of Doppler shift estimate in a strong SNR range and identifying sporadic range bins where good Doppler shift estimates are found. The authenticity of NADSET is established by comparing the trend of wind parameters with and without NADSET applied to the long-period lidar return data.

  12. Remote wind sensing with a CW diode laser lidar beyond the coherence regime.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi; Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-08-15

    We experimentally demonstrate for the first time (to our knowledge) a coherent CW lidar system capable of wind speed measurement at a probing distance beyond the coherence regime of the light source. A side-by-side wind measurement was conducted on the field using two lidar systems with identical optical designs but different laser linewidths. While one system was operating within the coherence regime, the other was measuring at least 2.4 times the coherence range. The probing distance of both lidars is 85 m and the radial wind speed correlation was measured to be r2=0.965 between the two lidars at a sampling rate of 2 Hz. Based on our experimental results, we describe a practical guideline for designing a wind lidar operating beyond the coherence regime. PMID:25121897

  13. A New Airborne Lidar for Remote Sensing of Canopy Fluorescence and Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ounis, A.; Bach, J.; Mahjoub, A.; Daumard, F.; Moya, I.; Goulas, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of a new lidar system for airborne remote sensing of chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vertical profile of canopies. By combining laserinduced fluorescence (LIF), sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) and canopy height distribution, the new instrument will low the simultaneous assessment of gross primary production (GPP), photosynthesis efficiency and above ground carbon stocks. Technical issues of the lidar development are discussed and expected performances are presented.

  14. On the impact of a refined stochastic model for airborne LiDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Glennie, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Accurate topographic information is critical for a number of applications in science and engineering. In recent years, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has become a standard tool for acquiring high quality topographic information. The assessment of airborne LiDAR derived DEMs is typically based on (i) independent ground control points and (ii) forward error propagation utilizing the LiDAR geo-referencing equation. The latter approach is dependent on the stochastic model information of the LiDAR observation components. In this paper, the well-known statistical tool of variance component estimation (VCE) is implemented for a dataset in Houston, Texas, in order to refine the initial stochastic information. Simulations demonstrate the impact of stochastic-model refinement for two practical applications, namely coastal inundation mapping and surface displacement estimation. Results highlight scenarios where erroneous stochastic information is detrimental. Furthermore, the refined stochastic information provides insights on the effect of each LiDAR measurement in the airborne LiDAR error budget. The latter is important for targeting future advancements in order to improve point cloud accuracy.

  15. Terrestrial and Airborne LIDAR: Comparison of Coincident Datasets for Measuring Ground Deformation and Topographic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R. E.; Stewart, J. P.; Lembo, A. J.; Hu, J.; Davis, C. A.; Hogue, T.; Collins, B. D.; Minasian, D.; Louis-Kayen, N. M.; O'Rourke, T. D.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results from a controlled study on the use of pulse-based terrestrial lidar and phase-based airborne lidar to detect topographic change and ground deformation in areas of earthquake- and storm- induced landslides. Terrestrial and airborne lidar scans were performed at three sites in Los Angeles County and their accuracy was gauged using coincident total station survey measurements as the control. The study was supported by the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). Horizontal accuracy was evaluated through the measurement of Northing and Easting residuals, standardized to WGS84. Assessment of accuracy was made on lengths and heights of well-defined objects in the lidar scans, such as LADWP buildings and water tanks. The bias and dispersion of lidar height measurements, standardized to NGVD88, were assessed at the Mulholland Tank adjacent to Hollywood Reservoir, the Owens Aqueduct Penstock at Power Plant 2 (PP2) in San Francisquito Canyon, and a flat un-vegetated site near the Los Angeles Reservoir before and after carefully measured trenching. At the vegetated slopes near PP2 and the Hollywood Reservoir site, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and a standard deviation of approximately 50 cm, whereas terrestrial lidar demonstrated large bias and dispersion (on order of meters) due to the inability of ground-based lidar to penetrate heavy vegetation. Both systems were able to assess heights and lengths on unobstructed man made structures at the sub-decimeter scale. At the trench site, airborne lidar showed decimeter scale bias of -23.6 cm for flat ground to -8.7 cm for trenched ground, and dispersion of 5.6 for flat ground to 20 cm for trenched ground. Terrestrial lidar was nearly unbiased (~0 cm for flat or trenched ground) and with very low dispersion of 4.1 and 6.5 cm for flat and trenched ground, respectively

  16. Processing of airborne lidar bathymetry data for detailed sea floor mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulldahl, H. Michael

    2014-10-01

    Airborne bathymetric lidar has proven to be a valuable sensor for rapid and accurate sounding of shallow water areas. With advanced processing of the lidar data, detailed mapping of the sea floor with various objects and vegetation is possible. This mapping capability has a wide range of applications including detection of mine-like objects, mapping marine natural resources, and fish spawning areas, as well as supporting the fulfillment of national and international environmental monitoring directives. Although data sets collected by subsea systems give a high degree of credibility they can benefit from a combination with lidar for surveying and monitoring larger areas. With lidar-based sea floor maps containing information of substrate and attached vegetation, the field investigations become more efficient. Field data collection can be directed into selected areas and even focused to identification of specific targets detected in the lidar map. The purpose of this work is to describe the performance for detection and classification of sea floor objects and vegetation, for the lidar seeing through the water column. With both experimental and simulated data we examine the lidar signal characteristics depending on bottom depth, substrate type, and vegetation. The experimental evaluation is based on lidar data from field documented sites, where field data were taken from underwater video recordings. To be able to accurately extract the information from the received lidar signal, it is necessary to account for the air-water interface and the water medium. The information content is hidden in the lidar depth data, also referred to as point data, and also in the shape of the received lidar waveform. The returned lidar signal is affected by environmental factors such as bottom depth and water turbidity, as well as lidar system factors such as laser beam footprint size and sounding density.

  17. Airborne/Space-Based Doppler Lidar Wind Sounders Sampling the PBL and Other Regions of Significant Beta and U Inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, Dave

    1998-01-01

    This final report covers the period from April 1994 through March 1998. The proposed research was organized under four main tasks. Those tasks were: (1) Investigate the vertical and horizontal velocity structures within and adjacent to thin and subvisual cirrus; (2) Investigate the lowest 1 km of the PBL and develop algorithms for processing pulsed Doppler lidar data obtained from single shots into regions of significant inhomogeneities in Beta and U; (3) Participate in OSSEs including those designed to establish shot density requirements for meso-gamma scale phenomena with quasi-persistent locations (e.g., jets, leewaves, tropical storms); and (4) Participate in the planning and execution of an airborne mission to measure winds with a pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar. Over the four year period of this research contract, work on all four tasks has yielded significant results which have led to 38 professional presentations (conferences and publications) and have been folded into the science justification for an approved NASA space mission, SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment), in 2001. Also this research has, through Task 4, led to a funded proposal to work directly on a NASA field campaign, CAMEX III, in which an airborne Doppler wind lidar will be used to investigate the cloud-free circulations near tropical storms. Monthly progress reports required under this contract are on file. This final report will highlight major accomplishments, including some that were not foreseen in the original proposal. The presentation of this final report includes this written document as well as material that is better presented via the internet (web pages). There is heavy reference to appended papers and documents. Thus, the main body of the report will serve to summarize the key efforts and findings.

  18. 3DLASE-M: three-dimensional lidar airborne system emulator, maritime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeert, Michael J.

    2014-05-01

    Imaging flash LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) is an effective method for airborne searches of the ocean surface and subsurface volume. The performance of ocean LIDAR depends strongly on the sea surface (e.g., waves, whitecaps, and flotsam), water turbidity, and the characteristics of the objects of interest. Cost-effective design of the LIDAR system and processing algorithms requires a modeling capability that can deal with the physics of light propagation through the air-water interface, into the ocean, and back to the LIDAR receiver. 3DLASE-M is a physics-based LIDAR simulator that yields high-fidelity images for three-dimensional algorithm development and performance predictions.

  19. 3DLASE-M: three-dimensional-LIDAR airborne system emulator -maritime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeert, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Imaging flash LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) is an effective method for airborne searches of the ocean surface and subsurface volume. The performance of ocean LIDAR depends strongly on the sea surface (e.g., waves, whitecaps, and flotsam), water turbidity, and the characteristics of the objects of interest. Cost-effective design of the LIDAR system and processing algorithms requires a modeling capability that can deal with the physics of light propagation through the air-water interface, into the ocean, and back to the LIDAR receiver. 3DLASE-M is a physics-based LIDAR simulator that yields high-fidelity images for three-dimensional algorithm development and performance predictions.

  20. Statistical correction of lidar-derived digital elevation models with multispectral airborne imagery in tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buffington, Kevin J.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Thorne, Karen M.; Takekawa, John

    2016-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) is a valuable tool for collecting large amounts of elevation data across large areas; however, the limited ability to penetrate dense vegetation with lidar hinders its usefulness for measuring tidal marsh platforms. Methods to correct lidar elevation data are available, but a reliable method that requires limited field work and maintains spatial resolution is lacking. We present a novel method, the Lidar Elevation Adjustment with NDVI (LEAN), to correct lidar digital elevation models (DEMs) with vegetation indices from readily available multispectral airborne imagery (NAIP) and RTK-GPS surveys. Using 17 study sites along the Pacific coast of the U.S., we achieved an average root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.072 m, with a 40–75% improvement in accuracy from the lidar bare earth DEM. Results from our method compared favorably with results from three other methods (minimum-bin gridding, mean error correction, and vegetation correction factors), and a power analysis applying our extensive RTK-GPS dataset showed that on average 118 points were necessary to calibrate a site-specific correction model for tidal marshes along the Pacific coast. By using available imagery and with minimal field surveys, we showed that lidar-derived DEMs can be adjusted for greater accuracy while maintaining high (1 m) resolution.

  1. Use of airborne and terrestrial lidar to detect ground displacement hazards to water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, J.P.; Hu, Jiawen; Kayen, R.E.; Lembo, A.J.; Collins, B.D.; Davis, C.A.; O'Rourke, T. D.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the use of multiepoch airborne and terrestrial lidar to detect and measure ground displacements of sufficient magnitude to damage buried pipelines and other water system facilities that might result, for example, from earthquake or rainfall-induced landslides. Lidar scans are performed at three sites with coincident measurements by total station surveying. Relative horizontal accuracy is evaluated by measurements of lateral dimensions of well defined objects such as buildings and tanks; we find misfits ranging from approximately 5 to 12 cm, which is consistent with previous work. The bias and dispersion of lidar elevation measurements, relative to total station surveying, is assessed at two sites: (1) a power plant site (PP2) with vegetated steeply sloping terrain; and (2) a relatively flat and unvegetated site before and after trenching operations were performed. At PP2, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and a standard deviation of approximately 70 cm, whereas terrestrial lidar did not produce useful results due to beam divergence issues and inadequate sampling of the study region. At the trench site, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and reduced standard deviation relative to PP2 (6-20 cm), whereas terrestrial lidar was nearly unbiased with very low dispersion (4-6 cm). Pre- and posttrench bias-adjusted normalized residuals showed minimal to negligible correlation, but elevation change was affected by relative bias between epochs. The mean of elevation change bias essentially matches the difference in means of pre- and posttrench elevation bias, whereas elevation change standard deviation is sensitive to the dispersion of individual epoch elevations and their correlation coefficient. The observed lidar bias and standard deviations enable reliable detection of damaging ground displacements for some pipelines types (e.g., welded steel) but not all (e.g., concrete with unwelded, mortared joints). ?? ASCE 2009.

  2. Parameter Trade Studies For Coherent Lidar Wind Measurements of Wind from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2007-01-01

    The design of an orbiting wind profiling lidar requires selection of dozens of lidar, measurement scenario, and mission geometry parameters; in addition to prediction of atmospheric parameters. Typical mission designs do not include a thorough trade optimization of all of these parameters. We report here the integration of a recently published parameterization of coherent lidar wind velocity measurement performance with an orbiting coherent wind lidar computer simulation; and the use of these combined tools to perform some preliminary parameter trades. We use the 2006 NASA Global Wind Observing Sounder mission design as the starting point for the trades.

  3. An Operational Wake Vortex Sensor Using Pulsed Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ben C., Jr.; Koch, Grady J.; Nguyen, D. Chi

    1998-01-01

    more recently, including a system developed by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory. This lidar has been used for detailed measurements of wake vortex velocities in support of wake vortex model validation. The first measurements of wake vortices using a pulsed, lidar were made by Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) using a 2 micron solid-state, flashlamp-pumped system operating at 5 Hz. This system was first deployed at Denver's Stapleton Airport. Pulsed lidar has been selected as the baseline technology for an operational sensor due to its longer range capability.

  4. SPARCLE: Validation of Observing System Simulations (SPace Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, G. D.; Miller, Timothy L.

    1998-01-01

    NASA recently approved a mission to fly a Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) on a U.S. Space Shuttle. SPARCLE, managed by Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, is targeted for launch in March 2001. This mission is viewed as a necessary demonstration of a solid state (2 micron) lidar using coherent detection before committing resources to a 3-5 year research or operational mission. While, to many, this shuttle mission is seen as the first step in a series leading to a fully operational wind observing system, to others, it is a chance to validate predictions of performance based upon theoretical models, analyses of airborne and ground-based data, and sophisticated observing system simulation experiments. This paper will be presented in two parts: first a brief overview of the SPARCLE mission and second, a summary of current performance predictions and key contributions from ground- based and airborne DWL research. The SPARCLE instrument is a 100 mJ, 6 Hz, diode-pumped 2-micron laser with a .25 m telescope using heterodyne mixing in a fiber and an InGaAs detector. A 25 cm silicon wedge scanner will be used in step-stare modes with dwells ranging from 60 seconds to .5 seconds. Pointing knowledge is achieved with a dedicated GPS/INS mounted close to the lidar. NASA's Hitchhiker program is providing the instrument enclosures (2 cans) and mission logistics support. An on-board data system is sized to record 150 Gbytes of raw signal from a two 400 MHZ A/D converters. On-board signal processing will be used to control the frequency of the Local Oscillator. SPARCLE is predicted to have a single shot backscatter sensitivity near 1x10(exp -6) m-1 sr-1, To achieve higher sensitivity, shot accumulation will be employed. Ground-based, 2 micron DWLs have been used to assess the benefits of shot accumulation (approximately SQRT for SNR). Airborne programs like MACAWS have provided good datasets for evaluating various sampling strategies and signal processing algorithms. Using these

  5. Detection of fault structures with airborne LiDAR point-cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Du, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is a new type of aerial earth observation method which can be used to produce high-precision DEM (Digital Elevation Model) quickly and reflect ground surface information directly. Fault structure is one of the key forms of crustal movement, and its quantitative description is the key to the research of crustal movement. The airborne LiDAR point-cloud data is used to detect and extract fault structures automatically based on linear extension, elevation mutation and slope abnormal characteristics. Firstly, the LiDAR point-cloud data is processed to filter out buildings, vegetation and other non-surface information with the TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) filtering method and Burman model calibration method. TIN and DEM are made from the processed data sequentially. Secondly, linear fault structures are extracted based on dual-threshold method. Finally, high-precision DOM (Digital Orthophoto Map) and other geological knowledge are used to check the accuracy of fault structure extraction. An experiment is carried out in Beiya Village of Yunnan Province, China. With LiDAR technology, results reveal that: the airborne LiDAR point-cloud data can be utilized to extract linear fault structures accurately and automatically, measure information such as height, width and slope of fault structures with high precision, and detect faults in areas with vegetation coverage effectively.

  6. Airborne Doppler lidar detection of wind shear. Results of performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1988-01-01

    Results of a performance analysis of an airborne Doppler radar wind shear detection system are given in vugraph form. It was concluded that both CO sub 2 and Ho:YAG lasers are feasible for dry microburst applications, but with limited performance in wet microbursts. The Ho:YAG performs better than the CO sub 2 for a set of identical lidar parameters.

  7. Airborne lidar measurements of ozone and aerosols during the pacific exploratory mission-tropics A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, Marta A.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Gregory, Gerald L.

    1998-01-01

    Airborne lidar measurements of aerosol and ozone distributions from the surface to above the tropopause over the South Pacific Ocean are presented. The measurements illustrate large-scale features of the region, and are used to quantify the relative contributions of different ozone sources to the tropospheric ozone budget in this remote region.

  8. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  9. Airborne high spectral resolution lidar for measuring aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients.

    PubMed

    Esselborn, Michael; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas; Tesche, Matthias; Ehret, Gerhard

    2008-01-20

    An airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on an iodine absorption filter and a high-power frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser has been developed to measure backscatter and extinction coefficients of aerosols and clouds. The instrument was operated aboard the Falcon 20 research aircraft of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in May-June 2006 to measure optical properties of Saharan dust. A detailed description of the lidar system, the analysis of its data products, and measurements of backscatter and extinction coefficients of Saharan dust are presented. The system errors are discussed and airborne HSRL results are compared to ground-based Raman lidar and sunphotometer measurements.

  10. Airborne lidar measurements of smoke plume distribution, vertical transmission, and particle size.

    PubMed

    Uthe, E E; Morley, B M; Nielsen, N B

    1982-02-01

    Observations were made of a dense smoke plume downwind from a forest fire using the ALPHA-1 two-wavelength downward-looking airborne lidar system. Facsimile displays derived from lidar signatures depict plume dimensions, boundary layer height, and underlying terrain elevation. Surface returns are interpreted in terms of vertical transmission as function of cross-plume distance. Results show significantly greater plume attenuation at 0.53-microm wavelength than at 1.06-microm, indicating ~0.1-microm mean particle diameters or the presence of gaseous constituents that absorb the visible radiation. These results demonstrate the potential of multiple-wavelength airborne lidar for quantitative analysis of atmospheric particulate and gaseous constituents. PMID:20372478

  11. Airborne lidar measurements of the soufriere eruption of 17 april 1979.

    PubMed

    Fuller, W H; Sokol, S; Hunt, W H

    1982-06-01

    At the time of the Soufriere, St. Vincent, volcanic eruption of 17 April 1979, a NASA P-3 aircraft with an uplooking lidar (light detection and ranging) system onboard was airborne 130 kilometers east of the island. Lidar measurements of the fresh volcanic ash were made approximately 2 hours after the eruption, 120 kilometers to the northeast and east. On the evening of 18 April, the airborne lidar, on a southerly flight track, detected significant amounts of stratospheric material in layers at 16, 17, 18, and 19.5 kilometers. These data, and measurements to the north on 19 April, indicate that the volcanic plume penetrated the stratosphere to an altitude of about 20 kilometers and moved south during the first 48 hours after the eruption.

  12. Study on the Explainable Ability by Using Airborne LIDAR in Stand Value and Stand Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. C.; Yeh, J. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Chen, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    Forest canopy structure is composed by the various species. Sun light is a main factor to affect the crown structures after tree competition. However, thinning operation is an appropriate way to control canopy density, which can adjust the competition conditions in the different crown structures. Recently, Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), has been established as a standard technology for high precision three dimensional forest data acquisition; it could get stand characteristics with three-dimensional information that had develop potential for the structure characteristics of forest canopy. The 65 years old, different planting density of Cryptomeria japonica experiment area was selected for this study in Nanytou, Taiwan. Use the LiDAR image to estimate LiDAR characteristic values by constructed CHM, voxel-based LiDAR, mu0ltiple echoes, and assess the accuracy of stand characteristics with intensity values and field data. The competition index was calculated with field data, and estimate competition index of LiDAR via multiple linear regression. The results showed that the highest accuracy with stand characteristics was stand high which estimate by LiDAR, its average accuracy of 91.03%. LiDAR raster grid size was 20 m × 20 m for the correlation was the best, however, the higher canopy density will reduce the accuracy of the LiDAR characteristic values to estimate the stand characteristics. The significantly affect canopy thickness and the degree of competition in different planting distances.

  13. Tensor Modeling Based for Airborne LiDAR Data Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Liu, C.; Pfeifer, N.; Yin, J. F.; Liao, Z. Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Feature selection and description is a key factor in classification of Earth observation data. In this paper a classification method based on tensor decomposition is proposed. First, multiple features are extracted from raw LiDAR point cloud, and raster LiDAR images are derived by accumulating features or the "raw" data attributes. Then, the feature rasters of LiDAR data are stored as a tensor, and tensor decomposition is used to select component features. This tensor representation could keep the initial spatial structure and insure the consideration of the neighborhood. Based on a small number of component features a k nearest neighborhood classification is applied.

  14. Coherent Doppler lidar signal covariance including wind shear and wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of coherent Doppler lidar is determined by the statistics of the coherent Doppler signal. The derivation and calculation of the covariance of the Doppler lidar signal is presented for random atmospheric wind fields with wind shear. The random component is described by a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum. The signal parameters are clarified for a general coherent Doppler lidar system. There are two distinct physical regimes: one where the transmitted pulse determines the signal statistics and the other where the wind field dominates the signal statistics. The Doppler shift of the signal is identified in terms of the wind field and system parameters.

  15. Potential for coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using neodymium lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, T. J.; Byer, R. L.; Zhou, B.

    1984-01-01

    Existing techniques for the frequency stabilization of Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1.06 micron, and the high-gain amplification of radiation at that wavelength, make possible the construction of a coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using Nd:YAG. Velocity accuracy and range resolution are better at 1.06 micron than at 10.6 microns at the same level of the SNR. Backscatter from the atmosphere at 1.06 micron is greater than that at 10.6 microns by about 2 orders of magnitude, but the quantum-limited noise is higher by 100 also. Near-field attenuation and turbulent effects are more severe at 1.06 micron. In some configurations and environments, the 1.06-micron wavelength may be the better choice, and there may be technological advantages favoring the use of solid-state lasers in satellite systems.

  16. Coherent differential absorption lidar measurements of CO2.

    PubMed

    Koch, Grady J; Barnes, Bruce W; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey Y; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Jirong; Davis, Richard E; Ismail, Syed; Vay, Stephanie; Kavaya, Michael J; Singh, Upendra N

    2004-09-10

    A differential absorption lidar has been built to measure CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. The transmitter is a pulsed single-frequency Ho:Tm:YLF laser at a 2.05-microm wavelength. A coherent heterodyne receiver was used to achieve sensitive detection, with the additional capability for wind profiling by a Doppler technique. Signal processing includes an algorithm for power measurement of a heterodyne signal. Results show a precision of the CO2 concentration measurement of 1%-2% 1sigma standard deviation over column lengths ranging from 1.2 to 2.8 km by an average of 1000 pulse pairs. A preliminary assessment of instrument sensitivity was made with an 8-h-long measurement set, along with correlative measurements with an in situ sensor, to determine that a CO2 trend could be detected.

  17. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Chambers, D. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Britten, J. A.; Shore, B. W.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The application of specialized rectangular relief transmission gratings to coherent lidar beam scanning is presented. Two types of surface relief transmission grating approaches are studied with an eye toward potential insertion of a constant thickness, diffractive scanner where refractive wedges now exist. The first diffractive approach uses vertically oriented relief structure in the surface of an optical flat; illumination of the diffractive scanner is off-normal in nature. The second grating design case describes rectangular relief structure slanted at a prescribed angle with respect to the surface. In this case, illumination is normal to the diffractive scanner. In both cases, performance predictions for 2.0 micron, circularly polarized light at beam deflection angles of 30 or 45 degrees are presented.

  18. NASA DC-8 Airborne Scanning Lidar Cloud and Contrail Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uthe, Edward E.; Oseberg, Terje E.; Nielsen, Norman B.

    1997-01-01

    An angular scanning backscatter lidar has been developed and operated from the NASA DC-8 aircraft; the lidar viewing direction could be scanned from vertically upward to forward in the direction of aircraft travel to vertically downward. The scanning lidar was used to generate real-time video displays of clouds and contrails above, below, and ahead of the aircraft to aid in positioning the aircraft for achieving optimum cloud/contrail sampling by onboard in situ samplers. Data examples show that the lidar provides unique information for the interpretation of the other data records and that combined data analyses provides enhanced evaluations of contrail/cloud structure, dynamics, composition, and optical/radiative properties.

  19. Examination of Airborne Discrete-Return Lidar in Prediction and Identification of Unique Forest Attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Brian M.

    Airborne discrete-return lidar is an active remote sensing technology capable of obtaining accurate, fine-resolution three-dimensional measurements over large areas. Discrete-return lidar data produce three-dimensional object characterizations in the form of point clouds defined by precise x, y and z coordinates. The data also provide intensity values for each point that help quantify the reflectance and surface properties of intersected objects. These data features have proven to be useful for the characterization of many important forest attributes, such as standing tree biomass, height, density, and canopy cover, with new applications for the data currently accelerating. This dissertation explores three new applications for airborne discrete-return lidar data. The first application uses lidar-derived metrics to predict understory vegetation cover, which has been a difficult metric to predict using traditional explanatory variables. A new airborne lidar-derived metric, understory lidar cover density, created by filtering understory lidar points using intensity values, increased the coefficient of variation (R2 ) from non-lidar understory vegetation cover estimation models from 0.2-0.45 to 0.7-0.8. The method presented in this chapter provides the ability to accurately quantify understory vegetation cover (± 22%) at fine spatial resolutions over entire landscapes within the interior ponderosa pine forest type. In the second application, a new method for quantifying and locating snags using airborne discrete-return lidar is presented. The importance of snags in forest ecosystems and the inherent difficulties associated with their quantification has been well documented. A new semi-automated method using both 2D and 3D local-area lidar point filters focused on individual point spatial location and intensity information is used to identify points associated with snags and eliminate points associated with live trees. The end result is a stem map of individual snags

  20. Dust aerosol optical properties using ground-based and airborne lidar in the framework of FENNEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnas, Fabien; Chazette, Patrick; Flamant, Cyrille; Royer, Philippe; Boytard, Mai-Lan; Genau, Pascal; Doira, Pascal; Bruneau, Didier; Pelon, Jacques; Sanak, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    The FENNEC program aims to improve our knowledge of both the role of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) on the West African monsoon and the interactions between the African continent and the Mediterranean basin through the Saharan dust transport. The Saharan desert is the major source of mineral dust in the world and may significantly impact the air quality over the Western Europe by increasing the particular matter content. Two lidar systems were operated by the French component of the FENNEC project: an airborne lidar which was flown aboard the French Falcon 20 research aircraft and a ground-based lidar which was located in the southeastern part of Spain, close to Marbella. The presence of dust in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer has been easily highlighted using the lidars and confirmed by ground-based sunphotometer and observations from both MODIS and SEVIRI spaceborne instruments. The simultaneous use of the sunphotometer-derived Angstrom exponent and the lidar-derived backscatter to extinction ratio is appeared to be a good approach to separate the optical contribution of dust from local aerosols for the coastal site. Over Spain, the dust layer was mainly located above the planetary boundary layer with several kilometers thick. Over the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Mauritania the airborne lidar shows a high planetary boundary layer (~5 km above the mean sea level) associated to strong aerosol optical thickness (> 0.8 at 532 nm). The airborne lidar data have been inverted using both MODIS and SEVIRI-derived aerosol optical thickness. The differences between dust optical properties close to and remote from the sources will be discussed.

  1. Using satellite and airborne LiDAR to model woodpecker habitat occupancy at the landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Vierling, Lee A; Vierling, Kerri T; Adam, Patrick; Hudak, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) relative to airborne-based LiDAR to model the north Idaho breeding distribution of a forest-dependent ecosystem engineer, the Red-naped sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis). GLAS data occurred within ca. 64 m diameter ellipses spaced a minimum of 172 m apart, and all occupancy analyses were confined to this grain scale. Using a hierarchical approach, we modeled Red-naped sapsucker occupancy as a function of LiDAR metrics derived from both platforms. Occupancy models based on satellite data were weak, possibly because the data within the GLAS ellipse did not fully represent habitat characteristics important for this species. The most important structural variables influencing Red-naped Sapsucker breeding site selection based on airborne LiDAR data included foliage height diversity, the distance between major strata in the canopy vertical profile, and the vegetation density near the ground. These characteristics are consistent with the diversity of foraging activities exhibited by this species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first to examine the utility of satellite-based LiDAR to model animal distributions. The large area of each GLAS ellipse and the non-contiguous nature of GLAS data may pose significant challenges for wildlife distribution modeling; nevertheless these data can provide useful information on ecosystem vertical structure, particularly in areas of gentle terrain. Additional work is thus warranted to utilize LiDAR datasets collected from both airborne and past and future satellite platforms (e.g. GLAS, and the planned IceSAT2

  2. Airborne lidar measurements of wave energy dissipation in a coral reef lagoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Reineman, Benjamin D.; Lenain, Luc; Melville, W. Kendall; Middleton, Jason H.

    2012-03-01

    Quantification of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the water column, ɛ, is very important for assessing nutrient uptake rates of corals and therefore the health of coral reef lagoon systems. However, the availability of such data is limited. Recently, at Lady Elliot Island (LEI), Australia, we showed that there was a strong correlation between in situ measurements of surface-wave energy dissipation and ɛ. Previously, Reineman et al. (2009), we showed that a small airborne scanning lidar system could measure the surface wavefield remotely. Here we present measurements demonstrating the use of the same airborne lidar to remotely measure surface wave energy fluxes and dissipation and thereby estimate ɛ in the LEI reef-lagoon system. The wave energy flux and wave dissipation rate across the fore reef and into the lagoon are determined from the airborne measurements of the wavefield. Using these techniques, observed spatial profiles of energy flux and wave energy dissipation rates over the LEI reef-lagoon system are presented. The results show that the high lidar backscatter intensity and point density coming from the high reflectivity of the foam from depth-limited breaking waves coincides with the high wave-energy dissipation rates. Good correlations between the airborne measurements and in situ observations demonstrate that it is feasible to apply airborne lidar systems for large-scale, long-term studies in monitoring important physical processes in coral reef environments. When added to other airborne techniques, the opportunities for efficient monitoring of large reef systems may be expanded significantly.

  3. 2.5 MHz Line-Width High-energy, 2 Micrometer Coherent Wind Lidar Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2007-01-01

    2 micron solid-state lasers are the primary choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. As wind lidars, they are used for wake vortex and clear air turbulence detection providing air transport safety. In addition, 2 micron lasers are one of the candidates for CO2 detection lidars. The rich CO2 absorption line around 2 micron, combined with the long upper state life of time, has made Ho based 2 micron lasers a viable candidate for CO2 sensing DIAL instrument. The design and fabrication of a compact coherent laser radar transmitter for Troposphere wind sensing is under way. This system is hardened for ground as well as airborne applications. As a transmitter for a coherent wind lidar, this laser has stringent spectral line width and beam quality requirements. Although the absolute wavelength does not have to be fixed for wind detection, to maximize return signal, the output wavelength should avoid atmospheric CO2 and H2O absorption lines. The base line laser material is Ho:Tm:LuLF which is an isomorph of Ho:Tm:YLF. LuLF produces 20% more output power than Ho:Tm:YLF. In these materials the Tm absorption cross-section, the Ho emission cross-section, the Tm to Ho energy transfer parameters and the Ho (sup 5) I (sub 7) radiative life time are all identical. However, the improved performance of the LuLF is attributed to the lower thermal population in the (sup 5) I (sub 8) manifold. It also provides higher normal mode to Q-switch conversion than YLF at high pump energy indicating a lower up-conversion. The laser architecture is composed of a seed laser, a ring oscillator, and a double pass amplifier. The seed laser is a single longitudinal mode with a line width of 13 KHz. The 100mJ class oscillator is stretched to 3 meters to accommodate the line-width requirement without compromising the range resolution of the instrument. The amplifier is double passed to produce greater than 300mJ energy.

  4. Unstable resonator antenna properties in coherent lidar applications - A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1988-01-01

    The antenna parameters of a coherent lidar in the far-field diffraction-limited regime, where the lidar transmitter consists of an unstable resonator with a Gaussian reflectivity profile output coupler, are investigated. A figure-of-merit combining lasr transmitter energy extraction efficiency with the far-field attributes of a given cavity configuration has been used to compare the lidar performance and relative merits of such systems as they relate to those of conventional unstable cavities with diffractive output coupling.

  5. Influence of coherent mesoscale structures on satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of coherent mesoscale structures on satellite based Doppler lidar wind measurements was investigated. Range dependent weighting functions and the single shot SNR of scan angle are examined and a space shuttle lidar experiment which used a fixed beam and rotating shuttle is simulated.

  6. Airborne Validation of Spatial Properties Measured by the CALIPSO Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew J.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Trepte, Charles Reginald; Hart, William D.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Winker, David M.; Keuhn, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    The primary payload onboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite is a dual-wavelength backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiling of clouds and aerosols. Launched in April 2006, the first data from this new satellite was obtained in June 2006. As with any new satellite measurement capability, an immediate post-launch requirement is to verify that the data being acquired is correct lest scientific conclusions begin to be drawn based on flawed data. A standard approach to verifying satellite data is to take a similar, or validation, instrument and fly it onboard a research aircraft. Using an aircraft allows the validation instrument to get directly under the satellite so that both the satellite instrument and the aircraft instrument are sensing the same region of the atmosphere. Although there are almost always some differences in the sampling capabilities of the two instruments, it is nevertheless possible to directly compare the measurements. To validate the measurements from the CALIPSO lidar, a similar instrument, the Cloud Physics Lidar, was flown onboard the NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft during July- August 2006. This paper presents results to demonstrate that the CALIPSO lidar is properly calibrated and the CALIPSO Level 1 data products are correct. The importance of the results is to demonstrate to the research community that CALIPSO Level 1 data can be confidently used for scientific research.

  7. Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Rush, Kurt; Rabenhorst, Scott; Welch, Wayne; Cadirola, Martin; McIntire, Gerry; Russo, Felicita; Adam, Mariana; Venable, Demetrius; Connell, Rasheen; Veselovskii, Igor; Forno, Ricardo; Mielke, Bernd; Stein, Bernhard; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Stuart; Voemel, Holger

    2010-01-01

    A high-performance Raman lidar operating in the UV portion of the spectrum has been used to acquire, for the first time using a single lidar, simultaneous airborne profiles of the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscatter, aerosol extinction, aerosol depolarization and research mode measurements of cloud liquid water, cloud droplet radius, and number density. The Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) system was installed in a Beechcraft King Air B200 aircraft and was flown over the mid-Atlantic United States during July August 2007 at altitudes ranging between 5 and 8 km. During these flights, despite suboptimal laser performance and subaperture use of the telescope, all RASL measurement expectations were met, except that of aerosol extinction. Following the Water Vapor Validation Experiment Satellite/Sondes (WAVES_2007) field campaign in the summer of 2007, RASL was installed in a mobile trailer for groundbased use during the Measurements of Humidity and Validation Experiment (MOHAVE-II) field campaign held during October 2007 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory s Table Mountain Facility in southern California. This ground-based configuration of the lidar hardware is called Atmospheric Lidar for Validation, Interagency Collaboration and Education (ALVICE). During theMOHAVE-II field campaign, during which only nighttime measurements were made, ALVICE demonstrated significant sensitivity to lower-stratospheric water vapor. Numerical simulation and comparisons with a cryogenic frost-point hygrometer are used to demonstrate that a system with the performance characteristics of RASL ALVICE should indeed be able to quantify water vapor well into the lower stratosphere with extended averaging from an elevated location like Table Mountain. The same design considerations that optimize Raman lidar for airborne use on a small research aircraft are, therefore, shown to yield significant dividends in the quantification of lower-stratospheric water vapor. The MOHAVE

  8. Airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data integration for weed detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamás, János; Lehoczky, Éva; Fehér, János; Fórián, Tünde; Nagy, Attila; Bozsik, Éva; Gálya, Bernadett; Riczu, Péter

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture uses 70% of global available fresh water. However, ca. 50-70% of water used by cultivated plants, the rest of water transpirated by the weeds. Thus, to define the distribution of weeds is very important in precision agriculture and horticulture as well. To survey weeds on larger fields by traditional methods is often time consuming. Remote sensing instruments are useful to detect weeds in larger area. In our investigation a 3D airborne laser scanner (RIEGL LMS-Q680i) was used in agricultural field near Sopron to scouting weeds. Beside the airborne LiDAR, hyperspectral imaging system (AISA DUAL) and air photos helped to investigate weed coverage. The LiDAR survey was carried out at early April, 2012, before sprouting of cultivated plants. Thus, there could be detected emerging of weeds and direction of cultivation. However airborne LiDAR system was ideal to detect weeds, identification of weeds at species level was infeasible. Higher point density LiDAR - Terrestrial laser scanning - systems are appropriate to distinguish weed species. Based on the results, laser scanner is an effective tool to scouting of weeds. Appropriate weed detection and mapping systems could contribute to elaborate water and herbicide saving management technique. This publication was supported by the OTKA project K 105789.

  9. Integrating Smartphone Images and Airborne LIDAR Data for Complete Urban Building Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenman; Shan, Jie; Zhang, Zhichao; Yan, Jixing; Hou, Yaolin

    2016-06-01

    A complete building model reconstruction needs data collected from both air and ground. The former often has sparse coverage on building façades, while the latter usually is unable to observe the building rooftops. Attempting to solve the missing data issues in building reconstruction from single data source, we describe an approach for complete building reconstruction that integrates airborne LiDAR data and ground smartphone imagery. First, by taking advantages of GPS and digital compass information embedded in the image metadata of smartphones, we are able to find airborne LiDAR point clouds for the corresponding buildings in the images. In the next step, Structure-from-Motion and dense multi-view stereo algorithms are applied to generate building point cloud from multiple ground images. The third step extracts building outlines respectively from the LiDAR point cloud and the ground image point cloud. An automated correspondence between these two sets of building outlines allows us to achieve a precise registration and combination of the two point clouds, which ultimately results in a complete and full resolution building model. The developed approach overcomes the problem of sparse points on building façades in airborne LiDAR and the deficiency of rooftops in ground images such that the merits of both datasets are utilized.

  10. Observations of Wind Profile of Marine Atmosphere Boundary Layer by Shipborne Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Hongwei; Song, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Kailin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system is so good as to prove the feasibility of the marine atmosphere boundary layer detection. A ship-mounted Coherent Doppler lidar was used to measure the wind profile and vertical velocity in the boundary layer over the Yellow sea in 2014. Furthermore, for the purpose of reducing the impact of vibration during movement and correcting the LOS velocity, the paper introduces the attitude correction algorithm and comparison results.

  11. Airborne lidar mapping of vertical ozone distributions in support of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uthe, Edward E.; Nielsen, Norman B.; Livingston, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandated attainment of the ozone standard established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Improved photochemical models validated by experimental data are needed to develop strategies for reducing near surface ozone concentrations downwind of urban and industrial centers. For more than 10 years, lidar has been used on large aircraft to provide unique information on ozone distributions in the atmosphere. However, compact airborne lidar systems are needed for operation on small aircraft of the type typically used on regional air quality investigations to collect data with which to develop and validate air quality models. Data presented in this paper will consist of a comparison between airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and airborne in-situ ozone measurements. Also discussed are future plans to improve the airborne ultraviolet-DIAL for ozone and other gas observations and addition of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) emission spectrometer to investigate the effects of other gas species on vertical ozone distribution.

  12. Evaluating the Potential of Multispectral Airborne LIDAR for Topographic Mapping and Land Cover Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, V.; Bremer, M.; Lindenberger, J.; Rutzinger, M.; Georges, C.; Petrini-Monteferri, F.

    2015-08-01

    Recently multispectral LiDAR became a promising research field for enhanced LiDAR classification workflows and e.g. the assessment of vegetation health. Current analyses on multispectral LiDAR are mainly based on experimental setups, which are often limited transferable to operational tasks. In late 2014 Optech Inc. announced the first commercially available multispectral LiDAR system for airborne topographic mapping. The combined system makes synchronic multispectral LiDAR measurements possible, solving time shift problems of experimental acquisitions. This paper presents an explorative analysis of the first airborne collected data with focus on class specific spectral signatures. Spectral patterns are used for a classification approach, which is evaluated in comparison to a manual reference classification. Typical spectral patterns comparable to optical imagery could be observed for homogeneous and planar surfaces. For rough and volumetric objects such as trees, the spectral signature becomes biased by signal modification due to multi return effects. However, we show that this first flight data set is suitable for conventional geometrical classification and mapping procedures. Additional classes such as sealed and unsealed ground can be separated with high classification accuracies. For vegetation classification the distinction of species and health classes is possible.

  13. Modeling loblolly pine dominant height using airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceyka, Andy

    The dominant height of 73 georeferenced field sample plots were modeled from various canopy height metrics derived by means of a small-footprint laser scanning technology, known as light detection and ranging (or just LiDAR), over young and mature forest stands using regression analysis. LiDAR plot metrics were regressed against field measured dominant height using Best Subsets Regression to reduce the number of models. From those models, regression assumptions were evaluated to determine which model was actually the best. The best model included the 1st and 90th height percentiles as predictors and explained 95% of the variance in average dominant height.

  14. NASA DC-8 Airborne Scanning Lidar Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Norman B.; Uthe, Edward E.; Kaiser, Robert D.; Tucker, Michael A.; Baloun, James E.; Gorordo, Javier G.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA DC-8 aircraft is used to support a variety of in-situ and remote sensors for conducting environmental measurements over global regions. As part of the atmospheric effects of aviation program (AEAP) the DC-8 is scheduled to conduct atmospheric aerosol and gas chemistry and radiation measurements of subsonic aircraft contrails and cirrus clouds. A scanning lidar system is being developed for installation on the DC-8 to support and extend the domain of the AEAP measurements. Design and objectives of the DC-8 scanning lidar are presented.

  15. NASA DC-8 airborne scanning LIDAR sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, N.B.; Uthe, E.E.; Kaiser, R.D.

    1996-11-01

    The NASA DC-8 aircraft is used to support a variety of in-situ and remote sensors for conducting environmental measurements over global regions. As part of the atmospheric effects of aviation program (AEAP) the DC-8 is scheduled to conduct atmospheric aerosol and gas chemistry and radiation measurements of subsonic aircraft contrails and cirrus clouds. A scanning lidar system is being developed for installation on the DC-8 to support and extend the domain of the AEAP measurements. Design and objectives of the DC-8 scanning lidar are presented. 4 figs.

  16. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  17. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure Made Using the Oxygen A-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriquez, Michael; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne measurements of atmospheric pressure using a fiber-laser based lidar operating in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm and the integrated path differential absorption measurement technique. Our lidar uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate tunable laser radiation at 765 nm, which overlaps an absorption line pair in the Oxygen A-band. We use a pulsed time resolved technique, which rapidly steps the laser wavelength across the absorption line pair, a 20 cm telescope and photon counting detector to measure Oxygen concentrations.

  18. Comparison of Coincident Terrestrial and Airborne Lidar Datasets with Respect to Detection of Ground Metrics and Topographic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R. E.; Stewart, J. P.; Lembo, A. J.; Hu, J.; Davis, C. A.; Hogue, T.; Collins, B. D.; Minasian, D.; Louis-Kayen, N. M.; O'Rourke, T. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research and National Science Foundation, in collaboration with the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), coordinated a controlled study of the use of pulse-based terrestrial lidar and phase-based airborne lidar systems to detect topographic changes and ground deformations in areas of buried pipelines subject to earthquakes and storm-induced landslides. Terrestrial and airborne lidar scans were performed at three LADWP sites in the Los Angeles region and their accuracy was evaluated using coincident high-precision total station survey measurements as a control. Horizontal accuracy was evaluated through the measurement of latitude Northing and longitude Easting (standardized to WGS84) residuals for distances separating well defined objects in the lidar scans, such as buildings and tanks. The bias and dispersion of lidar elevation measurements (standardized to NGVD88) was assessed at a flat un-vegetated site near the Los Angeles Reservoir before and after carefully measured trenching, and at a heavily vegetated and steeply sloping site at Power Plant 2 in San Francisquito Canyon. At the trench site, airborne lidar showed minimal bias and standard deviation (6-20 cm), whereas terrestrial lidar was nearly unbiased with very low dispersion (4-6 cm). Pre- and post-trench bias-adjusted normalized residuals are essentially randomly scattered, but elevation change was affected by relative bias within epochs. At the PP2 site, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and a standard deviation of approximately 50 cm, whereas terrestrial lidar demonstrated large bias and dispersion (on order of meters) due the inability of side-looking ground-based lidar to penetrate heavy vegetation. With careful calibration, both terrestrial and airborne lidar are capable of measuring centimeter-to decimeter level ground displacements for large features in areas of minimal vegetation, whereas their application is

  19. Analysis of wind coherence in the longitudinal direction using turbine mounted lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoust, S.; von Terzi, D.

    2016-09-01

    The use of lidar for wind turbine control relies on the hypothesis that the wind coherence in the longitudinal direction is sufficient to derive useful information from wind measurements at upstream locations. We examined wind coherence using measurements of longitudinal wind speed obtained using a forward facing pulsed turbine mounted lidar over three sites. The effect of different atmospheric conditions was evaluated. We found that the coherence decay parameter increases together with turbulence intensity, while the parameter defining the coherence at 0Hz increases with integral length-scale. A correction was applied for artificial coherence decrease due to lidar measurement effects. Results display encouraging similarities with a computational study carried out based on Large Eddy Simulation.

  20. Mapping Understory Trees Using Airborne Discrete-Return LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, I.; Hovi, A.; Morsdorf, F.

    2011-09-01

    Understory trees in multi-layer stands are often ignored in forest inventories. Information about them would benefit silviculture, wood procurement and biodiversity management. Cost-efficient inventory methods for the assessment of the presence, density, species- and size-distributions are called for. LiDAR remote sensing is a promising addition to field work. Unlike in passive image data, in which the signals from multiple layers mix, the 3D position of each hot-spot reflection is known in LiDAR data. The overstory however prevents from obtaining a wall-to-wall sample of understory, and measurements are subject to transmission losses. Discriminating between the crowns of dominant and suppressed trees can also be challenging. We examined the potential of LiDAR for the mapping of the understory trees in Scots pine stands (62°N, 24°E), using carefully georeferenced reference data and several LiDAR data sets. We present results that highlight differences in echo-triggering between sensors that affect the near-ground height data. A conceptual model for the transmission losses in the overstory was created and formulated into simple compensation models that reduced the intensity variation in second- and third return data. The task is highly ill-posed in discrete-return LiDAR data, and our models employed the geometry of the overstory as well as the intensity of previous returns. We showed that even first-return data in the understory is subject to losses in the overstory that did not trigger an echo. Even with compensation of the losses, the intensity data was deemed of low value in species discrimination. Area-based LiDAR height metrics that were derived from the data belonging to the crown volume of the understory showed reasonable correlation with the density and mean height of the understory trees. Assessment of the species seems out of reach in discrete-return LiDAR data, which is a drastic drawback.

  1. Quantification of L-band InSAR coherence over volcanic areas using LiDAR and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab-Sedze, Melanie; Heggy, Essam; Bretard, Frederic; Berveiller, Daniel; Jacquemoud, Stephane

    2014-07-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful tool to monitor large-scale ground deformation at active volcanoes. However, vegetation and pyroclastic deposits degrade the radar coherence and therefore the measurement of 3-D surface displacements. In this article, we explore the complementarity between ALOS - PALSAR coherence images, airborne LiDAR data and in situ measurements acquired over the Piton de La Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island, France) to determine the sources of errors that may affect repeat-pass InSAR measure- ments. We investigate three types of surfaces: terrains covered with vegetation, lava flows (a'a, pahoehoe or slabby pahoehoe lava flows) and pyroclastic deposits (lapilli). To explain the loss of coherence observed over the Dolomieu crater between 2008 and 2009, we first use laser altimetry data to map topographic variations. The LiDAR intensity, which depends on surface reflectance, also provides ancillary information about the potential sources of coherence loss. In addition, surface roughness and rock dielectric properties of each terrain have been determined in situ to better understand how electromagnetic waves interact with such media: rough and porous surfaces, such as the a'a lava flows, produce a higher coherence loss than smoother surfaces, such as the pahoehoe lava flows. Variations in dielectric properties suggest a higher penetration depth in pyroclasts than in lava flows at L-band frequency. Decorrelation over the lapilli is hence mainly caused by volumetric effects. Finally, a map of LAI (Leaf Area Index) produced using SPOT 5 imagery allows us to quantify the effect of vegeta- tion density: radar coherence is negatively correlated with LAI and is unreliable for values higher than 7.5.

  2. Mapping Urban Tree Canopy Cover Using Fused Airborne LIDAR and Satellite Imagery Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmehr, Ebadat G.; Amati, Marco; Fraser, Clive S.

    2016-06-01

    Urban green spaces, particularly urban trees, play a key role in enhancing the liveability of cities. The availability of accurate and up-to-date maps of tree canopy cover is important for sustainable development of urban green spaces. LiDAR point clouds are widely used for the mapping of buildings and trees, and several LiDAR point cloud classification techniques have been proposed for automatic mapping. However, the effectiveness of point cloud classification techniques for automated tree extraction from LiDAR data can be impacted to the point of failure by the complexity of tree canopy shapes in urban areas. Multispectral imagery, which provides complementary information to LiDAR data, can improve point cloud classification quality. This paper proposes a reliable method for the extraction of tree canopy cover from fused LiDAR point cloud and multispectral satellite imagery data. The proposed method initially associates each LiDAR point with spectral information from the co-registered satellite imagery data. It calculates the normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) value for each LiDAR point and corrects tree points which have been misclassified as buildings. Then, region growing of tree points, taking the NDVI value into account, is applied. Finally, the LiDAR points classified as tree points are utilised to generate a canopy cover map. The performance of the proposed tree canopy cover mapping method is experimentally evaluated on a data set of airborne LiDAR and WorldView 2 imagery covering a suburb in Melbourne, Australia.

  3. Estimation of the refractive index structure characteristic of air from coherent Doppler wind lidar data.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N; Rahm, S

    2014-08-01

    A technique is proposed for estimating the refractive index structure characteristic of air from data of a coherent Doppler wind lidar. The proposed technique is tested in atmospheric experiments. Time profiles of the structure characteristic in the atmospheric surface layer are obtained and compared with the time profiles of the dissipation rate of the kinetic energy of turbulence obtained from the same lidar data. It is shown in this way that coherent lidars can be used for investigating not only wind turbulence, but also temperature turbulence.

  4. Sea-ice freeboard heights in the Arctic Ocean from ICESat and airborne lidar - a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourup, H.; Forsberg, R.

    2005-12-01

    Two near-coincident tracks of ICESat/GLAS and airborne scanning airborne lidar data were acquired on May 25, 2004, in the Arctic Ocean north of Greenland, in an area of thick perennial sea-ice with few open leads and numerous large ridges. The airborne lidar data, having a relative accuracy of few cm and 1 m spatial resolution, provide an excellent quantification of the ability of ICESat to detect and model sea-ice features such as leads and ridges, as well as gaining insight into the expected ICESat waveforms over heavily deformed sea-ice. In the paper we outline the underflight experiment and hardware, as well as show examples of the good fit between ICESat and filtered airborne data, matching the ICESat footprint. We also compare the observed ICESat waveforms to the airborne data, as well as quantify the biases induced by "lowest-level" filtering techniques in this particular area. We conclude by showing examples of Arctic Ocean-wide freeboard heights derived from ICESat by an improved "lowest-level" technique, showing good overall correlation to Quikscat multi-year ice distribution and expected seasonal changes.

  5. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  6. Wind Profiling from a New Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar Transceiver during Wind Measurement Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Demoz, B.; Veneable, D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other lidars and other sensors will be presented.

  7. Seeing the trees yet not missing the forest: an airborne lidar approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Li, W.; Flanagan, J.

    2011-12-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) is an optical remote sensing technology that measures properties of scattered light to find range and/or other information of a distant object. Due to its ability to generate 3-dimensional data with high spatial resolution and accuracy, lidar technology is being increasingly used in ecology, geography, geology, geomorphology, seismology, remote sensing, and atmospheric physics. In this study, we acquire airborne lidar data for the study of hydrologic, geomorphologic, and geochemical processes at six Critical Zone Observatories: Southern Sierra, Boulder Creek, Shale Hills, Luquillo, Jemez, and Christina River Basin. Each site will have two lidar flights (leaf on/off, or snow on/off). Based on lidar data, we derive various products, including high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Digital Surface Model (DSM), Canopy Height Model (CHM), canopy cover & closure, tree height, DBH, canopy base height, canopy bulk density, biomass, LAI, etc. A novel approach is also developed to map individual tree based on segmentation of lidar point clouds, and a virtual forest is simulated using the location of individual trees as well as tree structure information. The simulated image is then compared to a camera photo taken at the same location. The two images look very similar, while, our simulated image provides not only a visually impressive visualization of the landscape, but also contains all the detailed information about the individual tree locations and forest structure properties.

  8. Aerosol Profile Measurements from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, John W.; Roers, Raymond R.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Since achieving first light in December of 2005, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been involved in seven field campaigns, accumulating over 450 hours of science data across more than 120 flights. Data from the instrument have been used in a variety of studies including validation and comparison with the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite mission, aerosol property retrievals combining passive and active instrument measurements, aerosol type identification, aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud top and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height determinations. Measurements and lessons learned from the HSRL are leading towards next-generation HSRL instrument designs that will enable even further studies of aerosol intensive and extensive parameters and the effects of aerosols on the climate system. This paper will highlight several of the areas in which the NASA Airborne HSRL is making contributions to climate science.

  9. A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Mascaro, Joseph; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Vaudry, Romuald; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Hall, Jefferson S; van Breugel, Michiel

    2012-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is fast turning the corner from demonstration technology to a key tool for assessing carbon stocks in tropical forests. With its ability to penetrate tropical forest canopies and detect three-dimensional forest structure, LiDAR may prove to be a major component of international strategies to measure and account for carbon emissions from and uptake by tropical forests. To date, however, basic ecological information such as height-diameter allometry and stand-level wood density have not been mechanistically incorporated into methods for mapping forest carbon at regional and global scales. A better incorporation of these structural patterns in forests may reduce the considerable time needed to calibrate airborne data with ground-based forest inventory plots, which presently necessitate exhaustive measurements of tree diameters and heights, as well as tree identifications for wood density estimation. Here, we develop a new approach that can facilitate rapid LiDAR calibration with minimal field data. Throughout four tropical regions (Panama, Peru, Madagascar, and Hawaii), we were able to predict aboveground carbon density estimated in field inventory plots using a single universal LiDAR model (r ( 2 ) = 0.80, RMSE = 27.6 Mg C ha(-1)). This model is comparable in predictive power to locally calibrated models, but relies on limited inputs of basal area and wood density information for a given region, rather than on traditional plot inventories. With this approach, we propose to radically decrease the time required to calibrate airborne LiDAR data and thus increase the output of high-resolution carbon maps, supporting tropical forest conservation and climate mitigation policy.

  10. Water turbidity estimation from airborne hyperspectral imagery and full waveform bathymetric LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Glennie, C. L.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in water turbidity are of great interest for the study of fluvial and coastal environments; and for predicting the performance of remote sensing systems that are used to map these. Conventional water turbidity estimates from remote sensing observations have normally been derived using near infrared reflectance. We have investigated the potential of determining water turbidity from additional remote sensing sources, namely airborne hyperspectral imagery and single wavelength bathymetric LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). The confluence area of the Blue and Colorado River, CO was utilized as a study area to investigate the capabilities of both airborne bathymetric LiDAR and hyperspectral imagery for water turbidity estimation. Discrete and full waveform bathymetric data were collected using Optech's Gemini (1064 nm) and Aquarius (532 nm) LiDAR sensors. Hyperspectral imagery (1.2 m pixel resolution and 72 spectral bands) was acquired using an ITRES CASI-1500 imaging system. As an independent reference, measurements of turbidity were collected concurrent with the airborne remote sensing acquisitions, using a WET Labs EcoTriplet deployed from a kayak and turbidity was then derived from the measured backscatter. The bathymetric full waveform dataset contains a discretized sample of the full backscatter of water column and benthic layer. Therefore, the full waveform records encapsulate the water column characteristics of turbidity. A nonparametric support vector regression method is utilized to estimate water turbidity from both hyperspectral imagery and voxelized full waveform LiDAR returns, both individually and as a fused dataset. Results of all the evaluations will be presented, showing an initial turbidity prediction accuracy of approximately 1.0 NTU. We will also discuss our future strategy for enhanced fusion of the full waveform LiDAR and hyperspectral imagery for improved turbidity estimation.

  11. All-fiber pulse coherent Doppler LIDAR and its validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Lingbing; Qiu, Zujing; Gao, Haiyang; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Liu, Jiqiao

    2015-12-01

    An all-fiber pulsed coherent Doppler LIDAR (CDL) system is described. It uses a fiber laser as a light source at a 1.54-μm wavelength, producing 200 μJ pulses at 10 kHz. The local oscillator signal is mixed with the backscattered light (of different frequency) in the fiber. The atmospheric wind speed is determined through the fast Fourier transform applied to the difference frequency signal acquired by an analog-to-digital converter card. This system was used to measure the atmospheric wind above the upper-air meteorological observatory in Rongcheng (37.10°N, 122.25°E) of China between January 7 and 19, 2015. The CDL data are compared with sounding- and pilot-balloon measurements to assess the CDL performance. The results show that the correlation coefficient of the different wind-speed measurements is 0.93 and their discrepancy 0.64 m/s; the correlation coefficient for wind-direction values is 0.92 and their discrepancy 5.8 deg. A time serial of the wind field, which benefits the understanding of atmospheric dynamics, is presented after the comparisons between data from CDL and balloons. The CDL system has a compact structure and demonstrates good stability, reliability, and a potential for application to wind-field measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  12. Airborne Lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile with tunable Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Milrod, J.; Walden, H.

    1986-01-01

    The first remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile made from an airborne platform are described. The measurements utilize a differential absorption lidar and tunable solid state Alexandrite lasers. The pressure measurement technique uses a high resolution oxygen A band where the absorption is highly pressure sensitive due to collision broadening. Absorption troughs and regions of minimum absorption were used between pairs of stongly absorption lines for these measurements. The trough technique allows the measurement to be greatly desensitized to the effects of laser frequency instabilities. The lidar system was set up to measure pressure with the on-line laser tuned to the absorption trough at 13147.3/cm and with the reference laser tuned to a nonabsorbing frequency near 13170.0/cm. The lidar signal returns were sampled with a 200 range gate (30 vertical resoltion) and averaged over 100 shots.

  13. Analysis of Debris Flow Behavior Using Airborne LIDAR and Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Yune, C. Y.; Paik, J.; Lee, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency of debris flow events caused by severe rainstorms has increased in Korea. LiDAR provides high-resolution topographical data that can represent the land surface more effectively than other methods. This study describes the analysis of geomorphologic changes using digital surface models derived from airborne LiDAR and aerial image data acquired before and after a debris flow event in the southern part of Seoul, South Korea in July 2011. During this event, 30 houses were buried, 116 houses were damaged, and 22 human casualties were reported. Longitudinal and cross-sectional profiles of the debris flow path reconstructed from digital surface models were used to analyze debris flow behaviors such as landslide initiation, transport, erosion, and deposition. LiDAR technology integrated with GIS is a very useful tool for understanding debris flow behavior.

  14. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG lidar for airborne cloud measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnert, A.; Halldorsson, Th.; Herrmann, H.; Haering, R.; Krichbaumer, W.; Streicher, J.; Werner, Ch.

    1992-07-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental method used to separate scattering and to use it for the determination of cloud microphysical parameters. It is also the first airborne test of a lidar version related to the ATLID Program - ESA's scheduled spaceborne lidar. The already tested DLR microlidar was modified with the new diode-pumped laser and a faster data recording system was added. The system was used during the CLEOPATRA campaign in the DLR research aircraft Falcon 20 to measure cloud parameters. The diode pumped Nd:YAG laser we developed for the microlidar is a modification of the laser we introduced at the Lidar Congress at 'Laser 1991' in Munich. Various aspects of this work are discussed.

  15. Similarity and Complementarity of Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR Data in High Mountain Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Nicole; Glira, Philipp; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    Glacier melt and a consequential increased sediment transport (erosion, transportation and accumulation) in high mountain regions are causing a frequent occurrence of geomorphic processes such as landslides and other natural hazards. These effects are investigated at the Gepatschferner (Kaunertal, Oetztal Alps, Tyrol), the second largest glacier in Austria, in the PROSA project (Catholic University Eichstätt - Ingolstadt, Vienna University of Technology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, University of Innsbruck, Munich University of Technology). To monitor these geomorphic processes, data with a very high spatial and very high temporally accuracy and resolution are needed. For this purpose multi-temporal terrestrial and aerial laser scanning data are acquired, processed and analysed. Airborne LiDAR data are collected with a density of 10 points/m² over the whole study area of the glacier and its foreland. Terrestrial LiDAR data are gathered to complement and improve the airborne LiDAR data. The different viewing geometry results in differences between airborne and terrestrial data. Very steep slopes and rock faces (around 90°, depending on the viewing direction) are not visible from the airborne view point. On the other hand, terrestrial viewpoints exhibit shadows for areas above the scanner position and in viewing direction behind vertical or steep faces. In addition, the density of terrestrial data is varying strongly, but has for most of the covered area a much higher level of detail than the airborne dataset. A small temporal baseline is also inevitable and may cause differences between acquisition of airborne and terrestrial data. The goal of this research work is to develop a method for merging airborne and terrestrial LiDAR data. One prerequisite for merging is the identification of areas which are measurements of the same physical surface in either data set. This allows a transformation of the

  16. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  17. Merging Airborne LIDAR Data and Satellite SAR Data for Building Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Nakagawa, M.

    2015-05-01

    A frequent map revision is required in GIS applications, such as disaster prevention and urban planning. In general, airborne photogrammetry and LIDAR measurements are applied to geometrical data acquisition for automated map generation and revision. However, attribute data acquisition and classification depend on manual editing works including ground surveys. In general, airborne photogrammetry and LiDAR measurements are applied to geometrical data acquisition for automated map generation and revision. However, these approaches classify geometrical attributes. Moreover, ground survey and manual editing works are finally required in attribute data classification. On the other hand, although geometrical data extraction is difficult, SAR data have a possibility to automate the attribute data acquisition and classification. The SAR data represent microwave reflections on various surfaces of ground and buildings. There are many researches related to monitoring activities of disaster, vegetation, and urban. Moreover, we have an opportunity to acquire higher resolution data in urban areas with new sensors, such as ALOS2 PALSAR2. Therefore, in this study, we focus on an integration of airborne LIDAR data and satellite SAR data for building extraction and classification.

  18. Estimation of Aerodynamic Roughness and Zero Plane Displacement Using Medium Density of Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Salleh, M. R.; Rahman, M. Z. Abdul; Abu Bakar, M. A.; Rasib, A. W.; Omar, H.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a framework to estimate aerodynamic roughness over specific height (zo/H) and zero plane displacement (d/H) over various landscapes in Kelantan State using airborne LiDAR data. The study begins with the filtering of airborne LiDAR, which produced ground and non-ground points. The ground points were used to generate digital terrain model (DTM) while the non-ground points were used for digital surface model (DSM) generation. Canopy height model (CHM) was generated by subtracting DTM from DSM. Individual trees in the study area were delineated by applying the Inverse Watershed segmentation method on the CHM. Forest structural parameters including tree height, height to crown base (HCB) and diameter at breast height (DBH) were estimated using existing allometric equations. The airborne LiDAR data was divided into smaller areas, which correspond to the size of the zo/H and d/H maps i.e. 50 m and 100 m. For each area individual tree were reconstructed based on the tree properties, which accounts overlapping between crowns and trunks. The individual tree models were used to estimate individual tree frontal area and the total frontal area over a specific ground surface. Finally, three roughness models were used to estimate zo/H and d/H for different wind directions, which were assumed from North/South and East/West directions. The results were shows good agreements with previous studies that based on the wind tunnel experiments.

  19. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead. PMID:23828665

  20. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead.

  1. Change Detection from differential airborne LiDAR using a weighted Anisotropic Iterative Closest Point Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Kusari, A.; Glennie, C. L.; Oskin, M. E.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Borsa, A. A.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2013-12-01

    Differential LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) from repeated surveys has recently emerged as an effective tool to measure three-dimensional (3D) change for applications such as quantifying slip and spatially distributed warping associated with earthquake ruptures, and examining the spatial distribution of beach erosion after hurricane impact. Currently, the primary method for determining 3D change is through the use of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm and its variants. However, all current studies using ICP have assumed that all LiDAR points in the compared point clouds have uniform accuracy. This assumption is simplistic given that the error for each LiDAR point is variable, and dependent upon highly variable factors such as target range, angle of incidence, and aircraft trajectory accuracy. Therefore, to rigorously determine spatial change, it would be ideal to model the random error for every LiDAR observation in the differential point cloud, and use these error estimates as apriori weights in the ICP algorithm. To test this approach, we implemented a rigorous LiDAR observation error propagation method to generate estimated random error for each point in a LiDAR point cloud, and then determine 3D displacements between two point clouds using an anistropic weighted ICP algorithm. The algorithm was evaluated by qualitatively and quantitatively comparing post earthquake slip estimates from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake between a uniform weight and anistropically weighted ICP algorithm, using pre-event LiDAR collected in 2006 by Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI), and post-event LiDAR collected by The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM).

  2. Urban Building Collapse Detection Using Very High Resolution Imagery and Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Li, P.

    2013-07-01

    The increasing availability of very high resolution (VHR) remotely sensed images makes it possible to detect and assess urban building damages in the aftermath of earthquake disasters by using these data. However, the accuracy obtained using spectral features from VHR data alone is comparatively low, since both undamaged and collapsed buildings are spectrally similar. The height information provided by airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data is complementary to VHR imagery. Thus, combination of these two datasets will be beneficial to the automatic and accurate extraction of building collapse. In this study, a hierarchical multi-level method of building collapse detection using bi-temporal (pre- and post-earthquake) VHR images and postevent airborne LiDAR data was proposed. First, buildings, bare ground, vegetation and shadows were extracted using post-event image and LiDAR data and masked out. Then building collapse was extracted using the bi-temporal VHR images of the remaining area with a one-class classifier. The proposed method was evaluated using bi-temporal VHR images and LiDAR data of Port au Prince, Haiti, which was heavily hit by an earthquake in January 2010. The method was also compared with some existing methods. The results showed that the method proposed in this study significantly outperformed the existing methods, with improvement range of 47.6% in kappa coefficient. The proposed method provided a fast and reliable way of detecting urban building collapse, which can also be applied to relevant applications.

  3. Characterization of shallow marine convection in subtropical regions by airborne and spaceborne lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Gutleben, Manuel; Schäfler, Andreas; Kiemle, Christoph; Wirth, Martin; Hirsch, Lutz; Ament, Felix

    2016-04-01

    One of the biggest challenges in present day climate research is still the quantification of cloud feedbacks in climate models. Especially the feedback from marine cumulus clouds in the boundary layer with maximum cloud top heights of 4 km introduces large uncertainties in climate sensitivity. Therefore a better understanding of these shallow marine clouds, as well as of their interaction with aerosols and the Earth's energy budget is demanded. To improve our knowledge of shallow marine cumulus convection, measurements onboard the German research aircraft HALO were performed during the NARVAL (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-sensing for Validation studies) mission in December 2013. During NARVAL an EarthCARE equivalent remote sensing payload, with the DLR airborne high spectral resolution and differential absorption lidar system WALES and the cloud radar of the HAMP (HALO Microwave Package) as its core instrumentation, was deployed. To investigate the capability of spaceborne lidar measurements for this kind of study several CALIOP underflights were performed. We will present a comparison of airborne and spaceborne lidar measurements, and we will present the vertical and horizontal distribution of the clouds during NARVAL based on lidar measurements. In particular we investigate the cloud top distribution and the horizontal cloud and cloud gap length. Furthermore we study the representativeness of the NARVAL data by comparing them to and analysing a longer time series and measurements at different years and seasons.

  4. Reference-beam storage for long-range low-coherence pulsed Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Dorrington, A A; Kunnemeyer, R; Danehy, P M

    2001-06-20

    We present a laser Doppler velocimeter that stores and delays the reference beam to preserve coherence with a long-path-length measurement beam. Our storage and delay technique relaxes the strict coherence requirements associated with lidar laser sources, permitting the use of low-coherence lasers. This technique potentially could reduce the cost and size of lidar systems for commercial applications. Experiments that use fiber-optic ring resonators to store the reference beams and generate reference pulse trains validated the concept. We obtained results at several simulated distances by beating each usable reference pulse with a delayed Doppler-shifted measurement beam reflected off a rotating mirror.

  5. Atmospheric refractive effects on coherent lidar performance at 10.6 microm.

    PubMed

    Schwiesow, R L; Calfee, R F

    1979-12-01

    The aperture diameter over which a lidar transceiver collects backscattered signal that can be coherently detected depends on refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere. We have studied the change in coherently detected signal with change in aperture for a cw (focusing) lidar operating at 10.6-microm wavelength over a horizontal path 2 m above the ground at target ranges between 0.6 km and 2.6 km. We conclude that for average daytime conditions at a range of 1 km, for example, a transceiver aperture diameter of 27 cm gives approximately 65% of the coherent signal expected from an aperture of twice that diameter.

  6. Airborne IPDA Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Methane in Support of MERLIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Amediek, A.; Wirth, M.; Ehret, G.

    2015-12-01

    Space-based lidar missions targeting greenhouse gases are expected to close observational gaps, e.g., over subarctic permafrost and tropical wetlands, where in-situ and passive remote sensing techniques have difficulties. Consequently, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" (MERLIN) was proposed by the German and French space agencies DLR and CNES. MERLIN is now in Phase B, in which all mission components are planned in detail; launch is foreseen in 2020. An integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar will measure weighted columns of atmospheric methane (XCH4) along the satellite track. Primary objective is to provide accurate global observations of methane concentration gradients for inverse numerical models in order to better quantify regional fluxes. DLR has developed an airborne demonstrator, CHARM-F, for technology demonstration and validation purposes. First successful flights on-board the German HALO research aircraft have been performed in May 2015 over Central Europe. The measurements are expected to help solve general retrieval issues for future space-borne IPDA lidars. For example, the CHARM-F flights over ocean and lakes help assess the strength and variability of backscatter from water surfaces. The IPDA weighting function, or measurement sensitivity, is dependent on atmospheric pressure and temperature, in particular close to the surface. We use ECMWF analyses interpolated in space and time to the aircraft track that provide these auxiliary data at 14 km horizontal resolution. Due to the coarse representation of orography the model's pressure and temperature profiles have to be extrapolated down to the true lidar's scattering surface elevation, which generates uncertainties that we assess. We also assess biases by spectroscopic uncertainties in the methane absorption lines' parameters. Overall, the airborne results will support the development of advanced processing algorithms for future space lidar missions such as MERLIN.

  7. Coherent Doppler lidar observation and numerical simulation of gap wind Kiyokawa-dashi in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Ishii, S.; Mizutani, K.; Kanno, H.; Matsushima, D.; Sha, W.; Iwasaki, T.

    2006-12-01

    This study presents the coherent Doppler lidar (CDL) observations and numerical simulations of local strong easterly wind Kiyokawa-dashi, which is most famous gap wind in Japan. Main goal of this study is to clarify the three dimensional structure and dynamics of Kiyokawa-dashi under the different synoptic situations. Observations were conducted in August 29 and 30, 2004. A 2μm eye-safe airborne CDL developed by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) established at the exit of the narrow valley of Mogami-River. The vertical scanning of CDL with the velocity-azimuth display technique shows that the easterly wind was confined below 600 m, which is almost same or slightly lower than the crest, and accelerated at the down stream side. The upper layer above the easterly wind was weak westerly and these vertical structures were common to the all of the events. Horizontal scanning sounds the line-of-sight (LOS) wind velocity up to 6 km of downstream and presents detailed temporal wind shift within 5-10 minutes. Numerical simulations have been performed with non hydrostatic atmospheric model (MRINPD NHM) with horizontal grid spacing down to 1 km. Many of the observed structures were realistically simulated, but it still has a bias that the detailed temporal evolution wasn't shown in the numerical simulation. The CDL captured the fine structure and temporal variations of Kiyokawa-dashi. It is a powerful and useful system for studying the wind field.

  8. Design of an airborne lidar for stratospheric aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A modular, multiple-telescope receiving concept is developed to gain a relatively large receiver collection aperture without requiring extensive modifications to the aircraft. This concept, together with the choice of a specific photodetector, signal processing, and data recording system capable of maintaining approximately 1% precision over the required large signal amplitude range, is found to be common to all of the options. It is recommended that development of the lidar begin by more detailed definition of solutions to these important common signal detection and recording problems.

  9. Assessing spaceborne lidar detection and characterization of aerosols near clouds using coincident airborne lidar and other measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Omar, A. H.; Burton, S. P.; Rogers, R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    The objectives are to 1) evaluate potential shortcomings in the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol height detection concerning specific biomass burning smoke events informed by airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in different cloud environments and 2) study the lidar-derived atmospheric parameters in the vicinity of clouds for the cases where smoke is within or above clouds. In the case of light absorbing aerosols like biomass burning smoke, studies show that the greater the cloud cover below the aerosols, the more likely the aerosols are to heat the planet. An accurate aerosol height assumption is also crucial to a correct retrieval of aerosol chemical composition from passive space-based measurements (through the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and aerosol absorption coefficient, as exemplified by aerosol retrievals using the passive Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)). Strong smoke events are recognized as very difficult to quantify from space using passive (MODIS, OMI etc...) or active (CALIOP) satellite sensors for different reasons. This study is performed through (i) the selection of smoke events with coincident CALIOP and airborne HSRL aerosol observations, with smoke presence determined according to the HSRL aerosol classification data, (ii) the order of such events by range of HSRL aerosol optical depth, total color ratio and depolarization ratio (the latter two informing on the size and shape of the particles) and the evaluation of CALIOP's detection, classification and retrieval performance for each event, (iii) the study of the HSRL (or CALIOP when available) atmospheric parameters (total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, mean attenuated backscatter) in the vicinity of clouds for each smoke event.

  10. Using satellite and airborne LiDAR to model woodpecker habitat occupancy at the landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Vierling, Lee A; Vierling, Kerri T; Adam, Patrick; Hudak, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) relative to airborne-based LiDAR to model the north Idaho breeding distribution of a forest-dependent ecosystem engineer, the Red-naped sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis). GLAS data occurred within ca. 64 m diameter ellipses spaced a minimum of 172 m apart, and all occupancy analyses were confined to this grain scale. Using a hierarchical approach, we modeled Red-naped sapsucker occupancy as a function of LiDAR metrics derived from both platforms. Occupancy models based on satellite data were weak, possibly because the data within the GLAS ellipse did not fully represent habitat characteristics important for this species. The most important structural variables influencing Red-naped Sapsucker breeding site selection based on airborne LiDAR data included foliage height diversity, the distance between major strata in the canopy vertical profile, and the vegetation density near the ground. These characteristics are consistent with the diversity of foraging activities exhibited by this species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first to examine the utility of satellite-based LiDAR to model animal distributions. The large area of each GLAS ellipse and the non-contiguous nature of GLAS data may pose significant challenges for wildlife distribution modeling; nevertheless these data can provide useful information on ecosystem vertical structure, particularly in areas of gentle terrain. Additional work is thus warranted to utilize LiDAR datasets collected from both airborne and past and future satellite platforms (e.g. GLAS, and the planned IceSAT2

  11. Using Satellite and Airborne LiDAR to Model Woodpecker Habitat Occupancy at the Landscape Scale

    PubMed Central

    Vierling, Lee A.; Vierling, Kerri T.; Adam, Patrick; Hudak, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) relative to airborne-based LiDAR to model the north Idaho breeding distribution of a forest-dependent ecosystem engineer, the Red-naped sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis). GLAS data occurred within ca. 64 m diameter ellipses spaced a minimum of 172 m apart, and all occupancy analyses were confined to this grain scale. Using a hierarchical approach, we modeled Red-naped sapsucker occupancy as a function of LiDAR metrics derived from both platforms. Occupancy models based on satellite data were weak, possibly because the data within the GLAS ellipse did not fully represent habitat characteristics important for this species. The most important structural variables influencing Red-naped Sapsucker breeding site selection based on airborne LiDAR data included foliage height diversity, the distance between major strata in the canopy vertical profile, and the vegetation density near the ground. These characteristics are consistent with the diversity of foraging activities exhibited by this species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first to examine the utility of satellite-based LiDAR to model animal distributions. The large area of each GLAS ellipse and the non-contiguous nature of GLAS data may pose significant challenges for wildlife distribution modeling; nevertheless these data can provide useful information on ecosystem vertical structure, particularly in areas of gentle terrain. Additional work is thus warranted to utilize LiDAR datasets collected from both airborne and past and future satellite platforms (e.g. GLAS, and the planned IceSAT2

  12. Implementation of Waveform Digitization In A Small Footprint, Airborne Lidar Topographic Mapping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, R.; Crawford, M. M.; Liadsky, J.

    2004-12-01

    Accurate mapping is critical for applications ranging from geodesy, geomorphology, and forestry to urban planning and natural hazards monitoring. While airborne lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) has had a revolutionary impact on three-dimensional imaging of the earth's surface, there is great potential for developing new capability by replacing the laser range and backscatter intensity information recorded by conventional lidar systems with full waveform digitization. The University of Texas at Austin (UT) owns and operates an Optech ALTM 1225, a small footprint lidar system. In response to an initiative from UT, Optech has developed a module which samples the analog waveform of a laser pulse and converts these samples into digital measurements. The waveform digitizer specifications include a 1-nanosecond sampling interval, 440 samples per return laser waveform (approximately 65 meters of vertical extent), and waveform digitization at the 25kHz laser pulse repetition rate. The digitizer also records the initial T0 pulse that starts the timing cycle. The digitizer unit is an independent module supported by a Pentium-4 computer, two hard drives, and a high-speed data recording system. The digitizer is integrated into the ALTM system so that both full waveform and the conventional first and last returns are recorded for each transmitted laser pulse. This unique capability allows for conventional lidar data to be directly compared to the full waveform. We present examples of full waveform lidar mapping over different environments and discuss future applications.

  13. Flight Testing of the TWiLiTE Airborne Molecular Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Machan, Roman; Reed, Daniel; Cargo, Ryan; Wilkens, David J.; Hart, William; Yorks, John; Scott, Stan; Wake, Shane; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan

    2010-01-01

    In September, 2009 the TWiLiTE (Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment) direct detection Doppler lidar was integrated for engineering flight testing on the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The TWiI,iTE Doppler lidar measures vertical profiles of wind by transmitting a short ultraviolet (355 nm) laser pulse into the atmosphere, collecting the laser light scattered back to the lidar by air molecules and measuring the Doppler shifted frequency of that light. The magnitude of the Doppler shift is proportional to the wind speed of the air in the parcel scattering the laser light. TWiLiTE was developed with funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (11P). The primary objectives of the TWiLiTE program are twofold: 1) to advance the development of key technologies and subsystems critical for a future space based Global 3-1) Wind Mission, as recommended by the National Research Council in the recent Decadal Survey for Earth Science [1] and 2) to develop, for the first time, a fully autonomous airborne Doppler lidar and to demonstrate tropospheric wind profile measurements from a high altitude downward looking, moving platform to simulate spaceborne measurements. In this paper we will briefly describe the instrument followed by a discussion of the results from the 2009 engineering test flights

  14. First Airborne Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the MERLIN Demonstrator CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, Axel; Büdenbender, Christian; Ehret, Gerhard; Fix, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Kiemle, Chritstoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    2016-04-01

    CHARM-F is the new airborne four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Due to its high technological conformity it is also a demonstrator for MERLIN, the French-German satellite mission providing a methane lidar. MERLIN's Preliminary Design Review was successfully passed recently. The launch is planned for 2020. First CHARM-F measurements were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The aircraft's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, result in data similar to those obtained by a spaceborne system. The CHARM-F and MERLIN lidars are designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between the system and ground. The successfully completed CHARM-F flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. Furthermore, the dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on system design questions. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard the aircraft during the flight campaign: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the aircraft lidar. For the near future, detailed characterizations of CHARM-F are planned, further support of the MERLIN design, as well as the scientific aircraft campaign CoMet.

  15. Airborne lidar for ocean-atmosphere studies and assessment of future satellite mission concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Hu, Y.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Cetinic, I.; Butler, C. F.; Powell, K. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Cairns, B.; Chowdhary, J.; Hare, R. J.; Harper, D. B.; Cook, A. L.; Berkoff, T.; Mack, T. L.; Notari, A.; Woodell, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    Global estimates of phytoplankton biomass (Cphyto) and particulate organic carbon (POC) have traditionally been made using passive ocean color measurements. Recently, data from the CALIOP sensor on the CALIPSO satellite have provided the first measurements of these two key carbon cycle stocks from a space-based lidar. Although CALIOP was not designed for subsurface ocean retrievals, global distributions of Cphyto and POC retrieved with CALIOP compare well with independent assessments using MODIS passive ocean color data. This success suggests a potentially important future role for space lidar measurements in global ocean plankton research, particularly for a lidar system optimized for water column profiling. To this end, the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was recently modified for ocean research to provide independent vertically-resolved retrievals of the diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and particulate backscatter coefficient (bbp). The advanced HSRL has been deployed on three ocean-focused airborne field missions: a mission based in the Azores in October 2012, a CALIPSO validation mission based in Bermuda in June 2014, and the Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) experiment based in Bermuda, New Hampshire, and Virginia in July-August of 2014. On the Azores and SABOR missions, the HSRL instrument acquired data coincident with ship-based optical measurements, and data were acquired along CALIOP tracks on all three missions. Results from the airborne HSRL and CALIOP studies will be described, along with a discussion of potential future aircraft campaigns, the scalability of the HSRL technique to space, and the value of simultaneously measuring plankton abundance, marine aerosol loading and optical properties, and cloud microphysical properties and albedo.

  16. Road centerline extraction from airborne LiDAR point cloud based on hierarchical fusion and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhenyang; Hu, Youjian; Jin, Shuanggen; Yevenyo, Yao Ziggah

    2016-08-01

    Road information acquisition is an important part of city informatization construction. Airborne LiDAR provides a new means of acquiring road information. However, the existing road extraction methods using LiDAR point clouds always decide the road intensity threshold based on experience, which cannot obtain the optimal threshold to extract a road point cloud. Moreover, these existing methods are deficient in removing the interference of narrow roads and several attached areas (e.g., parking lot and bare ground) to main roads extraction, thereby imparting low completeness and correctness to the city road network extraction result. Aiming at resolving the key technical issues of road extraction from airborne LiDAR point clouds, this paper proposes a novel method to extract road centerlines from airborne LiDAR point clouds. The proposed approach is mainly composed of three key algorithms, namely, Skewness balancing, Rotating neighborhood, and Hierarchical fusion and optimization (SRH). The skewness balancing algorithm used for the filtering was adopted as a new method for obtaining an optimal intensity threshold such that the "pure" road point cloud can be obtained. The rotating neighborhood algorithm on the other hand was developed to remove narrow roads (corridors leading to parking lots or sidewalks), which are not the main roads to be extracted. The proposed hierarchical fusion and optimization algorithm caused the road centerlines to be unaffected by certain attached areas and ensured the road integrity as much as possible. The proposed method was tested using the Vaihingen dataset. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can effectively extract road centerlines in a complex urban environment with 91.4% correctness and 80.4% completeness.

  17. NASA Goddards LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Morton, Douglas C.; McCorkel, Joel T.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Ly, Vuong; Montesano, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (approximately 1 m) on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT's data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov), which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA's Data and Information policy.

  18. Special relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raogudimetla, V. S.

    1994-01-01

    case of the space-based coherent lidar, assuming flat ground. Here an interest in developing analytical expression for the location of the receiving point for the return with respect to the satellite, receiving angle and Doppler shift in frequency and amount of tip, all as measured in the satellite moving coordinate system and the diffuse scattering angle at the ground which does not require any compensation. All the three cases of retro-reflection, specular reflection and diffuse scattering by the ground should be treated though retro-reflection and diffuse scattering are more important.

  19. New Results from Frequency and Energy Reference Measurements during the first Test Flight with the Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar System CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Amediek, A.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) technique is regarded as a suitable means for the measurement of methane and carbon dioxide columns from satellite or aircraft platforms with unprecedented accuracy. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. Both use e.g. optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) in a double-pulse mode as the transmitter. Of particular importance for both instruments are the sub-modules required for the frequency stabilization of the transmitter wavelength and, since the IPDA technique, in contrast to DIAL, requires the exact knowledge of the energy ratio of outgoing on-line. The coherence of the lidar transmitter gives rise to speckle effects which have to be considered for the monitoring of the energy ratio of outgoing on- and off-line pulses. For the frequency reference of CHARM-F, a very successful stabilization scheme has been developed which will also serve as the reference for MERLIN. In Spring 2015, CHARM-F was flown aboard the German HALO aircraft for the first time which enables a detailed view on the performance of both the energy calibration and frequency reference subsystems under real flight conditions. As an initial quality check we will compared the airborne results to previous lab measurements which have been performed under stable environmental conditions.

  20. Retrieval of Vegetation Structure and Carbon Balance Parameters Using Ground-Based Lidar and Scaling to Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Ni-Meister, W.; Woodcock, C. E.; Li, X.; Jupp, D. L.; Culvenor, D.

    2006-12-01

    This research uses a ground-based, upward hemispherical scanning lidar to retrieve forest canopy structural information, including tree height, mean tree diameter, basal area, stem count density, crown diameter, woody biomass, and green biomass. These parameters are then linked to airborne and spaceborne lidars to provide large-area mapping of structural and biomass parameters. The terrestrial lidar instrument, Echidna(TM), developed by CSIRO Australia, allows rapid acquisition of vegetation structure data that can be readily integrated with downward-looking airborne lidar, such as LVIS (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor), and spaceborne lidar, such as GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) on ICESat. Lidar waveforms and vegetation structure are linked for these three sensors through the hybrid geometric-optical radiative-transfer (GORT) model, which uses basic vegetation structure parameters and principles of geometric optics, coupled with radiative transfer theory, to model scattering and absorption of light by collections of individual plant crowns. Use of a common model for lidar waveforms at ground, airborne, and spaceborne levels facilitates integration and scaling of the data to provide large-area maps and inventories of vegetation structure and carbon stocks. Our research plan includes acquisition of Echidna(TM) under-canopy hemispherical lidar scans at North American test sites where LVIS and GLAS data have been or are being acquired; analysis and modeling of spatially coincident lidar waveforms acquired by the three sensor systems; linking of the three data sources using the GORT model; and mapping of vegetation structure and carbon-balance parameters at LVIS and GLAS resolutions based on Echidna(TM) measurements.

  1. Minimizing Intra-Campaign Biases in Airborne Laser Altimetry By Thorough Calibration of Lidar System Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, J. G.; Chibisov, A.; Krabill, K. A.; Linkswiler, M. A.; Swenson, C.; Yungel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Present-day airborne lidar surveys of polar ice, NASA's Operation IceBridge foremost among them, cover large geographical areas. They are often compared with previous surveys over the same flight lines to yield mass balance estimates. Systematic biases in the lidar system, especially those which vary from campaign to campaign, can introduce significant error into these mass balance estimates and must be minimized before the data is released by the instrument team to the larger scientific community. NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) team designed a thorough and novel approach in order to minimize these biases, and here we describe two major aspects of this approach. First, we conduct regular ground vehicle-based surveys of lidar calibration targets, and overfly these targets on a near-daily basis during field campaigns. We discuss our technique for conducting these surveys, in particular the measures we take specifically to minimize systematic height biases in the surveys, since these can in turn bias entire campaigns of lidar data and the mass balance estimates based on them. Second, we calibrate our GPS antennas specifically for each instrument installation in a remote-sensing aircraft. We do this because we recognize that the metallic fuselage of the aircraft can alter the electromagnetic properties of the GPS antenna mounted to it, potentially displacing its phase center by several centimeters and biasing lidar results accordingly. We describe our technique for measuring the phase centers of a GPS antenna installed atop an aircraft, and show results which demonstrate that different installations can indeed alter the phase centers significantly.

  2. Wind sensing in an atmospheric boundary layer by means of micropulse coherent Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, V. A.; Smalikho, I. N.

    2016-07-01

    An algorithm is developed and computer simulation of wind sensing by means of micropulse coherent Doppler lidars (CDLs) in the atmospheric boundary layer is conducted for low values of the signalto- noise (SNR) ratio. The accuracy of lidar wind measurements is studied numerically for parameters of micropulse Stream Line CDLs. Optimal parameters of the measurements and processing data obtained at low SNR, which allow reconstructing vertical profiles of the wind velocity vector with required accuracy within an entire atmospheric boundary layer, are determined.

  3. Observations and Analysis of Turbulent Wake of Wind Turbine by Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Li, Rongzhong; Wang, Xitao; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Turbulent wake of wind turbine will reduce the power output of wind farm. The access to real turbulent wake of wind turbine blades with different spatial and temporal scales is provided by the pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) which operates by transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. In this paper, the authors discuss the possibility of using lidar measurements to characterize the complicated wind field, specifically wind velocity deficit by the turbine wake.

  4. Does the Coherent Lidar System Corroborate Non-Interaction of Waves (NIW)?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Roychoudhari, Chandrasekhar

    2013-01-01

    The NIW (non-interaction of waves) property has been proposed by one of the coauthors. The NIW property states that in the absence of any "obstructing" detectors, all the Huygens-Fresnel secondary wavelets will continue to propagate unhindered and without interacting (interfering) with each other. Since a coherent lidar system incorporates complex behaviors of optical components with different polarizations including circular polarization for the transmitted radiation, then the question arises whether the NIW principle accommodate elliptical polarization of light. Elliptical polarization presumes the summation of orthogonally polarized electric field vectors which contradicts the NIW principle. In this paper, we present working of a coherent lidar system using Jones matrix formulation. The Jones matrix elements represent the anisotropic dipolar properties of molecules of optical components. Accordingly, when we use the Jones matrix methodology to analyze the coherent lidar system, we find that the system behavior is congruent with the NIW property.

  5. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10. 6 micrometers with airborne and ground-based CO sub 2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado high plains. 1. Lidar intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Bowdle, D.A. ); Rothermel, J. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Post, M.J. )

    1991-03-20

    An airborne continuous wave (CW) focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar were used to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than {approximately}50% near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  6. Lidar telescope overlap function and effects of misalignment for unstable resonator transmitter and coherent receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, G. M.; Menzies, R. T.; Brothers, A. M.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of lidar telescope overlap function modeling on the accuracy of aerosol backscatter measurements are discussed. The treatment pertains primarily to a lidar arrangement which combines high sensitivity and a large degree of geometrical signal compression but places stringent requirements on the accuracy of the overlap function modeling - coherent IR lidar with noncoaxial (side-by-side) transmit and receive telescopes. A model is presented which includes an unstable resonator transmitter and accommodates both coaxial and noncoaxial arrangements, and comparison is made to experimental results including effects of misalignment.

  7. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Velocity and Altitude of Space and Arial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar has been developed to support future NASA missions to planetary bodies. The lidar transmits three laser beams and measures line-of-sight range and velocity along each beam using a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique. Accurate altitude and velocity vector data, derived from the line-of-sight measurements, enables the landing vehicle to precisely navigate from several kilometers above the ground to the designated location and execute a gentle touchdown. The same lidar sensor can also benefit terrestrial applications that cannot rely on GPS or require surface-relative altitude and velocity data.

  8. The discrimination between crude-oil spills and monomolecular sea slicks by an airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huehnerfuss, H.; Garrett, W. D.; Hoge, F. E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne lidar measurements were performed over a deployed monomolecular oleyl alcohol surface film ('slick'), the physicochemical characteristics of which are known to be similar to biogenic organic compounds secreted by plankton and fish, and adjacent 'clean' sea surfaces in the North Sea. In the presence of the slick, the suppression of the Raman backscatter at 381 nm and of two spectral bands indicative of water column fluorescent organic material at 414 and 482 nm were observed. This effect is explained by two possible mechanisms giving rise to a modification of the transmission or coupling of the laser beam into the water column: (1) the damping of capillary and short gravity water waves by the oleyl alcohol slick, and (2) the modification of the uppermost water layer by the oleyl alcohol film. The results obtained in the presence of a slick are compared with data measured over a Murban crude-oil spill with the same lidar system off the coast of the U.S.A. The consequences of the lidar-monomolecular film experiments with regard to the remote detection of crude-oil spills and oil-thickness measurements with an airborne laser fluorosensing system will be discussed.

  9. Continental Outflow from the Northeastern United States as Observed by Airborne Ozone Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, R. M.; Senff, C. J.; Darby, L. S.; White, A. B.; Trainer, M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Hardesty, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    A continental outflow of pollutants, which represents an accumulation plume of pollutants from major cities and other sources from Washington DC to New York and Boston is often produced by summertime southwesterly synoptic flow along the East Coast of the United States, according to numerical weather prediction (NWP) modeling studies. Observational evidence of these effects is provided using measurements from NOAA's airborne ozone-profiling lidar, which measures a vertical curtain of height-resolved ozone concentrations from the surface to ~3 km above sea level (ASL) along the aircraft flight track. The daytime plume of a major source, the New York City urban-complex, was shown to be carried eastward over Long Island by late afternoon, while maintaining ozone concentrations exceeding 120 ppb. Flights several hundred kilometers offshore characterized the continental outflow, which consisted of a 75-ppb outflow with embedded plumes, which maintained concentrations of > 90 ppb and widths of ~100 km. Airborne ozone lidar data were combined with trajectory data from profiler networks, dropsonde data from the lidar aircraft (a DC-3), and air chemistry data from the NOAA P-3, to characterize the plume and the atmospheric transport. This combined analysis showed that the origins of the offshore plumes were the Philadelphia and Washington DC-Baltimore areas. Comparison of plume location and peak ozone concentrations with NWP model output will also be performed and presented.

  10. Airborne Lidar for Simultaneous Measurement of Column CO2 and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    The 2-micron wavelength region is suitable for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements due to the existence of distinct absorption feathers for the gas at this particular wavelength. For more than 20 years, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several high-energy and high repetition rate 2-micron pulsed lasers. This paper will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both CO2 and water vapor (H2O) in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver telescope, detection system and data acquisition. Future plans for the IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  11. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and sun photometers during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment. Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scanning Raman lidar system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W); are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and root-mean-square differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a) = 60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements. The lidar measurements of AOT are found to be generally within 25% of the AOT measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6). However, during certain periods the lidar and Sun photometer measurements of AOT differed significantly, possibly because of variations in the aerosol physical characteristics (e.g., size, composition) which affect S(sub a). Estimates of PWV, derived from water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured by LASE, are within 5-10% of PWV derived from the airborne Sun photometer. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by both lidars show that aerosols were generally concentrated in the lowest 2-3 km.

  12. Transport of mineral dust derived from airborne wind lidar measurements during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Groß, Silke; Rahm, Stephan; Freudenthaler, Volker; Toledano, Carlos; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2015-04-01

    During the SALTRACE field experiment conducted between the 10 of June and the 15 of July 2013, the transport and properties of Saharan dust were characterized by a 2-µm Doppler wind lidar (DWL) deployed on the DLR Falcon 20 research aircraft. Unlike aerosol lidars, the DLW is able to simultaneously measure wind fields and -by means of an adequate calibration- aerosol optical properties, which is more adequate for aerosol transport studies. The retrieved horizontal and vertical wind speed provide a direct observation of dust long range transport mechanisms across the Atlantic (e.g. by the African easterly jet) from Western Africa to the Caribbean. Vertical wind observations revealed the structure of island induced lee waves in the Cape Verde and Barbados regions. A novel method for the calibration of DWLs based on simultaneous measurements with a ground-based aerosol lidar and sun photometer was developed. After being calibrated, the system is able to retrieve quantitative aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients, which is usually not obtained from coherent lidars. Results from the validation with a ground-based aerosol lidar in Barbados and the CALIPSO satellite instrument will be discussed.

  13. Using Google Earth for Rapid Dissemination of Airborne Remote Sensing Lidar and Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C. W.; Nayegandhi, A.; Brock, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    In order to visualize and disseminate vast amounts of lidar and digital photography data, we present a unique method that make these data layers available via the Google Earth interface. The NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) provides unprecedented capabilities to survey coral reefs, nearshore benthic habitats, coastal vegetation, and sandy beaches. The EAARL sensor suite includes a water-penetrating lidar that provides high-resolution topographic information, a down-looking color digital camera, a down-looking high-resolution color-infrared (CIR) digital camera, and precision kinematic GPS receivers which provide for sub-meter geo-referencing of each laser and multispectral sample. Google Earth "kml" files are created for each EAARL multispectral and processed lidar image. A hierarchical structure of network links allows the user to download high-resolution images within the region of interest. The first network link (kmz file) downloaded by the user contains a color coded flight path and "minute marker" icons along the flight path. Each "minute" icon provides access to the image overlays, and additional network links for each second along the flight path as well as flight navigation information. Layers of false-color-coded lidar Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data are made available in 2 km by 2km tiles. These layers include canopy-top, bare-Earth, submerged topography, and links to any other lidar products. The user has the option to download the x,y,z ascii point data or a DEM in the Geotif file format for each tile. The NASA EAARL project captured roughly 250,000 digital photographs in five flights conducted a few days after Hurricane Katrina made landfall along the Gulf Coast in 2005. All of the photos and DEM layers are georeferenced and viewable online using Google Earth.

  14. Analytic model utilizing the complex ABCD method for range dependency of a monostatic coherent lidar.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2014-09-10

    In this work, we present an analytic model for analyzing the range and frequency dependency of a monostatic coherent lidar measuring velocities of a diffuse target. The model of the signal power spectrum includes both the contribution from the optical system as well as the contribution from the time dependencies of the optical field. A specific coherent Doppler wind lidar system measuring wind velocity in the atmosphere is considered, in which a Gaussian field is transmitted through a simple telescope consisting of a lens and an aperture. The effects of the aperture size, the beam waist position, and pulse duration are analyzed.

  15. Buildings classification from airborne LiDAR point clouds through OBIA and ontology driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomljenovic, Ivan; Belgiu, Mariana; Lampoltshammer, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    In the last years, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data proved to be a valuable information resource for a vast number of applications ranging from land cover mapping to individual surface feature extraction from complex urban environments. To extract information from LiDAR data, users apply prior knowledge. Unfortunately, there is no consistent initiative for structuring this knowledge into data models that can be shared and reused across different applications and domains. The absence of such models poses great challenges to data interpretation, data fusion and integration as well as information transferability. The intention of this work is to describe the design, development and deployment of an ontology-based system to classify buildings from airborne LiDAR data. The novelty of this approach consists of the development of a domain ontology that specifies explicitly the knowledge used to extract features from airborne LiDAR data. The overall goal of this approach is to investigate the possibility for classification of features of interest from LiDAR data by means of domain ontology. The proposed workflow is applied to the building extraction process for the region of "Biberach an der Riss" in South Germany. Strip-adjusted and georeferenced airborne LiDAR data is processed based on geometrical and radiometric signatures stored within the point cloud. Region-growing segmentation algorithms are applied and segmented regions are exported to the GeoJSON format. Subsequently, the data is imported into the ontology-based reasoning process used to automatically classify exported features of interest. Based on the ontology it becomes possible to define domain concepts, associated properties and relations. As a consequence, the resulting specific body of knowledge restricts possible interpretation variants. Moreover, ontologies are machinable and thus it is possible to run reasoning on top of them. Available reasoners (FACT++, JESS, Pellet) are used to check

  16. Advanced airborne Doppler Wind Lidar signal processing for observations in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmitt, G. D.; Godwin, K.

    2014-10-01

    An airborne Doppler Wind Lidar has been used in several atmospheric boundary layer field experiments over the past decade. These experiments have taken place in California (Salinas Valley and the Monterey Peninsula), Arizona (Yuma Proving Grounds), and Utah (Dugway Proving Grounds). A primary objective of these field experiments was to compare model predicted winds in mountainous areas with wind observations obtained from the lidar measurements. To accomplish this, there is a basic challenge to determine when a comparison is valid in space and time. Here we have introduced the case for combining 12 pint step stare scans (conical) with near nadir stares to better represent the vertical air motions in complex terrain. We have also described a new scanning pattern that allows for LOS intersections for desired altitudes such as a ridge line or a valley floor.

  17. Mapping and Monitoring Delmarva Fox Squirrel Habitat Using an Airborne LiDAR Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Ross; Ratnaswamy, Mary; Keller, Cherry

    2004-01-01

    Twenty five hundred thirty nine kilometers of airborne laser profiling and videography data were acquired over the state of Delaware during the summer of 2000. The laser ranging measurements and video from approximately one-half of that data set (1304 km) were analyzed to identify and locate forested sites that might potentially support populations of Delmarva fox squirrel (DFS, Sciurus niger cinereus). The DFS is an endangered species previously endemic to tall, dense, mature forests with open understories on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay. The airborne LiDAR employed in this study can measure forest canopy height and canopy closure, but cannot measure or infer understory canopy conditions. Hence the LiDAR must be viewed as a tool to map potential, not actual, habitat. Fifty-three potentially suitable DFS sites were identified in the 1304 km of flight transect data. Each of the 53 sites met the following criteria according to the LiDAR and video record: (1 ) at least 120m of contiguous forest; (2) an average canopy height greater than 20m; (3) an average canopy closure of >80%; and (4) no roofs, impervious surface (e.g., asphalt, concrete), and/or open water anywhere along the 120m length of the laser segment. Thirty-two of the 53 sites were visited on the ground and measurements taken for a DFS habitat suitability model. Seventy eight percent of the sites (25 of 32) were judged by the model to be suited to supporting a DFS population. Twenty-eight of the 32 sites visited in the field were in forest cover types (hardwood, mixed wood, conifer, wetlands) according to a land cover GIS map. Of these, 23 (82%) were suited to support DFS. The remaining 4 sites were located in nonforest cover types - agricultural or residential areas. Two of the four, or 50% were suited to the DFS. All of the LiDAR flight data, 2539 km, were analyzed to

  18. Estimating FPAR of maize canopy using airborne discrete-return LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Pan, Feifei

    2014-03-10

    The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) is a key parameter for ecosystem modeling, crop growth monitoring and yield prediction. Ground-based FPAR measurements are time consuming and labor intensive. Remote sensing provides an alternative method to obtain repeated, rapid and inexpensive estimates of FPAR over large areas. LiDAR is an active remote sensing technology and can be used to extract accurate canopy structure parameters. A method to estimating FPAR of maize from airborne discrete-return LiDAR data was developed and tested in this study. The raw LiDAR point clouds were processed to separate ground returns from vegetation returns using a filter method over a maize field in the Heihe River Basin, northwest China. The fractional cover (fCover) of maize canopy was computed using the ratio of canopy return counts or intensity sums to the total of returns or intensities. FPAR estimation models were established based on linear regression analysis between the LiDAR-derived fCover and the field-measured FPAR (R(2) = 0.90, RMSE = 0.032, p < 0.001). The reliability of the constructed regression model was assessed using the leave-one-out cross-validation procedure and results show that the regression model is not overfitting the data and has a good generalization capability. Finally, 15 independent field-measured FPARs were used to evaluate accuracy of the LiDAR-predicted FPARs and results show that the LiDAR-predicted FPAR has a high accuracy (R(2) = 0.89, RMSE = 0.034). In summary, this study suggests that the airborne discrete-return LiDAR data could be adopted to accurately estimate FPAR of maize.

  19. Double-Pulse Two-Micron IPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    An advanced double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-micron laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation from up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  20. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Column Abundance Made Using a Pulsed IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anamd; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection IPDA lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier (OPA) pumped by a Nd:YAG laser and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  1. Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part 1; Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, Cyrille N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Korb, C. Laurence; Evans, Keith D.; Palm, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Remote airborne measurements of the vertical and horizontal structure of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere are made with an oxygen differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A detailed analysis of this measurement technique is provided which includes corrections for imprecise knowledge of the detector background level, the oxygen absorption fine parameters, and variations in the laser output energy. In addition, we analyze other possible sources of systematic errors including spectral effects related to aerosol and molecular scattering interference by rotational Raman scattering and interference by isotopic oxygen fines.

  2. Challenges and Solutions for Frequency and Energy References for Spaceborne and Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Andreas; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Witschas, Benjamin; Wirth, Martin; Büdenbender, Christian; Amediek, Axel; Ehret, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The stringent requirements for both the frequency stability and power reference represent a challenging task for Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars (IPDA) to measure greenhouse gas columns from satellite or aircraft. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. The concepts and realization of these important sub-systems are discussed.

  3. Gross-merchantable timber volume estimation using an airborne lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclean, G. A.; Krabill, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary study to determine the utility of an airborne laser as a tool for use by forest managers to estimate gross-merchantable timber volume was conducted near the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Flight Facility utilizing the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system. Measured timber volume was regressed against the cross-sectional area of an AOL-generated profile of forest at the same location. The AOL profile area was found to be a very significant variable in the estimation of gross-merchantable timber volume. Significant improvements were obtained when the data were stratified by species. The overall R-squared value obtained was 0.921 with the regression significant at the one percent level.

  4. Application of the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar to the mapping of chlorophyll and other organic pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Laser fluorosensing techniques used for the airborne measurement of chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reviewed. Previous experiments demonstrating the utility of the airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) for assessment of various marine parameters are briefly discussed. The configuration of the AOL during the NOAA/NASA Superflux experiments is described. The participation of the AOL in these experiments is presented and the preliminary results are discussed. The importance of multispectral receiving capability in a laser fluorosensing system for providing reproducible measurements over wide areas having spatial variations in water column transmittance properties is addressed. This capability minimizes the number of truthing points required and is usable even in shallow estuarine areas where resuspension of bottom sediment is common. Finally, problems encountered on the Superflux missions and the resulting limitations on the AOL data sets are addressed and feasible solutions to these problems are provided.

  5. Boundary Layer CO2 mixing ratio measurements by an airborne pulsed IPDA lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the primary signature of CO2 fluxes at the surface occurs in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), remote sensing measurements of CO2 that can resolve the CO2 absorption in the PBL separate from the total column are more sensitive to fluxes than those that can only measure a total column. The NASA Goddard CO2 sounder is a pulsed, range-resolved lidar that samples multiple (presently 30) wavelengths across the 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. The range resolution and line shape measurement enable CO2 mixing ratio measurements to be made in two or more altitude layers including the PBL via lidar cloud-slicing and multi-layer retrievals techniques. The pulsed lidar approach allows range-resolved backscatter of scattering from ground and cloud tops. Post flight data analysis can be used split the vertical CO2 column into layers (lidar cloud-slicing) and solve for the CO2 mixing ratio in each layer. We have demonstrated lidar cloud slicing with lidar measurements from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 during the corn-growing season, remotely measuring a ≈15 ppm drawdown in the PBL CO2. We will present results using an improved lidar cloud slicing retrieval algorithm as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign. The CO2 absorption line is also more pressure broadened at lower altitudes. Analyzing the line shape also allows solving for some vertical resolution in the CO2 distribution. By allowing the retrieval process to independently vary the column concentrations in two or more altitude layers, one can perform a best-fit retrieval to obtain the CO2 mixing ratios in each of the layers. Analysis of airborne lidar measurements (in 2011) over Iowa, USA and Four Corners, New Mexico, USA show that for altitudes above 8 km, the CO2 sounder can detect and measure enhanced or diminished CO2 mixing ratios in the PBL even in the absence of clouds. We will present these results as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming

  6. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Concentration in the ASCENDS 2014 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Chen, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We report progress in demonstrating a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line by using 30 wavelength samples distributed across the lube. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength 10 times per second. The retrievals solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape and the column average CO2 concentrations using radiative transfer calculations based on HITRAN, the aircraft altitude, range to the scattering surface, and the atmospheric conditions. We compare these to CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. The number of wavelength samples can be reduced in the retrievals. During the ASCENDS airborne campaign in 2013 two flights were made in February over snow in the Rocky Mountains and the Central Plains allowing measurement of snow-covered surface reflectivity. Several improvements were made to the lidar for the 2014 campaign. These included using a new step-locked laser diode source, and incorporating a new HgCdTe APD detector and analog digitizer into the lidar receiver. Testing showed this detector had higher sensitivity, analog response, and a more linear dynamic range than the PMT detector used previously. In 2014 flights were made in late August and early September over the California Central Valley, the redwood forests along the California coast, two desert areas in Nevada and California, and two flights above growing agriculture in Iowa. Two flights were also made under OCO-2 satellite ground tracks. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, and mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, and through thin clouds and aerosol scattering. The lidar measurements clearly

  7. Lidar System for Airborne Measurement of Clouds and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew; Scott, V. Stanley; Izquierdo, Luis Ramos; Marzouk, Joe

    2008-01-01

    A lidar system for measuring optical properties of clouds and aerosols at three wavelengths is depicted. The laser transmitter is based on a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal pumped by light coupled to the crystal via optical fibers from laser diodes that are located away from the crystal to aid in dissipating the heat generated in the diodes and their drive circuits. The output of the Nd:YVO4 crystal has a wavelength of 1064 nm, and is made to pass through frequency-doubling and frequency-tripling crystals. As a result, the net laser output is a collinear superposition of beams at wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm. The laser operates at a pulse-repetition rate of 5 kHz, emitting per-pulse energies of 50 microJ at 1064 nm, 25 microJ at 532 nm and 50 microJ at 355 nm. An important feature of this system is an integrating sphere located between the laser output and the laser beam expander lenses. The integrating sphere collects light scattered from the lenses. Three energy-monitor detectors are located at ports inside the integrating sphere. Each of these detectors is equipped with filters such that the laser output energy is measured independently for each wavelength. The laser output energy is measured on each pulse to enable the most accurate calibration possible. The 1064-nm and 532-nm photodetectors are, more specifically, single photon-counting modules (SPCMs). When used at 1064 nm, these detectors have approximately 3% quantum efficiency and low thermal noise (fewer than 200 counts per second). When used at 532 nm, the SPCMs have quantum efficiency of about 60%. The photodetector for the 355-nm channel is a photon-counting photomultiplier tube having a quantum efficiency of about 20%. The use of photon-counting detectors is made feasible by the low laser pulse energy. The main advantage of photon-counting is ease of inversion of data without need for complicated calibration schemes like those necessary for analog detectors. The disadvantage of photon-counting detectors

  8. Atmospheric correlation-time measurements and effects on coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    The time for which the backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles remains coherent was studied by using a pulsed TEA CO2 lidar with coherent detection. Experimental results are compared with predictions by using model pulse shapes appropriate for TEA CO2 laser transmitters. The correlation time of the backscatter return signal is important in studies of atmospheric turbulence and its effects on optical propagation and backscatter. Techniques for its measurement are discussed and evaluated.

  9. Towards a Better Understanding of Forest Biophysical Parameters - Combining High Fidelity Simulations, Airborne Waveform Lidar, and Terrestrial Lidar Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aardt, J. A.; Kelbe, D.; Romanczyk, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; Krause, K.; Kampe, T. U.

    2015-12-01

    The science community has come a long way from traditional, 2D imaging approaches to the assessment of ecosystem structure, function and composition. For example, waveform- (wlidar) and terrestrial lidar systems (TLS) present us with exciting opportunities for detailed, accurate and precise, and scalable structural characterization of vegetation. wlidar and TLS generally can be regarded as complementary i.e., airborne wlidar typically digitizes the entire backscattered energy profile at high spatial and vertical resolutions, while TLS samples dense 3D point clouds of the bottom-up vegetation structure. Research teams at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) have been collaborating with the National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) to assess vegetation structure and variation in the Pacific-Southwest (San Joaquin Experimental Range and Soaproot Saddle sites, CA) and Northeast (Harvard Forest, MA) domains. The teams collected airborne small-footprint wlidar data and in-situ TLS data for these sites and is taking a two-tiered (top-down and bottom-up) approach to forest structural assessment. We will present our work where we (i) studied wlidar signal attenuation throughout the canopy in a simulation environment - the attenuation correction factor was linearly proportional to the sum of the area under the proceeding Gaussians - and (ii) used the fine-scale stem structure extracted via TLS to reconstruct complex, but realistic, 3D forest environments for refined simulation studies. These studies indicate that we can potentially assess vegetation canopies remotely using a vertically-stratified approach with wlidar and use rapid-scan TLS technology to calibrate models predicated upon synoptic airborne systems. Other outputs of our approaches can be used for typical forest inventory, ecological parameter extraction, and new algorithm validation.

  10. Column Closure Studies of Lower Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-Asia Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ and Ship-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Hegg, A.; Wang, J.; Bates, D.; Redemann, J.; Russells, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Welton, E. J.; Seinfield, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    We assess the consistency (closure) between solar beam attenuation by aerosols and water vapor measured by airborne sunphotometry and derived from airborne in-situ, and ship-based lidar measurements during the April 2001 Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The airborne data presented here were obtained aboard the Twin Otter aircraft. Comparing aerosol extinction o(550 nm) from four different techniques shows good agreement for the vertical distribution of aerosol layers. However, the level of agreement in absolute magnitude of the derived aerosol extinction varied among the aerosol layers sampled. The sigma(550 nm) computed from airborne in-situ size distribution and composition measurements shows good agreement with airborne sunphotometry in the marine boundary layer but is considerably lower in layers dominated by dust if the particles are assumed to be spherical. The sigma(550 nm) from airborne in-situ scattering and absorption measurements are about approx. 13% lower than those obtained from airborne sunphotometry during 14 vertical profiles. Combining lidar and the airborne sunphotometer measurements reveals the prevalence of dust layers at altitudes up to 10 km with layer aerosol optical depth (from 3.5 to 10 km altitude) of approx. 0.1 to 0.2 (500 nm) and extinction-to-backscatter ratios of 59-71 sr (523 nm). The airborne sunphotometer aboard the Twin Otter reveals a relatively dry atmosphere during ACE- Asia with all water vapor columns less than 1.5 cm and water vapor densities w less than 12 g/cu m. Comparing layer water vapor amounts and w from the airborne sunphotometer to the same quantities measured with aircraft in-situ sensors leads to a high correlation (r(sup 3)=0.96) but the sunphotometer tends to underestimate w by 7%.

  11. Above ground biomass and tree species richness estimation with airborne lidar in tropical Ghana forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglio Laurin, Gaia; Puletti, Nicola; Chen, Qi; Corona, Piermaria; Papale, Dario; Valentini, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    Estimates of forest aboveground biomass are fundamental for carbon monitoring and accounting; delivering information at very high spatial resolution is especially valuable for local management, conservation and selective logging purposes. In tropical areas, hosting large biomass and biodiversity resources which are often threatened by unsustainable anthropogenic pressures, frequent forest resources monitoring is needed. Lidar is a powerful tool to estimate aboveground biomass at fine resolution; however its application in tropical forests has been limited, with high variability in the accuracy of results. Lidar pulses scan the forest vertical profile, and can provide structure information which is also linked to biodiversity. In the last decade the remote sensing of biodiversity has received great attention, but few studies focused on the use of lidar for assessing tree species richness in tropical forests. This research aims at estimating aboveground biomass and tree species richness using discrete return airborne lidar in Ghana forests. We tested an advanced statistical technique, Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), which does not require assumptions on data distribution or on the relationships between variables, being suitable for studying ecological variables. We compared the MARS regression results with those obtained by multilinear regression and found that both algorithms were effective, but MARS provided higher accuracy either for biomass (R2 = 0.72) and species richness (R2 = 0.64). We also noted strong correlation between biodiversity and biomass field values. Even if the forest areas under analysis are limited in extent and represent peculiar ecosystems, the preliminary indications produced by our study suggest that instrument such as lidar, specifically useful for pinpointing forest structure, can also be exploited as a support for tree species richness assessment.

  12. Assessment of the Geodetic and Color Accuracy of Multi-Pass Airborne/Mobile Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, R. T.; Petersen, B.; Sunderland, D.; Blonquist, K.; Israelsen, P.; Crum, G.; Fowles, A.; Neale, C.

    2008-12-01

    The ability to merge lidar and color image data acquired by multiple passes of an aircraft or van is largely dependent on the accuracy of the navigation system that estimates the dynamic position and orientation of the sensor. We report an assessment of the performance of a Riegl Q560 lidar transceiver combined with a Litton LN-200 inertial measurement unit (IMU) based NovAtel SPAN GPS/IMU system and a Panasonic HD Video Camera system. Several techniques are reported that were used to maximize the performance of the GPS/IMU system in generating precisely merged point clouds. The airborne data used included eight flight lines all overflying the same building on the campus at Utah State University. These lines were flown at the FAA minimum altitude of 1000 feet for fixed-wing aircraft. The mobile data was then acquired with the same system mounted to look sideways out of a van several months later. The van was driven around the same building at variable speed in order to avoid pedestrians. An absolute accuracy of about 6 cm and a relative accuracy of less than 2.5 cm one-sigma are documented for the merged data. Several techniques are also reported for merging of the color video data stream with the lidar point cloud. A technique for back-projecting and burning lidar points within the video stream enables the verification of co-boresighting accuracy. The resulting pixel-level alignment is accurate with within the size of a lidar footprint. The techniques described in this paper enable the display of high-resolution colored points of high detail and color clarity.

  13. Optimizing coherent lidar performance with graded-reflectance laser resonator optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated how the design of graded-reflectance output coupler unstable laser cavities may be tailored to significantly enhance the overall power transmission efficiency of a given laser system relative to that of a conventional diffractively coupled unstable resonator. The importance of these findings in coherent lidar applications is explained with particular emphasis on projected space-based systems.

  14. Use of an airborne lidar system to model plant species composition and diversity of Mediterranean oak forests.

    PubMed

    Simonson, William D; Allen, Harriet D; Coomes, David A

    2012-10-01

    Airborne lidar is a remote-sensing tool of increasing importance in ecological and conservation research due to its ability to characterize three-dimensional vegetation structure. If different aspects of plant species diversity and composition can be related to vegetation structure, landscape-level assessments of plant communities may be possible. We examined this possibility for Mediterranean oak forests in southern Portugal, which are rich in biological diversity but also threatened. We compared data from a discrete, first-and-last return lidar data set collected for 31 plots of cork oak (Quercus suber) and Algerian oak (Quercus canariensis) forest with field data to test whether lidar can be used to predict the vertical structure of vegetation, diversity of plant species, and community type. Lidar- and field-measured structural data were significantly correlated (up to r= 0.85). Diversity of forest species was significantly associated with lidar-measured vegetation height (R(2) = 0.50, p < 0.001). Clustering and ordination of the species data pointed to the presence of 2 main forest classes that could be discriminated with an accuracy of 89% on the basis of lidar data. Lidar can be applied widely for mapping of habitat and assessments of habitat condition (e.g., in support of the European Species and Habitats Directive [92/43/EEC]). However, particular attention needs to be paid to issues of survey design: density of lidar points and geospatial accuracy of ground-truthing and its timing relative to acquisition of lidar data.

  15. An Airborne Scanning LiDAR System for Ocean and Coastal Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineman, B. D.; Lenain, L.; Castel, D.; Melville, W. K.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed an airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system and demonstrated its functionality for terrestrial and oceanographic measurements. Differential GPS (DGPS) and an Inertial Navigation System (INS) are synchronized with the LiDAR, providing end result vertical rms errors of approximately 6~cm. Flying 170~m above the surface, we achieve a point density of ~ 0.7 m-2 and a swath width of 90 to 120~m over ocean and 200~m over land. Georeferencing algorithms were developed in-house and earth-referenced data are available several hours after acquisition. Surveys from the system are compared with ground DGPS surveys and existing airborne surveys of fixed targets. Twelve research flights in a Piper Twin Comanche from August 2007 to July 2008 have provided topography of the Southern California coastline and sea surface wave fields in the nearshore ocean environment. Two of the flights also documented the results of the October 2007 landslide on Mt.~Soledad in La Jolla, California. Eight research flights aboard a Cessna Caravan surveyed the topography, lagoon, reef, and surrounding seas of Lady Elliot Island (LEI) in Australia's Great Barrier Reef in April 2008. We describe applications for the system, including coastal topographic surveys, wave measurements, reef research, and ship wake studies.

  16. Evaluating the accuracy and representativeness of Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar winds in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, K.; Emmitt, G. D.; Greco, S.; De Wekker, S.

    2013-12-01

    An Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar (ADWL) was flown during the MATERHORN experiment in October 2012. The ADWL was used to obtain profiles of u,v,w,σlos and aerosol structure between the surface and flight level (~2500m AGL). The lidar returns were processed to obtain a vertical resolution of 50m and a complete profile every 1.5km. The aircraft (Navy Twin Otter) was flown in a 'lawnmower' pattern near and over Granite Mountain located at the Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. Combining multiple Lines of Sight (LOS) measurements to construct a vertical profile in complex terrain presents several challenges that must be met before using these data in numerical models. In addition to the wind profiles obtained with a nadir conical scan, we pointed the beam straight down to obtain a direct measure of the vertical velocity of the air. With a precision of < 10 cm/s, mountain waves, katabatic flows and other complex terrain induced flow features are resolved and provide validation of model resolved flow features. Examples of ADWL profile grids will be presented along with a discussion of the methodology(s) used to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness of the ADWL winds. We will also illustrate how we are making comparisons with numerical model wind fields (WRF) by using a forward operator with lidar LOS observations. Particular attention will be paid to interpreting the non-conventional ADWL's estimate(s) of turbulent kinetic energy.

  17. Observing the Forest Canopy with a New Ultra-Violet Compact Airborne Lidar

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Juan; Chazette, Patrick; Allouis, Tristan; Flamant, Pierre H.; Durrieu, Sylvie; Sanak, Joseph; Genau, Pascal; Guyon, Dominique; Loustau, Denis; Flamant, Cyrille

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new airborne UV lidar for the forest canopy and deployed it in the Landes forest (France). It is the first one that: (i) operates at 355 nm for emitting energetic pulses of 16 mJ at 20 Hz while fulfilling eye-safety regulations and (ii) is flown onboard an ultra-light airplane for enhanced flight flexibility. Laser footprints at ground level were 2.4 m wide for a flying altitude of 300 m. Three test areas of ∼500 × 500 m2 with Maritime pines of different ages were investigated. We used a threshold method adapted for this lidar to accurately extract from its waveforms detailed forest canopy vertical structure: canopy top, tree crown base and undergrowth heights. Good detection sensitivity enabled the observation of ground returns underneath the trees. Statistical and one-to-one comparisons with ground measurements by field foresters indicated a mean absolute accuracy of ∼1 m. Sensitivity tests on detection threshold showed the importance of signal to noise ratio and footprint size for a proper detection of the canopy vertical structure. This UV-lidar is intended for future innovative applications of simultaneous observation of forest canopy, laser-induced vegetation fluorescence and atmospheric aerosols. PMID:22163608

  18. Observing the forest canopy with a new ultra-violet compact airborne lidar.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Juan; Chazette, Patrick; Allouis, Tristan; Flamant, Pierre H; Durrieu, Sylvie; Sanak, Joseph; Genau, Pascal; Guyon, Dominique; Loustau, Denis; Flamant, Cyrille

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new airborne UV lidar for the forest canopy and deployed it in the Landes forest (France). It is the first one that: (i) operates at 355 nm for emitting energetic pulses of 16 mJ at 20 Hz while fulfilling eye-safety regulations and (ii) is flown onboard an ultra-light airplane for enhanced flight flexibility. Laser footprints at ground level were 2.4 m wide for a flying altitude of 300 m. Three test areas of ≈ 500 × 500 m(2) with Maritime pines of different ages were investigated. We used a threshold method adapted for this lidar to accurately extract from its waveforms detailed forest canopy vertical structure: canopy top, tree crown base and undergrowth heights. Good detection sensitivity enabled the observation of ground returns underneath the trees. Statistical and one-to-one comparisons with ground measurements by field foresters indicated a mean absolute accuracy of ≈ 1 m. Sensitivity tests on detection threshold showed the importance of signal to noise ratio and footprint size for a proper detection of the canopy vertical structure. This UV-lidar is intended for future innovative applications of simultaneous observation of forest canopy, laser-induced vegetation fluorescence and atmospheric aerosols.

  19. Separating mixtures of aerosol types in airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Vaughan, M. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of aerosol type is important for source attribution and for determining the magnitude and assessing the consequences of aerosol radiative forcing. However, atmospheric aerosol is frequently not a single pure type, but instead occurs as a mixture of types, and this mixing affects the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol. This paper extends the work of earlier researchers by using the aerosol intensive parameters measured by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) to develop a comprehensive and unified set of rules for characterizing the external mixing of several key aerosol intensive parameters: extinction-to-backscatter ratio (i.e. lidar ratio), backscatter color ratio, and depolarization ratio. We present the mixing rules in a particularly simple form that leads easily to mixing rules for the covariance matrices that describe aerosol distributions, rather than just scalar values of measured parameters. These rules can be applied to infer mixing ratios from the lidar-observed aerosol parameters, even for cases without significant depolarization. We demonstrate our technique with measurement curtains from three HSRL-1 flights which exhibit mixing between two aerosol types, urban pollution plus dust, marine plus dust, and smoke plus marine. For these cases, we infer a time-height cross-section of mixing ratio along the flight track, and partition aerosol extinction into portions attributed to the two pure types.

  20. Separating mixtures of aerosol types in airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Vaughan, M. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge of aerosol type is important for determining the magnitude and assessing the consequences of aerosol radiative forcing, and can provide useful information for source attribution studies. However, atmospheric aerosol is frequently not a single pure type, but instead occurs as a mixture of types, and this mixing affects the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol. This paper extends the work of earlier researchers by using the aerosol intensive parameters measured by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) to develop a comprehensive and unified set of rules for characterizing the external mixing of several key aerosol intensive parameters: extinction-to-backscatter ratio (i.e., lidar ratio), backscatter color ratio, and depolarization ratio. We present the mixing rules in a particularly simple form that leads easily to mixing rules for the covariance matrices that describe aerosol distributions, rather than just single values of measured parameters. These rules can be applied to infer mixing ratios from the lidar-observed aerosol parameters, even for cases without significant depolarization. We demonstrate our technique with measurement curtains from three HSRL-1 flights which exhibit mixing between two aerosol types, urban pollution plus dust, marine plus dust, and smoke plus marine. For these cases, we infer a time-height cross-section of extinction mixing ratio along the flight track, and partition aerosol extinction into portions attributed to the two pure types.

  1. More About Graded-Reflectance Optics For Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of energy-extraction and power-transmission efficiency of unstable-resonator laser cavity, output mirror of which has graded reflectance. Super-gaussian reflectance profile may optimize performance. Similar study reported in "Comparative Study of Resonator Optics for Lidar Applications" (NPO-17776).

  2. Investigating the spatial distribution of water levels in the Mackenzie Delta using airborne LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkinson, C.; Crasto, N.; Marsh, P.; Forbes, D.; Lesack, L.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data were used to map water level (WL) and hydraulic gradients (??H/??x) in the Mackenzie Delta. The LiDAR WL data were validated against eight independent hydrometric gauge measurements and demonstrated mean offsets from - 0??22 to + 0??04 m (??< 0??11). LiDAR-based WL gradients could be estimated with confidence over channel lengths exceeding 5-10 km where the WL change exceeded local noise levels in the LiDAR data. For the entire Delta, the LiDAR sample coverage indicated a rate of change in longitudinal gradient (??2H/??x) of 5??5 ?? 10-10 m m-2; therefore offering a potential means to estimate average flood stage hydraulic gradient for areas of the Delta not sampled or monitored. In the Outer Delta, within-channel and terrain gradient measurements all returned a consistent estimate of - 1 ?? 10-5 m m-1, suggesting that this is a typical hydraulic gradient for the downstream end of the Delta. For short reaches (<10 km) of the Peel and Middle Channels in the middle of the Delta, significant and consistent hydraulic gradient estimates of - 5 ?? 10-5 m m-1 were observed. Evidence that hydraulic gradients can vary over short distances, however, was observed in the Peel Channel immediately upstream of Aklavik. A positive elevation anomaly (bulge) of > 0??1 m was observed at a channel constriction entering a meander bend, suggesting a localized modification of the channel hydraulics. Furthermore, water levels in the anabranch channels of the Peel River were almost 1 m higher than in Middle Channel of the Mackenzie River. This suggests: (i) the channels are elevated and have shallower bank heights in this part of the delta, leading to increased cross-delta and along-channel hydraulic gradients; and/or (ii) a proportion of the Peel River flow is lost to Middle Channel due to drainage across the delta through anastamosing channels. This study has demonstrated that airborne LiDAR data contain valuable information describing

  3. Airborne Lidar-Based Estimates of Tropical Forest Structure in Complex Terrain: Opportunities and Trade-Offs for REDD+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitold, Veronika; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carbon stocks and fluxes in tropical forests remain large sources of uncertainty in the global carbon budget. Airborne lidar remote sensing is a powerful tool for estimating aboveground biomass, provided that lidar measurements penetrate dense forest vegetation to generate accurate estimates of surface topography and canopy heights. Tropical forest areas with complex topography present a challenge for lidar remote sensing. Results: We compared digital terrain models (DTM) derived from airborne lidar data from a mountainous region of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil to 35 ground control points measured with survey grade GNSS receivers. The terrain model generated from full-density (approx. 20 returns/sq m) data was highly accurate (mean signed error of 0.19 +/-0.97 m), while those derived from reduced-density datasets (8/sq m, 4/sq m, 2/sq m and 1/sq m) were increasingly less accurate. Canopy heights calculated from reduced-density lidar data declined as data density decreased due to the inability to accurately model the terrain surface. For lidar return densities below 4/sq m, the bias in height estimates translated into errors of 80-125 Mg/ha in predicted aboveground biomass. Conclusions: Given the growing emphasis on the use of airborne lidar for forest management, carbon monitoring, and conservation efforts, the results of this study highlight the importance of careful survey planning and consistent sampling for accurate quantification of aboveground biomass stocks and dynamics. Approaches that rely primarily on canopy height to estimate aboveground biomass are sensitive to DTM errors from variability in lidar sampling density.

  4. Estimation of shoreline position and change using airborne topographic lidar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, H.F.; Sallenger, A.H.; List, J.H.; Holman, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for estimating shoreline position from airborne scanning laser data. This technique allows rapid estimation of objective, GPS-based shoreline positions over hundreds of kilometers of coast, essential for the assessment of large-scale coastal behavior. Shoreline position, defined as the cross-shore position of a vertical shoreline datum, is found by fitting a function to cross-shore profiles of laser altimetry data located in a vertical range around the datum and then evaluating the function at the specified datum. Error bars on horizontal position are directly calculated as the 95% confidence interval on the mean value based on the Student's t distribution of the errors of the regression. The technique was tested using lidar data collected with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) in September 1997 on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Estimated lidar-based shoreline position was compared to shoreline position as measured by a ground-based GPS vehicle survey system. The two methods agreed closely with a root mean square difference of 2.9 m. The mean 95% confidence interval for shoreline position was ?? 1.4 m. The technique has been applied to a study of shoreline change on Assateague Island, Maryland/Virginia, where three ATM data sets were used to assess the statistics of large-scale shoreline change caused by a major 'northeaster' winter storm. The accuracy of both the lidar system and the technique described provides measures of shoreline position and change that are ideal for studying storm-scale variability over large spatial scales.

  5. Decorrelation analysis of L-band interferometry over the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (France) using airborne LiDAR data and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedze, M.; Bretar, F.; Heggy, E.; Berveiller, D.; Jacquemoud, S.

    2012-12-01

    We combine ALOS-PALSAR coherence images with airborne LiDAR data, both acquired over the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island, France) in 2008 and 2009, to determine the cause of errors that affects repeat-pass InSAR measurements. We investigate how phase coherence varies with the nature of volcanic terrains and vegetation density in a typical volcanic environment. Our study is focused on several sites characterized by different vegetation densities (Leaf Area Index or LAI) and on bare volcanic surfaces displaying different geophysical properties: pahoehoe and a'a lava flows, slabby pahoehoe flows, and pyroclastic deposits (lapillis). The high resolution DTM generated using LiDAR data is used to subtract out the topographic contribution from the interferogram and to improve the radar coherence maps. To evaluate the coherence loss terms, the relationship between LiDAR intensity and radar coherence is then analyzed over several surfaces. Pyroclastic deposits and a'a lava flows are characterized by low coherence and intensity values, with high coherence standard deviations; pahoehoe and slabby lava flows display high coherence and intensity values, with low standard deviations; coherence decreases in regions covered with dense vegetation, whereas LiDAR intensity increases, and we observe a higher dispersion of coherence and intensity values depending on the type and density of plants. Additionally, a geological survey has been conducted in October 2011 to measure the physical properties of the surface and better interpret the radar images. From digital photographs, we first computed ~ 25 m^2 DTM at 1 mm spatial resolution using an automatic image matching method. Several 4 m long linear profiles have been extracted to calculate three roughness parameters: the standard deviation of height σ, the correlation length L_c, and the Z_s parameter defined as Z_s= σ^2/L_c. They describe soil surface microrelief: the rougher the surface, the lower the correlation

  6. Measuring Complete 3D Vegetation Structure With Airborne Waveform Lidar: A Calibration and Validation With Terrestrial Lidar Derived Voxels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, S.; Anderson, K.; Disney, M.; Gaston, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurements of vegetation are vital to understand habitats and their provision of ecosystem services as well as having applications in satellite calibration, weather modelling and forestry. The majority of humans now live in urban areas and so understanding vegetation structure in these very heterogeneous areas is of importance. A number of previous studies have used airborne lidar (ALS) to characterise canopy height and canopy cover, but very few have fully characterised 3D vegetation, including understorey. Those that have either relied on leaf-off scans to allow unattenuated measurement of understorey or else did not validate. A method for creating a detailed voxel map of urban vegetation, in which the surface area of vegetation within a grid of cuboids (1.5m by 1.5m by 25 cm) is defined, from full-waveform ALS is presented. The ALS was processed with deconvolution and attenuation correction methods. The signal processing was calibrated and validated against synthetic waveforms generated from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data, taken as "truth". The TLS data was corrected for partial hits and attenuation using a voxel approach and these steps were validated and found to be accurate. The ALS results were benchmarked against the more common discrete return ALS products (produced automatically by the lidar manufacturer's algorithms) and Gaussian decomposition of full-waveform ALS. The true vegetation profile was accurately recreated by deconvolution. Far more detail was captured by the deconvolved waveform than either the discrete return or Gaussian decomposed ALS, particularly detail within the canopy; vital information for understanding habitats. In the paper, we will present the results with a focus on the methodological steps towards generating the voxel model, and the subsequent quantitative calibration and validation of the modelling approach using TLS. We will discuss the implications of the work for complete vegetation canopy descriptions in

  7. Characterization of turbulent wake of wind turbine by coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Li, Rongzhong; Wang, Xitao; Feng, Changzhong; Zhuang, Quanfeng; Zhang, Kailin

    2014-11-01

    The indispensable access to real turbulent wake behavior is provided by the pulsed coherent Doppler Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) which operates by transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. The Doppler shift in the frequency of the backscattered signal is analyzed to obtain the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity component of the air motion. From the LOS velocities the characteristic of the turbulent wake can be deduced. The Coherent Doppler LIDAR (CDL) is based on all-fiber laser technology and fast digital-signal-processing technology. The 1.5 µm eye-safe Doppler LIDAR system has a pulse length of 200ns and a pulse repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The speed measurement range is ±50m/s and the speed measurement uncertainty is 0.3 m/s. The 2-axis beam scanner and detection range of 3000m enable the system to monitor the whole wind farming filed. Because of the all-fiber structure adoption, the system is stable, reliable and high-integrated. The wake vortices of wind turbine blades with different spatial and temporal scales have been observed by LIDAR. In this paper, the authors discuss the possibility of using LIDAR measurements to characterize the complicated wind field, specifically wind velocity deficit and terrain effects.

  8. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  9. Mapping the Risk of Forest Wind Damage Using Airborne Scanning LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, N.; Vastaranta, M.; Honkavaara, E.; Wulder, M. A.; White, J. C.; Litkey, P.; Holopainen, M.; Hyyppä, J.

    2015-03-01

    Wind damage is known for causing threats to sustainable forest management and yield value in boreal forests. Information about wind damage risk can aid forest managers in understanding and possibly mitigating damage impacts. The objective of this research was to better understand and quantify drivers of wind damage, and to map the probability of wind damage. To accomplish this, we used open-access airborne scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. The probability of wind-induced forest damage (PDAM) in southern Finland (61°N, 23°E) was modelled for a 173 km2 study area of mainly managed boreal forests (dominated by Norway spruce and Scots pine) and agricultural fields. Wind damage occurred in the study area in December 2011. LiDAR data were acquired prior to the damage in 2008. High spatial resolution aerial imagery, acquired after the damage event (January, 2012) provided a source of model calibration via expert interpretation. A systematic grid (16 m x 16 m) was established and 430 sample grid cells were identified systematically and classified as damaged or undamaged based on visual interpretation using the aerial images. Potential drivers associated with PDAM were examined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Risk model predictors were extracted from the LiDAR-derived surface models. Geographic information systems (GIS) supported spatial mapping and identification of areas of high PDAM across the study area. The risk model based on LiDAR data provided good agreement with detected risk areas (73 % with kappa-value 0,47). The strongest predictors in the risk model were mean canopy height and mean elevation. Our results indicate that open-access LiDAR data sets can be used to map the probability of wind damage risk without field data, providing valuable information for forest management planning.

  10. Basis and methods of NASA airborne topographic mapper lidar surveys for coastal studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Krabill, William B.; Swift, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the basic principles of airborne laser altimetry for surveys of coastal topography, and describes the methods used in the acquisition and processing of NASA Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) surveys that cover much of the conterminous US coastline. This form of remote sensing, also known as "topographic lidar", has undergone extremely rapid development during the last two decades, and has the potential to contribute within a wide range of coastal scientific investigations. Various airborne laser surveying (ALS) applications that are relevant to coastal studies are being pursued by researchers in a range of Earth science disciplines. Examples include the mapping of "bald earth" land surfaces below even moderately dense vegetation in studies of geologic framework and hydrology, and determination of the vegetation canopy structure, a key variable in mapping wildlife habitats. ALS has also proven to be an excellent method for the regional mapping of geomorphic change along barrier island beaches and other sandy coasts due to storms or long-term sedimentary processes. Coastal scientists are adopting ALS as a basic method in the study of an array of additional coastal topics. ALS can provide useful information in the analysis of shoreline change, the prediction and assessment of landslides along seacliffs and headlands, examination of subsidence causing coastal land loss, and in predicting storm surge and tsunami inundation.

  11. Development of a Coherent Lidar for Aiding Precision Soft Landing on Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Tolson, Robert H.; Powell, Richard W.; Davidson, John B.; Peri, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Coherent lidar can play a critical role in future planetary exploration missions by providing key guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) data necessary for navigating planetary landers to the pre-selected site and achieving autonomous safe soft-landing. Although the landing accuracy has steadily improved over time to approximately 35 km for the recent Mars Exploration Rovers due to better approach navigation, a drastically different guidance, navigation and control concept is required to meet future mission requirements. For example, future rovers will require better than 6 km landing accuracy for Mars and better than 1 km for the Moon plus maneuvering capability to avoid hazardous terrain features. For this purpose, an all-fiber coherent lidar is being developed to address the call for advancement of entry, descent, and landing technologies. This lidar will be capable of providing precision range to the ground and approach velocity data, and in the case of landing on Mars, it will also measure the atmospheric wind and density. The lidar obtains high resolution range information from a frequency modulated-continuous wave (FM-CW) laser beam whose instantaneous frequency varies linearly with time, and the ground vector velocity is directly extracted from the Doppler frequency shift. Utilizing the high concentration of aerosols in the Mars atmosphere (approx. two order of magnitude higher than the Earth), the lidar can measure wind velocity with a few watts of optical power. Operating in 1.57 micron wavelength regime, the lidar can use the differential absorption (DIAL) technique to measure the average CO2 concentration along the laser beam using, that is directly proportional to the Martian atmospheric density. Employing fiber optics components allows for the lidar multi-functional operation while facilitating a highly efficient, compact and reliable design suitable for integration into a spacecraft with limited mass, size, and power resources.

  12. Three-Dimensional Wind Profiling of Offshore Wind Energy Areas With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-micrometer wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  13. Development of a 100 mJ, 5 Hz, flashlamp-pumped, Cr,Tm:YAG coherent lidar transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, S.; Johnson, S.

    1993-01-01

    A contract to develop a 100 mJ, 5 Hz, flashlamp-pumped Cr,Tm:YAG coherent lidar transmitter has been awarded to Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI). The lidar transmitter will operate at an eyesafe wavelength of 2.01 microns. The development complements work being performed under an SBIR Phase II with Electro-Optics Technology (EOT). EOT is developing continuous wave, low and medium power Tm:YAG oscillators of a unique design. One of the low power oscillators will be used as the injection seeder/local oscillator in the CIT lidar transmitter. The lidar transmitter will require the addition of a receiver section. Once completed, the lidar will be used in atmospheric performance studies, allowing comparison with that of the more mature CO2 lidar technology. The focus of current research and plans for next year are presented.

  14. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly

  15. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Holben, B.; Remer, L.; Smirnov, A.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and Sun photometers during TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment). Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W), are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and rms differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a)=60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements.

  16. 315mJ, 2-micrometers Double-Pulsed Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Transmitter for Atmospheric CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Koch, Grady; Chen, Songsheng; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The design of a double pulsed, injection seeded, 2-micrometer compact coherent Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter for CO2 sensing is presented. This system is hardened for ground and airborne applications. The design architecture includes three continuous wave lasers which provide controlled on and off line seeding, injection seeded power oscillator and a single amplifier operating in double pass configuration. As the derivative a coherent Doppler wind lidar, this instrument has the added benefit of providing wind information. The active laser material used for this application is a Ho: Tm:YLF crystal operates at the eye-safe wavelength. The 3-meter long folded ring resonator produces energy of 130-mJ (90/40) with a temporal pulse length around 220 nanoseconds and 530 nanosecond pulses for on and off lines respectively. The separation between the two pulses is on the order of 200 microseconds. The line width is in the order of 2.5MHz and the beam quality has an M(sup 2) of 1.1 times diffraction limited beam. A final output energy for a pair of both on and off pulses as high as 315 mJ (190/125) at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is achieved. The operating temperature is set around 20 C for the pump diode lasers and 10 C for the rod. Since the laser design has to meet high-energy as well as high beam quality requirements, close attention is paid to the laser head design to avoid thermal distortion in the rod. A side-pumped configuration is used and heat is removed uniformly by passing coolant through a tube slightly larger than the rod to reduce thermal gradient. This paper also discusses the advantage of using a long upper laser level life time laser crystal for DIAL application. In addition issues related to injection seeding with two different frequencies to achieve a transform limited line width will be presented.

  17. Tropical Airborne LiDAR for Landslide Assessment in Malaysia: a technical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Manap, Mohamad; Azhari Razak, Khamarrul; Mohamad, Zakaria; Ahmad, Azhari; Ahmad, Ferdaus; Mohamad Zin, Mazlan; A'zad Rosle, Qalam

    2015-04-01

    Malaysia has faced a substantial number of landslide events every year. Cameron Highlands, Pahang is one of the badly areas affected by slope failures characterized by extreme climate, rugged topographic and weathered geological structures in a tropical environment. A high frequency of landslide occurrence in the hilly areas is predominantly due to the geological materials, tropical monsoon seasons and uncontrolled agricultural activities. Therefore the Government of Malaysia through the Prime Minister Department has allocated a special budget to conduct national level hazard and risk mapping project through Minerals and Geoscience Department Malaysia, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. The primary aim of this project is to provide slope hazard risk information for a better slope management in Malaysia. In addition this project will establish national infrastructure for geospatial information on the geological terrain and slope by emphasizing the disaster risk throughout the country. The areas of interest are located in the three different selected areas i.e. Cameron Highlands (275 square kilometers), Ipoh (200 square kilometers) and Cheras Kajang -- Batang kali (650 square kilometers). These areas are selected based on National Slope Master Plan (2009 -- 2023) that endorsed by Malaysia Government Cabinet. The national hazard and risk mapping project includes six parts of major tasks: (1) desk study and mobilization, (2) airborne LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, (3) field data acquisition and verification, (4) hazard and risk for natural terrain, (5) hazard and risk analysis for man-made slope and (6) Man-made slope mitigation/preventive measures. The project was authorized in September, 2014 and will be ended in March, 2016. In this paper, the main focus is to evaluate the suitability of integrated capability of airborne- and terrestrial LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, and also digital photography for regional landslide assessment. The

  18. Testing of a Two-Micron Double-Pulse IPDA Lidar Instrument for Airborne Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Singh, U. N.

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing a tunable two-micron double-pulse laser transmitter, an airborne IPDA lidar system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for atmospheric carbon dioxide column measurements. The instrument comprises a receiver with 0.4 m telescope and InGaAs pin detectors coupled to 12-bit, 200 MS/s waveform digitizers. For on-site ground testing, the 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar was installed inside a trailer located where meteorological data and CO2 mixing ratio profiles were obtained from CAPABLE and LiCoR in-suite sampling, respectively. IPDA horizontal ground testing with 860 m target distance indicated CO2 sensitivity of 2.24 ppm with -0.43 ppm offset, while operating at 3 GHz on-line position from the R30 line center. Then, the IPDA lidar was integrated inside the NASA B-200 aircraft, with supporting instrumentation, for airborne testing and validation. Supporting instruments included in-situ LiCoR sensor, GPS and video recorder for target identification. Besides, aircraft built-in sensors provided altitude, pressure, temperature and relative humidity sampling during flights. The 2-mm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne testing was conducted through ten daytime flights (27 hours flight time). Airborne testing included different operating and environmental conditions for flight altitude up to 7 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. Relying on independent CO2 in-situ sampling, conducted through NOAA, airborne IPDA CO2 sensitivity of 4.15 ppm with 1.14 ppm offset were observed at 6 km altitude and 4 GHz on-line offset frequency. This validates the 2-μm double-pulse IPDA lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurement.

  19. Improving Forest Attribute Estimation of Airborne Lidar Based on Profile Assimilation from Terrestrial Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasmer, L.; Xi, Z.; Hopkinson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The development of high-resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) system can expose sub-canopy details with flexible scanning angles. This advantage of preciseness makes TLS an ideal source to integrate to Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS), with regard to the potential for removing ALS's penetration bias. The popular treatment of the integration is simply spatial co-registration or TLS-derived inventory statistics, without further concerning the rich geometrical information from TLS. This poster proposes a profile assimilation approach for ALS and TLS integration, in order to improve the plot-level estimation of tree height and biomass. The overlapped ALS and TLS data were first co-registered into compound point clouds and the canopy structure were reconstructed from the compound. The canopy profile of ALS was then calibrated from the reconstructed canopy profile using a Kalman filter. The calibration was applied to the rest ALS canopy profile, from which the new estimation of tree height and biomass can be derived. Our study site is located in Vivian, Toronto. The area was flown with an Optech Titan operating at 532, 1064 and 1550 nm wavelengths one week before the TLS data collection in July, 2015. The trees scans by TLS were halved to calibrate and to validate our proposed integration approach. Additional validation was also conducted via in-situ inventory.

  20. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  1. A decade of sea ice thickness mapping by airborne lidar between Greenland and the North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvidegaard, S. M.; Forsberg, R.; Skourup, H.; Stenseng, L.; Hanson, S.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne laser altimetry provides a direct measurement of sea ice freeboard, when combined with a precise geoid model and a lowest-level filtering algorithm to take into account residual errors in GPS-positioning, ocean dynamic topography, tides etc. Using swath laser scanning, the method additionally gives detailed information on the geometry of leads, ridges and the distribution of thin ice and open water. The conversion of sea ice freeboard heights to thickness is based on the assumption of equilibrium, with major errors sources relating to snow depth and density of sea ice. In the paper we describe results of measurements with airborne laser north of Greenland, Ellesmere Island and in the Fram Strait region, carried out on a yearly basis since 1998, in the first years using a single beam laser, and since 2001 using swath laser scanning giving a resolution of approximately 1 m in the ice features. The campaigns have mostly been done in the spring period, typically in connection with airborne gravity surveys or CryoSat calibration and validation activities. Observed secular changes in the sea ice freeboard heights are masked by limited spatial and temporal extent of campaigns, as well as interannual variability in the sea ice regime of the region. To address the error sources in the lidar thickness determination, a number of in-situ and helicopter EM comparisons have been carried out, e.g latest in April 2007 around the Tara drifting station beyond the North Pole, as part of the Damocles project. In cooperation with ESA and APL, coincident Ku-band radar and laser systems have also been flown, giving a unique opportunity for airborne measurement of snow depth as well.

  2. Compact and Rugged Transceiver for Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Reithmaier, Karl; Petzar, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    High-accuracy, vertical profiles of the horizontal vector wind in earth s atmosphere, with the global coverage of an orbiting sensor, are a highly desired measurement of NASA, NOAA, and many other agencies and countries. It is the consensus of NASA and NOAA that the most cost effective, lowest risk measurement method with the earliest achievable mission date is the hybrid Doppler lidar method which utilizes both coherent- and direct-detection Doppler lidars to obtain the desired profiles. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has advanced the 2-micron pulsed solid-state laser greatly over the past 15 years and has recently demonstrated 1.2 J of pulse energy whereas the requirement for a 400-km hybrid Doppler lidar mission is only 0.25 J. The IIP project reported here is an effort to increase the ruggedness and to compactly package the LaRC state-of-the-art laser technology.

  3. Motion error analysis of the 3D coordinates of airborne lidar for typical terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tao; Lan, Tian; Ni, Guoqiang

    2013-07-01

    A motion error model of 3D coordinates is established and the impact on coordinate errors caused by the non-ideal movement of the airborne platform is analyzed. The simulation results of the model show that when the lidar system operates at high altitude, the influence on the positioning errors derived from laser point cloud spacing is small. For the model the positioning errors obey simple harmonic vibration whose amplitude envelope gradually reduces with the increase of the vibration frequency. When the vibration period number is larger than 50, the coordinate errors are almost uncorrelated with time. The elevation error is less than the plane error and in the plane the error in the scanning direction is less than the error in the flight direction. Through the analysis of flight test data, the conclusion is verified.

  4. Analysis of the NASA/MSFC airborne Doppler lidar results from San Gorgonio Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.; Sandusky, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System was flown in July 1981 aboard the NASA/Ames Convair 990 on the east side of San Gorgonio Pass California, near Palm Springs, to measure and investigate the accelerated atmospheric wind field discharging from the pass. At this region, the maritime layer from the west coast accelerates through the pass and spreads out over the valley floor on the east side of the pass. The experiment was selected in order to study accelerated flow in and at the exit of the canyon. Ground truth wind data taken concurrently with the flight data were available from approximately 12 meteorological towers and 3 tala kites for limited comparison purposes. The experiment provided the first spatial data for ensemble averaging of spatial correlations to compute lateral and longitudinal length scales in the lateral and longitudinal directions for both components, and information on atmospheric flow in this region of interest from wind energy resource considerations.

  5. Quantifying landscape change in an arctic coastal lowland using repeat airborne LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Stoker, Jason M.; Gibbs, Ann E.; Grosse, Guido; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Douglas, Thomas A.; Kinsman, Nichole E.M.; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2013-01-01

    Increases in air, permafrost, and sea surface temperature, loss of sea ice, the potential for increased wave energy, and higher river discharge may all be interacting to escalate erosion of arctic coastal lowland landscapes. Here we use airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data acquired in 2006 and 2010 to detect landscape change in a 100 km2 study area on the Beaufort Sea coastal plain of northern Alaska. We detected statistically significant change (99% confidence interval), defined as contiguous areas (>10 m2) that had changed in height by at least 0.55 m, in 0.3% of the study region. Erosional features indicative of ice-rich permafrost degradation were associated with ice-bonded coastal, river, and lake bluffs, frost mounds, ice wedges, and thermo-erosional gullies. These features accounted for about half of the area where vertical change was detected. Inferred thermo-denudation and thermo-abrasion of coastal and river bluffs likely accounted for the dominant permafrost-related degradational processes with respect to area (42%) and volume (51%). More than 300 thermokarst pits significantly subsided during the study period, likely as a result of storm surge flooding of low-lying tundra (<1.4 m asl) as well as the lasting impact of warm summers in the late-1980s and mid-1990s. Our results indicate that repeat airborne LiDAR can be used to detect landscape change in arctic coastal lowland regions at large spatial scales over sub-decadal time periods.

  6. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Technology for Space Based Wind Measurements Including SPARCLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1999-01-01

    It has been over 30 years since coherent lidar systems first measured wind velocity, and over 20 years since the "ultimate application" of measuring Earth's winds from space was conceived. Coherent or heterodyne optical detection involves the combination (or mixing) of the returned optical field with a local oscillator (LO) laser's optical field on the optical detector. This detection technique yields the benefits of dramatically improved signal-to-noise ratios; insensitivity to detector noise, background light and multiply scattered light; reduction of the returned signal's dynamic range; and preservation of the optical signal spectrum for electronic and computer processing. (Note that lidar systems are also referred to as optical radar, laser radar, and LADAR systems.) Many individuals, agencies, and countries have pursued the goal of space-based wind measurements through technology development, experiments, field campaigns and studies.

  7. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle rendezvous, stationkeeping and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The inherent spatial resolution of laser radar makes ladar or lidar an attractive candidate for Automated Rendezvous and Capture application. Previous applications were based on incoherent lidar techniques, requiring retro-reflectors on the target vehicle. Technology improvements (reduced size, no cryogenic cooling requirement) have greatly enhanced the construction of coherent lidar systems. Coherent lidar permits the acquisition of non-cooperative targets at ranges that are limited by the detection capability rather than by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements. The sensor can provide translational state information (range, velocity, and angle) by direct measurement and, when used with any array detector, also can provide attitude information by Doppler imaging techniques. Identification of the target is accomplished by scanning with a high pulse repetition frequency (dependent on the SNR). The system performance is independent of range and should not be constrained by sun angle. An initial effort to characterize a multi-element detection system has resulted in a system that is expected to work to a minimum range of 1 meter. The system size, weight and power requirements are dependent on the operating range; 10 km range requires a diameter of 3 centimeters with overall size at 3 x 3 x 15 to 30 cm, while 100 km range requires a 30 cm diameter.

  8. Modeling aboveground tree woody biomass using national-scale allometric methods and airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Estimating tree aboveground biomass (AGB) and carbon (C) stocks using remote sensing is a critical component for understanding the global C cycle and mitigating climate change. However, the importance of allometry for remote sensing of AGB has not been recognized until recently. The overarching goals of this study are to understand the differences and relationships among three national-scale allometric methods (CRM, Jenkins, and the regional models) of the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program in the U.S. and to examine the impacts of using alternative allometry on the fitting statistics of remote sensing-based woody AGB models. Airborne lidar data from three study sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA were used to predict woody AGB estimated from the different allometric methods. It was found that the CRM and Jenkins estimates of woody AGB are related via the CRM adjustment factor. In terms of lidar-biomass modeling, CRM had the smallest model errors, while the Jenkins method had the largest ones and the regional method was between. The best model fitting from CRM is attributed to its inclusion of tree height in calculating merchantable stem volume and the strong dependence of non-merchantable stem biomass on merchantable stem biomass. This study also argues that it is important to characterize the allometric model errors for gaining a complete understanding of the remotely-sensed AGB prediction errors.

  9. GeoEarthScope Airborne LiDAR and Satellite InSAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C.

    2008-12-01

    UNAVCO has successfully acquired a significant volume of aerial and satellite geodetic imagery as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility project funded by the National Science Foundation. All GeoEarthScope acquisition activities are now complete. Airborne LiDAR data acquisitions took place in 2007 and 2008 and cover a total area of more than 5000 square kilometers. The primary LiDAR survey regions cover features in Northern California, Southern/Eastern California, the Pacific Northwest, the Intermountain Seismic Belt (including the Wasatch and Teton faults and Yellowstone), and Alaska. We have ordered and archived more than 28,000 scenes (more than 81,000 frames) of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data suitable for interferometric analyses covering most of the western U.S. and parts of Alaska and Hawaii from several satellite platforms, including ERS-1/2, ENVISAT and RADARSAT. In addition to ordering data from existing archives, we also tasked the ESA ENVISAT satellite to acquire new SAR data in 2007 and 2008. GeoEarthScope activities were led by UNAVCO, guided by the community and conducted in partnership with the USGS and NASA. Processed imagery products, in addition to formats intended for use in standard research software, can also be viewed using general purpose tools such as Google Earth. We present a summary of these vast geodetic imagery datasets, totaling tens of terabytes, which are freely available to the community.

  10. A comprehensive framework of building model reconstruction from airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y.; Wang, C.; Xi, X. H.; Zhang, W. M.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive framework of reconstructing 3D building models from airborne LiDAR data, which involves building extraction, roof segmentation and model generation. Firstly, building points are extracted from LiDAR point clouds by removing walls, trees, ground and noises. Walls and trees are identified by the normal and multi-return features respectively and then ground and noise are detected by the region growing algorithm which aims at extracting smooth surfaces. Then the connected component analysis is performed to extract building points. Secondly, once the building points are acquired, building roofs are separated by the region growing algorithm which employs the normal vector and curvature of points to detect planar clusters. Finally, by combining regular building outlines obtained from building points and roof intersections acquired from the roof segmentation results, 3D building models with high accuracy are derived. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to correctly obtain building points and reconstruct 3D building models with high accuracy.

  11. Improved progressive TIN densification filtering algorithm for airborne LiDAR data in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoqian; Guo, Qinghua; Su, Yanjun; Xue, Baolin

    2016-07-01

    Filtering of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data into the ground and non-ground points is a fundamental step in processing raw airborne LiDAR data. This paper proposes an improved progressive triangulated irregular network (TIN) densification (IPTD) filtering algorithm that can cope with a variety of forested landscapes, particularly both topographically and environmentally complex regions. The IPTD filtering algorithm consists of three steps: (1) acquiring potential ground seed points using the morphological method; (2) obtaining accurate ground seed points; and (3) building a TIN-based model and iteratively densifying TIN. The IPTD filtering algorithm was tested in 15 forested sites with various terrains (i.e., elevation and slope) and vegetation conditions (i.e., canopy cover and tree height), and was compared with seven other commonly used filtering algorithms (including morphology-based, slope-based, and interpolation-based filtering algorithms). Results show that the IPTD achieves the highest filtering accuracy for nine of the 15 sites. In general, it outperforms the other filtering algorithms, yielding the lowest average total error of 3.15% and the highest average kappa coefficient of 89.53%.

  12. Automated Detection of Selective Logging in Amazon Forests Using Airborne Lidar Data and Pattern Recognition Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, M. M.; d'Oliveira, M. N.; Takemura, C. M.; Vitoria, D.; Araujo, L. S.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Selective logging, the removal of several valuable timber trees per hectare, is an important land use in the Brazilian Amazon and may degrade forests through long term changes in structure, loss of forest carbon and species diversity. Similar to deforestation, the annual area affected by selected logging has declined significantly in the past decade. Nonetheless, this land use affects several thousand km2 per year in Brazil. We studied a 1000 ha area of the Antimary State Forest (FEA) in the State of Acre, Brazil (9.304 ○S, 68.281 ○W) that has a basal area of 22.5 m2 ha-1 and an above-ground biomass of 231 Mg ha-1. Logging intensity was low, approximately 10 to 15 m3 ha-1. We collected small-footprint airborne lidar data using an Optech ALTM 3100EA over the study area once each in 2010 and 2011. The study area contained both recent and older logging that used both conventional and technologically advanced logging techniques. Lidar return density averaged over 20 m-2 for both collection periods with estimated horizontal and vertical precision of 0.30 and 0.15 m. A relative density model comparing returns from 0 to 1 m elevation to returns in 1-5 m elevation range revealed the pattern of roads and skid trails. These patterns were confirmed by ground-based GPS survey. A GIS model of the road and skid network was built using lidar and ground data. We tested and compared two pattern recognition approaches used to automate logging detection. Both segmentation using commercial eCognition segmentation and a Frangi filter algorithm identified the road and skid trail network compared to the GIS model. We report on the effectiveness of these two techniques.

  13. Forest Stand Segmentation Using Airborne LIDAR Data and Very High Resolution Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechesne, Clément; Mallet, Clément; Le Bris, Arnaud; Gouet, Valérie; Hervieu, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Forest stands are the basic units for forest inventory and mapping. Stands are large forested areas (e.g., ≥ 2 ha) of homogeneous tree species composition. The accurate delineation of forest stands is usually performed by visual analysis of human operators on very high resolution (VHR) optical images. This work is highly time consuming and should be automated for scalability purposes. In this paper, a method based on the fusion of airborne laser scanning data (or lidar) and very high resolution multispectral imagery for automatic forest stand delineation and forest land-cover database update is proposed. The multispectral images give access to the tree species whereas 3D lidar point clouds provide geometric information on the trees. Therefore, multi-modal features are computed, both at pixel and object levels. The objects are individual trees extracted from lidar data. A supervised classification is performed at the object level on the computed features in order to coarsely discriminate the existing tree species in the area of interest. The analysis at tree level is particularly relevant since it significantly improves the tree species classification. A probability map is generated through the tree species classification and inserted with the pixel-based features map in an energetical framework. The proposed energy is then minimized using a standard graph-cut method (namely QPBO with α-expansion) in order to produce a segmentation map with a controlled level of details. Comparison with an existing forest land cover database shows that our method provides satisfactory results both in terms of stand labelling and delineation (matching ranges between 94% and 99%).

  14. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Species Diversity: The Utility of Integrated Airborne Hyperspectral and Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Keith Stuart

    The change, reduction, or extinction of species is a major issue currently facing the Earth. Efforts are underway to measure, monitor, and protect habitats that contain high species diversity. Remote sensing technology shows extreme value for monitoring species diversity by mapping ecosystems and using those land cover maps or other derived data as proxies to species number and distribution. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) consists of remote sensing instruments such as an imaging spectrometer, a full-waveform lidar, and a high-resolution color camera. AOP collected data over the Ordway-Swisher Biological Station (OSBS) in May 2014. A majority of the OSBS site is covered by the Sandhill ecosystem, which contains a very high diversity of vegetation species and is a native habitat for several threatened fauna species. The research presented here investigates ways to analyze the AOP data to map ecosystems at the OSBS site. The research attempts to leverage the high spatial resolution data and study the variability of the data within a ground plot scale along with integrating data from the different sensors. Mathematical features are derived from the data and brought into a decision tree classification algorithm (rpart), in order to create an ecosystem map for the site. The hyperspectral and lidar features serve as proxies for chemical, functional, and structural differences in the vegetation types for each of the ecosystems. K-folds cross validation shows a training accuracy of 91%, a validation accuracy of 78%, and a 66% accuracy using independent ground validation. The results presented here represent an important contribution to utilizing integrated hyperspectral and lidar remote sensing data for ecosystem mapping, by relating the spatial variability of the data within a ground plot scale to a collection of vegetation types that make up a given ecosystem.

  15. Separating Dust Mixtures and Other External Aerosol Mixtures Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Vaughan, M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol type is important for source attribution and for determining the magnitude and assessing the consequences of aerosol radiative forcing. The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) has acquired considerable datasets of both aerosol extensive parameters (e.g. aerosol optical depth) and intensive parameters (e.g. aerosol depolarization ratio, lidar ratio) that can be used to infer aerosol type. An aerosol classification methodology has been used extensively to classify HSRL-1 aerosol measurements of different aerosol types including dust, smoke, urban pollution, and marine aerosol. However, atmospheric aerosol is frequently not a single pure type, but instead occurs as a mixture of types, and this mixing affects the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol. Here we present a comprehensive and unified set of rules for characterizing external mixtures using several key aerosol intensive parameters: extinction-to-backscatter ratio (i.e. lidar ratio), backscatter color ratio, and depolarization ratio. Our mixing rules apply not just to the scalar values of aerosol intensive parameters, but to multi-dimensional normal distributions with variance in each measurement dimension. We illustrate the applicability of the mixing rules using examples of HSRL-1 data where mixing occurred between different aerosol types, including advected Saharan dust mixed with the marine boundary layer in the Caribbean Sea and locally generated dust mixed with urban pollution in the Mexico City surroundings. For each of these cases we infer a time-height cross section of mixing ratio along the flight track and we partition aerosol extinction into portions attributed to the two pure types. Since multiple aerosol intensive parameters are measured and included in these calculations, the techniques can also be used for cases without significant depolarization (unlike similar work by earlier researchers), and so a third example of a

  16. Relationships between MODIS black-sky shortwave albedo and airborne lidar based forest canopy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Lauri; Rautiainen, Miina; Arumäe, Tauri; Lang, Mait; Flewelling, James; Tokola, Timo; Stenberg, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    Albedo is one of the essential climate variables affecting the Earth's radiation balance. It is however not well understood how changes in forest canopy structure influence the albedo. Canopy structure can be mapped consistently for fairly large areas using airborne lidar sensors. Our objective was to study the relationships between MODIS shortwave black sky albedo product and lidar-based estimates of canopy structure in different biomes ranging from arctic to tropical. Our study is based on six structurally different forest sites located in Finland, Estonia, USA and Laos. Lidar-based mean height of the canopy, canopy cover and their transformations were used as predictor variables to describe the canopy structure. Tree species composition was also included for the three sites where it was available. We noticed that the variables predicting albedo best were different in open and closed canopy forests. In closed canopy forests, the species information was more important than canopy structure variables (R2=0.31-0.32) and using only structural variables resulted in poor R2 (0.13-0.15). If the 500 m MODIS pixel contained a mixture of forests and other land cover types, the albedo was strongly related to the forest area percent. In open canopy forests, structural variables such as canopy cover or height explained albedo well, but species information still improved the models (R2=0.27-0.52). We obtained the highest R2=0.52 using only structural variables in Laos on a partially degraded tropical forest with large variation in canopy cover. The different canopy structure variables were often correlated and the one that provided the best model changed from site to site.

  17. Classification of breaklines derived from airborne LiDAR data for geomorphological activity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutzinger, Martin; Höfle, Bernhard; Vetter, Michael; Stötter, Johann; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    Airborne LiDAR surveys provide 3D high-resolution elevation information for area-wide applications. Due to the capability of LiDAR to penetrate vegetation cover highly accurate digital terrain models (DTMs) can be derived also for forested areas. Breaklines derived from LiDAR DTMs mark regions of slope discontinuities, describing the main characteristics of a terrain surface in an efficient manner. Breaklines are often used for DTM enhancement but also for the detection and interpretation of geomorphologically relevant landforms such as landslides, torrents, erosion scraps and tectonic faults. Because of human activities geomorphologic landforms are often disturbed and reshaped i.e. by construction of roads, skiing slopes, drainage channels and surface mining. Therefore, DTMs contain both, anthropogenic and geomorphologic discontinuities. This significantly disturbs morphometric analysis and causes problems for automatic landform mapping algorithms. In this research an automatic breakline detection method is applied in an alpine region with high relief variation containing surface discontinuities such as torrents, creeping slope failure, and landslides, which are reshaped by anthropogenic activities. Regions of high curvature are classified and vectorised in order to derive 3D breaklines. These are further filtered and classified based on object-based properties such as their size, shape and slope to separate natural i.e. geomorphologic relevant and anthropogenic structures. The classification result is compared to reference map data indicating a high reliability of the classification quality. After the removal of anthropogenic breaklines the remaining natural breaklines are used to compute line density maps using a moving window approach. These density maps point out areas of different relief energy and assist to delineate areas of geomorphologic relevance. These areas are also of most interest to identify geomorphological landforms. The methodology presented

  18. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  19. Detection of trees using airborne lidar data based on ArcGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Feifei; Liu, Jingnan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2006-10-01

    In this article, we use the height difference between the first pulse and last pulse recorded by the airborne laser scanning system to implement a strategy for detection of trees, especially for relatively tall trees. The airborne lidar data we use include 3D coordinates and intensity information of first pulse and last pulse respectively, and the image file of the test area are also available. ArcGIS version 9.0, has been used as the implementation platform as which as effective data processing function and outstanding performance of data analysis such as TIN interpolation and 3D display. To extract trees from the raw data, the data is loaded into ArcGIS to create shapefile recognized by ArcGIS at first, and the corresponding attributes, coordinates, intensity and height difference computed by programming are stored. Then we select the data accord with the filtering condition, a threshold for height difference is given. All the comparisons of 3D coordinates and intensity occur between point data in the same row, in other words, between the first pulse and last pulse. We accept the first pulse which satisfies the height difference threshold as vegetation points. At last, a considerable result of detection of trees has been achieved.

  20. Multispectral airborne laser scanning - a new trend in the development of LiDAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is the one of the most accurate remote sensing techniques for data acquisition where the terrain and its coverage is concerned. Modern scanners have been able to scan in two or more channels (frequencies of the laser) recently. This gives the rise to the possibility of obtaining diverse information about an area with the different spectral properties of objects. The paper presents an example of a multispectral ALS system - Titan by Optech - with the possibility of data including the analysis of digital elevation models accuracy and data density. As a result of the study, the high relative accuracy of LiDAR acquisition in three spectral bands was proven. The mean differences between digital terrain models (DTMs) were less than 0.03 m. The data density analysis showed the influence of the laser wavelength. The points clouds that were tested had average densities of 25, 23 and 20 points per square metre respectively for green (G), near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) lasers. In this paper, the possibility of the generation of colour composites using orthoimages of laser intensity reflectance and its classification capabilities using data from airborne multispectral laser scanning for land cover mapping are also discussed and compared with conventional photogrammetric techniques.

  1. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Aerosol Measurements during MILAGRO and TEXAQS/GOMACCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John; Cook Anthony; Harper, David; Burton, Sharon; Clayton, Marian; Clarke, Antony; Russell, Phil; Redemann, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Two1 field experiments conducted during 2006 provided opportunities to investigate the variability of aerosol properties near cities and the impacts of these aerosols on air quality and radiative transfer. The Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX-MEX)/Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-B (INTEX-B) joint experiment conducted during March 2006 investigated the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) (http://www.al.noaa.gov/2006/) conducted during August and September 2006 investigated climate and air quality in the Houston/Gulf of Mexico region. During both missions, the new NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on the NASA Langley B200 King Air aircraft and measured profiles of aerosol extinction, backscattering, and depolarization to: 1) characterize the spatial and vertical distributions of aerosols, 2) quantify aerosol extinction and optical thickness contributed by various aerosol types, 3) investigate aerosol variability near clouds, 4) evaluate model simulations of aerosol transport, and 5) assess aerosol optical properties derived from a combination of surface, airborne, and satellite measurements.

  2. Neural networks for the generation of sea bed models using airborne lidar bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, Tomasz; Niemeyer, Joachim; Bujakiewicz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    Various sectors of the economy such as transport and renewable energy have shown great interest in sea bed models. The required measurements are usually carried out by ship-based echo sounding, but this method is quite expensive. A relatively new alternative is data obtained by airborne lidar bathymetry. This study investigates the accuracy of these data, which was obtained in the context of the project `Investigation on the use of airborne laser bathymetry in hydrographic surveying'. A comparison to multi-beam echo sounding data shows only small differences in the depths values of the data sets. The IHO requirements of the total horizontal and vertical uncertainty for laser data are met. The second goal of this paper is to compare three spatial interpolation methods, namely Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Delaunay Triangulation (TIN), and supervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), for the generation of sea bed models. The focus of our investigation is on the amount of required sampling points. This is analyzed by manually reducing the data sets. We found that the three techniques have a similar performance almost independently of the amount of sampling data in our test area. However, ANN are more stable when using a very small subset of points.

  3. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric optical depth using the Oxygen A-band at 765 nm.

    PubMed

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Michael; Allan, Graham R; Hasselbrack, William; Mao, Jianping; Stephen, Mark; Abshire, James

    2013-09-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen optical depth measurements with an IPDA lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate knowledge of atmospheric temperature and pressure is required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, and climate modeling studies. The lidar uses a doubled erbium-doped fiber amplifier and single photon-counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at 765 nm. Our results show good agreement between the experimentally derived differential optical depth measurements with the theoretical predictions for aircraft altitudes from 3 to 13 km.

  4. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure made Using an IPDA Lidar Operating in the Oxygen A-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Abshire, James B.; Stephen, Mark; Rodriquez, Michael; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Mao, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of atmospheric pressure made using an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar that operates in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are needed for NASA s Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission to measure atmospheric CO2. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve our predictions of climate change. The goal of ASCENDS is to determine the CO2 dry mixing ratio with lidar measurements from space at a level of 1 ppm. Analysis to date shows that with current weather models, measurements of both the CO2 column density and the column density of dry air are needed. Since O2 is a stable molecule that uniformly mixed in the atmosphere, measuring O2 absorption in the atmosphere can be used to infer the dry air density. We have developed an airborne (IPDA) lidar for Oxygen, with support from the NASA ESTO IIP program. Our lidar uses DFB-based seed laser diodes, a pulsed modulator, a fiber laser amplifier, and a non-linear crystal to generate wavelength tunable 765 nm laser pulses with a few uJ/pulse energy. The laser pulse rate is 10 KHz, and average transmitted laser power is 20 mW. Our lidar steps laser pulses across a selected line O2 doublet near 764.7 nm in the Oxygen A-band. The direct detection lidar receiver uses a 20 cm diameter telescope, a Si APD detector in Geiger mode, and a multi-channel scalar to detect and record the time resolved laser backscatter in 40 separate wavelength channels. Subsequent analysis is used to estimate the transmission line shape of the doublet for the laser pulses reflected from the ground. Ground based data analysis allows averaging from 1 to 60 seconds to increase SNR in the transmission line shape of the doublet. Our retrieval algorithm fits the expected O2 lineshapes against the measurements and

  5. Urban forest ecosystem analysis using fused airborne hyperspectral and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Mike Gerard

    Urban trees are strategically important in a city's effort to mitigate their carbon footprint, heat island effects, air pollution, and stormwater runoff. Currently, the most common method for quantifying urban forest structure and ecosystem function is through field plot sampling. However, taking intensive structural measurements on private properties throughout a city is difficult, and the outputs from sample inventories are not spatially explicit. The overarching goal of this dissertation is to develop methods for mapping urban forest structure and function using fused hyperspectral imagery and waveform lidar data at the individual tree crown scale. Urban forest ecosystem services estimated using the USDA Forest Service's i-Tree Eco (formerly UFORE) model are based largely on tree species and leaf area index (LAI). Accordingly, tree species were mapped in my Santa Barbara, California study area for 29 species comprising >80% of canopy. Crown-scale discriminant analysis methods were introduced for fusing Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometry (AVIRIS) data with a suite of lidar structural metrics (e.g., tree height, crown porosity) to maximize classification accuracy in a complex environment. AVIRIS imagery was critical to achieving an overall species-level accuracy of 83.4% while lidar data was most useful for improving the discrimination of small and morphologically unique species. LAI was estimated at both the field-plot scale using laser penetration metrics and at the crown scale using allometry. Agreement of the former with photographic estimates of gap fraction and the latter with allometric estimates based on field measurements was examined. Results indicate that lidar may be used reasonably to measure LAI in an urban environment lacking in continuous canopy and characterized by high species diversity. Finally, urban ecosystem services such as carbon storage and building energy-use modification were analyzed through combination of aforementioned

  6. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm Attenuated Backscatter Calibration Using the NASA LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Obland, Michael D.; Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony L.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter) using an internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that average HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% +/- 2.1% (CALIOP lower) at night and within 2.9 % +/- 3.9% (CALIOP lower) during the day., demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential systematic uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 3.7% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared to those from prior assessments of CALIOP calibration and attenuated backscatter.

  7. [Estimating individual tree aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest using airborne LiDAR technology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Tan, Chang; Lei, Pi-Feng

    2014-11-01

    Taking Wugang forest farm in Xuefeng Mountain as the research object, using the airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data under leaf-on condition and field data of concomitant plots, this paper assessed the ability of using LiDAR technology to estimate aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest. A semi-automated individual tree LiDAR cloud point segmentation was obtained by using condition random fields and optimization methods. Spatial structure, waveform characteristics and topography were calculated as LiDAR metrics from the segmented objects. Then statistical models between aboveground biomass from field data and these LiDAR metrics were built. The individual tree recognition rates were 93%, 86% and 60% for coniferous, broadleaf and mixed forests, respectively. The adjusted coefficients of determination (R(2)adj) and the root mean squared errors (RMSE) for the three types of forest were 0.83, 0.81 and 0.74, and 28.22, 29.79 and 32.31 t · hm(-2), respectively. The estimation capability of model based on canopy geometric volume, tree percentile height, slope and waveform characteristics was much better than that of traditional regression model based on tree height. Therefore, LiDAR metrics from individual tree could facilitate better performance in biomass estimation.

  8. Comparison of winds, waves, and turbulence as observed by airborne lidar, ground-based radars, and instrumented tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Doviak, R. J.; Sundara-Rajan, A.

    1984-01-01

    On June 29, 1981, two ground-based Doppler radars, an airborne Doppler optical radar (lidar), an instrumented tower, and a rawinsonde were employed to collect wind data in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) in central Oklahoma. The main objectives of this experiment were related to a comparison of wind estimates and the visualization of the three-dimensional eddy structure in the convective atmospheric boundary layer. Discrepancies in the mean wind and wind profile detected by the different sensing systems were explained as being caused by a Schuler resonance of the aircraft's inertial navigation system, which caused an erroneous component of the aircraft's ground-relative velocity vector to be subtracted from the lidar-measured radial velocities. It is concluded that NASA's airborne Doppler optical radar system is capable of measuring wind fields in clear air on a smaller scale than was previously available with fixed remote sensors.

  9. Reexamination of Faulting in the Tahoe Basin Using Airborne LiDAR Data and Seismic CHIRP Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmauder, G. C.; Kent, G.; Smith, K. D.; Driscoll, N. W.; Maloney, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Faulting across the Tahoe basin has been mapped using a combination of multibeam sonar, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), and high-resolution seismic CHIRP imagery. In August 2010, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) collected 941 square kilometers of airborne LiDAR data in the Tahoe basin using a Leica ALS50 Phase II Laser system mounted on a Cessna Caravan 208B aircraft; our group was involved with data specification, selection of contractor and data QC. These data have a resolution of 11.82 points per square meter and a vertical accuracy of 3.5 centimeters. The high data resolution has allowed us to map with ease the many fault scarps associated with the three major active fault zones in the Tahoe basin, which include the West Tahoe-Dollar Point fault zone, the Stateline fault, and the Incline Village fault. By using the airborne LiDAR data, we were able to identify previously unmapped fault segments throughout the Tahoe basin. Future application of terrestrial LiDAR using an I-Site 4400 laser scanner at selected sites will provide better control and resolution of the fault scarp characteristics. This will allow us to not only ground truth the airborne LiDAR, but also look for subtle features that may be indicative of dextral motion on faults otherwise displaying predominantly normal displacement. Finally, to refine fault locations beneath Lake Tahoe, Fallen Leaf Lake and Cascade Lake, we collected additional CHIRP imagery using an Edgetech Subscan system, in some cases to groundtruth the new LiDAR fault data (i.e., Cascade Lake). By combining these images with the LiDAR, multibeam data and new multispectral imagery, we were able to link previously unknown segments of the faults and identify continuity in the individual fault systems. From our results, we have developed a much-improved model of the fault systems within the Lake Tahoe basin. Our model provides us with a better understanding of the tectonic environment of the basin and may help

  10. Frequency-agile dual-frequency lidar for integrated coherent radar-lidar architectures.

    PubMed

    Vercesi, Valeria; Onori, Daniel; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Bogoni, Antonella; Scaffardi, Mirco

    2015-04-01

    We propose a novel architecture for implementing a dual-frequency lidar (DFL) exploiting differential Doppler shift measurement. The two frequency tones, needed for target velocity measurements, are selected from the spectrum of a mode-locked laser operating in the C-band. The tones' separation is easily controlled by using a programmable wavelength selective switch, thus allowing for a dynamic trade-off among robustness to atmospheric turbulence and sensitivity. Speed measurements for different tone separations equal to 10, 40, 80, and 160 GHz are demonstrated, proving the system's capability of working in different configurations. Thanks to the acquisition system based on an analog-to-digital converter and digital-signal processing, real-time velocity measurements are demonstrated. The MLL-based proposed architecture enables the integration of the DFL with a photonic-based radar that exploits the same laser for generating and receiving radio-frequency signal with high performance, thus allowing for simultaneous or complementary target observations by exploiting the advantages of both radar and lidar. PMID:25831332

  11. Frequency-agile dual-frequency lidar for integrated coherent radar-lidar architectures.

    PubMed

    Vercesi, Valeria; Onori, Daniel; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Bogoni, Antonella; Scaffardi, Mirco

    2015-04-01

    We propose a novel architecture for implementing a dual-frequency lidar (DFL) exploiting differential Doppler shift measurement. The two frequency tones, needed for target velocity measurements, are selected from the spectrum of a mode-locked laser operating in the C-band. The tones' separation is easily controlled by using a programmable wavelength selective switch, thus allowing for a dynamic trade-off among robustness to atmospheric turbulence and sensitivity. Speed measurements for different tone separations equal to 10, 40, 80, and 160 GHz are demonstrated, proving the system's capability of working in different configurations. Thanks to the acquisition system based on an analog-to-digital converter and digital-signal processing, real-time velocity measurements are demonstrated. The MLL-based proposed architecture enables the integration of the DFL with a photonic-based radar that exploits the same laser for generating and receiving radio-frequency signal with high performance, thus allowing for simultaneous or complementary target observations by exploiting the advantages of both radar and lidar.

  12. Evaluation of airborne image data and LIDAR main stem data for monitoring physical resources within the Colorado River ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.; Rosiek, Mark R.; Galuszka, Donna M.

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated near-infrared LIDAR data acquired over the main-stem channel at four long-term monitoring sites within the Colorado River ecosystem (CRE) to determine the ability of these data to provide reliable indications in changes in water elevation over time. Our results indicate that there is a good correlation between the LIDAR water-surface elevations and ground measurements of water-edge elevation, but there are also inherent errors in the LIDAR data. The elevation errors amount to about 50 cm and therefore temporal changes in water-surface elevation that exceed this value by the majority of data at a particular location can be deemed significant or real. This study also evaluated airborne image data for producing photogrammetric elevation data and for automated mapping of sand bars and debris flows within the CRE. The photogrammetric analyses show that spatial resolutions of ≤ 10 cm are required to produce vertical accuracies

  13. High Power Laser Diode Arrays for 2-Micron Solid State Coherent Lidars Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra; Sudesh, Vikas; Baker, Nathaniel

    2003-01-01

    Laser diode arrays are critical components of any diode-pumped solid state laser systems, constraining their performance and reliability. Laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used as the pump source for energizing the solid state lasing media to generate an intense coherent laser beam with a high spatial and spectral quality. The solid state laser design and the characteristics of its lasing materials define the operating wavelength, pulse duration, and power of the laser diodes. The pump requirements for high pulse energy 2-micron solid state lasers are substantially different from those of more widely used 1-micron lasers and in many aspects more challenging [1]. Furthermore, the reliability and lifetime demanded by many coherent lidar applications, such as global wind profiling from space and long-range clear air turbulence detection from aircraft, are beyond the capability of currently available LDAs. In addition to the need for more reliable LDAs with longer lifetime, further improvement in the operational parameters of high power quasi-cw LDAs, such as electrical efficiency, brightness, and duty cycle, are also necessary for developing cost-effective 2-micron coherent lidar systems for applications that impose stringent size, heat dissipation, and power constraints. Global wind sounding from space is one of such applications, which is the main driver for this work as part of NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program. This paper discusses the current state of the 792 nm LDA technology and the technology areas being pursued toward improving their performance. The design and development of a unique characterization facility for addressing the specific issues associated with the LDAs for pumping 2-micron coherent lidar transmitters and identifying areas of technological improvement will be described. Finally, the results of measurements to date on various standard laser diode packages, as well as custom-designed packages with potentially longer lifetime, will be reported.

  14. Comparison of Continuous-Wave CO2 Lidar Calibration by use of Earth-Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1998-01-01

    Backscatter of several Earth surfaces was characterized in the laboratory as a function of incidence angle with a focused continuous-wave 9.1 micro meter CO2 Doppler lidar for use as possible calibration targets. Some targets showed negligible angular dependence, while others showed a slight increase with decreasing angle. The Earth-surface signal measured over the complex Californian terrain during a 1995 NASA airborne mission compared well with laboratory data. Distributions of the Earth's surface signal shows that the lidar efficiency can be estimated with a fair degree of accuracy, preferably with uniform Earth-surface targets during flight for airborne or space-based lidar.

  15. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  16. First Airborne IPDA Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the DLR Greenhouse Gas Sounder CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, A.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.; Quatrevalet, M.; Büdenbender, C.; Kiemle, C.; Loehring, J.; Gerbig, C.

    2015-12-01

    First airborne measurement using CHARM-F, the four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4, were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The lidar is designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between aircraft and ground. HALO's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, enable the CHARM-F system to be an airborne demonstrator for future spaceborne greenhouse gas lidars. Due to a high technological conformity this applies in particular to the French-German satellite mission MERLIN, the spaceborne methane IPDA lidar. The successfully completed flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. The flights covered different ground cover types, different orography types as well as the sea. Additionally, we captured different cloud conditions, at which the broken cloud case is a matter of particular interest. This dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on technical details of the system. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the lidar. Additionally the onboard instrumentation of HALO gives information about pressure and temperature for cross-checking the ECMWF data, which are intended to be used for calculating the weighting function, the key quantity for the retrieval of gas column mixing ratios from the measured gas optical depths. In combination with dedicated descents into the boundary layer and subsequent ascents, a self-contained dataset for characterizations of CHARM-F is available.

  17. Infrared lidars for atmospheric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1991-01-01

    Lidars using pulsed TEA-CO2 transmitters and coherent receivers have been developed at JPL and used to measure atmospheric backscatter and extinction at wavelengths in the 9-11 micron region. The global winds measurement application of coherent Doppler lidar requires intensive study of the global climatology of aerosol and cloud backscatter and extinction. An airborne lidar was recently flown on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft for operation during two Pacific circumnavigation missions. The instrument characteristics, as well as representative measurement results, are discussed.

  18. Assessing and Correcting Topographic Effects on Forest Canopy Height Retrieval Using Airborne LiDAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively. PMID:26016907

  19. Assessing and correcting topographic effects on forest canopy height retrieval using airborne LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively. PMID:26016907

  20. Tropospheric ozone and aerosols measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic boundary layer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and aerosol distributions were measured from an aircraft using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system as part of the 1988 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment - Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE-3A) to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during the summer. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. Several cases of continental polar air masses were examined during the experiment. The aerosol scattering associated with these air masses was very low, and the atmospheric distribution of aerosols was quite homogeneous for those air masses that had been transported over the ice for greater than or = 3 days. The transition in O3 and aerosol distributions from tundra to marine conditions was examined several times. The aerosol data clearly show an abrupt change in aerosol scattering properties within the mixed layer from lower values over the tundra to generally higher values over the water. The distinct differences in the heights of the mixed layers in the two regions was also readily apparent. Several cases of enhanced O3 were observed during ABLE-3 in conjunction with enhanced aerosol scattering in layers in the free atmosphere. Examples are presented of the large scale variations of O3 and aerosols observed with the airborne lidar system from near the surface to above the tropopause over the Arctic during ABLE-3.

  1. Assessing and correcting topographic effects on forest canopy height retrieval using airborne LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-05-26

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively.

  2. Evaluation Of Airborne LiDAR Data To Predict Presence / Absence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaseanu, M.; Nayegandhi, A.; Brock, J.; Woodman, R.; Wright, W. C.

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluates the capabilities of the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) system in delineating vegetation assemblages in Jean Lafitte National Park, Louisiana. Five-meter-resolution grids of bare earth (BE), canopy height (CH), canopy-reflection ratio (CRR), and height of median energy (HOME) were derived from EAARL data acquired in September 2006. Ground-truth data were collected along transects to assess species composition, canopy cover, and ground cover. Comparisons of the capabilities of general linear models (GLM) and generalized additive models (GAM) were conducted using conventional evaluation methods (sensitivity, specificity, kappa statistics, area under the curve) and two new indexes, net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI). GAMs were superior to GLMs in modeling the vegetation training data, but no statistically significant differences between the two models were achieved for predicting vegetation validation data using conventional evaluation methods, although statistically significant improvements in net reclassifications were observed. The goodness-of-fit and prediction accuracy for both models are influenced by data prevalence and occurrence, although GAM models perform much better in the case of training data for all vegetation communities. Vegetation communities with less than 60% prevalence (e.g., coarse woody debris, herbs, shrubs, floating aquatics, and palms) have less than 40% maximum deviance explained, with the exception of bare ground for which the deviance explained by the GAM model is 64%. Midstory and canopy trees that have over 80% prevalence and over 10% occurrence have 99% deviance explained by the GAM model. For the validation dataset with vegetation community prevalence above 35%, GAM models show improvements in NRI only for vegetation categories with occurrences above 10%, and improvements in IDI for vegetation categories with occurrences above 20

  3. Mapping Forest Carbon by Fusing Terrestrial and Airborne LiDAR Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The storage and flux of terrestrial carbon (C) is one of the largest and most uncertain components of the global C budget, the vast majority of which is held within the biomass of the world's forests. However, the spatial distribution and quantification of forest C remains difficult to measure on a large scale. Remote sensing of forests with airborne LiDAR has proven to be an extremely effective method of bridging the gap between data from plot-level forestry mensuration and landscape-scale C storage estimates, but the standard method of assessing forest C is typically based on national or regional-scale allometric equations that are often not representative on the local-scale. Improvement of these measurements is necessary in order for collaborative multi-national carbon monitoring programs such as REDD implemented by the UNFCCC to be successful in areas, such as tropical forests, with tree species that have insufficiently documented allometric relationships. The primary goal of this study is to set forth a pipeline for precise non-destructive monitoring of C storage by: 1) determining C storage on 15 1/10th ha plots in a 25.6 ha Virginia temperate forest using the recently updated national allometric equations from Chojnacky et. al 2014, 2) comparing these estimates to non-destructively determined individual tree biomass using several semi-automated approaches of three-dimensionally analyzing the point cloud from a high-precision Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), and 3) creating a predictive model of forest C storage by fusing airborne LiDAR data to the plot-level TLS measurements. Our findings align with several other studies, indicating a strong relationship between allometrically-derived C estimates and TLS-derived C measurements (R2=0.93, n=30) using relatively few individuals, suggesting the potential application of these methods to species that are understudied or are without allometric relationships. Voxel based C storage was estimated on the plot level and

  4. Catchment-Scale Terrain Modelling with Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry: a replacement for airborne lidar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, James; James, Joe; Cook, Simon; Cox, Simon; Lotsari, Eliisa; McColl, Sam; Lehane, Niall; Williams, Richard; Vericat, Damia

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, 3D terrain reconstructions based on Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry have dramatically democratized the availability of high quality topographic data. This approach involves the use of a non-linear bundle adjustment to estimate simultaneously camera position, pose, distortion and 3D model coordinates. In contrast to traditional aerial photogrammetry, the bundle adjustment is typically solved without external constraints and instead ground control is used a posteriori to transform the modelled coordinates to an established datum using a similarity transformation. The limited data requirements, coupled with the ability to self-calibrate compact cameras, has led to a burgeoning of applications using low-cost imagery acquired terrestrially or from low-altitude platforms. To date, most applications have focused on relatively small spatial scales (0.1-5 Ha), where relaxed logistics permit the use of dense ground control networks and high resolution, close-range photography. It is less clear whether this low-cost approach can be successfully upscaled to tackle larger, watershed-scale projects extending over 102-3 km2 where it could offer a competitive alternative to established landscape modelling with airborne lidar. At such scales, compromises over the density of ground control, the speed and height of sensor platform and related image properties are inevitable. In this presentation we provide a systematic assessment of the quality of large-scale SfM terrain products derived for over 80 km2 of the braided Dart River and its catchment in the Southern Alps of NZ. Reference data in the form of airborne and terrestrial lidar are used to quantify the quality of 3D reconstructions derived from helicopter photography and used to establish baseline uncertainty models for geomorphic change detection. Results indicate that camera network design is a key determinant of model quality, and that standard aerial photogrammetric networks based on strips of nadir

  5. Catchment-Scale Terrain Modelling with Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry: a replacement for airborne lidar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last five years, Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry has dramatically democratized the availability of high quality topographic data. This approach involves the use of a non-linear bundle adjustment to estimate simultaneously camera position, pose, distortion and 3D model coordinates. In contrast to traditional aerial photogrammetry, the bundle adjustment is typically solved without external constraints and instead ground control is used a posteriori to transform the modelled coordinates to an established datum using a similarity transformation. The limited data requirements, coupled with the ability to self-calibrate compact cameras, has led to a burgeoning of applications using low-cost imagery acquired terrestrially or from low-altitude platforms. To date, most applications have focused on relatively small spatial scales where relaxed logistics permit the use of dense ground control and high resolution, close-range photography. It is less clear whether this low-cost approach can be successfully upscaled to tackle larger, watershed-scale projects extending over 102-3 km2 where it could offer a competitive alternative to landscape modelling with airborne lidar. At such scales, compromises over the density of ground control, the speed and height of sensor platform and related image properties are inevitable. In this presentation we provide a systematic assessment of large-scale SfM terrain products derived for over 80 km2 of the braided Dart River and its catchment in the Southern Alps of NZ. Reference data in the form of airborne and terrestrial lidar are used to quantify the quality of 3D reconstructions derived from helicopter photography and used to establish baseline uncertainty models for geomorphic change detection. Results indicate that camera network design is a key determinant of model quality, and that standard aerial networks based on strips of nadir photography can lead to unstable camera calibration and systematic errors that are difficult

  6. Design and Calibration of Autonomous Coherent Doppler Lidar for Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod G.; Kavaya, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Developed a new algorithm for the simulation of three dimensional homogeneous turbulent velocity fields. For typical atmospheric conditions it is impossible to produce a simulated velocity field that simultaneously satisfy a given spatial correlation and the corresponding spatial spectrum because of spectral aliasing. The new algorithms produce a turbulent velocity field which has accurate spatial correlations which is required for performance predictions from space-based systems. Developed a new algorithm for extracting the spatial statistics of the atmospheric velocity field using coherent Doppler lidar. The performance of the algorithm was compared with past methods and the new algorithm produces useful results for space-based data, which was not possible before. Developed new methods for verification of the errors in ground-based and space-based Doppler lidar wind measurements. These new methods do not require independent in situ data. This is an important issue for the verification of space-based Doppler lidar measurements of the global wind field. The performance of the new algorithm was compared with past results for both space-based and ground-based operation. The new algorithm has the best performance and is the only algorithm that performed satisfactory for spacebased operation. The performance of coherent Doppler lidar for a space missions with various scanning geometries was determined using computer simulation which contained the effects of random instrumental velocity errors, wind shear, wind variability along the range-gate and from shot-to-shot, and random variations in atmospheric aerosol backscatter over the measurement volume. The bias in the velocity estimates was small and the accuracy in the is typically less than 0.5 m/s for high signal conditions. For a large number of shot per velocity estimate, the threshold signal level for acceptable estimates is proportional to the number of shots to the minus one half power. This agrees with previous

  7. Pre-Launch End-to-End Testing Plans for the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) mission was proposed as a low cost technology demonstration mission, using a 2-micron, 100-mJ, 6-Hz, 25-cm, coherent lidar system based on demonstrated technology. SPARCLE was selected in late October 1997 to be NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) second earth-observing (EO-2) mission. To maximize the success probability of SPARCLE, NASA/MSFC desired expert guidance in the areas of coherent laser radar (CLR) theory, CLR wind measurement, fielding of CLR systems, CLR alignment validation, and space lidar experience. This led to the formation of the NASA/MSFC Coherent Lidar Technology Advisory Team (CLTAT) in December 1997. A threefold purpose for the advisory team was identified as: 1) guidance to the SPARCLE mission, 2) advice regarding the roadmap of post-SPARCLE coherent Doppler wind lidar (CDWL) space missions and the desired matching technology development plan 3, and 3) general coherent lidar theory, simulation, hardware, and experiment information exchange. The current membership of the CLTAT is shown. Membership does not result in any NASA or other funding at this time. We envision the business of the CLTAT to be conducted mostly by email, teleconference, and occasional meetings. The three meetings of the CLTAT to date, in Jan. 1998, July 1998, and Jan. 1999, have all been collocated with previously scheduled meetings of the Working Group on Space-Based Lidar Winds. The meetings have been very productive. Topics discussed include the SPARCLE technology validation plan including pre-launch end-to-end testing, the space-based wind mission roadmap beyond SPARCLE and its implications on the resultant technology development, the current values and proposed future advancement in lidar system efficiency, and the difference between using single-mode fiber optical mixing vs. the traditional free space optical mixing. attitude information from lidar and non-lidar sensors, and pointing knowledge algorithms will

  8. High-Rate Data-Capture for an Airborne Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valett, Susan; Hicks, Edward; Dabney, Philip; Harding, David

    2012-01-01

    A high-rate data system was required to capture the data for an airborne lidar system. A data system was developed that achieved up to 22 million (64-bit) events per second sustained data rate (1408 million bits per second), as well as short bursts (less than 4 s) at higher rates. All hardware used for the system was off the shelf, but carefully selected to achieve these rates. The system was used to capture laser fire, single-photon detection, and GPS data for the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photo-counting Lidar (SIMPL). However, the system has applications for other laser altimeter systems (waveform-recording), mass spectroscopy, xray radiometry imaging, high-background- rate ranging lidar, and other similar areas where very high-speed data capture is needed. The data capture software was used for the SIMPL instrument that employs a micropulse, single-photon ranging measurement approach and has 16 data channels. The detected single photons are from two sources those reflected from the target and solar background photons. The instrument is non-gated, so background photons are acquired for a range window of 13 km and can comprise many times the number of target photons. The highest background rate occurs when the atmosphere is clear, the Sun is high, and the target is a highly reflective surface such as snow. Under these conditions, the total data rate for the 16 channels combined is expected to be approximately 22 million events per second. For each photon detection event, the data capture software reads the relative time of receipt, with respect to a one-per-second absolute time pulse from a GPS receiver, from an event timer card with 0.1-ns precision, and records that information to a RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) storage device. The relative time of laser pulse firings must also be read and recorded with the same precision. Each of the four event timer cards handles the throughput from four of the channels. For each detection event, a flag is

  9. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  10. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  11. Applying modified high resolution airborne LiDAR DTM for floodplain mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, M.; Jochem, A.; Franke, M.; Schöberl, F.; Stötter, J.; Werthmann, M.

    2009-04-01

    Today, airborne LiDAR derived digital terrain models (DTM) are used in the research context and various scientific disciplines. In hydrology such high resolution DTMs are used for computing flood simulations, calculating roughness maps, floodplain mapping, etc. The presented approach outlines the strength of a LiDAR derived DTM (1m) in comparison to a photogrammetric derived DTM (10m). By implementing an interpolated river bed model, which is derived by using terrestrial measured river cross sections and hence modifying the high resolution DTM for hydraulic task floodplain mapping and modeling routines, could be improved. The river bed interpolation routine includes an automatic bridge detection algorithm to delete bridge pillars in the relevant river cross sections. Furthermore, the position of riverbanks, which are a contributing factor in the field of hydraulic modeling and influence the results of the hydraulic simulations, can be detected. Once the DTM is modified, river cross profiles can be extracted directly on each position along the river axis and can be used as input for hydraulic models. In this study the software HEC-RAS is used to calculate different floodplain areas on the basis of the HQ30, HQ100 and HQ200 flood scenarios, which are calibrated on key data of the flood in August 2005. The comparison of the floodplain area in the city of Innsbruck (Tyrol, Austria), modeled on the basis of a modified LiDAR derived DTM, with those from the HORA study (Hochwasserrisikozonierung Austria), shows remarkable differences. These differences result from (i) the different hydraulic modeling methods and (ii) the used DTMs, which HORA does not consider flood protection measures. The results show that the resolution of the used DTM is the determining factor for modeling adequate floodplain areas whereas the applied hydraulic model has secondary effects. The grade of accuracy attained by this approach is reflected by the numbers ,of flooding affected buildings (e

  12. a Hybrid Approach to Extraction and Refinement of Building Footprints from Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Sester, M.

    2011-08-01

    This work presents a combined bottom-up and top-down approach to extraction and refinement of building footprints from airborne LIDAR data. Building footprints are interesting for many applications in urban planning. The cadastral maps, however, may be limited for certain areas or not be updated frequently. Airborne laser scanning data is therefore considered by many people in the last decade as an important alternative data for change detection and update of building footprints. Laser scanning data of city scenes, however, often shows noise and incompleteness because of, e.g., the clutter by vegetation and the reflection of windows/waterlogged depressions on the roof. Results of the bottom-up detection may thus be limited to incomplete or irregular polygons. We employ 3D Hough transform to detect the building points. An improved joint multiple-plane detection scheme is proposed to find and label the laser points on multiple roof facets synchronously. The bottom-up processing provides not only a rough point segmentation but also additional 3D information, e.g., roof heights and horizontal ridges. Using these as priors, a top-down reconstruction is conducted via generative models. We consider the building footprint as an assembly of regular primitives. A statistical search by means of Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo and Maximum A Posteriori estimation is implemented to find the optimal configuration of the footprint. By these means a robust and plausible reconstruction is guaranteed. First results on point clouds with various resolutions show the potential of this approach.

  13. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure Made Using the Oxygen A-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriquez, Michael D.; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurements of greenhouse gas mixing ratios on a global scale are currently needed to gain a better understanding of climate change and its possible impact on our planet. In order to remotely measure greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere with regard to dry air, the air number density in the atmosphere is also needed in deriving the greenhouse gas concentrations. Since oxygen is stable and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere at 20.95%, the measurement of an oxygen absorption in the atmosphere can be used to infer the dry air density and used to calculate the dry air mixing ratio of a greenhouse gas, such as carbon dioxide or methane. OUT technique of measuring Oxygen uses integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) with an Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDF A) laser system and single photon counting module (SPCM). It measures the absorbance of several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to an O2 absorption line in the A-band at 764.7 nm. The choice of wavelengths allows us to maximize the pressure sensitivity using the trough between two absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm uses ancillary meteorological and aircraft altitude information to fit the experimentally obtained lidar O2 line shapes to a model atmosphere and derives the pressure from the profiles of the two lines. We have demonstrated O2 measurements from the ground and from an airborne platform. In this paper we will report on our airborne measurements during our 2011 campaign for the ASCENDS program.

  14. Height-resolved Scaling Properties of Tropospheric Water Vapour based on Airborne Lidar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Fischer, Lucas; Craig, George C.

    2013-04-01

    Two-dimensional vertical water vapour cross sections of the free troposphere between altitudes of 2 and 10 km, measured by nadir-viewing airborne differential-absorption lidar with high spatial resolution, were analyzed using structure functions up to the fifth order. We found scale invariance, i.e. a power-law dependency of structure function on length scale, for scales between 5 and 100 km, for the horizontal time series of water vapour mixing ratio. In contrast to one-dimensional in situ measurements, the two-dimensional water vapor lidar observations allow height-resolved analyses of power-law scaling exponents at a vertical resolution of 200 m. The data reveal significantly different scaling properties above and below an air-mass boundary. They stem from three very dissimilar aircraft campaigns: COPS/ETReC over middle and southern Europe in summer 2007, T-PARC around Japan mostly over sea in late summer 2008, and T-IPY around Spitsbergen over sea in winter 2008. After discarding flight segments with low lidar signals or large data gaps, and after averaging horizontally to a resolution of between 1 and 5 km to obtain a high signal to noise ratio, structure functions were computed for 20 flights at various heights, adding up to a length of more than 300,000 km. The power-law scaling exponents of the structure functions do not show significant latitudinal, seasonal or land/sea dependency, but they do differ between air masses influenced by moist convection and air masses aloft, not influenced. A classification of the horizontal water vapour time series into two groups according to whether the series occurred above or below the level of nearby convective cloud tops could be performed by detecting the cloud top height from the lidar backscatter signal in the corresponding flight segment. We found that the scaling exponents can be divided into two groups depending on the respective air mass: The smoothness of the time series, expressed by the first-order scaling

  15. Height-resolved Scaling Properties of Water Vapor in the Mesoscale using Airborne Lidar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, L.; Craig, G. C.; Kiemle, C.

    2012-12-01

    Free tropospheric water vapor variability, measured by long-range airborne differential-absorption lidar, has been analyzed by using structure functions of different orders at altitudes from 2 to 10 km. It is shown that the water vapor field exhibits scale invariance at spatial scales ranging from 5km to 100km, where scaling behavior is defined as a power law dependence of structure functions on length scale. In contrast to one-dimensional in situ measurements, two-dimensional water vapor lidar observations allow height-resolved analysis of scaling exponents with a vertical resolution of 200m. Using this data a clear distinction was found between scaling properties above and below an air-mass boundary. Data has been analysed from three campaigns, COPS/ETReC (2007) collected during summertime in middle and south Europe, T-PARC (2008) collected during late summer around Japan mostly over sea and T-IPY (2008) collected during winter around Spitsbergen mostly over sea. After discarding flights with low lidar signals or large data gaps, and after horizontal averaging to a resolution of 1-5km to obtain a high signal to noise ratio, structure functions were computed for 20 flights at various heights with a total length of more than 300,000 km. Scaling exponents were obtained for structure functions up to fifth order, and results will be presented for first and second order structure functions and for intermittency (variation of the scaling exponent with increasing order). The scaling exponents show no significant latitudinal, seasonal and land/sea dependence, but show significantly different behavior depending on whether the time series occured in an air mass influenced by cumulus convection or not. A classification of the time series into two groups according to whether the series occurred above or below the level of nearby convective cloud tops was performed by detecting the cloud height from the lidar backscatter signal of the corresponding flight. It was found that

  16. Ecosystem Mapping Approaches Based on Vegetation Structure Using NEON Prototype Airborne LiDAR and Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, K.; Emery, W. J.; Barnett, D.; Petroy, S. B.; Meier, C. L.; Wessman, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing is a powerful tool for measuring the current state of vegetation and monitoring changes over time with repeated data collections. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is especially well suited for mapping 3D vegetation structure. In 2010, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) contracted LiDAR and hyperspectral airborne data collections over the Ordway-Swisher Biological Station (OSBS). Ground truth campaigns were also conducted in 2010, 2011, and 2014 including structural measurements and generation of species lists for a set of ground validation plots. The vegetation communities at OSBS can be characterized by the Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI) classification system, with a large area of the property belonging to the Sandhill community. For this study, classification algorithm training locations are hand selected for each FNAI community type using photo-interpretation. A series of LiDAR metrics are calculated on the discrete return point clouds and derived digital elevation (DEM) and canopy height models (CHM). A decision tree classification algorithm is run using R package "rpart". A main goal of the project is to relate the LiDAR metrics used by the decision tree to direct canopy structural quantities. For instance, the canopy 75th minus the 50th percentile height in the LiDAR point clouds are related to the uniformity and light penetration in the upper canopy. A prototype of the decision tree achieved a classification accuracy of 89% on the training data itself, suggesting that some locations in different FNAI vegetation communities have similar structure and could not be distinguished in the LiDAR metrics used. An improved decision tree is currently under development which will include more training locations and more LiDAR metrics as input features. Results from this improved model will be presenting using the NEON ground truth locations as an independent and quantitative validation measure of the decision tree

  17. Study of wind retrieval from space-borne infrared coherent lidar in cloudy atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Mizutani, Kohei; Okamoto, Kozo; Ochiai, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Future spaceborne tropospheric wind missions using infrared coherent lidar are currently being studied in Japan and in the United States [1,2]. The line-of-sight wind velocity is retrieved from the Doppler shift frequency of the signal returned by aerosol particles. However a large percentage (70-80%) of the measured single-shot intensity profiles are expected to be contaminated by clouds [3]. A large number of cloud contaminated profiles (>40%) will be characterized by a cloud-top signal intensity stronger than the aerosol signal by a factor of one order of magnitude, and by a strong attenuation of the signal backscattered from below the clouds. Profiles including more than one cloud layer are also expected. This work is a simulation study dealing with the impacts of clouds on wind retrieval. We focus on the three following points: 1) definition of an algorithm for optimizing the wind retrieval from the cloud-top signal, 2) assessment of the clouds impact on the measurement performance and, 3) definition of a method for averaging the measurements before the retrieval. The retrieval simulations are conducted considering the instrumental characteristics selected for the Japanese study: wavelength at 2 µm, PRF of 30 Hz, pulse power of 0.125 mJ and platform altitude between 200-400 km. Liquid and ice clouds are considered. The analysis uses data from atmospheric models and statistics of cloud effects derived from CALIPSO measurements such as in [3]. A special focus is put on the average method of the measurements before retrieval. Good retrievals in the mid-upper troposphere implie the average of measured single-range power spectra over large horizontal (100 km) and vertical (1 km) ranges. Large differences of signal intensities due to the presence of clouds and the clouds non-uniform distribution have to be taken into account when averaging the data to optimize the measurement performances. References: [1] S. Ishii, T. Iwasaki, M. Sato, R. Oki, K. Okamoto, T

  18. Measuring Tropospheric Winds from Space Using a Coherent Doppler Lidar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Emmitt, G. David

    1999-01-01

    The global measurement of tropospheric wind profiles has been cited by the operational meteorological community as the most important missing element in the present and planned observing system. The most practical and economical method for obtaining this measurement is from low earth orbit, utilizing a Doppler lidar (laser radar) technique. Specifically, this paper will describe the coherent Doppler wind lidar (CDWL) technique, the design and progress of a current space flight project to fly such a system on the Space Shuttle, and plans for future flights of similar instruments. The SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) is a Shuttle-based instrument whose flight is targeted for March, 2001. The objectives of SPARCLE are three-fold: Confirm that the coherent Doppler lidar technique can measure line-of-sight winds to within 1-2 m/s accuracy; Collect data to permit validation and improvement of instrument performance models to enable better design of future missions; and Collect wind and backscatter data for future mission optimization and for atmospheric studies. These objectives reflect the nature of the experiment and its program sponsor, NASA's New Millennium Program. The experiment is a technology validation mission whose primary purpose is to provide a space flight validation of this particular technology. (It should be noted that the CDWL technique has successfully been implemented from ground-based and aircraft-based platforms for a number of years.) Since the conduct of the SPARCLE mission is tied to future decisions on the choice of technology for free-flying, operational missions, the collection of data is intrinsically tied to the validation and improvement of instrument performance models that predict the sensitivity and accuracy of any particular present or future instrument system. The challenges unique to space flight for an instrument such as SPARCLE and follow-ons include: Obtaining the required lidar sensitivity from the long distance

  19. Remote sensing measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio in the planetary boundary layer using cloud slicing with airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Anand K.; Mao, Jianping; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham R.

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using cloud slicing with an airborne pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar from flight altitudes of up to 13 km. During a flight over Iowa in summer 2011, simultaneous measurement of the optical range and CO2 absorption to clouds and the ground were made using time-resolved detection of pulse echoes from each scattering surface. We determined the CO2 absorption in the PBL by differencing the two lidar-measured absorption line shapes, one to a broken shallow cumulus cloud layer located at the top of the PBL and the other to the ground. Solving for the CO2 VMR in the PBL and that of the free troposphere, we measured a ≈15 ppm (4%) drawdown in the PBL. Both CO2 VMRs were within ≈3 ppm of in situ CO2 profile measurements. We have also demonstrated cloud slicing using scatter from thin, diffuse cirrus clouds and cumulus clouds, which allowed solving for the CO2 VMR for three vertical layers. The technique and retrieval algorithm are applicable to a space-based lidar instrument as well as to lidar IPDA measurements of other trace gases. Thus, lidar cloud slicing also offers promise toward space-based remote sensing of vertical trace gas profiles in the atmosphere using a variety of clouds.

  20. Combined Use of Airborne Lidar and DBInSAR Data to Estimate LAI in Temperate Mixed Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peduzzi, Alicia; Wynne, Randolph Hamilton; Thomas, Valerie A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Reis, James J.; Sanford, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether leaf area index (LAI) in temperate mixed forests is best estimated using multiple-return airborne laser scanning (lidar) data or dual-band, single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar data (from GeoSAR) alone, or both in combination. In situ measurements of LAI were made using the LiCor LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer on 61 plots (21 hardwood, 36 pine, 4 mixed pine hardwood; stand age ranging from 12-164 years; mean height ranging from 0.4 to 41.2 m) in the Appomattox-Buckingham State Forest, Virginia, USA. Lidar distributional metrics were calculated for all returns and for ten one meter deep crown density slices (a new metric), five above and five below the mode of the vegetation returns for each plot. GeoSAR metrics were calculated from the X-band backscatter coefficients (four looks) as well as both X- and P-band interferometric heights and magnitudes for each plot. Lidar metrics alone explained 69% of the variability in LAI, while GeoSAR metrics alone explained 52%. However, combining the lidar and GeoSAR metrics increased the R2 to 0.77 with a CV-RMSE of 0.42. This study indicates the clear potential for X-band backscatter and interferometric height (both now available from spaceborne sensors), when combined with small-footprint lidar data, to improve LAI estimation in temperate mixed forests.

  1. Airborne lidar observations of volcanic ash during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Spring 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenco, F.; Johnson, B.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Newman, S.; Webster, H.; Cooke, M.; Dorsey, J.; Ricketts, H.; Clarisse, L.

    2012-04-01

    The London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), based at the Met Office, provided forecast guidance for the Civil Aviation Authority during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in April-May 2010. Besides providing daily forecasts using the Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME), a series of observational activities were carried out by the Met Office, involving ground-based lidars, the exploitation of satellite data, and research flights using the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 research aircraft (FAAM, www.faam.ac.uk), on which this talk is focused. Due to safety restrictions, aircraft sampling has only been performed in areas where ash concentrations where forecasted to be less than 2000 μg/m3. Volcanic ash layers were observed using an elastic backscatter lidar on-board the FAAM aircraft operating at 355 nm, which allowed detailed mapping of the plumes. A flight on 4 May overpassed the ground-based lidar in Aberystwyth a few times. This provided ground truth validation of the on-board lidar and of its data inversion procedure. The ash layer during this flight was found to be in patches of short horizontal extent, but despite the strong horizontal inhomogeneity the two lidars showed excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. Moreover, radiative transfer computations using the lidar-derived profiles of aerosol extinction led to a good reconstruction of observed radiance spectra with on-board spectrometers. Aircraft in situ measurements of the particle size-distribution permitted the evaluation of a coarse extinction fraction (ranging 0.5-1) and a coarse mode specific extinction (0.6-0.9 m2/g) for six research flights. These quantities were then used to convert the lidar-derived aerosol extinction to ash concentration (with an estimated uncertainty of a factor of two). The combination of lidar and in-situ sampling of aerosol properties has thus offered us the opportunity to compile a dataset of the airborne

  2. Coherent infrared lidar mission and technology needs for measurements of transport and concentration of tropospheric trace species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Brockman, P.; Bair, C. H.; Staton, L. D.; Lytle, C. D.; Laughman, L. M.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The science justification and the feasibility of aircraft-based CO2 Doppler lidar measurements of transport between the free troposphere and the stratosphere (or planetary boundary layer) are discussed for a wide range of seasonal and geographic conditions. Ground-based coherent CO2 lidar aerosol scattering experiments using a stable ring resonator (about 50 mJ/pulse) CO2 laser with external injection locking are reported. Comparative studies of injection-locked CO2 laser unstable resonators and master oscillator power amplifiers are reported for future CO2 lidar missions with respect to requirements of pulse energy, duration/shape, frequency chirp, efficiency for heterodyne detection, and combined Doppler lidar and Differential Absorption Lidar missions.

  3. Use of Airborne LiDAR To Estimate Forest Stand Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Li, Chang

    2014-03-01

    Small-Footprint Airborne LiDAR(light detection and ranging) remote sensing is a breakthrough technology for deriving forest canopy structural characteristics. Because the technique is relatively new as applied to canopy measurement in China, there is a tremendous need for experiments that integrate field work, LiDAR remote sensing and subsequent analyses for retrieving the full complement of structural measures critical for forestry applications. Data storage capacity and high processing speed available today have made it possible to digitally sample and store the entire reflected waveform, instead of only extracting the discrete coordinates which form the so-called point clouds. Return waveforms can give more detailed insights into the vertical structure of surface objects, surface slope, roughness and reflectivity than the conventional echoes. In this paper, an improved Expectation Maximum (EM) algorithm is adopted to decompose raw waveform data. Derived forest biophysical parameters, such as vegetation height, subcanopy topography, crown volume, ground reflectivity, vegetation reflectivity and canopy closure, are able to describe the horizontal and vertical forest canopy structure.

  4. Mixed Layer Heights Derived from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarino, Amy J.; Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.; Fast, Jerome; Dasilva, Arlindo; Benedetti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been deployed on board the NASA Langley Research Center's B200 aircraft to several locations in North America from 2006 to 2012 to aid in characterizing aerosol properties for over fourteen field missions. Measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) during 349 science flights, many in coordination with other participating research aircraft, satellites, and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as properties and variability of the Mixing Layer (ML) height. We describe the use of the HSRL data collected during these missions for computing ML heights and show how the HSRL data can be used to determine the fraction of aerosol optical thickness within and above the ML, which is important for air quality assessments. We describe the spatial and temporal variations in ML heights found in the diverse locations associated with these experiments. We also describe how the ML heights derived from HSRL have been used to help assess simulations of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) derived using various models, including the Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem), NASA GEOS-5 model, and the ECMWF/MACC models.

  5. Evaluation of airborne lidar data to predict vegetation Presence/Absence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, M.; Nayegandhi, A.; Brock, J.; Woodman, R.; Wright, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the capabilities of the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) in delineating vegetation assemblages in Jean Lafitte National Park, Louisiana. Five-meter-resolution grids of bare earth, canopy height, canopy-reflection ratio, and height of median energy were derived from EAARL data acquired in September 2006. Ground-truth data were collected along transects to assess species composition, canopy cover, and ground cover. To decide which model is more accurate, comparisons of general linear models and generalized additive models were conducted using conventional evaluation methods (i.e., sensitivity, specificity, Kappa statistics, and area under the curve) and two new indexes, net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement. Generalized additive models were superior to general linear models in modeling presence/absence in training vegetation categories, but no statistically significant differences between the two models were achieved in determining the classification accuracy at validation locations using conventional evaluation methods, although statistically significant improvements in net reclassifications were observed. ?? 2009 Coastal Education and Research Foundation.

  6. Using airborne LiDAR to investigated the bedrock incision in the Tsaoling Landslide surface, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chin-Shyong; Chen, Yi-Zhong; Hsieh, Yu-Chung; Chen, Rou-Fei; Wu, Ruo-Ying

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, a great number of studies have investigated the tectonic topographic evolution and development of active orogenic belts that cause the dynamics related to a variety of terrain features. In particular, the incision of bedrock via erosion by rivers plays a crucial research role. Erosion gullies reflect the incision of bedrock by rivers during the tectonic and topographic evolution of active orogenic zones; however, a limited amount of measurement data is currently available. Therefore, this study explored the incision erosion rate of different lithologies in the collapsed surface of a landslide induced by the 1999 Chi-chi earthquake in the Tsaoling area. This study uses the 1 m high-resolution DEM established by the Central Geological Survey via airborne LiDAR, organized by the Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA. In this study, we investigated the distribution of erosion gullies produced in different rock formations by the Tsaoling landslide based on an openness analysis using a red relief image map (RRIM) and calculated the bedrock incision rate for the Cholan Formation and Chishui Shale for 1999, 2011 and 2012, which was 30-40 cm/yr and 54-90 cm/yr on average, respectively. These results indicated that the Cholan Formation has a higher resistance to erosion than the Chishui Shale, where the erosion was more serious.

  7. Hierarchical Higher Order Crf for the Classification of Airborne LIDAR Point Clouds in Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, J.; Rottensteiner, F.; Soergel, U.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel hierarchical approach for the classification of airborne 3D lidar points. Spatial and semantic context is incorporated via a two-layer Conditional Random Field (CRF). The first layer operates on a point level and utilises higher order cliques. Segments are generated from the labelling obtained in this way. They are the entities of the second layer, which incorporates larger scale context. The classification result of the segments is introduced as an energy term for the next iteration of the point-based layer. This framework iterates and mutually propagates context to improve the classification results. Potentially wrong decisions can be revised at later stages. The output is a labelled point cloud as well as segments roughly corresponding to object instances. Moreover, we present two new contextual features for the segment classification: the distance and the orientation of a segment with respect to the closest road. It is shown that the classification benefits from these features. In our experiments the hierarchical framework improve the overall accuracies by 2.3% on a point-based level and by 3.0% on a segment-based level, respectively, compared to a purely point-based classification.

  8. Analysis of the NASA/MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar results from San Gorgonio Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.; Sandusky, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Two days during July of 1981 the NASA/MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) was flown aboard the NASA/AMES Convair 990 on the east side of San Gorgonio Pass California, near Palm Springs, to measure and investigate the accelerated atmospheric wind field discharging from the pass. The vertical and horizontal extent of the fast moving atmospheric flow discharging from the San Gorgonio Pass were examined. Conventional ground measurements were also taken during the tests to assist in validating the ADLS results. This particular region is recognized as a high wind resource region and, as such, a knowledge of the horizontal and vertical extent of this flow was of interest for wind energy applications. The statistics of the atmospheric flow field itself as it discharges from the pass and then spreads out over the desert were also of scientific interests. This data provided the first spatial data for ensemble averaging of spatial correlations to compute longitudinal and lateral integral length scales in the longitudinal and lateral directions for both components.

  9. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  10. Validation of Temperature Measurements from the Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar During SOLVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walter; Lait, Leslie; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Heaps, William; Hostetler, Chris; Bui, T. Paul; Neuber, Roland; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Airborne Raman Ozone, Temperature and Aerosol Lidar (AROTEL) participated in the recent Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) by providing profiles of aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), ozone and temperature with high vertical and horizontal resolution. Temperatures were derived from just above the aircraft to approximately 60 kilometers geometric altitude with a reported vertical resolution of between 0.5 and 1.5 km. The horizontal footprint varied from 4 to 70 km. This paper explores the measurement uncertainties associated with the temperature retrievals and makes comparisons with independent, coincident, measurements of temperature. Measurement uncertainties range from 0.1 K to approximately 4 K depending on altitude and integration time. Comparisons between AROTEL and balloon sonde temperatures retrieved under clear sky conditions using both Rayleigh and Raman scattered data showed AROTEL approximately 1 K colder than sonde values. Comparisons between AROTEL and the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) on NASA's ER-2 show AROTEL being from 2-3 K colder for altitudes ranging from 14 to 18 km. Temperature comparisons between AROTEL and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's model showed differences of approximately 1 K below approximately 25 km and a very strong cold bias of approximately 12 K at altitudes between 30 and 35 km.

  11. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  12. Assessing visual green effects of individual urban trees using airborne Lidar data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyue; Xu, Bing; Gao, Bingbo

    2015-12-01

    Urban trees benefit people's daily life in terms of air quality, local climate, recreation and aesthetics. Among these functions, a growing number of studies have been conducted to understand the relationship between residents' preference towards local environments and visual green effects of urban greenery. However, except for on-site photography, there are few quantitative methods to calculate green visibility, especially tree green visibility, from viewers' perspectives. To fill this research gap, a case study was conducted in the city of Cambridge, which has a diversity of tree species, sizes and shapes. Firstly, a photograph-based survey was conducted to approximate the actual value of visual green effects of individual urban trees. In addition, small footprint airborne Lidar (Light detection and ranging) data was employed to measure the size and shape of individual trees. Next, correlations between visual tree green effects and tree structural parameters were examined. Through experiments and gradual refinement, a regression model with satisfactory R2 and limited large errors is proposed. Considering the diversity of sample trees and the result of cross-validation, this model has the potential to be applied to other study sites. This research provides urban planners and decision makers with an innovative method to analyse and evaluate landscape patterns in terms of tree greenness.

  13. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions. PMID:20941181

  14. Extracting vertical winds from simulated clouds with ground-based coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Lottman, B T; Frehlich, R G

    1998-12-20

    The performance of mean velocity estimators is determined by computer simulations for solid-state coherent Doppler lidar measurements of wind fields at a cloud interface with deterministic profiles of velocity and aerosol backscatter. Performance of the velocity estimates is characterized by the standard deviation about the estimated mean and the bias referenced to the input velocity. A new class of estimators are required for cloud conditions, as traditional techniques result in biased estimates. We consider data with high signal energy that produces negligible random outliers. PMID:18301652

  15. Extracting vertical winds from simulated clouds with ground-based coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Lottman, B T; Frehlich, R G

    1998-12-20

    The performance of mean velocity estimators is determined by computer simulations for solid-state coherent Doppler lidar measurements of wind fields at a cloud interface with deterministic profiles of velocity and aerosol backscatter. Performance of the velocity estimates is characterized by the standard deviation about the estimated mean and the bias referenced to the input velocity. A new class of estimators are required for cloud conditions, as traditional techniques result in biased estimates. We consider data with high signal energy that produces negligible random outliers.

  16. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (5-year interval) airborne lidar data set for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved and/or coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change was estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 yr-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 yr-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01 (fire return rate of 100 years), as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  17. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2015-09-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (five year interval) airborne lidar dataset for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved/coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change were estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 year-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a~tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 year-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire occurrence) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 year-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01, as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon dynamics models. Space

  18. Continuous wave synthetic low-coherence wind sensing Lidar: motionless measurement system with subsequent numerical range scanning.

    PubMed

    Brinkmeyer, Ernst; Waterholter, Thomas

    2013-01-28

    A continuous wave (CW) Lidar system for detection of scattering from atmospheric aerosol particles is presented which is useful in particular for remote sensing of wind velocities. It is based on a low-coherence interferometric setup powered by a synthetic broadband laser source with Gaussian power density spectrum. The laser bandwidth is electronically adjustable and determines the spatial resolution which is independent of range. The Lidar system has no moving parts. The location to be resolved can be shifted numerically after the measurement meaning that a single measurement already contains the full range information. The features of constant resolution and numerical range scanning are in sharp contrast to ordinary CW Lidar systems.

  19. Analysis of airborne LiDAR as a basis for digital soil mapping in Alpine areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kringer, K.; Tusch, M.; Geitner, C.; Meißl, G.; Rutzinger, M.

    2009-04-01

    Especially in mountainous regions like the Alps the formation of soil is highly influenced by relief characteristics. Among all factors included in Jenny's (1941) model for soil development, relief is the one most commonly used in approaches to create digital soil maps and to derive soil properties from secondary data sources (McBratney et al. 2003). Elevation data, first order (slope, aspect) and second order derivates (plan, profile and cross-sectional curvature) as well as complex morphometric parameters (various landform classifications, e.g., Wood 1996) and compound indices (e.g., topographic wetness indices, vertical distance to drainage network, insolation) can be calculated from digital elevation models (DEM). However, while being an important source of information for digital soil mapping on small map scales, "conventional" DEMs are of limited use for the design of large scale conceptual soil maps for small areas due to rather coarse raster resolutions with cell sizes ranging from 20 to 100 meters. Slight variations in elevation and small landform features might not be discernible even though they might have a significant effect to soil formation, e.g., regarding the influence of groundwater in alluvial soils or the extent of alluvial fans. Nowadays, Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) provides highly accurate data for the elaboration of high-resolution digital terrain models (DTM) even in forested areas. In the project LASBO (Laserscanning in der Bodenkartierung) the applicability of digital terrain models derived from LiDAR for the identification of soil-relevant geomorphometric parameter is investigated. Various algorithms which were initially designed for coarser raster data are applied on high-resolution DTMs. Test areas for LASBO are located in the region of Bruneck (Italy) and near the municipality of Kramsach in the Inn Valley (Austria). The freely available DTM for Bruneck has a raster resolution of 2.5 meters while in Kramsach a DTM with

  20. Space-Time Cube Analytics of Evolving Landforms Captured by Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitasova, H.; Starek, M. J.; Hardin, E. J.; Wegmann, K. W.; Blundell, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    methods were applied to a 15 year time series of airborne lidar surveys of the North Carolina barrier islands. The analysis of coastal terrain dynamics includes sections of barrier island characterized by different types of landforms, including a beach-foredune system, active back island dune and a cape. Evolution of these landforms has been influenced by wind, wave and storm surge processes creating impacts that are reflected in specific STC-derived isosurface topologies. Terrestrial lidar application is illustrated by analysis of two year monitoring data acquired at a meander bend of an eroding stream in North Carolina Piedmont. The presented STC methodology is simple to implement yet powerful in its ability to condense surface evolution complexity into meaningful information. Furthermore, the methodology is general and can be used with any software that supports 2D and 3D raster data processing, trivariate interpolation, and volume visualization. Our implementation was based on open-source GRASS GIS.

  1. Optimization of coherent lidar performance with graded-reflectance transmitter resonator optics in the low equivalent Fresnel number regime.

    PubMed

    Tratt, D M; Bowers, M S

    1996-08-20

    Using a diffractive eigenmode treatment to model the laser output we show that graded-reflectance resonator optics offer significant efficiency benefits over conventional hard-edge coupled unstable resonators in the context of coherent detection lidar applications. Extending previous research pertinent to the high equivalent Fresnel number regime, we have modeled the optimum performance of a notional super-Gaussian coupled cavity as a function of the key resonator parameters in the low equivalent Fresnel number (<3) regime. The findings from this study are applicable to the design of coherent lidar transmitters operated within this regime. PMID:21102907

  2. Design of the processing chain for a high-altitude, airborne, single-photon lidar mapping instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluckman, Joshua

    2016-05-01

    Processing data from high-altitude, airborne lidar instruments that employ single-photon sensitive, arrayed detectors poses several challenges. Arrayed detectors produce large volumes of data; single-photon sensitive detectors produce high levels of noise; and high-altitude operation makes accurate geolocation difficult to achieve. To address these challenges, a unique and highly automated processing chain for high-altitude, single-photon, airborne lidar mapping instruments has been developed. The processing chain includes algorithms for coincidence processing, noise reduction, self-calibration, data registration, and geolocation accuracy enhancement. Common to all single-photon sensitive systems is a high level of background photon noise. A key step in the processing chain is a fast and accurate algorithm for density estimation, which is used to separate the lidar signal from the background photon noise, permitting the use of a wide-range gate and daytime operation. Additional filtering algorithms are used to remove or reduce other sources of system and detector noise. An optimization algorithm that leverages the conical scan pattern of the instrument is used to improve geolocation and to self-calibrate the system.

  3. Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements as Low-Mass Coherent Lidar Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Transmissive scanning elements for coherent laser radar systems are typically optical wedges, or prisms, which deflect the lidar beam at a specified angle and are then rotated about the instrument optical axis to produce a scan pattern. The wedge is placed in the lidar optical system subsequent to a beam-expanding telescope, implying that it has the largest diameter of any element in the system. The combination of the wedge diameter and asymmetric profile result in the element having very large mass and, consequently, relatively large power consumption required for scanning. These two parameters, mass and power consumption, are among the instrument requirements which need to be minimized when designing a lidar for a space-borne platform. Reducing the scanner contributions in these areas will have a significant effect on the overall instrument specifications, Replacing the optical wedge with a diffraction grating on the surface of a thin substrate is a straight forward approach with potential to reduce the mass of the scanning element significantly. For example, the optical wedge that will be used for the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) is approximately 25 cm in diameter and is made from silicon with a wedge angle designed for 30 degree deflection of a beam operating at approx. 2 micrometer wavelength. The mass of this element could be reduced by a factor of four by instead using a fused silica substrate, 1 cm thick, with a grating fabricated on one of the surfaces. For a grating to deflect a beam with a 2 micrometer wavelength by 30 degrees, a period of approximately 4 micrometers is required. This is small enough that fabrication of appropriate high efficiency blazed or multi-phase level diffractive optical gratings is prohibitively difficult. Moreover, bulk or stratified volume holographic approaches appear impractical due to materials limitations at 2 micrometers and the need to maintain adequate wavefront quality. In order to avoid the

  4. Field performance of an all-semiconductor laser coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2012-06-15

    We implement and test what, to our knowledge, is the first deployable coherent Doppler lidar (CDL) system based on a compact, inexpensive all-semiconductor laser (SL). To demonstrate the field performance of our SL-CDL remote sensor, we compare a 36 h time series of averaged radial wind speeds measured by our instrument at an 80 m distance to those simultaneously obtained from an industry-standard sonic anemometer (SA). An excellent degree of correlation (R2=0.994 and slope=0.996) is achieved from a linear regression analysis of the CDL versus SA wind speed data. The lidar system is capable of providing high data availability, ranging from 85% to 100% even under varying outdoor (temperature and humidity) conditions during the test period. We also show the use of our SL-CDL for monitoring the dependence of aerosol backscatter on relative humidity. This work points to the feasibility of a more general class of low-cost, portable remote sensors based on all-SL emitters for applications that require demanding laser stability and coherence. PMID:22739880

  5. A reconfigurable all-fiber polarization-diversity coherent Doppler lidar: principles and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Abari, Cyrus F; Chu, Xinzhao; Michael Hardesty, R; Mann, Jakob

    2015-10-20

    This paper shows an efficient adaptation of a polarization diversity optical front-end, commonly used in high-speed fiber-optic communications, in a coherent Doppler lidar (CDL). The adopted architecture can be employed in a modified transceiver design for an all-fiber micropulsed coherent Doppler wind lidar where the performance limits of such systems are pushed beyond the conventionally available wind CDLs. As a result, either a longer measurement range, crucial in clear-air environments with low concentration of aerosols, or a shorter integration time (resulting in a faster scanning) can be achieved. Alternatively, in certain aerosol loading conditions where the presence of nonspherical aerosols is considerable, the system can be reconfigured on the fly to analyze the cross polarization of the backscatter optical signal. The result is the capability to analyze the nature of aerosol particles for the detected range of interest. Due to full utilization of the backscatter signal, i.e., detection of co-polarization and cross polarization components, the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) as well as detection range is improved in this configuration. Moreover, the system is capable of providing a more reliable estimation of the aerosol backscatter coefficient when compared with the contemporary CDLs. This system employs robust and compact all-fiber subsystems, which are cost effective and widely available as off-the-shelf components.

  6. A reconfigurable all-fiber polarization-diversity coherent Doppler lidar: principles and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Abari, Cyrus F; Chu, Xinzhao; Michael Hardesty, R; Mann, Jakob

    2015-10-20

    This paper shows an efficient adaptation of a polarization diversity optical front-end, commonly used in high-speed fiber-optic communications, in a coherent Doppler lidar (CDL). The adopted architecture can be employed in a modified transceiver design for an all-fiber micropulsed coherent Doppler wind lidar where the performance limits of such systems are pushed beyond the conventionally available wind CDLs. As a result, either a longer measurement range, crucial in clear-air environments with low concentration of aerosols, or a shorter integration time (resulting in a faster scanning) can be achieved. Alternatively, in certain aerosol loading conditions where the presence of nonspherical aerosols is considerable, the system can be reconfigured on the fly to analyze the cross polarization of the backscatter optical signal. The result is the capability to analyze the nature of aerosol particles for the detected range of interest. Due to full utilization of the backscatter signal, i.e., detection of co-polarization and cross polarization components, the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) as well as detection range is improved in this configuration. Moreover, the system is capable of providing a more reliable estimation of the aerosol backscatter coefficient when compared with the contemporary CDLs. This system employs robust and compact all-fiber subsystems, which are cost effective and widely available as off-the-shelf components. PMID:26560390

  7. Ecological Characterization Of An Intact Tropical Peat Forest Using Airborne Small Footprint LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. T.; Hutyra, L.; Raciti, S. M.; Hardiman, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical peat forests in Southeast Asia have been experiencing climatic and anthropogenic disturbances in the form of drought, fire, deforestation and drainage at an increasing pace and with an increasing extent throughout the past two decades. In this project we aim to improve our understanding of the structural dynamics of tropical peat swamps and the effect of deforestation on the forest structure by (i) characterizing the forest structural parameters (stem density, stem height, crown area, crown roughness, gap size and frequency) of an intact peat dome and (ii) comparing with those from a nearby deforested peat dome. Both are located in Northwestern Borneo. We combine field sampling of 0.8 hectare of forest in 2014 and 84km2 of airborne, small footprint, discrete returns LiDAR acquired in 2010 to extract the parameters of interest. We first process LiDAR data to produce to a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and a Canopy Height Model (CHM) of the area. Individual canopy stems are extracted through local maxima filtering with varying size and shape of search windows. Canopy crowns are segmented from the CHM via K-means clustering using stem positions as fixed cluster centroids. Canopy crown height and stem density are calibrated with field survey in order to upscale stem density to the whole peat dome. Crown roughness is defined as standard deviation of each cluster (crown). Finally, gaps were delineated from the CHM with 30m as vertical threshold and 40m2 as minimum area. The entire procedure is then repeated for the deforested peat dome. Across the intact peat dome, we find an increase in stem density but a decrease in canopy stem height, canopy crown area and canopy crown roughness as a function of a 5m elevational change. Gap size frequency follows a Gamma distribution with higher variance in gap percentage for areas closer to the dome center. As a function of canopy stem height, aboveground biomass decreases towards the dome center. For the deforested peat dome

  8. Image-Based Airborne LiDAR Point Cloud Encoding for 3d Building Model Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chao-Hung

    2016-06-01

    With the development of Web 2.0 and cyber city modeling, an increasing number of 3D models have been available on web-based model-sharing platforms with many applications such as navigation, urban planning, and virtual reality. Based on the concept of data reuse, a 3D model retrieval system is proposed to retrieve building models similar to a user-specified query. The basic idea behind this system is to reuse these existing 3D building models instead of reconstruction from point clouds. To efficiently retrieve models, the models in databases are compactly encoded by using a shape descriptor generally. However, most of the geometric descriptors in related works are applied to polygonal models. In this study, the input query of the model retrieval system is a point cloud acquired by Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems because of the efficient scene scanning and spatial information collection. Using Point clouds with sparse, noisy, and incomplete sampling as input queries is more difficult than that by using 3D models. Because that the building roof is more informative than other parts in the airborne LiDAR point cloud, an image-based approach is proposed to encode both point clouds from input queries and 3D models in databases. The main goal of data encoding is that the models in the database and input point clouds can be consistently encoded. Firstly, top-view depth images of buildings are generated to represent the geometry surface of a building roof. Secondly, geometric features are extracted from depth images based on height, edge and plane of building. Finally, descriptors can be extracted by spatial histograms and used in 3D model retrieval system. For data retrieval, the models are retrieved by matching the encoding coefficients of point clouds and building models. In experiments, a database including about 900,000 3D models collected from the Internet is used for evaluation of data retrieval. The results of the proposed method show a clear superiority

  9. Airborne and terrestrial lidar imaging and analysis of the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskin, M. E.; Gold, P. O.; Hinojosa, A.; Arrowsmith, R.; Elliott, A. J.; Taylor, M. H.; Herrs, A. J.; Sartori, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Gonzalez, A.; Kreylos, O.; Cowgill, E.

    2010-12-01

    We report newly available data sets and preliminary analysis of ground- and airborne-lidar surveys of the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture. The hyperarid setting and varied surficial geology of this complex rupture zone presents an ideal setting to advance the use of lidar in post-earthquake scientific response. Terrestrial lidar surveys commenced within two weeks of the earthquake and capture ephemeral geomorphic features of the rupture zone. We recorded approximately 2 km of rupture on the Borrego fault where oblique dextral slip approaches four meters. These data highlight fine-scale features such as centimeter-scale scarps, subtle warping of the ground surface, and striations on the exposed fault free-face. Airborne lidar surveys, collected mid-August, 2010, span the rupture zone for 100 km in a NW-SE direction, from just south of the international border to the tidal flats of the Colorado River delta at the head of the Gulf of California. 3.8 billion point measurements were obtained with an average density of 11 points per square meter. GPS ground control was provided from a combination of PBO stations north of the border and coordination with the occupation of post-earthquake campaign sites in the central and southern portions of the rupture zone. The 3 km average width of the survey captures the complexity of strain-transfer between the multiple fault segments that slipped in 2010, as well as the adjacent zone of surface ruptures attributed to the 1892 Laguna Salada earthquake. This data set provides a new basis for offset measurements to be compared against field data collected immediately following the 2010 earthquake. Quantitative comparison to lower-resolution, pre-event lidar collected by the Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI) illuminates near-field distributed vertical deformation adjacent to the fault rupture. The southeastern half of the lidar survey spans a zone of cryptic dextral deformation, hosted within the

  10. Detection of large above-ground biomass variability in lowland forest ecosystems by airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubanski, J.; Ballhorn, U.; Kronseder, K.; Franke, J.; Siegert, F.

    2013-06-01

    Quantification of tropical forest above-ground biomass (AGB) over large areas as input for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) projects and climate change models is challenging. This is the first study which attempts to estimate AGB and its variability across large areas of tropical lowland forests in Central Kalimantan (Indonesia) through correlating airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to forest inventory data. Two LiDAR height metrics were analysed, and regression models could be improved through the use of LiDAR point densities as input (R2 = 0.88; n = 52). Surveying with a LiDAR point density per square metre of about 4 resulted in the best cost / benefit ratio. We estimated AGB for 600 km of LiDAR tracks and showed that there exists a considerable variability of up to 140% within the same forest type due to varying environmental conditions. Impact from logging operations and the associated AGB losses dating back more than 10 yr could be assessed by LiDAR but not by multispectral satellite imagery. Comparison with a Landsat classification for a 1 million ha study area where AGB values were based on site-specific field inventory data, regional literature estimates, and default values by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) showed an overestimation of 43%, 102%, and 137%, respectively. The results show that AGB overestimation may lead to wrong greenhouse gas (GHG) emission estimates due to deforestation in climate models. For REDD+ projects this leads to inaccurate carbon stock estimates and consequently to significantly wrong REDD+ based compensation payments.

  11. Performance simulation of a spaceborne infrared coherent lidar for measuring tropospheric wind profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Kyoka, Gamo; Mizutani, Kohei; Chikako, Takahashi; Itabe, Toshikazu; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Kubota, Takuji; Okamoto, Kozo; Oki, Riko; Satoh, Masaki; Satoh, Yohei

    2014-05-01

    An effort has begun in Japan to develop a spaceborne instrument for measuring tropospheric winds. This project is a collaboration between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI, Japan) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) [1,2]. The aim is to measure the horizontal wind field in the troposphere on a global scale with a precision better than 3 ms-1, and a vertical and horizontal (along the satellite ground track) resolution better than 1 km and 100 km, respectively. In order to support the definition and the development of the instrument, an end-to-end simulator has been implemented including modules for i) simulating the time-dependent laser shot return power, ii) for averaging the spectral power of several returns and iii) for estimating the line-of-sight wind from the Doppler shift of the averaged spectra. The simulations take into account the satellite position and motion along the orbit track, the observational and instrumental characteristics, a 3-D representation of the relevant atmospheric parameters (i.e. wind field, cloud coverage and aerosols distribution) and the Earth surface characteristics. The simulator and the method for estimating the line-of-sight wind will be presented. We will show the results obtained for a payload composed of two 2-μm coherent LIDARs looking in orthogonal directions, and for a satellite moving on a low orbit. The precision, accuracy and the vertical and horizontal resolution of the wind estimates will be discussed. References: [1] S. Ishii, T. Iwasaki, M. Sato, R. Oki, K. Okamoto, T. Ishibashi, P. Baron, and T. Nishizawa, Future Doppler lidar wind measurement from space in Japan, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8529, 2012 [2] S. Ishii, H. Iwai, K. Mizutani, P. Baron, T. Itabe, H. Fukuoka, T. Ishikawa, A. Sato and A. Asai, 2-μm coherent LIDAR for CO2 and wind measurements, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8872, 2013

  12. Regional reconnaissance of seasonal landslide activity in the Eel River catchment, northern California, using InSAR and airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handwerger, A. L.; Schmidt, D. A.; Roering, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing techniques have greatly improved our ability to quantify deformation of the Earth’s surface and provide reconnaissance information with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use InSAR and airborne LiDAR to examine the spatial and temporal behavior of 15 landslides located in the Eel River catchment, northern California. The Eel River catchment is well known for its large, deep seated, slow-moving landslides. This region is ideal for landslide studies using InSAR because the landslides are continuously moving at a rate fast enough to observe deformation in a short time span, yet slow enough to avoid a loss in radar coherence (Roering et al., 2009). 10 of the 15 landslides presented here have not been previously identified using InSAR and were identified using statistical analysis to discriminate consistent small-scale deformation from artifacts. We produced 30 differential interferograms between February 2007 and May 2010 using ALOS PALSAR data from tracks 223 and 224 with the ROI_PAC processing package. The 15 identified landslides move at line-of sight rates ranging from 0.1 m yr -1 to 0.45 m yr -1, and have dimensions ranging from 0.5 to 5 km long and 0.27 to 3 km wide. To explore seasonal variations in landslide velocity, we construct InSAR time series from the inversion of small-baseline interferograms. Preliminary results show that slide acceleration lags the onset of rainfall events by weeks to months. Combining InSAR and a shaded relief LiDAR image, we identify distinct kinematic zones (e.g. source, transport, toe) within most landslides. This study demonstrates the capabilities of InSAR and airborne LiDAR to explore the spatial and temporal behavior of large, slow-moving landslides in a regional context. Although InSAR analyses of landslides is successful at this field site, there exists a bias toward optimally oriented landslides in our regional reconnaissance. InSAR is blind to surface displacement that is parallel to the satellite

  13. A GUI visualization system for airborne lidar image data to reconstruct 3D city model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Yoshiyuki; Koizumi, Kohei

    2015-10-01

    A visualization toolbox system with graphical user interfaces (GUIs) was developed for the analysis of LiDAR point cloud data, as a compound object oriented widget application in IDL (Interractive Data Language). The main features in our system include file input and output abilities, data conversion capability from ascii formatted LiDAR point cloud data to LiDAR image data whose pixel value corresponds the altitude measured by LiDAR, visualization of 2D/3D images in various processing steps and automatic reconstruction ability of 3D city model. The performance and advantages of our graphical user interface (GUI) visualization system for LiDAR data are demonstrated.

  14. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  15. Airborne lidar sensing of massive stony coral colonies on patch reefs in the northern Florida reef tract

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.; Kuffner, I.B.; Hernandez, R.; Thompson, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this study we examined the ability of the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) to discriminate cluster zones of massive stony coral colonies on northern Florida reef tract (NFRT) patch reefs based on their topographic complexity (rugosity). Spatially dense EAARL laser submarine topographic soundings acquired in August 2002 were used to create a 1-m resolution digital rugosity map for adjacent NFRT study areas characterized by patch reefs (Region A) and diverse substratums (Region B). In both regions, sites with lidar-sensed rugosities above 1.2 were imaged by an along-track underwater videography system that incorporated the acquisition of instantaneous GPS positions. Subsequent manual interpretation of videotape segments was performed to identify substratum types that caused elevated lidar-sensed rugosity. Our study determined that massive coral colony formation, modified by subsequent physical and biological processes that breakdown patch reef framework, was the primary source of topographic complexity sensed by the EAARL in the NFRT. Sites recognized by lidar scanning to be topographically complex preferentially occurred around the margins of patch reefs, constituted a minor fraction of the reef system, and usually reflected the presence of massive coral colonies in cluster zones, or their derivatives created by mortality, bioerosion, and physical breakdown.

  16. Levee crest elevation profiles derived from airborne lidar-based high resolution digital elevation models in south Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using airborne lidar surveys to derive high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and develop an automated procedure to extract levee longitudinal elevation profiles for both federal levees in Atchafalaya Basin and local levees in Lafourche Parish. Generally, the use of traditional manual surveying methods to map levees is a costly and time consuming process that typically produces cross-levee profiles every few hundred meters, at best. The purpose of our paper is to describe and test methods for extracting levee crest elevations in an efficient, comprehensive manner using high resolution lidar generated DEMs. In addition, the vertical uncertainty in the elevation data and its effect on the resultant estimate of levee crest heights is addressed in an assessment of whether the federal levees in our study meet the USACE minimum height design criteria.

  17. Lidar reflectance from snow at 2.05  μm wavelength as measured by the JPL Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph C

    2016-03-10

    We report airborne measurements of lidar directional reflectance (backscatter) from land surfaces at a wavelength in the 2.05 μm CO₂ absorption band, with emphasis on snow-covered surfaces in various natural environments. Lidar backscatter measurements using this instrument provide insight into the capabilities of lidar for both airborne and future global-scale CO₂ measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO₂ Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. Lidar measurement capability is particularly useful when the use of solar scattering spectroscopy is not feasible for high-accuracy atmospheric CO₂ measurements. Consequently, performance in high-latitude and winter season environments is an emphasis. Snow-covered surfaces are known to be dark in the CO₂ band spectral regions. The quantitative backscatter data from these field measurements help to elucidate the range of backscatter values that can be expected in natural environments.

  18. Automatic 3D Building Detection and Modeling from Airborne LiDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shaohui

    Urban reconstruction, with an emphasis on man-made structure modeling, is an active research area with broad impact on several potential applications. Urban reconstruction combines photogrammetry, remote sensing, computer vision, and computer graphics. Even though there is a huge volume of work that has been done, many problems still remain unsolved. Automation is one of the key focus areas in this research. In this work, a fast, completely automated method to create 3D watertight building models from airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) point clouds is presented. The developed method analyzes the scene content and produces multi-layer rooftops, with complex rigorous boundaries and vertical walls, that connect rooftops to the ground. The graph cuts algorithm is used to separate vegetative elements from the rest of the scene content, which is based on the local analysis about the properties of the local implicit surface patch. The ground terrain and building rooftop footprints are then extracted, utilizing the developed strategy, a two-step hierarchical Euclidean clustering. The method presented here adopts a "divide-and-conquer" scheme. Once the building footprints are segmented from the terrain and vegetative areas, the whole scene is divided into individual pendent processing units which represent potential points on the rooftop. For each individual building region, significant features on the rooftop are further detected using a specifically designed region-growing algorithm with surface smoothness constraints. The principal orientation of each building rooftop feature is calculated using a minimum bounding box fitting technique, and is used to guide the refinement of shapes and boundaries of the rooftop parts. Boundaries for all of these features are refined for the purpose of producing strict description. Once the description of the rooftops is achieved, polygonal mesh models are generated by creating surface patches with outlines defined by detected

  19. Tropical forest structure characterization using airborne lidar data: an individual tree level approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz, A.; Saatchi, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Fine scale tropical forest structure characterization has been performed by means of field measurements techniques that record both the specie and the diameter at the breast height (dbh) for every tree within a given area. Due to dense and complex vegetation, additional important ecological variables (e.g. the tree height and crown size) are usually not measured because they are hardly recognized from the ground. The poor knowledge on the 3D tropical forest structure has been a major limitation for the understanding of different ecological issues such as the spatial distribution of carbon stocks, regeneration and competition dynamics and light penetration gradient assessments. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing technique that provides georeferenced distance measurements between the aircraft and the surface. It provides an unstructured 3D point cloud that is a high-resolution model of the forest. This study presents the first approach for tropical forest characterization at a fine scale using remote sensing data. The multi-modal lidar point cloud is decomposed into 3D clusters that correspond to single trees by means of a technique called Adaptive Mean Shift Segmentation (AMS3D). The ability of the corresponding individual tree metrics (tree height, crown area and crown volume) for the estimation of above ground biomass (agb) over the 50 ha CTFS plot in Barro Colorado Island is here assessed. We conclude that our approach is able to map the agb spatial distribution with an error of nearly 12% (RMSE=28 Mg ha-1) compared with field-based estimates over 1ha plots.

  20. Airborne Multispectral LIDAR Data for Land-Cover Classification and Land/water Mapping Using Different Spectral Indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, S.; Shaker, A.; El-Rabbany, A.; LaRocque, P. E.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data is widely used in remote sensing applications, such as topographic and landwater mapping. Recently, airborne multispectral LiDAR sensors, which acquire data at different wavelengths, are available, thus allows recording a diversity of intensity values from different land features. In this study, three normalized difference feature indexes (NDFI), for vegetation, water, and built-up area mapping, were evaluated. The NDFIs namely, NDFIG-NIR, NDFIG-MIR, and NDFINIR-MIR were calculated using data collected at three wavelengths; green: 532 nm, near-infrared (NIR): 1064 nm, and mid-infrared (MIR): 1550 nm by the world's first airborne multispectral LiDAR sensor "Optech Titan". The Jenks natural breaks optimization method was used to determine the threshold values for each NDFI, in order to cluster the 3D point data into two classes (water and land or vegetation and built-up area). Two sites at Scarborough, Ontario, Canada were tested to evaluate the performance of the NDFIs for land-water, vegetation, and built-up area mapping. The use of the three NDFIs succeeded to discriminate vegetation from built-up areas with an overall accuracy of 92.51%. Based on the classification results, it is suggested to use NDFIG-MIR and NDFINIR-MIR for vegetation and built-up areas extraction, respectively. The clustering results show that the direct use of NDFIs for land-water mapping has low performance. Therefore, the clustered classes, based on the NDFIs, are constrained by the recorded number of returns from different wavelengths, thus the overall accuracy is improved to 96.98%.

  1. An energy minimization approach to automated extraction of regular building footprints from airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Zhang, C.; Fraser, C. S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents an automated approach to the extraction of building footprints from airborne LiDAR data based on energy minimization. Automated 3D building reconstruction in complex urban scenes has been a long-standing challenge in photogrammetry and computer vision. Building footprints constitute a fundamental component of a 3D building model and they are useful for a variety of applications. Airborne LiDAR provides large-scale elevation representation of urban scene and as such is an important data source for object reconstruction in spatial information systems. However, LiDAR points on building edges often exhibit a jagged pattern, partially due to either occlusion from neighbouring objects, such as overhanging trees, or to the nature of the data itself, including unavoidable noise and irregular point distributions. The explicit 3D reconstruction may thus result in irregular or incomplete building polygons. In the presented work, a vertex-driven Douglas-Peucker method is developed to generate polygonal hypotheses from points forming initial building outlines. The energy function is adopted to examine and evaluate each hypothesis and the optimal polygon is determined through energy minimization. The energy minimization also plays a key role in bridging gaps, where the building outlines are ambiguous due to insufficient LiDAR points. In formulating the energy function, hard constraints such as parallelism and perpendicularity of building edges are imposed, and local and global adjustments are applied. The developed approach has been extensively tested and evaluated on datasets with varying point cloud density over different terrain types. Results are presented and analysed. The successful reconstruction of building footprints, of varying structural complexity, along with a quantitative assessment employing accurate reference data, demonstrate the practical potential of the proposed approach.

  2. Integrating airborne LiDAR dataset and photographic images towards the construction of 3D building model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, R.; Latif, Z. A.; Hamid, J. R. A.; Jaafar, J.; Ahmad, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    A 3D building model of man-made objects is an important tool for various applications such as urban planning, flood mapping and telecommunication. The reconstruction of 3D building models remains difficult. No universal algorithms exist that can extract all objects in an image successfully. At present, advances in remote sensing such as airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology have changed the conventional method of topographic mapping and increased the interest of these valued datasets towards 3D building model construction. Airborne LiDAR has proven accordingly that it can provide three dimensional (3D) information of the Earth surface with high accuracy. In this study, with the availability of open source software such as Sketch Up, LiDAR datasets and photographic images could be integrated towards the construction of a 3D building model. In order to realize the work an area comprising residential areas situated at Putrajaya in the Klang Valley region, Malaysia, covering an area of two square kilometer was chosen. The accuracy of the derived 3D building model is assessed quantitatively. It is found that the difference between the vertical height (z) of the 3D building models derived from LiDAR dataset and ground survey is approximately ± 0.09 centimeter (cm). For the horizontal component (RMSExy), the accuracy estimates derived for the 3D building models were ± 0.31m. The result also shows that the qualitative assessment of the 3D building models constructed seems feasible for the depiction in the standard of LOD 3 (Level of details).

  3. A Comparison of Foliage Profiles in the Sierra National Forest Obtained with a Full-Waveform Under-Canopy EVI Lidar System with the Foliage Profiles Obtained with an Airborne Full-Waveform LVIS Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Strahler, Alan H.; Schaaf, Crystal L.; Yao, Tian; Wang, Zhuosen; Roman, Miguel O.; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Jupp, David L. B.; Lovell, Jenny L.; Culvenor, Darius S.; Newnham, Glenn J.; Tang, Hao; Dubayah, Ralph O.

    2013-01-01

    Foliage profiles retrieved froma scanning, terrestrial, near-infrared (1064 nm), full-waveformlidar, the Echidna Validation Instrument (EVI), agree well with those obtained from an airborne, near-infrared, full-waveform, large footprint lidar, the Lidar Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). We conducted trials at 5 plots within a conifer stand at Sierra National Forest in August, 2008. Foliage profiles retrieved from these two lidar systems are closely correlated (e.g., r = 0.987 at 100 mhorizontal distances) at large spatial coverage while they differ significantly at small spatial coverage, indicating the apparent scanning perspective effect on foliage profile retrievals. Alsowe noted the obvious effects of local topography on foliage profile retrievals, particularly on the topmost height retrievals. With a fine spatial resolution and a small beam size, terrestrial lidar systems complement the strengths of the airborne lidars by making a detailed characterization of the crowns from a small field site, and thereby serving as a validation tool and providing localized tuning information for future airborne and spaceborne lidar missions.

  4. Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar. Part 2; Ground Based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Cadirola, Martin; Venable, Demetrius; Connell, Rasheen; Rush, Kurt; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The same RASL hardware as described in part I was installed in a ground-based mobile trailer and used in a water vapor lidar intercomparison campaign, hosted at Table Mountain, CA, under the auspices of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The converted RASL hardware demonstrated high sensitivity to lower stratospheric water vapor indicating that profiling water vapor at those altitudes with sufficient accuracy to monitor climate change is possible. The measurements from Table Mountain also were used to explain the reason, and correct , for sub-optimal airborne aerosol extinction performance during the flight campaign.

  5. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-Based 3-D Winds Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.

    2012-01-01

    We review the 20-plus years of pulsed transmit laser development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to enable a coherent Doppler wind lidar to measure global winds from earth orbit. We briefly also discuss the many other ingredients needed to prepare for this space mission.

  6. Optical system design and experimental evaluation of a coherent Doppler wind Lidar system for the predictive control of wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Leilei; Tauscher, Julian Asche; Beuth, Thorsten; Heussner, Nico; Fox, Maik; Babu, Harsha Umesh; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-09-01

    The control of wind turbine blade pitch systems by Lidar assisted wind speed prediction has been proposed to increase the electric power generation and reduce the mechanical fatigue load on wind turbines. However, the sticking point of such Lidar systems is the price. Hence, our objective is to develop a more cost efficient Lidar system to support the pitch control of horizontal axis wind turbines and therefore to reduce the material requirement, lower the operation and maintenance costs and decrease the cost of wind energy in the long term. Compared to the state of the art Lidar systems, a laser with a shorter coherence length and a corresponding fiber delay line is introduced for reducing the costs. In this paper we present the experimental evaluation of different sending and receiving optics designs for such a system from a free space laboratory setup.

  7. Oceanic Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Instrument concepts which measure ocean temperature, chlorophyll, sediment and Gelbstoffe concentrations in three dimensions on a quantitative, quasi-synoptic basis were considered. Coastal zone color scanner chlorophyll imagery, laser stimulated Raman temperaure and fluorescence spectroscopy, existing airborne Lidar and laser fluorosensing instruments, and their accuracies in quantifying concentrations of chlorophyll, suspended sediments and Gelbstoffe are presented. Lidar applications to phytoplankton dynamics and photochemistry, Lidar radiative transfer and signal interpretation, and Lidar technology are discussed.

  8. Comparison of IPDA lidar receiver sensitivity for coherent detection and for direct detection using sine-wave and pulsed modulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B

    2012-09-10

    We use theoretical models to compare the receiver signal to noise ratio (SNR) vs. average rate of detected signal photons for an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar using coherent detection with continuous wave (CW) lasers and direct detection with sine-wave and pulse modulations. The results show the coherent IPDA lidar has high receiver gain and narrow bandwidth to overcome the effects of detector circuit noise and background light, but the actual receiver performance can be limited by the coherent mixing efficiency, speckle and other factors. For direct detection, using sine-wave modulation allows the use of a low peak power laser transmitter and synchronous detection. The pulse modulation technique requires higher laser peak powers but is more efficient than sine-wave modulation in terms of average detected signal photon rate required to achieve a given receiver SNR. We also conducted experiments for the direct detection cases and the results agreed well with theory.

  9. Analysis of the performance of a coherent pulsed fiber lidar for aerosol backscatter applications.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Guy N; Roberts, P John; Eacock, Justin R; Harris, Michael

    2002-10-20

    The antenna and the Doppler estimation characteristics of a coherent pulsed lidar intended for short-range aerosol backscatter applications have been analyzed. The system used fiber-optic interconnects and operated at a wavelength of 1.548 microm. The range dependence of the signal for various bistatic and monostatic antenna configurations has been determined. The system operated in a low-pulse-energy, high-pulse-repetition-rate mode, and the Doppler estimates from the return signal were achieved with a multipulse accumulation procedure. The expected performance of the accumulation in this low-photocount regime was compared with the data obtained from the system, and a reasonable level of agreement was demonstrated. PMID:12396197

  10. 1540-nm single frequency single-mode pulsed all fiber laser for coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Diao, Weifeng; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Jiqiao; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    A single-mode single frequency eye-safe pulsed all fiber laser based on master oscillator power amplification structure is presented. This laser is composed of a narrow linewidth distributed laser diode seed laser and two-stage cascade amplifiers. 0.8 m longitudinally gradient strained erbium/ytterbium co-doped polarization-maintaining fiber with a core diameter of 10 μm is used as the gain fiber and two acoustic-optics modulators are adopted to enhance pulse extinction ratio. A peak power of 160 W and a pulse width of 200 ns at 10 kHz repetition rate are achieved with transform-limited linewidth and diffraction-limited beam quality. This laser will be employed in a compact short range coherent Doppler wind lidar.

  11. Performance evaluation of an all-fiber image-reject homodyne coherent Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abari, C. F.; Pedersen, A. T.; Dellwik, E.; Mann, J.

    2015-04-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the near-zero wind velocity measurement performance of two separate 1.5 μm all-fiber coherent Doppler lidars (CDL). The performance characterization is performed through the presentation of the results from two separate atmospheric field campaigns. In one campaign, a recently developed continuous wave (CW) CDL benefiting from an image-reject front-end was deployed. The other campaign utilized a different CW CDL, benefiting from a heterodyne receiver with intermediate frequency (IF) sampling. In both field campaigns the results are compared against a sonic anemometer, as the reference instrument. The measurements clearly show that the image-reject architecture results in more accurate measurements of radial wind velocities close to zero. Close-to-zero velocities are usually associated with the vertical component of the wind and are important to characterize.

  12. Performance evaluation of an all-fiber image-reject homodyne coherent Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abari, C. F.; Pedersen, A. T.; Dellwik, E.; Mann, J.

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the near-zero wind velocity measurement performance of two separate 1.5 μm all-fiber coherent Doppler lidars (CDLs). The performance characterization is carried out through the presentation of the results from two separate atmospheric field campaigns. In one campaign, a recently developed continuous wave (CW) CDL benefiting from an image-reject front-end was deployed. The other campaign utilized a different CW CDL, benefiting from a heterodyne receiver with intermediate-frequency (IF) sampling. In both field campaigns the results are compared against a sonic anemometer, as the reference instrument. The measurements clearly show that the image-reject architecture results in more accurate measurements of radial wind velocities close to zero. Close-to-zero velocities are usually associated with the vertical component of the wind and are important to characterize.

  13. A Micropulse eye-safe all-fiber molecular backscatter coherent temperature lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abari, Cyrus F.; Chu, Xinzhao; Mann, Jakob; Spuler, Scott

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of an all-fiber, micropulse, 1.5 μm coherent lidar for remote sensing of atmospheric temperature. The proposed system benefits from the recent advances in optics/electronics technology, especially an all-fiber image-reject homodyne receiver, where a high resolution spectrum in the baseband can be acquired. Due to the presence of a structured spectra resulting from the spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouine scattering, associated with the relevant operating regimes, an accurate estimation of the temperature can be carried out. One of the main advantages of this system is the removal of the contaminating Mie backscatter signal by electronic filters at the baseband (before signal conditioning and amplification). The paper presents the basic concepts as well as a Monte-Carlo system simulation as the proof of concept.

  14. An ultra-sensitive coherent detector capable of single photon detection for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amimoto, Sherwin; Gross, Rolf; Lacy, Bob; Garman-Duvalle, Lissa; Good, Tom

    1992-01-01

    The properties of Ultra-Sensitive Coherent Detectors (USCD's) are nearly that of an ideal detector for lidar applications. Recent progress in the development of USCD's is briefly reviewed, and its imaging capability is demonstrated. These new detectors possess properties with significant improvements over conventional technology. These improvements include a high quantum efficiency of 0.95, gain in excess of 10 exp 13, a narrow bandwidth of 180-300 MHz at 1 micron, imaging capability, and phase conjugation ability. We have constructed a USCD using two Nd:YAG laser amplifiers and a four-wave Brillouin mirror (FWBM) using SnCl4 as the Brillouin medium. Using a 10 Hz repetitively-pulsed single frequency laser, we have shown that the Brillouin medium is free from thermal blooming and from optical breakdown.

  15. Signal to Noise Ratio Characterization of Coherent Doppler Lidar Backscattered Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazim, Sameh; Santoro, David; Arend, Mark; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2016-06-01

    An eye-safe coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system for wind measurement was developed and tested at the Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York (CCNY). The system employs a 1542 nm fiber laser to leverage components' availability and affordability of the telecommunication industry. A balanced detector with a bandwidth extending from dc to 125 MHz is used to eliminate the common mode relative intensity noise (RIN). The system is shot noise limited i.e., the dominant component of received signals' noise is the shot noise. Wind velocity can be measured under nominal aerosol loading and atmospheric turbulence conditions for ranges up to 3 km while pointing vertically with 0.08 m/s precision.

  16. Receiving efficiency of monostatic pulsed coherent lidars. I - Theory. II - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yanzeng; Post, Madison J.; Hardesty, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed coherent radars' receiving efficiency, eta, is presently investigated as a function of range z on the basis of a theory which relates eta(z) to both the transmitted laser intensity and the point-source receiving efficiency; this efficiency is calculated by a backward method employing the back-propagated local oscillator (BPLO) approach. The theory is applied to the ideal case, in order to study system optimization when both the transmitted and the BPLO fields at the antenna are Gaussian. In the second part of this work, eta(z) is calculated for various conditions of the NOAA/ERL Wave Propagation Laboratory CO2 Doppler lidar; the sensitivity of eta(z) to transmitted laser beam quality, telescope focal setting, telescope power, scanner astigmatism, and system misalignment.

  17. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  18. Elevation and mass balance changes in Alaska glaciers from airborne LiDAR surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nathaniel; Larsen, Chris; Johnson, Austin

    2013-04-01

    Since 1993, the University of Alaska (UAF) Glaciers Group has monitored glacier elevation changes across Alaska (AK) and northwest Canada (NWC) using airborne laser altimetry surveys. Since 2009, this effort has been part of NASA's Operation Ice Bridge. The ongoing campaign has measured centerline elevation profiles for over 200 glaciers in the region. We will present updated mass balance and volume change estimates of glaciers and ice fields throughout AK and NWC. In addition, we estimate the contribution to sea level rise (SLR) from AK and NWC glaciers. In 2009 the single-point laser altimeter was replaced by a scanning LiDAR system, which vastly improves the sampling rate and spatial coverage of the laser returns. The combination of updated glacier outlines, upgraded LiDAR system, and improved analysis techniques provides more accurate results and more robust uncertainty analysis of the glacier mass balances and SLR calculations. Our recent results suggest that AK and NWC glaciers overall continue to show loss of surface elevation and decreasing mass balances. AK and NWC glaciers show high variability in the relationships between mass balances and glacier-type, geographic distribution, and climate. In Denali National Park, most of the surveyed glaciers show negative mass balances increasing by approximately 50% from about -0.7 m/yr w.e. to -1.2 m/yr w.e. Mountain glaciers in Lake Clark National Park followed similar trends of slightly positive mass balances from 1996-2001 (~0.2 m/yr w.e.),and slightly negative mass balances from 2001-2008 (~ -0.6 m/yr w.e.). In the Juneau Icefield, Taku Glacier has maintained positive mass balances in recent decades, but from 2007 to 2011 its mass balance decreased to values of zero to slightly negative (-0.1 ± 0.1 m/yr w.e.). This decrease in the mass balance of Taku Glacier appears to be driven by loss of surface elevations in the upper areas of the glacier. The mass balances of glaciers in Glacier Bay National Park generally

  19. Design and evaluation of a short coherence length laser-based Doppler wind Lidar system for wind energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Leilei; Asche-Tauscher, Julian; Fox, Maik; Beuth, Thorsten; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays larger horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) are setup in difficult to access locations adding an overhead to the production cost as well as the Operation & Maintenance (O&M) costs. In order to cover those overhead cost, Lidar assisted preview control of wind turbine blade pitch system is prosperous both on research and industry applications. However, there are not a lot of choices to remote sense the wind field inflow. Doppler wind Lidar systems have been proved to be advantageous on such applications. However due to the economical consideration, the state-of-the-art wind Lidar systems are only limited on research. Therefore, developing a cost efficient wind Lidar to support the pitch control of HAWT to reduce the material requirement, lower the O&M cost and decrease the cost of energy (COE) in the long term is our motivation. Our current main focusing of investigations has been laid on the optical design of emitting and receiving system, and the evaluation of the low cost laser system instead of using a high cost fiber laser as a transmitter. The short coherence length lasers brings a higher phase noise into the detection, normally it is not used for the coherent Lidars system. However, such a laser can achieve a higher output power with a low cost which is very important for the market. In order to bring such kind of laser into the application, different sending, receiving, and detection design is simulated and tested. Those testing results are presented in this paper.

  20. Wetland inundation mapping and change monitoring using landsat and airborne LiDAR data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a new approach for mapping wetland inundation change using Landsat and LiDAR intensity data. In this approach, LiDAR data were used to derive highly accurate reference subpixel inundation percentage (SIP) maps at the 30-m resolution. The reference SIP maps were then used to est...

  1. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric optical depth using the Oxygen A-band at 765 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riris, H.; Rodriguez, M.; Allan, G. R.; Mao, J.; Hasselbrack, W.; Abshire, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen (O2) optical depth measurements with an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements are required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission. Since O2 in uniformly mixed in the atmosphere, its absorption spectra can be used to estimate atmospheric pressure. In its airborne configuration, the IPDA lidar uses a doubled Erbium Doped Fiber amplifier and single photon counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at multiple discrete wavelengths in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm. This instrument has been deployed three times aboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory as part of campaigns to measure CO2 mixing ratios over a wide range of topography and weather conditions from altitudes between 3 km and 13 km. The O2 IPDA lidar flew seven flights in 2011 and six flights in 2013 in the continental United States and British Columbia, Canada. Our results from 2011 showed good agreement between the experimentally derived differential optical depth measurements with the theoretical predictions for aircraft altitudes from 3 to 13 km after a systematic bias correction of approximately 8% was applied. The random noise component was 2.5-3.0 %. The most recent data recorded in 2013 show better agreement between experimental optical depth measurements and theoretical predictions and much smaller systematic errors. The random error remained comparable with 2011 at 2-3%. The main source of random error is primarily the low energy (power) of the laser transmitter and the high solar background. We are in the process of addressing this issue with a new, higher energy amplifier that we anticipate will reduce the random noise component by a factor of 3-5 to less than 0.5%. The results from these flights show that the IPDA technique is a viable method

  2. Estimating Evapotranspiration over Heterogeneously Vegetated Surfaces using Large Aperture Scintillometer, LiDAR, and Airborne Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, H. M.; Neale, C. M.; Pack, R. T.; Watts, D. R.; Osterberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) over heterogeneous areas is challenging especially in water-limited sparsely vegetated environments. New techniques such as airborne full-waveform LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and high resolution multispectral and thermal imagery can provide enough detail of sparse canopies to improve energy balance model estimations as well as footprint analysis of scintillometer data. The objectives of this study were to estimate ET over such areas and develop methodologies for the use of these airborne data technologies. Because of the associated heterogeneity, this study was conducted over the Cibola National wildlife refuge, southern California on an area dominated with tamarisk (salt cedar) forest (90%) interspersed with arrowweed and bare soil (10%). A set of two large aperture scintillometers (LASs) were deployed over the area to provide estimates of sensible heat flux (HLAS). The LASs were distributed over the area in a way that allowed capturing different surface spatial heterogeneity. Bowen ratio systems were used to provide hydrometeorological variables and surface energy balance fluxes (SEBF) (i.e. Rn, G, H, and LE) measurements. Scintillometer-based estimates of HLAS were improved by considering the effect of the corresponding 3D footprint and the associated displacement height (d) and the roughness length (z0) following Geli et al. (2011). The LiDAR data were acquired using the LASSI Lidar developed at Utah State University (USU). The data was used to obtain 1-m spatial resolution DEM's and vegetation canopy height to improve the HLAS estimates. The BR measurements of Rn and G were combined with LAS estimates, HLAS, to provide estimates of LELASas a residual of the energy balance equation. A thermal remote sensing model namely the two source energy balance (TSEB) of Norman et al. (1995) was applied to provide spatial estimates of SEBF. Four airborne images at 1-4 meter spatial resolution acquired using the USU airborne

  3. Quantifying erosion and deposition patterns using airborne LiDAR following the 2012 High Park Fire and 2013 Colorado Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogan, D. J.; Nelson, P. A.; MacDonald, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying and predicting geomorphic change over large spatial scales is increasingly feasible and of growing interest as repeat high resolution topography becomes available. We began detailed field studies of channel geomorphic change using RTK-GPS in two 15 km2 watersheds following the 2012 High Park Fire; the watersheds were then subjected to a several-hundred year flood in September 2013. During this time a series of airborne LiDAR datasets were collected, and the objectives of this study were to: 1) determine and compare the spatial variability in channel and valley erosion and deposition over time from the LiDAR; and 2) determine if the observed changes can be predicted from channel and valley bottom characteristics. Data quality issues in the initial LiDAR required us to rotate and translate flight lines in order to co-register ground-classified point clouds between successive datasets; uncertainty was then estimated using our RTK-GPS field measurements. Topographic changes were calculated using the Multiscale Model to Model Cloud Comparison (M3C2) algorithm. Results indicate that the 2013 flood mobilized much more sediment than was mobilized due to the fire alone; unfortunately the uncertainty in differencing is still frequently greater than the observed changes, especially within transfer reaches. Valley expansion and constriction are major controls on spatial patterns of erosion and deposition, suggesting that topographic metrics such as longitudinal distributions of channel slope and valley confinement may provide quasi-physically based estimates of sediment deposition and delivery potential.

  4. Soft classification of mixed seabed objects based on fuzzy clustering analysis using airborne LIDAR bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ramu; Sohn, Gunho; Kim, Heungsik B.; Miller, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal seabed mapping is essential for a variety of nearshore management related activities including sustainable resource management, ecological protection, and environmental change detection in coastal sites. Recently introduced airborne LIDAR bathymetry (ALB) sensors allow, under favorable environmental conditions and mapping requirements, time and cost efficient collection of shallow coastal seabed data in comparison to acoustic techniques. One important application of these sensors, given ALB seabed footprint size on the order to several meters in diameter for shallow waters, is the development of seabed classification maps and techniques to classify both benthic species and seabed sediment. The coastal seabed is a complex environment consisting of diverse habitats and, thus, necessitates classification methods which readily account for seabed class heterogeneity. Recent ALB classification studies have relied on classification techniques that assign each ALB shot to a single seabed class (i.e., hard classification) instead of allowing for assignment to multiple seabed classes which may be present in an illuminated ALB footprint (i.e., soft classification). In this study, a soft seabed classification (SSC) algorithm is developed using unsupervised classification with fuzzy clustering to produce classification products accounting for a sub-footprint habitat mixture. With this approach, each shot is assigned to multiple seabed classes with a percentage cover measuring the extent to which each seabed class is present in the ALB footprint. This has the added benefit of generating smooth spatial ecological transitions of the seabed instead of sharp boundaries between classes or clusters. Furthermore, due to the multivariate nature of the SSC output (i.e., percentage cover for each seabed class for a given shot), a recently developed self-organizing map neural network-based approach to geo-visualization of seabed classification results was used to visualize seabed

  5. Improved Beach Zone Segmentation From Airborne Lidar Measurements Using Intensity Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starek, M. J.; Vemula, R. K.; Slatton, C.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.

    2007-05-01

    In an effort to monitor beach zone stability along the St. Augustine Beach region of Florida, high-resolution airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) data are routinely acquired by the University of Florida's Geosensing and Engineering Mapping (GEM) Center. ALSM, often referred to as Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), systems enable sub-meter sampling of the near-shore coastal topography and the subsequent creation of digital elevation images with rms errors of less than 10cm over minimally-vegetated surfaces, such as beaches. Currently, there are seven collection dates spanning August 2003 to February 2007. This high spatial resolution coupled with the multiple acquisitions through time provided several results: two separate beach nourishment efforts were captured in the data allowing sediment spreading rate to be modeled and volume loss quantified, shoreline change rates were estimated for temporal scales ranging from a few months to over two years at various spatial frequencies from < 5m to > 300m, storm and seasonal wave climate induced shoreline response were modeled, and novel approaches to morphological feature extraction and identification of localized erosional hot- spots were developed. All previous analyses are based on range measurements; however, the ALSM system also records the intensity (peak voltage from the APD) for each return. Intensity has traditionally been under utilized as a feature for image classification because it does not represent true terrain radiance. We show that in areas with minimal topographic relief, such as beaches, intensity measures have great potential for improved beach zone segmentation. Segmentation of the beach zone is important for several factors including identification of the wet-dry line for traditional shoreline comparison and change-detection, and removal of water points to allow analysis of beach-only zones. Several intensity-based features are extracted from ALSM training data collected along the St. Augustine

  6. Spatial distribution of lacunarity of voxelized airborne LiDAR point clouds in various forest assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, Balázs; Kania, Adam; Standovár, Tibor; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Forest ecosystems have characteristic structure of features defined by various structural elements of different scales and vertical positions: shrub layers, understory vegetation, tree trunks, and branches. Furthermore in most of the cases there are superimposed structures in distributions (mosaic or island patterns) due to topography, soil variability, or even anthropogenic factors like past/present forest management activity. This multifaceted spatial context of the forests is relevant for many ecological issues, especially for maintaining forest biodiversity. Our aim in this study is twofold: (1) to quantify this structural variability laterally and vertically using lacunarity, and (2) to relate these results to relevant ecological features, i.e quantitatively described forest properties. Airborne LiDAR data of various quality and point density have been used for our study including a number of forested sites in Central and East Europe (partly Natura 2000 sites). The point clouds have been converted to voxel format and then converted to horizontal layers as images. These images were processed further for the lacunarity calculation. Areas of interest (AOIs) have been selected based on evaluation of the forested areas and auxiliary field information. The calculation has been performed for the AOIs for all available vertical data slices. The lacunarity function referring to a certain point and given vicinity varies horizontally and vertically, depending on the vegetation structure. Furthermore, the topography may also influence this property as the growth of plants, especially spacing and size of trees are influenced by the local topography and relief (e.g., slope, aspect). The comparisons of the flatland and hilly settings show interesting differences and the spatial patterns also vary differently. Because of the large amount of data resulting from these calculations, sophisticated methods are required to analyse the results. The large data amount then has been

  7. Analysis of Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Weaver, Clark J.; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission [1]. It uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1575 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with the range profile of scattering in the path. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off-line signals via the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. The time of flight of the laser pulses is used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate an early version of the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar stepped the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 wavelength steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a NIR photomultiplier and is recorded on every other reading by a photon counting system [2]. During August 2009 we made a series of 2.5 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over locations in the US, including the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma, central Illinois, north-eastern North Carolina, and over the Chesapeake Bay and the eastern shore of Virginia. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made

  8. Near Field Deformation of the Mw 6.0 24 August, 2014 South Napa Earthquake Estimated by Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Change Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyda, A. W.; Zhang, X.; Glennie, C. L.; Hudnut, K. W.; Brooks, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    We examine surface deformation caused by the Mw 6.0 24 August, 2014 South Napa Earthquake using high-resolution pre and post event airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) observations. Temporally spaced LiDAR surveys taken before and after an earthquake can provide decimeter-level, 3D near-field estimates of deformation. These near-field deformation estimates can help constrain fault slip and rheology of shallow seismogenic zones. We compare and contrast estimates of deformation obtained from pre and post-event LiDAR data sets of the 2014 South Napa Earthquake using two change detection techniques, Iterative Control Point (ICP) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The ICP algorithm has been and still is the primary technique for acquiring three dimensional deformations from airborne LiDAR data sets. It conducts a rigid registration of pre-event data points to post event data points via iteratively matching data points with the smallest Euclidian distances between data sets. PIV is a technique derived from fluid mechanics that measures the displacement of a particle between two images of known time. LiDAR points act as the particles within the point cloud images so that their movement represents the horizontal deformation of the surface. The results from these change detection techniques are presented and further analyzed for differences between the techniques, the effects of temporal spacing between LiDAR collections, and the use of permanent LiDAR scatterers to constrain deformation estimates. The airborne LiDAR results will also be compared with far field deformations from space based geodetic techniques (InSAR and GNSS) and field observations of surface displacement.

  9. Individual tree crown delineation using localized contour tree method and airborne LiDAR data in coniferous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Yu, Bailang; Wu, Qiusheng; Huang, Yan; Chen, Zuoqi; Wu, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    Individual tree crown delineation is of great importance for forest inventory and management. The increasing availability of high-resolution airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data makes it possible to delineate the crown structure of individual trees and deduce their geometric properties with high accuracy. In this study, we developed an automated segmentation method that is able to fully utilize high-resolution LiDAR data for detecting, extracting, and characterizing individual tree crowns with a multitude of geometric and topological properties. The proposed approach captures topological structure of forest and quantifies topological relationships of tree crowns by using a graph theory-based localized contour tree method, and finally segments individual tree crowns by analogy of recognizing hills from a topographic map. This approach consists of five key technical components: (1) derivation of canopy height model from airborne LiDAR data; (2) generation of contours based on the canopy height model; (3) extraction of hierarchical structures of tree crowns using the localized contour tree method; (4) delineation of individual tree crowns by segmenting hierarchical crown structure; and (5) calculation of geometric and topological properties of individual trees. We applied our new method to the Medicine Bow National Forest in the southwest of Laramie, Wyoming and the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in the central portion of the Cascade Range of Oregon, U.S. The results reveal that the overall accuracy of individual tree crown delineation for the two study areas achieved 94.21% and 75.07%, respectively. Our method holds great potential for segmenting individual tree crowns under various forest conditions. Furthermore, the geometric and topological attributes derived from our method provide comprehensive and essential information for forest management.

  10. Long-duration Operation of 2-micron Coherent Doppler Lidar in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Baggot, Rene P.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser remote sensing systems that can operate autonomously over a sufficiently long period are mainly constrained by the laser diode arrays (LDAs) used for pumping their laser transmitters. The lifetime of a 2-micron coherent lidar operating in space is particularly of concern in lieu of required pump pulse duration of Thulium and Holmium solid state lasers (approx. 1msec) that are considerably longer than those of more widely used 1-micron lasers (< 0.2 msec). A factor of 5 to 10 times longer pulse duration can easily translate to over an order of magnitude shorter lifetime for a typical commercially available high-power 2-D array. Therefore, it is imperative to address the lifetime and reliability of LDAs for pumping 2-micron lasers by exploring all the potential options that significantly prolong their life meeting the required operational lifetime of space-based coherent Doppler lidars. The leading causes of sudden failure and premature degradation of LDAs are intrinsic semiconductor defects, optical facet breakdown resulting from excessive localized heating, and thermo-mechanical stresses due to the extreme thermal cycling of the laser active regions1-2. Long pulse operation grossly amplifies the impact of these failure/degradation causes, particularly the thermo-mechanical stresses due to pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling. Therefore, several experimental setups have been developed to investigate each of the failure mechanisms and causes of premature degradation in order to evaluate various package designs, define the best operating parameters, and to guide the technology advancement, leading to highly reliable and very long lifetime LDAs5. Several areas of improvement in the packaging and fabrication process of laser diodes have already been identified and efforts towards implementing these improvements are well underway. These efforts include the use of advanced high thermal conductivity materials for packaging of laser diode

  11. Analytical empirical expressions of the transverse coherence properties for monostatic and bistatic lidars in the presence of moderate atmospheric refractive-index turbulence.

    PubMed

    Guérit, G; Drobinski, P; Flamant, P H; Augère, B

    2001-08-20

    There have been many analyses of the reduction of lidar system efficiency in bistatic geometry caused by beam spreading and by fluctuations along the two paths generated by refractive-index turbulence. Although these studies have led to simple, approximate results that provide a reliable basis for preliminary assessment of lidar performance, they do not apply to monostatic lidars. For such systems, calculations and numerical simulations predict an enhanced coherence for the backscattered field. However, to the authors' knowledge, a simple analytical mathematical framework for diagnosing the effects of refractive-index turbulence on the performance of both bistatic and monostatic coherent lidars does not exist. Here analytical empirical expressions for the transverse coherence variables and the heterodyne intensity are derived for bistatic and monostatic lidars as a function of moderate atmospheric refractive-index turbulence within the framework of the Gaussian-beam approximation.

  12. The probability of laser caused ocular injury to the aircrew of undetected aircraft violating the exclusion zone about the airborne aura LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-12-01

    The probability of a laser caused ocular injury, to the aircrew of an undetected aircraft entering the exclusion zone about the AURA LIDAR airborne platform with the possible violation of the Laser Hazard Zone boundary, was investigated and quantified for risk analysis and management.

  13. On the usefulness of an airborne lidar for O3 layer analysis in the free troposphere and the planetary boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Ancellet, G; Ravetta, F

    2003-02-01

    Ozone vertical profiling with a lidar is well adapted to the spatial and temporal O3 variability analysis either in the free troposphere, when studying the respective impact of chemical production and dynamical processes, or in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) when characterizing the diurnal evolution of ozone plumes during pollution episodes. Comparisons with other measuring techniques (ozonesonde and aircraft in-situ measurements) demonstrate the lidar ability to characterize narrow layers (< 500 m) with a good accuracy (deltaO3 < 5-10 ppb). Application of airborne or ground-based operation of the CNRS airborne ozone lidar show its ability (i) to observe O3 layering above the PBL during two field experiments held to study air pollution in the Po Valley, Northern Italy, and the city of Marseille, Southern France, (ii) to improve airborne campaign planning (real time information on position of O3 layers) and analysis (three-dimensional perspective for layers detected by in-situ measurements) when chemical characterization of narrow O3 layers in the free troposphere is sought, (iii) to map O3 inhomogeneity down to an horizontal scale of 10-20 km within or above the polluted PBL by airborne measurements. For O3 pollution studies, understanding the origin and the life cycle of O3 layering is the first priority, and in this case the optimum use of the lidar remains the continuous operation of a ground-based instrument.

  14. Improving estimation of tree carbon stocks by harvesting aboveground woody biomass within airborne LiDAR flight areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, M.; Asner, G. P.; Swemmer, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The accurate estimation of carbon stored in a tree is essential to accounting for the carbon emissions due to deforestation and degradation. Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has been successful in estimating aboveground carbon density (ACD) by correlating airborne metrics, such as canopy height, to field-estimated biomass. This latter step is reliant on field allometry which is applied to forest inventory quantities, such as stem diameter and height, to predict the biomass of a given tree stem. Constructing such allometry is expensive, time consuming, and requires destructive sampling. Consequently, the sample sizes used to construct such allometry are often small, and the largest tree sampled is often much smaller than the largest in the forest population. The uncertainty resulting from these sampling errors can lead to severe biases when the allometry is applied to stems larger than those harvested to construct the allometry, which is then subsequently propagated to airborne ACD estimates. The Kruger National Park (KNP) mission of maintaining biodiversity coincides with preserving ecosystem carbon stocks. However, one hurdle to accurately quantifying carbon density in savannas is that small stems are typically harvested to construct woody biomass allometry, yet they are not representative of Kruger's distribution of biomass. Consequently, these equations inadequately capture large tree variation in sapwood/hardwood composition, root/shoot/leaf allocation, branch fall, and stem rot. This study eliminates the "middleman" of field allometry by directly measuring, or harvesting, tree biomass within the extent of airborne LiDAR. This enables comparisons of field and airborne ACD estimates, and also enables creation of new airborne algorithms to estimate biomass at the scale of individual trees. A field campaign was conducted at Pompey Silica Mine 5km outside Kruger National Park, South Africa, in Mar-Aug 2010 to harvest and weigh tree mass. Since

  15. Airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral mapping of snow depth and albedo in the Upper Colorado River Basin, Colorado, USA by the NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Operational hydrologic simulation and forecasting in snowmelt-dominated watersheds currently relies on indices of snow accumulation and melt from measurements at a small number of point locations or geographically-limited manual surveys. These data sources cannot adequately characterize the spatial distribution of snow depth/water equivalent, which is the primary determinant of snowpack volume and runoff rates. The NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory's airborne laser scanning system maps snow depth at high spatial and temporal resolutions, and is paired with a hyperspectral imager to provide an unprecedented snowpack monitoring capability and enabling a new operational paradigm. We present the initial results from this new application of multi-temporal LiDAR and hyperspectral mapping. During the snowmelt seasons of 2013 and 2014, the ASO mapped snow depth and albedo in the Uncompahgre River Basin in Colorado's Upper Colorado River Basin on a nominally monthly basis. These products enable an assessment and comparison of spatial snow accumulation and melt processes in two years with very different snowmelt hydrographs.

  16. Lidar Remote Sensing for Industry and Environment Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Itabe, Toshikazu (Editor); Sugimoto, Nobuo (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Keynote paper: Overview of lidar technology for industrial and environmental monitoring in Japan. 2. lidar technology I: NASA's future active remote sensing mission for earth science. Geometrical detector consideration s in laser sensing application (invited paper). 3. Lidar technology II: High-power femtosecond light strings as novel atmospheric probes (invited paper). Design of a compact high-sensitivity aerosol profiling lidar. 4. Lasers for lidars: High-energy 2 microns laser for multiple lidar applications. New submount requirement of conductively cooled laser diodes for lidar applications. 5. Tropospheric aerosols and clouds I: Lidar monitoring of clouds and aerosols at the facility for atmospheric remote sensing (invited paper). Measurement of asian dust by using multiwavelength lidar. Global monitoring of clouds and aerosols using a network of micropulse lidar systems. 6. Troposphere aerosols and clouds II: Scanning lidar measurements of marine aerosol fields at a coastal site in Hawaii. 7. Tropospheric aerosols and clouds III: Formation of ice cloud from asian dust particles in the upper troposphere. Atmospheric boundary layer observation by ground-based lidar at KMITL, Thailand (13 deg N, 100 deg. E). 8. Boundary layer, urban pollution: Studies of the spatial correlation between urban aerosols and local traffic congestion using a slant angle scanning on the research vessel Mirai. 9. Middle atmosphere: Lidar-observed arctic PSC's over Svalbard (invited paper). Sodium temperature lidar measurements of the mesopause region over Syowa Station. 10. Differential absorption lidar (dIAL) and DOAS: Airborne UV DIAL measurements of ozone and aerosols (invited paper). Measurement of water vapor, surface ozone, and ethylene using differential absorption lidar. 12. Space lidar I: Lightweight lidar telescopes for space applications (invited paper). Coherent lidar development for Doppler wind measurement from the International Space

  17. Improved speckle statistics in coherent differential absorption lidar with in-fiber wavelength multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Ridley, K D; Pearson, G N; Harris, M

    2001-04-20

    Remote detection of gaseous pollutants and other atmospheric constituents can be achieved with differential absorption lidar (DIAL) methods. The technique relies on the transmission of two or more laser wavelengths and exploits absorption features in the target gas by measuring the ratio of their detected powers to determine gas concentration. A common mode of operation is when the transmitter and receiver are collocated, and the absorption is measured over a return trip by a randomly scattering topographic target. Hence, in coherent DIAL, speckle fluctuation leads to a large uncertainty in the detected powers unless the signal is averaged over multiple correlation times, i.e., over many independent speckles. We examine a continuous-wave coherent DIAL system in which the laser wavelengths are transmitted and received by the same single-mode optical fibers. This ensures that the two wavelengths share a common spatial mode, which, for certain transmitter and target parameters, enables highly correlated speckle fluctuations to be readily achieved in practice. For a DIAL system, this gives the potential for improved accuracy in a given observation time. A theoretical analysis quantifies this benefit as a function of the degree of correlation between the two time series (which depends on wavelength separation and target depth). The results are compared with both a numerical simulation and a laboratory-based experiment.

  18. Profiling tropospheric water vapour with a coherent infrared differential absorption lidar: a sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Mizutani, Kohei; Itabe, Toshikazu; Yasui, Motoaki

    2012-11-01

    In the last decade the precision of coherent Doppler differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been greatly improved in near and middle infra-red domains for measuring greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4 and winds. The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) has developed and is operating a CO2 and wind measuring ground-based coherent DIAL at 2.05 μm (4878 cm-1). The application of this technology from space is now considered. In this analysis we study the use of the NICT DIAL for profiling tropospheric water vapour from space. We present the methodology to select the spectral lines and summarized the results of the selected lines between 4000 and 7000 cm-1. The choice of the frequency offset, the pulse energy and repetition frequency are discussed. Retrieval simulations from the line at 4580 cm-1 (2.18 μm) suitable for the boundary layer and the stronger one at 5621 cm-1 (1.78 μm) for sounding the boundary layer and the middle troposphere, are shown.

  19. Derivation of Burn Scar Depths with Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) in Indonesian Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhorn, U.; Siegert, F.

    2009-04-01

    more CO2 per year than the fourth-largest industrial nation, Germany, saved to achieve its Kyoto target. Since 1990, emissions from peat burning and peat decomposition have exceeded that of above ground biomass deforestation. These numbers show how important it is to have more accurate estimations for peat burn depth in the future. Until now few field measurements were made, which would require to know the fire affected area in advance or ignite peatland on purpose. Furthermore fire scars are quickly covered by regenerating vegetation. Another problem is the lack of a method without actually having to go into the field (e.g. through remote sensing techniques), due to the fact that many of the fire locations are remote and very difficult to access. We investigated if airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR), an active laser pulse technology by which the height of objects can be precisely measured, can be used to determine the amount of peat burned during a fire event. From a LIDAR data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after severe fires resulting from the 2006 El Niño drought, we calculated that the average depth of a burn scar was 0.30 ± 0.15 m .This was achieved through the construction of digital terrain models (DTMs) by interpolating the LIDAR ground return signals in burnt and adjacent unburned peatland. These calculated depths were compared to in situ measurements, which came to similar results. We believe that the method presented here to estimate burnt peat depth has the potential to considerably improve the accuracy of regional and global carbon emission models but would also be helpful for monitoring projects under the Kyoto Protocol like the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) or the proposed Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism.

  20. Tree species identification in an African Savanna with airborne imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) using stacked support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeck, C. A.; Colgan, M.; Féret, J.; Asner, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne remote sensing data provide promising opportunities for species identification of individual tree and shrub crowns across large areas which cannot be mapped from the ground. Previous investigations of the potential for species identification of crowns from airborne data have focused on pixel-level information (0.5-1m2), and thus have been unable to take advantage of the structural information that exist at the crown level. Hyperspectral data consisting of 58 bands from 517 to 1054nm and LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data providing vegetation height information were acquired over several landscapes within Kruger National Park, South Africa, by the CAO in 2008 at 1.1m spatial resolution. Over 1,000 individual trees and shrubs were mapped and identified in the field to construct species spectral and structural libraries. We used stacked support vector machines (SVM) that incorporate pixel-level spectral information and crown-level structural information to predict species identity for individual tree crowns. The addition of a crown-level classification step that incorporates crown structural information significantly improved model accuracy by ~6% and our prediction accuracy of the final model was ~75% for 16 species classes. This model was then used to predict the species identity of individual crowns across multiple airborne-mapped landscapes, made possible by an automated crown segmentation algorithm. The resultant species maps will make it possible to examine the environmental controls over individual species distributions and tree community composition, and provide important landscape-scale species distribution information relevant to park management and conservation.

  1. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric C02 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a C02 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, 02 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the C02 line and an 02 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the C02 and 02 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the C02 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear 25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across a selected C02 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz and laser pulse widths are I usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric C02 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm C02 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These nights were coordinated with DOE investigators who Hew an in-situ C02 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing C02 line absorptions with

  2. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the

  3. Application of airborne LiDAR to the detailed geological mapping of mineralised terrain: the Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebby, S.; Cunningham, D.; Naden, J.; Tansey, K.

    2009-04-01

    The identification of mineral prospects is highly dependent upon the acquisition and synthesis of a wide variety of geological information, e.g., lithological, structural, geophysical and geochemical data. Conventionally, the majority of this information is acquired through field-based surveys. However, the quality of data collected in this manner is often affected by subjectivity and lack of detail due to coarse sampling over vast areas or inaccessible terrain. Both multi- and hyperspectral satellite remote sensing and the interpretation of aerial photography are typically used to help try and overcome some of the limitations associated with field-based surveys. However, the use of these approaches for the extraction of exploration data can be hindered by spatial and spectral limitations and by dense forest cover. A relatively new active remote sensing technology—known as airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR)—offers the possibility of acquiring accurate and high-resolution (ca. 1-4 m) topographic data through dense forest cover. The ability of LiDAR systems to detect multiple returns from the emission of a single laser pulse can be utilised to generate a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the ground beneath the forest canopy. Airborne LiDAR is an important tool for geoscience research, with a wide spectrum of applications including the mapping of landslides and faults to help inform hazard assessment studies. A LiDAR system can also provide an insight into the spectral and textural properties of surface materials using intensity data—a ratio of the reflected laser energy to the emitted laser energy. Where rocks outcrop, these properties are linked to the surface mineralogy and weathering at the LiDAR footprint scale. The ability to acquire two high-resolution datasets simultaneously from a single survey makes airborne LiDAR an attractive tool for the extraction of detailed geological information in terrain with either sparse or dense

  4. Airborne and spaceborne lasers for terrestrial geophysical sensing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 14, 15, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, Frank (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on airborne and spaceborne remote sensing laser applications discusses topics in atmospheric and geophysical sciences-related sensors, lidar and DIAL component and subsystem technologies, and coherent laser experiments and semiconductor laser technologies. Attention is given to airborne lidar measurement of aerosols, a ground-based injection-locked pulsed TEA laser for wind measurements, chemical/biological agent standoff detection methods, lidars for wind shear erosion, laser tuning to selected gas absorption lines in the atmosphere, the NASA lidar-in-space technology experiment, and the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder.

  5. Design of an Airborne Scanning Lidar Using a Holographic Optical Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Hopf, Dan; Neuman, Mark; Kubalak, David; Christhilif, Ellen; Hasselbrack, William; Ranganayakamma, Belthur; Kim, Jin; Hwang, I. H.

    1998-01-01

    An aerosol and cloud backscatter lidar system has been built using a one meter focal length transmission holographic optical element that functions as a scanning telescope. Rotating the disk about the center line normal effects a 45 degree conical scan.

  6. Continuous wave synthetic low-coherence wind sensing Lidar: motionless measurement system with subsequent numerical range scanning.

    PubMed

    Brinkmeyer, Ernst; Waterholter, Thomas

    2013-01-28

    A continuous wave (CW) Lidar system for detection of scattering from atmospheric aerosol particles is presented which is useful in particular for remote sensing of wind velocities. It is based on a low-coherence interferometric setup powered by a synthetic broadband laser source with Gaussian power density spectrum. The laser bandwidth is electronically adjustable and determines the spatial resolution which is independent of range. The Lidar system has no moving parts. The location to be resolved can be shifted numerically after the measurement meaning that a single measurement already contains the full range information. The features of constant resolution and numerical range scanning are in sharp contrast to ordinary CW Lidar systems. PMID:23389172

  7. Atmospheric CO2 Column Measurements Under Clear and Cloudy Conditions Using an Airborne Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Harrison, F. W.; Nehrir, A. R.; Browell, E. V.; Fan, T. F.; Kooi, S. A.; Dobler, J. T.; Meadows, B.; Obland, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the atmospheric CO2 measurements using the Exelis' airborne Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) system operating in the 1.57-mm CO2 absorption band. The atmospheric CO2 estimates above clouds and for entire columns are retrieved from the data obtained during the summer 2011 and spring 2013 ASCENDS flight campaigns. The lidar returns from clouds and surfaces are discriminated by the range-encoded IM signals transmitted by the airborne LAS system. Under thin cloud conditions, lidar systems generally have strong enough return signals from the surface for CO2 retrieval. For optically thick clouds, CO2 columns above the clouds are estimated with lidar returns from the cloud tops, and neighboring clear sky areas are used to measure the total CO2 columns to the surface. Case studies show that the full-column atmospheric CO2 measurements are very similar in adjacent clear and thin-cloud regions, while the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values of the CO2 columns are very different due to differences in the transmissions from aircraft to surface over cloudy and clear regions. For example, the measured CO2 columns to land surfaces were found to be about 398 ppm with an average SNR values for 0.1-s averages of about 140 and 38 in clear and thin-cloud conditions, respectively. Under thick clouds conditions, considerable variations in lidar returns for the extended targets are found. Also, their CO2 differential absorption optical depth values are normally smaller than those to the surface. These effects significantly reduce the precisions of CO2 column measurements both above clouds and to the surface under cloudy conditions compared to those to the surface in clear skies. Still, column-averaged CO2 mixing ratio (XCO2) estimates above clouds for daytime observations are expected to be slightly higher than those for the entire atmospheric column due to CO2 uptake by vegetation at the surface.

  8. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  9. A quasi-rigorous model based on improved ICP algorithm in the application of auto-calibration of airborne LiDAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lelin; Jiang, San

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the airborne LiDAR system calibration is to eliminate the influence of system error and improve the precision of the original point cloud data. In certain hypothesis of flight conditions, the directly positioning model for LiDAR can be reduced to a quasi-rigorous model, and the dependence on the original observation data for the system calibration model is reduced too. In view of the shortcoming of human interaction way to establish corresponding relationship between strips, an improved ICP method which considering the object features in point clouds is proposed to get the transform relationship between strips, and the automatic calibration procedures of LiDAR system is established in this paper. Taking with the real LiDAR data in Baotou test field, experiment results show that the proposed system calibration procedures can greatly eliminate the influence of system error.

  10. Probabilistic topographic maps from raw, full-waveform airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalobeanu, A.; Gonçalves, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The main goal of the AutoProbaDTM project is to derive new methodologies to measure the topography and terrain characteristics using the latest full-waveform airborne LiDAR technology. It includes algorithmic development, implementation, and validation over a large test area. In the long run, we wish to develop techniques that are scalable and applicable to future satellite missions such as LIST (NASA Decadal Survey), to help perform efficient and accurate large-scale mapping. One of the biggest challenges is to develop fast ways to process huge volumes of raw data without compromising the accuracy and the physical consistency of the result. Over the past decades, significant progress has been made in digital elevation model (DEM) extraction and user interaction has been much reduced, however most algorithms are still supervised. Topographic surveys currently play a central role in sensor calibration and full automation is still an unsolved problem. Moreover, very few existing methods are currently able to propose a quantitative error map with the reconstructed DEM. Traditional validation and quality control only allow to check the discrepancy between the product and a set of reference points, lacking the ability to predict the actual uncertainty related to elevations at chosen locations. We plan to provide fast and automated techniques to derive topographic maps and to compute error maps as well, based on a probabilistic approach to modeling terrains and data acquisition, solving inverse problems and handling uncertainty. Bayesian inference provides a rigorous framework for model reconstruction and error propagation, treating all quantities as random, and combining sources of information optimally. In the future, the uncertainty maps shall help scientists put error bars on quantities derived from the models. In June 2011, 200 km2 of data were acquired (100 GB of binary files, half a billion waveforms) in central Portugal, over an area of geomorphological and

  11. Mapping, Assessment and Analysis of Large-Scale Landslides Based on Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    In the context of the integrated risk management of the Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control (WLV) large-scale landslides - per definition only areas larger than 10 ha - were mapped in a study area in the South of Innsbruck/Tyrol. The large-scale landslides to be identified are mostly very slow and deep-seated including complex processes like mountain slope deformations ("Talzuschübe"). The mapping method for the first time developed in this study is based on hillshades of high-resolution airborne LIDAR data which recently has been made nearly nationwide available for Austria. These data have the advantage faced with other remote-sensing data like orthophotos that dense and high vegetation and other distracting objects on the ground are eliminated. This guarantees everywhere a high visibility of the terrain surface which is very helpful for the detection of landslides. These aspects allowed developing a new systematic approach for the identification and rough classification of large-scale landslides according to their activity. Using an iterative comparison of first results with other existing methods and field observations the methodology was developed as objective as possible. For this reason these landslides are divided in four distinct segments showing typical characteristics like double ridges or a surface of rupture. According to the characteristics and to the importance of these four segments all detected landslides are then assigned to one of the four classes of activity: "active", "likely active", "inactive" or "possibly inactive". Using this method, large-scale landslides were identified in 26 % of the entire study area. The major part of these landslides (65 %) is supposed to be "inactive" and only 0.5 % are classified as "active". In addition some analyses in the context of natural hazard research were carried out to interpret the quantitative occurrence and spatial distribution of the mapped landslides. Glacial overdeepening in valleys

  12. Optimization of Coherent Lidar Performance Using Graded- Reflectance Transmitter Resonator Optics in the Low Equivalent Fresnel Number Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Using a diffractive eigenmode treatment to model the laser output, we show that graded-reflectance resonator optics offer significant efficiency benefits over conventional hard-edge coupled unstable resonators in the context of coherent detection lidar applications. Extending previous work pertinent to the high equivalent Fresnel number regime, we have modelled the optimum performance of a notional super-Gaussian coupled cavity as a function of the key resonator parameters in the low equivalent Fresnel number regime.

  13. Analysis of ALOPE data from Superflux. [airborne lidar sensing of phytoplankton color groups in the Chesapeake Bay and shelf regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, O., Jr.; Esaias, W. E.; Brown, C. A., Jr.; Pritchard, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    Remote sensing data collected with the airborne lidar oceanographic probing experiment (ALOPE) laser fluorosensor during the Superflux 1 and Superflux 2 experiments were analyzed using two techniques. A qualitative technique which requires no supplementary data provided a near-real-time estimate of relative abundance of the golden-brown and green phytoplankton color groups. Contour plots developed for the later mission are used to demonstrate the utility of this technique. A quantitative technique which requires supplementary data to define the attenuation coefficient provides chlorophyll a concentration by color group. The sum of the golden-brown and green chlorophyll a data yields total chlorophyll a values which may be compared with in situ data. As expected, the golden-brown population was dominant in the Chesapeake Bay and the Bay plume whereas the green population was dominant in shelf waters.

  14. Airborne imaging lidar, detection and classification of surface and subsurface objects in a marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cianciotto, F.T.P.

    1996-11-01

    The current problem of imaging objects located within a body of water is overcome by the use of a Gated Imaging Lidar System. Due to variation of suspended particulate matter within a body of water, normal visible video reconnaissance has proven to be highly unreliable. By using nanosecond short pulsed, low repetition rate blue-green laser signals that are exclusively tuned for specific water conditions, Lidar systems are capable of reproducing clear images from oceanic surface to significant depths. One of the major advantages of gated Lidar is that back scatter from layers above and below the region to be searched is basically reduced to zero. This discrimination in layer searching greatly increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, substantially increasing the likelihood of target recognition. Imaging Lidar systems have been successfully used for numerous military applications, studying of marine life forms, and oil spill detection and classification. Gated imaging Lidar systems are light weight with low power consumption and can be operated by personnel with minimal instruction. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Lidar.

    PubMed

    Collis, R T

    1970-08-01

    Lidar uses laser energy in radar fashion to observe atmospheric backscattering as a function of range. The concomitant attenuation of energy along the intervening path complicates the evaluation of the observations, but even on a qualitative basis the delineation of clouds or of structure in the apparently clear air is of considerable value in operational meteorology and atmospheric research. Under certain conditions the atmosphere's optical parameters may be evaluated and related to meteorologically significant characteristics. Advanced techniques based on resonant absorption and Raman shift back- scattering are briefly noted. The current attainment and future prospects of lidar are reviewed.

  16. Mesoscale morphology of airborne core-shell nanoparticle clusters: x-ray laser coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersoli, E.; Loh, N. D.; Capotondi, F.; Y Hampton, C.; Sierra, R. G.; Starodub, D.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; Nelson, A. J.; Aslam, M.; Li, S.; Dravid, V. P.; Martin, A. V.; Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Fleckenstein, H.; Gumprecht, L.; Liang, M.; Nass, K.; Schulz, J.; White, T. A.; Coppola, N.; Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Graafsma, H.; Hirsemann, H.; Wunderer, C.; Epp, S. W.; Erk, B.; Rudek, B.; Rudenko, A.; Foucar, L.; Kassemeyer, S.; Lomb, L.; Rolles, D.; Shoeman, R. L.; Steinbrener, J.; Hartmann, R.; Hartmann, A.; Hauser, G.; Holl, P.; Kimmel, N.; Reich, C.; Soltau, H.; Weidenspointner, G.; Benner, W. H.; Farquar, G. R.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Hunter, M. S.; Ekeberg, T.; Hantke, M.; Maia, F. R. N. C.; Tobias, H. J.; Marchesini, S.; Frank, M.; Strüder, L.; Schlichting, I.; Ullrich, J.; Chapman, H. N.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Kiskinova, M.; Bogan, M. J.

    2013-08-01

    Unraveling the complex morphology of functional materials like core-shell nanoparticles and its evolution in different environments is still a challenge. Only recently has the single-particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), enabled by the ultrabright femtosecond free-electron laser pulses, provided breakthroughs in understanding mesoscopic morphology of nanoparticulate matter. Here, we report the first CDI results for Co@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles randomly clustered in large airborne aggregates, obtained using the x-ray free-electron laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Our experimental results compare favourably with simulated diffraction patterns for clustered Co@SiO2 nanoparticles with ˜10 nm core diameter and ˜30 nm shell outer diameter, which confirms the ability to resolve the mesoscale morphology of complex metastable structures. The findings in this first morphological study of core-shell nanomaterials are a solid base for future time-resolved studies of dynamic phenomena in complex nanoparticulate matter using x-ray lasers.

  17. Fault Scarp Detection Beneath Dense Vegetation Cover: Airborne Lidar Mapping of the Seattle Fault Zone, Bainbridge Island, Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Berghoff, Gregory S.

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of a commercial airborne laser mapping industry is paying major dividends in an assessment of earthquake hazards in the Puget Lowland of Washington State. Geophysical observations and historical seismicity indicate the presence of active upper-crustal faults in the Puget Lowland, placing the major population centers of Seattle and Tacoma at significant risk. However, until recently the surface trace of these faults had never been identified, neither on the ground nor from remote sensing, due to cover by the dense vegetation of the Pacific Northwest temperate rainforests and extremely thick Pleistocene glacial deposits. A pilot lidar mapping project of Bainbridge Island in the Puget Sound, contracted by the Kitsap Public Utility District (KPUD) and conducted by Airborne Laser Mapping in late 1996, spectacularly revealed geomorphic features associated with fault strands within the Seattle fault zone. The features include a previously unrecognized fault scarp, an uplifted marine wave-cut platform, and tilted sedimentary strata. The United States Geologic Survey (USGS) is now conducting trenching studies across the fault scarp to establish ages, displacements, and recurrence intervals of recent earthquakes on this active fault. The success of this pilot study has inspired the formation of a consortium of federal and local organizations to extend this work to a 2350 square kilometer (580,000 acre) region of the Puget Lowland, covering nearly the entire extent (approx. 85 km) of the Seattle fault. The consortium includes NASA, the USGS, and four local groups consisting of KPUD, Kitsap County, the City of Seattle, and the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC). The consortium has selected Terrapoint, a commercial lidar mapping vendor, to acquire the data.

  18. Estimating Carbon STOCK Changes of Mangrove Forests Using Satellite Imagery and Airborne LiDAR Data in the South Sumatra State, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Y.; Fukushima, A.; Imai, Y.; Tanahashi, Y.; Nakama, E.; Ohta, S.; Kawazoe, K.; Akune, N.

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to estimate the biomass in the mangrove forests using satellite imagery and airborne LiDAR data, and 2) to estimate the amount of carbon stock changes using biomass estimated. The study area is located in the coastal area of the South Sumatra state, Indonesia. This area is approximately 66,500 ha with mostly flat land features. In this study, the following procedures were carried out: (1) Classification of types of tree species using Satellite imagery in the study area, (2) Development of correlation equations between spatial volume based on LiDAR data and biomass stock based on field survey for each types of tree species, and estimation of total biomass stock and carbon stock using the equation, and (3) Estimation of carbon stock change using Chronological Satellite Imageries. The result showed the biomass and the amount of carbon stock changes can be estimated with high accuracy, by combining the spatial volume based on airborne LiDAR data with the tree species classification based on satellite imagery. Quantitative biomass monitoring is in demand for projects related to REDD+ in developing countries, and this study showed that combining airborne LiDAR data with satellite imagery is one of the effective methods of monitoring for REDD+ projects.

  19. [Building Change Detection Based on Multi-Level Rules Classification with Airborne LiDAR Data and Aerial Images].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-long; Yan, Li

    2015-05-01

    The present paper proposes a new building change detection method combining Lidar point cloud with aerial image, using multi-level rules classification algorithm, to solve building change detection problem between these two kinds of heterogeneous data. Then, a morphological post-processing method combined with area threshold is proposed. Thus, a complete building change detection processing flow that can be applied to actual production is proposed. Finally, the effectiveness of the building change detection method is evaluated, processing the 2010 airborne LiDAR point cloud data and 2009 high resolution aerial image of Changchun City, Jilin province, China; in addition, compared with the object-oriented building change detection method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification, more analysis and evaluation of the suggested method is given. Experiment results show that the performance of the proposed building change detection method is ideal. Its Kappa index is 0. 90, and correctness is 0. 87, which is higher than the object-oriented building change detection method based on SVM classification.

  20. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  1. A robust approach for tree segmentation in deciduous forests using small-footprint airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamraz, Hamid; Contreras, Marco A.; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a non-parametric approach for segmenting trees from airborne LiDAR data in deciduous forests. Based on the LiDAR point cloud, the approach collects crown information such as steepness and height on-the-fly to delineate crown boundaries, and most importantly, does not require a priori assumptions of crown shape and size. The approach segments trees iteratively starting from the tallest within a given area to the smallest until all trees have been segmented. To evaluate its performance, the approach was applied to the University of Kentucky Robinson Forest, a deciduous closed-canopy forest with complex terrain and vegetation conditions. The approach identified 94% of dominant and co-dominant trees with a false detection rate of 13%. About 62% of intermediate, overtopped, and dead trees were also detected with a false detection rate of 15%. The overall segmentation accuracy was 77%. Correlations of the segmentation scores of the proposed approach with local terrain and stand metrics was not significant, which is likely an indication of the robustness of the approach as results are not sensitive to the differences in terrain and stand structures.

  2. Landslide Investigation by Repeat Airborne LiDAR and Ground Monitoring in the Western Suburb of Sapporo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, M.; Marutani, T.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents landslide investigation using the combination of airborne LiDAR and ground monitoring data. The study site is located on the Teine Landslide (width: 2 km, Length: 6.5 km) in the western suburb of Sapporo city in Hokkaido Island, Japan, which collapsed more than 50,000 years ago. Since then streams have been developing and incising the landslide mass consisted of rock debris and volcanic deposits, presently causing a series of small deep-seated landslides along the banks. Because Sapporo is the economic center of Hokkaido and the suburb is expanding at the toe of the Teine slide, it is important to understand the behaviors of these active slopes to protect residents and infrastructures from unexpected disasters possibly triggered by an intense storm or earthquake. The LiDAR data for the area was first obtained by a manned helicopter in August 2010, and another survey by an unmanned helicopter is planned in autumn 2014 to estimate their activities from changes in the ground surfaces during the period from 2010 to 2014. Ground water level and landslide mass movements have also been monitored on site by using the coring holes for sampling since 2013. The combination of the data sets can make up the deficits of these methods, e.g., errors created through data processing for LiDAR survey and spatially limited information for ground monitoring, enabling to provide a solid three dimensional view of the slope movements. The notion obtained can be utilized to predict their future behaviors as well as to discover active but hiding landslides nearby. This study also showed that repeat monitoring of sites is a way of utilizing UAVs, particularly in terms of cost and convenience.

  3. Comparison of Methods to Map and Measure River Terraces using High-Resolution Airborne LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A. J.; Snyder, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    Fluvial terraces are important recorders of land-use, climate, and tectonic history that form in both erosional and depositional landscapes and consist of a flat surface bounded by valley walls and a steep-sloping scarp adjacent to the river channel. Combining these defining characteristics with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) surveys, several methods have been developed to identify and map terraces. The goals of this research are to compare some of these existing techniques and develop an objective approach to map terraces over entire watersheds using lidar DEMs. Additionally, we aim to quantify the thickness and volume of fill terrace deposits. Our preliminary application is to the Sheepscot River watershed, Maine, where strath and fill terraces are present and record Pleistocene deglaciation, Holocene eustatic forcing, and Anthropocene land-use change. We identify terraces along the longitudinal profile using an algorithm developed by Finnegan and Balco (2013), that computes the elevation frequency distribution at regularly spaced cross-sections normal to the channel. Next, we delineate terrace spatial extent using three separate methodologies: (1) image processing using Matlab, (2) feature classification algorithms developed by Wood (1996), and (3) image interpretation using manually placed points on known terraces to construct interpolated surfaces (Walter and Merritts, 2008). Lastly, we determine the thickness and volume of fill terrace sediments by subtracting an interpolated, adjacent water surface elevation from the defined terrace points. We compare our LiDAR-based results with field mapping, stratigraphic columns of terrace landforms, and ground penetrating radar over terrace surfaces. These findings suggest powerful new ways to rapidly analyze landscape history over large regions using high-resolution lidar DEMs, with less reliance on detailed and costly field data collection.

  4. Assessment of seismic loading on structures based on airborne LiDAR data from the Kalochori urban area (N. Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovithis, Emmanouil; Kirtas, Emmanouil; Marini, Eleftheria; Bliziotis, Dimitris; Maltezos, Evangelos; Pitilakis, Dimitris; Makra, Konstantia; Savvaidis, Alexandros

    2016-08-01

    Airborne LiDAR monitoring integrated with field data is employed to assess the fundamental period and the seismic loading of structures composing an urban area under prescribed earthquake scenarios. Α piecewise work-flow is adopted by combining geometrical data of the building stock derived from a LiDAR-based 3D city model, structural data from in-situ inspections on representative city blocks and results of soil response analyses. The procedure is implemented in the residential area of Kalochori, (west of Thessaloniki in Northern Greece). Special attention is paid to the in-situ inspection of the building stock in order to discriminate recordings between actual buildings and man-made constructions that do not conform to seismic design codes and to acquire additional building stock data on structural materials, typologies and number of stories which is not feasible by the LiDAR process. The processed LiDAR and field data are employed to compute the fundamental period of each building by means of code-defined formulas. Knowledge of soil conditions in the Kalochoti area allows for soil response analyses to obtain free-field at ground surface under earthquake scenarios with varying return period. Upon combining the computed vibrational characteristics of the structures with the free-field response spectra, the seismic loading imposed on the structures of the urban area under investigation is derived for each one of the prescribed seismic motions. Results are presented in GIS environment in the form of spatially distributed spectral accelerations with direct implications in seismic vulnerability studies of an urban area.

  5. The Price of Precision: Large-Scale Mapping of Forest Structure and Biomass Using Airborne Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing provides one of the best means for acquiring detailed information on forest structure. However, its application over large areas has been limited largely because of its expense. Nonetheless, extant data exist over many states in the U.S., funded largely by state and federal consortia and mainly for infrastructure, emergency response, flood plain and coastal mapping. These lidar data are almost always acquired in leaf-off seasons, and until recently, usually with low point count densities. Even with these limitations, they provide unprecedented wall-to-wall mappings that enable development of appropriate methodologies for large-scale deployment of lidar. In this talk we summarize our research and lessons learned in deriving forest structure over regional areas as part of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). We focus on two areas: the entire state of Maryland and Sonoma County, California. The Maryland effort used low density, leaf-off data acquired by each county in varying epochs, while the on-going Sonoma work employs state-of-the-art, high density, wall-to-wall, leaf-on lidar data. In each area we combine these lidar coverages with high-resolution multispectral imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) and in situ plot data to produce maps of canopy height, tree cover and biomass, and compare our results against FIA plot data and national biomass maps. Our work demonstrates that large-scale mapping of forest structure at high spatial resolution is achievable but products may be complex to produce and validate over large areas. Furthermore, fundamental issues involving statistical approaches, plot types and sizes, geolocation, modeling scales, allometry, and even the definitions of "forest" and "non-forest" must be approached carefully. Ultimately, determining the "price of precision", that is, does the value of wall-to-wall forest structure data justify their expense, should consider not only carbon market applications

  6. Noise modeling by the trend of each range gate for coherent Doppler LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zhichao; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan; Li, Lu; Chen, He

    2014-06-01

    A denoising method of all-fiber pulsed coherent Doppler LIDAR (CDL) is investigated. The goal is to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the weak signal regime. Based on differential detection theory, the total noise expression of CDL with a dual-balanced detector is introduced and analyzed. The conclusion is drawn that the total noise can be acquired under the local oscillator laser exposure conditions by reasonable simplification. Using the actual measured data, the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean value of the total noise in each range gate is obtained and is up to approximately 11%. In order to suppress the jitter of the noise, an effective noise modeling by the trend of each range gate is developed. The feasibility of this method is verified by a long set of measured data. The spatial and temporal distribution of wind speed is illustrated with 400 pulses accumulation. Compared to the noise modeling of the tail, the detection range of wind speed using the proposed method can be improved by 35.3%.

  7. Amplified reference pulse storage for low-coherence pulsed Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jyi-Lai; Künnemeyer, Rainer

    2006-11-10

    We present a lidar concept for wind-speed measurements, in which a pulsed laser is used as the source for measurement and reference beams. A fraction of the transmitted pulse is stored in a fiber-optic ring resonator with a path length longer than the pulse. The output of the resonator is a pulse train that is used as the reference beam and can be mixed with the Doppler-shifted measurement signal. Because this reference has traveled a distance equivalent to the measurement beam's path length, low-coherence sources can be used. Inserting an erbium-doped fiber amplifier into the resonator ensures that the stored pulses do not decay in amplitude. Experiments prove that 16 reference pulses of sufficiently constant amplitude and stability can be generated. This would correspond to a measurement range of 240 m in free air over which the returned signal is sampled at equal intervals. Velocity measurements of a hard target have been carried out in the range of 1-10 m/s. The Doppler-measured velocities agree with tachometer reference measurements within +/-0.09 m/s.

  8. Requirements and Technology Advances for Global Wind Measurement with a Coherent Lidar: A Shrinking Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, G. David

    2007-01-01

    Early concepts to globally measure vertical profiles of vector horizontal wind from space planned on an orbit height of 525 km, a single pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system to cover the full troposphere, and a continuously rotating telescope/scanner that mandated a vertical line of sight wind profile from each laser shot. Under these conditions system studies found that laser pulse energies of approximately 20 J at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate with a rotating telescope diameter of approximately 1.5 m was required. Further requirements to use solid state laser technology and an eyesafe wavelength led to the relatively new 2-micron solid state laser. With demonstrated pulse energies near 20 mJ at 5 Hz, and no demonstration of a rotating telescope maintaining diffraction limited performance in space, the technology gap between requirements and demonstration was formidable. Fortunately the involved scientists and engineers set out to reduce the gap, and through a combination of clever ideas and technology advances over the last 15 years, they have succeeded. This paper will detail the gap reducing factors and will present the current status.

  9. An all-fiber image-reject homodyne coherent Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    Abari, Cyrus F; Pedersen, Anders T; Mann, Jakob

    2014-10-20

    In this paper, we present an alternative approach to the down-conversion (translation) of the received optical signals collected by the antenna of an all-fiber coherent Doppler lidar (CDL). The proposed method, widely known as image-reject, quadrature detection, or in-phase/quadrature-phase detection, utilizes the advances in fiber optic communications such that the received signal can be optically down-converted into baseband where not only the radial velocity but also the direction of the movement can be inferred. In addition, we show that by performing a cross-spectral analysis, enabled by the presence of two independent signal observations with uncorrelated noise, various noise sources can be suppressed and a more simplified velocity estimation algorithm can be employed in the spectral domain. Other benefits of this architecture include, but are not limited to, a more reliable measurement of radial velocities close to zero and an improved bandwidth. The claims are verified through laboratory implementation of a continuous wave CDL, where measurements both on a hard and diffuse target have been performed and analyzed.

  10. Amplified reference pulse storage for low-coherence pulsed Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jyi-Lai; Künnemeyer, Rainer

    2006-11-10

    We present a lidar concept for wind-speed measurements, in which a pulsed laser is used as the source for measurement and reference beams. A fraction of the transmitted pulse is stored in a fiber-optic ring resonator with a path length longer than the pulse. The output of the resonator is a pulse train that is used as the reference beam and can be mixed with the Doppler-shifted measurement signal. Because this reference has traveled a distance equivalent to the measurement beam's path length, low-coherence sources can be used. Inserting an erbium-doped fiber amplifier into the resonator ensures that the stored pulses do not decay in amplitude. Experiments prove that 16 reference pulses of sufficiently constant amplitude and stability can be generated. This would correspond to a measurement range of 240 m in free air over which the returned signal is sampled at equal intervals. Velocity measurements of a hard target have been carried out in the range of 1-10 m/s. The Doppler-measured velocities agree with tachometer reference measurements within +/-0.09 m/s. PMID:17068580

  11. Spatial-temporal analysis of coherent offshore wind field structures measured by scanning Doppler-lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valldecabres, L.; Friedrichs, W.; von Bremen, L.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the spatial and temporal power fluctuations of a simplified wind farm model is conducted on four offshore wind fields data sets, two from lidar measurements and two from LES under unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions. The integral length scales of the horizontal wind speed computed in the streamwise and the cross-stream direction revealed the elongation of the structures in the direction of the mean flow. To analyse the effect of the structures on the power output of a wind turbine, the aggregated equivalent power of two wind turbines with different turbine spacing in the streamwise and cross-stream direction is analysed at different time scales under 10 minutes. The fact of considering the summation of the power of two wind turbines smooths out the fluctuations of the power output of a single wind turbine. This effect, which is stronger with increasing spacing between turbines, can be seen in the aggregation of the power of two wind turbines in the streamwise direction. Due to the anti-correlation of the coherent structures in the cross-stream direction, this smoothing effect is stronger when the aggregated power is computed with two wind turbines aligned orthogonally to the mean flow direction.

  12. An all-fiber image-reject homodyne coherent Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    Abari, Cyrus F; Pedersen, Anders T; Mann, Jakob

    2014-10-20

    In this paper, we present an alternative approach to the down-conversion (translation) of the received optical signals collected by the antenna of an all-fiber coherent Doppler lidar (CDL). The proposed method, widely known as image-reject, quadrature detection, or in-phase/quadrature-phase detection, utilizes the advances in fiber optic communications such that the received signal can be optically down-converted into baseband where not only the radial velocity but also the direction of the movement can be inferred. In addition, we show that by performing a cross-spectral analysis, enabled by the presence of two independent signal observations with uncorrelated noise, various noise sources can be suppressed and a more simplified velocity estimation algorithm can be employed in the spectral domain. Other benefits of this architecture include, but are not limited to, a more reliable measurement of radial velocities close to zero and an improved bandwidth. The claims are verified through laboratory implementation of a continuous wave CDL, where measurements both on a hard and diffuse target have been performed and analyzed. PMID:25401620

  13. Important features of pollutant transport and diffusion in complex terrain/coastal settings revealed by airborne lidar

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, J.L.; Smith, T.B.

    1994-12-31

    Our knowledge of transport and dispersion of air pollutants in complicated terrain or complex coastal/lakeshore settings is considerably less than that over simple, level terrain. This is largely because of induced microscale and mesoscale flows and lack of representative sites for ground-based monitors and inaccessibility for airborne in situ platforms. This knowledge, for instance, is required to improve the formulations of and validate air quality models, which in turn are used to develop strategies for alleviation of air pollution problems. Remote sensing devices, particularly those from aircraft or satellite platforms, have the capability of providing measurements with the requisite space and time detail for the understanding of the physical governing processes in such locales and also for improving and using air quality models for strategy development. One such device, the airborne lidar, has been widely used during field investigations to study pollutant distributions and attendant boundary layer structure and physical processes in relevant locales as various parts of Southern California. Each of these field investigations focussed on specific aspects or features of pollutant transport and diffusion. This paper summarizes pertinent and presents explicit examples of these aspects or features.

  14. Calibration and Validation of Airborne LiDAR at McMurdo Station, Antarctica for Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne LiDAR flight operations based at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, present unusual challenges for calibrating and validating the sensor measurements at the level of a few centimeters. NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) team prefers to perform regular, near-daily calibrations of range and angular biases of our sensor for the lengthy field deployments typical for Operation IceBridge (OIB). For the fall 2013 OIB deployment to McMurdo, we had to adapt our usual technique of regular overflights of an independently-surveyed airport parking ramp to deal with the fact that the McMurdo airfield was located on tidally-influenced sea ice, and that very few nearby durable surfaces were free of variable-depth snow during the OIB deployment. We detail our approach for dealing with these challenges, which included multiple GPS/vehicle surveys of the sea ice runway to quantify surface changes due to grooming operations, combined with GPS tide-gauge measurements of the runway's tidal motion. We also conducted a remote GPS/vehicle survey of a mostly snow-free road on Black Island, and included both sites during near-daily overflights with the ATM. We discuss the quantitative results of these surveys and the associated ATM overflights, and present conclusions for future deployments. Finally we discuss a related validation effort in which we compare ATM results from overflights of snow-free areas in the Dry Valleys with ATM surveys of the same area from a 2001 effort there.

  15. MSFC Doppler Lidar Science experiments and operations plans for 1981 airborne test flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Bilbro, J. W.; Kaufman, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The flight experiment and operations plans for the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) are provided. Application of DLS to the study of severe storms and local weather penomena is addressed. Test plans involve 66 hours of flight time. Plans also include ground based severe storm and local weather data acquisition.

  16. Spatial Patterns of Trees from Airborne LiDAR Using a Simple Tree Segmentation Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, S.; Kane, V. R.; McGaughey, R. J.; Franklin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Objectives for management of forest ecosystems on public land incorporate a focus on maintenance and restoration of ecological functions through silvicultural manipulation of forest structure. The spatial pattern of residual trees - the horizontal element of structure - is a key component of ecological restoration prescriptions. We tested the ability of a simple LiDAR individual tree segmentation method - the watershed transform - to generate spatial pattern metrics similar to those obtained by the traditional method - ground-based stem mapping - on forested plots representing the structural diversity of a large wilderness area (Yosemite NP) and a large managed area (Sierra NF) in the Sierra Nevada, Calif. Most understory and intermediate-canopy trees were not detected by the LiDAR segmentation; however, LiDAR- and field-based assessments of spatial pattern in terms of tree clump size distributions largely agreed. This suggests that (1) even when individual tree segmentation is not effective for tree density estimates, it can provide a good measurement of tree spatial pattern, and (2) a simple segmentation method is adequate to measure spatial pattern of large areas with a diversity of structural characteristics. These results lay the groundwork for a LiDAR tool to assess clumping patterns across forest landscapes in support of restoration silviculture. This tool could describe spatial patterns of functionally intact reference ecosystems, measure departure from reference targets in treatment areas, and, with successive acquisitions, monitor treatment efficacy.

  17. Biomass estimation of Douglas fir stands using airborne LiDAR data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass is an important parameter not only for carbon cycle modeling, but also for supporting land management operations (e.g. land use policy, forest fire management). Various remote sensing data have been utilized for biomass estimation, especially in forested areas. LiDAR (Light Detection And Ran...

  18. Alexandrite laser characterization and airborne lidar developments for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, P.; Higdon, N. S.; Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of an Alexandrite laser used for making water vapor DIAL measurements have been evaluated. The optical servo-system used to lock the laser wavelength on a water vapor absorption line is described. A brief description of the DIAL system is given and the data obtained with this lidar during flight tests in March 1990 are also presented.

  19. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Range During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar only on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear C02 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs

  20. A geomorphologist's dream come true: synoptic high resolution river bathymetry with the latest generation of airborne dual wavelength lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, Dimitri; Launeau, Patrick; Michon, Cyril; Gouraud, Emmanuel; Juge, Cyril; Gentile, William; Hubert-Moy, Laurence; Crave, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Airborne, terrestrial lidar and Structure From Motion have dramatically changed our approach of geomorphology, from low density/precision data, to a wealth of data with a precision adequate to actually measure topographic change across multiple scales, and its relation to vegetation. Yet, an important limitation in the context of fluvial geomorphology has been the inability of these techniques to penetrate water due to the use of NIR laser wavelengths or to the complexity of accounting for water refraction in SFM. Coastal bathymetric systems using a green lidar can penetrate clear water up to 50 m but have a resolution too coarse and deployment costs that are prohibitive for fluvial research and management. After early prototypes of narrow aperture green lidar (e.g., EEARL NASA), major lidar manufacturer are now releasing dual wavelength laser system that offer water penetration consistent with shallow fluvial bathymetry at very high resolution (> 10 pts/m²) and deployment costs that makes the technology, finally accessible. This offers unique opportunities to obtain synoptic high resolution, high precision data for academic research as well as for fluvial environment management (flood risk mapping, navigability,…). In this presentation, we report on the deployment of the latest generation Teledyne-Optech Titan dual-wavelength lidar (1064 nm + 532 nm) owned by the University of Nantes and Rennes. The instrument has been deployed over several fluvial and lacustrine environments in France. We present results and recommendation on how to optimize the bathymetric cover as a function of aerial and aquatic vegetation cover and the hydrology regime of the river. In the surveyed rivers, the penetration depth varies from 0.5 to 4 m with discrete echoes (i.e., onboard detection), heavily impacted by water clarity and bottom reflectance. Simple post-processing of the full waveform record allows to recover an additional 20 % depth. As for other lidar techniques, the main

  1. Evaluation of airborne lidar elevation surfaces for propagation of coastal inundation: the importance of hydrologic connectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppenga, Sandra; Worstell, Bruce B.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed information about coastal inundation is vital to understanding dynamic and populated areas that are impacted by storm surge and flooding. To understand these natural hazard risks, lidar elevation surfaces are frequently used to model inundation in coastal areas. A single-value surface method is sometimes used to inundate areas in lidar elevation surfaces that are below a specified elevation value. However, such an approach does not take into consideration hydrologic connectivity between elevation grids cells resulting in inland areas that should be hydrologically connected to the ocean, but are not. Because inland areas that should drain to the ocean are hydrologically disconnected by raised features in a lidar elevation surface, simply raising the water level to propagate coastal inundation will lead to inundation uncertainties. We took advantage of this problem to identify hydrologically disconnected inland areas to point out that they should be considered for coastal inundation, and that a lidar-based hydrologic surface should be developed with hydrologic connectivity prior to inundation analysis. The process of achieving hydrologic connectivity with hydrologic-enforcement is not new, however, the application of hydrologically-enforced lidar elevation surfaces for improved coastal inundation mapping as approached in this research is innovative. In this article, we propagated a high-resolution lidar elevation surface in coastal Staten Island, New York to demonstrate that inland areas lacking hydrologic connectivity to the ocean could potentially be included in inundation delineations. For inland areas that were hydrologically disconnected, we evaluated if drainage to the ocean was evident, and calculated an area exceeding 11 ha (~0.11 km2) that could be considered in inundation delineations. We also assessed land cover for each inland area to determine the type of physical surfaces that would be potentially impacted if the inland areas were considered as

  2. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Distributions and Properties during the NASA DISCOVER-AQ Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Scarino, A. J.; Burton, S. P.; Harper, D. B.; Cook, A. L.; Berkoff, T.; Rogers, R. R.; Seaman, S. T.; Fenn, M. A.; Sawamura, P.; Clayton, M.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidars, HSRL-1 and HSRL-2, were deployed for the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) missions. DISCOVER-AQ provided systematic and concurrent observations of column-integrated, surface, and vertically-resolved distributions of aerosols and trace gases to improve the interpretation of satellite observations related to air quality. HSRL-1, deployed during the first DISCOVER-AQ mission over the Washington DC-Baltimore region, measured profiles of aerosol backscatter and depolarization (532, 1064 nm) and aerosol extinction and optical thickness (AOT) (532 nm). HSRL-2, the first airborne multiwavelength HSRL, was deployed for the following three DISCOVER-AQ missions over the California Central Valley, Houston, and Denver. HSRL-2 measures profiles of aerosol backscatter and depolarization (355, 532, 1064 nm) and aerosol extinction and AOT (355, 532 nm). Additional HSRL-2 data products include aerosol type, mixed layer depth, and range-resolved aerosol microphysical parameters. The HSRL measurements reveal the temporal, spatial, and vertical variability of aerosol optical properties over these locations. HSRL measurements show that surface PM2.5 concentrations were better correlated with near surface aerosol extinction than AOT scaled by the mixed layer height. During the missions over Washington DC-Baltimore, Houston, and Denver, only about 20-65% of AOT was within the mixed layer. In contrast, nearly all of the AOT was within the mixed layer over the California Central Valley. HSRL-2 retrievals of aerosol fine mode volume concentration and effective radius compare well with coincident airborne in situ measurements and vary with relative humidity. HSRL-2 retrievals of aerosol fine mode volume concentration were also used to derive PM2.5 concentrations which compare well with surface PM2.5 measurements.

  3. Ecosystem services - from assessements of estimations to quantitative, validated, high-resolution, continental-scale mapping via airborne LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlinszky, András; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    "Ecosystem services" defined vaguely as "nature's benefits to people" are a trending concept in ecology and conservation. Quantifying and mapping these services is a longtime demand of both ecosystems science and environmental policy. The current state of the art is to use existing maps of land cover, and assign certain average ecosystem service values to their unit areas. This approach has some major weaknesses: the concept of "ecosystem services", the input land cover maps and the value indicators. Such assessments often aim at valueing services in terms of human currency as a basis for decision-making, although this approach remains contested. Land cover maps used for ecosystem service assessments (typically the CORINE land cover product) are generated from continental-scale satellite imagery, with resolution in the range of hundreds of meters. In some rare cases, airborne sensors are used, with higher resolution but less covered area. Typically, general land cover classes are used instead of categories defined specifically for the purpose of ecosystem service assessment. The value indicators are developed for and tested on small study sites, but widely applied and adapted to other sites far away (a process called benefit transfer) where local information may not be available. Upscaling is always problematic since such measurements investigate areas much smaller than the output map unit. Nevertheless, remote sensing is still expected to play a major role in conceptualization and assessment of ecosystem services. We propose that an improvement of several orders of magnitude in resolution and accuracy is possible through the application of airborne LIDAR, a measurement technique now routinely used for collection of countrywide three-dimensional datasets with typically sub-meter resolution. However, this requires a clear definition of the concept of ecosystem services and the variables in focus: remote sensing can measure variables closely related to "ecosystem

  4. Multi-wavelength Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Observations of Aerosol Above Clouds in California during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately representing the vertical profile of aerosols is important for determining their radiative impact, which is still one of the biggest uncertainties in climate forcing. Aerosol radiative forcing can be either positive or negative depending on aerosol absorption properties and underlying albedo. Therefore, accurately characterizing the vertical distribution of aerosols, and specifically aerosols above clouds, is vital to understanding climate change. Unlike passive sensors, airborne lidar has the capability to make vertically resolved aerosol measurements of aerosols above and between clouds. Recently, NASA Langley Research Center has built and deployed the world's first airborne multi-wavelength High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL-2. The HSRL-2 instrument employs the HSRL technique to measure extinction at both 355 nm and 532 nm and also measures aerosol depolarization and backscatter at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. Additional HSRL-2 data products include aerosol type and range-resolved aerosol microphysical parameters (e.g., effective radius, number concentration, and single scattering albedo). HSRL-2 was deployed in the San Joaquin Valley, California, from January 16 to February 6, 2013, on the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality). On February 6, the observation region was mostly cloudy, and HSRL-2 saw two distinct aerosol layers above the clouds. One layer was aged boundary-layer pollution located just above cloud top at approximately 1.5 km above sea level. An aged smoke layer was also observed over land and over the ocean at altitudes 4-7 km ASL. In this study, we will show HSRL-2 products for these cases, and compare them with airborne in situ measurements of the 1.5-km layer from a coincident flight of the NASA P3B. We will also compare and contrast the HSRL-2 measurements of these two aerosol layers with each other and the clear-air boundary

  5. Airborne Multi-wavelength High Spectral Resolution Lidar for Process Studies and Assessment of Future Satellite Remote Sensing Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Mack, T. L.; Hare, R. J.; Cleckner, C. S.; Rogers, R.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Burton, S. P.; Obland, M. D.; Scarino, A. J.; Cairns, B.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Schmid, B.; Berg, L. K.; Fast, J. D.; Flynn, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Langley recently developed