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Sample records for airborne combined radiometric

  1. Airborne microwave radiometric imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Zhang, Zuyin; Chen, Zhengwen

    1998-08-01

    A dual channel Airborne Microwave Radiometric Imaging system (AMRI) was designed and constructed for regional environment mapping. The system operates at 35GHz, which collects radiation at horizontal and vertical polarized. It runs at mechanical conical scanning with 45 degrees incidence angle. Two Cassegrain antennas with 1.5 degrees 3 dB beamwidth scan the scene alternately and two pseudo-color images of two channels are displayed on the screen of PC in real time. Simultaneously all parameters of flight and radiometric data are stored in hard disk for postprocessing. The sensitivity of the radiometers of flight and radiometric data are stored in hard disk for postprocessing. The sensitivity of the radiometers (Delta) T equals 0.16K. A new display method, unequal size element arc displaying method, is used in image displaying. Several experiments on mobile tower were carried out and the images demonstrate the AMRI is available to work steadily and accurately.

  2. Airborne microwave radiometric imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Futang; Zhang, Zuyin

    1999-09-01

    A dual channel Airborne Microwave Radiometric Imaging system (AMRI) was designed and constructed for regional environment mapping. The system operates at 35GHz, which collects radiation at horizontal and vertical polarized channels. It runs at mechanical conical scanning with 45 degrees incidence angle. Two Cassegrain antennas with 1.5 degrees beamwidth scan the scene alternately and two pseudo- color images of two channels are displayed on the screen of PC in real time. Simultaneously, all parameters of flight and radiometric data are sorted in hard disk for post- processing. The sensitivity of the radiometer (Delta) T equals 0.16K. A new displaying method, unequal size element arc displaying method, is used in image displaying. Several experiments on mobile tower were carried out and the images demonstrate that the AMRI is available to work steadily and accurately.

  3. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  4. Granite petrogenesis revealed by combined gravimetric and radiometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartèse, Romain; Boulvais, Philippe; Poujol, Marc; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    In peneplaned terranes, it is often impossible to get a full 3D view of geological objects. In the case of granitic plutons, for which intrusive relationships between constituent units can provide first order information regarding their petrogenesis, this lack of 3D field evidence is a major issue. Indirect observations can be provided by geophysical surveys. Here, we interpret field gravity data and airborne gamma ray radiometric maps with whole rock geochemistry data in order to obtain information on granite petrogenesis. First, we test our proposed combined geophysical and geochemical approach on the Huelgoat Variscan intrusion (Armorican Massif, France) and we show that ternary radiometric maps are a good proxy for the distribution of K, U and Th radioelements. Then, we apply our method to the Lizio and Questembert Variscan granitic intrusions (Armorican Massif) and show that some features characteristic of the intrusions, such as the feeding zones, can be localised by geophysical imaging. Indeed, radiometric maps constitute a frozen image of the latest stage of the magmatic building of plutons.

  5. Airborne lidar and radiometric observations of PBL- and low clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Valentin, R.; Pelon, J.

    1992-01-01

    Boundary layer- and low altitude clouds over open ocean and continent areas have been studied during several field campaigns since mid-1990 using the French airborne backscatter lidar LEANDRE in conjunction with on-board IR and visible radiometers. LEANDRE is an automatic system, and a modification of the instrumental parameters, when airborne, is computer controlled through an operator keyboard. The vertical range squared lidar signals and instrument status are displayed in real time on two dedicated monitors. The lidar is used either down- or up-looking while the aircraft is flying above or below clouds. A switching of the viewing configuration takes about a minute. The lidar measurements provide a high resolution description of cloud morphology and holes in cloud layers. The flights were conducted during various meteorological conditions on single or multilayer stratocumulus and cumulus decks. Analysis on a single shot basis of cloud top (or bottom) altitude and a plot of the corresponding histogram allows one to determine a probability density function (PDF). The preliminary results show the PDFs for cloud top are not Gaussian and symmetric about the mean value. The skewness varies with atmospheric conditions. An example of results recorded over the Atlantic ocean near Biarritz is displayed, showing: (1) the range squared lidar signals as a function of time (here 100 s corresponds to about 8 km, 60 shots are averaged on horizontal); the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) - up to 600 m - is observed at the beginning of the leg as well as on surface returns, giving an indication of the porosity; (2) the cloud top altitude variation between 2.4 to 2.8 km during the 150 to 320 s section; and (3) the corresponding PDF. Similar results are obtained on stratocumulus over land. Single shot measurements can be used also to determine an optical porosity at a small scale as well as a fractional cloudiness at a larger scale. A comparison of cloud top altitude retrieved from

  6. Radiometric Normalization of Large Airborne Image Data Sets Acquired by Different Sensor Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.; Beshah, B. T.

    2016-06-01

    Generating seamless mosaics of aerial images is a particularly challenging task when the mosaic comprises a large number of im-ages, collected over longer periods of time and with different sensors under varying imaging conditions. Such large mosaics typically consist of very heterogeneous image data, both spatially (different terrain types and atmosphere) and temporally (unstable atmo-spheric properties and even changes in land coverage). We present a new radiometric normalization or, respectively, radiometric aerial triangulation approach that takes advantage of our knowledge about each sensor's properties. The current implementation supports medium and large format airborne imaging sensors of the Leica Geosystems family, namely the ADS line-scanner as well as DMC and RCD frame sensors. A hierarchical modelling - with parameters for the overall mosaic, the sensor type, different flight sessions, strips and individual images - allows for adaptation to each sensor's geometric and radiometric properties. Additional parameters at different hierarchy levels can compensate radiome-tric differences of various origins to compensate for shortcomings of the preceding radiometric sensor calibration as well as BRDF and atmospheric corrections. The final, relative normalization is based on radiometric tie points in overlapping images, absolute radiometric control points and image statistics. It is computed in a global least squares adjustment for the entire mosaic by altering each image's histogram using a location-dependent mathematical model. This model involves contrast and brightness corrections at radiometric fix points with bilinear interpolation for corrections in-between. The distribution of the radiometry fixes is adaptive to each image and generally increases with image size, hence enabling optimal local adaptation even for very long image strips as typi-cally captured by a line-scanner sensor. The normalization approach is implemented in HxMap software. It has been

  7. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  8. Airborne Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Observations of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the first radiometric measurements of cirrus clouds in the frequency range of 89-325 GHz from a high-altitude aircraft flight. The measurements are conducted with a Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft over a region in northern Oklahoma. Aboard the same aircraft are a cloud lidar system and a multichannel radiometer operating at the visible and infrared wavelengths. The instrument ensemble is well suited for identifying cirrus clouds. It is shown that the depressions in brightness temperatures associated with a few intense cirrus clouds occur at all frequency channels of the MIR. Estimates of total ice water path of the cirrus clouds are derived from comparisons of radiative transfer calculations and observed brightness depressions.

  9. Imaging and radiometric performance simulation for a new high-performance dual-band airborne reconnaissance camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Sehyun; Yu, Jinhee; Ryu, Dongok; Hong, Jinsuk; Yoon, Jee-Yeon; Kim, Sug-Whan; Lee, Jun-Ho; Shin, Myung-Jin

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, high performance visible and IR cameras have been used widely for tactical airborne reconnaissance. The process improvement for efficient discrimination and analysis of complex target information from active battlefields requires for simultaneous multi-band measurement from airborne platforms at various altitudes. We report a new dual band airborne camera designed for simultaneous registration of both visible and IR imagery from mid-altitude ranges. The camera design uses a common front end optical telescope of around 0.3m in entrance aperture and several relay optical sub-systems capable of delivering both high spatial resolution visible and IR images to the detectors. The camera design is benefited from the use of several optical channels packaged in a compact space and the associated freedom to choose between wide (~3 degrees) and narrow (~1 degree) field of view. In order to investigate both imaging and radiometric performances of the camera, we generated an array of target scenes with optical properties such as reflection, refraction, scattering, transmission and emission. We then combined the target scenes and the camera optical system into the integrated ray tracing simulation environment utilizing Monte Carlo computation technique. Taking realistic atmospheric radiative transfer characteristics into account, both imaging and radiometric performances were then investigated. The simulation results demonstrate successfully that the camera design satisfies NIIRS 7 detection criterion. The camera concept, details of performance simulation computation, the resulting performances are discussed together with future development plan.

  10. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; Koenig, Kristina; Groom, Geoff; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about the magnitude of localised flooding of riverine areas is crucial for appropriate land management and administration at regional and local levels. However, detection and delineation of localised flooding with remote sensing techniques are often hampered on floodplains by the presence of herbaceous vegetation. To address this problem, this study presents the application of full-waveform airborne laser scanning (ALS) data for detection of floodwater extent. In general, water surfaces are characterised by low values of backscattered energy due to water absorption of the infrared laser shots, but the exact strength of the recorded laser pulse depends on the area covered by the targets located within a laser pulse footprint area. To account for this we analysed the physical quantity of radiometrically calibrated ALS data, the backscattering coefficient, in relation to water and vegetation coverage within a single laser footprint. The results showed that the backscatter was negatively correlated to water coverage, and that of the three distinguished classes of water coverage (low, medium, and high) only the class with the largest extent of water cover (>70%) had relatively distinct characteristics that can be used for classification of water surfaces. Following the laser footprint analysis, three classifiers, namely AdaBoost with Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest, were utilised to classify laser points into flooded and non-flooded classes and to derive the map of flooding extent. The performance of the classifiers is highly dependent on the set of laser points features used. Best performance was achieved by combining radiometric and geometric laser point features. The accuracy of flooding maps based solely on radiometric features resulted in overall accuracies of up to 70% and was limited due to the overlap of the backscattering coefficient values between water and other land cover classes. Our point-based classification methods assure a high

  11. Radiometric Calibration of an Airborne CO2 Pulsed Doppler Lidar Using a Natural Earth Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, Dean R.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Tratt, David M.; Srivastava, Vandana; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar has been accomplished using surface retro-reflection signals from the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico, USA. Two circular passes were made at altitudes of 6.26 and 9.26 km. The computed calibration factors for both altitudes are in excellent agreement with the value derived from standard ground-based measurements involving a fixed sandpaper target of known reflectance. This finding corroborates a previous study that successfully calibrated an airborne continuous-wave Doppler lidar using a variety of natural Earth surfaces. The present results indicate that relatively uniform Earth-surface targets can be used for in-flight calibration of pulsed airborne, and, in principal, spaceborne lidars.

  12. Pilot study of the application of Tellus airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data for radon mapping.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Green, B M R; Larmour, R

    2008-10-01

    The scope for using Tellus Project airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and soil geochemical data to predict the probability of houses in Northern Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is evaluated, in a pilot study in the southeast of the province, by comparing these data statistically with in-house radon measurements. There is generally good agreement between radon maps modelled from the airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data using multivariate linear regression analysis and conventional radon maps which depend solely on geological and indoor radon data. The radon maps based on the Tellus Project data identify some additional areas where the radon risk appears to be relatively high compared with the conventional radon maps. One of the ways of validating radon maps modelled on the Tellus Project data will be to carry out additional indoor measurements in these areas.

  13. Mapping of local-scale flooding on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina; Groom, Geoffrey; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2014-05-01

    The agricultural use of riverine lowlands is often dependent on complex hydrological regimes including localized flooding. Knowledge about spatio-temporal inundation patterns enables a better understanding of the state of agricultural areas in lowlands and provides valuable and objective information on land suitability for land use administration and environmental planning. Data from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS), also referred to as LiDAR, have become one of the most important sources of elevation data during the last two decades. Recently, geometric and radiometric attributes of ALS have also been explored for analysing the extent of water surfaces. Thus, the main objective of this work is to develop a method for mapping the spatial extent of floodplain inundation by means of remote sensing data. Our study focusses on analysing floodwaters partly covered by some vegetation, which is a major challenge in flood mapping. We hypothesize that ALS data due to its high sampling density and high rate of canopy penetration can effectively be used for floodwater detection in such areas. This research utilizes full-waveform ALS data with an average point density of 20 points/m2 obtained for an area of ca. 8 km2 of the Nørreå River valley in Jutland, Denmark. The study area is characterised by the presence of improved or semi-improved grasslands (meadows and pasture), few arable fields, irregularly scattered group of trees and bushes, and an extensive ditch network. Our approach is based on an inspection of properties of single laser points with regard to water vs. vegetation coverage within the laser footprint, which is compared with very detailed field reference data. Exploratory analysis and classification of ALS data were preceded by radiometric calibration of point cloud data, utilizing in situ measurements of reference targets reflectance. The resulting calibration derivatives provide very stable estimates of surface characteristics and are used as the main input in

  14. Combining radiometric images, 137Cs, geochemical and digital elevation data to quantify erosion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, F.; Tourliere, B.; Bonte, P.; Perrin, J.; Bourdon, B.; Pili, E.

    2003-04-01

    In this study, gamma-spectroscopic airborne data, digital elevation data, together with river and sediment geochemical data have been combined to quantify chemical and physical erosion within a rather small watershed (150 km2). In addition, the 137Cs technique is applied to have a better understanding of present-day erosion and weathering processes. The Hyrome watershed, South-East Armorican Massif (France), mainly consists of brioverian micaschists. We have examined particularly how past and present physical and chemical erosion is distributed within the drainage basin. In order to enhance these merged effects all the data are combined by Hierarchy Ascending Classification (HAC - cluster analysis). The multivariable analysis sorts each individual data point into separate groups characterized by radiometry, geochemistry, slope and difference between altitude and base level affinities. HAC groups delineate zones used to select target sites inside the watershed. The radiometric airborne data clearly show that the plateau areas are depleted in K and U as a result of chemical erosion while Th is fairly constant. In contrast, the valleys are characterized by larger K and U concentrations reflecting the bedrock original composition. This probably indicates more recent incision and/or faster physical erosion. The 137Cs is used as a tracer of soil erosion because of its adsorption since 40 years on surface soil particles. Suitable undisturbed sites have been found for 137Cs measurements using a field-portable HP-Ge gamma detector and then on core samples. The 137Cs technique provides a quantitative estimation of erosion and weathering processes and a qualitative determination of origin, transport and accumulation zones from those pre-selected with HAC. This data will be used to establish how the present-day erosion and soil redistribution relate to the pattern of erosion visible by airborne gamma-spectrometry.

  15. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  16. Urban vegetation detection using radiometrically calibrated small-footprint full-waveform airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfle, Bernhard; Hollaus, Markus; Hagenauer, Julian

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new GIS workflow for urban vegetation mapping from high-density (50 pts./m 2) full-waveform airborne LiDAR data, combining the advantages of both raster and point cloud based analysis. Polygon segments derived by edge-based segmentation of the normalized digital surface model are used for classification. A rich set of segment features based on the point cloud and derived from full-waveform attributes is built, serving as input for a decision tree and artificial neural network (ANN) classifier. Exploratory data analysis and detailed investigation of the discriminative power of selected point cloud and full-waveform LiDAR observables indicate a high value of the occurrence of multiple distinct targets in a laser beam (i.e. 'echo ratio') for vegetation classification (98% correctness). The radiometric full-waveform observables (e.g. backscattering coefficient) do not suffice as single discriminators with low correctness values using a decision tree classifier (⩽72% correctness) but higher values with ANN (⩽95% correctness). Tests using reduced point densities indicate that the derived segment features and classification accuracies remain relatively stable even up to a reduction factor of 10 (5 pts./m 2). In a representative study area in the City of Vienna/Austria the applicability of the developed object-based GIS workflow is demonstrated. The unique high density full-waveform LiDAR data open a new scale in 3D object characterization but demands for novel joint strategies in object-based raster and 3D point cloud analysis.

  17. In-flight radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Green, Robert O.; Alley, Ronald E.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Carrere, Veronique; Margolis, Jack S.; Vane, Gregg; Chrien, Thomas G.; Slater, Philip N.; Biggard, Stuart F.

    1988-01-01

    A reflectance-based method was used to provide an analysis of the in-flight radiometric performance of AVIRIS. Field spectral reflectance measurements of the surface and extinction measurements of the atmosphere using solar radiation were used as input to atmospheric radiative transfer calculations. Five separate codes were used in the analysis. Four include multiple scattering, and the computed radiances from these for flight conditions were in good agreement. Code-generated radiances were compared with AVIRIS-predicted radiances based on two laboratory calibrations (pre- and post-season of flight) for a uniform highly reflecting natural dry lake target. For one spectrometer (C), the pre- and post-season calibration factors were found to give identical results, and to be in agreement with the atmospheric models that include multiple scattering. This positive result validates the field and laboratory calibration technique. Results for the other spectrometers (A, B and D) were widely at variance with the models no matter which calibration factors were used. Potential causes of these discrepancies are discussed.

  18. NASA Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the characterization of radiometric data by NASA. The objective was to perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of imagery and compare with vendor-provided calibration coefficients. The approach was to use multiple, well-characterized sites. These sites are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and space borne sensors. Using the data from these sites, the investigators performed independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  19. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Frisbee, Troy; Zanoni, Vicki; Blonski, Slawek; Daehler, Erik; Grant, Brennan; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Sellers, Richard; Smith, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this program: Perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of IKQNOS imagery and compare with Space Imaging calibration coefficients The approach taken: utilize multiple well-characterized sites which are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and spaceborne sensors; and to Perform independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  20. Spectral deconvolution and operational use of stripping ratios in airborne radiometrics.

    PubMed

    Allyson, J D; Sanderson, D C

    2001-01-01

    Spectral deconvolution using stripping ratios for a set of pre-defined energy windows is the simplest means of reducing the most important part of gamma-ray spectral information. In this way, the effective interferences between the measured peaks are removed, leading, through a calibration, to clear estimates of radionuclide inventory. While laboratory measurements of stripping ratios are relatively easy to acquire, with detectors placed above small-scale calibration pads of known radionuclide concentrations, the extrapolation to measurements at altitudes where airborne survey detectors are used bring difficulties such as air-path attenuation and greater uncertainties in knowing ground level inventories. Stripping ratios are altitude dependent, and laboratory measurements using various absorbers to simulate the air-path have been used with some success. Full-scale measurements from an aircraft require a suitable location where radionuclide concentrations vary little over the field of view of the detector (which may be hundreds of metres). Monte Carlo simulations offer the potential of full-scale reproduction of gamma-ray transport and detection mechanisms. Investigations have been made to evaluate stripping ratios using experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

  1. Combining mobile terrestrial laser scanning geometric and radiometric data to eliminate accessories in circular metro tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kai; Cheng, Xiaojun; Ju, Qiaoqiao

    2016-07-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a noninvasive technique to monitor surface conditions and morphological characteristics of structures and has been successfully introduced to the regular inspection and maintenance of metro tunnels. To accurately analyze the deformation and structural conditions of a metro tunnel, nonliner points (e.g., outliers and accessories) should be detected and eliminated. Nevertheless, the accessories are attached very closely to the liner and cannot be thoroughly eliminated by three-dimensional (3D) geometric information. This study proposes to separate the liner and accessories by combining TLS geometric and radiometric information. A refitted mobile Faro Focus3D X330 system is used for data collection of a new-built metro tunnel in Hangzhou, China. The results show that the corrected intensity data are an effective physical criterion and a complementary data source to remove accessories that cannot be eliminated by geometric data. After the removal of accessories by geometric and radiometric data, the remaining liner points can accurately reflect the actual structural and deformation conditions of metro tunnels.

  2. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Young, M

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air.

  3. Investigating the influence of radiometric calibration on tree species determination based on small footprint full-waveform airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mücke, W.; Briese, C.; Hollaus, M.; Pfeifer, N.; Wagner, W.

    2013-12-01

    Small footprint airborne LiDAR is a well-established measurement technique in forestry, where cost- and time efficient wide-area data acquisition of the vegetation structure is required. Gathering stand-based information about tree species composition is of particular interest for forestry applications. Modern LiDAR systems provide, next to the acquired 3D (i.e. geometric) information, also a quantification of the signal strength of each echo. In order to utilize this information for tree species determination independently from different overlapping LiDAR swaths, different LiDAR sensors or acquisition times, radiometric calibration is a necessity. This contribution summarises the theoretical background of radiometric LiDAR data calibration on the physical basis of the radar equation. Using LiDAR observations of reference targets with known reflectivity the so-called calibration constant is computed. It accounts for sensor specific parameters, as well as atmospheric attenuation of the laser signal. Hence the backscatter properties of the laser echoes can be determined and physical observables characterizing the reflectivity of the scanned surface can be estimated. A practical calibration workflow is demonstrated on the example of a single wavelength full-waveform LiDAR data set from a mixed woodland in Austria. Subsequently, an automated method for tree species determination that is based on the laser light scattering mechanisms in the forest canopy is applied on both (calibrated and un-calibrated) data sets. First, an edge-based segmentation approach is used to aggregate LiDAR echoes to segments representing single tree crowns. Second, metrics are computed for each tree crown describing radiometric and geometric features that are related to foliage composition. Third, these metrics are used in a knowledge-based fuzzy classification scheme for the determination of segments representing coniferous and deciduous trees. Influences of the radiometric calibration on the

  4. The Radiometric Map of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minty, Brian; Franklin, Ross; Milligan, Peter; Richardson, Murray; Wilford, John

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience Australia and the Australian State and Territory Geological Surveys have systematically surveyed most of the Australian continent over the past 40 years using airborne gamma-ray spectrometry to map potassium, uranium and thorium elemental concentrations at the Earth's surface. However, the individual surveys that comprise the national gamma-ray spectrometric radioelement database are not all registered to the same datum. This limits the usefulness of the database as it is not possible to easily combine surveys into regional compilations or make accurate comparisons between radiometric signatures in different survey areas. To solve these problems, Geoscience Australia has undertaken an Australia-Wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS), funded under the Australian Government's Onshore Energy Security Program, to serve as a radioelement baseline for all current and future airborne gamma-ray spectrometric surveys in Australia. The AWAGS survey has been back-calibrated to the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) radioelement datum. We have used the AWAGS data to level the national radioelement database by estimating survey correction factors that, once applied, minimise both the differences in radioelement estimates between surveys (where these surveys overlap) and the differences between the surveys and the AWAGS traverses. The database is thus effectively levelled to the IAEA datum. The levelled database has been used to produce the first `Radiometric Map of Australia' - levelled and merged composite potassium (% K), uranium (ppm eU) and thorium (ppm eTh) grids over Australia at 100m resolution. Interpreters can use the map to reliably compare the radiometric signatures observed over different parts of Australia. This enables the assessment of key mineralogical and geochemical properties of bedrock and regolith materials from different geological provinces and regions with contrasting landscape histories.

  5. Geometric and radiometric preprocessing of airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data in rugged terrain for quantitative data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Peter; Green, Robert O.; Staenz, Karl; Itten, Klaus I.

    1994-01-01

    A geocoding procedure for remotely sensed data of airborne systems in rugged terrain is affected by several factors: buffeting of the aircraft by turbulence, variations in ground speed, changes in altitude, attitude variations, and surface topography. The current investigation was carried out with an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene of central Switzerland (Rigi) from NASA's Multi Aircraft Campaign (MAC) in Europe (1991). The parametric approach reconstructs for every pixel the observation geometry based on the flight line, aircraft attitude, and surface topography. To utilize the data for analysis of materials on the surface, the AVIRIS data are corrected to apparent reflectance using algorithms based on MODTRAN (moderate resolution transfer code).

  6. Characterization of Titan surface scenarios combining Cassini SAR images and radiometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, B.; Notarnicola, C.; Casarano, D.; Janssen, M.; Posa, F.; Cassini RADAR Science Team

    2009-04-01

    A great amount of data and images was provided by the radar on Cassini probe, thus opening and suggesting new scenarios about Titan's formation and evolution. An important result was the detection, among the peculiar and heterogeneous Titan's surface features, of lakes most likely constituted by liquid hydrocarbons, thus supporting the hypothesis of a methane cycle similar to water cycle on Earth.These areas, which resemble terrestrial lakes, seem to be sprinkled all over the high latitudes surrounding Titan's pole. The abundant methane in Titan's atmosphere combined with the low temperature, 94 K, lead scientists to interpret them as lakes of liquid methane or ethane. In this work, scattering models and a Bayesian inversion algorithm are applied in order to characterize lake and land surfaces. The possibility of combining the SAR data with radiometric ones on both lakes and neighboring land areas is also presented. Radar backscattering from lakes is described in terms of a double layer model, consisting of Bragg or facets scattering for the upper liquid layer and the Integral Equation Model (IEM) model for the lower solid surface. Furthermore, by means of a gravity-capillary wave model (Donelan-Pierson), the wave spectra of liquid hydrocarbons surfaces are introduced as a function of wind speed and direction. Theoretical radar backscattering coefficient values are compared with the experimental ones collected by the radar in order to estimate physical and morphological surface parameters, and to evaluate their compatibility with the expected constituents for Titan surfaces. This electromagnetic analysis is the starting point for a statistical inversion algorithm which allows determining limits on the parameters values, especially on the optical thickness and wind speed of the lakes. The physical surface parameters inferred by using the inversion algorithm are used as input for a forward radiative transfer model calculation to obtain simulated brightness

  7. Airborne hyperspectral sensor radiometric self-calibration using near-infrared properties of deep water and vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieux, Kévin; Nouchi, Vincent; Merminod, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    Retrieving the water-leaving reflectance from airborne hyperspectral data implies to deal with three steps. Firstly, the radiance recorded by an airborne sensor comes from several sources: the real radiance of the object, the atmospheric scattering, sky and sun glint and the dark current of the sensor. Secondly, the dispersive element inside the sensor (usually a diffraction grating or a prism) could move during the flight, thus shifting the observed spectra on the wavelengths axis. Thirdly, to compute the reflectance, it is necessary to estimate, for each band, what value of irradiance corresponds to a 100% reflectance. We present here our calibration method, relying on the absorption features of the atmosphere and the near-infrared properties of common materials. By choosing proper flight height and flight lines angle, we can ignore atmospheric and sun glint contributions. Autocorrelation plots allow to identify and reduce the noise in our signals. Then, we compute a signal that represents the high frequencies of the spectrum, to localize the atmospheric absorption peaks (mainly the dioxygen peak around 760 nm). Matching these peaks removes the shift induced by the moving dispersive element. Finally, we use the signal collected over a Lambertian, unit-reflectance surface to estimate the ratio of the system's transmittances to its near-infrared transmittance. This transmittance is computed assuming an average 50% reflectance of the vegetation and nearly 0% for water in the near-infrared. Results show great correlation between the output spectra and ground measurements from a TriOS Ramses and the water-insight WISP-3.

  8. Airborne geophysical surveys in the north-central region of Goias (Brazil): implications for radiometric characterization of tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Suze Nei P; Hamza, Valiya M; da Silva, Joney Justo

    2013-02-01

    Progress obtained in analysis aerogammaspectrometric and aeromagnetic survey data for the north-central region of the state of Goias (Brazil) are presented. The results obtained have allowed not only determination of the abundances of naturally radioactive elements but also new insights into the processes that determine the radiometric characteristics of the main soil types. There are indications that the radioelement abundances of soils are not only related to their physical properties, but also chemical characteristics of source rocks from which they are derived. For example, oxisol soils derived from the felsic source rocks of the Mara Rosa and Green stone belts have equivalent uranium (eU) values higher than 1.7 ppm, while those derived from source rocks of the relatively more basic Uruaçu Group and sediment sequences of Proterozoic age are characterized by eU contents of less than 1 ppm. Oxisol soils of the Median massif, ultisol soils of the Paranoá, Canastra and Araxá Groups, cambisol soils of the Araí Group and plintosol soils of the Bambuí Group constitute an intermediate class with eU contents in the range of 1-1.3 ppm. Equivalent thorium abundances of soil types display similar trends, the range of variation being 4-16 ppm. Potassium abundances on the other hand are rather uniform with values in the range of 1-1.3%, the only exception being the sedimentary sequences of Proterozoic age, which has a mean value of 0.7%. These observations have been considered as indicative of characteristic features of tropical soils in the study area. In this context, we point out the possibility of using results of aerogammaspectrometry surveys as a convenient complementary tool in identifying geochemical zoning of soils in tropical environments. The ratios of eU/K are found to fall in the range of 1-1.7, which is typical of common soils. The ratios of eTh/K exhibit a relatively wide interval, with values in the range of 4-16. The ratios of eTh/eU are found to have

  9. Lithological discrimination and structural trends in W-Rwanda (Africa) on images of airborne radiometric and aeromagnetic surveys, coregistered to a Landsat TM scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Alonso, M.; Tahon, A.

    Processing and interpretation of an airborne gamma-ray and aeromagnetic survey, combined with Thematic Mapper imagery, enables the successful discrimination of lithological units and their geological and structural interpretation in a complex area, where weathering and a dense vegetation cover make traditional mapping extremely difficult. The visual inspection of RGB color-composites reveals the differentiation of the area in distinct colored domains, each of which has been related to existing units. The aeromagnetic data not only reveal superficial structures, but also show deeper structural detail inside the tectonometamorphic complexes of the area, adding weight to existing hypotheses on the evolution of the Kibaran orogeny.

  10. Airborne microwave radiometric data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Results from the 1.5 cm, 19.35 GHz electrical scanning microwave radiometer which was once of the instruments used during the 1971 flight over Imperial Valley, California; Phoenix, Arizona; and Weslaco, Texas.

  11. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: First Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the first year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-looking technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of FAA certification requirements and the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment.

  12. Radon potential determination by a combination of geological mapping, geochemistry, groundwater investigations and airborne geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Motschka, K.; Ahl, A.; Slapansky, P.; Finger, F.; Alletsgruber, I.; Gasser, V.; Supper, R.; Bieber, G.

    2009-04-01

    During the nineties comprehensive Radon investigations were carried out in Austria to determine the Radon exposure of the population (Ditto et al., 1999, Friedmann et al.,1997 and Friedmann et al., 2007). Friedmann (2007, p 16-17) came to the result that indoor measurements can be better used than geological methods to pinpoint areas with a high Radon hazard. Contrary to this conclusion, in the current presentation we intend to show that geological factors are the most important parameters for Radon potential evaluation and we demonstrate a new mapping method for determining the spatial distribution of the Radon potential by means of geological and airborne geophysical investigations. Within the last years, several test sites in the southern Bohemian Massive were investigated. Based on large scaled geological maps different types of Granites were analysed on Uranium content. Furthermore, in order to obtain the spatial distribution of Uranium, close-meshed airborne radiometric mapping was carried out. Additionally, ground water samples were analysed to derive representative Radon concentrations for the pore volume within the different Granite types. Final results concluded that there is a significant correlation between the Uranium content of the geological subsurface and the Radon concentration in the ground water (SCHUBERT et al., 2003, ALLETSGRUBER, 2007). As a consequence airborne radiometric mapping could be used as an effective tool to derive quick and detailed information on spatial distribution of the Radon potential. Furthermore this methodology could contribute to identify potential Radon hot spot areas as only airborne radiometric mapping could provide countrywide Uranium data coverage in high resolution. I. Alletsgruber(2007): Radongehalte in Grundwässern des Mühlviertels (Oberösterreich). Geologische und hydrogeologische Faktoren. - diploma thesis, Univ. Salzburg. PT M. Ditto, W. Fimml, V. Karg, M. Korner, J. Weisz (1999): Radon-222 im Grundwasser

  13. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference hosted jointly by NASA Langley (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was held in Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 18 to 20, 1988. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the second year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  14. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was held in Hampton, Va., on October 16-18, 1990. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant on-going results of the NASA/FAA joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  15. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Passman, Robert H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant ongoing results of the NASA/FAA joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements. The present document was compiled to record the essence of the technology updates and discussions which follow each.

  16. Identifying areas with potential for high indoor radon levels: analysis of the national airborne radiometric reconnaissance data for California and the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, B.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Schwehr, M.B.; Van Heuvelen, A.

    1984-04-01

    Radon-222 is an important indoor air pollutant which, through the inhalation of its radioactive decay products, accounts for nearly half of the effective dose equivalent to the public from natural ionizing radiation. Indoor radon concentrations vary widely, largely because of local and regional differences in the rate of entry from sources. The major sources are soil and rock near building foundations, earth-based building materials, and domestic water; of these, soil and rock are thought to be predominant in many buildings with higher-than-average concentrations. Thus, one key factor in determining radon source potential is the concentration of radium, the progenitor of radon, in surficial rocks and soils. Aerial radiometric data were analyzed, collected for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, for seven Western states to: (1) provide information on the spatial distribution of radium contents in surficial geologic materials for those states; and (2) investigate approaches for using the aerial data, which have been collected throughout the contiguous United States and Alaska, to identify areas where high indoor radon levels may be common. Radium concentrations were found to be relatively low in central and western portions of Washington, Oregon, and northern California; they were found to be relatively high in central and southern California. A field validation study, conducted along two flight-line segments near Spokane, Washington, showed close correspondence between the aerial data, in situ measurements of both radium content and radon flux from soil, and laboratory measurements of both radium content of and radon emanation rate from soil samples. 99 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  17. The Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC), Uganda Revealed As a Mineralized Nested Ring Complex Using High Resolution Airborne Radiometric and Magnetic Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; LePera, A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Katumwehe, A. B.; Achang, M.

    2014-12-01

    We used high-resolution radiometrics and aeromagnetic data to investigate the Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC) in Uganda. The SIC covers an area of about 700 km² and is host to hydrothermally formed economic minerals such as Gold and Tungsten. The distribution of the ore deposits is not well known and current mine workings are limited to the western margins of the complex. Our objectives were to (1) provide a detailed geological map of the SIC and surrounding, (2) investigate relationships between preserved intrusive bodies and Precambrian tectonic structures to provide insight into emplacement of the complex, (3) examine links between magma emplacement, discontinuities and hydrothermal alteration (4) generate two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) models of the complex to understand its subsurface geometry, (5) investigate the relationship between the structure of the SIC and mineral occurrences as an aid to future exploration programs. Edge enhancement filters such as the analytical signal, vertical and tilt derivatives were applied to the magnetic data. In addition, 2-D and 3-D models were produced using Geosoft's GM-SYS 2-D and Voxi modules. The filtered data provided unprecedented structural details of the complex and revealed the following: (1) the edge of the SIC is characterized by higher magnetic susceptibility and Thorium content than its interior, (2) the SIC is characterized by eight to nine nested ring complexes with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 14 km, (3) the 3-D inversion suggests near vertical walls for the ring complexes extending to a depth of about 7 km, (4) the SIC was emplaced within a Precambrian folded basement and was traversed by numerous NW-trending dykes and (5) present day mining activities are concentrated within the folded basement units although occurrences of Tungsten and Gold are found associated with the highly magnetized edge of the ring complexes. We interpret the highly magnetized edges of the nested ring

  18. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 18 to 20, 1988. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Herbrt Schlickenmaier of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the second year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  19. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Passman, Robert H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on April 14-16, 1992. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Bob Passman of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant ongoing results of the NASA/FAA Joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements. The present document has been compiled to record the essence of the technology updates and discussions which follow each.

  20. Airborne Windshear Detection and Warning Systems. Fifth and Final Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Fifth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Airborne Windshear Review Meeting was hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center and the Federal Aviation Administration in Hampton, Virginia, on September 28-30, 1993. The purpose was to report on the highly successful windshear experiments conducted by government, academic institutions, and industry; to transfer the results to regulators, manufacturers, and users; and to set initiatives for future aeronautics technology research. The formal sessions covered recent developments in windshear flight testing, windshear modeling, flight management, and ground-based systems, airborne windshear detection systems, certification and regulatory issues, and development and applications of sensors for wake vortices and for synthetic and enhanced vision systems. This report was compiled to record and make available the technology updates and materials from the conference.

  1. Airborne Windshear Detection and Warning Systems. Fifth and Final Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Fifth (and Final) Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Airborne Windshear Review Meeting was hosted jointly by the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Hampton, Virginia, on September 28-30, 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to report on the highly successful windshear experiments conducted by government, academic institutions, and industry; to transfer the results to regulators, manufacturers, and users; and to set initiatives for future aeronautics technology research. The formal sessions covered recent developments in windshear flight testing; windshear modeling, flight management, and ground-based systems; airborne windshear detection systems; certification and regulatory issues; development and applications of sensors for wake vortex detection; and synthetic and enhanced vision systems.

  2. Rapid detection of airborne viruses by personal bioaerosol sampler combined with the PCR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovski, I. E.; Safatov, A. S.; Sergeev, A. A.; Pyankov, O. V.; Petrishchenko, V. A.; Mikheev, M. V.; Sergeev, A. N.

    A new personal sampler had been previously developed and verified for monitoring of viable airborne viruses. The aims of this project were to investigate a possibility of the utilization of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to speed up the time consuming analytical procedures and to evaluate a lower detection limit of the combined (sampler-PCR) device. Tenfold serial dilutions of the initial suspension of the Vaccinia virus were aerosolized in the chamber and airborne viruses were monitored by two simultaneously operating samplers. The results of monitoring were successfully obtained by a standard plaque assay (live microbes) and by the PCR method (total DNA). The corresponding calculations to identify the minimal detectable concentration in the ambient air were then performed. It was found that the minimal detectable concentration of airborne viruses in the ambient air depends on the sampling time. As demonstrated, such concentration should be at least 125×10 3 PFU m -3 for a sampling time of as short as 1 min. The detectable concentration decreases with the increase of the sampling time and reaches 25×10 3 and 10×10 3 PFU m -3 for 5 and 12.5 min of sampling respectively.

  3. Verification of the radiometric map of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Matolín, Milan

    2017-01-01

    The radiometric map of the Czech Republic is based on uniform regional airborne radiometric total count measurements (1957-1959) which covered 100% of the country. The airborne radiometric instrument was calibrated to a (226)Ra point source. The calibration facility for field gamma-ray spectrometers, established in the Czech Republic in 1975, significantly contributed to the subsequent radiometric data standardization. In the 1990's, the original analogue airborne radiometric data were digitized and using the method of back-calibration (IAEA, 2003) converted to dose rate. The map of terrestrial gamma radiation expressed in dose rate (nGy/h) was published on the scale 1:500,000 in 1995. Terrestrial radiation in the Czech Republic, formed by magmatic, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks of Proterozoic to Quaternary age, ranges mostly from 6 to 245 nGy/h, with a mean of 65.6 ± 19.0 nGy/h. The elevated terrestrial radiation in the Czech Republic, in comparison to the global dose rate average of 54 nGy/h, reflects an enhanced content of natural radioactive elements in the rocks. The 1995 published radiometric map of the Czech Republic was successively studied and verified by additional ground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements and by comparison to radiometric maps of Germany, Poland and Slovakia in border zones. A ground dose rate intercomparison measurement under participation of foreign and domestic professional institutions revealed mutual dose rate deviations about 20 nGy/h and more due to differing technical parameters of applied radiometric instruments. Studies and verification of the radiometric map of the Czech Republic illustrate the magnitude of current deviations in dose rate data. This gained experience can assist in harmonization of dose rate data on the European scale.

  4. Image-Based Airborne Sensors: A Combined Approach for Spectral Signatures Classification through Deterministic Simulated Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo; Herrera, P. Javier

    2009-01-01

    The increasing technology of high-resolution image airborne sensors, including those on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, demands automatic solutions for processing, either on-line or off-line, the huge amountds of image data sensed during the flights. The classification of natural spectral signatures in images is one potential application. The actual tendency in classification is oriented towards the combination of simple classifiers. In this paper we propose a combined strategy based on the Deterministic Simulated Annealing (DSA) framework. The simple classifiers used are the well tested supervised parametric Bayesian estimator and the Fuzzy Clustering. The DSA is an optimization approach, which minimizes an energy function. The main contribution of DSA is its ability to avoid local minima during the optimization process thanks to the annealing scheme. It outperforms simple classifiers used for the combination and some combined strategies, including a scheme based on the fuzzy cognitive maps and an optimization approach based on the Hopfield neural network paradigm. PMID:22399989

  5. Laser-jamming effectiveness analysis of combined-fiber lasers for airborne defense systems.

    PubMed

    Jie, Xu; Shanghong, Zhao; Rui, Hou; Shengbao, Zhan; Lei, Shi; Jili, Wu; Shaoqiang, Fang; Yongjun, Li

    2008-12-20

    The laser-jamming effectiveness of combined fiber lasers for airborne defense systems is analyzed in detail. Our preliminary experimental results are proof of the concept of getting a high-power laser through a beam combination technique. Based on combined fiber lasers, the jamming effectiveness of four-quadrant guidance and imaging guidance systems are evaluated. The simulation results have proved that for a four-quadrant guidance system, the tracking system takes only two seconds to complete tracking, and the new tracking target is the jamming laser; for the imaging guidance system, increasing the power of the jamming laser or the distance between the target and the jamming laser are both efficient ways to achieve a successful laser jamming.

  6. Landsat radiometric continuity using airborne imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Angal, A.; Thome, K.; Cook, B.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Goddard's Lidar, Hyperspectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT) includes a scanning lidar, an imaging spectrometer and a thermal camera. The Visible Near-Infrared (VNIR) Imaging Spectrometer acquires high resolution spectral measurements (1.5 nm resolution) from 0.4 to 1.0 µm. The SIRCUS-based calibration facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center was used to measure the absolute spectral response (ASR) of the G-LiHT's imaging spectrometer. Continuously tunable lasers coupled to an integrating sphere facilitated a radiance-based calibration for the detectors in the reflective solar bands. The transfer of the SIRCUS-based laboratory calibration of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer to the Landsat sensors (Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 OLI) is demonstrated using simultaneous overpasses over the Red Lake Playa and McClaw's Playa sites during the commissioning phase of Landsat 8 in March 2013. Solar Lunar Absolute Imaging Spectrometer (SOLARIS) is the calibration demonstration system for the reflected solar instrument of CLARREO. A portable version of SOLARIS, known as Suitcase SOLARIS, also calibrated using a SIRCUS-based setup, was deployed for ground measurements as a part of both the field campaigns. Simultaneous measurements of SOLARIS allow cross-comparison with G-LiHT and Landsat sensors. The transfer of the lab-based calibration of G-LiHT to Landsat sensors show that the sensors agree within 5% with a 1-3% calibration uncertainty of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer.

  7. The effect of spatial, spectral and radiometric factors on classification accuracy using thematic mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Acevedo, W.; Alexander, D.; Buis, J.; Card, D.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment of a factorial design was conducted to test the effects on classification accuracy of land cover types due to the improved spatial, spectral and radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper (TM) in comparison to the Multispectral Scanner (MSS). High altitude aircraft scanner data from the Airborne Thematic Mapper instrument was acquired over central California in August, 1983 and used to simulate Thematic Mapper data as well as all combinations of the three characteristics for eight data sets in all. Results for the training sites (field center pixels) showed better classification accuracies for MSS spatial resolution, TM spectral bands and TM radiometry in order of importance.

  8. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming; Roos, Per

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5 × 10(5) for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference values, revealing that the developed method for plutonium determination in environmental samples is reliable. The measurement results of (239+240)Pu by alpha spectrometry agreed very well with the sum of (239)Pu and (240)Pu measured by ICP-MS. ICP-MS can not only measure (239)Pu and (240)Pu separately but also (241)Pu. However, it is impossible to measure (238)Pu using ICP-MS in environmental samples even a decontamination factor as high as 10(6) for uranium was obtained by chemical separation.

  9. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  10. Simultaneous Inflight Spectral and Radiometric Calibration Validation of AVRIS and HYDICE Over Lunar Lake, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrien, Thomas; Green, Robert; Chovit, Chris; Faust, Jessica; Johnson, Howell; Basedow, Robert; Zalewski, Edward; Colwell, John

    1995-01-01

    An experiment to check the spectral and radiometric calibration of two sensors--the airborne visible/infrared imaging spectromenter (AVRIS) and the Hyperspectral digital image collection experiment (HYDICE)--is described.

  11. Radiometric correction procedure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colby, C.; Sands, R.; Murphrey, S.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of MSS radiometric processing techniques identified as a preferred radiometric processing technique a procedure which equalizes the mean and standard deviation of detector-specific histograms of uncalibrated scene data. Evaluation of MSS calibration data demonstrated that the relationship between detector responses is essentially linear over the range of intensities typically observed in MSS data, and that the calibration wedge data possess a high degree of temporal stability. An analysis of the preferred radiometric processing technique showed that it could be incorporated into the MDP-MSS system without a major redesign of the system, and with minimal impact on system throughput.

  12. Urban Tree Classification Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Zs.; Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria). The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries) and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas) on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  13. A Combined Texture-principal Component Image Classification Technique For Landslide Identification Using Airborne Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, M.; Giles, D.; Murphy, W.

    The Jurassic strata of the Cotswolds escarpment of southern central United Kingdom are associated with extensive mass movement activity, including mudslide systems, rotational and translational landslides. These mass movements can pose a significant engineering risk and have been the focus of research into the use of remote sensing techniques as a tool for landslide identification and delineation on clay slopes. The study has utilised a field site on the Cotswold escarpment above the village of Broad- way, Worcestershire, UK. Geomorphological investigation was initially undertaken at the site in order to establish ground control on landslides and other landforms present at the site. Subsequent to this, Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) imagery and colour stereo photography were acquired by the UK Natural Environment Research Coun- cil (NERC) for further analysis and interpretation. This paper describes the textu- ral enhancement of the airborne imagery undertaken using both mean euclidean dis- tance (MEUC) and grey level co-occurrence matrix entropy (GLCM) together with a combined texture-principal component based supervised image classification that was adopted as the method for landslide identification. The study highlights the importance of image texture for discriminating mass movements within multispectral imagery and demonstrates that by adopting a combined texture-principal component image classi- fication we have been able to achieve classification accuracy of 84 % with a Kappa statistic of 0.838 for landslide classes. This paper also highlights the potential prob- lems that can be encountered when using high-resolution multispectral imagery, such as the presence of dense variable woodland present within the image, and presents a solution using principal component analysis.

  14. Vineyard zonal management for grape quality assessment by combining airborne remote sensed imagery and soil sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, I.; Martínez De Toda, F.; Martínez-Casasnovas, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Vineyard variability within the fields is well known by grape growers, producing different plant responses and fruit characteristics. Many technologies have been developed in last recent decades in order to assess this spatial variability, including remote sensing and soil sensors. In this paper we study the possibility of creating a stable classification system that better provides useful information for the grower, especially in terms of grape batch quality sorting. The work was carried out during 4 years in a rain-fed Tempranillo vineyard located in Rioja (Spain). NDVI was extracted from airborne imagery, and soil conductivity (EC) data was acquired by an EM38 sensor. Fifty-four vines were sampled at véraison for vegetative parameters and before harvest for yield and grape analysis. An Isocluster unsupervised classification in two classes was performed in 5 different ways, combining NDVI maps individually, collectively and combined with EC. The target vines were assigned in different zones depending on the clustering combination. Analysis of variance was performed in order to verify the ability of the combinations to provide the most accurate information. All combinations showed a similar behaviour concerning vegetative parameters. Yield parameters classify better by the EC-based clustering, whilst maturity grape parameters seemed to give more accuracy by combining all NDVIs and EC. Quality grape parameters (anthocyanins and phenolics), presented similar results for all combinations except for the NDVI map of the individual year, where the results were poorer. This results reveal that stable parameters (EC or/and NDVI all-together) clustering outcomes in better information for a vineyard zonal management strategy.

  15. Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Plumes from Combined Ground-Airborne Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Jamey; Mitchell, Taylor; Honeycutt, Wes; Materer, Nicholas; Ley, Tyler; Clark, Peter

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid ground-airborne sensing network for real-time plume monitoring of CO2 and CH4 for carbon sequestration is investigated. Conventional soil gas monitoring has difficulty in distinguishing gas flux signals from leakage with those associated with meteorologically driven changes. A low-cost, lightweight sensor system has been developed and implemented onboard a small unmanned aircraft and is combined with a large-scale ground network that measures gas concentration. These are combined with other atmospheric diagnostics, including thermodynamic data and velocity from ultrasonic anemometers and multi-hole probes. To characterize the system behavior and verify its effectiveness, field tests have been conducted with simulated discharges of CO2 and CH4 from compressed gas tanks to mimic leaks and generate gaseous plumes, as well as field tests over the Farnsworth CO2-EOR site in the Anadarko Basin. Since the sensor response time is a function of vehicle airspeed, dynamic calibration models are required to determine accurate location of gas concentration in space and time. Comparisons are made between the two tests and results compared with historical models combining both flight and atmospheric dynamics. Supported by Department of Energy Award DE-FE0012173.

  16. Ice cloud microphysics study from combined active and passive radiometric observations in visible and thermal infrared domains during FRENCH-DIRAC campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bécu, L.; Brogniez, G.; Parol, F.; Pelon, J.; Gayet, J. F.; Auriol, F.; Balois, J. Y.; Verwearde, C.; Damiri, B.

    2003-04-01

    Radiative properties of cirrus clouds in relation to their microphysical characteristics were studied during the airborne FRENCH-DIRAC campaign. It was held in September/October 2001 in south western France and over the Mediterranean sea. During this campaign, two aircrafts were involved. A TBM 700 aircraft devoted to insitu measurements has carried out a 2D-C probe and a nephelometer sensor. A Mystere 20 aircraft devoted to remote sensing measurements has carried out a backscatter lidar with polarisation capability (LEANDRE), a three channel infrared radiometer (CLIMAT), an imaging polarisation radiometer (POLDER) operating in the shortwave domain, and a visible-near infrared polarimeter (MINIMIR). As an example, we particularly focus this presentation on the synergy between LEANDRE, CLIMAT, and POLDER instruments in order to analyse radiative parameters and microphysical characteristics of an evidenced mixed phase cloud with a transition between liquid and solid phase of water at one km-scale. We show how the combined lidar and radiometry measurements are complementing each others to characterise such a complex cloud structure and better retrieve cloud properties.

  17. Interest of a combined electrostatic/cold atoms gradiometers configuration for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Douch, Karim; Panet, Isabelle; Bresson, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    During these two last decades, the knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved thanks to global positioning satellites constellations and to recent space gravity missions. However these gravity data do not address spatial resolution shorter than 90 km. Taking advantage of technologies, developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, the GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is more particularly developed to complete them at the short wavelengths in particular in the areas where spatial distribution and quality of ground data remain quite uneven like for example land/sea transition. Built using a double planar electrostatic gradiometer with eight proof-masses in a cubic configuration, the GREMLIT instrument is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. The levitation of the proof-masses along the normal gravity and the vibration isolation of the platform are designed to allow the instrument to support 1g ± 1g along the vertical axis. In addition to be well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field, the planar configuration of each accelerometer also presents an intrinsic linearity of the horizontal control loops which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. Taking into account the estimated performance of the platform and associated with its additional attitude and angular rate sensors, the gradiometer differential measurements along the two horizontal axes provide the necessary information to extract 5 of the 6 components of the gravity gradient tensor at the location of the instrument with a performance objective better than 1 Eötvös along the two Txx and Tyy horizontal components. The last vertical Tzz component

  18. On the spectral combination of satellite gravity model, terrestrial and airborne gravity data for local gravimetric geoid computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yan Ming

    2016-12-01

    One of the challenges for geoid determination is the combination of heterogeneous gravity data. Because of the distinctive spectral content of different data sets, spectral combination is a suitable candidate for its solution. The key to have a successful combination is to determine the proper spectral weights, or the error degree variances of each data set. In this paper, the error degree variances of terrestrial and airborne gravity data at low degrees are estimated by the aid of a satellite gravity model using harmonic analysis. For higher degrees, the error covariances are estimated from local gravity data first, and then used to compute the error degree variances. The white and colored noise models are also used to estimate the error degree variances of local gravity data for comparisons. Based on the error degree variances, the spectral weights of satellite gravity models, terrestrial and airborne gravity data are determined and applied for geoid computation in Texas area. The computed gravimetric geoid models are tested against an independent, highly accurate geoid profile of the Geoid Slope Validation Survey 2011 (GSVS11). The geoid computed by combining satellite gravity model GOCO03S and terrestrial (land and DTU13 altimetric) gravity data agrees with GSVS11 to ±1.1 cm in terms of standard deviation along a line of 325 km. After incorporating the airborne gravity data collected at 11 km altitude, the standard deviation is reduced to ±0.8 cm. Numerical tests demonstrate the feasibility of spectral combination in geoid computation and the contribution of airborne gravity in an area of high quality terrestrial gravity data. Using the GSVS11 data and the spectral combination, the degree of correctness of the error spectra and the quality of satellite gravity models can also be revealed.

  19. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  20. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Photovoltaics radiometric issues and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of issues discussed at the photovoltaic radiometric measurements workshop. Topics included radiometric measurements guides, the need for well-defined goals, documentation, calibration checks, accreditation of testing laboratories and methods, the need for less expensive radiometric instrumentation, data correlations, and quality assurance.

  2. Using a bioaerosol personal sampler in combination with real-time PCR analysis for rapid detection of airborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Pyankov, Oleg V; Agranovski, Igor E; Pyankova, Olga; Mokhonova, Ekaterina; Mokhonov, Vlad; Safatov, Alexander S; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2007-04-01

    We have recently developed a new personal sampler and demonstrated its feasibility for detection of viable airborne microorganisms including bacteria, fungi and viruses. To accelerate the time-consuming analytical procedure involving 2-5 days of biological testing, we employed a real-time PCR protocol in conjunction with the personal sampler for collection of airborne viruses. The advantage of this approach is that if the presence of a particular pathogen in the air is detected by the PCR, the remaining collecting liquid can be further analysed by more time-consuming biological methods to estimate the number of airborne infectious/live microorganisms. As sampling of bioaerosols in natural environments is likely to be associated with substantial contamination by a range of microorganisms commonly existing in an ambient air, an investigation of the specificity of detection by targeted PCR analysis is required. Here we present the results of the study on the detection of Influenza virus in the ambient air contaminated with high concentrations of bacteria and fungi using real-time PCR protocol. The combined sampling PCR detection method was found to be fully feasible for the rapid ( approximately 2.5 h) and highly specific (no cross-reactivity) identification of the labile airborne virus in the air containing elevated concentrations of other microorganisms.

  3. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  4. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on airborne wind shear detection and warning systems are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: terms of reference; case study; flight management; sensor fusion and flight evaluation; Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data link/display; heavy rain aerodynamics; and second generation reactive systems.

  5. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth`s radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  6. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth's radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  7. Radiometric Characterization of IKONOS Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Kelly, Michelle; Holekamp, Kara; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Schiller, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    A radiometric characterization of Space Imaging's IKONOS 4-m multispectral imagery has been performed by a NASA funded team from the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group (UARSG), and South Dakota State University (SDSU). Both intrinsic radiometry and the effects of Space Imaging processing on radiometry were investigated. Relative radiometry was examined with uniform Antarctic and Saharan sites. Absolute radiometric calibration was performed using reflectance-based vicarious calibration methods on several uniform sites imaged by IKONOS, coincident with ground-based surface and atmospheric measurements. Ground-based data and the IKONOS spectral response function served as input to radiative transfer codes to generate a Top-of-Atmosphere radiance estimate. Calibration coefficients derived from each vicarious calibration were combined to generate an IKONOS radiometric gain coefficient for each multispectral band assuming a linear response over the full dynamic range of the instrument. These calibration coefficients were made available to Space Imaging, which subsequently adopted them by updating its initial set of calibration coefficients. IKONOS imagery procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program is processed with or without a Modulation Transfer Function Compensation kernel. The radiometric effects of this kernel on various scene types was also investigated. All imagery characterized was procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program.

  8. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  9. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  10. Radiometric surveys in underground environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasquale, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Due to their ability to travel through the air for several metres, gamma-rays emitted from natural radioactive elements can be successfully used in surveys carried out both with airborne and ground equipments. Besides the concentration of the radio-elements contained in rocks and soils and the intrinsic characteristics of the gamma-ray detector, the detected count rate depends on the solid angle around the spectrometer. On a flat outcrop, ground spectrometry detects the radiation ideally produced by a cylindrical mass of rock of about two metres in diameter and thickness of about half a meter. Under these geometrical conditions, the natural radioactivity can be easily evaluated. With operating conditions different from the standard ones, such as at the edge of an escarpment, the count rate halves because of the missing material, whereas in the vicinity of a rock wall the count rate will increase. In underground environment, the recorded count rate may even double and the in situ assessment of the concentration of radio-elements may be rather difficult, even if the ratios between the different radio-elements may not be affected. We tested the applicability of gamma-ray spectrometry for rapid assessment of the potential hazard levels related to radon and radiation dose rate in underground environment. A mine shaft, located in a zone of uranium enrichment in Liguria (Italy), has been investigated. A preliminary ground radiometric survey was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, the radiometric investigation was focussed on the mine shaft. Due to rock mass above the shaft vault, the background gamma radiation can be considered of negligible influence on measurements. In underground surveys, besides deviations from a flat geometry, factors controlling radon exhalation, emanation and stagnation, such as fractures, water leakage and the presence of ventilation, should be carefully examined. We attempted to evaluate these control factors and collected

  11. Retrieval of Snow and Rain From Combined X- and W-B and Airborne Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    2008-01-01

    Two independent airborne dual-wavelength techniques, based on nadir measurements of radar reflectivity factors and Doppler velocities, respectively, are investigated with respect to their capability of estimating microphysical properties of hydrometeors. The data used to investigate the methods are taken from the ER-2 Doppler radar (X-band) and Cloud Radar System (W-band) airborne Doppler radars during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment campaign in 2002. Validity is assessed by the degree to which the methods produce consistent retrievals of the microphysics. For deriving snow parameters, the reflectivity-based technique has a clear advantage over the Doppler-velocity-based approach because of the large dynamic range in the dual-frequency ratio (DFR) with respect to the median diameter Do and the fact that the difference in mean Doppler velocity at the two frequencies, i.e., the differential Doppler velocity (DDV), in snow is small relative to the measurement errors and is often not uniquely related to Do. The DFR and DDV can also be used to independently derive Do in rain. At W-band, the DFR-based algorithms are highly sensitive to attenuation from rain, cloud water, and water vapor. Thus, the retrieval algorithms depend on various assumptions regarding these components, whereas the DDV-based approach is unaffected by attenuation. In view of the difficulties and ambiguities associated with the attenuation correction at W-band, the DDV approach in rain is more straightforward and potentially more accurate than the DFR method.

  12. Radiometric and Spectral Measurement Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-18

    NSWCCR/RDTN-92/0003 AD-A250 771LI~ llliii11l li l l iillt111 RADIOMETRIC AND SPECTRAL MEASUREMENT INSTRUMENTS CRANE DIVISION NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE... INSTRUMENTS 6. AUTHOR(S) B. E. DOUDA H. A. WEBSTER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) a. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NIJMBER...Maxiry-um 200 w ords) THIS IS A DESCRIPTION OF AN ASSORTMENT OF RADIOMETRIC AND SPECTRAL INSTRUMENTATION USED FOR MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIATIVE OUTPUT OF

  13. Delineating and Defining the Boundaries of an Active Landslide in the Rainforest of Puerto Rico Using a Combination of Airborne and Terrestrial LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Joyce, J.; Phillips, D. A.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.

    2013-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is a remote sensing technique that uses light, often using pulses from a laser to measure the distance to a target. Both terrestrial and airborne based LIDAR techniques have been frequently used to map landslides. Airborne LIDAR has the advantage of identifying large scarps of landslides covered by tree canopies and is widely applied in identifying historical and current active landslides hidden in forested areas. However, because landslides naturally have relatively small vertical surface deformation in the foot area, it is practically difficult to identify the margins of landslide foot area with the limited spatial resolution (few decimeters) of airborne LIDAR. Alternatively, ground-based LIDAR can achieve resolution of several centimeters and also has the advantages of being portable, repeatable, and less costly. Thus ground based LIDAR can be used to identify small deformations in landslide foot areas by differencing repeated Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys. This study demonstrates a method of identifying the superficial boundaries as well as the bottom boundary (sliding plane) of an active landslide in National Rainforest Park, Puerto Rico, USA, using the combination of ground based and airborne LIDAR data. The method of combining terrestrial and airborne LIDAR data can be used to study landslides in other regions. This study indicates that intensity and density of laser point clouds are remarkably useful in identifying superficial boundaries of landslides.

  14. Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging of Seagrass and Coral Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, J.; Pan, Z.; Mewes, T.; Herwitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    This talk presents the process of project preparation, airborne data collection, data pre-processing and comparative analysis of a series of airborne hyperspectral projects focused on the mapping of seagrass and coral reef communities in the Florida Keys. As part of a series of large collaborative projects funded by the NASA ROSES program and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and administered by the NASA UAV Collaborative, a series of airborne hyperspectral datasets were collected over six sites in the Florida Keys in May 2012, October 2012 and May 2013 by Galileo Group, Inc. using a manned Cessna 172 and NASA's SIERRA Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Precise solar and tidal data were used to calculate airborne collection parameters and develop flight plans designed to optimize data quality. Two independent Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging systems covering 400-100nm were used to collect imagery over six Areas of Interest (AOIs). Multiple collections were performed over all sites across strict solar windows in the mornings and afternoons. Independently developed pre-processing algorithms were employed to radiometrically correct, synchronize and georectify individual flight lines which were then combined into color balanced mosaics for each Area of Interest. The use of two different hyperspectral sensor as well as environmental variations between each collection allow for the comparative analysis of data quality as well as the iterative refinement of flight planning and collection parameters.

  15. Combined Use of Airborne Lidar and DBInSAR Data to Estimate LAI in Temperate Mixed Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peduzzi, Alicia; Wynne, Randolph Hamilton; Thomas, Valerie A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Reis, James J.; Sanford, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether leaf area index (LAI) in temperate mixed forests is best estimated using multiple-return airborne laser scanning (lidar) data or dual-band, single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar data (from GeoSAR) alone, or both in combination. In situ measurements of LAI were made using the LiCor LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer on 61 plots (21 hardwood, 36 pine, 4 mixed pine hardwood; stand age ranging from 12-164 years; mean height ranging from 0.4 to 41.2 m) in the Appomattox-Buckingham State Forest, Virginia, USA. Lidar distributional metrics were calculated for all returns and for ten one meter deep crown density slices (a new metric), five above and five below the mode of the vegetation returns for each plot. GeoSAR metrics were calculated from the X-band backscatter coefficients (four looks) as well as both X- and P-band interferometric heights and magnitudes for each plot. Lidar metrics alone explained 69% of the variability in LAI, while GeoSAR metrics alone explained 52%. However, combining the lidar and GeoSAR metrics increased the R2 to 0.77 with a CV-RMSE of 0.42. This study indicates the clear potential for X-band backscatter and interferometric height (both now available from spaceborne sensors), when combined with small-footprint lidar data, to improve LAI estimation in temperate mixed forests.

  16. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable, Wideband, Onboard Calibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, James B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.; Nolte, Scott H.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Knoll, Linley A.

    2013-01-01

    The Onboard Calibration (OBC) source incorporates a medical/scientific-grade halogen source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system, and a fiber-based intensity-monitoring feedback loop that results in radiometric and spectral stabilities to within less than 0.3 percent over a 15-hour period. The airborne imaging spectrometer systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory incorporate OBC sources to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The use of the OBC source will provide a significant increase in the quantitative accuracy, reliability, and resulting utility of the spectral data collected from current and future imaging spectrometer instruments.

  17. Radiometric framework for image mosaicking.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Anatoly; Schechner, Yoav Y

    2005-05-01

    Nonuniform exposures often affect imaging systems, e.g., owing to vignetting. Moreover, the sensor's radiometric response may be nonlinear. These characteristics hinder photometric measurements. They are particularly annoying in image mosaicking, in which images are stitched to enhance the field of view. Mosaics suffer from seams stemming from radiometric inconsistencies between raw images. Prior methods feathered the seams but did not address their root cause. We handle these problems in a unified framework. We suggest a method for simultaneously estimating the radiometric response and the camera nonuniformity, based on a frame sequence acquired during camera motion. The estimated functions are then compensated for. This permits image mosaicking, in which no seams are apparent. There is no need to resort to dedicated seam-feathering methods. Fundamental ambiguities associated with this estimation problem are stated.

  18. Recovery and reanalysis of archived airborne gamma spectrometry data from the 1991 Dounreay survey.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J

    2012-01-01

    Archived Airborne Gamma Spectrometry (AGS) data from the 1991 NIREX characterisations of Caithness have been recovered. The separate gamma spectrometry and positional data streams for approximately 120,000 measurements have been combined into a single data stream using the European Radiometrics and Spectrometry (ERS) data format. An analysis using working calibration coefficients and spectral stripping procedure has verified that the original survey recorded high quality data. The converted data stream is in a format more accessible to future research use, including evaluation of environmental change in the Caithness region.

  19. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  20. Iron speciation of airborne subway particles by the combined use of energy dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and Raman microspectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Sobanska, Sophie; Chung, Sang-Gwi; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Sunwoo, Young; Ro, Chul-Un

    2013-11-05

    Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), known as low-Z particle EPMA, and Raman microspectrometry (RMS) were applied in combination for an analysis of the iron species in airborne PM10 particles collected in underground subway tunnels. Iron species have been reported to be a major chemical species in underground subway particles generated mainly from mechanical wear and friction processes. In particular, iron-containing particles in subway tunnels are expected to be generated with minimal outdoor influence on the particle composition. Because iron-containing particles have different toxicity and magnetic properties depending on their oxidation states, it is important to determine the iron species of underground subway particles in the context of both indoor public health and control measures. A recently developed analytical methodology, i.e., the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and RMS, was used to identify the chemical species of the same individual subway particles on a single particle basis, and the bulk iron compositions of airborne subway particles were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The majority of airborne subway particles collected in the underground tunnels were found to be magnetite, hematite, and iron metal. All the particles collected in the tunnels of underground subway stations were attracted to permanent magnets due mainly to the almost ubiquitous ferrimagnetic magnetite, indicating that airborne subway particles can be removed using magnets as a control measure.

  1. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Alireza G.; Olsen, Michael J.; Parrish, Christopher E.; Wilson, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record “intensity”, loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of “normalization”, “correction”, or “calibration” techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration. PMID:26561813

  2. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Alireza G; Olsen, Michael J; Parrish, Christopher E; Wilson, Nicholas

    2015-11-06

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record "intensity", loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of "normalization", "correction", or "calibration" techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration.

  3. Combined toxic effect of airborne heavy metals on human lung cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeowool; Park, Kihong; Kim, Injeong; Kim, Sang D

    2016-11-25

    Many studies have demonstrated that heavy metals existing as a mixture in the atmospheric environment cause adverse effects on human health and are important key factors of cytotoxicity; however, little investigation has been conducted on a toxicological study of a metal mixture from atmospheric fine particulate matter. The objective of this study was to predict the combined effects of heavy metals in aerosol by using in vitro human cells and obtain a suitable mixture toxicity model. Arsenic, nickel, and lead were selected for mixtures exposed to A549 human lung cancer cells. Cell proliferation (WST-1), glutathione (GSH), and interleukin (IL)-8 inhibition were observed and applied to the prediction models of mixture toxicity, concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The total mixture concentrations were set by an IC10-fixed ratio of individual toxicity to be more realistic for mortality and enzyme inhibition tests. The results showed that the IA model was statistically closer to the observed results than the CA model in mortality, indicating dissimilar modes of action. For the GSH inhibition, the results predicted by the IA and CA models were highly overestimated relative to mortality. Meanwhile, the IL-8 results were stable with no significant change in immune reaction related to inflammation. In conclusion, the IA model is a rapid prediction model in heavy metals mixtures; mortality, as a total outcome of cell response, is a good tool for demonstrating the combined toxicity rather than other biochemical responses.

  4. a Comparison of LIDAR Reflectance and Radiometrically Calibrated Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncat, A.; Briese, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    In order to retrieve results comparable under different flight parameters and among different flight campaigns, passive remote sensing data such as hyperspectral imagery need to undergo a radiometric calibration. While this calibration, aiming at the derivation of physically meaningful surface attributes such as a reflectance value, is quite cumbersome for passively sensed data and relies on a number of external parameters, the situation is by far less complicated for active remote sensing techniques such as lidar. This fact motivates the investigation of the suitability of full-waveform lidar as a "single-wavelength reflectometer" to support radiometric calibration of hyperspectral imagery. In this paper, this suitability was investigated by means of an airborne hyperspectral imagery campaign and an airborne lidar campaign recorded over the same area. Criteria are given to assess diffuse reflectance behaviour; the distribution of reflectance derived by the two techniques were found comparable in four test areas where these criteria were met. This is a promising result especially in the context of current developments of multi-spectral lidar systems.

  5. Investigation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds during VERDI and RACEPAC: Combining airborne remote sensing and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    To improve our understanding of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in sea-ice covered areas the airborne research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) and the Radiation-Aerosol-Cloud Experiment in the Arctic Circle (RACEPAC, April/May 2014) were initiated by a collaboration of German and French research institutes. The aircraft operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany were based in Inuvik, Canada from where the research flights of in total 149 flight hours (62 h during VERDI, 87 h during RACEPAC) were able to cover a wide area above the Canadian Beaufort. The aim of both campaigns was to combine remote sensing and in-situ cloud, aerosol and trace gas measurements to investigate interactions between radiation, cloud and aerosol particles. Remote sensing instrumentation contained a backscatter lidar and spectral solar radiation measurements including a hyperspectral camera. In-situ sampling was highlighted by a suit of comprehensive cloud particle probes, aerosol particle counters and mass spectroscopy as well as trace gas detectors. While during VERDI remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed by one aircraft (Polar 5) subsequently, for RACEPAC two identical aircraft (Polar 5 & 6, Basler BT-67) were coordinated at different altitudes to horizontally collocate both remote sensing and in-situ measurements. In this way not only the combined analysis of radiative and microphysical processes in the clouds can by studied more reliably, also remote sensing methods can be validated efficiently. Here we will illustrate the scientific strategy of both projects including instrumentation and flight patterns of the research flights. Beside flight missions dedicated to sample low level clouds by remote sensing and in situ probing, flights were also coordinated with satellite overpasses and ground based stations. Exemplary results will be highlighted.

  6. Airborne Observation of Ocean Surface Roughness Variations Using a Combination of Microwave Radiometer and Reflectometer Systems: The Second Virginia Offshore (Virgo II) Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    katzberg (Snasa.gov Abstract—Airborne and satellite retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity ( SSS ) using L-band micronave radiometers requires accurate...combined an L-band micronave radiometer for retrieving SSS , with L- and S-band reflectometer systems for retrieving SSR descriptors including Mean Square...from the reflectometers to correct the brightness temperatures observed by the L-band radiometer, and produce more accurate SSS retrievals. Here we

  7. Combined Atmospheric and Ocean Profiling from an Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hair, Johnathan; Hostetler, Chris; Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Michael; Butler, Carolyn; Harper, David; Hare, Rich; Berkoff, Timothy; Cook, Antony; Collins, James; Stockley, Nicole; Twardowski, Michael; Cetinić, Ivona; Ferrare, Richard; Mack, Terry

    2016-06-01

    First of its kind combined atmospheric and ocean profile data were collected by the recently upgraded NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) during the 17 July - 7 August 2014 Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research Experiment (SABOR). This mission sampled over a region that covered the Gulf of Maine, open-ocean near Bermuda, and coastal waters from Virginia to Rhode Island. The HSRL-1 and the Research Scanning Polarimeter from NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies collected data onboard the NASA LaRC King Air aircraft and flight operations were closely coordinated with the Research Vessel Endeavor that made in situ ocean optical measurements. The lidar measurements provided profiles of atmospheric backscatter and particulate depolarization at 532nm, 1064nm, and extinction (532nm) from approximately 9km altitude. In addition, for the first time HSRL seawater backscatter, depolarization, and diffuse attenuation data at 532nm were collected and compared to both the ship measurements and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (NASA MODIS-Aqua) satellite ocean retrievals.

  8. Combined VHF Dopplar radar and airborne (CV-990) measurements of atmospheric winds on the mesoscale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairall, Christopher W.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    Hourly measurements of wind speed and direction obtained using two wind profiling Doppler radars during two prolonged jet stream occurrences over western Pennsylvania were analyzed. In particular, the time-variant characteristics of derived shear profiles were examined. To prevent a potential loss of structural detail and retain statistical significance, data from both radars were stratified into categories based on the location data from the Penn State radar were also compared to data from Pittsburgh radiosondes. Profiler data dropouts were studied in an attempt to determine possible reasons for the apparently reduced performance of profiling radars operating beneath a jet stream. Temperature profiles for the radar site were obtained using an interpolated temperature and dewpoint temperature sounding procedure developed at Penn State. The combination of measured wind and interpolated temperature profiles allowed Richardson number profiles to be generated for the profiler sounding volume. Both Richardson number and wind shear statistics were then examined along with pilot reports of turbulence in the vicinity of the profiler.

  9. A comparison of four relative radiometric normalization (RRN) techniques for mosaicing H-res multi-temporal thermal infrared (TIR) flight-lines of a complex urban scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Hay, G. J.; Couloigner, I.; Hemachandran, B.; Bailin, J.

    2015-08-01

    High-spatial and -radiometric resolution (H-res) thermal infrared (TIR) airborne imagery, such as the TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) provide unique surface temperature information that can be used for urban heat loss mapping, heat island analysis, and landcover classifications. For mapping large urban areas at a high-spatial resolution (i.e., sub-meter), airborne thermal imagery needs to be acquired over a number of flight-lines and mosaiced together. However, due to radiometric variations between flight-lines the similar objects tend to have different temperature characteristics on the mosaicked image, resulting in reduced visual and radiometric agreement between the flight-lines composing the final mosaiced output. To reduce radiometric variability between airborne TIR flight-lines, with a view to produce a visually seamless TIR image mosaic, we evaluate four relative radiometric normalization techniques including: (i) Histogram Matching, (ii) Pseudo Invariant Feature (PIF) Based Linear Regression, (iii) PIF-Based Theil-Sen Regression, and (iv) No-Change Stratified Random Samples (NCSRS) Based Linear Regression. The techniques are evaluated on two adjacent TABI-1800 airborne flight-lines (each ∼30 km × 0.9 km) collected ∼25 min apart over a portion of The City of Calgary (with ∼30% overlap between them). The performances of these techniques are compared based on four criteria: (i) speed of computation, (ii) ability to automate, (iii) visual assessment, and (iv) statistical analysis. Results show that NCSRS-Based Linear Regression produces the best overall results closely followed by Histogram Matching. Specifically, these two radiometric normalization techniques: (i) increase the visual and statistical agreement between the tested TIR airborne flight-lines (NCSRS Based Linear Regression increases radiometric agreement between flight-lines by 53.3% and Histogram Matching by 52.4%), (ii) produce a visually seamless image mosaic, and (iii) can

  10. Improved identification of transition metals in airborne aerosols by SEM-EDX combined backscattered and secondary electron microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Pietrodangelo, A; Pareti, S; Perrino, C

    2014-03-01

    The SEM EDX backscattered electron (BSE) atomic number contrast has been largely used in this work, in combination with conventional secondary electron microanalysis, to investigate the presence of metal particles in airborne particulate collected at three sites (industrial, residential, and rural background) in the Po Valley (Italy). Individual particle x-ray microanalysis was used for this aim. In many cases, the presence of metal particles was not evident by secondary electron imaging and it was instead revealed by BSE detection. Metal particles were observed either as isolated (not clustered to other particles), or gathered together (homogeneous clusters). In addition, the BSE microanalysis put on evidence two main types of association of metals to other particulate components: heterogeneous clusters and metals embedded or enclosed in other materials. In this study, the first association (heterogeneous clusters) was observed mostly between Fe-bearing metallic particles and soot aggregates (or other carbonaceous particles) and it was found in the particulate matter (PM) of all studied sites. The second association, conversely, seems to be characterized by more selective relationships between composition/size of metal particles and type of other particulate components. These associations could be evidenced only when using the BSE Z-contrast and mainly concern three cases: (1) unusual silicate-carbonate mixed aggregates were observed at the industrial site only. In these aggregates, embedded Mn, Cr, Co, Bi, W, and Zr fine particles were selectively observed. (2) Ni and V rich ultrafine particles were only observed as embedded particles in the surface structure of carbon cenospheres. (3) Pb or Pb-Zn bearing fine and ultrafine particles were largely detected only in oxygenated organic aerosols in the ultrafine PM.

  11. JACIE Radiometric Assessment of QuickBird Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Carver, David; Holekamp, Kara; Knowlton, Kelly; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Aaron, David

    2004-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can place confidence in the imagery they use and can fully understand its properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, the NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) Earth Science Applications (ESA) directorate,through the Joint Agency for Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) framework, established a commercial imaging satellite radiometric calibration team consisting of two groups: 1) NASA SSC ESA, supported by South Dakota State University, and 2) the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group. The two groups determined the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of the Digital Globe 4-band, 2.4-m QuickBird multispectral product covering the visible through near-infrared spectral region. For a 2-year period beginning in 2002, both groups employed some variant of a reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, which required ground-based measurements coincident with QuickBird image acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations. The groups chose several study sites throughout the United States that covered nearly the entire dynamic range of the QuickBird sensor. QuickBird at-sensor radiance values were compared with those estimated by the two independent groups to determine the QuickBird sensor's radiometric accuracy. Approximately 20 at-sensor radiance estimates were vicariously determined each year. The estimates were combined to provide a high-precision radiometric gain calibration coefficient. The results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of the QuickBird sensor's absolute calibration and stability over the 2-year period. While the techniques and method described reflect those developed at the NASA SSC, the results of both JACIE team groups are

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of ALS Intensity Data: Effects on Accuracy and Target Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  13. Radiometric studies of Mycobacterium lepraemurium.

    PubMed

    Camargo, E E; Larson, S M; Tepper, B S; Wagner, H N

    1976-01-01

    The radiometric method has been applied for studying the metabolism of M. lepraemurium and the conditions which might force or inhibit its metabolic activity in vitro. These organisms assimilate and oxidize (U-14C) glycerol, and (U-14C) acetate, but are unable to oxidize (U-14C) glucose, (U-14C) pyruvate, (U-14C) glycine and 14C-formate. When incubated at 30 degrees C M. lepraemurium oxidizes (U-14C) acetate to 14CO2 faster than 37 degrees C. The smae effect was observed with increasing concentrations of polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), or the 14C-substrate. No change in metabolic rate was observed when the organisms were kept at -20 degrees C for 12 days. Although tried several times, it was not possible to demonstrate any "inhibitors" of bacterial metabolism in the reaction system. The radiometric method seems to be an important tool for studying metabolic pathways and the influence of physical and biochemical factors on the metabolism of M. lepraemurium in vitro.

  14. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume II. Radiometric multi-variable stacked profile data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. Volume II contains the 10-variable radiometric stacked profile data for the entire survey area.

  15. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  16. Radiometric Characterization of the IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3 Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  17. Spectral combination of land-based, airborne, shipborne and altimeter-derived gravity values: examples in Taiwan and Tahiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Cheinway

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan and Tahiti are bordered by seas and are islands with mountain ranges up to 4000 m height. The gravity fields here are rough due to the geodynamic processes that create the islands. On and around the two islands, gravity data have been collected by land gravimeters in relative gravity networks (point-wise), by airborne and shipborne (along-track) methods and by transformations from sea surface heights (altimeter-derived). Typically, network-adjusted land gravity values have accuracies of few tens of micro gals and contain the full gravity spectrum. Airborne gravity values are obtained by filtering original one-HZ along-track gravity values collected at varying flight altitudes that are affected by aircraft dynamics, GPS positioning error and gravimeter error. At a 5000-m flight height, along-track airborne gravity has a typical spatial resolution of 4 km and an accuracy of few mgal. Shipborne gravity is similar to airborne gravity, but with higher spatial resolutions because of ship's lower speed. Altimeter-derived gravity has varying spatial resolutions and accuracies, depending on altimeter data, processing method and extent of waveform interference. Using the latest versions of Geosat/GM, ERS-1/GM, ENVISAT, Jason-1/GM, Cryosat-2 and SARAL altimeter data, one can achieve accuracies at few mgal. The synergy of the four kinds of gravity datasets is made by the band-limited least-squares collocation, which best integrates datasets of different accuracies and spatial resolutions. The method uses the best contributions from a DEM, a global gravity model, available gravity datasets to form an optimal gravity grid. We experiment with different optimal spherical harmonic degrees of EGM08 for use around the two islands. For Tahiti, the optimal degree is 1500. New high-resolution gravity and geoid grids are constructed for the two islands and can be used in future geophysical and geodetic studies.

  18. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  19. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and -B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through one year of simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the longwave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both Polar and Tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO datasets indicate that, the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 comparison spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining 4 spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  20. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark data sets for both intercalibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and MetOp-B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations in 2013, to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the long-wave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both polar and tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO data sets indicate that the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining four spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  1. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters.

  2. Integration of remote sensing and radiometric data set to improve geologic map : application to namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, C.; Ledru, P.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.; Wackerle, R.

    2003-04-01

    Remote sensing and radiometric data sets have been processed and interpreted in order to improve the existing geologic map, on the Southern margin of the Damara orogen (Namibia, northern margin of the Nama marine sedimentary sequence). The data set is composed by ASTER images (multi spectral imaging system), Digital Elevation Model (DEM, 50-m gridding), and airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data (K, eTh and eU, 50-m gridding). Apparent reflectance images have been first calculated from raw ASTER data. Terrain illumination effects have been then removed using slope and aspect data calculated from the DEM, by applying a first order reflectance law. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been realized on the ASTER data in order to reduce the redundancy in highly correlated bands. Results of PCA and supervised classification, combining radioelement contents enable a revision of the geologic map. A precise mapping of the internal structure of the Nama quartzite, limestone and dolomite is performed while several types of surficial formations are characterized. The Omkyk Member Massif, hosting the oldest Proterozoic biomineralized metazoan on Earth, is well contrasted in reflectance and display a complete depletion in radioelements, that is unique in the studied zone.

  3. Principal Component Noise Filtering for NAST-I Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L., Sr.

    2011-01-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed- Interferometer (NAST-I) instrument is a high-resolution scanning interferometer that measures emitted thermal radiation between 3.3 and 18 microns. The NAST-I radiometric calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient and hot temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes a principal component (PC) noise filter to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, further improve the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy. To test the procedure and estimate the PC filter noise performance, we form dependent and independent test samples using odd and even sets of blackbody spectra. To determine the optimal number of eigenvectors, the PC filter algorithm is applied to both dependent and independent blackbody spectra with a varying number of eigenvectors. The optimal number of PCs is selected so that the total root-mean-square (RMS) error is minimized. To estimate the filter noise performance, we examine four different scenarios: apply PC filtering to both dependent and independent datasets, apply PC filtering to dependent calibration data only, apply PC filtering to independent data only, and no PC filters. The independent blackbody radiances are predicted for each case and comparisons are made. The results show significant reduction in noise in the final calibrated radiances with the implementation of the PC filtering algorithm.

  4. Radiometric Characterization of Hyperspectral Imagers using Multispectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Kurt, Thome; Leisso, Nathan; Anderson, Nikolaus; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona has a long history of using ground-based test sites for the calibration of airborne and satellite based sensors. Often, ground-truth measurements at these test sites are not always successful due to weather and funding availability. Therefore, RSG has also automated ground instrument approaches and cross-calibration methods to verify the radiometric calibration of a sensor. The goal in the cross-calibration method is to transfer the calibration of a well-known sensor to that of a different sensor, This work studies the feasibility of determining the radiometric calibration of a hyperspectral imager using multispectral a imagery. The work relies on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (M0DIS) as a reference for the hyperspectral sensor Hyperion. Test sites used for comparisons are Railroad Valley in Nevada and a portion of the Libyan Desert in North Africa. Hyperion bands are compared to MODIS by band averaging Hyperion's high spectral resolution data with the relative spectral response of M0DlS. The results compare cross-calibration scenarios that differ in image acquisition coincidence, test site used for the calibration, and reference sensor. Cross-calibration results are presented that show agreement between the use of coincident and non-coincident image pairs within 2% in most brands as well as similar agreement between results that employ the different MODIS sensors as a reference.

  5. Calibration Of Airborne Visible/IR Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, G. A.; Chrien, T. G.; Miller, E. A.; Reimer, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    Paper describes laboratory spectral and radiometric calibration of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) applied to all AVIRIS science data collected in 1987. Describes instrumentation and procedures used and demonstrates that calibration accuracy achieved exceeds design requirements. Developed for use in remote-sensing studies in such disciplines as botany, geology, hydrology, and oceanography.

  6. Feasibility Study of Radiometry for Airborne Detection of Aviation Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimmestad, Gary G.; Papanicolopoulos, Chris D.; Richards, Mark A.; Sherman, Donald L.; West, Leanne L.; Johnson, James W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric sensors for aviation hazards have the potential for widespread and inexpensive deployment on aircraft. This report contains discussions of three aviation hazards - icing, turbulence, and volcanic ash - as well as candidate radiometric detection techniques for each hazard. Dual-polarization microwave radiometry is the only viable radiometric technique for detection of icing conditions, but more research will be required to assess its usefulness to the aviation community. Passive infrared techniques are being developed for detection of turbulence and volcanic ash by researchers in this country and also in Australia. Further investigation of the infrared airborne radiometric hazard detection approaches will also be required in order to develop reliable detection/discrimination techniques. This report includes a description of a commercial hyperspectral imager for investigating the infrared detection techniques for turbulence and volcanic ash.

  7. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions Support Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Kudela, R. M.; Hooker, S. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Russell, P. B.; Palacios, S. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Negrey, K.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Broughton, J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has a continuing requirement to collect high-quality in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation ocean color satellite sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal is to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue spectral domain to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data are accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Flight operations are presented for the instrument payloads using the CIRPAS Twin Otter flown over Monterey Bay during the seasonal fall algal bloom in 2011 (COAST) and 2013 (OCEANIA) to support bio-optical measurements of phytoplankton for coastal zone research.

  8. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  9. Combining ground-based and airborne EM through Artificial Neural Networks for modelling hydrogeological units under saline groundwater conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnink, J. L.; Bosch, J. H. A.; Siemon, B.; Roth, B.; Auken, E.

    2012-03-01

    Airborne Electro Magnetic (EM) methods supply data over large areas in a cost-effective way. We used Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to classify the geophysical signal into a meaningful geological parameter. By using examples of known relations between ground-based geophysical data (in this case electrical conductivity, EC, from Electrical Cone Penetration Tests) and geological parameters (presence of glacial till), we extracted learning rules that could be applied to map the presence of a glacial till using the EC profiles from the airborne EM data. The saline groundwater in the area was obscuring the EC signal from the till but by using ANN we were able to extract subtle and often non-linear, relations in EC that were representative for the presence of the till. The ANN results were interpreted as the probability of having till and showed a good agreement with drilling data. The glacial till is acting as a layer that inhibits groundwater flow, due to its high clay-content, and is therefore an important layer in hydrogeological modelling and for predicting the effects of climate change on groundwater quantity and quality.

  10. Detection of mycobacteria by radiometric and standard plate procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Damato, J J; Collins, M T; Rothlauf, M V; McClatchy, J K

    1983-01-01

    A group of 89 smear-positive sputum specimens were evaluated by radiometric and standard plate procedures to determine the methodology which would provide the earliest detection of mycobacteria and maximum test sensitivity. Digested non-decontaminated specimens were concentrated and inoculated into modified selective BACTEC radiometric 7H12 broth and Mitchison selective 7H10 agar. Sodium hydroxide (1.5% final concentration) was then used to decontaminate these specimens. They were then concentrated and inoculated into both selective and nonselective 7H12 radiometric broths and into selective 7H10 and nonselective Middlebrook 7H11 agar media. The specimen processing and media combinations providing the earliest detection were non-decontaminated specimens with modified selective 7H12 BACTEC broth and decontaminated specimens with 7H12 BACTEC broths. Maximum sensitivity (percent positive) was obtained by using non-decontaminated specimens on Mitchison selective 7H10 Agar (98%) or decontaminated specimens in 7H12 BACTEC broth (95%). The decontamination process was found to reduce significantly the number of mycobacteria in clinical specimens, particularly the mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The specimen processing-media combinations providing the earliest detection and maximum recovery of mycobacteria (100%) were non-decontaminated specimens with modified selective 7H12 BACTEC broth or Mitchison selective agar and decontaminated specimens with 7H12 BACTEC broth or 7H11 agar. PMID:6348076

  11. Vertical wind retrieved by airborne lidar and analysis of island induced gravity waves in combination with numerical models and in situ particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Jähn, Michael; Rahm, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the analysis of island induced gravity waves observed by an airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) during SALTRACE. First, the instrumental corrections required for the retrieval of high spatial resolution vertical wind measurements from an airborne DWL are presented and the measurement accuracy estimated by means of two different methods. The estimated systematic error is below -0.05 m s-1 for the selected case of study, while the random error lies between 0.1 and 0.16 m s-1 depending on the estimation method. Then, the presented method is applied to two measurement flights during which the presence of island induced gravity waves was detected. The first case corresponds to a research flight conducted on 17 June 2013 in the Cabo Verde islands region, while the second case corresponds to a measurement flight on 26 June 2013 in the Barbados region. The presence of trapped lee waves predicted by the calculated Scorer parameter profiles was confirmed by the lidar and in situ observations. The DWL measurements are used in combination with in situ wind and particle number density measurements, large-eddy simulations (LES), and wavelet analysis to determine the main characteristics of the observed island induced trapped waves.

  12. Lansat MSS, Radiometric Processing Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunier, Sebastien; Salgues, Germain; Gascon, Ferran; Biaasutti, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The reprocessing campaigns of Landsat European Space Agency (ESA) data archive have been initiated since 3 years [1]. As part of this project, the processing algorithms have been upgraded. This article focuses on the radiometric processing of historical data observed with the Multi Spectral Scanner (MSS) instruments on board Landsat 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.The Landsat MSS data have been recorded data from 1972 up to 1990. The MSS instruments have been designed with four visible bands covering the near / infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, allowing the spatial sampling of our Earth surface at 60 meter.The current calibration method has shown some limitations in case of data observed out of mid latitude areas, where the Earth surface is bright because of desert or snow. The resulting image data suffers from saturations and is not fit for the potential application purposes.Although, when saturation exist, further investigations have shown that the radiometry of the raw data involved in the production of the Level 1 images is generally correct. As consequences, experiments have been undertaken to adapt the current processing in order to produce image data saturation free products.

  13. Extended- and Point-Source Radiometric Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-08-08

    Radiometric Measurements of Cs1 37 Sources Made with NaI Detector. . 60 6.2 Aerial Radiometric Measurements of Co 60 Sources Made with Bioplastic ...Hanford aircraft consisted of an NaI scintillator, bioplastic scintillator, and a 40-liter ionization chamber. The aircraft employed was a twin-engine...supply, amplifier, and count rate, was transistorized portable equipment designed and fabricated at Hanford. The bioplastic instrument consisted of a 5

  14. Radiometric calibration updates to the Landsat collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micijevic, Esad; Haque, Md. Obaidul; Mishra, Nischal

    2016-09-01

    The Landsat Project is planning to implement a new collection management strategy for Landsat products generated at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. The goal of the initiative is to identify a collection of consistently geolocated and radiometrically calibrated images across the entire Landsat archive that is readily suitable for time-series analyses. In order to perform an accurate land change analysis, the data from all Landsat sensors must be on the same radiometric scale. Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) is calibrated to a radiance standard and all previous sensors are cross-calibrated to its radiometric scale. Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) is calibrated to both radiance and reflectance standards independently. The Landsat 8 OLI reflectance calibration is considered to be most accurate. To improve radiometric calibration accuracy of historical data, Landsat 1-7 sensors also need to be cross-calibrated to the OLI reflectance scale. Results of that effort, as well as other calibration updates including the absolute and relative radiometric calibration and saturated pixel replacement for Landsat 8 OLI and absolute calibration for Landsat 4 and 5 Thematic Mappers (TM), will be implemented into Landsat products during the archive reprocessing campaign planned within the new collection management strategy. This paper reports on the planned radiometric calibration updates to the solar reflective bands of the new Landsat collection.

  15. User's guide to the Radiometric Age Data Bank (RADB)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, Robert Eugene; Cole, James C.; Marvin, Richard F.

    1976-01-01

    The Radiometric Age Data Bank (RADB) has been established by the U.S. Geological Survey, as a means for collecting and organizing the estimated 100,000 radiometric ages presently published for the United States. RADB has been constructed such that a complete sample description (location, rock type, etc.), literature citation, and extensive analytical data are linked to form an independent record for each sample reported in a published work. Analytical data pertinent to the potassium-argon, rubidium-strontium, uranium-thorium-lead, lead-alpha, and fission-track methods can be accommodated, singly or in combinations, for each record. Data processing is achieved using the GIPSY program (University of Oklahoma) which maintains the data file and builds, updates, searches, and prints the records using simple yet versatile command statements. Searching and selecting records is accomplished by specifying the presence, absence, or (numeric or alphabetic) value of any element of information in the data bank, and these specifications can be logically linked to develop sophisticated searching strategies. Output is available in the form of complete data records, abbreviated tests, or columnar tabulations. Samples of data-reporting forms, GIPSY command statements, output formats, and data records are presented to illustrate the comprehensive nature and versatility of the Radiometric Age Data Bank.

  16. Results of magnetic HGI and radiometric surveys in W. Canada

    SciTech Connect

    LeSchack, L.A.

    1997-05-19

    This article presents four case histories in which ground-based magnetic horizontal gradient intensity (HGI) and radiometric surveys were used in Western Canada for cost-effective geochemical exploration for hydrocarbons. The authors has developed these two surface exploration techniques from published studies and adapted them for use on the prairies the past 7 years. These surveys are used in conjunction with the usual geologic and seismic studies for: (1) evaluating prospects and land; (2) verifying seismic anomalies and inexpensively locating areas for conducting expensive 3D seismic surveys. Occasionally, as in two of the case histories discussed, these surveys were used successfully as stand-alone exploration methods where seismic exploration is not effective. The HGI and radiometric surveys measure, by geophysical methods, those effects associated with geochemical alterations due to vertical microseepage of hydrocarbons. The total cost, including permitting, data acquisition, data processing, and interpretation of the combination HGI and radiometric surveys is about 15% the total cost of a 3D seismic survey. Because of this, the author finds them an attractive and rapid survey adjunct to traditional exploration. They substantially reduce finding costs and significantly raise the probability of financial success.

  17. Novel techniques for the analysis of the TOA radiometric uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorroño, Javier; Banks, Andrew; Gascon, Ferran; Fox, Nigel P.; Underwood, Craig I.

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of the European Copernicus programme, the European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the Sentinel-2 (S2) Earth Observation (EO) mission which provides optical high spatial -resolution imagery over land and coastal areas. As part of this mission, a tool (named S2-RUT, from Sentinel-2 Radiometric Uncertainty Tool) estimates the radiometric uncertainties associated to each pixel using as input the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance factor images provided by ESA. The initial version of the tool has been implemented — code and user guide available1 — and integrated as part of the Sentinel Toolbox. The tool required the study of several radiometric uncertainty sources as well as the calculation and validation of the combined standard uncertainty in order to estimate the TOA reflectance factor uncertainty per pixel. Here we describe the recent research in order to accommodate novel uncertainty contributions to the TOA reflectance uncertainty estimates in future versions of the tool. The two contributions that we explore are the radiometric impact of the spectral knowledge and the uncertainty propagation of the resampling associated to the orthorectification process. The former is produced by the uncertainty associated to the spectral calibration as well as the spectral variations across the instrument focal plane and the instrument degradation. The latter results of the focal plane image propagation into the provided orthoimage. The uncertainty propagation depends on the radiance levels on the pixel neighbourhood and the pixel correlation in the temporal and spatial dimensions. Special effort has been made studying non-stable scenarios and the comparison with different interpolation methods.

  18. Selection of chemotherapy for patient treatment utilizing a radiometric versus a cloning system

    SciTech Connect

    Von Hoff, D.D.; Forseth, B.J.; Turner, J.N.; Clark, G.M.; Warfel, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    From the 1950s to the 1970s, a number of in vitro systems that measured inhibition of glucose metabolism were used to predict the responsiveness of patients' tumors to chemotherapy. In vitro-in vivo correlations were excellent, with true positive predictions ranging from 68% to 96% and true negative predictions of 95% to 100%. The radiometric system is a new in vitro technique that measures the conversion of 14C-glucose to 14CO2. The system already has been utilized to screen prospective new antineoplastic agents for cytotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to determine if the radiometric system might be used to predict correctly the responsiveness of an individual patient's tumor to single-agent or combination-agent chemotherapy. Fifty-six tumor specimens were divided and tested for drug sensitivity in the radiometric system and a conventional human tumor clonning system. Overall, there was a significant correlation between in vitro and in vivo results for the conventional cloning system (P = 0.03). However, there was no significant relationship between in vitro and in vivo results for the radiometric system. The radiometric system consistently failed to predict the tumor's clinical sensitivity to single agents. A radiometric system is not useful in predicting the responsiveness of a patient's tumor to single agent chemotherapy and is not a replacement for the more biologically attractive human tumor cloning system.

  19. A multi-channel radiometric profiler of temperature, humidity and cloud liquid.

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Carpenter, R.; Guldner, J.; Liljegren, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Solheim, F.; Vandenberghe, F.; Environmental Research; Radiometrics Corp.; Univ. Corp. for Atmospheric Research; Weather Decision Technologies Inc.; Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc.; National Center for Atmospheric Research

    2003-07-31

    A microwave radiometer is described that provides continuous thermodynamic (temperature, water vapor, and moisture) soundings during clear and cloudy conditions. The radiometric profiler observes radiation intensity at 12 microwave frequencies, along with zenith infrared and surface meteorological measurements. Historical radiosonde and neural network or regression methods are used for profile retrieval. We compare radiometric, radiosonde, and forecast soundings and evaluate the accuracy of radiometric temperature and water vapor soundings on the basis of statistical comparison with radiosonde soundings. We find that radiometric soundings are equivalent in accuracy to radiosonde soundings when used in numerical weather forecasting. A case study is described that demonstrates improved fog forecasting on the basis of variational assimilation of radiometric soundings. The accuracy of radiometric cloud liquid soundings is evaluated by comparison with cloud liquid sensors carried by radiosondes. Accurate high-resolution three-dimensional water vapor and wind analysis is described on the basis of assimilation of simulated thermodynamic and wind soundings along with GPS slant delays. Examples of mobile thermodynamic and wind profilers are shown. Thermodynamic profiling, particularly when combined with wind profiling and slant GPS, provides continuous atmospheric soundings for improved weather and dispersion forecasting.

  20. Calibration of the National Ecological Observatory Network's Airborne Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisso, N.; Kampe, T. U.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is currently under construction by the National Science Foundation. NEON is designed to collect data on the causes and responses to change in the observed ecosystem. The observatory will combine site data collected by terrestrial, instrumental, and aquatic observation systems with airborne remote sensing data. The Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) is designed to collect high-resolution aerial imagery, waveform and discrete LiDAR, and high-fidelity imaging spectroscopic data over the NEON sites annually at or near peak-greenness. Three individual airborne sensor packages will be installed in leased Twin Otter aircraft and used to the collect the NEON sites as NEON enters operations. A key driver to the derived remote sensing data products is the calibration of the imaging spectrometers. This is essential to the overall NEON mission to detect changes in the collected ecosystems over the 30-year expected lifetime. The NEON Imaging Spectrometer (NIS) is a Visible and Shortwave Infrared (VSWIR) grating spectrometer designed by NASA JPL. Spectroscopic data is collected at 5-nm intervals from 380-2500-nm. A single 480 by 640 pixel HgCdTe Focal Plane Array collects dispersed light from a grating tuned for efficiency across the solar-reflective utilized in a push-broom configuration. Primary calibration of the NIS consists of the characterizing the FPA behavior, spectral calibration, and radiometric calibration. To this end, NEON is constructing a Sensor Test Facility to calibrate the NEON sensors. This work discusses the initial NIS laboratory calibration and verification using vicarious calibration techniques during operations. Laboratory spectral calibration is based on well-defined emission lines in conjunction with a scanning monochromator to define the individual spectral response functions. A NIST traceable FEL bulb is used to radiometrically calibrate the imaging spectrometer. An On-board Calibration (OBC) system

  1. Simulation evaluation of combined 4D RNAV and airborne traffic situation displays and procedures applied to terminal aerial maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Connelly, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simulation scenarios were developed in which subject pilots must simultaneously follow a 3D terminal airspace structure and arrive at fixed waypoints within the structure precisely at pre-scheduled times in the presence of a full range of wind conditions aloft, and monitor nearby traffic on an airborne traffic situation display, especially during merging and spacing operations, and detect blunders and resolve conflicts in a safe manner. Open-loop simulator tests of the single-stage 4D RNAV algorithm indicate that a descending pilot can comply quite closely with an assigned time of arrival at a 3D waypoint simply by tracking a pre-calculated speed profile. Initial experiments show that the aircraft arrives at the 3D waypoint within a few seconds of the anticipated time. The presence of headwinds or tailwinds does not affect the arrival time error as long as the wind is accurately modeled in the descent algorithm. Results all but quarantee that a 5 second standard deviation in arrival time error can be realized in closed-loop descents at very moderate pilot workload levels.

  2. Semantic segmentation of forest stands of pure species combining airborne lidar data and very high resolution multispectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechesne, Clément; Mallet, Clément; Le Bris, Arnaud; Gouet-Brunet, Valérie

    2017-04-01

    Forest stands are the basic units for forest inventory and mapping. Stands are defined as large forested areas (e.g., ⩾ 2 ha) of homogeneous tree species composition and age. Their accurate delineation is usually performed by human operators through visual analysis of very high resolution (VHR) infra-red images. This task is tedious, highly time consuming, and should be automated for scalability and efficient updating purposes. In this paper, a method based on the fusion of airborne lidar data and VHR multispectral images is proposed for the automatic delineation of forest stands containing one dominant species (purity superior to 75%). This is the key preliminary task for forest land-cover database update. The multispectral images give information about the tree species whereas 3D lidar point clouds provide geometric information on the trees and allow their individual extraction. Multi-modal features are computed, both at pixel and object levels: the objects are individual trees extracted from lidar data. A supervised classification is then performed at the object level in order to coarsely discriminate the existing tree species in each area of interest. The classification results are further processed to obtain homogeneous areas with smooth borders by employing an energy minimum framework, where additional constraints are joined to form the energy function. The experimental results show that the proposed method provides very satisfactory results both in terms of stand labeling and delineation (overall accuracy ranges between 84 % and 99 %).

  3. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Durango A, B, C, and D, Colorado. Volume I. Detail area. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the Durango A, Durango B, Durango C, and Durango D Detail Areas of southwestern Colorado. The Durango A Detail Area is within the coverage of the Needle Mountains and Silverton 15' map sheets, and the Pole Creek Mountain, Rio Grande Pyramid, Emerald Lake, Granite Peak, Vallecito Reservoir, and Lemon Reservoir 7.5' map sheets of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). The Durango B Detail Area is within the coverage of the Silverton 15' map sheet and the Wetterhorn Peak, Uncompahgre Peak, Lake City, Redcloud Peak, Lake San Cristobal, Pole Creek Mountain, and Finger Mesa 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango C Detail Area is within the coverage of the Platoro and Wolf Creek Pass 15' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango D Detail Area is within the coverage of the Granite Lake, Cimarrona Peak, Bear Mountain, and Oakbrush Ridge 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, gridded, and contoured to produce maps of the radiometric variables, uranium, potassium, and thorium; their ratios; and the residual magnetic field. These maps have been analyzed in order to produce a multi-variant analysis contour map based on the radiometric response of the individual geological units. A geochemical analysis has been performed, using the radiometric and magnetic contour maps, the multi-variant analysis map, and factor analysis techniques, to produce a geochemical analysis map for the area.

  4. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  5. Direct radiometric observations of the water vapor greenhouse effect over the equatorial Pacific ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, F.P.J.; Collins, W.D.; Bucholtz, A.

    1997-03-21

    Airborne radiometric measurements were used to determine tropospheric profiles of the clear sky greenhouse effect. At sea surface temperatures (SSTs) larger than 300 kelvin, the clear sky water vapor greenhouse effect was found to increase with SST at a rate of 13 to 15 watts per square meter per kelvin. Satellite measurements of infrared radiances and SSTs indicate that almost 52 percent of the tropical oceans between 20{degrees}N and 20{degrees}S are affected during all seasons. Current general circulation models suggest that the increase in the clear sky water vapor greenhouse effect with SST may have climatic effects on a planetary scale. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Direct Radiometric Observations of the Water Vapor Greenhouse Effect Over the Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    PubMed

    Valero; Collins; Pilewskie; Bucholtz; Flatau

    1997-03-21

    Airborne radiometric measurements were used to determine tropospheric profiles of the clear sky greenhouse effect. At sea surface temperatures (SSTs) larger than 300 kelvin, the clear sky water vapor greenhouse effect was found to increase with SST at a rate of 13 to 15 watts per square meter per kelvin. Satellite measurements of infrared radiances and SSTs indicate that almost 52 percent of the tropical oceans between 20°N and 20°S are affected during all seasons. Current general circulation models suggest that the increase in the clear sky water vapor greenhouse effect with SST may have climatic effects on a planetary scale.

  7. Rapid identification and analysis of airborne plutonium using a combination of alpha spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Dennis E; Steed, Amber C; Sobus, Jon; Stetzenbach, Klaus; Lindley, Kaz; Hodge, Vernon F

    2003-10-01

    Recent wildland fires near two U.S. nuclear facilities point to a need to rapidly identify the presence of airborne plutonium during incidents involving the potential release of radioactive materials. Laboratory turn-around times also need to be shortened for critical samples collected in the earliest stages of radiological emergencies. This note discusses preliminary investigations designed to address both these problems. The methods under review are same day high-resolution alpha spectroscopy to screen air filter samples for the presence of plutonium and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to perform sensitive plutonium analyses. Thus far, using modified alpha spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to reliably identify the approximately 5.2 MeV emission of 239Pu on surrogate samples (air filters artificially spiked with plutonium after collection) even though the primary alpha-particle emissions of plutonium are, as expected, superimposed against a natural alpha radiation background dominated by short-lived radon and thoron progeny (approximately 6-9 MeV). Several processing methods were tested to prepare samples for analysis and shorten laboratory turn-around time. The most promising technique was acid-leaching of air filter samples using a commercial open-vessel microwave digestion system. Samples prepared in this way were analyzed by both alpha spectroscopy (as a thin-layer iron hydroxide co-precipitate) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The detection levels achieved for 239Pu--approximately 1 mBq m(-3) for alpha spectroscopy screening, and, < 0.1 mBq m(-3) for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis--are consistent with derived emergency response levels based on EPA's Protective Action Guides, and samples can be evaluated in 36 to 72 h. Further, if samples can be returned to a fixed-laboratory and processed immediately, results from mass spectrometry could be available in as little as 24 h. When fully implemented

  8. Spatially explicit modelling of forest structure and function using airborne lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data combined with micrometeorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Valerie Anne

    This research models canopy-scale photosynthesis at the Groundhog River Flux Site through the integration of high-resolution airborne remote sensing data and micrometeorological measurements collected from a flux tower. Light detection and ranging (lidar) data are analysed to derive models of tree structure, including: canopy height, basal area, crown closure, and average aboveground biomass. Lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data are used to model canopy chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoid concentrations (known to be good indicators of photosynthesis). The integration of lidar and hyperspectral data is applied to derive spatially explicit models of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) absorbed by the canopy as well as a species classification for the site. These products are integrated with flux tower meteorological measurements (i.e., air temperature and global solar radiation) collected on a continuous basis over 2004 to apply the C-Fix model of carbon exchange to the site. Results demonstrate that high resolution lidar and lidar-hyperspectral integration techniques perform well in the boreal mixedwood environment. Lidar models are well correlated with forest structure, despite the complexities introduced in the mixedwood case (e.g., r2=0.84, 0.89, 0.60, and 0.91, for mean dominant height, basal area, crown closure, and average aboveground biomass). Strong relationships are also shown for canopy scale chlorophyll/carotenoid concentration analysis using integrated lidar-hyperspectral techniques (e.g., r2=0.84, 0.84, and 0.82 for Chl(a), Chl(a+b), and Chl(b)). Examination of the spatially explicit models of fPAR reveal distinct spatial patterns which become increasingly apparent throughout the season due to the variation in species groupings (and canopy chlorophyll concentration) within the 1 km radius surrounding the flux tower. Comparison of results from the modified local-scale version of the C-Fix model to tower gross ecosystem

  9. Evaluation of S190A radiometric exposure test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.; Goodding, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The S190A preflight radiometric exposure test data generated as part of preflight and system test of KM-002 Sequence 29 on flight camera S/N 002 was analyzed. The analysis was to determine camera system transmission using available data which included: (1) films exposed to a calibrated light source subject; (2) filter transmission data; (3) calibrated light source data; (4) density vs. log10 exposure curves for the films; and (5) spectral sensitometric data for the films. The procedure used is outlined, and includes the data and a transmission matrix as a function of field position for nine measured points on each station-film-filter-aperture-shutter speed combination.

  10. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  11. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  12. AIRS radiometric calibration validation for climate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave; Broberg, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Climate research using data from satellite based radiometers makes extreme demands on the traceability and stability of the radiometric calibration. The selection of a cooled grating array spectrometer for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, AIRS, is key, but does not ensured that AIRS data will be of climate quality. Additional design features, plus additional pre-launch testing, and extensive on-orbit calibration subsystem monitoring beyond what would suffice for application of the data to weather forecasting were required to ensure the radiometric data quality required for climate research. Validation that climate data quality are being generated makes use of the sea surface skin temperatures (SST and (obs-calc).

  13. Experimental methods of indoor millimeter-wave radiometric imaging for personnel concealed contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Taiyang; Xiao, Zelong; Li, Hao; Lv, Rongchuan; Lu, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    The increasingly emerging terrorism attacks and violence crimes around the world have posed severe threats to public security, so carrying out relevant research on advanced experimental methods of personnel concealed contraband detection is crucial and meaningful. All of the advantages of imaging covertly, avoidance of interference with other systems, intrinsic property of being safe to persons under screening , and the superior ability of imaging through natural or manmade obscurants, have significantly combined to enable millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometric imaging to offer great potential in personnel concealed contraband detection. Based upon the current research status of MMW radiometric imaging and urgent demands of personnel security screening, this paper mainly focuses on the experimental methods of indoor MMW radiometric imaging. The reverse radiation noise resulting from super-heterodyne receivers seriously affects the image experiments carried out at short range, so both the generation mechanism and reducing methods of this noise are investigated. Then, the benefit of sky illumination no longer exists for the indoor radiometric imaging, and this leads to the decrease in radiometric temperature contrast between target and background. In order to enhance the radiometric temperature contrast for improving indoor imaging performance, the noise illumination technique is adopted in the indoor imaging scenario. In addition, the speed and accuracy of concealed contraband detection from acquired MMW radiometric images are usually restricted to the deficiencies in traditional artificial interpretation by security inspectors, thus an automatic recognition and location algorithm by integrating improved Fuzzy C-means clustering with moment invariants is put forward. A series of original results are also presented to demonstrate the significance and validity of these methods.

  14. Target contrast considerations in millimeter wave radiometry for airborne navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, A.

    1971-01-01

    Target signal requirements for aircraft navigation systems that use radiometric receivers which map thermally emitted power radiated by terrain or power radiated by ground-based beacons are discussed. For selected millimeter wavelength bands, microwaves suffer relatively little degradation by absorption or scattering on passage through the atmosphere, despite extreme weather variations. Interest centers on 8-millimeter waves because of component availability, portability (small size), high image resolution, and all-weather capability at this wavelength. The idea of radiometric airborne navigation is introduced. Elements of radiometry, terrain radiation, and atmospheric transmission characteristics are reviewed. Data pertaining to these elements at 8 mm wavelength are collected. Calculation of radiometric contrasts is discussed for some simple models of terrain targets.

  15. Kernel MAD Algorithm for Relative Radiometric Normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Tang, Ping; Hu, Changmiao

    2016-06-01

    The multivariate alteration detection (MAD) algorithm is commonly used in relative radiometric normalization. This algorithm is based on linear canonical correlation analysis (CCA) which can analyze only linear relationships among bands. Therefore, we first introduce a new version of MAD in this study based on the established method known as kernel canonical correlation analysis (KCCA). The proposed method effectively extracts the non-linear and complex relationships among variables. We then conduct relative radiometric normalization experiments on both the linear CCA and KCCA version of the MAD algorithm with the use of Landsat-8 data of Beijing, China, and Gaofen-1(GF-1) data derived from South China. Finally, we analyze the difference between the two methods. Results show that the KCCA-based MAD can be satisfactorily applied to relative radiometric normalization, this algorithm can well describe the nonlinear relationship between multi-temporal images. This work is the first attempt to apply a KCCA-based MAD algorithm to relative radiometric normalization.

  16. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions in Support of Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guild, Liane S.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Kudela, Raphael; Morrow, John; Russell, Philip; Myers, Jeffrey; Dunagan, Stephen; Palacios, Sherry; Livingston, John; Negrey, Kendra; Torres-Perez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, coastal marine ecosystems are exposed to land-based sources of pollution and sedimentation from anthropogenic activities including agriculture and coastal development. Ocean color products from satellite sensors provide information on chlorophyll (phytoplankton pigment), sediments, and colored dissolved organic material. Further, ship-based in-water measurements and emerging airborne measurements provide in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation satellite ocean color sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal of the airborne missions was to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. Utilizing an imaging spectrometer optimized in the blue to green spectral domain enables higher signal for detection of the relatively dark radiance measurements from marine and freshwater ecosystem features. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic

  17. Estimating lava volume by precision combination of multiple baseline spaceborne and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar: The 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Fielding, E.; Patrick, M.R.; Trautwein, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques are used to calculate the volume of extrusion at Okmok volcano, Alaska by constructing precise digital elevation models (DEMs) that represent volcano topography before and after the 1997 eruption. The posteruption DEM is generated using airborne topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) data where a three-dimensional affine transformation is used to account for the misalignments between different DEM patches. The preeruption DEM is produced using repeat-pass European Remote Sensing satellite data; multiple interferograms are combined to reduce errors due to atmospheric variations, and deformation rates are estimated independently and removed from the interferograms used for DEM generation. The extrusive flow volume associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano is 0.154 ?? 0.025 km3. The thickest portion is approximately 50 m, although field measurements of the flow margin's height do not exceed 20 m. The in situ measurements at lava edges are not representative of the total thickness, and precise DEM data are absolutely essential to calculate eruption volume based on lava thickness estimations. This study is an example that demonstrates how InSAR will play a significant role in studying volcanoes in remote areas.

  18. Determination of airborne trialkyl and triaryl organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Development of methodology for combined aerosol and vapor sampling.

    PubMed

    Solbu, K; Thorud, S; Hersson, M; Ovrebø, S; Ellingsen, D G; Lundanes, E; Molander, P

    2007-08-17

    Methodology for personal occupational exposure assessment of airborne trialkyl and triaryl organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids by active combined aerosol and vapor sampling at 1.5L/min is presented. Determination of the organophosphates was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Combinations of adsorbents (Anasorb 747, Anasorb CSC, Chromosorb 106, XAD-2 and silica gel) with an upstream cassette with glass fiber or PTFE filters and different desorption/extraction solvents (CS(2), CS(2)-dimethylformamide (50:1, v/v), toluene, dichloromethane, methyl-t-butyl ether and methanol) have been evaluated for optimized combined vapor and aerosol air sampling of the organophosphates tri-isobutyl, tri-n-butyl, triphenyl, tri-o-cresyl, tri-m-cresyl and tri-p-cresyl phosphates. The combination of Chromosorb 106 and 37 mm filter cassette with glass fiber filter and dichloromethane as desorption/extraction solvent was the best combination for mixed phase air sampling of the organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids. The triaryl phosphates were recovered solely from the filter, while the trialkyl phosphates were recovered from both the filter and the adsorbent. The total sampling efficiency on the combined sampler was in the range 92-101% for the studied organophosphates based on spiking experiments followed by pulling air through the sampler. Recoveries after 28 days storage were 98-102% and 99-101% when stored at 5 and -20 degrees C, respectively. The methodology was further evaluated in an exposure chamber with generated oil aerosol atmospheres with both synthetic and mineral base oils with added organophosphates in various concentrations, yielding total sampling efficiencies in close comparison to the spiking experiments. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by exposure measurements in a mechanical workshop where system suitability tests are performed on different aircraft components in a test bench, displaying tricresyl phosphate

  19. An approach for combining airborne LiDAR and high-resolution aerial color imagery using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yansong; Monteiro, Sildomar T.; Saber, Eli

    2015-10-01

    Changes in vegetation cover, building construction, road network and traffic conditions caused by urban expansion affect the human habitat as well as the natural environment in rapidly developing cities. It is crucial to assess these changes and respond accordingly by identifying man-made and natural structures with accurate classification algorithms. With the increase in use of multi-sensor remote sensing systems, researchers are able to obtain a more complete description of the scene of interest. By utilizing multi-sensor data, the accuracy of classification algorithms can be improved. In this paper, we propose a method for combining 3D LiDAR point clouds and high-resolution color images to classify urban areas using Gaussian processes (GP). GP classification is a powerful non-parametric classification method that yields probabilistic classification results. It makes predictions in a way that addresses the uncertainty of real world. In this paper, we attempt to identify man-made and natural objects in urban areas including buildings, roads, trees, grass, water and vehicles. LiDAR features are derived from the 3D point clouds and the spatial and color features are extracted from RGB images. For classification, we use the Laplacian approximation for GP binary classification on the new combined feature space. The multiclass classification has been implemented by using one-vs-all binary classification strategy. The result of applying support vector machines (SVMs) and logistic regression (LR) classifier is also provided for comparison. Our experiments show a clear improvement of classification results by using the two sensors combined instead of each sensor separately. Also we found the advantage of applying GP approach to handle the uncertainty in classification result without compromising accuracy compared to SVM, which is considered as the state-of-the-art classification method.

  20. Calibration, Sensor Model Improvements and Uncertainty Budget of the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueni, A.

    2015-12-01

    ESA's Airborne Imaging Spectrometer APEX (Airborne Prism Experiment) was developed under the PRODEX (PROgramme de Développement d'EXpériences scientifiques) program by a Swiss-Belgian consortium and entered its operational phase at the end of 2010 (Schaepman et al., 2015). Work on the sensor model has been carried out extensively within the framework of European Metrology Research Program as part of the Metrology for Earth Observation and Climate (MetEOC and MetEOC2). The focus has been to improve laboratory calibration procedures in order to reduce uncertainties, to establish a laboratory uncertainty budget and to upgrade the sensor model to compensate for sensor specific biases. The updated sensor model relies largely on data collected during dedicated characterisation experiments in the APEX calibration home base but includes airborne data as well where the simulation of environmental conditions in the given laboratory setup was not feasible. The additions to the model deal with artefacts caused by environmental changes and electronic features, namely the impact of ambient air pressure changes on the radiometry in combination with dichroic coatings, influences of external air temperatures and consequently instrument baffle temperatures on the radiometry, and electronic anomalies causing radiometric errors in the four shortwave infrared detector readout blocks. Many of these resolved issues might be expected to be present in other imaging spectrometers to some degree or in some variation. Consequently, the work clearly shows the difficulties of extending a laboratory-based uncertainty to data collected under in-flight conditions. The results are hence not only of interest to the calibration scientist but also to the spectroscopy end user, in particular when commercial sensor systems are used for data collection and relevant sensor characteristic information tends to be sparse. Schaepman, et al, 2015. Advanced radiometry measurements and Earth science

  1. ISMAR: an airborne submillimetre radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Stuart; Lee, Clare; Moyna, Brian; Philipp, Martin; Rule, Ian; Rogers, Stuart; King, Robert; Oldfield, Matthew; Rea, Simon; Henry, Manju; Wang, Hui; Chawn Harlow, R.

    2017-02-01

    The International Submillimetre Airborne Radiometer (ISMAR) has been developed as an airborne demonstrator for the Ice Cloud Imager (ICI) that will be launched on board the next generation of European polar-orbiting weather satellites in the 2020s. It currently has 15 channels at frequencies between 118 and 664 GHz which are sensitive to scattering by cloud ice, and additional channels at 874 GHz are being developed. This paper presents an overview of ISMAR and describes the algorithms used for calibration. The main sources of bias in the measurements are evaluated, as well as the radiometric sensitivity in different measurement scenarios. It is shown that for downward views from high altitude, representative of a satellite viewing geometry, the bias in most channels is less than ±1 K and the NEΔT is less than 2 K, with many channels having an NEΔT less than 1 K. In-flight calibration accuracy is also evaluated by comparison of high-altitude zenith views with radiative-transfer simulations.

  2. Combined application of airborne and terrestrial laserscanning for quantifying sediment relocation by a large debris flow event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, Magnus; Sass, Oliver; Vetter, Michael; Geilhausen, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Country-wide ALS datasets of high resolution become more and more available and can provide a solid basis for geomorphological research. On the other hand, terrain changes after geomorphological extreme events can be quickly and flexibly documented by TLS and be compared to the pre-existing ALS datasets. For quantifying net-erosion, net-sedimentation and transport rates of events like rock falls, landslides and debris flows, comparing TLS surveys after the event to ALS data before the event is likely to become a widespread and powerful tool. However, the accuracy and possible errors of fitting ALS and TLS data have to be carefully assessed. We tried to quantify sediment movement and terrain changes caused by a major debris-flow-event in the Halltal in the Karwendel Mountains (Tyrol, Austria). Wide areas of limestone debris were dissected and relocated in the course of an exceptional rainstorm event on 29th June 2008. The event occurred 64 years after wildfire-driven deforestation. In the area, dense dwarf pine (pinus mugo) shrub cover is widespread, causing specific problems in generating terrain models. We compared a pre-event ALS-dataset, provided by the federal-state of Tyrol, and a post-event TLS survey. The two scanner systems have differing system characteristics (scan angles, resolutions, application of dGPS, etc.), causing different systematic and random errors. Combining TLS and ALS point data was achieved using an algorithm of the RISCAN_PRO software (Multi Station Adjustment), enabling a least square fitting between the two surfaces. Adjustment and registration accuracies as well as the quality of applied vegetation filters, mainly eliminating non-groundpoints from the raw data, are crucial for the generation of high-quality terrain models and a reliable comparison of the two data sets. Readily available filter algorithms provide good performance for gently sloped terrain and high forest vegetation. However, the low krummholz vegetation on steep terrain

  3. Reduction of Striping Noise in Overlapping LIDAR Intensity Data by Radiometric Normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wai Yeung; Shaker, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    To serve seamless mapping, airborne LiDAR data are usually collected with multiple parallel strips with one or two cross strip(s). Nevertheless, the overlapping regions of LiDAR data strips are usually found with unbalanced intensity values, resulting in the appearance of stripping noise. Despite that physical intensity correction methods are recently proposed, some of the system and environmental parameters are assumed as constant or not disclosed, leading to such an intensity discrepancy. This paper presents a new normalization technique to adjust the radiometric misalignment found in the overlapping LiDAR data strips. The normalization technique is built upon a second-order polynomial function fitted on the joint histogram plot, which is generated with a set of pairwise closest data points identified within the overlapping region. The method was tested on Teledyne Optech's Gemini dataset (at 1064 nm wavelength), where the LiDAR intensity data were first radiometrically corrected based on the radar (range) equation. Five land cover features were selected to evaluate the coefficient of variation (cv) of the intensity values before and after implementing the proposed method. Reduction of cv was found by 19% to 59% in the Gemini dataset, where the striping noise was significantly reduced in the radiometrically corrected and normalized intensity data. The Gemini dataset was also used to conduct land cover classification, and the overall accuracy yielded a notable improvement of 9% to 18%. As a result, LiDAR intensity data should be pre-processed with radiometric correction and normalization prior to any data manipulation.

  4. The Candela and Photometric and Radiometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Albert C.

    2001-01-01

    The national measurement system for photometric and radiometric quantities is presently based upon techniques that make these quantities traceable to a high-accuracy cryogenic radiometer. The redefinition of the candela in 1979 provided the opportunity for national measurement laboratories to base their photometric measurements on optical detector technology rather than on the emission from high-temperature blackbody optical sources. The ensuing technical developments of the past 20 years, including the significant improvements in cryogenic radiometer performance, have provided the opportunity to place the fundamental maintenance of photometric quantities upon absolute detector based technology as was allowed by the 1979 redefinition. Additionally, the development of improved photodetectors has had a significant impact on the methodology in most of the radiometric measurement areas. This paper will review the status of the NIST implementation of the technical changes mandated by the 1979 redefinition of the candela and its effect upon the maintenance and dissemination of optical radiation measurements. PMID:27500020

  5. Infrared radiometric technique in temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, S.; Madding, R.

    1988-01-01

    One class of commercially available imaging infrared radiometers using cooled detectors is sensitive to radiation over the 3 to 12 micron wavelength band. Spectral filters can tailor instrument sensitivity to specific regions where the target exhibits optimum radiance. The broadband spectral response coupled with real time two-dimensional imaging and emittance/background temperature corrections make the instruments useful for remote measurement of surface temperatures from -20 C to +1500 C. Commonly used radiometric techniques and assumptions are discussed, and performance specifications for a typical modern commercial instrument are presented. The potential usefulness of an imaging infrared radiometer in space laboratories is highlighted through examples of research, nondestructive evaluation, safety, and routine maintenance applications. Future improvements in instrument design and application of the radiometric technique are discussed.

  6. Geometric and Radiometric Evaluation of Rasat Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cam, Ali; Topan, Hüseyin; Oruç, Murat; Özendi, Mustafa; Bayık, Çağlar

    2016-06-01

    RASAT, the second remote sensing satellite of Turkey, was designed and assembled, and also is being operated by TÜBİTAK Uzay (Space) Technologies Research Institute (Ankara). RASAT images in various levels are available free-of-charge via Gezgin portal for Turkish citizens. In this paper, the images in panchromatic (7.5 m GSD) and RGB (15 m GSD) bands in various levels were investigated with respect to its geometric and radiometric characteristics. The first geometric analysis is the estimation of the effective GSD as less than 1 pixel for radiometrically processed level (L1R) of both panchromatic and RGB images. Secondly, 2D georeferencing accuracy is estimated by various non-physical transformation models (similarity, 2D affine, polynomial, affine projection, projective, DLT and GCP based RFM) reaching sub-pixel accuracy using minimum 39 and maximum 52 GCPs. The radiometric characteristics are also investigated for 8 bits, estimating SNR between 21.8-42.2, and noise 0.0-3.5 for panchromatic and MS images for L1R when the sea is masked to obtain the results for land areas. The analysis show that RASAT images satisfies requirements for various applications. The research is carried out in Zonguldak test site which is mountainous and partly covered by dense forest and urban areas.

  7. Revised landsat-5 thematic mapper radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective April 2, 2007, the radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) data that are processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) will be updated. The lifetime gain model that was implemented on May 5, 2003, for the reflective bands (1-5, 7) will be replaced by a new lifetime radiometric-calibration curve that is derived from the instrument's response to pseudoinvariant desert sites and from cross calibration with the Landsat-7 (L7) Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+). Although this calibration update applies to all archived and future L5 TM data, the principal improvements in the calibration are for the data acquired during the first eight years of the mission (1984-1991), where the changes in the instrument-gain values are as much as 15%. The radiometric scaling coefficients for bands 1 and 2 for approximately the first eight years of the mission have also been changed. Users will need to apply these new coefficients to convert the calibrated data product digital numbers to radiance. The scaling coefficients for the other bands have not changed. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  8. NASA IKONOS Multispectral Radiometric Calibration and 3-Year Temporal Stability Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Carver, David; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Schiller, Stephen; Aaran, David

    2003-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can place confidence in the imagery they use and can fully understand its properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other system. In addition, the user community has little or no insight into the design and operation of commercial sensors or into the methods involved in generating commercial products. To address this calibration need, the NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) Earth Science Applications (ESA) Directorate established a commercial satellite imaging radiometric calibration team consisting of three independent groups: NASA, SSC,ESA, the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group, and South Dacota State University. Each group determined the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of the Space Imaging IKONOS 4-band, 4 m multispectral product covering the visible through near-infrared spectral region. For a three year period beginning in 2000, each team employed some variant of a reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, requiring ground-based measurements coincident with IKONOS image acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations. Several study sites throughout the United States were employed that covered nearly the entire dynamic range of the IKONOS sensor. IKONOS at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent group to determine the IKONOS sensor's radiometric accuracy and stability. Over 10 individual vicariously determined at-sensor radiance estimates were used each year. When combined, these estimates provided a high-precision radiometric gain calibration coefficient. No significant calibration offset was observed. The results of this evaluation provide the scientific community with an independent assessment of the IKONOS sensor's absolute calibration and temporal stability over the 3

  9. The radiometric characteristics of KOMPSAT-3A by using reference radiometric tarps and ground measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Jong-Min

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we performed the vicarious radiometric calibration of KOMPSAT-3A multispectral bands by using 6S radiative transfer model, radiometric tarps, MFRSR measurements. Furthermore, to prepare the accurate input parameter, we also did experiment work to measure the BRDF of radiometric tarps based on hyperspectral gonioradiometer to compensate the observation geometry difference between satellite and ASD Fieldspec 3. Also, we measured point spread function (PSF) by using the bright star and corrected multispectral bands based on the Wiener filter. For accurate atmospheric constituent effects such as aerosol optical depth, column water, and total ozone, we used MFRSR instrument and estimated related optical depth of each gases. Based on input parameters for 6S radiative transfer model, we simulated top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance by observed by KOMPSAT-3A and matched-up the digital number. Consequently, DN to radiance coefficients was determined based on aforementioned methods and showed reasonable statistics results.

  10. Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover Agaritta and Brady Creek fields, Concho County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. ); Brown, J.J. )

    1992-04-01

    From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King Sandstone (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King Sandstone field discoveries or extensions and three deeper pay Goen Limestone field discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67 per bbl of proven producing oil reserves. As examples, the authors present the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6,000,000 BO. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (2) interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (3) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (4) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon anomalies combined with soil magnetic susceptibility anomalies provided the best detailed surface guidance to Agaritta field. These were supported locally by radiometric anomalies. The Brady Creek field is interpreted to be a possible crevasse splay deposit. The Aggaritta field is interpreted to be a point bar deposit. Both fields are stratigraphic traps.

  11. Voxel Based Representation of Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Data for Forestry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, N.; Richter, K.

    2016-06-01

    The advantages of using airborne full-waveform laser scanner data in forest applications, e.g. for the description of the vertical vegetation structure or accurate biomass estimation, have been emphasized in many publications. To exploit the full potential offered by airborne full-waveform laser scanning data, the development of voxel based methods for data analysis is essential. In contrast to existing approaches based on the extraction of discrete 3D points by a Gaussian decomposition, it is very promising to derive the voxel attributes from the digitised waveform directly. For this purpose, the waveform data have to be transferred into a 3D voxel representation. This requires a series of radiometric and geometric transformations of the raw full-waveform laser scanner data. Thus, the paper deals with the geometric aspects and describes a processing chain from the raw waveform data to an attenuationcorrected volumetric forest stand reconstruction. The integration of attenuation-corrected waveform data into the voxel space is realised with an efficient parametric voxel traversal method operating on an octree data structure. The voxel attributes are derived from the amplitudes of the attenuation-corrected waveforms. Additionally, a new 3D filtering approach is presented to eliminate non-object voxel. Applying these methods to real full-waveform laser scanning data, a voxel based representation of a spruce was generated combining three flight strips from different viewing directions.

  12. An airborne gamma-ray spectrometry survey of nuclear sites in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, D C W; Cresswell, A J; Hardeman, F; Debauche, A

    2004-01-01

    As part of a wider study to define the existing background levels in Belgium an airborne gamma-ray survey was conducted in two areas associated with nuclear sites. In the Mol area, the survey zone included areas surrounding the SCK-CEN nuclear research centre, and its associated neighbourhood which includes radioactive waste stores, fuel manufacture and fabrication facilities and an international accelerator laboratory. In the vicinity of Fleurus, the survey included the IRE complex with radiochemical laboratories, irradiation facilities and stores, and isotope production accelerators. The survey was conducted using a twin engined helicopter equipped with a combined scintillation and semiconductor spectrometer. The system was installed and tested in the UK, and then transferred to Belgium for operations. The complete survey was conducted successfully within 1 week. The results provide a comprehensive record of the radiation environment of the nuclear sites at time of survey, and show a range of signals associated with the types of activity present in each area. They confirm that radiation fields are largely confined to the operational sites, and provide a traceable record against which future changes could be assessed. The demonstration of efficient deployment between two European countries, coupled with rapid mapping of many different radiometric signals around these sites confirms the utility of the airborne gamma spectrometry approach for accurate definition of enhanced radiation fields. This has important implications for emergency response.

  13. ROSCAM: a 95-GHz radiometric one-second camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Roger M.; Sundstrom, Bryce M.; Belcher, Byron W.; Ewen, Doc

    1998-08-01

    The ability to obtain millimeter wave images under a variety of environmental conditions, such as rain, snow, fog, smoke, dust, etc., has numerous DoD as well as commercial applications. The demonstrated ability to look through doors, walls and clothing has recently extended potential millimeter wave applications to contraband detection and surveillance within buildings. Though the phenomenology supports the generation of high quality millimeter wave images, present-day frame time capabilities limit the use of millimeter wave cameras. Several solutions to frame time reduction are currently being investigated within government and industry. Two popular approaches include: (1) Electronic scanning focal plane arrays (FPA); (2) Mechanical raster scanning of a single antenna beam. One significant difference between the two approaches noted above is the number of receiving channels required. This is important because camera cost is driven by the number of receiver channels used in a camera, as well as the added complexities associated with inter-channel gain stability. There are a number of applications that do not require a motion picture capability. Images obtained sequentially at a nominal rate of one per second would satisfy the needs of a wide range of applications. It is evident, however, that the motion picture quality of a starring FPA may ultimately reduce the market for one-second cameras. In the interim, the one-second camera fills an important need. The goal of the Radiometric One Second Camera (ROSCAM) investigation is to demonstrate a practical millimeter-wave imaging (MMWI) camera, with a frame time of approximately one second. The approach combines a high-speed mechanical raster scanning antenna system with a single-channel radiometric receiving system. For baseline comparison, it is assumed that the scene is comprised of 1,000 pixels, each sampled for one millisecond, to generate a single frame in one second. The ROSCAM is based on combining a state

  14. Relative radiometric calibration of LANDSAT TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Raw thematic mapper (TM) calibration data from pre-launch tests and in-orbit acquisitions from LANDSAT 4 and 5 satellites are analyzed to assess the radiometric characteristics of the TM sensor. A software program called TM radiometric and algorithmic performance program (TRAPP) was used for the majority of analyses. Radiometric uncertainty in the final TM image originates from: (1) scene variability (solar irradiance and atmospheric scattering); (2) optical and electrical variability of the sensor; and (3) variability introduced during image processing.

  15. Evaluation on Radiometric Capability of Chinese Optical Satellite Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Aixia; Zhong, Bo; Wu, Shanlong; Liu, Qinhuo

    2017-01-01

    The radiometric capability of on-orbit sensors should be updated on time due to changes induced by space environmental factors and instrument aging. Some sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), have onboard calibrators, which enable real-time calibration. However, most Chinese remote sensing satellite sensors lack onboard calibrators. Their radiometric calibrations have been updated once a year based on a vicarious calibration procedure, which has affected the applications of the data. Therefore, a full evaluation of the sensors’ radiometric capabilities is essential before quantitative applications can be made. In this study, a comprehensive procedure for evaluating the radiometric capability of several Chinese optical satellite sensors is proposed. In this procedure, long-term radiometric stability and radiometric accuracy are the two major indicators for radiometric evaluation. The radiometric temporal stability is analyzed by the tendency of long-term top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance variation; the radiometric accuracy is determined by comparison with the TOA reflectance from MODIS after spectrally matching. Three Chinese sensors including the Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera onboard Huan Jing 1 satellite (HJ-1), as well as the Visible and Infrared Radiometer (VIRR) and Medium-Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) onboard the Feng Yun 3 satellite (FY-3) are evaluated in reflective bands based on this procedure. The results are reasonable, and thus can provide reliable reference for the sensors’ application, and as such will promote the development of Chinese satellite data. PMID:28117745

  16. Radiometric instrumentation and measurements guide for photovoltaic performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.

    1997-04-01

    The Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs indoor and outdoor standardization, testing, and monitoring of the performance of a wide range of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion devices and systems. The PV Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team (PVSRME) within that project is responsible for measurement and characterization of natural and artificial optical radiation which stimulates the PV effect. The PV manufacturing and research and development community often approaches project members for technical information and guidance. A great area of interest is radiometric instrumentation, measurement techniques, and data analysis applied to understanding and improving PV cell, module, and system performance. At the Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Workshop conducted by the PVSRME team in July 1995, the need to communicate knowledge of solar and optical radiometric measurements and instrumentation, gained as a result of NREL`s long-term experiences, was identified as an activity that would promote improved measurement processes and measurement quality in the PV research and manufacturing community. The purpose of this document is to address the practical and engineering need to understand optical and solar radiometric instrument performance, selection, calibration, installation, and maintenance applicable to indoor and outdoor radiometric measurements for PV calibration, performance, and testing applications. An introductory section addresses radiometric concepts and definitions. Next, concepts essential to spectral radiometric measurements are discussed. Broadband radiometric instrumentation and measurement concepts are then discussed. Each type of measurement serves as an important component of the PV cell, module, and system performance measurement and characterization process.

  17. Evaluation on Radiometric Capability of Chinese Optical Satellite Sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aixia; Zhong, Bo; Wu, Shanlong; Liu, Qinhuo

    2017-01-22

    The radiometric capability of on-orbit sensors should be updated on time due to changes induced by space environmental factors and instrument aging. Some sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), have onboard calibrators, which enable real-time calibration. However, most Chinese remote sensing satellite sensors lack onboard calibrators. Their radiometric calibrations have been updated once a year based on a vicarious calibration procedure, which has affected the applications of the data. Therefore, a full evaluation of the sensors' radiometric capabilities is essential before quantitative applications can be made. In this study, a comprehensive procedure for evaluating the radiometric capability of several Chinese optical satellite sensors is proposed. In this procedure, long-term radiometric stability and radiometric accuracy are the two major indicators for radiometric evaluation. The radiometric temporal stability is analyzed by the tendency of long-term top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance variation; the radiometric accuracy is determined by comparison with the TOA reflectance from MODIS after spectrally matching. Three Chinese sensors including the Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera onboard Huan Jing 1 satellite (HJ-1), as well as the Visible and Infrared Radiometer (VIRR) and Medium-Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) onboard the Feng Yun 3 satellite (FY-3) are evaluated in reflective bands based on this procedure. The results are reasonable, and thus can provide reliable reference for the sensors' application, and as such will promote the development of Chinese satellite data.

  18. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  19. Systematic biases in radiometric diameter determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Sykes, Mark V.

    1989-01-01

    Radiometric diameter determinations are presently shown to often be significantly affected by the effect of rotation. This thermal effect of rotation depends not only on the object's thermal inertia, rotation rate, and pole orientation, but also on its temperature, since colder objects having constant rotation rate and thermal inertia will radiate less of their heat on the diurnal than on the nocturnal hemisphere. A disk-integrated beaming parameter of 0.72 is determined for the moon, and used to correct empirically for the roughness effects in thermophysical models; the standard thermal model is found to systematically underestimate cold object diameters, while overstating their albedos.

  20. Soil mapping in northern Thailand based on an radiometrically calibrated Maximum likelihood approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, U.; Herrmann, L.; Rangnugpit, W.; Stahr, K.

    2009-04-01

    The highlands of northern Thailand are dominated by the soil reference groups Acrisols and Alisols. The occurrence of these depends mainly on petrography and local climate gradients. The probabilistic Maximum likelihood method locally proved the potential to predict these reference soil groups. However, the available soil information is mostly nested around research stations with vast blank areas in between. Therefore more training data are required. The collection of further soil information is costly and time consuming as the access is often difficult and the determination of the reference soil groups is based on clay content, cation exchange capacity and the organic matter content, which can hardly be determined in the field. Groundbased radiometric data have shown the potential to distinguish Acrisols and Alisols. Therefore, airborne radiometric data, which are available for whole Thailand, might have the potential for regional distinction of those. The airborne data were collected in 1984-89. The sensor was mounted on an airplane flying at approximately 120m altitude, with a distance between the flight lines of approximately 1km and measurements in the flight line of approximately 50m. After orthographic correction a low pass filter (Savitzky Golay) was used for smoothing the data. Corrected output data (grey values) were calibrated and thus transferred to concentration values (K %; Th ppm, U ppm). The standard procedure for interpolation between the flight lines was bidirectional latticing (spline). After interpolation, the data can be presented as a 2D map either as single channel, binary, or ternary presentation. Initial comparisons between the petrography in the field and those ternary maps showed a potential for further subdivision of the existing geological maps. However, smoothing and data interpolation caused numerous artefacts. Therefore it is intended to focus on the primary measuring points. At least, ground measurements of gamma-ray in a limestone

  1. Investigation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds by combining airborne remote sensing and in situ observations during VERDI, RACEPAC and ACLOUD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Borrmann, Stephan; Crewell, Susanne; Herber, Andreas; Hoor, Peter; Jourdan, Olivier; Krämer, Martina; Lüpkes, Christof; Mertes, Stephan; Neuber, Roland; Petzold, Andreas; Schnaiter, Martin; Schneider, Johannes; Weigel, Ralf; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    To improve our understanding of Arctic mixed-phase clouds a series of airborne research campaigns has been initiated by a collaboration of German research institutes. Clouds in areas dominated by a close sea-ice cover were observed during the research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) and the Radiation-Aerosol-Cloud Experiment in the Arctic Circle (RACEPAC, April/May 2014) which both were based in Inuvik, Canada. The aircraft (Polar 5 & 6, Basler BT-67) operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany did cover a wide area above the Canadian Beaufort with in total 149 flight hours (62h during VERDI, 87h during RACEPAC). For May/June 2017 a third campaign ACLOUD (Arctic Clouds - Characterization of Ice, aerosol Particles and Energy fluxes) with base in Svalbard is planned within the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172 ArctiC Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and SurfaCe Processes, and Feedback Mechanisms (AC)3 to investigate Arctic clouds in the transition zone between open ocean and sea ice. The aim of all campaigns is to combine remote sensing and in-situ cloud, aerosol and trace gas measurements to investigate interactions between radiation, cloud and aerosol particles. While during VERDI remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed by one aircraft subsequently, for RACEPAC and ACLOUD two identical aircraft are coordinated at different altitudes to horizontally collocate both remote sensing and in-situ measurements. The campaign showed that in this way radiative and microphysical processes in the clouds can by studied more reliably and remote sensing methods can be validated efficiently. Here we will illustrate the scientific strategy of the projects including the progress in instrumentation. Differences in the general synoptic and sea ice situation and related changes in cloud properties at the different locations and seasons will be

  2. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric calibration status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S.; Helder, Dennis L.; Hook, Simon J.; Schott, John R.; Haque, Md. Obaidul

    2016-09-01

    Now in its 17th year of operation, the Enhanced Thematic Mapper + (ETM+), on board the Landsat-7 satellite, continues to systematically acquire imagery of the Earth to add to the 40+ year archive of Landsat data. Characterization of the ETM+ on-orbit radiometric performance has been on-going since its launch in 1999. The radiometric calibration of the reflective bands is still monitored using on-board calibration devices, though the Pseudo-Invariant Calibration Sites (PICS) method has proven to be an effective tool as well. The calibration gains were updated in April 2013 based primarily on PICS results, which corrected for a change of as much as -0.2%/year degradation in the worst case bands. A new comparison with the SADE database of PICS results indicates no additional degradation in the updated calibration. PICS data are still being tracked though the recent trends are not well understood. The thermal band calibration was updated last in October 2013 based on a continued calibration effort by NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab and Rochester Institute of Technology. The update accounted for a 0.036 W/m2 sr μm or 0.26K at 300K bias error. The updated lifetime trend is now stable to within +/- 0.4K.

  3. Real-time adaptive radiometric compensation.

    PubMed

    Grundhöfer, Anselm; Bimber, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Recent radiometric compensation techniques make it possible to project images onto colored and textured surfaces. This is realized with projector-camera systems by scanning the projection surface on a per-pixel basis. Using the captured information, a compensation image is calculated that neutralizes geometric distortions and color blending caused by the underlying surface. As a result, the brightness and the contrast of the input image is reduced compared to a conventional projection onto a white canvas. If the input image is not manipulated in its intensities, the compensation image can contain values that are outside the dynamic range of the projector. These will lead to clipping errors and to visible artifacts on the surface. In this article, we present an innovative algorithm that dynamically adjusts the content of the input images before radiometric compensation is carried out. This reduces the perceived visual artifacts while simultaneously preserving a maximum of luminance and contrast. The algorithm is implemented entirely on the GPU and is the first of its kind to run in real-time.

  4. Developing a semi/automated protocol to post-process large volume, High-resolution airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery for urban waste heat mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mir Mustafizur

    variability within a thermal flight line based on varying road temperatures; (b) Automated Polynomial Relative Radiometric Normalization (RRN)---which mitigates the between flight line radiometric variability; and (c) Object Based Mosaicking (OBM)---which minimizes the geometric distortion along the mosaic edge between each flight line. A modified Emissivity Modulation technique is also described to correct H-res TIR images for emissivity. This combined radiometric and geometric post-processing protocol (i) increases the visual agreement between TABI-1800 flight lines, (ii) improves radiometric agreement within/between flight lines, (iii) produces a visually seamless mosaic, (iv) improves hot-spot detection and landcover classification accuracy, and (v) provides accurate data for thermal-based HEAT energy models. Keywords: Thermal Infrared, Post-Processing, High Spatial Resolution, Airborne, Thermal Urban Road Normalization (TURN), Relative Radiometric Normalization (RRN), Object Based Mosaicking (OBM), TABI-1800, HEAT, and Automation.

  5. Relative radiometric calibration of LANDSAT TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A common scientific methodology and terminology is outlined for characterizing the radiometry of both TM sensors. The magnitude of the most significant sources of radiometric variability are discussed and methods are recommended for achieving the exceptional potential inherent in the radiometric precision and accuracy of the TM sensors.

  6. Best practices for radiometric modeling of imaging spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellinger, Lou; Silny, John F.

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides best practices for the radiometric performance modeling of imaging spectrometers. A set of standard terminology is proposed to use when modeling imaging spectrometers. The calculation of various radiometric sensitivity metrics and their contrast counterparts are outlined. Modeling approaches are described for both solar reflected and thermally emitted bands. Finally, this approach is applied to an example hyperspectral sensor.

  7. Understanding Satellite Characterization Knowledge Gained from Radiometric Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    UNDERSTANDING SATELLITE CHARACTERIZATION KNOWLEDGE GAINED FROM RADIOMETRIC DATA Andrew Harms Princeton University Kris Hamada, Charles J. Wetterer...framework for determining satellite characterization knowledge, in the form of estimated parameter uncertainties, from radiometric observation type...uncer- tainties into satellite characterization parameter space. These parameters can include size, shape, orientation, material properties, etc., and

  8. Inclusion of sensor noise in radiometric models for generation of synthetic longwave infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, John R.; Salvaggio, Carl

    1987-01-01

    A radiometric model has been developed for modeling the effects of self emission, reflection of downwelled radiance, atmospheric transmission and path radiance on the radiance reaching an airborne or satellite sensing system. The model, which incorporates LOWTRAN 6, includes angular emissivity effects and will account for either specular or diffuse reflectance from targets and backgrounds. The model has been refined to facilitate its use in generating primitive synthetic images to study LWIR phenomena. In particular, various types of sensor related noise have been included in the imaging process. Images are presented simulating the effects of target-to-background contrast as a function of view angle, range, emissivity variation, and atmospheric effects. The potential for use of LWIR models in sensor and algorithm development is discussed.

  9. Visible/infrared radiometric calibration station

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Maier, W.B. II; Bender, S.C.; Holland, R.F.; Michaud, F.D.; Luettgen, A.L.; Christensen, R.W.; O`Brian, T.R.

    1994-07-01

    We have begun construction of a visible/infrared radiometric calibration station that will allow for absolute calibration of optical and IR remote sensing instruments with clear apertures less than 16 inches in diameter in a vacuum environment. The calibration station broadband sources will be calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and allow for traceable absolute radiometric calibration to within {plus_minus}3% in the visible and near IR (0.4--2.5 {mu}m), and less than {plus_minus}1% in the infrared, up to 12 {mu}m. Capabilities for placing diffraction limited images or for sensor full-field flooding will exist. The facility will also include the calibration of polarization and spectral effects, spatial resolution, field of view performance, and wavefront characterization. The configuration of the vacuum calibration station consists of an off-axis 21 inch, f/3.2, parabolic collimator with a scanning fold flat in collimated space. The sources are placed, via mechanisms to be described, at the focal plane of the off-axis parabola. Vacuum system pressure will be in the 10{sup {minus}6} Torr range. The broadband white-light source is a custom design by LANL with guidance from Labsphere Inc. The continuous operating radiance of the integrating sphere will be from 0.0--0.006 W/cm{sup 2}/Sr/{mu}m (upper level quoted for {approximately}500 nm wavelength). The blackbody source is also custom designed at LANL with guidance from NIST. The blackbody temperature will be controllable between 250--350{degrees}K. Both of the above sources have 4.1 inch apertures with estimated radiometric instability at less than 1%. The designs of each of these units will be described. The monochromator and interferometer light sources are outside the vacuum, but all optical relay and beam shaping optics are enclosed within the vacuum calibration station. These sources are described, as well as the methodology for alignment and characterization.

  10. Thematic mapper: detailed radiometric and geometric characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh

    1983-01-01

    Those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data have been examined. Subscenes of radiometric all raw data (B-data) were examined on an individual detector basis: areas of uniform radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems. A variety of anomalies have been discovered with magnitude of a few digital levels or less: the only problem not addressable by ground processing is irregular width of the digital levels. Essentially all of this non-ideal performance is incorporated in the fully processed (P-type) images, but disguised by the geometric resampling procedure. The overall performance of the Thematic Mapper is a great improvement over previous Landsat scanners. The effective resolution in radiance is degraded by about a factor of two by irregular width of the digital levels. Several detectors have a change of gain with a period of several scans, the largest effect is about 4%. These detectors appear to switch between two response levels during scan direction reversal; there is no apparent periodicity to these changes. This can cause small apparent difference between forward and reverse scans for portions of an image. The high-frequency noise level of each detector was characterized by the standard deviation of the first derivative in the sample direction across a flat field. Coherent sinusoidal noise patterns were determined using one-dimensional Fourier transforms. A "stitching" pattern in Band 1 has a period of 13.8 samples with a peak-to-peak amplitude ranging from 1 to 5 DN. Noise with a period of 3.24 samples is pronounced for most detectors in band 1, to a lesser extent in bands 2, 3, and 4, and below background noise levels in bands 5, 6, and 7. The geometric fidelity of the GSFC film writer used for Thematic Mapper (TM) images was assessed by measurement with accuracy bette than three micrometers of a test grid. A set of 55

  11. New Sentinel-2 radiometric validation approaches (SEOM program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruniquel, Véronique; Lamquin, Nicolas; Ferron, Stéphane; Govaerts, Yves; Woolliams, Emma; Dilo, Arta; Gascon, Ferran

    2016-04-01

    SEOM is an ESA program element whose one of the objectives aims at launching state-of-the-art studies for the scientific exploitation of operational missions. In the frame of this program, ESA awarded ACRI-ST and its partners Rayference and National Physical Laboratory (NPL) early 2016 for a R&D study on the development and intercomparison of algorithms for validating the Sentinel-2 radiometric L1 data products beyond the baseline algorithms used operationally in the frame of the S2 Mission Performance Centre. In this context, several algorithms have been proposed and are currently in development: The first one is based on the exploitation of Deep Convective Cloud (DCC) observations over ocean. This method allows an inter-band radiometry validation from the blue to the NIR (typically from B1 to B8a) from a reference band already validated for example with the well-known Rayleigh method. Due to their physical properties, DCCs appear from the remote sensing point of view to have bright and cold tops and they can be used as invariant targets to monitor the radiometric response degradation of reflective solar bands. The DCC approach is statistical i.e. the method shall be applied on a large number of measurements to derive reliable statistics and decrease the impact of the perturbing contributors. The second radiometric validation method is based on the exploitation of matchups combining both concomitant in-situ measurements and Sentinel-2 observations. The in-situ measurements which are used here correspond to measurements acquired in the frame of the RadCalNet networks. The validation is performed for the Sentinel-2 bands similar to the bands of the instruments equipping the validation site. The measurements from the Cimel CE 318 12-filters BRDF Sun Photometer installed recently in the Gobabeb site near the Namib desert are used for this method. A comprehensive verification of the calibration requires an analysis of MSI radiances over the full dynamic range

  12. Characterization of Atmospheric Mineral Dust from Radiometric and Polarimetric Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    microphysical and optical properties. APPROACH Our approach combines an extensive forward modeling, analysis of laboratory and in-situ data of dust ...Characterization of Atmospheric Mineral Dust from Radiometric and Polarimetric Remote Sensing PI: Dr. Irina N. Sokolik School of Earth and...the properties of mineral aerosols and their interactions with visible and IR atmospheric radiation, and to develop the dust optical models needed

  13. GIFTS SM EDU Radiometric and Spectral Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, J.; Reisse, R. a.; Johnson, D. G.; Gazarik, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Sensor Module (SM) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) is a high resolution spectral imager designed to measure infrared (IR) radiance using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The GIFTS instrument gathers measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The raw interferogram measurements are radiometrically and spectrally calibrated to produce radiance spectra, which are further processed to obtain atmospheric profiles via retrieval algorithms. This paper describes the processing algorithms involved in the calibration. The calibration procedures can be subdivided into three categories: the pre-calibration stage, the calibration stage, and finally, the post-calibration stage. Detailed derivations for each stage are presented in this paper.

  14. A Radiometric Uncertainty Tool for OLCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, S.; Nieke, J.

    2016-08-01

    With its first satellite launched in February 2016, the Sentinel-3 mission will support Ocean, Land, Atmospheric, Emergency, Security and Cryospheric applications and related Copernicus services (http://www.copernicus.eu). One of the key payloads carried by the satellite, OLCI (Ocean and Land Colour Instrument), is a push-broom imaging spectrometer designed to image the Earth's surface in 21 spectral bands, from the visible to the near infrared, across a 1200 km swath. An understanding of the quality of the Level 1b (L1) data produced by OLCI is important for many of its applications. As such, work has been ongoing to develop a software tool to determine the per pixel uncertainty of these images to be used by L1 product users. This tool has been named OLCI-RUT (OLCI - Radiometric Uncertainty Tool) and this report provides a description of its development.

  15. Solar Tower Experiments for Radiometric Calibration and Validation of Infrared Imaging Assets and Analysis Tools for Entry Aero-Heating Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Horvath, Thomas J.; Mercer, David C.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ross, Martin N.; Tietjen, Alan; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsored Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements assessment team has a task to perform radiometric calibration and validation of land-based and airborne infrared imaging assets and tools for remote thermographic imaging. The IR assets and tools will be used for thermographic imaging of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry aero-heating to provide flight boundary layer transition thermography data that could be utilized for calibration and validation of empirical and theoretical aero-heating tools. A series of tests at the Sandia National Laboratories National Solar Thermal Test Facility were designed for this task where reflected solar radiation from a field of heliostats was used to heat a 4 foot by 4 foot test panel consisting of LI 900 ceramic tiles located on top of the 200 foot tall Solar Tower. The test panel provided an Orbiter-like entry temperature for the purposes of radiometric calibration and validation. The Solar Tower provided an ideal test bed for this series of radiometric calibration and validation tests because it had the potential to rapidly heat the large test panel to spatially uniform and non-uniform elevated temperatures. Also, the unsheltered-open-air environment of the Solar Tower was conducive to obtaining unobstructed radiometric data by land-based and airborne IR imaging assets. Various thermocouples installed on the test panel and an infrared imager located in close proximity to the test panel were used to obtain surface temperature measurements for evaluation and calibration of the radiometric data from the infrared imaging assets. The overall test environment, test article, test approach, and typical test results are discussed.

  16. Precision radiometric surface temperature (PRST) sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, James T.; Roberts, Carson; Bodkin, Andrew; Sundberg, Robert; Beaven, Scott; Weinheimer, Jeffrey

    2013-05-01

    There is a need for a Precision Radiometric Surface Temperature (PRST) measurement capability that can achieve noncontact profiling of a sample's surface temperature when heated dynamically during laser processing, aerothermal heating or metal cutting/machining. Target surface temperature maps within and near the heated spot provide critical quantitative diagnostic data for laser-target coupling effectiveness and laser damage assessment. In the case of metal cutting, this type of measurement provides information on plastic deformation in the primary shear zone where the cutting tool is in contact with the workpiece. The challenge in these cases is to measure the temperature of a target while its surface's temperature and emissivity are changing rapidly and with incomplete knowledge of how the emissivity and surface texture (scattering) changes with temperature. Bodkin Design and Engineering, LLC (BDandE), with partners Spectral Sciences, Inc. (SSI) and Space Computer Corporation (SCC), has developed a PRST Sensor that is based on a hyperspectral MWIR imager spanning the wavelength range 2-5 μm and providing a hyperspectral datacube of 20-24 wavelengths at 60 Hz frame rate or faster. This imager is integrated with software and algorithms to extract surface temperature from radiometric measurements over the range from ambient to 2000K with a precision of 20K, even without a priori knowledge of the target's emissivity and even as the target emissivity may be changing with time and temperature. In this paper, we will present a description of the PRST system as well as laser heating test results which show the PRST system mapping target surface temperatures in the range 600-2600K on a variety of materials.

  17. Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowlton, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: a) To determine the magnitude of radiometric tarp BRDF; b) To determine whether an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer can be used to perform the experiment. Radiometric tarps with nominal reflectance values of 52%, 35%, and 3.5%, deployed for IKONOS. QuickBird, and OrbView-3 overpasses Ground-based spectroradiometric measurements of tarp and Spectralon@ panel taken during overpass using ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer, and tarp reflectance calculated. Reflectance data used in atmospheric radiative transfer model (MODTRAN) to predict satellite at-sensor radiance for radiometric calibration. Reflectance data also used to validate atmospheric correction of high-spatial-resolution multispectral image products

  18. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds.

  19. Errors in radiometric remote sensing of sea-surface temperature and salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, C. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for remote measurement of sea-surface physical temperature and salinity using radiometric measurements from aircraft or satellite are reviewed. Studies have been conducted to determine the sensitivity of the errors in surface temperature and salinity to errors in the measured brightness temperatures using combinations of UHF, L, S, and C-band measurements. These investigations were made using values of conductivity, static dielectric constant, and relaxation time derived from the regression equations of Klein and Swift (1977). Results of the error sensitivity study are presented in the form of error contour plots which permit the calculation of errors in the estimation of the physical parameters for given errors in the raw radiometric measurements.

  20. Science Measurement Requirements for Imaging Spectrometers from Airborne to Spaceborne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Asner, Gregory P.; Boardman, Joseph; Ungar, Stephen; Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the objectives of the work to create imaging spectrometers. The science objectives are to remotely determine the properties of the surface and atmosphere (physics, chemistry and biology) revealed by the interaction of electromagnetic energy with matter via spectroscopy. It presents a review the understanding of spectral, radiometric and spatial science measurement requirements for imaging spectrometers based upon science research results from past and current airborne and spaceborne instruments. It also examines the future requirements that will enable the next level of imaging spectroscopy science.

  1. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume IV. Graphic data maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. Volume IV contains the following maps at a scale of 1:62,500/sup 0/; flight line base maps; radiometric and magnetic contour maps; multi-variate analysis maps; geochemical analysis maps; geochemical composite maps.

  2. Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hopfer, R.L.; Orengo, A.; Chesnut, S.; Wenglar, M.

    1980-09-01

    During a 12-month period, 19,457 blood cultures were collected. Yeasts were isolated from 193 cultures derived from 76 cancer patients. Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis accounted for 79% of isolates. Of the three methods compared, the radiometric method required 2.9 days to become positive, blind subculture required 2.6 days, and Gram stains required 1 day. However, the radiometric method was clearly superior in detecting positive cultures, since 73% of all cultures were first detected radiometrically, 22% were detected by subculture, and only 5% were detected by Gram stain. Although 93% of the isolates were detected by aerobic culture, five (7%) isolates were obtained only from anaerobic cultures. Seven days of incubation appear to be sufficient for the radiometric detection of yeasts.

  3. On-orbit radiometric validation and field-of-view calibration of spaceborne microwave sounding instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, William J.; Bickmeier, Laura J.; Jairam, Laura G.; Leslie, R. Vincent

    2008-12-01

    Two calibration/validation efforts planned for current and future spaceborne microwave sounding instruments will be presented. First, the NPOESS Aircraft Sounder Testbed-Microwave (NAST-M) airborne sensor is used to directly validate the microwave radiometers (AMSU and MHS) on several operational satellites. Comparison results for underflights of the Aqua, NOAA, and MetOp-A satellites will be shown. Second, a potential approach will be presented for on-orbit field-of-view (FOV) calibration of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). A variety of proposed spacecraft maneuvers that could facilitate the characterization of the radiometric boresight of all 22 ATMS channels will be discussed. Radiance observations from the NAST-M airborne sensor can be used to directly validate the radiometric performance of spaceborne sensors. NAST-M includes a total of four spectrometers, with three operating near the oxygen lines at 50-57, 118.75, and 424.76 GHz, and a fourth spectrometer centered on the water vapor absorption line at 183.31 GHz. All four feedhorns are co-located, have 3-dB (full-width at half-maximum) beamwidths of 7.5° (translating to 2.5-km nominal pixel diameter at nadir incidence), and are directed at a single mirror that scans cross-track beneath the aircraft with a nominal swath width of 100 km. We will present results for two recent validation efforts: 1) the Pacific THORpex (THe Observing-system Research and predictability experiment) Observing System Test (PTOST 2003, Honolulu, HI) and 2) the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx 2007, Houston, TX). Radiance differences between the NAST-M sensor and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sensor (MHS) were found to be less than 1K for most channels. Comparison results for ocean underflights of the Aqua, NOAA, and MetOp-A satellites are shown. We also present an approach for on-orbit FOV calibration of the ATMS satellite instrument using vicarious

  4. Calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, J. K.; Schildkraut, Elliot Robert; Bauldree, Russell S.; Goodrich, Shawn M.

    1996-06-01

    The calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer (CIGARS) is a new high performance, multi-purpose, multi- platform Fourier transform spectrometer (FPS) sensor. It covers the waveband from 0.2 to 12 micrometer, has spectral resolution as fine as 0.3 cm-1, and records over 100 spectra per second. Two CIGARS units are being used for observations of target signatures in the air or on the ground from fixed or moving platforms, including high performance jet aircraft. In this paper we describe the characteristics and capabilities of the CIGARS sensor, which uses four interchangeable detector modules (Si, InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe) and two optics modules, with internal calibration. The data recording electronics support observations of transient events, even without precise information on the timing of the event. We present test and calibration data on the sensitivity, spectral resolution, stability, and spectral rate of CIGARS, and examples of in- flight observations of real targets. We also discuss plans for adapting CIGARS for imaging spectroscopy observations, with simultaneous spectral and spatial data, by replacing the existing detectors with a focal plane array (FPA).

  5. Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most {sup 238}Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size.

  6. Radiometric dating of the Siloam Tunnel, Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Amos; Shimron, Aryeh; Rosenbaum, Jeff

    2003-09-11

    The historical credibility of texts from the Bible is often debated when compared with Iron Age archaeological finds (refs. 1, 2 and references therein). Modern scientific methods may, in principle, be used to independently date structures that seem to be mentioned in the biblical text, to evaluate its historical authenticity. In reality, however, this approach is extremely difficult because of poor archaeological preservation, uncertainty in identification, scarcity of datable materials, and restricted scientific access into well-identified worship sites. Because of these problems, no well-identified Biblical structure has been radiometrically dated until now. Here we report radiocarbon and U-Th dating of the Siloam Tunnel, proving its Iron Age II date; we conclude that the Biblical text presents an accurate historic record of the Siloam Tunnel's construction. Being one of the longest ancient water tunnels lacking intermediate shafts, dating the Siloam Tunnel is a key to determining where and when this technological breakthrough took place. Siloam Tunnel dating also refutes a claim that the tunnel was constructed in the second century bc.

  7. Blast investigation by fast multispectral radiometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devir, A. D.; Bushlin, Y.; Mendelewicz, I.; Lessin, A. B.; Engel, M.

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge regarding the processes involved in blasts and detonations is required in various applications, e.g. missile interception, blasts of high-explosive materials, final ballistics and IED identification. Blasts release large amount of energy in short time duration. Some part of this energy is released as intense radiation in the optical spectral bands. This paper proposes to measure the blast radiation by a fast multispectral radiometer. The measurement is made, simultaneously, in appropriately chosen spectral bands. These spectral bands provide extensive information on the physical and chemical processes that govern the blast through the time-dependence of the molecular and aerosol contributions to the detonation products. Multi-spectral blast measurements are performed in the visible, SWIR and MWIR spectral bands. Analysis of the cross-correlation between the measured multi-spectral signals gives the time dependence of the temperature, aerosol and gas composition of the blast. Farther analysis of the development of these quantities in time may indicate on the order of the detonation and amount and type of explosive materials. Examples of analysis of measured explosions are presented to demonstrate the power of the suggested fast multispectral radiometric analysis approach.

  8. Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz David A. Wikner and Thomas J. Pizzillo ARL-TR-837 February 2001...MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-837 February 2001 Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz David A. Wikner and Thomas J. Pizzillo Sensors and...collision avoidance system," Proc. SPIE 3088 (April 1997), pp 57-63. 5. D. Wikner and T. Pizzillo, "Measurement of nadir and near-nadir 94-GHz

  9. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Radiometric Measurements Dick K.P. Yue Center for Ocean Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Room 5-321 77 Massachusetts Ave...comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES ...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements 5a

  10. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Radiometric Measurement Lian Shen Department of Mechanical Engineering & St. Anthony Falls Laboratory University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurement 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  11. Data processing of remotely sensed airborne hyperspectral data using the Airborne Processing Library (APL): Geocorrection algorithm descriptions and spatial accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mark A.; Taylor, Benjamin H.; Grant, Michael G.; Shutler, Jamie D.

    2014-03-01

    Remote sensing airborne hyperspectral data are routinely used for applications including algorithm development for satellite sensors, environmental monitoring and atmospheric studies. Single flight lines of airborne hyperspectral data are often in the region of tens of gigabytes in size. This means that a single aircraft can collect terabytes of remotely sensed hyperspectral data during a single year. Before these data can be used for scientific analyses, they need to be radiometrically calibrated, synchronised with the aircraft's position and attitude and then geocorrected. To enable efficient processing of these large datasets the UK Airborne Research and Survey Facility has recently developed a software suite, the Airborne Processing Library (APL), for processing airborne hyperspectral data acquired from the Specim AISA Eagle and Hawk instruments. The APL toolbox allows users to radiometrically calibrate, geocorrect, reproject and resample airborne data. Each stage of the toolbox outputs data in the common Band Interleaved Lines (BILs) format, which allows its integration with other standard remote sensing software packages. APL was developed to be user-friendly and suitable for use on a workstation PC as well as for the automated processing of the facility; to this end APL can be used under both Windows and Linux environments on a single desktop machine or through a Grid engine. A graphical user interface also exists. In this paper we describe the Airborne Processing Library software, its algorithms and approach. We present example results from using APL with an AISA Eagle sensor and we assess its spatial accuracy using data from multiple flight lines collected during a campaign in 2008 together with in situ surveyed ground control points.

  12. Regional-scale mineral mapping using ASTER VNIR/SWIR data and validation of reflectance and mineral map products using airborne hyperspectral CASI/SASI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Cui; Bokun, Yan; Runsheng, Wang; Feng, Tian; Yingjun, Zhao; Dechang, Liu; Suming, Yang; Wei, Shen

    2014-12-01

    ASTER data have been widely and successfully used in lithological mapping and mineral exploration for decades. The errors due to atmospheric water vapor and the characteristics of the photoelectric sensor could lead to the anomalous characteristics of band 5 and 9 in the ASTER standard reflectivity product. These anomalies could result in the spectroscopic misidentification of minerals. This study proposed a simple method of atmospheric correction for converting radiance-at-sensor to ground reflectance. The ASTER VNIR/SWIR reflectance correction factor was derived to correct the spectral shape bias resulting from the radiometric calibration error using airborne hyperspectral CASI_SASI data. The ASTER VNIR/SWIR reflectance correction factor was derived to correct the spectral shape bias resulting from the radiometric calibration error. After applying the reflectance factor to the atmospheric-corrected ASTER L1B data, a band combination mapping method was proposed for identifying minerals more quickly and accurately. The results indicate that this method for atmospheric correction of ASTER data produces very good results in the arid and bare areas. It is still unknown whether the method is suitable for humid and rainy areas where atmospheric water vapor varies spatially more than in arid and bare areas. After applying the reflectance factor to the atmospheric-corrected ASTER L1B data, the mean error of all reflectance bands decreased from 0.0256 to 0.002, and the standard deviation decreased from 0.04251 to 0.0007. The errors of the 2/1, 5/6 and 9/8 band ratios decreased from 2.38%, 4.102%, and 4.28% to 1.26%, -0.162%, and 0.31%, respectively. The radiometric calibration error of the ASTER band 1-9 data can lead to the overestimation of kaolinite. A band index of 2/1 for retrieving Fe3+ cannot produce a reliable Fe3+ distribution map, and a new index should be developed.

  13. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L B; Strahler, Alan H; Schaaf, Crystal B; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-03-02

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna(®) Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρ(app)), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρ(app) are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρ(app) error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρ(app) from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars.

  14. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A.; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J.; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρapp), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρapp are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρapp error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρapp from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars. PMID:26950126

  15. Optimal attributes for the object based detection of giant reed in riparian habitats: A comparative study between Airborne High Spatial Resolution and WorldView-2 imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria Rosário; Aguiar, Francisca C.; Silva, João M. N.; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Pereira, José M. C.

    2014-10-01

    Giant reed is an aggressive invasive plant of riparian ecosystems in many sub-tropical and warm-temperate regions, including Mediterranean Europe. In this study we tested a set of geometric, spectral and textural attributes in an object based image analysis (OBIA) approach to map giant reed invasions in riparian habitats. Bagging Classification and Regression Tree were used to select the optimal attributes and to build the classification rules sets. Mapping accuracy was performed using landscape metrics and the Kappa coefficient to compare the topographical and geometric similarity between the giant reed patches obtained with the OBIA map and with a validation map derived from on-screen digitizing. The methodology was applied in two high spatial resolution images: an airborne multispectral imagery and the newly WorldView-2 imagery. A temporal coverage of the airborne multispectral images was radiometrically calibrated with the IR-Mad transformation and used to assess the influence of the phenological variability of the invader. We found that optimal attributes for giant reed OBIA detection are a combination of spectral, geometric and textural information, with different scoring selection depending on the spectral and spatial characteristics of the imagery. WorldView-2 showed higher mapping accuracy (Kappa coefficient of 77%) and spectral attributes, including the newly yellow band, were preferentially selected, although a tendency to overestimate the total invaded area, due to the low spatial resolution (2 m of pixel size vs. 50 cm) was observed. When airborne images were used, geometric attributes were primarily selected and a higher spatial detail of the invasive patches was obtained, due to the higher spatial resolution. However, in highly heterogeneous landscapes, the low spectral resolution of the airborne images (4 bands instead of the 8 of WorldView-2) reduces the capability to detect giant reed patches. Giant reed displays peculiar spectral and geometric

  16. Self-Organizing Maps: A Data Mining Tool for the Analysis of Airborne Geophysical Data Collected over the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, C.; Fraser, S. J.; Crosta, A. P.; Silva, A.; Barros, C.

    2011-12-01

    Regional airborne geophysical data sets are being collected worldwide to promote mineral exploration and resource development. These data sets often are collected over highly prospective terranes, where access is limited or there are environmental concerns. Such regional surveys typically consist of two or more sensor packages being flown in an aircraft over the survey area and vast amounts of near-continuous data can be acquired in a relatively short time. Increasingly, there is also a need to process such data in a timely fashion to demonstrate the data's value and indicate the potential return or value of the survey to the funding agency. To assist in the timely analysis of such regional data sets, we have used an exploratory data mining approach: the Self Organizing Map (SOM). Because SOM is based on vector quantization and measures of vector similarity, it is an ideal tool to analyze a data set consisting of disparate geophysical input parameters to look for relationships and trends. We report on our use of SOM to analyze part of a regional airborne geophysical survey collected over the prospective Anapu-Tuere region of the Brazilian Amazon. Magnetic and spectrometric gamma ray data were used as input to our SOM analysis, and the results used to discriminate and identify various rock types and produce a "pseudo" geological map over the study area. The ability of SOM to define discrete domains of rock-types with similar properties allowed us to expand upon existing geological knowledge of the area for mapping purposes; and, often it was the combination of the magnetic and radiometric responses that identified a lithology's unique response. One particular unit was identified that had an association with known gold mineralization, which consequently highlighted the prospectivity of that unit elsewhere in the survey area. Our results indicate that SOM can be used for the semi-automatic analysis of regional airborne geophysical data to assist in geological mapping

  17. Glacier surface feature detection and classification from airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfle, B.; Sailer, R.; Vetter, M.; Rutzinger, M.; Pfeifer, N.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years airborne LiDAR evolved to the state-of-the-art technology for topographic data acquisition. Up to now mainly the derived elevation information has been used in glaciology (e.g. roughness determination, multitemporal elevation and volume changes). Few studies have already shown the potential of using LiDAR signal intensities for glacier surface differentiation, primarily based on visual interpretation of signal intensity images. This contribution brings together the spatial and radiometric information provided by airborne LiDAR, in order to make an automatic glacier surface feature detection and classification possible. The automation of the processing workflow and the standardization of the used input data become important particularly for multitemporal analysis where surface changes and feature tracking are of major interest. This study is carried out at the Hintereisferner, Ötztal Alps/Austria, where 16 airborne LiDAR acquisitions have taken place since 2001. We aim at detecting the main glacier surface classes as defined by crevasses, snow, firn, ice and debris covered ice areas. Prior to the glacier facies differentiation, an automated glacier delineation based on roughness constraints is performed. It is assumed that the glacier surface, except the crevasse zone, tends to a smoother surface than the adjacent slopes and represents one large connected spatial unit. The developed method combines raster and point cloud based processing steps in an object-based segmentation and classification procedure where elevation and calibrated signal intensity are used as complementary input. The calibration of the recorded signal intensity removes known effects originating from the atmosphere, topography and scan geometry (e.g. distance to target) and hence provides a value proportional to surface reflectance in the wavelength of the laser system. Since the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of the scanned surface is not known beforehand

  18. Airborne radiometric data - A tool for reconnaissance geological mapping using a GIS

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.F.; Bonham-Carter, G.F. Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa )

    1993-08-01

    A clustering technique is applied to radioelement data, and the resulting cluster map is compared with a digitized geological map within a GIS software package. The cross tabulation clearly identifies those geological units that have a distinctive radioelement response. By reclassifying the map overlay and imposing a color coding scheme that enhances bedrock geology classes, the relationship between the bedrock geology and radioelement response is enhanced. The degree of correlation between the two cartographic images is site dependent, rather than global. Areas where the two maps differ indicate zones of possible interest for field verification of published field maps for the purposes of mineral exploration. 13 refs.

  19. NEON Airborne Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    sensing data collection protocol to meet NEON science requirements? How do aircraft altitude, spatial sampling, spatial resolution, and LiDAR instrument configuration affect data retrievals? What are appropriate algorithms to derive ECVs from AOP data? What methodology should be followed to validate AOP remote sensing products and how should ground truth data be collected? Early test flights were focused on radiometric and geometric calibration as well as processing from raw data to Level-1 products. Subsequent flights were conducted focusing on collecting vegetation chemistry and structure measurements. These test flights that were conducted during 2012 have proved to be extremely valuable for verifying instrument functionality and performance, exercising remote sensing collection protocols, and providing data for algorithm and science product validation. Results from these early flights are presented, including the radiometric and geometric calibration of the AOP instruments. These 2012 flight campaigns are just the first of a series of test flights that will take place over the next several years as part of the NEON observatory construction. Lessons learned from these early campaigns will inform both airborne and ground data collection methodologies for future campaigns as well as guide the AOP sampling strategy before NEON enters full science operations.

  20. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in uranium exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuwanshi, S. S.

    1992-07-01

    Uranium exploration is of paramount importance to India to maximize the indigeneous resources to meet the ever increasing demand for energy. Comprehensive regional and local zones of uranium mineralization are needed to be resolved. Such data comprise information on radioactivity in various energy ranges and on lithological knowledge. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometric techniques are particularly suited to provide spatial information. This review briefly discusses the conventional data presentation, statistically significant maps and the schemes suitable for classification of mineralized zones. A brief introduction is provided to airborne gamma-ray data, their acquisition, analysis, processing and interpretation to bring out their role in designing suitable models of uranium resources. State-of-the-art in uranium exploration covers radiometric mapping through airborne gamma-ray surveys. Through the examples of the Indian work done during this decade, the state-of-the-art and its usefulness in the country has been illustrated. It is concluded that the high sensitivity airborne gamma-ray spectrometric surveys coupled with modern methods of data analysis can further narrow down the targets.

  2. Airborne FTIR remote sensing of methane from the FAAM aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Grant; Illingworth, Samuel; Mead, Iq; Harlow, Chawn; Newman, Stuart; Vance, Alan

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the first campaign results for retrievals of methane (and other gases and thermodynamic parameters) from the Airborne Research Interferometer Evaluation System (ARIES) FTIR instrument on the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAE-146 aircraft. The ARIES is a thermal infrared BOMEM FTS tailored for airborne use and has an unapodised spectral resolution of 1 cm-1. It was developed as an IASI analogue for radiometric calibration of its satellite countepart. We will discuss the technical and theoretical assessment of the ARIES retrieval processor and present retrievals and interpretation of remote sampling over several years of campaign data in the tropics, around the UK, and in the high Arctic, during the Jaivex, GAUGE and MAMM campaigns respectively. Validation studies against airborne in situ data have shown that ARIES can achieve accuracties of ~2% in partial column retrievals of methane, while providing simultaneous information on a wide range of other trace gases typical of FTIR measurement. The ARIES has now beein in operation on the FAAM aircraft for a range of campaigns around the world and represents a useful validation bridge between high precision in situ point measurements (on the ground and by aircraft) and satellite remote sensing.

  3. Airborne geophysical surveys over the eastern Adirondacks, New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Anjana K.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne geophysical surveys were conducted in the eastern Adirondacks from Dec. 7, 2015 - Dec. 21, 2015, by Goldak Airborne Surveys. The area was flown along a draped surface with a nominal survey height above ground of 200 meters. The flight line spacing was 250 meters for traverse lines and 2500 meters for control lines. Here we present downloadable magnetic and radiometric (gamma spectrometry) data from those surveys as image (Geotiff) and flight line data (csv format).BackgroundThe Eastern Adirondacks region was known for iron mining in the 1800's and 1900's but it also contains deposits of rare earth minerals. Rare earth minerals are used in advanced technology such as in cell phones, rechargeable batteries and super-magnets. In many areas rare earth minerals appear to be associated with iron ore.The surveys were flown in order to map geologic variations in three dimensions. Magnetic surveys measure subtle changes in Earth's magnetic field that reflect different types of buried rock, such as iron-rich ore bodies. Radiometric methods detect naturally occurring gamma particles. The energy spectra of these particles can be used to estimate relative amounts of potassium, uranium and thorium (also referred to as gamma ray spectrometry), which are sometimes associated with rare earth elements. Together, these data provide insights into the regional tectonic and magmatic history as well as mineral resources in the area.

  4. Deep Space Network Radiometric Remote Sensing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft are viewed through a troposphere that absorbs and delays radio signals propagating through it. Tropospheric water, in the form of vapor, cloud liquid, and precipitation, emits radio noise which limits satellite telemetry communication link performance. Even at X-band, rain storms have severely affected several satellite experiments including a planetary encounter. The problem will worsen with DSN implementation of Ka-band because communication link budgets will be dominated by tropospheric conditions. Troposphere-induced propagation delays currently limit VLBI accuracy and are significant sources of error for Doppler tracking. Additionally, the success of radio science programs such as satellite gravity wave experiments and atmospheric occultation experiments depends on minimizing the effect of water vapor-induced propagation delays. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the troposphere, the Deep Space Network has supported a program of radiometric remote sensing. Currently, water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and microwave temperature profilers (MTPs) support many aspects of the Deep Space Network operations and research and development programs. Their capability to sense atmospheric water, microwave sky brightness, and atmospheric temperature is critical to development of Ka-band telemetry systems, communication link models, VLBI, satellite gravity wave experiments, and radio science missions. During 1993, WVRs provided data for propagation model development, supported planetary missions, and demonstrated advanced tracking capability. Collection of atmospheric statistics is necessary to model and predict performance of Ka-band telemetry links, antenna arrays, and radio science experiments. Since the spectrum of weather variations has power at very long time scales, atmospheric measurements have been requested for periods ranging from one year to a decade at each DSN site. The resulting database would provide reliable statistics on daily

  5. Classification of Baltic Sea ice types by airborne multifrequency microwave radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kurvonen, L.; Hallikainen, M.

    1996-11-01

    An airborne multifrequency radiometer (24, 34, 48, and 94 GHz, vertical polarization) was used to investigate the behavior of the brightness temperature of different sea ice types in the Gulf of Bothnia (Baltic Sea). The measurements and the main results of the analysis are presented. The measurements were made in dry and wet conditions (air temperature above and below 0 C). The angle of incidence was 45{degree} in all measurements. The following topics are evaluated: (a) frequency dependency of the brightness temperature of different ice types, (b) the capability of the multifrequency radiometer to classify ice types for winter navigation purposes, and (c) the optimum measurement frequencies for mapping sea ice. The weather conditions had a significant impact on the radiometric signatures of some ice types (snow-covered compact pack ice and frost-covered new ice); the impact was the highest at 94 GHz. In all cases the overall classification accuracy was around 90% (the kappa coefficient was from 0.86 to 0.96) when the optimum channel combination (24/34 GHz and 94 GHz) was used.

  6. High accuracy in situ radiometric mapping.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrew N

    2004-01-01

    In situ and airborne gamma ray spectrometry have been shown to provide rapid and spatially representative estimates of environmental radioactivity across a range of landscapes. However, one of the principal limitations of this technique has been the influence of changes in the vertical distribution of the source (e.g. 137Cs) on the observed photon fluence resulting in a significant reduction in the accuracy of the in situ activity measurement. A flexible approach for single gamma photon emitting radionuclides is presented, which relies on the quantification of forward scattering (or valley region between the full energy peak and Compton edge) within the gamma ray spectrum to compensate for changes in the 137Cs vertical activity distribution. This novel in situ method lends itself to the mapping of activity concentrations in environments that exhibit systematic changes in the vertical activity distribution. The robustness of this approach has been demonstrated in a salt marsh environment on the Solway coast, SW Scotland, with both a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) detector and a 35% n-type HPGe detector. Application to ploughed field environments has also been demonstrated using HPGe detector, including its application to the estimation of field moist bulk density and soil erosion measurement. Ongoing research work is also outlined.

  7. Landsat-5 TM reflective-band absolute radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Helder, D.L.; Markham, B.L.; Dewald, J.D.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Micijevic, E.; Ruggles, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provides the longest running continuous dataset of moderate spatial resolution remote sensing imagery, dating back to its launch in March 1984. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for this imagery used the instrument's response to the Internal Calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset of each detector. Due to observed degradations in the IC, a new procedure was implemented for U.S.-processed data in May 2003. This new calibration procedure is based on a lifetime radiometric calibration model for the instrument's reflective bands (1-5 and 7) and is derived, in part, from the IC response without the related degradation effects and is tied to the cross calibration with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus. Reflective-band absolute radiometric accuracy of the instrument tends to be on the order of 7% to 10%, based on a variety of calibration methods.

  8. Separation of secondary refractories by type by radioresonance and x-ray radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovskii, N.I.; Rogozina, V.G.; Bortnikova, N.V.; Koronchevskii, A.V.; Trufanov, A.M.; Fedorov, Yu.O.

    1987-11-01

    The investigations on radiometric methods of beneficiation were made on samples of secondary refractories taken at Orsk-Khalilov Metallurgical Combine which were a mixture of aluminosilicate and magnesia (periclase and periclase-chromite) refractory scrap. The change in quality factor of the circuit under the action on it of secondary refractories was measured at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and the results of the measurements are presented. The periclase, periclase-chromite, and aluminosilicate refractory scrap change the quality factor of the circuit differently. On the basis of these investigations it may be concluded that the radioresonance method of separation may be used for separation of refractory scrap by types.

  9. DSMC Simulation of Radiometric Flow in a Ratchet-Channel Nano-Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roohi, Ehsan; Shahbi, Vahid; Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    The current paper presents a description of the fluid and pumping characteristics of a ratchet-type nano-scale pump suggested by Donkov et al. [1] and presents the optimum geometry and working conditions of the pump. The pump consists of a ratchet channel with the temperature gradient applied between the opposing walls. Here, we report the physical mechanism of flow induction within the pump and show that the combination of configuration and boundary temperature of this pump induces a radiometric-type flow. Benefiting from the DSMC simulations, we suggest the optimum working condition/geometrical size of the pump. Comparison of DSMC simulation with analytical relations is reported.

  10. Combined MIPAS (airborne/satellite), CALIPSO and in situ study on large potential NAT particles observed in early Arctic winter stratosphere in December 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Pitts, Michael; Poole, Lamont; Oelhaf, Hermann; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Frey, Wiebke; Gulde, Thomas; Maucher, Guido; Piesch, Christof; Sartorius, Christian; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the characteristics of large HNO3-containing particles (potential 'NAT-rocks') involved in vertical redistribution of HNO3 in the polar winter stratosphere is limited due to the difficult accessibility of these particles by observations. While robust polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) classification schemes exist for observations by the space-borne lidar aboard CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) as well as for the passive mid-infrared limb observations by MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding), these observations are hardly exploited for the detection of large (diameter >10 μm) NAT particles. This is due to the facts that these particles have low overall number densities, resulting in weak detectable signatures, and that the physical characteristics of these particles (i.e. shape, morphology, HNO3-content and optical characteristics) are uncertain. We investigate collocated and complementary observations of a low-density potential large NAT particle field by the space-borne instruments CALIPSO and MIPAS-ENVISAT as well as the airborne observations by the limb-sounder MIPAS-STR and the in situ particle probe FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe 100) aboard the high-altitude aircraft Geophysica. The observations aboard the Geophysica on 11 December 2011 associated to ESSenCe (ESa Sounder Campaign 2011) provided us the unique opportunity to study in detail the lower boundary region of a PSC where large potential NAT particles (>20 μm in diameter) were detected in situ. We analyse the ambient temperatures and gas-phase composition (HNO3 and H2O), the signatures of the observed particles in the CALIPSO and MIPAS observations, the HNO3-content of these particles suggested by the FSSP-100 and MIPAS-STR observations, and focus on the spectral fingerprint of these particles in the MIPAS-STR observations. While the spectral characterisation of the observed particles is subject

  11. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  12. Evaluation of computational radiometric and spectral sensor calibration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakov, Alkhazur

    2016-04-01

    Radiometric and spectral calibration are essential for enabling the use of digital sensors for measurement purposes. Traditional optical calibration techniques require expensive equipment such as specialized light sources, monochromators, tunable filters, calibrated photo-diodes, etc. The trade-offs between computational and physics-based characterization schemes are, however, not well understood. In this paper we perform an analysis of existing computational calibration schemes and elucidate their weak points. We highlight the limitations by comparing against ground truth measurements performed in an optical characterization laboratory (EMVA 1288 standard). Based on our analysis, we present accurate and affordable methods for the radiometric and spectral calibration of a camera.

  13. Mapping and discriminating the Pan-African granitoids in the Hoggar (southern Algeria) using Landsat 7 ETM+ data and airborne geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrouk, Siham; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Liégeois, Jean Paul; Boubekri, Hichem; El Khaznadji, Riad Ben

    2017-03-01

    This study presents a multidisciplinary approach to discriminate and map different types and generations of Pan-African granitoids in the Hoggar, southern Algeria, using remote sensing and airborne geophysics in close correlation with previous works and established geological maps. RGB (Red, Green, Blue) combinations of band ratios; principal component analysis (PCA) and image classification for Landsat 7 ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus), allow spatial discrimination and mapping of granitoid rocks of the studied area (200*350 km). This area extend over four contrasted Pan-African terranes (In Tedeini, Iskel, Tefedest and Laouni terranes, the two latter belong to the LATEA (Laouni-Azrou-n-Fad-Tefedest-Egéré-Aleksod-Assodé-Issalane) metacraton. The airborne magnetic intensity provides a wide range of responses from high values (youngest granitoids) to low values (volcano-sedimentary and gneissic country-rocks). Radiometric data, displaying radioelements concentration, discriminate efficiently the late alkaline granitoids (high values), the calk-alkaline granitoids (intermediate values) and the Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite series (low values). This study led to the establishment of a more accurate geological map where the geochemical characteristics of the Pan-African granitoids are determined, including plutons not yet studied, especially in the poorly known In Tedeini terrane, and brings new constraints for the geodynamic development of the Tuareg Shield, which includes the Hoggar.

  14. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Boegh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne; Alfieri, Joseph G.; Kustas, William P.; Prueger, John H.; Niyogi, Dev; Das, Narendra; Drewry, Darren T.; Hoffmann, Lucien; Jarvis, Andrew J.

    2015-08-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combines TR data with standard energy balance closure models for deriving a hybrid scheme that does not require parameterization of the surface (or stomatal) and aerodynamic conductances (gS and gB). STIC is formed by the simultaneous solution of four state equations and it uses TR as an additional data source for retrieving the "near surface" moisture availability (M) and the Priestley-Taylor coefficient (α). The performance of STIC is tested using high-temporal resolution TR observations collected from different international surface energy flux experiments in conjunction with corresponding net radiation (RN), ground heat flux (G), air temperature (TA), and relative humidity (RH) measurements. A comparison of the STIC outputs with the eddy covariance measurements of λE and H revealed RMSDs of 7-16% and 40-74% in half-hourly λE and H estimates. These statistics were 5-13% and 10-44% in daily λE and H. The errors and uncertainties in both surface fluxes are comparable to the models that typically use land surface parameterizations for determining the unobserved components (gS and gB) of the surface energy balance models. However, the scheme is simpler, has the capabilities for generating spatially explicit surface energy fluxes and independent of submodels for boundary layer developments. This article was corrected on 27 AUG 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  15. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  16. Exploring a Black Body Source as an Absolute Radiometric Calibration Standard and Comparison with a NIST Traced Lamp Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Chrien, Thomas; Sarture, Chuck

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is required for the scientific research and application objectives pursued with the spectroscopic measurements. Specifically calibration is required for: inter-comparison of AVIRIS data measured at different locations and at different times; analysis of AVIRIS data with data measured by other instruments; and analysis of AVIRIS data in conjunction with computer models. The primary effect of radiometric calibration is conversion of AVIRIS instrument response values (digitized numbers, or DN) to units of absolute radiance. For example, a figure shows the instrument response spectrum measured by AVIRIS over a portion of Rogers Dry Lake, California, and another figure shows the same spectrum calibrated to radiance. Only the calibrated spectrum may be quantitatively analyzed for science research and application objectives. Since the initial development of the AVIRIS instrument-radiometric calibration has been based upon a 1000-W irradiance lamp with a calibration traced to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are several advantages to this irradiance-lamp calibration approach. First, the considerable effort of NIST backs up the calibration. Second, by changing the distance to the lamp, the output can closely span the radiance levels measured by AVIRIS. Third, this type of standard is widely used. Fourth, these calibrated lamps are comparatively inexpensive. Conversely, there are several disadvantages to this approach as well. First, the lamp is not a primary standard. Second, the lamp output characteristics may change in an unknown manner through time. Third, it is difficult to assess, constrain, or improve the calibration uncertainty delivered with the lamp. In an attempt to explore the effect and potentially address some of these disadvantages a set of analyses and measurements comparing an irradiance lamp with a black-body source have been completed

  17. Oceanic radiance model development and validation: application of airborne active-passive ocean color spectral measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Swift, R; Yungel, J

    1995-06-20

    It is shown that airborne active-passive (laser-solar) ocean color data can be used to develop and validate oceanic radiance models. The two principal inputs to the oceanic radiance model, chlorophyll pigment and incident solar irradiance, are obtained from a nadir-viewing laser-induced fluorescence spectrometer and a zenith-viewing radiometer, respectively. The computed water-leaving radiances are validated by comparison with the calibrated output of a separate nadir-viewing radiometer subsystem. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the calculated and the observed airborne radiances are found to compare very favorably for the 443-, 520-, and 550-nm wavelengths over an ∼ 170-km flight track east of St. John's, Newfoundland. The results further suggest that the semianalytical radiance model of ocean color, the airborne active (laser) fluorescence spectrometer, and the passive (solar) radiometric instrumentation are all remarkably precise.

  18. A preliminary study of a very large space radiometric antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    An approach used to compute the size of a special radiometric reflector antenna is presented. Operating at 1 GHz, this reflector is required to produce 200 simultaneous contiguous beams, each with a 3 dB footprint of 1 km from an assumed satellite height of 650 km. The overall beam efficiency for each beam is required to be more than 90%.

  19. A Non-Radiative Transfer Approach to Radiometric Vicarious Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    TOA (top-of-atmosphere) radiance from high-spatial-resolution satellite imagery systems is important for a wide variety of research and applications. Many research initiatives require data with absolute radiometric accuracy better than a few percent. The conversion of satellite digital numbers to radiance depends on accurate radiometric calibration. A common method for determining and validating radiometric calibrations is to rely upon vicarious calibration approaches. Historically, vicarious calibration methods use radiative transfer codes with ground-based atmosphere and surface reflectance or radiance inputs for estimating TOA radiance values. These TOA radiance values are compared against the satellite digital numbers to determine the radiometric calibration. However, the radiative transfer codes used depend on many assumptions about the aerosol properties and the atmospheric point spread function. A measurement-based atmospheric radiance estimation approach for high-spatial-resolution, multispectral, visible/near-infrared sensors is presented that eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and many of the underlying assumptions. A comparison between the radiative transfer and non-radiative transfer approaches is made.

  20. Laboratory-based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions of radiometric tarps

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J

    2008-06-20

    Laboratory-based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) of radiometric tarp samples used in the vicarious calibration of Earth remote sensing satellite instruments are presented in this paper. The results illustrate the BRDF dependence on the orientation of the tarps' weft and warp threads. The study was performed using the GSFC scatterometer at incident zenith angles of 0 deg., 10 deg., and 30 deg.; scatter zenith angles from 0 deg. to 60 deg.; and scatter azimuth angles of 0 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 135 deg., and 180 deg.. The wavelengths were 485 nm, 550 nm, 633 nm, and 800 nm. The tarp's weft and warp dependence on BRDF is well defined at all measurement geometries and wavelengths. The BRDF difference can be as high as 8% at 0 deg. incident angle and 12% at 30 deg. incident angle. The fitted BRDF data show a very small discrepancy from the measured ones. New data on the forward and backscatter properties of radiometric tarps are reported. The backward scatter is well pronounced for the white samples. The black sample has well-pronounced forward scatter. The provided BRDF characterization of radiometric tarps is an excellent reference for anyone interested in using tarps for radiometric calibrations. The results are NIST traceable.

  1. Design, calibration, and application of an airborne gamma spectrometer system in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, G.F.; Rybach, L.; Klingele, E.E.

    1997-09-01

    Airborne radiometric surveys are finding increasingly wider application in environmental mapping and monitoring. They are the most efficient tool to delimit surface contamination and to locate lost radioactive sources. To secure radiometric capability in survey and emergency situations, a new sensitive airborne system has been built that includes an airborne spectrometer with 256 channels and a sodium iodide detector with a total volume of 16.8 liters. A rack-mounted PC with memory cards is used for data acquisition, with a GPS satellite navigation system for positioning. The system was calibrated with point sources using a mathematical correction to take into account the effects of gamma-ray scattering in the ground and in the atmosphere. The calibration was complemented by high precision ground gamma spectrometry and laboratory measurements on rock samples. In Switzerland, two major research programs make use of the capabilities of airborne radiometric measurements. The first one concerns nuclear power-plant monitoring. The five Swiss nuclear installations (four power plants and one research facility) and the surrounding regions of each site are surveyed annually. The project goal is to monitor the dose-rate distribution and to provide a documented baseline database. The measurements show that all sites (with the exception of the Goesgen power plant) can be identified clearly on the maps. No artificial radioactivity that could not be explained by the Chernobyl release or earlier nuclear weapons tests was detected outside of the fenced sites of the nuclear installations. The second program aims at a better evaluation of the natural radiation level in Switzerland. The survey focused on the crystalline rocks of the Central Massifs of the Swiss Alps because of their relatively high natural radioactivity and lithological variability.

  2. Investigation of coastal areas in Northern Germany using airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miensopust, Marion; Siemon, Bernhard; Wiederhold, Helga; Steuer, Annika; Ibs-von Seht, Malte; Voß, Wolfgang; Meyer, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Since 2000, the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) carried out several airborne geophysical surveys in Northern Germany to investigate the coastal areas of the North Sea and some of the North and East Frisian Islands. Several of those surveys were conducted in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG). Two helicopter-borne geophysical systems were used, namely the BGR system, which collects simultaneously frequency-domain electromagnetic, magnetic and radiometric data, and the SkyTEM system, a time-domain electromagnetic system developed by the University of Aarhus. Airborne geophysical surveys enable to investigate huge areas almost completely with high lateral resolution in a relatively short time at economic cost. In general, the results can support geological and hydrogeological mapping. Of particular importance are the airborne electromagnetic results, as the surveyed parameter - the electrical conductivity - depends on both lithology and groundwater status. Therefore, they can reveal buried valleys and the distribution of sandy and clayey sediments as well as salinization zones and fresh-water occurrences. The often simultaneously recorded magnetic and radiometric data support the electromagnetic results. Lateral changes of Quaternary and Tertiary sediments (shallow source - several tens of metres) as well as evidences of the North German Basin (deep source - several kilometres) are revealed by the magnetic results. The radiometric data indicate the various mineral compositions of the soil sediments. This BGR/LIAG project aims to build up a geophysics data base (http://geophysics-database.de/) which contains all airborne geophysical data sets. However, the more significant effort is to create a reference data set as basis for monitoring climate or man-made induced changes of the salt-water/fresh-water interface at the German North Sea coast. The significance of problems for groundwater extraction

  3. Airborne Gravimetry and Downward Continuation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jekeli, C.; Yang, H.; Kwon, J.

    2009-12-01

    Measuring the Earth’s gravity field using airborne instrumentation is fully operational and has been widely practiced for nearly three decades since its official debut in the early 1980s (S. Hammer: “Airborne Gravity is Here!”) coinciding with the precision kinematic positioning capability of GPS. Airborne gravimetry is undertaken for both efficient geophysical exploration purposes, as well as the determination of the regional geoid to aid in the modernization of height systems. Especially for the latter application, downward continuation of the data and combination with existing terrestrial gravimetry pose theoretical as well as practical challenges, which, on the other hand, create multiple processing possibilities. Downward continuation may be approached in various ways from the viewpoint of potential theory and the boundary-value problem to using gradients either estimated locally or computed from existing models. Logistical constraints imposed by the airborne survey, instrumental noise, and the intrinsic numerical instability of downward continuation all conspire to impact the final product in terms of achievable resolution and accuracy. In this paper, we review the theory of airborne gravimetry and the methodology of downward continuation, and provide a numerical comparison of possible schemes and their impact on geoid determination.

  4. Peat Depth Assessment Using Airborne Geophysical Data for Carbon Stock Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaney, Antoinette; McKinley, Jennifer; Ruffell, Alastair; Robinson, Martin; Graham, Conor; Hodgson, Jim; Desissa, Mohammednur

    2013-04-01

    The Kyoto Agreement demands that all signatory countries have an inventory of their carbon stock, plus possible future changes to this store. This is particularly important for Ireland, where some 16% of the surface is covered by peat bog. Estimates of soil carbon stores are a key component of the required annual returns made by the Irish and UK governments to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Saturated peat attenuates gamma-radiation from underlying rocks. This effect can be used to estimate the thickness of peat, within certain limits. This project examines this relationship between peat depth and gamma-radiation using airborne geophysical data generated by the Tellus Survey and newly acquired data collected as part of the EU-funded Tellus Border project, together encompassing Northern Ireland and the border area of the Republic of Ireland. Selected peat bog sites are used to ground truth and evaluate the use of airborne geophysical (radiometric and electromagnetic) data and validate modelled estimates of soil carbon, peat volume and depth to bedrock. Data from two test line sites are presented: one in Bundoran, County Donegal and a second line in Sliabh Beagh, County Monaghan. The plane flew over these areas at different times of the year and at a series of different elevations allowing the data to be assessed temporally with different soil/peat saturation levels. On the ground these flight test lines cover varying surface land use zones allowing future extrapolation of data from the sites. This research applies spatial statistical techniques, including uncertainty estimation in geostatistical prediction and simulation, to investigate and model the use of airborne geophysical data to examine the relationship between reduced radioactivity and peat depth. Ground truthing at test line locations and selected peat bog sites involves use of ground penetrating radar, terrestrial LiDAR, peat depth probing, magnetometry, resistivity, handheld gamma

  5. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume III. Magnetic and ancillary stacked profile data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. This volume contains the 5-variable residual magnetic and ancillary stacked profile data for the entire survey area.

  6. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume I. General narrative report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. Volume I contains the following: flight operations; data acquisition and processing; synopsis of surface geology; geochemical data interpretation; geologic-geochemical analogy; summary and recommendations for geochemical units.

  7. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable Wide-Band on Board Calibration Source for In-Flight Data Validation in Imaging Spectroscopy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, J. B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Kroll, Linley A.; Nolte, Scott H.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the quantitative spectral data collected by an imaging spectrometer instrument is critically dependent upon the accuracy of the spectral and radiometric calibration of the system. In order for the collected spectra to be scientifically useful, the calibration of the instrument must be precisely known not only prior to but during data collection. Thus, in addition to a rigorous in-lab calibration procedure, the airborne instruments designed and built by the NASA/JPL Imaging Spectroscopy Group incorporate an on board calibrator (OBC) system with the instrument to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The output of the OBC source illuminates a target panel on the backside of the foreoptics shutter both before and after data collection. The OBC and in-lab calibration data sets are then used to validate and post-process the collected spectral image data. The resulting accuracy of the spectrometer output data is therefore integrally dependent upon the stability of the OBC source. In this paper we describe the design and application of the latest iteration of this novel device developed at NASA/JPL which integrates a halogen-cycle source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system and a fiber-based intensity monitoring feedback loop. The OBC source in this Airborne Testbed Spectrometer was run over a period of 15 hours while both the radiometric and spectral stabilities of the output were measured and demonstrated stability to within 1% of nominal.

  8. The Hintereisferner - eight years of experience in method development for glacier monitoring with airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, M.; Höfle, B.; Pfeifer, N.; Rutzinger, M.; Sailer, R.; Stötter, J.; Geist, T.

    2009-04-01

    classification method distinguishing water from dry land on proglacial braided river system based on multitemporal data, (iii) a computation method to localize debris flows and other mass movements have been implemented. LiDAR data provide a huge potential for monitoring glacier surfaces because of the different surface attributes, which are recorded by the sensor (i.e. intensity and elevation) or can be derived by combining different features (e.g. point density, local roughness, etc). Within the next few years, full-waveform LiDAR systems will be established as standard LiDAR system specification. An increase of the point density using full-waveform systems will provide more accurate elevation and radiometric information of the terrain.

  9. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  10. The enhanced MODIS airborne simulator hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Daniel C.; Fisher, John; Graham, Edward R.

    2011-06-01

    The EMAS-HS or Enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator is an upgrade to the solar reflected and thermal infrared channels of NASA's MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS). In the solar reflected bands, the MAS scanner functionality will be augmented with the addition of this separate pushbroom hyperspectral instrument. As well as increasing the spectral resolution of MAS beyond 10 nm, this spectrometer is designed to maintain a stable calibration that can be transferred to the existing MAS sensor. The design emphasizes environmental control and on-board radiometric stability monitoring. The system is designed for high-altitude missions on the ER-2 and the Global Hawk platforms. System trades optimize performance in MODIS spectral bands that support land, cloud, aerosol, and atmospheric water studies. The primary science mission driving the development is high altitude cloud imaging, with secondary missions possible for ocean color. The sensor uses two Offner spectrometers to cover the 380-2400 nm spectral range. It features an all-reflective telescope with a 50° full field-of-view. A dichroic cold mirror will split the image from the telescope, with longer radiation transmitted to the SWIR spectrometer. The VNIR spectrometer uses a TE-cooled Si CCD detector that samples the spectrum at 2.5 nm intervals, while the SWIR spectrometer uses a Stirling-cooled hybrid HgCdTe detector to sample the spectrum at 10 nm per band. Both spectrometers will feature 1.05 mRad instantaneous fields-of-view registered to the MAS scanner IFOV's.

  11. Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discovered Agaritta and Brady Creek Fields, Concho County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. ); Brown, J.J. )

    1993-07-01

    From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King sand (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil-gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King sand discoveries or extensions and three deeper Goen discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67/bbl of proven producing oil reserves. Final locations for the discovery wells on each of the nine successful prospects were selected primarily on the basis of combined subsurface geology and surface geochemical data. As examples, we present information about the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new-field discoveries, with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6 million bbl of oil. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) regional subsurface geologic projection, (2) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (3) interstitial soil-gas hydrocarbon data, (4) soil magnetic-susceptibility measurements, and (5) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry.

  12. The 90 GHz radiometric imaging. [for terrain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. E.; White, J. D.; Wilson, W. J.; Mori, T. T.; Hollinger, J. P.; Troy, B. E.; Kenney, J. E.; Mcgoogan, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A 90-GHz (3 mm wavelength) radiometer with a noise output fluctuation of 0.22 K (RMS), with a scanning antenna beam mirror, and the data processing system are described. Real-time radiometric imaging of terrain and man-made objects are shown. Flying at an altitude of 1500 ft a radiometer antenna with a 2 degrees halfpower beamwidth can distinguish landforms, waterways, roads, runways, bridges, ships at sea and their wakes, aircraft on runways, and athletic fields. A flight taken at an altitude of 3000 ft with approximately 2000 ft of clouds below the radiometer demonstrates the ability to distinguish bridges, rivers, marshland and other landforms even though the clouds are optically opaque. The radiometric images of a few representative scenes along with photographs of the corresponding scenes are presented to demonstrate the resolution of the imager system.

  13. The OLI Radiometric Scale Realization Round Robin Measurement Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutlip, Hansford; Cole,Jerold; Johnson, B. Carol; Maxwell, Stephen; Markham, Brian; Ong, Lawrence; Hom, Milton; Biggar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A round robin radiometric scale realization was performed at the Ball Aerospace Radiometric Calibration Laboratory in January/February 2011 in support of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) Program. Participants included Ball Aerospace, NIST, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and the University of Arizona. The eight day campaign included multiple observations of three integrating sphere sources by nine radiometers. The objective of the campaign was to validate the radiance calibration uncertainty ascribed to the integrating sphere used to calibrate the OLI instrument. The instrument level calibration source uncertainty was validated by quatnifying: (1) the long term stability of the NIST calibrated radiance artifact, (2) the responsivity scale of the Ball Aerospace transfer radiometer and (3) the operational characteristics of the large integrating sphere.

  14. Detection of coliform organisms in drinking water by radiometric method.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, S J; Bibi, S

    1991-07-01

    The radiometric method has been used for detection of coliform bacteria in water. The method is based on measuring the released metabolic 14CO2 from 14C-lactose in growth media containing coliform organisms incubated at 37 degrees C under continuous shaking. This rapid and sensitive radiometric method permits the detection of even single coliform organisms within 6 hours of incubation. Using this automated method, a total of 102 samples (in duplicate) collected from different areas in and around Rawalpindi and Islamabad were assessed for coliform bacteria. Of these 102 samples, 50 were tap water samples, 40 from wells and 6 each were from Rawal and Simly dams. About 47% and 67% tap water samples, while 62% and 74% well water samples were found unsatisfactory from around Islamabad and Rawalpindi areas, respectively. About 83% and 66% water samples from Rawal dam and Simly dam respectively were found to be unsatisfactory.

  15. Characterization of radiometric calibration of LANDSAT-4 TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch internal calibrator, image, and background data is to characterize the radiometric performance of the LANDSAT-4 TM and to recommend improved procedures for radiometric calibration. All but two channels (band 2, channel 4; band 5, channel 3) behave normally. Gain changes relative to a postlaunch reference for channels within a band vary within 0.5 percent as a group. Instrument gain for channels in the cold focal plane oscillates. Noise in background and image data ranges from 0.5 to 1.7 counts. Average differences in forward and reverse image data indicate a need for separate calibration processing of forward and reverse scans. Precision is improved by increasing the pulse integration width from 31 to 41 minor frames, depending on the band.

  16. Analysis and Applications of Radiometric Forces in Rarefied Gas Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    Forces in Rarefied Gas Flows 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sergey F. Gimelshein & Natalia E. Gimelshein (ERC, Inc...Forces in Rarefied Gas Flows Sergey F. Gimelshein∗, Natalia E. Gimelshein∗, Andrew D. Ketsdever† and Nathaniel P. Selden∗∗ ∗ERC, Inc, Edwards AFB, CA 93524...geometries. Keywords: Radiometric force, shear, ES-BGK equation PACS: 51.10.+y INTRODUCTION Rarefied gas flow surrounding a thin vane with a temperature

  17. High speed radiometric measurements of IED detonation fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spidell, Matthew T.; Gordon, J. Motos; Pitz, Jeremey; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-04-01

    Continuum emission is predominant in fireball spectral phenomena and in some demonstrated cases, fine detail in the temporal evolution of infrared spectral emissions can be used to estimate size and chemical composition of the device. Recent work indicates that a few narrow radiometric bands may reveal forensic information needed for the explosive discrimination and classification problem, representing an essential step in moving from "laboratory" measurements to a rugged, fieldable system. To explore phenomena not observable in previous experiments, a high speed (10μs resolution) radiometer with four channels spanning the infrared spectrum observed the detonation of nine home made explosive (HME) devices in the < 100lb class. Radiometric measurements indicate that the detonation fireball is well approximated as a single temperature blackbody at early time (0 < t <~ 3ms). The effective radius obtained from absolute intensity indicates fireball growth at supersonic velocity during this time. Peak fireball temperatures during this initial detonation range between 3000.3500K. The initial temperature decay with time (t <~ 10ms) can be described by a simple phenomenological model based on radiative cooling. After this rapid decay, temperature exhibits a small, steady increase with time (10 <~ t <~ 50ms) and peaking somewhere between 1000.1500K-likely the result of post-detonation combustion-before subsequent cooling back to ambient conditions . Radius derived from radiometric measurements can be described well (R2 > 0.98) using blast model functional forms, suggesting that energy release could be estimated from single-pixel radiometric detectors. Comparison of radiometer-derived fireball size with FLIR infrared imagery indicate the Planckian intensity size estimates are about a factor of two smaller than the physical extent of the fireball.

  18. Changes in the Radiometric Sensitivity of SeaWiFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Patt, Frederick S.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the lunar and solar measurements used to determine the changes in the radiometric sensitivity of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Radiometric sensitivity is defined as the output from the instrument (or from one of the instrument bands) per unit spectral radiance at the instrument's input aperture. Knowledge of the long-term repeatability of the SeaWiFS measurements is crucial to maintaining the quality of the ocean scenes derived from measurements by the instrument. For SeaWiFS bands 1 through 6 (412 nm through 670 rim), the change in radiometric sensitivity is less than 0.2% for the period from November 1997 through November 1998. For band 7 (765 nm), the change is about 1.5%, and for band 8 (865 nm) about 5%. The rates of change of bands 7 and 8, which were linear with time for the first eight months of lunar measurements, are now slowing. The scatter in the data points about the trend lines in this analysis is less than 0.3% for all eight SeaWiFS bands. These results are based on monthly measurements of the moon. Daily solar measurements using an onboard diffuser show that the radiometric sensitivities of the SeaWiFS bands have changed smoothly during the time intervals between lunar measurements. Since SeaWiFS measurements have continued past November 1998, the results presented here are considered as a snapshot of the instrument performance as of that date.

  19. BOREAS TE-18, 60-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 2 1 Jun-1995. The 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18-Sep-1994 in the SSA and 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (1991). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, the full-resolution (30-m) images may not be publicly distributed. However, this spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images may be openly distributed and is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. After the radiometric rectification processing, the original data were degraded to a 60-m pixel size from the original 30-m pixel size by averaging the data over a 2- by 2-pixel window. The data are stored in binary image-format files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    2. REPORT DATE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...WORK UNIT NUMBER 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 31-03-2015...Final March 2013 -- February 2015 Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements N00014-13-1-0352 Yue, Dick K.P

  1. Radiometric observations of the nucleus of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, W. A.; Reitsema, H. J.; Huebner, W. F.; Schmidt, H. U.; Keller, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Wilhelm, K.; Whipple, Fred L.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera (HMC) were used to determine the surface brightness of the nucleus. Radiometric values of jet-free areas of the surface are presented and a range of possible surface brightness values are derived. These direct measures are compared with brightnesses derived from the size of the nucleus, as determined from HMC images, and ground-based observations obtained before the onset of coma activity.

  2. Radiometric measurements of gap probability in conifer tree canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Bryan J.; Strahler, Alan H.; Li, Xiaowen; Liang, Shunlin; Clarke, Keith C.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of gap probability were made for some moderate-sized, open-grown conifers of varying species. Results of the radiometric analysis show that the gap probability, which is taken as the mean of the binomial, fits well a negative exponential function of a path length. The conifer shadow, then, is an object of almost uniform darkness with some bright holes or gaps that are found near the shadow's edge and rapidly disappear toward the shadows center.

  3. LANDSAT-4 multispectral scanner (MSS) subsystem radiometric characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, W. (Editor); Barker, J. (Editor); Clark, B. P.; Dasgupta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The multispectral band scanner (mass) and its spectral characteristics are described and methods are given for relating video digital levels on computer compatible tapes to radiance into the sensor. Topics covered include prelaunch calibration procedures and postlaunch radiometric processng. Examples of current data resident on the MSS image processing system are included. The MSS on LANDSAT 4 is compared with the scanners on earlier LANDSAT satellites.

  4. Radiometric Methods for Rapid Diagnosis of Viral Infection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    4, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours postinfection, infection time beginning when the 14C-labeled medium was added. Nucleic acid sT, thesis system. Stationary...coccus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter caloaceticus var. anitratus) had no effect on the DNA synthesis of HSV-1 infected or...7 UNCLASS 41 RADIOMETRIC METHODS FOR RAPID DIAGNIS F VIRA ~ /fl INFECTION (U) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MDUNC . IFEDH N WAG ER FT AL. NOV 75

  5. The Radiometric Bode’s law and Extrasolar Planets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    THE RADIOMETRIC BODE’S LAW AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS T. Joseph, W. Lazio Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375-5351; joseph.lazio...the magnetic polar regions. We find that most of the known extrasolar planets should emit in the frequency range 10–1000 MHz and, under favorable...detect the known extrasolar planets or place austere limits on their radio emission. Planets with masses much lower than those in the current census

  6. Radiometric cross-calibration of KOMPSAT-3 with Landsat-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongyoon; Jin, Cheonggil; Ahn, Hoyong; Choi, Chuluong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a radiometric cross calibration of KOMPSAT-3 AEISS based on Landsat-8 OLI. Cross calibration between the two sensors using simultaneous image pairs, acquired during an underfly event over the Libya 4 pseudo invariant calibration site (PICS) site. The spectral profile of the target comes from the near-simultaneous EO-1 Hyperion data over these sites for apply Spectral Band Adjustment Factor (SBAF). The results indicate that the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance measurements for KOMPSAT-3 agree with Landsat-8 to within 5% after the application of SBAF. To validate radiometric coefficient, comparison TOA reflectance executed in north Virginia, USA. The difference in TOA reflectance was calculated to within a maximum ±1.55%. There was a huge improvement when the standard deviation altered from 0.1 to 0.01, when applying the SBAF. The result of radiometric coefficient presented here appear to be a good standard for maintaining the optical quality of the KOMPSAT-3, for which prelaunch, onboard, and vicarious calibration data are lacking.

  7. Preliminary radiometric calibration assessment of ALOS AVNIR-2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouvet, M.; Goryl, P.; Chander, G.; Santer, R.; Saunier, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities carried out in the frame of the data quality activities of the Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) sensor onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). Assessment of the radiometric calibration of the AVNIR-2 multi-spectral imager is achieved via three intercomparisons to currently flying sensors over the Libyan desert, during the first year of operation. AU three methodologies indicate a slight underestimation of AVNIR-2 in band 1 by 4 to 7% with respect to other sensors radiometric scale. Band 2 does not show any obvious bias. Results for band 3 are affected by saturation due to inappropriate gain setting. Two methodologies indicate no significant bias in band 4. Preliminary results indicate possible degradations of the AVNIR-2 channels, which, when modeled as an exponentially decreasing functions, have time constants of respectively 13.2 %.year-1, 8.8%.year-1 and 0.1%.year-1 in band 1, 2 and 4 (with respect to the radiometric scale of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, MERIS). Longer time series of AVNIR-2 data are needed to draw final conclusions. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  8. Laboratory-Based BRDF Calibration of Radiometric Tarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.

    2007-01-01

    The current study provides the remote sensing community with important high accuracy laboratory-based BRDF calibration of radiometric tarps. The results illustrate the dependence of tarps' weft and warp threads orientation on BRDF. The study was done at incident angles of 0deg, 10deg, and 30deg; scatter zenith angles from 0deg to 60deg, and scatter azimuth angles of 0deg, 45deg, 90deg, 135deg, and 180deg. The wavelengths were 485nm, 550nm, 633nm and 800nm. The dependence is well defined at all measurement geometries and wavelengths. It can be as high as 8% at 0deg incident angle and 2% at 30deg incident angle. The fitted BRDF data show a very small discrepancy from the measured ones. New data on the forward and backscatter properties of radiometric tarps is reported. The backward scatter is well pronounced for the white samples. The black sample has well pronounced forward scatter. The BRDF characterization of radiometric tarps can be successfully extended to other structured surface fabric samples. The results are NIST traceable.

  9. A Preliminary Analysis of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Radiometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C.; Fusco, L.; Mehl, W.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA raw (BT) product, the radiometrically corrected (AT) product, and the radiometrically and geometrically corrected (PT) product of a TM scene were analyzed examine the frequency distribution of the digital data; the statistical correlation between the bands; and the variability between the detectors within a band. The analyses were performed on a series of image subsets from the full scence. Results are presented from one 1024 c 1024 pixel subset of Realfoot Lake, Tennessee which displayed a representative range of ground conditions and cover types occurring within the full frame image. From this cursory examination of one of the first seven channel TM data sets, it would appear that the radiometric performance of the system is most satisfactory and largely meets pre-launch specifications. Problems were noted with Band 5 Detector 3 and Band 2 Detector 4. Differences were observed between forward and reverse scan detector responses both for the BT and AT products. No systematic variations were observed between odd and even detectors.

  10. On the estimation of snow depth from microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James R.; Chang, Alfred T. C.; Sharma, Awdhesh K.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple-channel microwave radiometric measurements made over Alaska at aircraft (near 90 and 183 GHz) and satellite (at 37 and 85 GHz) altitudes are used to study the effect of atmospheric absorption on the estimation of snow depth. The estimation is based on the radiative transfer calculations using an early theoretical model of Mie scattering of single-size particles. It is shown that the radiometric correction for the effect of atmospheric absorption is important even at 37 GHz for a reliable estimation of snow depth. Under a dry atmosphere and based on single-frequency radiometric measurements, the underestimation of snow depth could amount to 50 percent at 85 GHz and 20-30 percent at 37 GHz if the effect of atmospheric absorption is not taken into account. The snow depths estimated from the 90-GHz aircraft and 85-GHz satellite measurements are found to be in reasonable agreement. However, there is a discrepancy in the snow depths estimated from the 37-GHz (at both vertical and horizontal polarizations) and 85-GHz satellite measurements.

  11. Airborne Geophysical Surveys Applied to Hydrocarbon Resource Development Environmental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Ball, L. B.; Finn, C.; Kass, A.; Thamke, J.

    2014-12-01

    mapping AEM surveys could also be effectively used in mapping tectonic features. Airborne radiometric methods have not been routinely used in hydrocarbon environmental studies but might be useful in understanding the surficial distribution of deposits related to naturally occurring radioactive materials.

  12. Preliminary Evaluation of the Radiometric Calibration of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Data by the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J.; Park, W.; Fitzgerald, A.

    1985-01-01

    The radiometric characteristics of the LANDSAT-4 TM sensor are being studied with a view to developing absolute and relative radiometric calibration procedures. Preliminary results from several different approaches to the relative correction of all detectors within each band are reported. Topics covered include: the radiometric correction method; absolute calibration; the relative radiometric calibration algorithm; relative gain and offset calibration; relative gain and offset observations; and residual radiometric stripping.

  13. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  14. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  15. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  16. Collation of earth resources data collected by ERIM airborne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Earth resources imagery from nine years of data collection with developmental airborne sensors is cataloged for reference. The imaging sensors include single and multiband line scanners and side-looking radars. The operating wavelengths of the sensors include ultraviolet, visible and infrared band scanners, and X- and L-band radar. Imagery from all bands (radar and scanner) were collected at some sites and many sites had repeated coverage. The multiband scanner data was radiometrically calibrated. Illustrations show how the data can be used in earth resource investigations. References are made to published reports which have made use of the data in completed investigations. Data collection sponsors are identified and a procedure described for gaining access to the data.

  17. Processing and analysis of radiometer measurements for airborne reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Helmut

    1990-11-01

    Thi8 paper describes selected results of airborne, radiometric imaging measurements at 90 GHz and 140 GHz relevant for the application in reconnaissance. Using a temperature resolution below 0.5 K and an angular resolution of about 1 degree high quality images show the capability of discriminating between many brightness temperature classes within our natural environment and man-made objects. Measurement examples are given for cloud and fog penetration at 90 GHz, for the detection of vehicles on roads, and for the detection and classification of airports and airplanes. The application of different contour enhancement methods (Marr-Hildreth and Canny) shows the possibility of extracting lines and shapes precisely in order to improve automatic target recognition. The registration of the passive images with corresponding X-band synthetic aperture images from the same area is carried out and the high degree of correlation is dicussed.

  18. Processing and analysis of radiometer measurements for airborne reconnaissance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Helmut

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes selected results of airborne, radiometric imaging measurements at 90 GHz and 140 GHz relevant for the application in reconnaissance. Using a temperature resolution below 0.5 K and an angular resolution of about 1-degree high-quality images show the capability of discriminating between many brightness temperature classes within our natural environment and man-made objects. Measurement examples are given for cloud and fog penetration at 90 GHz, for the detection of vehicles on roads, and for the detection and classification of airports and airplanes. The application of different contour enhancement methods (Marr-Hildreth and Canny) shows the possibility of extracting lines and shapes precisely in order to improve automatic target recognition. The registration of the passive images with corresponding X-band synthetic aperture images from the same area is carried out and the high degree of correlation is discussed.

  19. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  20. Real-time airborne hyperspectral imaging of land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanco, Tyler; Achal, Steve; McFee, John E.; Anger, Cliff; Young, Jane

    2007-04-01

    DRDC Suffeld and Itres Research have jointly investigated the use of visible and infrared hyperspectral imaging (HSI) for surface and buried land mine detection since 1989. These studies have demonstrated reliable passive HSI detection of surface-laid mines, based on their reflectance spectra, from airborne and ground-based platforms. Commercial HSI instruments collect and store image data at aircraft speeds, but the data are analysed off- line. This is useful for humanitarian demining, but unacceptable for military countermine operations. We have developed a hardware and software system with algorithms that can process the raw hyperspectral data in real time to detect mines. The custom algorithms perform radiometric correction of the raw data, then classify pixels of the corrected data, referencing a spectral signature library. The classification results are stored and displayed in real time, that is, within a few frame times of the data acquisition. Such real-time mine detection was demonstrated for the first time from a slowly moving land vehicle in March 2000. This paper describes an improved system which can achieve real-time detection of mines from an airborne platform, with its commensurately higher data rates. The system is presently compatible with the Itres family of visible/near infrared, short wave infrared and thermal infrared pushbroom hyperspectral imagers and its broadband thermal infrared pushbroom imager. Experiments to detect mines from an airborne platform in real time were conducted at DRDC Suffield in November 2006. Surface-laid land mines were detected in real time from a slowly moving helicopter with generally good detection rates and low false alarm rates. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that land mines have been detected from an airborne platform in real time using hyperspectral imaging.

  1. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  2. LAI estimation in a Mediterranean grassland by in situ radiometric measurements and MODIS satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzarolo, M.; Arriga, N.; Papale, D.

    2009-04-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is one of a key variables in studying and understanding biogeochemical cycle mechanisms and ecosystem functionalities and, then, one of a main inputs for ecological modeling. Leaf area surface is related to the main interactions between leaves and the atmosphere as water interception, radiation extinction, energy, mass and gas exchange. Therefore LAI reduction, consequently the loss of productivity, is expression of any physiological and biochemical change of plant status due for example to summer water stress in Mediterranean areas. A good knowledge of seasonal trend and spatial variability of LAI can helps not only modelers but also local farmer to manage grasslands in a sustainable way (grazing, harvesting). In situ LAI measurements are often limited to relatively small areas whit a small number of samplings that can be sporadic, destructive and time-consuming. Nowadays an interesting alternative to estimate LAI is provided by a large variety of radiometric sensors (ground, airborne and satellite based) whit several spatial, temporal and spectral resolutions. However, few studies shown the effect of different radiometers set-up on VIs-LAI relationships that are also differently sensible to different ranges of LAI, management and to which method is used for LAI measurements. In this work, we analyzed the relations between several spectral vegetation indexes (VIs) and LAI for the Mediterranean grassland of Amplero, in the Abruzzo Region, Italy. In situ measurements were carried out in 2005 and 2006. Contemporaneously to destructive LAI measurements, radiometric measurements over the grass herbage were made by two different radiometric sensors: by hyperspectral Hand Held ASD spettroradiometer (HYS) field samplings and by broad band measurements (BNR) of incoming and outgoing global (shortwave) solar radiation components and of incident and reflected photosintetically active radiation (PAR). In addition we included in this analysis VIs

  3. Integration and analysis of airborne geophysical data of the Darrehzar area, Kerman Province, Iran, using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, H.; Hassanzadeh, H.; Torabi, M.; Ilaghi, O.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the integrated interpretation of airborne magnetic and airborne γ-ray spectrometer data. The Darrehzar porphyry copper deposit is situated in the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage of Central Iran. Phyllic and propylitic alterations are pervasive in the area but potassic and argillic alterations are not readily recognized on the surface. The spatial distributions of geophysical data resemble the lithological and alteration patterns in the area. The Darrehzar porphyry copper deposit is considered as a control site for determination of the degrees that the geophysical data is correlated with the mineralization zone. Airborne magnetic/radiometric, and geochemical/alteration data sets have been integrated and analyzed using principal component analysis. This technique is found to be useful for the delineation of hydrothermally altered areas and data compression.

  4. DEM-Based SAR Pixel Area Estimation For Enhanced Geocoding Refinement And Radiometric Normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Othmar; Santoro, Maurizio; Werner, Charles L.; Wegmuller, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Precise terrain-corrected georeferencing of SAR images and derived products in range-Doppler coordinates is important with respect to several aspects, such as data interpretation, combination with other geodata products, and transformation of, e.g., terrain heights into SAR geometry as used in DInSAR applications. For georeferencing a look-up table is calculated and refined based on a coregistration of the actual SAR image to a simulated SAR image. The impact of using two different implementations of such a simulator of topography-induced radar brightness, an approach based on angular relationships and a pixel-area based method are discussed in this paper. It is found that the pixel-area-based method leads to considerable improvements with regard to the robustness of georeferencing and also with regard to radiometric normalization in layover- affected areas.

  5. Prediction of radio frequency power generation of Neptune's magnetosphere from generalized radiometric Bode's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millon, M. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio frequency emission power has been shown to vary as a function of both solar wind and planetary values such as magnetic field by Kaiser and Desch. Planetary magnetic fields have been shown to scale with planetary variables such as density and angular momentum by numerous researchers. This paper combines two magnetic scaling laws (Busse's and Curtis Ness') with the radiometric law to yield "Bode's"-type laws governing planetary radio emission. Further analysis allows the reduction of variables to planetary mass and orbital distance. These generalized laws are then used to predict the power output of Neptune to be about 1.6×107W; with the intensity peaking at about 3 MHz.

  6. Extraction of auxiliary data from AVIRIS distribution tape for spectral, radiometric, and geometric quality assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Peter; Green, Robert O.; Chrien, Thomas G.

    1993-01-01

    Remotely sensed data are affected by system (sensor and platform), and scene related effects. For quantitative investigations the spectral, radiometric characteristics of the system and scene have to be known. The relevant effects and their possible influence on an image have to be specifically determined for every remote sensing system and adequate description parameters need to be updated and reported on a regular basis as they are carried out, e.g., for the AVIRIS system. It is evident that the strength of the influence of similar effects in very dependent on the accessibility of auxiliary information about such sensor systems. Degradation in a spaceborne system can normally be just reported and cannot be corrected. In contrast, an airborne sensor can be evaluated, maintained and improved periodically. Such maintenance efforts are particularly important because airborne systems are exposed to extreme and changing environments. These include tens of takeoffs and landing each year as well as extreme changes in temperature and humidity on the tarmac and in flight. For the AVIRIS system there are environmental stresses such as changes in temperature, air pressure, humidity, vibration of the platform or scene-related reasons like atmospheric conditions, and topography. The information contained in the auxiliary files included with the AVIRIS data can be used to assess these effects and compensate for them. In addition the spectral, radiometer and geometric calibration data contained in the auxiliary file are required for quantitative analysis of the data. The paper describes tools to access the auxiliary information that characterizes the AVIRIS system. These tools allow the examination of parameters that may impact the quality of the measured AVIRIS image. An example of the use of this auxiliary data was carried out with regard to a parametric geocoding approach. Emphasis is placed on the reported auxiliary information that describes the geometric character of the

  7. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  8. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  9. Airborne Infrared Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2017-01-01

    A unique program of infrared astronomical observations from aircraft evolved at NASA’s Ames Research Center, beginning in the 1960s. Telescopes were flown on a Convair 990, a Lear Jet, and a Lockheed C-141 - the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) - leading to the planning and development of SOFIA: a 2.7 m telescope now flying on a Boeing 747SP. The poster describes these telescopes and highlights of some of the scientific results obtained from them.

  10. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  11. Radiometric calibration of the Landsat MSS sensor series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, Dennis L.; Karki, Sadhana; Bhatt, Rajendra; Micijevik, Esad; Aaron, David; Jasinski, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Multispectral remote sensing of the Earth using Landsat sensors was ushered on July 23, 1972, with the launch of Landsat-1. Following that success, four more Landsat satellites were launched, and each of these carried the Multispectral Scanner System (MSS). These five sensors provided the only consistent multispectral space-based imagery of the Earth's surface from 1972 to 1982. This work focuses on developing both a consistent and absolute radiometric calibration of this sensor system. Cross-calibration of the MSS was performed through the use of pseudoinvariant calibration sites (PICSs). Since these sites have been shown to be stable for long periods of time, changes in MSS observations of these sites were attributed to changes in the sensors themselves. In addition, simultaneous data collections were available for some MSS sensor pairs, and these were also used for cross-calibration. Results indicated substantial differences existed between instruments, up to 16%, and these were reduced to 5% or less across all MSS sensors and bands. Lastly, this paper takes the calibration through the final step and places the MSS sensors on an absolute radiometric scale. The methodology used to achieve this was based on simultaneous data collections by the Landsat-5 MSS and Thematic Mapper (TM) instruments. Through analysis of image data from a PICS location and through compensating for the spectral differences between the two instruments, the Landsat-5 MSS sensor was placed on an absolute radiometric scale based on the Landsat-5 TM sensor. Uncertainties associated with this calibration are considered to be less than 5%.

  12. BOREAS TE-18, 30-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 21-Jun-1995. the 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18 Sep-1994 in the SSA and from 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (199 1). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. The data are stored in binary image-format files. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, these full-resolution images may not be publicly distributed. However, a spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. See Sections 15 and 16 for information about how to possibly acquire the full resolution data. Information about the full-resolution images is provided in an inventory listing on the CD-ROMs. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  13. Site characterization for calibration of radiometric sensors using vicarious method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, Shailesh; Rathore, L. S.; Mohapatra, M.; Sharma, A. K.; Mitra, A. K.; Bhatla, R.; Singh, R. S.; Desai, Yogdeep; Srivastava, Shailendra S.

    2016-05-01

    Radiometric performances of earth observation satellite/sensors vary from ground pre-launch calibration campaign to post launch period extended to lifetime of the satellite due to launching vibrations. Therefore calibration is carried out worldwide through various methods throughout satellite lifetime. In India Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) calibrates the sensor of Resourcesat-2 satellite by vicarious method. One of these vicarious calibration methods is the reflectance-based approach that is applied in this study for radiometric calibration of sensors on-board Resouresat-2 satellite. The results of ground-based measurement of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance are made at Bap, Rajasthan Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) site. Cal/Val observations at site were carried out with hyper-spectral Spectroradiometer covering spectral range of 350nm- 2500nm for radiometric characterization of the site. The Sunphotometer/Ozonometer for measuring the atmospheric parameters has also been used. The calibrated radiance is converted to absolute at-sensor spectral reflectance and Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) radiance. TOA radiance was computed using radiative transfer model `Second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum' (6S), which can accurately simulate the problems introduced by the presence of the atmosphere along the path from Sun to target (surface) to Sensor. The methodology for band averaged reflectance retrieval and spectral reflectance fitting process are described. Then the spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters are put into 6S code to predict TOA radiance which compare with Resourcesat-2 radiance. Spectral signature and its reflectance ratio indicate the uniformity of the site. Thus the study proves that the selected site is suitable for vicarious calibration of sensor of Resourcesat-2. Further the study demonstrates the procedure for similar exercise for site selection for Cal/Val analysis of other satellite over India

  14. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  15. Radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper multispectral images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S.

    1989-01-01

    A main problem encountered in radiometric calibration of satellite image data is correcting for atmospheric effects. Without this correction, an image digital number (DN) cannot be converted to a surface reflectance value. In this paper the accuracy of a calibration procedure, which includes a correction for atmospheric scattering, is tested. Two simple methods, a stand-alone and an in situ sky radiance measurement technique, were used to derive the HAZE DN values for each of the six reflectance Thematic Mapper (TM) bands. The DNs of two Landsat TM images of Phoenix, Arizona were converted to surface reflectances. -from Author

  16. MARS-3 matrix radiometric system for RATAN-600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, A. B.; Parijskij, Yu. N.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskiy, R. Yu.; Smirnov, V. V.; Pylypenko, O. M.

    2012-07-01

    The MARS-3 third-generation matrix radiometric system has been developed, manufactured, and is currently being used in observations within the framework of the "Cosmological Gene" program. The system is based on new hardware components and consists of 16 independent radiometers (32 horns with a step of 20 mm). Each pair of horns is connected to the input of an amplifier unit via a square-loop modulator. The parameters of each radiometer are: central frequency, 30.0 GHz; bandwidth, 5GHz; average noise temperature of the system, 250 K; and a sensitivity of about 5 mK for τ = RC = 1 s.

  17. Cropland measurement using Thematic Mapper data and radiometric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, John G.; Khuwaiter, I. H. S.

    1989-01-01

    To halt erosion and desertification, it is necessary to quantify resources that are affected. Necessary information includes inventory of croplands and desert areas as they change over time. Several studies indicate the value of remote sensor data as input to inventories. In this study, the radiometric modeling of spectral characteristics of soil and vegetation provides the theoretical basis for the remote sensing approach. Use of Landsat Thematic Mapper images allows measurement of croplands in Saudi Arabia, demonstrating the capability of the approach. The inventory techniques and remote sensing approach presented are potentially useful in developing countries.

  18. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  19. Airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly signatures of serpentinite in relation to soil geochemistry, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, A.E.; Van Gosen, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks and associated soils in northern California are characterized by high concentrations of Cr and Ni, low levels of radioelements (K, Th, and U) and high amounts of ferrimagnetic minerals (primarily magnetite). Geophysical attributes over ultramafic rocks, which include airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly data, are quantified and provide indirect measurements on the relative abundance of radioelements and magnetic minerals, respectively. Attributes are defined through a statistical modeling approach and the results are portrayed as probabilities in chart and map form. Two predictive models are presented, including one derived from the aeromagnetic anomaly data and one from a combination of the airborne K, Th and U gamma-ray data. Both models distinguish preferential values within the aerogeophysical data that coincide with mapped and potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks. The magnetic predictive model shows positive probabilities associated with magnetic anomaly highs and, to a lesser degree, anomaly lows, which accurately locate many known ultramafic outcrops, but more interestingly, locate potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks, possible extensions of ultramafic bodies that dip into the shallow subsurface, as well as prospective buried ultramafic rocks. The airborne radiometric model shows positive probabilities in association with anomalously low gamma radiation measurements over ultramafic rock, which is similar to that produced by gabbro, metavolcanic rock, and water bodies. All of these features share the characteristic of being depleted in K, Th and U. Gabbro is the only rock type in the study area that shares similar magnetic properties with the ultramafic rock. The aerogeophysical model results are compared to the distribution of ultramafic outcrops and to Cr, Ni, K, Th and U concentrations and magnetic susceptibility measurements from soil samples. Analysis of the soil data indicates high positive correlation between

  20. Airborne Passive Microwave Measurements from the AMISA 2008 Science Campaign for Modeling of Arctic Sea Ice Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, M. L.; Gasiewski, A. J.; CenterEnvironmental Technology

    2011-12-01

    While climate changes in the Arctic are occurring more rapidly than anywhere else on Earth model-based predictions of sea ice extent are at once both more optimistic than the data suggest and exhibit a high degree of variability. It is believed that this high level of uncertainty is the result of an inadequate quantitative understanding of surface heating mechanisms, which in large part is due to a lack of high spatial resolution data on boundary layer and surface energy processes during melt and freezeup. In August 2008 the NASA Arctic Mechanisms of Interactions between the Surface and Atmosphere (AMISA) campaign, in conjunction with the Swedish-led Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) conducted coordinated high spatial resolution measurements of geophysical parameters in the Arctic relevant to atmospheric-sea ice interaction. The IPY-approved AMISA campaign used airborne radiometers, including the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) system, a suite of L-band to V-band fixed-beam radiometers for cloud liquid and water vapor measurement, short and longwave radiation sensors, meteorological parameters from cloud size distribution probes, GPS dropsondes, and aerosol sensors. Calibration of the PSR is achieved through periodic observations of stable references such as thermal blackbody targets and noise diodes. A combination of methods using both infrequent external thermal blackbody views and brief frequent internal noise sources has proven practical for airborne systems such as the PSR and is proposed for spaceborne systems such as GeoMAS. Once radiometric data is calibrated it is then rasterized into brightness temperature images which are then geo-located and imported into Google EarthTM. An example brightness temperature map from the AMISA 2008 campaign is included in this abstract. The analysis of this data provides a basis for the development of a heat flux model needed to decrease the uncertainly in weather and climate predictions within the Arctic. In

  1. Development of radiometric assays for quantification of enzyme activities of the key enzymes of thyroid hormones metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, S

    2014-01-01

    We newly elaborated and adapted several radiometric enzyme assays for the determination of activities of the key enzymes engaged in the biosynthesis (thyroid peroxidase, TPO) and metabolic transformations (conjugating enzymes and iodothyronine deiodinases, IDs) of thyroid hormones (THs) in the thyroid gland and in peripheral tissues, especially in white adipose tissue (WAT). We also elaborated novel, reliable radiometric methods for extremely sensitive determination of enzyme activities of IDs of types 1, 2 and 3 in microsomal fractions of different rat and human tissues, as well as in homogenates of cultured mammalian cells. The use of optimized TLC separation of radioactive products from the unconsumed substrates and film-less autoradiography of radiochromatograms, taking advantage of storage phosphor screens, enabled us to determine IDs enzyme activities as low as 10(-18) katals. In studies of the interaction of fluoxetine (Fluox) with the metabolism of THs, we applied adapted radiometric enzyme assays for iodothyronine sulfotransferases (ST) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronyltransferase (UDP-GT). Fluox is the most frequently used representative of a new group of non-tricyclic antidepressant drugs--selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. We used the elaborated assays for quantification the effects of Fluox and for the assessment of the degree of potential induction of rat liver ST and/or UDP-GT enzyme activities by Fluox alone or in combination with T(3). Furthermore, we studied possible changes in IDs activities in murine adipose tissue under the conditions that promoted either tissue hypertrophy (obesogenic treatment) or involution (caloric restriction), and in response to leptin, using our newly developed radiometric enzyme assays for IDs. Our results suggest that deiodinase D1 has a functional role in WAT, with D1 possibly being involved in the control of adipose tissue metabolism and/or accumulation of the tissue. Significant positive correlation between

  2. A simple and effective radiometric correction method to improve landscape change detection across sensors and across time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, X.; Vierling, Lee; Deering, D.

    2005-01-01

    Satellite data offer unrivaled utility in monitoring and quantifying large scale land cover change over time. Radiometric consistency among collocated multi-temporal imagery is difficult to maintain, however, due to variations in sensor characteristics, atmospheric conditions, solar angle, and sensor view angle that can obscure surface change detection. To detect accurate landscape change using multi-temporal images, we developed a variation of the pseudoinvariant feature (PIF) normalization scheme: the temporally invariant cluster (TIC) method. Image data were acquired on June 9, 1990 (Landsat 4), June 20, 2000 (Landsat 7), and August 26, 2001 (Landsat 7) to analyze boreal forests near the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), and reduced simple ratio (RSR). The temporally invariant cluster (TIC) centers were identified via a point density map of collocated pixel VIs from the base image and the target image, and a normalization regression line was created to intersect all TIC centers. Target image VI values were then recalculated using the regression function so that these two images could be compared using the resulting common radiometric scale. We found that EVI was very indicative of vegetation structure because of its sensitivity to shadowing effects and could thus be used to separate conifer forests from deciduous forests and grass/crop lands. Conversely, because NDVI reduced the radiometric influence of shadow, it did not allow for distinctions among these vegetation types. After normalization, correlations of NDVI and EVI with forest leaf area index (LAI) field measurements combined for 2000 and 2001 were significantly improved; the r 2 values in these regressions rose from 0.49 to 0.69 and from 0.46 to 0.61, respectively. An EVI "cancellation effect" where EVI was positively related to understory greenness but negatively related to forest canopy coverage was evident across a

  3. A Traceable Ground to On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration System for the Solar Reflective Wavelength Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Donald F.; Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the combination of a Mie scattering spectral BSDF and BTDF albedo standard whose calibration is traceable to the NIST SIRCUS Facility or the NIST STARR II Facility. The Space-based Calibration Transfer Spectroradiometer (SCATS) sensor uses a simple, invariant optical configuration and dedicated narrow band spectral channel modules to provide very accurate, polarization-insensitive, stable measurements of earth albedo and lunar disk albedo. Optical degradation effects on calibration stability are eliminated through use of a common optical system for observations of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. The measurements from space would be traceable to SI units through preflight calibrations of radiance and irradiance at NIST's SIRCUS facility and the invariant optical system used in the sensor. Simultaneous measurements are made in multiple spectral channels covering the solar reflective wavelength range of 300 nm to 2.4 microns. The large dynamic range of signals is handled by use of single-element, highly-linear detectors, stable discrete electronic components, and a non imaging optical configuration. Up to 19 spectral modules can be mounted on a single-axis drive to give direct pointing at the Earth and at least once per orbit view of the Sun and Moon. By observing the Sun on every orbit, the most stringent stability requirements of the system are limited to short time periods. The invariant optical system for both radiance and irradiance measurements also give excellent transfer to-orbit SI traceability. Emerging instrumental requirements for remotely sensing tropospheric trace species have led to a rethinking by some of the paradigm for Systeme International d'Unites (SI) traceability of the spectral irradiance and radiance radiometric calibrations to spectral albedo (sr(exp -1)) which is not a SI unit. In the solar reflective wavelength region the spectral albedo calibrations are tied often to either the spectral albedo of a solar diffuser or the Moon

  4. Reduction of radiometric miscalibration--applications to pushbroom sensors.

    PubMed

    Rogass, Christian; Spengler, Daniel; Bochow, Mathias; Segl, Karl; Lausch, Angela; Doktor, Daniel; Roessner, Sigrid; Behling, Robert; Wetzel, Hans-Ulrich; Kaufmann, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of hyperspectral images is an important task in Remote Sensing. Foregoing radiometric calibration results in the assignment of incident electromagnetic radiation to digital numbers and reduces the striping caused by slightly different responses of the pixel detectors. However, due to uncertainties in the calibration some striping remains. This publication presents a new reduction framework that efficiently reduces linear and nonlinear miscalibrations by an image-driven, radiometric recalibration and rescaling. The proposed framework-Reduction Of Miscalibration Effects (ROME)-considering spectral and spatial probability distributions, is constrained by specific minimisation and maximisation principles and incorporates image processing techniques such as Minkowski metrics and convolution. To objectively evaluate the performance of the new approach, the technique was applied to a variety of commonly used image examples and to one simulated and miscalibrated EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) scene. Other examples consist of miscalibrated AISA/Eagle VNIR (Visible and Near Infrared) and Hawk SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) scenes of rural areas of the region Fichtwald in Germany and Hyperion scenes of the Jalal-Abad district in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Recovery rates of approximately 97% for linear and approximately 94% for nonlinear miscalibrated data were achieved, clearly demonstrating the benefits of the new approach and its potential for broad applicability to miscalibrated pushbroom sensor data.

  5. Radiometric and Geometric Accuracy Analysis of Rasat Pan Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaman, S.; Yalcin, I.; Guler, M.

    2016-06-01

    RASAT is the second Turkish Earth Observation satellite which was launched in 2011. It operates with pushbroom principle and acquires panchromatic and MS images with 7.5 m and 15 m resolutions, respectively. The swath width of the sensor is 30 km. The main aim of this study is to analyse the radiometric and geometric quality of RASAT images. A systematic validation approach for the RASAT imagery and its products is being applied. RASAT image pair acquired over Kesan city in Edirne province of Turkey are used for the investigations. The raw RASAT data (L0) are processed by Turkish Space Agency (TUBITAK-UZAY) to produce higher level image products. The image products include radiometrically processed (L1), georeferenced (L2) and orthorectified (L3) data, as well as pansharpened images. The image quality assessments include visual inspections, noise, MTF and histogram analyses. The geometric accuracy assessment results are only preliminary and the assessment is performed using the raw images. The geometric accuracy potential is investigated using 3D ground control points extracted from road intersections, which were measured manually in stereo from aerial images with 20 cm resolution and accuracy. The initial results of the study, which were performed using one RASAT panchromatic image pair, are presented in this paper.

  6. Radiometric infrared focal plane array imaging system for thermographic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, B. J.; Mccafferty, N.; Brown, R.; Tower, J. R.; Kosonocky, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes research performed under the Radiometric Infrared Focal Plane Array Imaging System for Thermographic Applications contract. This research investigated the feasibility of using platinum silicide (PtSi) Schottky-barrier infrared focal plane arrays (IR FPAs) for NASA Langley's specific radiometric thermal imaging requirements. The initial goal of this design was to develop a high spatial resolution radiometer with an NETD of 1 percent of the temperature reading over the range of 0 to 250 C. The proposed camera design developed during this study and described in this report provides: (1) high spatial resolution (full-TV resolution); (2) high thermal dynamic range (0 to 250 C); (3) the ability to image rapid, large thermal transients utilizing electronic exposure control (commandable dynamic range of 2,500,000:1 with exposure control latency of 33 ms); (4) high uniformity (0.5 percent nonuniformity after correction); and (5) high thermal resolution (0.1 C at 25 C background and 0.5 C at 250 C background).

  7. A Preliminary Analysis of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Radiometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C.; Fusco, L.; Mehl, W.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis was performed to characterize the radiometry of three Thematic Mapper (TM) digital products of a scene of Arkansas. The three digital products examined were the NASA raw (BT) product, the radiometrically corrected (AT) product and the radiometrically and geometrically corrected (PT) product. The frequency distribution of the digital data; the statistical correlation between the bands; and the variability between the detectors within a band were examined on a series of image subsets from the full scene. The results are presented from one 1024 x 1024 pixel subset of Realfoot Lake, Tennessee which displayed a representative range of ground conditions and cover types occurring within the full frame image. Bands 1, 2 and 5 of the sample area are presented. The subsets were extracted from the three digital data products to cover the same geographic area. This analysis provides the first step towards a full appraisal of the TM radiometry being performed as part of the ESA/CEC contribution to the NASA/LIDQA program.

  8. Branching Ratios for The Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daw, Adrian N.; Bhatia, A. K.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket instrument is a two-channel imaging spectrograph that observes the solar corona and transition region with high spectral resolution and a rapid cadence made possible by unprecedented sensitivity. The upcoming flight will incorporate a new wavelength channel covering the range 524-630 Angstroms, the previously-flown 300-370 Angstroms channel, and the first flight demonstration of cooled active pixel sensor (APS) arrays. The new 524-630 Angstrom channel incorporates a Toroidal Varied Line Space (TVLS) grating coated with B4C/Ir, providing broad spectral coverage and a wide temperature range of 0.025 to 10 MK. Absolute radiometric calibration of the two channels is being performed using a hollow cathode discharge lamp and NIST-calibrated AXUV-100G photodiode. Laboratory observations of He I 584 Angstroms and He II 304 Angstroms provide absolute radiometric calibrations of the two channels at those two respective wavelengths by using the AXUV photodiode as a transfer standard. The spectral responsivity is being determined by observing line pairs with a common upper state in the spectra of Ne I-III and Ar II-III. Calculations of A-values for the observed branching ratios are in progress.

  9. Radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper Thermal Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wukelic, G. E.; Gibbons, D. E.; Martucci, L. M.; Foote, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of satellite-acquired data is essential for quantitative scientific studies, as well as for a variety of image-processing applications. This paper describes a multiyear, on-orbit radiometric calibration of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Band 6 conducted at DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Numerous Landsat TM scenes acquired and analyzed included day and night coverages at several geographical locations over several seasons. Concurrent with Landsat overpasses, thermal field and local meteorological (surface and radiosonde) measurements were collected. At-satellite (uncorrected) radiances and temperatures for water and nonwater land cover were compared to ground truth (GT) measurements after making adjustments for atmospheric (using LOWTRAN), mixed-pixel, and emissivity effects. Results indicate that, for both water and nonwater features, TM Band 6 average corrected temperature determinations using local radiosonde data to adjust for atmospheric effects, and using appropriate emissivities, are within 1.0 C of GT temperature values. Temperatures of water pixels derived from uncorrected TM Band 6 data varied roughly between 1 and 3 C of ground truth values for water temperatures ranging between 4 and 24 C. Moreover, corrections using nonlocal and noncoincident radiosonde data resulted in errors as large as 12 C. Corrections using the U.S. Standard Atmosphere gave temperature values within 1 to 2 C of GT. The average uncertainty for field instruments was + or - 0.2 C; average uncertainty for Landsat TM corrected temperature determinations was + or - 0.4 C.

  10. Radiometric tests on wet and dry antenna reflector surface panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of X-band noise temperature tests on two types of antenna surface panels are presented. The first type tested was a solid antenna panel, while the second type was a perforated panel with 3/16-in.-diameter holes. Measurements were made at 8.45 GHz using an X-band radiometric system. Included in this article are measured noise temperature contributions from: (1) thermal diffusive white paint on solid and perforated panels, and (2) water sprayed on both painted and unpainted perforated panels. Experiments on perforated panels were restricted to the 3/16-in.-diameter hole panels formerly used on Deep Space Network 64-m antennas. Rigorous calibration equations, applicable to a variety of antenna panel and dichroic plate test configurations, are presented. It was demonstrated that an accurate, stable radiometric measurement system of the type used for the results of this research makes it possible to obtain information that would be much more difficult to obtain using other techniques.

  11. Airborne infrared hyperspectral imager for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagueux, Philippe; Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Gagnon, Marc-André; Bastedo, John; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Persistent surveillance and collection of airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information is critical in today's warfare against terrorism. High resolution imagery in visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, leading to additional tools for detection and identification of targets, based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 μm spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently used for the first time in two compact airborne platforms: a bellymounted gyro-stabilized platform and a gyro-stabilized gimbal ball. Both platforms are described in this paper, and successful results of high-altitude detection and identification of targets, including industrial plumes, and chemical spills are presented.

  12. Airborne infrared hyperspectral imager for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Gagnon, Marc-André; Bastedo, John; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Persistent surveillance and collection of airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information is critical in today's warfare against terrorism. High resolution imagery in visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, leading to additional tools for detection and identification of targets, based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 μm spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently used for the first time in two compact airborne platforms: a belly-mounted gyro-stabilized platform and a gyro-stabilized gimbal ball. Both platforms are described in this paper, and successful results of high-altitude detection and identification of targets, including industrial plumes, and chemical spills are presented.

  13. Potential of Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy at Czechglobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuš, J.; Fabiánek, T.; Fajmon, L.

    2016-06-01

    Ecosystems, their services, structures and functions are affected by complex environmental processes, which are both natural and human-induced and globally changing. In order to understand how ecosystems behave in globally changing environment, it is important to monitor the current status of ecosystems and their structural and functional changes in time and space. An essential tool allowing monitoring of ecosystems is remote sensing (RS). Many ecosystems variables are being translated into a spectral response recorded by RS instruments. It is however important to understand the complexity and synergies of the key ecosystem variables influencing the reflected signal. This can be achieved by analysing high resolution RS data from multiple sources acquired simultaneously from the same platform. Such a system has been recently built at CzechGlobe - Global Change Research Institute (The Czech Academy of Sciences). CzechGlobe has been significantly extending its research infrastructure in the last years, which allows advanced monitoring of ecosystem changes at hierarchical levels spanning from molecules to entire ecosystems. One of the CzechGlobe components is a laboratory of imaging spectroscopy. The laboratory is now operating a new platform for advanced remote sensing observations called FLIS (Flying Laboratory of Imaging Spectroscopy). FLIS consists of an airborne carrier equipped with passive RS systems. The core instrument of FLIS is a hyperspectral imaging system provided by Itres Ltd. The hyperspectral system consists of three spectroradiometers (CASI 1500, SASI 600 and TASI 600) that cover the reflective spectral range from 380 to 2450 nm, as well as the thermal range from 8 to 11.5 μm. The airborne platform is prepared for mounting of full-waveform laser scanner Riegl-Q780 as well, however a laser scanner is not a permanent part of FLIS. In 2014 the installation of the hyperspectral scanners was completed and the first flights were carried out with all

  14. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  15. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  16. Galileo SSI/Gaspra Radiometrically Calibrated Images V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    This data set includes Galileo Orbiter SSI radiometrically calibrated images of the asteroid 951 Gaspra, created using ISIS software and assuming nadir pointing. This is an original delivery of radiometrically calibrated files, not an update to existing files. All images archived include the the asteroid within the image frame. Calibration was performed in 2013-2014.

  17. Galileo SSI/Ida Radiometrically Calibrated Images V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    This data set includes Galileo Orbiter SSI radiometrically calibrated images of the asteroid 243 Ida, created using ISIS software and assuming nadir pointing. This is an original delivery of radiometrically calibrated files, not an update to existing files. All images archived include the asteroid within the image frame. Calibration was performed in 2013-2014.

  18. Application of radiometric surface temperature for surface energy balance estimation: John Monteith's contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 25 years ago, Huband and Monteith paper’s investigating the radiative surface temperature and the surface energy balance of a wheat canopy, highlighted the key issues in computing fluxes with radiometric surface temperature. These included the relationship between radiometric and aerodynamic s...

  19. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  20. RADI's Airborne X-SAR with High Resolution: Performance, Characterization and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, T.; Li, J.; Wang, Z. R.; Huang, L.

    2016-11-01

    X-SAR is an airborne multi-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system with high- resolution, interferometer and full-polarization, developed by the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), funded by the CAS Large Research Infrastructures. Since 2009, the first developed stage of X-SAR system was successfully implemented to an operational SAR with high resolution (up to 0.5 meter). In May 2013, the imaging verification on flights test was carried out. The data calibration on the laboratory measurements were completed at the end of 2015. Many valuable results of imaging verification and data calibration have emphasized the quantitative microwave measurement capabilities. This paper presents the results of X-SAR system performance, characterization, optimization, and verification as carried out during the flight trials and laboratory measurement. The system performance and calibration parameters are presented such as transmitter amplitude accuracy, phase noise, system gain change with temperature variation, long-term radiometric stability. The imaging verification of the key performance parameters is discussed, including target-response function, target pairs discrimination, image noise and radiometric resolution. The example imagery of radiometric enhanced products for intensity change detection is also described.

  1. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  2. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission Operational Land Imager (OLI) Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Dabney, Philip W.; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.; Knight, Edward J.; Kvaran, Geir; Barsi, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) has a comprehensive radiometric characterization and calibration program beginning with the instrument design, and extending through integration and test, on-orbit operations and science data processing. Key instrument design features for radiometric calibration include dual solar diffusers and multi-lamped on-board calibrators. The radiometric calibration transfer procedure from NIST standards has multiple checks on the radiometric scale throughout the process and uses a heliostat as part of the transfer to orbit of the radiometric calibration. On-orbit lunar imaging will be used to track the instruments stability and side slither maneuvers will be used in addition to the solar diffuser to flat field across the thousands of detectors per band. A Calibration Validation Team is continuously involved in the process from design to operations. This team uses an Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the ground system to characterize and calibrate the on-orbit data.

  3. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Upgrade to Full Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry Capability for Airborne Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunagan, S. E.; Flynn, C. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument has been developed at NASA Ames in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and NASA Goddard, supported substantially since 2009 by NASA's Radiation Science Program and Earth Science Technology Office. It combines grating spectrometers with fiber optic links to a tracking, scanning head to enable sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith viewing. 4STAR builds on the long and productive heritage of the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS-6 and -14), which have yielded more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and extensive archived data sets in many NASA Airborne Science campaigns from 1986 to the present. The baseline 4STAR instrument has provided extensive data supporting the TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013), SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys, 2013), and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment, 2014), field campaigns.This poster presents plans and progress for an upgrade to the 4STAR instrument to achieve full science capability, including (1) direct-beam sun tracking measurements to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (2) sky radiance measurements to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index and mode-resolved size distribution), (3) cloud properties via zenith radiance, and (4) trace gas spectrometry. Technical progress in context with the governing physics is reported on several upgrades directed at improved light collection and usage, particularly as related to spectrally and radiometrically stable propagation through the collection light path. In addition, improvements to field calibration and verification, and flight operability and reliability are addressed.

  4. The New Airborne Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Community air pollution is the new airborne disease of our generation's communities. It is caused by the increasing use of fuel, associated with both affluence and careless waste. Photochemical air pollution of the California type involves newly defined atmospheric reactions, is due mostly to motor vehicle exhaust, is oxidizing, and produces ozone, plant damage, impairment of visibility and eye and respiratory symptoms. Aggravation of asthma, impairment of lung function among persons with chronic respiratory disease and a possible causal role, along with cigarette smoking in emphysema and chronic bronchitis, are some of the effects of photochemical pollution. More subtle effects of pollution include impairment of oxygen transport by the blood due to carbon monoxide and interference with porphyrin metabolism due to lead. Carbon monoxide exposures may affect survival of patients who are in hospitals because of myocardial infarction. While many uncertainties in pollution-health reactions need to be resolved, a large number of people in California have health impairment due to airborne disease of this new type. PMID:5485227

  5. Radiometric calibration and SNR calculation of a SWIR imaging telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Ozgur; Turk, Fethi; Selimoglu, Ozgur

    2012-09-06

    Radiometric calibration of an imaging telescope is usually made using a uniform illumination sphere in a laboratory. In this study, we used the open-sky images taken during bright day conditions to calibrate our telescope. We found a dark signal offset value and a linear response coefficient value for each pixel by using three different algorithms. Then we applied these coefficients to the taken images, and considerably lowered the image non-uniformity. Calibration can be repeated during the operation of telescope with an object that has better uniformity than open-sky. Also SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of each pixel was calculated from the open-sky images using the temporal mean and standard deviations. It is found that SNR is greater than 80 for all pixels even at low light levels.

  6. Radiometric performance of the Viking Mars lander cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Burcher, E. E.; Taylor, E. J.; Wall, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking lander cameras feature an array of 12 silicon photodiodes for electronic focus selection and multispectral imaging. Comparisons of absolute radiometric calibrations of the four cameras selected for the mission to Mars with performance predictions based on their design data revealed minor discrepancies. These discrepancies were caused primarily by the method used to calibrate the photosensor array and apparently also from light reflections internal to the array. The sensitivity and dynamic range of all camera channels are found to be sufficient for high quality pictures, providing that the commandable gains and offsets can be optimized for the scene radiance; otherwise, the quantization noise may be too high or the dynamic range too low for an adequate characterization of the scene.

  7. The importance and attainment of accurate absolute radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of accurate absolute radiometric calibration is discussed by reference to the needs of those wishing to validate or use models describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the atmosphere and earth surface features. The in-flight calibration methods used for the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre, Haute Resolution visible (SPOT/HRV) systems are described and their limitations discussed. The questionable stability of in-flight absolute calibration methods suggests the use of a radiative transfer program to predict the apparent radiance, at the entrance pupil of the sensor, of a ground site of measured reflectance imaged through a well characterized atmosphere. The uncertainties of such a method are discussed.

  8. High dynamic range infrared thermography by pixelwise radiometric self calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, M.; Schulz, A.; Bauer, H.-J.

    2010-03-01

    A procedure is described where the response function of each pixel of an InSb detector is determined by radiometric self-calibration. With the present approach no knowledge of the spectral characteristics of the IR system is required to recover a quantity which is linear with the incident irradiance of the object. The inherent detector non-uniformity is corrected on the basis of self-calibrated scaled irradiance. Compared to the standard two-point non-uniformity correction procedure - performed with the detector signal - only two NUC-tables are required for arbitrary integration times. Images obtained at various exposures are fused to a single high dynamic range image. The procedure is validated with synthetic data and its performance is demonstrated by measurements performed with a high resolution InSb FPA.

  9. Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowlton, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    This experiment measured the reflectance of tarps with ground instruments in order to check radiometric calibration, validate atmospheric correction, and predict at-sensor radiance for satellite instruments. The procedure of this experiment is as follows: 1) Assemble laboratory apparatus to duplicate ground reference measurement geometry and satellite measurement geometry; 2) Measure spectral radiance with Optronics OL 750 double monochromator/spectroradiometer; 3) Measure radiance of NIST-calibrated Spectralon panel irradiated by collimated light at incidence angle of calibrated reflectance (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, or 50 deg), viewing normal to panel surface; 4) Measure radiance of Spectralon panel irradiated at incidence angle equal to solar zenith angle at time of overpass; 5) Calculate reflectance of Spectralon panel irradiated at solar zenith angle, viewing normal to panel surface (ground geometry).

  10. Revised radiometric calibration technique for LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J.; Butlin, T.; Duff, P.; Fitzgerald, A.

    1984-01-01

    Depending on detector number, there are random fluctuations in the background level for spectral band 1 of magnitudes ranging from 2 to 3.5 digital numbers (DN). Similar variability is observed in all the other reflective bands, but with smaller magnitude in the range 0.5 to 2.5 DN. Observations of background reference levels show that line dependent variations in raw TM image data and in the associated calibration data can be measured and corrected within an operational environment by applying simple offset corrections on a line-by-line basis. The radiometric calibration procedure defined by the Canadian Center for Remote Sensing was revised accordingly in order to prevent striping in the output product.

  11. Active radiometric calorimeter for absolute calibration of radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, K.E.; DeWerd, L.A.; Rudman, D.A.; Schima, S.A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the design and initial noise floor measurements of a radiometric calorimeter designed to measure therapeutic medical radioactive sources. The instrument demonstrates a noise floor of approximately 2 nW. This low noise floor is achieved by using high temperature superconducting (HTS) transition edge sensor (TES) thermometers in a temperature-control feedback loop. This feedback loop will be used to provide absolute source calibrations based upon the electrical substitution method. Other unique features of the calorimeter are (a) its ability to change sources for calibration without disrupting the vacuum of the instrument, and (b) the ability to measure the emitted power of a source in addition to the total contained source power.

  12. Airborne measurements in the longwave infrared using an imaging hyperspectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Jean-Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Marcotte, Frédérick; Rolland, Matthias; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André

    2008-07-01

    Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state is one important application. Analysis of the surface emissivity as a means to classify ground properties and usage is another one. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on the Fourier Transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at 0.35mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 μm spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection [http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.788027.1]. More recently, an airborne system integrating the FIRST has been developed to provide airborne hyperspectral measurement capabilities. The airborne system and its capabilities are presented in this paper. The FIRST sensor modularity enables operation in various configurations such as tripod-mounted and airborne. In the airborne configuration, the FIRST can be operated in push-broom mode, or in staring mode with image motion compensation. This paper focuses on the airborne operation of the FIRST sensor.

  13. JPSS-1 VIIRS Pre-Launch Radiometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oudrari, Hassan; McIntire, Jeff; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Efremova, Boryana; Ji, Jack; Lee, Shihyan; Schwarting, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on-board the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) completed its sensor level testing on December 2014. The JPSS-1 (J1) mission is scheduled to launch in December 2016, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) mission. VIIRS instrument was designed to provide measurements of the globe twice daily. It is a wide-swath (3,040 kilometers) cross-track scanning radiometer with spatial resolutions of 370 and 740 meters at nadir for imaging and moderate bands, respectively. It covers the wavelength spectrum from reflective to long-wave infrared through 22 spectral bands [0.412 microns to 12.01 microns]. VIIRS observations are used to generate 22 environmental data products (EDRs). This paper will briefly describe J1 VIIRS characterization and calibration performance and methodologies executed during the pre-launch testing phases by the independent government team, to generate the at-launch baseline radiometric performance, and the metrics needed to populate the sensor data record (SDR) Look-Up-Tables (LUTs). This paper will also provide an assessment of the sensor pre-launch radiometric performance, such as the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs), dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, bands spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS), near field and stray light responses. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to the SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  14. JPSS-1 VIIRS pre-launch radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrari, Hassan; McIntire, Jeff; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Efremova, Boryana; Ji, Qiang; Lee, Shihyan; Schwarting, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on-board the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) completed its sensor level testing on December 2014. The JPSS-1 (J1) mission is scheduled to launch in December 2016, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) mission. VIIRS instrument was designed to provide measurements of the globe twice daily. It is a wide-swath (3,040 km) cross-track scanning radiometer with spatial resolutions of 370 and 740 m at nadir for imaging and moderate bands, respectively. It covers the wavelength spectrum from reflective to long-wave infrared through 22 spectral bands [0.412 μm to 12.01 μm]. VIIRS observations are used to generate 22 environmental data products (EDRs). This paper will briefly describe J1 VIIRS characterization and calibration performance and methodologies executed during the pre-launch testing phases by the independent government team, to generate the at-launch baseline radiometric performance, and the metrics needed to populate the sensor data record (SDR) Look-Up-Tables (LUTs). This paper will also provide an assessment of the sensor pre-launch radiometric performance, such as the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs), dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, bands spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS), near field and stray light responses. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to the SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  15. IRCM spectral signature measurements instrumentation featuring enhanced radiometric accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantagne, Stéphane; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Roy, Claude; Willers, Cornelius J.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) signature measurements are performed in military applications including aircraft- and -naval vessel stealth characterization, detection/lock-on ranges, and flares efficiency characterization. Numerous military applications require high precision measurement of infrared signature characterization. For instance, Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems and Infrared Counter-Countermeasure (IRCCM) system are continuously evolving. Infrared flares defeated IR guided seekers, IR flares became defeated by intelligent IR guided seekers and Jammers defeated the intelligent IR guided seekers [7]. A precise knowledge of the target infrared signature phenomenology is crucial for the development and improvement of countermeasure and counter-countermeasure systems and so precise quantification of the infrared energy emitted from the targets requires accurate spectral signature measurements. Errors in infrared characterization measurements can lead to weakness in the safety of the countermeasure system and errors in the determination of detection/lock-on range of an aircraft. The infrared signatures are analyzed, modeled, and simulated to provide a good understanding of the signature phenomenology to improve the IRCM and IRCCM technologies efficiency [7,8,9]. There is a growing need for infrared spectral signature measurement technology in order to further improve and validate infrared-based models and simulations. The addition of imagery to Spectroradiometers is improving the measurement capability of complex targets and scenes because all elements in the scene can now be measured simultaneously. However, the limited dynamic range of the Focal Plane Array (FPA) sensors used in these instruments confines the ranges of measurable radiance intensities. This ultimately affects the radiometric accuracy of these complex signatures. We will describe and demonstrate how the ABB hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer features enhanced the radiometric accuracy

  16. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  17. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  18. RapidEye constellation relative radiometric accuracy measurement using lunar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn, Joe; Tyc, George; Beckett, Keith; Hashida, Yoshi

    2009-09-01

    The RapidEye constellation includes five identical satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Each satellite has a 5-band (blue, green, red, red-edge and near infrared (NIR)) multispectral imager at 6.5m GSD. A three-axes attitude control system allows pointing the imager of each satellite at the Moon during lunations. It is therefore possible to image the Moon from near identical viewing geometry within a span of 80 minutes with each one of the imagers. Comparing the radiometrically corrected images obtained from each band and each satellite allows a near instantaneous relative radiometric accuracy measurement and determination of relative gain changes between the five imagers. A more traditional terrestrial vicarious radiometric calibration program has also been completed by MDA on RapidEye. The two components of this program provide for spatial radiometric calibration ensuring that detector-to-detector response remains flat, while a temporal radiometric calibration approach has accumulated images of specific dry dessert calibration sites. These images are used to measure the constellation relative radiometric response and make on-ground gain and offset adjustments in order to maintain the relative accuracy of the constellation within +/-2.5%. A quantitative comparison between the gain changes measured by the lunar method and the terrestrial temporal radiometric calibration method is performed and will be presented.

  19. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  20. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  1. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  2. Visualizing Airborne and Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierwirth, Victoria A.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing is a process able to provide information about Earth to better understand Earth's processes and assist in monitoring Earth's resources. The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is one remote sensing instrument dedicated to the cause of collecting data on anthropogenic influences on Earth as well as assisting scientists in understanding land-surface and atmospheric interactions. Landsat is a satellite program dedicated to collecting repetitive coverage of the continental Earth surfaces in seven regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Combining these two aircraft and satellite remote sensing instruments will provide a detailed and comprehensive data collection able to provide influential information and improve predictions of changes in the future. This project acquired, interpreted, and created composite images from satellite data acquired from Landsat 4-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+). Landsat images were processed for areas covered by CAR during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCT AS), Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC), Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B (INTEXB), and Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI) 2000 missions. The acquisition of Landsat data will provide supplemental information to assist in visualizing and interpreting airborne and satellite imagery.

  3. Analysis of hyperspectral field radiometric data for monitoring nitrogen concentration in rice crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroppiana, D.; Boschetti, M.; Confalonieri, R.; Bocchi, S.; Brivio, P. A.

    2005-10-01

    Monitoring crop conditions and assessing nutrition requirements is fundamental for implementing sustainable agriculture. Rational nitrogen fertilization is of particular importance in rice crops in order to guarantee high production levels while minimising the impact on the environment. In fact, the typical flooded condition of rice fields can be a significant source of greenhouse gasses. Information on plant nitrogen concentration can be used, coupled with information about the phenological stage, to plan strategies for a rational and spatially differentiated fertilization schedule. A field experiment was carried out in a rice field Northern Italy, in order to evaluate the potential of field radiometric measurements for the prediction of rice nitrogen concentration. The results indicate that rice reflectance is influenced by nitrogen supply at certain wavelengths although N concentration cannot be accurately predicted based on the reflectance measured at a given wavelength. Regression analysis highlighted that the visible region of the spectrum is most sensitive to plant nitrogen concentration when reflectance measures are combined into a spectral index. An automated procedure allowed the analysis of all the possible combinations into a Normalized Difference Index (NDI) of the narrow spectral bands derived by spectral resampling of field measurements. The derived index appeared to be least influenced by plant biomass and Leaf Area Index (LAI) providing a useful approach to detect rice nutritional status. The validation of the regressive model showed that the model is able to predict rice N concentration (R2=0.55 [p<0.01] RRMSE=29.4; modelling efficiency close to the optimum value).

  4. Influence of solar elevation in radiometric and geometric performance of multispectral photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkavaara, Eija; Markelin, Lauri; Rosnell, Tomi; Nurminen, Kimmo

    2012-01-01

    Solar elevation is an important factor in passive, airborne data collection. The minimum solar elevation allowed in missions for topographic mapping is typically 30° from the horizon. A general hypothesis is that the new, high dynamic range, digital large-format photogrammetric sensors allow for high data quality, even with lower solar elevations, which would improve the feasibility and cost-efficiency of photogrammetric technology in various applications. Objectives of this study were to investigate theoretically and empirically the impacts of solar elevation in modern photogrammetric processes. Two cutting-edge aspects of novel photogrammetric technology were considered: point cloud creation by automatic image matching and reflectance calibration of image data. For the empirical study, we used image data collected by a large-format photogrammetric camera, Intergraph DMC, with low (25-28°) and medium (44-48°) solar elevations from 2, 3 and 4 km heights. We did not detect negative influences of decreasing solar elevation during our general evaluations: an analysis of image histograms showed that the ranges of digital numbers could be tuned to similar levels with exposure settings, and evaluations of density and the accuracy of point clouds did not show any reduction of quality. We carried out detailed evaluations in forests, roads and fields. Our results did not indicate deterioration of the quality in sun-illuminated areas with decreasing solar elevation. In shadowed areas, we observed that the variation of image signal was reduced in comparison to sun-illuminated areas and emphasized the issue of complication of reflectance calibration. Artefacts appeared in automatically generated point clouds in areas shadowed by trees, which we observed in flat objects as up to 3 times increased random height variation and decreased success in measuring the terrain surface. Our results also showed that the overall performance of point cloud generation was high. Typically

  5. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y. (Inventor); Koch, Grady J. (Inventor); Kavaya, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices of the present invention enable airborne Doppler Wind LIDAR system measurements and INS/GPS measurements to be combined to estimate wind parameters and compensate for instrument misalignment. In a further embodiment, the wind speed and wind direction may be computed based on two orthogonal line-of-sight LIDAR returns.

  6. Airborne Dial Remote Sensing of the Arctic Ozone Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, Martin; Renger, Wolfgang; Ehret, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    A combined ozone and aerosol LIDAR was developed at the Institute of Physics of the Atmosphere at the DLR in Oberpfaffenhofen. It is an airborne version, that, based on the DIAL-principle, permits the recording of two-dimensional ozone profiles. This presentation will focus on the ozone-part; the aerosol subsection will be treated later.

  7. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission Operational Land Imager: Radiometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Dabney, Philip; Pedelty, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) is one of two instruments to fly on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), which is scheduled to launch in December 2012 to become the 8th in the series of Landsat satellites. The OLI images in the solar reflective part of the spectrum, with bands similar to bands 1-5, 7 and the panchromatic band on the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument. In addition, it has a 20 nm bandpass spectral band at 443 nm for coastal and aerosol studies and a 30 nm band at 1375 nm to aid in cirrus cloud detection. Like ETM+, spatial resolution is 30 m in the all but the panchromatic band, which is 15 meters. OLI is a pushbroom radiometer with approximately 6000 detectors per 30 meter band as opposed to the 16 detectors per band on the whiskbroom ETM+. Data are quantized to 12 bits on OLI as opposed to 8 bits on ETM+ to take advantage of the improved signal to noise ratio provided by the pushbroom design. The saturation radiances are higher on OLI than ETM+ to effectively eliminate saturation issues over bright Earth targets. OLI includes dual solar diffusers for on-orbit absolute and relative (detector to detector) radiometric calibration. Additionally, OLI has 3 sets of on-board lamps that illuminate the OLI focal plane through the full optical system, providing additional checks on the OLI's response[l]. OLI has been designed and built by Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp. (BATC) and is currently undergoing testing and calibration in preparation for delivery in Spring 2011. Final pre-launch performance results should be available in time for presentation at the conference. Preliminary results will be presented below. These results are based on the performance of the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) that was radiometrically tested at the integrated instrument level in 2010 and assembly level measurements made on the flight unit. Signal-to-Noise (SNR) performance: One of the advantages of a pushbroom system is the increased dwell time of the detectors

  8. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  9. Controlling airborne cues to study small animal navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gershow, Marc; Berck, Matthew; Mathew, Dennis; Luo, Linjiao; Kane, Elizabeth A.; Carlson, John R.; Samuel, Aravinthan D.T.

    2012-01-01

    Small animals like nematodes and insects analyze airborne chemical cues to infer the direction of favorable and noxious locations. In these animals, the study of navigational behavior evoked by airborne cues has been limited by the difficulty of precise stimulus control. We present a system that enables us to deliver gaseous stimuli in defined spatial and temporal patterns to freely moving small animals. We use this apparatus, in combination with machine vision algorithms, to assess and quantify navigational decision-making of Drosophila larvae in response to ethyl acetate (a volatile attractant) and carbon dioxide (a gaseous repellant). PMID:22245808

  10. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  11. Transmittance Measurement of a Heliostat Facility used in the Preflight Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  12. Transmittance measurement of a heliostat facility used in the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-08-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  13. Radiometric absolute noise-temperature measurement system features improved accuracy and calibration ease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W.; Ewen, H.; Haroules, G.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometric receiver system, which measures noise temperatures in degrees Kelvin, does not require cryogenic noise sources for routine operation. It eliminates radiometer calibration errors associated with RF attenuation measurements. Calibrated noise source is required only for laboratory adjustment and calibration.

  14. Flight Technology Improvement. [spaceborne optical radiometric instruments, attitude control, and electromechanical and power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Shortcomings in spaceborne instrumentation technology are analyzed and recommendations are given for corrections and technology development. The technologies discussed are optical radiometric instruments and calibration, attitude control and determination, and electromechanical and power subsystems.

  15. Intra-annual NDVI validation of the Landsat 5 TM radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Groeneveld, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone of the extensive archive of moderate‐resolution Earth imagery. Even after more than 24 years of service, the L5 TM is still operational. Given the longevity of the satellite, the detectors have aged and the sensor's radiometric characteristics have changed since launch. The calibration procedures and parameters in the National Land Archive Production System (NLAPS) have also changed with time. Revised radiometric calibrations in 2003 and 2007 have improved the radiometric accuracy of recently processed data. This letter uses the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as a metric to evaluate the radiometric calibration. The calibration change has improved absolute calibration accuracy, consistency over time, and consistency with Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic radiometry and will provide the basis for continued long‐term studies of the Earth's land surfaces.

  16. NERO: General concept of a NEO radiometric observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellino, A.; Somma, R.; Tommasi, L.; Paolinetti, R.; Muinonen, K.; Virtanen, J.; Tedesco, E. F.

    NERO (Near-Earth Objects Radiometric Observatory) is one of the six studies for possible missions dedicated to near-Earth objects, that were funded by the ESA in 2002-2003. NERO is a further development of previous studies already submitted to ESA (Sysiphos,Spaceguard-1). The general concept is that a small satellite equipped with both a CCD for visible wavelengths and an array for thermal IR measurements around 10 microns would be an ideal platform for simultaneously obtaining two of the major objectives of current NEO science, namely the physical characterization of the objects and the discovery of NEOs which are difficult to detect because they have orbits entirely or partly interior to the Earth's orbit. The NERO study included a comprehensive analysis of the advantages and drawbacks of different orbital options for the satellite (including L2 of Earth and L2 of Venus) and a preliminary simulation of the effectiveness in deriving reliable orbits of the newly detected objects. The main results of this study, including also a preliminary design of the payload (optics, detectors, cooling system, etc.) are briefly summarized.

  17. Advanced radiometric and interferometric milimeter-wave scene simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauss, B. I.; Moffa, P. J.; Steele, W. G.; Agravante, H.; Davidheiser, R.; Samec, T.; Young, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Smart munitions and weapons utilize various imaging sensors (including passive IR, active and passive millimeter-wave, and visible wavebands) to detect/identify targets at short standoff ranges and in varied terrain backgrounds. In order to design and evaluate these sensors under a variety of conditions, a high-fidelity scene simulation capability is necessary. Such a capability for passive millimeter-wave scene simulation exists at TRW. TRW's Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code is a rigorous, benchmarked, end-to-end passive millimeter-wave scene simulation code for interpreting millimeter-wave data, establishing scene signatures and evaluating sensor performance. In passive millimeter-wave imaging, resolution is limited due to wavelength and aperture size. Where high resolution is required, the utility of passive millimeter-wave imaging is confined to short ranges. Recent developments in interferometry have made possible high resolution applications on military platforms. Interferometry or synthetic aperture radiometry allows the creation of a high resolution image with a sparsely filled aperture. Borrowing from research work in radio astronomy, we have developed and tested at TRW scene reconstruction algorithms that allow the recovery of the scene from a relatively small number of spatial frequency components. In this paper, the TRW modeling capability is described and numerical results are presented.

  18. Optimized mapping of radiometric quantities into OpenGL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, Maximo; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Moulton, J. R., Jr.; Liu, Jesse

    1999-07-01

    Physically realistic synthesis of FLIR imagery requires intensive phenomenology calculations of the spectral band thermal emission and reflection from scene elements in the database. These calculations predict the heat conduction, convection, and radiation exchange between scene elements and the environment. Balancing this requirement is the need for imagery to be presented to a display in a timely fashion, often in real time. In order to support these conflicting requirements, some means of overcoming the gap between real time and high fidelity must be achieved. Over the past several years, the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has been developing a real-time forward looking infrared sensor simulation known as Paint the Night (PTN). As part of this development, NVESD has explored schemes for optimizing signature models and for mapping model radiometric output into parameters compatible with OpenGL, real-time rendering architectures. Relevant signature and mapping optimization issues are discussed, and a current NVESD PTN real-time implementation scheme is presented.

  19. Estimation of Radiometric Calibration Coefficients of EGYPTSAT-1 Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, A. H.; El Leithy, B. M.; Badr, H. S.; Centeno, J.

    2012-07-01

    Sensors usually must be calibrated as part of a measurement system. Calibration may include the procedure of correcting the transfer of the sensor, using the reference measurements, in such a way that a specific input-output relation can be guaranteed with a certain accuracy and under certain conditions. It is necessary to perform a calibration to relate the output signal precisely to the physical input signal (e.g., the output Digital Numbers (DNs) to the absolute units of at-sensor spectral radiance). Generic calibration data associated with Egyptsat-1 sensor are not provided by the manufacturer. Therefore, this study was conducted to estimate Egyptsat-1 sensor specific calibration data and tabulates the necessary constants for its different multispectral bands. We focused our attention on the relative calibration between Egyptsat-1 and Spot-4 sensors for their great spectral similarity. The key idea is to use concurrent correlation of signals received at both sensors in the same day (i.e., sensors are observing the same phenomenon). Calibration formula constructed from Spot-4 sensor is used to derive the calibration coefficients for Egyptsat-1. A brief overview of the radiometric calibration coefficients retrieval procedures is presented. A reasonable estimate of the overall calibration coefficient is obtained. They have been used to calibrate reflectances of Egyptsat-1 sensor. Further updates to evaluate and improve the retrieved calibration data are being investigated.

  20. Advanced radiometric and interferometric milimeter-wave scene simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauss, B. I.; Moffa, P. J.; Steele, W. G.; Agravante, H.; Davidheiser, R.; Samec, T.; Young, S. K.

    1993-12-01

    Smart munitions and weapons utilize various imaging sensors (including passive IR, active and passive millimeter-wave, and visible wavebands) to detect/identify targets at short standoff ranges and in varied terrain backgrounds. In order to design and evaluate these sensors under a variety of conditions, a high-fidelity scene simulation capability is necessary. Such a capability for passive millimeter-wave scene simulation exists at TRW. TRW's Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code is a rigorous, benchmarked, end-to-end passive millimeter-wave scene simulation code for interpreting millimeter-wave data, establishing scene signatures and evaluating sensor performance. In passive millimeter-wave imaging, resolution is limited due to wavelength and aperture size. Where high resolution is required, the utility of passive millimeter-wave imaging is confined to short ranges. Recent developments in interferometry have made possible high resolution applications on military platforms. Interferometry or synthetic aperture radiometry allows the creation of a high resolution image with a sparsely filled aperture. Borrowing from research work in radio astronomy, we have developed and tested at TRW scene reconstruction algorithms that allow the recovery of the scene from a relatively small number of spatial frequency components. In this paper, the TRW modeling capability is described and numerical results are presented.

  1. Phoretic and Radiometric Force Measurements on Microparticles in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. James

    1996-01-01

    Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and radiometric forces on microparticles are being measured over a wide range of gas phase and particle conditions using electrodynamic levitation of single particles to simulate microgravity conditions. The thermophoretic force, which arises when a particle exists in a gas having a temperature gradient, is measured by levitating an electrically charged particle between heated and cooled plates mounted in a vacuum chamber. The diffusiophoretic force arising from a concentration gradient in the gas phase is measured in a similar manner except that the heat exchangers are coated with liquids to establish a vapor concentration gradient. These phoretic forces and the radiation pressure force acting on a particle are measured directly in terms of the change in the dc field required to levitate the particle with and without the force applied. The apparatus developed for the research and the experimental techniques are discussed, and results obtained by thermophoresis experiments are presented. The determination of the momentum and energy accommodation coefficients associated with molecular collisions between gases molecules and particles and the measurement of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and small particles are of particular interest.

  2. History of Solar Radiometry and the World Radiometric Reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, C.

    1991-01-01

    The history of solar radiometry since the first pyrheliometer of Pouillet is presented. After the invention of the Ångström and the Smithsonian pyrheliometers around the turn of this century two different "scales" were in use. Comparisons with absolute cavity radiometers developed in America and Europe have been performed since about 1910 which show remarkably accurate measurements in terms of the SI units. However, these results have never been accepted and several rules have been established to reference radiation measurements in the meteorological community and to remedy the unsatisfactory fact of having different "scales". Unfortunately none of these rules led to a reference close to the SI units of irradiance, confusing the issue even more. With the advent of modern absolute radiometers in the late 1960s the situation improved and led to the definition of the World Radiometric Reference in use by the meteorological community since 1981. This reference has an estimated accuracy of 0,3% and guarantees the worldwide homogeneity of radiation measurements within 0,1% precision.

  3. Radiometric STFT Analysis of PDV recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozier, Olivier; Prudhomme, Gabriel; Mercier, Patrick; Berthe, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: by example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach ``PDV Radiometric analysis'' resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derivate an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit. It may be compared to back-scattering and collected power from a particle, which is increasing with its size. At least, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it may show the improvement of sensitivity.

  4. Automatic Ship Recognition Using A Passive Radiometric Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keng, Janmin

    1982-03-01

    Automatic ship recognition is of interest in such problems as over-the-horizon surface surveillance and targeting, long range air targeting, and satellite ocean surveillance. Our approach is model-driven. It uses the fact that the wake caused by a cruising ship has a higher temperature profile than the surrounding water background. In addition, we distinguish between the active wake and the turbulent water surrounding the ship. Furthermore, the temperature of the ship itself is usually lower than that of the ocean. Finally, we make use of the knowledge of ship sizes, convoy patterns and other information concerning ships traveling in formation. An image from a radiometric sensor forms the basis of the analysis. Edge detection and region association techniques are used to locate a "zone of activity", a region of the image that contains the ship. Grey level histogram analysis of the zone is then used to categorize pixels into "ship", "wake", and "water". Results of experiments using this technique are presented.

  5. Design, manufacture, and calibration of infrared radiometric blackbody sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Michaud, F.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    A Radiometric Calibration Station (RCS) is being assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) which will allow for calibration of sensors with detector arrays having spectral capability from about 0.4-15 {mu}m. The configuration of the LANL RCS. Two blackbody sources have been designed to cover the spectral range from about 3-15 {mu}m, operating at temperatures ranging from about 180-350 K within a vacuum environment. The sources are designed to present a uniform spectral radiance over a large area to the sensor unit under test. The thermal uniformity requirement of the blackbody cavities has been one of the key factors of the design, requiring less than 50 mK variation over the entire blackbody surface to attain effective emissivity values of about 0.999. Once the two units are built and verified to the level of about 100 mK at LANL, they will be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where at least a factor of two improvement will be calibrated into the blackbody control system. The physical size of these assemblies will require modifications of the existing NIST Low Background Infrared (LBIR) Facility. LANL has constructed a bolt-on addition to the LBIR facility that will allow calibration of our large aperture sources. Methodology for attaining the two blackbody sources at calibrated levels of performance equivalent to present state of the art will be explained in the following.

  6. Effects on Spacecraft Radiometric Data at Superior Solar Conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Trevor; Budnik, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During 2006, three ESA interplanetary spacecraft, Rosetta, Mars Express (MEX) and Venus Express (VEX), passed through superior solar conjunction. For all three spacecraft, the noise in the post-fit range-rate residuals from the orbit determination was analysed. At small Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles the level was almost two orders of magnitude higher than normal. The main objective was to characterize the Doppler (rangerate) noise as a function of SEP angle. At least then the range-rate data can be appropriately weighted within the orbit determination so that the solution uncertainties are realistic. For VEX, some intervals of particularly noisy Doppler data could be correlated with unusual solar activity. For Rosetta, the biases in the range data residuals were analysed with the aim of improving the model used for calibrating the signal delay due to the solar plasma. The model, which originally had fixed coefficients, was adjusted to achieve better fits to the data. Even the relatively small Doppler biases were well represented. Using the improved model, the electron density at 20 solar radii was compared with earlier results obtained by radio science studies using Voyager 2 and Ulysses radiometric data. There is some evidence for a dependency of the density on the phase within the 11 years solar cycle.

  7. Radiometric sensor performance model including atmospheric and IR clutter effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Rudolf; Davis, Joel S.; Duggin, Michael J.

    1997-06-01

    The computer code SENSAT developed for radiometric investigations in remote sensing was extended to include two statistical clutter models of infrared background and the prediction of the target detection probability. The first one is based on the standard deviation of scene clutter estimated from scene data, the second one is based on the power spectral density of different classes of IR background as a function of temporal or spatial frequency. The overall code consists of modules describing the optoelectronic sensor (optics, detector, signal processor), a radiative transfer code (MODTRAN) to include the atmospheric effects, and the scene module consisting of target and background. The scene is evaluated for a certain pixel at a time. However, a sequence of pixels can be simulated by varying the range, view angle, atmospheric condition, or the clutter level. The target consists of one or two subpixel surface elements, the remaining part of the pixels represents background. Multiple paths, e.g. sun-ground-target-sensor, can also be selected. An expert system, based upon the IDL language, provides user-friendly input menus, performs consistency checks, and submits the required MODTRAN and SENSAT runs. A sample case of the detection probability of a sub-pixel target in a marine cluttered background is discussed.

  8. Radiometric Measurements of Slant Path Attenuation in the V/W Bands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    MM-YYYY) SEPTEMBER 2014 2. REPORT TYPE INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2012 – APR 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RADIOMETRIC ... RADIOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS OF SLANT PATH ATTENUATION IN THE V/W BANDS SEPTEMBER 2014 INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD

  9. Study of Spectral/Radiometric Characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for Land Use Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Metzler, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    An investigation conducted in support of the LANDSAT 4/5 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) Program is discussed. Results of engineering analyses of radiometric, spatial, spectral, and geometric properties of the Thematic Mapper systems are summarized; major emphasis is placed on the radiometric analysis. Details of the analyses are presented in appendices, which contain three of the eight technical papers produced during this investigation; these three, together, describe the major activities and results of the investigation.

  10. Airborne Gravity Data Enhances NGS Experimental Gravimetric Geoid in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, S. A.; Childers, V. A.; Li, X.; Roman, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey [NGS], through their Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum [GRAV-D] program, continues to update its gravimetry holdings by flying new airborne gravity surveys over a large fraction of the USA and its territories. By 2022, NGS intends that all orthometric heights in the USA will be determined in the field by using a reliable national gravimetric geoid model to transform from geodetic heights obtained from GPS. Several airborne campaigns have already been flown over Alaska and its coastline. Some of this Alaskan coastal data have been incorporated into a new NGS experimental geoid model - xGEOID14. The xGEOID14 model is the first in a series of annual experimental geoid models that will incorporate NGS GRAV-D airborne data. This series provides a useful benchmark for assessing and improving current techniques by which the airborne and land-survey data are filtered and cleaned, and then combined with satellite gravity models, elevation data (etc.) with the ultimate aim of computing a geoid model that can support a national physical height system by 2022. Here we will examine the NGS GRAV-D airborne data in Alaska, and assess its contribution to xGEOID14. Future prospects for xGEOID15 will also be considered.

  11. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  12. Evaluation of relative radiometric correction techniques on Landsat 8 OLI sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, Antonio; Caradonna, Grazia; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2016-08-01

    The quality of information derived from processed remotely sensed data may depend upon many factors, mostly related to the extent data acquisition is influenced by atmospheric conditions, topographic effects, sun angle and so on. The goal of radiometric corrections is to reduce such effects in order enhance the performance of change detection analysis. There are two approaches to radiometric correction: absolute and relative calibrations. Due to the large amount of free data products available, absolute radiometric calibration techniques may be time consuming and financially expensive because of the necessary inputs for absolute calibration models (often these data are not available and can be difficult to obtain). The relative approach to radiometric correction, known as relative radiometric normalization, is preferred with some research topics because no in situ ancillary data, at the time of satellite overpasses, are required. In this study we evaluated three well known relative radiometric correction techniques using two Landsat 8 - OLI scenes over a subset area of the Apulia Region (southern Italy): the IR-MAD (Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection), the HM (Histogram Matching) and the DOS (Dark Object Subtraction). IR-MAD results were statistically assessed within a territory with an extremely heterogeneous landscape and all computations performed in a Matlab environment. The panchromatic and thermal bands were excluded from the comparisons.

  13. Column Closure Studies of Lower Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-Asia Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ and Ship-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Hegg, A.; Wang, J.; Bates, D.; Redemann, J.; Russells, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Welton, E. J.; Seinfield, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    We assess the consistency (closure) between solar beam attenuation by aerosols and water vapor measured by airborne sunphotometry and derived from airborne in-situ, and ship-based lidar measurements during the April 2001 Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The airborne data presented here were obtained aboard the Twin Otter aircraft. Comparing aerosol extinction o(550 nm) from four different techniques shows good agreement for the vertical distribution of aerosol layers. However, the level of agreement in absolute magnitude of the derived aerosol extinction varied among the aerosol layers sampled. The sigma(550 nm) computed from airborne in-situ size distribution and composition measurements shows good agreement with airborne sunphotometry in the marine boundary layer but is considerably lower in layers dominated by dust if the particles are assumed to be spherical. The sigma(550 nm) from airborne in-situ scattering and absorption measurements are about approx. 13% lower than those obtained from airborne sunphotometry during 14 vertical profiles. Combining lidar and the airborne sunphotometer measurements reveals the prevalence of dust layers at altitudes up to 10 km with layer aerosol optical depth (from 3.5 to 10 km altitude) of approx. 0.1 to 0.2 (500 nm) and extinction-to-backscatter ratios of 59-71 sr (523 nm). The airborne sunphotometer aboard the Twin Otter reveals a relatively dry atmosphere during ACE- Asia with all water vapor columns less than 1.5 cm and water vapor densities w less than 12 g/cu m. Comparing layer water vapor amounts and w from the airborne sunphotometer to the same quantities measured with aircraft in-situ sensors leads to a high correlation (r(sup 3)=0.96) but the sunphotometer tends to underestimate w by 7%.

  14. Making SAR Data Accessible - ASF's ALOS PALSAR Radiometric Terrain Correction Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Arko, S. A.; Gens, R.

    2015-12-01

    While SAR data have proven valuable for a wide range of geophysical research questions, so far, largely only the SAR-educated science communities have been able to fully exploit the information content of internationally available SAR archives. The main issues that have been preventing a more widespread utilization of SAR are related to (1) the diversity and complexity of SAR data formats, (2) the complexity of the processing flows needed to extract geophysical information from SAR, (3) the lack of standardization and automation of these processing flows, and (4) the often ignored geocoding procedures, leaving the data in image coordinate space. In order to improve upon this situation, ASF's radiometric terrain-correction (RTC) project is generating uniformly formatted and easily accessible value-added products from the ASF Distributed Active Archive Center's (DAAC) five-year archive of JAXA's ALOS PALSAR sensor. Specifically, the project applies geometric and radiometric corrections to SAR data to allow for an easy and direct combination of obliquely acquired SAR data with remote sensing imagery acquired in nadir observation geometries. Finally, the value-added data is provided to the user in the broadly accepted Geotiff format, in order to support the easy integration of SAR data into GIS environments. The goal of ASF's RTC project is to make SAR data more accessible and more attractive to the broader SAR applications community, especially to those users that currently have limited SAR expertise. Production of RTC products commenced October 2014 and will conclude late in 2015. As of July 2015, processing of 71% of ASF's ALOS PALSAR archive was completed. Adding to the utility of this dataset are recent changes to the data access policy that allow the full-resolution RTC products to be provided to the public, without restriction. In this paper we will introduce the processing flow that was developed for the RTC project and summarize the calibration and validation

  15. Radiometric calibration stability of the EO-1 advanced land imager: 5 years on-orbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Ong, L.; Barsi, J.A.; Mendenhall, J.A.; Lencioni, D.E.; Helder, D.L.; Hollaren, D.M.; Morfitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was developed as a prototype sensor for follow on missions to Landsat-7. It was launched in November 2000 on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite as a nominal one-year technology demonstration mission. As of this writing, the sensor has continued to operate in excess of 5 years. Six of the ALl's nine multi-spectral (MS) bands and the panchromatic band have similar spectral coverage as those on the Landsat-7 ETM+. In addition to on-board lamps, which have been significantly more stable than the lamps on ETM+, the ALI has a solar diffuser and has imaged the moon monthly since launch. This combined calibration dataset allows understanding of the radiometric stability of the ALI system, its calibrators and some differentiation of the sources of the changes with time. The solar dataset is limited as the mechanism controlling the aperture to the solar diffuser failed approximately 18 months after launch. Results over 5 years indicate that: the shortest wavelength band (443 nm) has degraded in response about 2%; the 482 nm and 565 nm bands decreased in response about 1%; the 660 nm, 790 nm and 868 nm bands each degraded about 5%; the 1250 nm and 1650 nm bands did not change significantly and the 2215 nm band increased in response about 2%.

  16. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  17. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  18. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  19. The absolute radiometric calibration of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager using the reflectance-based approach and the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Anderson, Nikolaus; Thome, Kurtis; Biggar, Stuart

    2014-10-01

    Landsat 8 was launched on 11 February 2013 as the newest platform in the Landsat program. It contains two Earthobserving instruments, one of which is the Operational Land Imager (OLI). OLI includes an onboard radiometric calibration system that is used to monitor changes in its responsivity throughout the mission lifetime, and it consists of Spectralon solar diffuser panels as well as tungsten lamp assemblies. External techniques are used to monitor both OLI and its calibration system, and they include lunar views, side slither maneuvers of the satellite, and ground-based vicarious calibration. This work presents the absolute radiometric calibration results for Landsat 8 OLI that were obtained using two ground-based measurement techniques. The first is the reflectance-based approach, where measurements of atmospheric and surface properties are made during a Landsat 8 overpass, and it requires personnel to be on site during the time of measurement. The second uses the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS), which was developed by the Remote Sensing Group in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona so that radiometric calibration data can be collected without the requirement of on-site personnel. It allows more data to be collected annually, which increases the temporal sampling of trending results.

  20. Water Vapor Profiling From CoSSIR Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Chang, L. A.; Monosmith, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Previous millimeter-wave radiometry for water vapor profiling, by either airborne or satellite sensors, has been limited to frequencies less than or equal to 183 GHz. The retrievals are generally limited to an altitude range of 0-10 km. The additional measurements at the frequencies of 380.2 plus or minus 0.8, 380.2 plus or minus 1.8, 380.2 plus or minus 3.3, and 380.2 plus or minus 6.2 GHz provided by the new airborne Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) can extend this profiling capability up to an altitude of about 15 km. Furthermore, the retrievals can be performed over both land and water surfaces in the tropics without much difficulty. These properties are demonstrated by recent CoSSIR measurements on board the NASA WB-57 aircraft during CR-AVE in January 2006. Retrievals of water vapor mixing ratio were performed at eight altitude levels of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 km from CoSSIR data sets acquired at observational angles of 0 and 53.4 degrees, and the results were compared with other available measurements from the same aircraft and near-concurrent satellites. A comparison of the variations of mixing ratios retrieved from CoSSIR and those derived from the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) in the aircraft vicinity, along the path of the transit flight on January 14, 2006, appears to show some connection, although the measurements were referring to different altitudes. A very good agreement was found between the collocated values of total precipitable water derived from the CoSSIR-retrieved water vapor profiles and those estimated from TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager)

  1. Radiometric Calibration Techniques for Signal-of-Opportunity Reflectometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Shah, Rashmi; Deshpande, Manohar; Johnson, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Bi-static reflection measurements utilizing global navigation satellite service (GNSS) or other signals of opportunity (SoOp) can be used to sense ocean and terrestrial surface properties. End-to-end calibration of GNSS-R has been performed using well-characterized reflection surface (e.g., water), direct path antenna, and receiver gain characterization. We propose an augmented approach using on-board receiver electronics for radiometric calibration of SoOp reflectometers utilizing direct and reflected signal receiving antennas. The method calibrates receiver and correlator gains and offsets utilizing a reference switch and common noise source. On-board electronic calibration sources, such as reference switches, noise diodes and loop-back circuits, have shown great utility in stabilizing total power and correlation microwave radiometer and scatterometer receiver electronics in L-band spaceborne instruments. Application to SoOp instruments is likely to bring several benefits. For example, application to provide short and long time scale calibration stability of the direct path channel, especially in low signal-to-noise ratio configurations, is directly analogous to the microwave radiometer problem. The direct path channel is analogous to the loopback path in a scatterometer to provide a reference of the transmitted power, although the receiver is independent from the reflected path channel. Thus, a common noise source can be used to measure the gain ratio of the two paths. Using these techniques long-term (days to weeks) calibration stability of spaceborne L-band scatterometer and radiometer has been achieved better than 0.1. Similar long-term stability would likely be needed for a spaceborne reflectometer mission to measure terrestrial properties such as soil moisture.

  2. Precise quantitation of PAIgG: A new radiometric microtechnique

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, K.A.; Gauger, J.A.; Davis, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    We report the development of a radiometric assay for platelet-bound IgG that is both sensitive and quantitative. The assay utilized 96-well millititer plates incorporating a 0.2 microns filter membrane in the bottom. A 125I-labeled monoclonal antihuman IgG, as a secondary antibody, detected the platelet-bound human IgG. Since 5 x 10(6) platelets were used for each assay, tests for platelet-bound IgG can be performed on persons with severe thrombocytopenia. For the detection of circulating antiplatelet alloantibodies, as little as 10 microliters of platelet-free plasma per assay is required. Antiplatelet IgG was quantitated by using anti-PIA1 antibody that was purified with affinity and elution and DEAE chromatography. This purified antiplatelet antibody was labeled with 125I and was used to determine the binding ratio of secondary antibody to primary antibody. Under our standard conditions, this ratio was found to be stable at approximately 0.35 over the sensitivity range of the assay. The assay can detect approximately 200 molecules of human IgG per platelet (0.1 ng of secondary antibody bound per 5 x 10(6) platelets). It has a linear range from 0 to 7,000 molecules per platelet. Quantitation of anti-PIA1 binding for platelets stored for up to 6 months under refrigeration showed no change in number of PIA1 binding sites. Clinical studies showed that 18 of 19 ITP patients had an increased number of IgG molecules per platelet as did patients with malignancy and drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia. Patients who had received multiple platelet transfusions had antiplatelet antibody in their plasma. Normal amounts of PAIgG were observed in platelets and plasma of patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenia.

  3. Wafer-level radiometric performance testing of uncooled microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis G.; Topart, Patrice; Tremblay, Bruno; Julien, Christian; Martin, Louis; Vachon, Carl

    2014-03-01

    A turn-key semi-automated test system was constructed to perform on-wafer testing of microbolometer arrays. The system allows for testing of several performance characteristics of ROIC-fabricated microbolometer arrays including NETD, SiTF, ROIC functionality, noise and matrix operability, both before and after microbolometer fabrication. The system accepts wafers up to 8 inches in diameter and performs automated wafer die mapping using a microscope camera. Once wafer mapping is completed, a custom-designed quick insertion 8-12 μm AR-coated Germanium viewport is placed and the chamber is pumped down to below 10-5 Torr, allowing for the evaluation of package-level focal plane array (FPA) performance. The probe card is electrically connected to an INO IRXCAM camera core, a versatile system that can be adapted to many types of ROICs using custom-built interface printed circuit boards (PCBs). We currently have the capability for testing 384x288, 35 μm pixel size and 160x120, 52 μm pixel size FPAs. For accurate NETD measurements, the system is designed to provide an F/1 view of two rail-mounted blackbodies seen through the Germanium window by the die under test. A master control computer automates the alignment of the probe card to the dies, the positioning of the blackbodies, FPA image frame acquisition using IRXCAM, as well as data analysis and storage. Radiometric measurement precision has been validated by packaging dies measured by the automated probing system and re-measuring the SiTF and Noise using INO's pre-existing benchtop system.

  4. Radiometric method for determining solubility of organic solvents in water

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, J.M.; Tseng, C.L.; Yang, J.Y.

    1986-06-01

    Cobalt-60 labeled cobalt(III) pyrrolidinecarbodithioate (/sup 60/Co(PDC)/sub 3/) has a peculiar stability during storage in organic solvent and when its organic solution is shaken with an aqueous solution containing different acids or ions. Using these characteristics, the authors have attempted to use /sup 60/Co(PDC)/sub 3/ as a radioagent for determining solubilities of various organic solvents in water. The radioagent was first dissolved in the organic solvent under investigation before pure water was added. The solution mixture was shaken vigorously in order to let the organic phase contact with water sufficiently. Some of the organic solvent would dissolve in water after shaking, resulting in volume reduction of the organic phase. However, the radioagent was found not to accompany the organic solvent molecules going into water; i.e., all the radioactivity of /sup 60/Co(PDC)/sub 3/ would be retained in the organic phase. Solubility of the organic solvent in water therefore can be calculated from the value of the volume change of the organic phase divided by the water volume. Direct measurement of a small change in volume of organic phase with high accuracy is generally very difficult; alternatively, the authors have measured the specific activities of /sup 60/Co(PDC)/sub 3/ (cpm/mL) in the original and the final organic solutions, and the counting results were used to estimate the decrease in volume of the organic phase. Several commonly used organic solvents were selected to test the applicability of the proposed radiometric method. The solubilities of the organic solvents selected for this study range from very small values (10/sup -4/) to relatively large values (10/sup -2/), 6 references, 1 table.

  5. Radiometric Calibration of the Earth Observing System's Imaging Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Philip N. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The work on the grant was mainly directed towards developing new, accurate, redundant methods for the in-flight, absolute radiometric calibration of satellite multispectral imaging systems and refining the accuracy of methods already in use. Initially the work was in preparation for the calibration of MODIS and HIRIS (before the development of that sensor was canceled), with the realization it would be applicable to most imaging multi- or hyper-spectral sensors provided their spatial or spectral resolutions were not too coarse. The work on the grant involved three different ground-based, in-flight calibration methods reflectance-based radiance-based and diffuse-to-global irradiance ratio used with the reflectance-based method. This continuing research had the dual advantage of: (1) developing several independent methods to create the redundancy that is essential for the identification and hopefully the elimination of systematic errors; and (2) refining the measurement techniques and algorithms that can be used not only for improving calibration accuracy but also for the reverse process of retrieving ground reflectances from calibrated remote-sensing data. The grant also provided the support necessary for us to embark on other projects such as the ratioing radiometer approach to on-board calibration (this has been further developed by SBRS as the 'solar diffuser stability monitor' and is incorporated into the most important on-board calibration system for MODIS)- another example of the work, which was a spin-off from the grant funding, was a study of solar diffuser materials. Journal citations, titles and abstracts of publications authored by faculty, staff, and students are also attached.

  6. Geostatistical analysis as applied to two environmental radiometric time series.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, Mark; Lind, Bjørn; Gerland, Sebastian; Rudjord, Anne Liv

    2003-03-01

    This article details the results of an investigation into the application of geostatistical data analysis to two environmental radiometric time series. The data series employed consist of 99Tc values for seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) and seawater samples taken as part of a marine monitoring program conducted on the coast of northern Norway by the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Geostatistical methods were selected in order to provide information on values of the variables at unsampled times and to investigate the temporal correlation exhibited by the data sets. This information is of use in the optimisation of future sampling schemes and for providing information on the temporal behaviour of the variables in question that may not be obtained during a cursory analysis. The results indicate a high degree of temporal correlation within the data sets, the correlation for the seawater and seaweed data being modelled with an exponential and linear function, respectively. The semi-variogram for the seawater data indicates a temporal range of correlation of approximately 395 days with no apparent random component to the overall variance structure and was described best by an exponential function. The temporal structure of the seaweed data was best modelled by a linear function with a small nugget component. Evidence of drift was present in both semi-variograms. Interpolation of the data sets using the fitted models and a simple kriging procedure were compared, using a cross-validation procedure, with simple linear interpolation. Results of this exercise indicate that, for the seawater data, the kriging procedure outperformed the simple interpolation with respect to error distribution and correlation of estimates with actual values. Using the unbounded linear model with the seaweed data produced estimates that were only marginally better than those produced by the simple interpolation.

  7. Even Shallower Exploration with Airborne Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Kirkegaard, C.; Nyboe, N. S.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (EM) is in many ways undergoing the same type rapid technological development as seen in the telecommunication industry. These developments are driven by a steadily increasing demand for exploration of minerals, groundwater and geotechnical targets. The latter two areas demand shallow and accurate resolution of the near surface geology in terms of both resistivity and spatial delineation of the sedimentary layers. Airborne EM systems measure the grounds electromagnetic response when subject to either a continuous discrete sinusoidal transmitter signal (frequency domain) or by measuring the decay of currents induced in the ground by rapid transmission of transient pulses (time domain). In the last decade almost all new developments of both instrument hardware and data processing techniques has focused around time domain systems. Here we present a concept for measuring the time domain response even before the transient transmitter current has been turned off. Our approach relies on a combination of new instrument hardware and novel modeling algorithms. The newly developed hardware allows for measuring the instruments complete transfer function which is convolved with the synthetic earth response in the inversion algorithm. The effect is that earth response data measured while the transmitter current is turned off can be included in the inversion, significantly increasing the amount of available information. We demonstrate the technique using both synthetic and field data. The synthetic examples provide insight on the physics during the turn off process and the field examples document the robustness of the method. Geological near surface structures can now be resolved to a degree that is unprecedented to the best of our knowledge, making airborne EM even more attractive and cost-effective for exploration of water and minerals that are crucial for the function of our societies.

  8. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  9. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  10. Within-field and regional-scale accuracies of topsoil organic carbon content prediction from an airborne visible near-infrared hyperspectral image combined with synchronous field spectra for temperate croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Bel, Liliane; Lefevre, Josias; Chehdi, Kacem

    2016-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the TOSCA-PLEIADES-CO of the French Space Agency and benefited data from the earlier PROSTOCK-Gessol3 project supported by the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME). It aimed at identifying the potential of airborne hyperspectral visible near-infrared AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with intensive annual crop cultivation and both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soils comprise hortic or glossic luvisols, calcaric, rendzic cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle images (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks. Tracks were atmospherically corrected then mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution using a set of 24 synchronous field spectra of bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then calculation and thresholding of NDVI from an atmospherically corrected SPOT4 image acquired the same day enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. A total of 101 sites, which were sampled either at the regional scale or within one field, were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic AISA spectra which were related to SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples, considering those 75 sites outside cloud shadows only, and different sampling strategies for selecting calibration samples. Validation root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were comprised between 3.73 and 4.49 g. Kg-1 and were ~4 g. Kg-1 in median. The most performing models in terms of coefficient of determination (R²) and Residual Prediction Deviation (RPD) values were the

  11. Airborne Remote Sensing of River Flow and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, S.; Anderson, S. P.; McLean, J.; Redford, R.

    2014-12-01

    River morphology, surface slope and flow are some of the fundamental measurements required for surface water monitoring and hydrodynamic research. This paper describes a method of combining bathymetric lidar with space-time processing of mid-wave infrared (MWIR) imagery to simultaneously measure bathymetry, currents and surface slope from an airborne platform. In May 2014, Areté installed a Pushbroom Imaging Lidar for Littoral Surveillance (PILLS) and a FLIR SC8000 MWIR imaging system sampling at 2 Hz in a small twin-engine aircraft. Data was collected over the lower Colorado River between Picacho Park and Parker. PILLS is a compact bathymetric lidar based on streak-tube sensor technology. It provides channel and bank topography and water surface elevation at 1 meter horizontal scales and 25 cm vertical accuracy. Surface currents are derived from the MWIR imagery by tracking surface features using a cross correlation algorithm. This approach enables the retrieval of currents along extended reaches at the forward speed of the aircraft with spatial resolutions down to 5 m with accuracy better than 10 cm/s. The fused airborne data captures current and depth variability on scales of meters over 10's of kilometers collected in just a few minutes. The airborne MWIR current retrievals are combined with the bathymetric lidar data to calculate river discharge which is then compared with real-time streamflow stations. The results highlight the potential for improving our understanding of complex river environments with simultaneous collections from multiple airborne sensors.

  12. Airborne transmission of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jason M; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J

    2012-09-15

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets.

  13. Determination of pasture quality using airborne hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, G.; Yule, Ian J.; Irwin, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Pasture quality is a critical determinant which influences animal performance (live weight gain, milk and meat production) and animal health. Assessment of pasture quality is therefore required to assist farmers with grazing planning and management, benchmarking between seasons and years. Traditionally, pasture quality is determined by field sampling which is laborious, expensive and time consuming, and the information is not available in real-time. Hyperspectral remote sensing has potential to accurately quantify biochemical composition of pasture over wide areas in great spatial detail. In this study an airborne imaging spectrometer (AisaFENIX, Specim) was used with a spectral range of 380-2500 nm with 448 spectral bands. A case study of a 600 ha hill country farm in New Zealand is used to illustrate the use of the system. Radiometric and atmospheric corrections, along with automatized georectification of the imagery using Digital Elevation Model (DEM), were applied to the raw images to convert into geocoded reflectance images. Then a multivariate statistical method, partial least squares (PLS), was applied to estimate pasture quality such as crude protein (CP) and metabolisable energy (ME) from canopy reflectance. The results from this study revealed that estimates of CP and ME had a R2 of 0.77 and 0.79, and RMSECV of 2.97 and 0.81 respectively. By utilizing these regression models, spatial maps were created over the imaged area. These pasture quality maps can be used for adopting precision agriculture practices which improves farm profitability and environmental sustainability.

  14. Infrared heterodyne radiometer for airborne atmospheric transmittance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolczok, J. M.; Lange, R. A.; Dinardo, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    An infrared heterodyne radiometer (IHR) was used to measure atmospheric transmittance at selected hydrogen fluoride (2.7 micrometer) and deuterium fluoride (3.8 micrometer) laser transitions. The IHR was installed aboard a KC-135 aircraft for an airborne atmospheric measurements program that used the sun as a backlighting source for the transmission measurements. The critical components are: a wideband indium antimonide (1nSb) photomixer, a CW HF/DF laser L0, a radiometric processor, and a 1900 K blackbody reference source. The measured heterodyne receiver sensitivity (NEP) is 1.3 x 10 to the -19th power W/Hz, which yields a calculated IHR temperature resolution accuracy of delta I sub S/-3 sub S = 0.005 for a source temperature of 1000 K and a total transmittance of 0.5. Measured atmospheric transmittance at several wavelengths and aircraft altitudes from 9.14 km (30,000 ft) to 13.72 km (45,000 ft) were obtained during the measurements program and have been compared with values predicted by the AFGL Atmospheric Line Parameter Compilation.

  15. Microwave Temperature Profiler Mounted in a Standard Airborne Research Canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, Michael J.; Denning, Richard F.; Fox, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Many atmospheric research aircraft use a standard canister design to mount instruments, as this significantly facilitates their electrical and mechanical integration and thereby reduces cost. Based on more than 30 years of airborne science experience with the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP), the MTP has been repackaged with state-of-the-art electronics and other design improvements to fly in one of these standard canisters. All of the controlling electronics are integrated on a single 4 5-in. (.10 13- cm) multi-layer PCB (printed circuit board) with surface-mount hardware. Improved circuit design, including a self-calibrating RTD (resistive temperature detector) multiplexer, was implemented in order to reduce the size and mass of the electronics while providing increased capability. A new microcontroller-based temperature controller board was designed, providing better control with fewer components. Five such boards are used to provide local control of the temperature in various areas of the instrument, improving radiometric performance. The new stepper motor has an embedded controller eliminating the need for a separate controller board. The reference target is heated to avoid possible emissivity (and hence calibration) changes due to moisture contamination in humid environments, as well as avoiding issues with ambient targets during ascent and descent. The radiometer is a double-sideband heterodyne receiver tuned sequentially to individual oxygen emission lines near 60 GHz, with the line selection and intermediate frequency bandwidths chosen to accommodate the altitude range of the aircraft and mission.

  16. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Souce for System-Level Testing of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the development of an improved vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source used for characterizing and calibrating remote optical sensors, in situ, throughout their testing period. The original flat plate radiometric source was developed for use by the VIIRS instrument during the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). Following this effort, the FPI has had significant upgrades in order to improve both the radiometric throughput and uniformity. Results of the VIIRS testing with the reconfigured FPI are reported and discussed.

  17. Alternative analysis of airborne laser data collected within conventional multi-parameter airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.; Schattauer, I.

    2010-05-01

    For the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry as well as airborne electromagnetics it is of great importance to determine the distance between the geophysical sensor and the ground surface. Since radar altimeters do not penetrate vegetation, laser altimeters became popular in airborne geophysics over the past years. Currently the airborne geophysical platform of the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) is equipped with a Riegl LD90-3800VHS-FLP high resolution laser altimeter, measuring the distances according to the first and the last reflected pulse. The goal of the presented study was to explore the possibilities of deriving additional information about the survey area from the laser data and to determine the accuracy of such results. On one hand the difference between the arrival time of the first and the last reflected pulse can be used to determine the height of the vegetation. This parameter is for example important for the correction of damping effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements caused by vegetation. Moreover especially for groundwater studies at catchment scale, this parameter can also be applied to support the spatial assessment of evapotranspiration. In combination with the altitude above geoid, determined by a GPS receiver, a rough digital elevation model of the survey area can be derived from the laser altimetry. Based on a data set from a survey area in the northern part of Austria, close to the border with the Czech Republic, the reliability of such a digital elevation model and the calculated vegetation height was tested. In this study a mean deviation of -1.4m, with a standard deviation of ±3.4m, between the digital elevation model from Upper Austria (25m spatial resolution) and the determined elevation model was determined. We also found an obvious correlation between the calculated vegetation heights greater 15m and the mapped forest published by the ‘Department of Forest Inventory' of the ‘Federal Forest Office' of Austria

  18. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Forward Modeling Results from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, E.R.; Cimini, D.; Klein, M.; Leuski, V.; Mattioli, V.; Gasiewski, A.J.; Dowlatshahi, S.; Liljegren, J.S.; Lesht, B.M.; Shaw, J.A.

    2005-03-18

    The 2004 Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program field site near Barrow, Alaska from March 9 to April 9, 2004. The goals of the experiment were: to study the microwave and millimeter wave radiometric response to water vapor and clouds during cold and dry conditions; to obtain data for forward model studies at frequencies ranging from 22.235 to 400 GHz, to demonstrate new Environmental Technology Laboratory's (ETL) radiometric receiver and calibration technology and to compare both radiometric and in situ measurements of water vapor.

  19. Filter algorithm for airborne LIDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Ma, Hongchao; Wu, Jianwei; Tian, Liqiao; Qiu, Feng

    2007-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning data has become an accepted data source for highly automated acquisition of digital surface models(DSM) as well as for the generation of digital terrain models(DTM). To generate a high quality DTM using LIDAR data, 3D off-terrain points have to be separated from terrain points. Even though most LIDAR system can measure "last-return" data points, these "last-return" point often measure ground clutter like shrubbery, cars, buildings, and the canopy of dense foliage. Consequently, raw LIDAR points must be post-processed to remove these undesirable returns. The degree to which this post processing is successful is critical in determining whether LIDAR is cost effective for large-scale mapping application. Various techniques have been proposed to extract the ground surface from airborne LIDAR data. The basic problem is the separation of terrain points from off-terrain points which are both recorded by the LIDAR sensor. In this paper a new method, combination of morphological filtering and TIN densification, is proposed to separate 3D off-terrain points.

  20. Comparison of the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) with radiometric and solid culture for recovery of acid-fast bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Pfyffer, G E; Welscher, H M; Kissling, P; Cieslak, C; Casal, M J; Gutierrez, J; Rüsch-Gerdes, S

    1997-01-01

    In a multicenter study involving three reference centers for mycobacteria, the rate of recovery of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) and the mean time to their detection from clinical specimens was determined by using the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT). These parameters were compared to those assessed by the radiometric BACTEC 460 TB system and by cultivation on solid media. Clinical specimens (n = 1,500) were pretreated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC)-NaOH. The contamination rates for MGITs were 2.0% (center 1), 13.8% (center 2), and 6.1% (center 3). A total of 180 mycobacterial isolates were detected (M. tuberculosis complex, n = 113; nontuberculous mycobacteria [NTM], n = 67). When using a combination of liquid and solid media (the current "gold standard" for culture), MGIT plus solid media detected 156 (86.7%) of the isolates, whereas BACTEC plus solid media recovered 168 (93.3%) of all AFB. Between these two gold standards there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). The combination of MGIT plus BACTEC detected 171 (95.0%) of all isolates (compared with MGIT plus solid media, P < 0.01; compared with BACTEC plus solid media, P > 0.05). Considering the efficacies of the different media separately, MGIT was superior to solid media (although not significantly; P > 0.05) in detecting AFB but was inferior to the BACTEC system (P < 0.01). The mean time to the detection of M. tuberculosis complex was 9.9 days with MGIT, 9.7 days with BACTEC, and 20.2 days with solid media. NTM needed, on average, 11.9, 13.0, and 22.2 days to appear by the three methods, respectively. In conclusion, MGIT proved to be a valuable alternative to the radiometric cultivation system. PMID:9003597

  1. Vicarious absolute radiometric calibration of GF-2 PMS2 sensor using permanent artificial targets in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaokai; Li, Chuanrong; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Ning; Qian, Yonggang; Tang, Lingli

    2016-10-01

    GF-2, launched on August 19 2014, is one of the high-resolution land resource observing satellite of the China GF series satellites plan. The radiometric performance evaluation of the onboard optical pan and multispectral (PMS2) sensor of GF-2 satellite is very important for the further application of the data. And, the vicarious absolute radiometric calibration approach is one of the most useful way to monitor the radiometric performance of the onboard optical sensors. In this study, the traditional reflectance-based method is used to vicarious radiometrically calibrate the onboard PMS2 sensor of GF-2 satellite using three black, gray and white reflected permanent artificial targets located in the AOE Baotou site in China. Vicarious field calibration campaign were carried out in the AOE-Baotou calibration site on 22 April 2016. And, the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients were determined with in situ measured atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance of the permanent artificial calibration targets. The predicted TOA radiance of a selected desert area with our determined calibrated coefficients were compared with the official distributed calibration coefficients. Comparison results show a good consistent and the mean relative difference of the multispectral channels is less than 5%. Uncertainty analysis was also carried out and a total uncertainty with 3.87% is determined of the TOA radiance.

  2. (abstract) Deep Space Network Radiometric Remote Sensing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft are viewed through a troposphere that absorbs and delays radio signals propagating through it. Tropospheric water, in the form of vapor, cloud liquid,and precipitation , emits radio noise which limits satellite telemetry communication link performance. Even at X-band, rain storms have severely affected several satellite experiments including a planetary encounter. The problem will worsen with DSN implementation of Ka-band becausecommunication link budgets will be dominated by tropospheric conditions. Troposphere-induced propagation delays currently limit VLBI accuracy and are significant sources of error for Doppler tracking. Additionally, the success of radio science programs such as satellite gravity wave experiments and atmospheric occultation experiments depends on minimizing the effect of watervapor-induced prop agation delays. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the troposphere, the Deep Space Network has supported a program of radiometric remote sensing. Currently, water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and microwave temperature profilers (MTPs) support many aspects of the Deep Space Network operations and research and development programs. Their capability to sense atmospheric water, microwave sky brightness, and atmospheric temperature is critical to development of Ka-band telemetry systems, communication link models, VLBI, satellite gravity waveexperiments, and r adio science missions. During 1993, WVRs provided data for propagation mode development, supp orted planetary missions, and demonstrated advanced tracking capability. Collection of atmospheric statistics is necessary to model and predict performance of Ka-band telemetry links, antenna arrays, and radio science experiments. Since the spectrum of weather variations has power at very long time scales, atmospheric measurements have been requested for periods ranging from one year to a decade at each DSN site. The resulting database would provide reliable statistics on daily

  3. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  4. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  5. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  6. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  7. New calibration techniques for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrien, Thomas G.; Green, Robert O.; Chovit, Chris; Eastwood, Mike; Faust, Jessica; Hajek, Pavel; Johnson, Howell; Novack, H. Ian; Sarture, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Recent laboratory calibrations of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) include new methods for the characterization of the geometric, spectral, temporal and radiometric properties of the sensor. New techniques are desired in order to: (1) increase measurement accuracy and precision, (2) minimize measurement time and expense, (3) prototype new field and inflight calibration systems, (4) resolve measurement ambiguities, and (5) add new measurement dimensions. One of the common features of these new methods is the use of the full data collection and processing power of the AVIRIS instrument and data facility. This allows the collection of large amounts of calibration data in a short period of time and is well suited to modular data analysis routines.

  8. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  9. Simulation of Wake Vortex Radiometric Detection via Jet Exhaust Proxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  10. Airborne Microwave Radiometry on a Semi-Arid Area During HAPEX-Sahel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanzy, A; Schmugge, T. J.; Calvet, J.-C.; Kerr, Y.; vanOevelen, P.; Grosjean, O.; Wang, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Airborne microwave radiometric measurements in the framework of the HAPEX-Sahel Experiment were performed by the Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the PORTOS radiometer. The flights of both radiometers produced an original set of data covering the 1.4-90 GHz range of frequency. The East and West Central Super Sites were the areas most intensively observed by the microwave radiometers. Over those sites, several brightness temperature (TB) maps are available at seven dates distributed over a 1 month period in the middle of the rainy season. A comparison of the two radiometers demonstrates their radiometric quality and the precision of the localization of the microwave observations. At 1.4 GHz, the vegetation had very little effect on the soil microwave emission. Maps of soil moisture were developed using a single linear relationship between TB and the surface soil moisture. There is an important spatial heterogeneity in the soil moisture distribution, which is explained by both the soil moisture hydrodynamic properties and the localization of the precipitation fields. At 5.05 GHz, the vegetation must be accounted for to infer soil moisture from the microwave observations. A method based on a simple radiative transfer model and on microwave data has shown encouraging results.

  11. Airborne microwave radiometry on a semi-arid area during HAPEX-Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanzy, A.; Schmugge, T. J.; Calvet, J.-C.; Kerr, Y.; van Oevelen, P.; Grosjean, O.; Wang, J. R.

    1997-02-01

    Airborne microwave radiometric measurements in the framework of the HAPEX-Sahel Experiment were performed by the Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the PORTOS radiometer. The flights of both radiometers produced an original set of data covering the 1.4-90 GHz range of frequency. The East and West Central Super Sites were the areas most intensively observed by the microwave radiometers. Over those sites, several brightness temperature ( TB) maps are available at seven dates distributed over a 1 month period in the middle of the rainy season. A comparison of the two radiometers demonstrates their radiometric quality and the precision of the localization of the microwave observations. At 1.4 GHz, the vegetation had very little effect on the soil microwave emission. Maps of soil moisture were developed using a single linear relationship between TB and the surface soil moisture. There is an important spatial heterogeneity in the soil moisture distribution, which is explained by both the soil moisture hydrodynamic properties and the localization of the precipitation fields. At 5.05 GHz, the vegetation must be accounted for to infer soil moisture from the microwave observations. A method based on a simple radiative transfer model and on microwave data has shown encouraging results.

  12. Detecting payload performance based on relative radiometric characteristic: case of the optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Li, Shengyang; Zhang, Tao; Qin, Bangyong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for accurately estimating the degree of radiometric non-uniformity in remote sensing images. The algorithm was tested on high-quality images and heavily striping images, and quantitative analyses were conducted to evaluate the performance for each band by measuring the radiometric non-uniformity of the images. The results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm exhibits high accuracy and stability compared with traditional algorithms. The radiometric performance of TianGong-1 short-wave infrared images was calculated using this new method, and it was highly correlated with the solar angle, pitch angle and refrigerator thermal according to the Apriori algorithm. Based on these results, we have proposed a strategy for restricting increases in striping.

  13. Preparation of a new autonomous instrumented radiometric calibration site: Gobabeb, Namib Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwell, Claire; Bialek, Agnieszka; Marks, Amelia; Woolliams, Emma; Berthelot, Béatrice; Meygret, Aimé; Marcq, Sébastien; Bouvet, Marc; Fox, Nigel

    2015-10-01

    A new permanently instrumented radiometric calibration site for high/medium resolution imaging satellite sensors is currently under development, focussing on the visible and near infra-red parts of the spectrum. The site will become a European contribution to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) initiative RadCalNet (Radiometric Calibration Network). The exact location of the permanent monitoring instrumentation will be defined following the initial site characterisation. The new ESA/CNES RadCalNet site will have a robust uncertainty budget and its data fully SI traceable through detailed characterisation and calibration by NPL of the instruments and artefacts to be used on the site. This includes a CIMEL sun photometer (the permanent instrumentation) an ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer, Gonio Radiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS), and reference reflectance standards.

  14. Radiometric Calibration of Mars HiRISE High Resolution Imagery Based on Fpga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yifan; Geng, Xun; Xing, Shuai; Tang, Yonghe; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Due to the large data amount of HiRISE imagery, traditional radiometric calibration method is not able to meet the fast processing requirements. To solve this problem, a radiometric calibration system of HiRISE imagery based on field program gate array (FPGA) is designed. The montage gap between two channels caused by gray inconsistency is removed through histogram matching. The calibration system is composed of FPGA and DSP, which makes full use of the parallel processing ability of FPGA and fast computation as well as flexible control characteristic of DSP. Experimental results show that the designed system consumes less hardware resources and the real-time processing ability of radiometric calibration of HiRISE imagery is improved.

  15. Radiometric selective inhibition tests for differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, and other mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, W M; Hawkins, J E

    1985-01-01

    In the context of a busy reference laboratory, radiometric selective inhibition tests were evaluated for rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis and of the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria. p-Nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone at 5 micrograms and hydroxylamine hydrochloride at 62.5 and 125 micrograms per ml of 7H12 medium were used to separate the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli). Since it is important epidemiologically to distinguish M. tuberculosis from M. bovis, susceptibility to 1 microgram of thiophene-2-carboxylic acid per ml was also determined radiometrically. By using these three agents as selective inhibitors, M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and MOTT bacilli were differentiated with a high degree of specificity by a BACTEC radiometric procedure. Results of tests performed on clinical isolates submitted on solid medium to our reference laboratory were available within 5 days. PMID:3921561

  16. Artifact correction and absolute radiometric calibration techniques employed in the Landsat 7 image assessment system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boncyk, Wayne C.; Markham, Brian L.; Barker, John L.; Helder, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the Landsat-7 Ground System, will calibrate and evaluate the radiometric and geometric performance of the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM +) instrument. The IAS incorporates new instrument radiometric artifact correction and absolute radiometric calibration techniques which overcome some limitations to calibration accuracy inherent in historical calibration methods. Knowledge of ETM + instrument characteristics gleaned from analysis of archival Thematic Mapper in-flight data and from ETM + prelaunch tests allow the determination and quantification of the sources of instrument artifacts. This a priori knowledge will be utilized in IAS algorithms designed to minimize the effects of the noise sources before calibration, in both ETM + image and calibration data.

  17. A detector combining quantum and thermal primary radiometric standards in the same artefact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M.; Gran, J.; Tomlin, N.; Lehman, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present the concept of a dual-mode primary standard cryogenic detector, utilizing a predictable quantum efficient silicon photodiode, and demonstrate the behaviour of the detector from room temperature down to 30 K. The detector absorbs visible radiation generating either heat or photocurrent, dependent on the selected mode of operation. In effect, this detector links optical power to fundamental constants through the two different routes of operation in the one artefact. Forward biasing of the photodiode is used in lieu of resistive heating to provide the electrical substitution power. The detector has a thermal time constant of 50 s and a sensitivity of 1.39 K mW-1. Using an LED source, we measure equivalence between the two modes of operation of 1.5% at 50 K, limited principally by our knowledge of the wavelength of the emitted radiation of the source.

  18. Correction of WindScat Scatterometric Measurements by Combining with AMSR Radiometric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, S.; Moore, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    The Seawinds scatterometer on the advanced Earth observing satellite-2 (ADEOS-2) will determine surface wind vectors by measuring the radar cross section. Multiple measurements will be made at different points in a wind-vector cell. When dense clouds and rain are present, the signal will be attenuated, thereby giving erroneous results for the wind. This report describes algorithms to use with the advanced mechanically scanned radiometer (AMSR) scanning radiometer on ADEOS-2 to correct for the attenuation. One can determine attenuation from a radiometer measurement based on the excess brightness temperature measured. This is the difference between the total measured brightness temperature and the contribution from surface emission. A major problem that the algorithm must address is determining the surface contribution. Two basic approaches were developed for this, one using the scattering coefficient measured along with the brightness temperature, and the other using the brightness temperature alone. For both methods, best results will occur if the wind from the preceding wind-vector cell can be used as an input to the algorithm. In the method based on the scattering coefficient, we need the wind direction from the preceding cell. In the method using brightness temperature alone, we need the wind speed from the preceding cell. If neither is available, the algorithm can work, but the corrections will be less accurate. Both correction methods require iterative solutions. Simulations show that the algorithms make significant improvements in the measured scattering coefficient and thus is the retrieved wind vector. For stratiform rains, the errors without correction can be quite large, so the correction makes a major improvement. For systems of separated convective cells, the initial error is smaller and the correction, although about the same percentage, has a smaller effect.

  19. Integrated approach to airborne laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louthain, James A.; Schmidt, Jason D.

    2008-10-01

    Lasers offer tremendous advantages over RF communication systems in bandwidth and security, due to their ultrahigh frequency and narrow spatial beamwidth. Unfortunately, atmospheric turbulence causes severe received power variations and significant bit error rates (BERs) in free-space optical communication (FSOC). Airborne optical communication systems require special considerations in size, complexity, power, and weight. We alleviate the deleterious effects of turbulence by integrating multiple techniques into an on/off keying direct detection system. Wave optics simulations show a combination of transmitter diversity, receiver and transmitter trackers, and adaptive thresholding significantly reduces the BER in air-to-air FSOC (up to 13 dB). Two transmitters alone provide a significant BER improvement over one transmitter, especially for the strong turbulence regime with up to a 9 dB improvement. Two beams also provide a reduction in fade length, indicating they will probably provide even greater improvement with interleaving and forward error correction coding.

  20. Airborne transmission of disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Eames, I.; Tang, J. W.; Li, Y.; Wilson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infection (HAI) is an important public health issue with unacceptable levels of morbidity and mortality, over the last 5 years. Disease can be transmitted by air (over large distances), by direct/indirect contact or a combination of both routes. While contact transmission of disease forms the majority of HAI cases, transmission through the air is harder to control, but one where the engineering sciences can play an important role in limiting the spread. This forms the focus of this themed volume. In this paper, we describe the current hospital environment and review the contributions from microbiologists, mechanical and civil engineers, and mathematicians to this themed volume on the airborne transmission of infection in hospitals. The review also points out some of the outstanding scientific questions and possible approaches to mitigating transmission. PMID:19828499

  1. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  2. Microwave radiometric measurements of soil moisture in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macelloni, G.; Paloscia, S.; Pampaloni, P.; Santi, E.; Tedesco, M.

    Within the framework of the MAP and RAPHAEL projects, airborne experimental campaigns were carried out by the IFAC group in 1999 and 2000, using a multifrequency microwave radiometer at L, C and X bands (1.4, 6.8 and 10 GHz). The aim of the experiments was to collect soil moisture and vegetation biomass information on agricultural areas to give reliable inputs to the hydrological models. It is well known that microwave emission from soil, mainly at L-band (1.4 GHz), is very well correlated to its moisture content. Two experimental areas in Italy were selected for this project: one was the Toce Valley, Domodossola, in 1999, and the other, the agricultural area of Cerbaia, close to Florence, where flights were performed in 2000. Measurements were carried out on bare soils, corn and wheat fields in different growth stages and on meadows. Ground data of soil moisture (SMC) were collected by other research teams involved in the experiments. From the analysis of the data sets, it has been confirmed that L-band is well related to the SMC of a rather deep soil layer, whereas C-band is sensitive to the surface SMC and is more affected by the presence of surface roughness and vegetation, especially at high incidence angles. An algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture, based on the sensitivity to moisture of the brightness temperature at C-band, has been tested using the collected data set. The results of the algorithm, which is able to correct for the effect of vegetation by means of the polarisation index at X-band, have been compared with soil moisture data measured on the ground. Finally, the sensitivity of emission at different frequencies to the soil moisture profile was investigated. Experimental data sets were interpreted by using the Integral Equation Model (IEM) and the outputs of the model were used to train an artificial neural network to reproduce the soil moisture content at different depths.

  3. Comparison of diverse methods for the correction of atmospheric effects on LANDSAT and SKYLAB images. [radiometric correction in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Camara, G.; Dias, L. A. V.; Mascarenhas, N. D. D.; Desouza, R. C. M.; Pereira, A. E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Earth's atmosphere reduces a sensors ability in currently discriminating targets. Using radiometric correction to reduce the atmospheric effects may improve considerably the performance of an automatic image interpreter. Several methods for radiometric correction from the open literature are compared leading to the development of an atmospheric correction system.

  4. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  5. The Future of Airborne Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    biplanes to the worldwide Cold War missions of the U - 2 and SR-71, airborne reconnaissance has become an indispensable tool to the intelligence community...Reconnaissance Operations (SRO) procedures, such as the U - 2 , RC- 135, and the EP-3, and traditional theater/fleet tactical reconnaissance systems like...upgraded sensor package on the U -2.14 The Army Staffs argument centers around command and control of the asset. The Army agreed that the U - 2 ’s

  6. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  7. The building block approach to airborne pod structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jan D.

    2011-05-01

    The certification and testing of new airborne structures is a costly undertaking. This paper presents which measures can be taken to limit the cost and certification required in order to improve the capabilities of the current airborne as-sets, by applying a building block approach to the design and certification of airborne pod structures. A simple way of improving aircraft capabilities is by adding external pod structures, which has been performed for many applications over many years. However, this paper describes a truly modular approach, in which a typical airborne pod structure may be reconfigured to many various roles, with only limited re-certification requirements. Using existing or general aerodynamic shapes, the basic outer shape for the external store is defined, which is then combined with a modular substructure which can accommodate a large variety of electronic and/or optical sensors. This also allows the airborne pod structure to perform several intelligence collecting operations during the same sortie, thereby limiting the time spent near the danger area. The re-use of existing substructure modules reduces the cost and leadtime of the design phase allowing for a rapid entry into service. The modular design, relying on proven interface systems between the building blocks, significantly reduces risk involved in new programs. The certification process is also discussed in order to optimize the use of the pod structure modularity and certification requirements in order to simplify the certification task, by drawing similarity to existing designs. Finally the paper covers how modularity is implemented in new composite pod designs with stealth capabilities.

  8. ESA airborne campaigns in support of Earth Explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, Tania; Davidson, Malcolm; Schuettemeyer, Dirk; Perrera, Andrea; Bianchi, Remo

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of its Earth Observation Programmes the European Space Agency (ESA) carries out ground based and airborne campaigns to support geophysical algorithm development, calibration/validation, simulation of future spaceborne earth observation missions, and applications development related to land, oceans and atmosphere. ESA has been conducting airborne and ground measurements campaigns since 1981 by deploying a broad range of active and passive instrumentation in both the optical and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum such as lidars, limb/nadir sounding interferometers/spectrometers, high-resolution spectral imagers, advanced synthetic aperture radars, altimeters and radiometers. These campaigns take place inside and outside Europe in collaboration with national research organisations in the ESA member states as well as with international organisations harmonising European campaign activities. ESA campaigns address all phases of a spaceborne missions, from the very beginning of the design phase during which exploratory or proof-of-concept campaigns are carried out to the post-launch exploitation phase for calibration and validation. We present four recent campaigns illustrating the objectives and implementation of such campaigns. Wavemill Proof Of Concept, an exploratory campaign to demonstrate feasibility of a future Earth Explorer (EE) mission, took place in October 2011 in the Liverpool Bay area in the UK. The main objectives, successfully achieved, were to test Astrium UKs new airborne X-band SAR instrument capability to obtain high resolution ocean current and topology retrievals. Results showed that new airborne instrument is able to retrieve ocean currents to an accuracy of ± 10 cms-1. The IceSAR2012 campaign was set up to support of ESA's EE Candidate 7,BIOMASS. Its main objective was to document P-band radiometric signatures over ice-sheets, by upgrading ESA's airborne POLARIS P-band radar ice sounder with SAR capability. Campaign

  9. Establishing metrological traceability for radiometric calibration of earth observation sensor in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. W.; Zulkifli, A.

    2016-10-01

    The space borne earth observation (EO) sensor provides a continuous large spatial coverage over the earth at relatively low cost (cost-effective) and can be practically accessible worldwide. The daily synoptic view offered by instrument in earth orbit is tremendously useful in various applications, particularly long term global monitoring that needs multi-disciplinary, multi-temporal and multi-sensor data. Due to the indirect measurement nature of the EO sensor, calibration and validation (cal/val) are essentially required to establish the linkage between the acquired raw data and the actual target of interest. Ultimately, EO sensor provider must strive to deliver “the right information, at the right time, to the right people”. This paper is authored with the main aim to report the process of establishing metrological traceability for radiometric calibration of EO sensor at Optical Calibration Laboratory (OCL), National Space Agency of Malaysia (ANGKASA). The paper is structured into six sections. The first section introduces the context of EO and background of radiometric calibration. The next section discusses the requirements for metrological traceability in radiometric calibration while the following third section outlines ANGKASA efforts in setting up the metrological traceability laboratory in radiometric calibration. Meanwhile, the uncertainty estimation results is reported in the fourth section and the fifth section explains some of the continuous efforts made in order to improve the current metrological traceability set up. Lastly, the summary of this paper is provided in the last section.

  10. MODIS Cloud Optical Property Retrieval Uncertainties Derived from Pixel-Level VNIR/SWIR Radiometric Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.; Wind, G.; Xiong, X.

    2011-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of optical thickness and effective particle radius for liquid water and ice phase clouds employ a well-known VNIR/ SWIR solar reflectance technique. For this type of algorithm, we evaluate the quantitative uncertainty in simultaneous retrievals of these two cloud parameters to pixel-level radiometric calibration estimates and other fundamental (and tractable) error sources.

  11. MODIS Cloud Optical Property Retrieval Uncertainties Derived from Pixel-Level Radiometric Error Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2011-01-01

    MODIS retrievals of cloud optical thickness and effective particle radius employ a well-known VNIR/SWIR solar reflectance technique. For this type of algorithm, we evaluate the uncertainty in simultaneous retrievals of these two parameters to pixel-level (scene-dependent) radiometric error estimates as well as other tractable error sources.

  12. Investigation of Pre- and Post-Flight Radiometric Calibration Uncertainties from Surface Based Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.F.; Wei, Z.Y.; Ahman, Z.

    1997-06-01

    A new technique has been developed for inferring column ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths from zenith sky observations. A new radiometric calibration technique for large aperture remote sensing instruments observing the earth through space has been validated which subsequently increased the accuracy of remote sensing measurements of ozone and vertical profiles using measurements of back-scattered ultraviolet solar radiation.

  13. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance on-orbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morfitt, Ron; Barsi, Julia A.; Levy, Raviv; Markham, Brian L.; Micijevic, Esad; Ong, Lawrence; Scaramuzza, Pat; Vanderwerff, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance onboard Landsat-8 have been met or exceeded. The calibration activities that occurred prior to launch provided calibration parameters that enabled ground processing to produce imagery that met most requirements when data were transmitted to the ground. Since launch, calibration updates have improved the image quality even more, so that all requirements are met. These updates range from detector gain coefficients to reduce striping and banding to alignment parameters to improve the geometric accuracy. This paper concentrates on the on-orbit radiometric performance of the OLI, excepting the radiometric calibration performance. Topics discussed in this paper include: signal-to-noise ratios that are an order of magnitude higher than previous Landsat missions; radiometric uniformity that shows little residual banding and striping, and continues to improve; a dynamic range that limits saturation to extremely high radiance levels; extremely stable detectors; slight nonlinearity that is corrected in ground processing; detectors that are stable and 100% operable; and few image artifacts.

  14. Radiometric ages of brachyuran crabs from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.T.; Turekian, K.K.

    1984-09-01

    The ages of four crab carapaces from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield were determined radiometrically using members of the U and Th decay chains. One animal had an age of 0.1 years and therefore had undergone molting just before collection; the other three had last molted 3-4 years before collection.

  15. Integrated approach to airborne laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louthain, James A.

    Lasers offer tremendous advantages over RF communication systems in terms of bandwidth and security due to their ultra-high frequency and narrow spatial beamwidth. Unfortunately, atmospheric turbulence significantly increases the received power variation and bit error rate (BER) in free-space optical communication (FSOC) systems. Further, airborne optical communication systems require special considerations in size, complexity, power, and weight. If two or more laser beams are sufficiently separated so that their turbulence effects are uncorrelated (i.e. anisoplanatic), they can effectively "average out" turbulence effects. This requisite separation distance is derived for multiple geometries, turbulence conditions, and optical properties. In most cases and geometries, the angles ordered from largest to smallest are: phase uncorrelated angle (equivalent to the tilt uncorrelated angle and phase anisoplanatic angle), tilt isoplanatic angle, phase isoplanatic angle, scintillation uncorrelated angle (or scintillation anisoplanatic angle), and scintillation isoplanatic angle ( qyind > thetaTA > theta0 > qcind > qc0 ). Conventional adaptive optics (AO) systems only correct for phase and cannot correct for strong scintillation, while multiple-transmitter systems use several transmission paths to "average out" effects of the strong scintillation by incoherently summing up the beams in the receiver. Since all three airborne geometries (air-to-air, air-to-ground, and ground-to-air) are studied, a comparison of multiple-beam airborne laser communication system performance is presented for the first time. Wave optics simulations show that a combination of transmitter diversity, receiver and transmitter trackers, and adaptive thresholding can significantly reduce BER in an air-to-air FSOC system by over 10,000 times. As demonstrated in this work, two transmitters alone separated by only 31 cm (100 km path length, 1.55 mum wavelength, 4 km in altitude) provide a significant BER

  16. Airborne rotary separator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drnevich, R. F.; Nowobilski, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Several air breathing propulsion concepts for future earth-to-orbit transport vehicles utilize air collection and enrichment, and subsequent storage of liquid oxygen for later use in the vehicle mission. Work performed during the 1960's established the feasibility of substantially reducing weight and volume of a distillation type air separator system by operating the distillation elements in high 'g' fields obtained by rotating the separator assembly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various fuels and fuel combinations with the objective of minimizing the weight and increase the ready alert capability of the plane. Fuels will be used to provide energy as well as act as heat sinks for the on-board heat rejection system. Fuel energy was used to provide power for air separation as well as to produce refrigeration for liquefaction of oxygen enriched air, besides its primary purpose of vehicle propulsion. The heat generated in the cycle was rejected to the fuel and water which is also carried on board the vehicle.The fuels that were evaluated include JP4, methane, and hydrogen. Hydrogen served as a comparison to the JP4 and methane cases.

  17. Dynamic noise corrected hyperspectral radiometric calibration in the SWIR range using a supercontinuum laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Janos C.; Aernouts, Ben; Koshel, R. J.; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-09-01

    As line scanning short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a growing field in the food industry, it is important to select efficient illumination designs to image contaminants with high contrast and low noise. Illumination systems can efficiently be compared and optimized through the use of ray tracing simulations. However, these simulations provide illumination patterns in absolute radiometric units while HSI systems typically provide relative measurements. To bridge this gap, a supercontinuum laser and monochromator setup was used in this study to calibrate a SWIR HSI imager in spectral radiometric units. For the radiometric calibration, an integrating sphere (IS) was illuminated with the monochromatic laser light, while both a high sensitivity photodiode and the hyperspectral camera were positioned at different ports of the IS to measure the diffuse light synchronously. For each spectral band, the radiance observed by the imager corresponding to a line was detected using image analysis, while the remainder of the image was used to sample the noise of the sensor. Laser power fluctuations were monitored using a power meter coupled with a thermal sensor, allowing for their correction. As these measurements were time consuming, while InGaAs based sensors are very sensitive to thermal drift, the dark current was sampled frequently to avoid noise time drifts. This approach allowed correcting for 6% of temporal noise fluctuations. A per-pixel linear radiometric model was fitted with an R2 of 0:94+/-0:3 and used to transfer the measured light distribution of a halogen spot with and without a diffuser into absolute radiometric units. This allowed comparing measurements with the results of ray tracing.

  18. Rapid radiometric methods to detect and differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis from other mycobacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hwangbo, C.C.; Silcox, V.; Good, R.C.; Snider, D.E. Jr.; Middlebrook, G.

    1984-10-01

    Rapid methods for the differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis (TB complex) from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli) were developed and evaluated in a three-phase study. In the first phase, techniques for identification of Mycobacterium species were developed by using radiometric technology and BACTEC Middlebrook 7H12 liquid medium. Based on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution, characteristic growth patterns were established for 13 commonly encountered mycobacterial species. Mycobacteria belonging to the TB complex were differentiated from other mycobacteria by cellular morphology and rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution. For further differentiation, radiometric tests for niacin production and inhibition by Q-nitro-alpha-acetyl amino-beta-hydroxy-propiophenone (NAP) were developed. In the second phase, 100 coded specimens on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were identified as members of the TB complex, MOTT bacilli, bacteria other than mycobacteria, or ''no viable organisms'' within 3 to 12 (average 6.4) days of receipt from the Centers for Disease Control. Isolation and identification of mycobacteria from 20 simulated sputum specimens were carried out in phase III. Out of 20 sputum specimens, 16 contained culturable mycobacteria, and all of the positives were detected by the BACTEC method in an average of 7.3 days. The positive mycobacterial cultures were isolated and identified as TB complex or MOTT bacilli in an average of 12.8 days. The radiometric NAP test was found to be highly sensitive and specific for a rapid identification of TB complex, whereas the radiometric niacin test was found to have some inherent problems. Radiometric BACTEC and conventional methodologies were in complete agreement in Phase II as well as in Phase III.

  19. Enhanced radiometric detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis by using filter-concentrated bovine fecal specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.T.; Kenefick, K.B.; Sockett, D.C.; Lambrecht, R.S.; McDonald, J.; Jorgensen, J.B. )

    1990-11-01

    A commercial radiometric medium, BACTEC 12B, was modified by addition of mycobactin, egg yolk suspension, and antibiotics (vancomycin, amphotericin B, and nalidixic acid). Decontaminated bovine fecal specimens were filter concentrated by using 3-microns-pore-size, 13-mm-diameter polycarbonate filters, and the entire filter was placed into the radiometric broth. Comparison of the radiometric technique with conventional methods on 603 cattle from 9 Mycobacterium paratuberculosis-infected herds found that of 75 positive specimens, the radiometric technique detected 92% while conventional methods detected 60% (P less than 0.0005). Only 3.9% of radiometric cultures were contaminated. To measure the effect of filter concentration of specimens on the detection rate, 5 cattle with minimal and 5 with moderate ileum histopathology were sampled weekly for 3 weeks. M. paratuberculosis was detected in 33.3% of nonfiltered specimens and 76.7% of filtered specimens (P less than 0.005). Detection rates were directly correlated with the severity of disease, and the advantage of specimen concentration was greatest on fecal specimens from cattle with low-grade infections. Detection times were also correlated with infection severity: 13.4 +/- 5.9 days with smear-positive specimens, 27.9 +/- 8.7 days with feces from cows with typical subclinical infections, and 38.7 +/- 3.8 days with fecal specimens from cows with low-grade infections. Use of a cocktail of vancomycin, amphotericin B, and nalidixic acid for selective suppression of nonmycobacterial contaminants was better than the commercial product PANTA (Becton Dickinson Microbiologic Systems, Towson, Md.) only when specimens contained very low numbers of M. paratuberculosis.

  20. Radiometric and geometric evaluation of GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 and Pléiades-1A stereo images for 3D information extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, D.; Remondino, F.; Angiuli, E.; Agugiaro, G.

    2015-02-01

    Today the use of spaceborne Very High Resolution (VHR) optical sensors for automatic 3D information extraction is increasing in the scientific and civil communities. The 3D Optical Metrology (3DOM) unit of the Bruno Kessler Foundation (FBK) in Trento (Italy) has collected VHR satellite imagery, as well as aerial and terrestrial data over Trento for creating a complete testfield for investigations on image radiometry, geometric accuracy, automatic digital surface model (DSM) generation, 2D/3D feature extraction, city modelling and data fusion. This paper addresses the radiometric and the geometric aspects of the VHR spaceborne imagery included in the Trento testfield and their potential for 3D information extraction. The dataset consist of two stereo-pairs acquired by WorldView-2 and by GeoEye-1 in panchromatic and multispectral mode, and a triplet from Pléiades-1A. For reference and validation, a DSM from airborne LiDAR acquisition is used. The paper gives details on the project, dataset characteristics and achieved results.

  1. GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: spectral response functions and radiometric biases with the NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite evaluated for desert calibration sites.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, David; Cao, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be launched in late 2015 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series satellite, will be evaluated in terms of its data quality postlaunch through comparisons with other satellite sensors such as the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The ABI has completed much of its prelaunch characterization and its developers have generated and released its channel spectral response functions (response versus wavelength). Using these responses and constraining a radiative transfer model with ground reflectance, aerosol, and water vapor measurements, we simulate observed top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for analogous visible and near infrared channels of the VIIRS and ABI sensors at the Sonoran Desert and White Sands National Monument sites and calculate the radiometric biases and their uncertainties. We also calculate sensor TOA reflectances using aircraft hyperspectral data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to validate the uncertainties in several of the ABI and VIIRS channels and discuss the potential for validating the others. Once on-orbit, calibration scientists can use these biases to ensure ABI data quality and consistency to support the numerical weather prediction community and other data users. They can also use the results for ABI or VIIRS anomaly detection and resolution.

  2. Airborne Precision Spacing for Dependent Parallel Operations Interface Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Paul M.; Takallu, M. A.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Weiser, Jarold; Turner, Dexter

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a usability study of proposed cockpit interfaces to support Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) operations for aircraft performing dependent parallel approaches (DPA). NASA has proposed an airborne system called Pair Dependent Speed (PDS) which uses their Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes (ASTAR) algorithm to manage spacing intervals. Interface elements were designed to facilitate the input of APS-DPA spacing parameters to ASTAR, and to convey PDS system information to the crew deemed necessary and/or helpful to conduct the operation, including: target speed, guidance mode, target aircraft depiction, and spacing trend indication. In the study, subject pilots observed recorded simulations using the proposed interface elements in which the ownship managed assigned spacing intervals from two other arriving aircraft. Simulations were recorded using the Aircraft Simulation for Traffic Operations Research (ASTOR) platform, a medium-fidelity simulator based on a modern Boeing commercial glass cockpit. Various combinations of the interface elements were presented to subject pilots, and feedback was collected via structured questionnaires. The results of subject pilot evaluations show that the proposed design elements were acceptable, and that preferable combinations exist within this set of elements. The results also point to potential improvements to be considered for implementation in future experiments.

  3. Use of radiometric indices to evaluate Zn and Pb stress in two grass species (Festuca rubra L. and Vulpia myuros L.).

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Yunta, F; Esteban, E; Carpena, R O; Zornoza, P

    2016-11-01

    Vegetation indices obtained from radiometric measurements have been used to estimate the stress response of plants grown in contaminated sites. The phytotoxicity of Pb and Zn in Festuca rubra L. and Vulpia myuros L. plants grown under hydroponic conditions was evaluated using vegetation indices obtained from radiometric measurements. The plants were supplied with 3 mM Zn (+Zn), 500 μM Pb (+Pb) and 500 μM Pb with EDTA (+PbEDTA) for 3 months. Significantly higher Zn concentrations in F. rubra shoots compared with V. myuros shoots were detected for Zn and Pb treatments. EDTA increased Pb transport to the shoots for both grasses, while Pb-treated plants retained Pb primarily in the roots. All vegetation indices tested showed the highest differences in F. rubra under +PbEDTA treatment and minor effects under +Zn, whereas the major variations for V. myuros corresponded to +Zn treatment, followed by +PbEDTA. Red edge normalized difference vegetation index, yellowness index and anthocyanin concentration index were the most sensitive indices to report Zn and Pb phytotoxicity in these grasses. According to the results obtained, both metal concentrations and radiometric indices suggested that Pb is more phytotoxic to F. rubra, which tolerates high Zn levels, whereas V. myuros was strongly affected by high Zn levels and markedly tolerant to Pb, even when applied in a mobile form (PbEDTA). Both species could be used in the phytostabilization of Zn- and Pb-contaminated soils. The abilities of F. rubra to accumulate Zn and V. myuros to accumulate Pb in the roots would facilitate a more efficient phytoremediation strategy when used in combination.

  4. Identification and levels of airborne fungi in Portuguese primary schools.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Pereira, Cristiana; Paciência, Inês; Teixeira, João Paulo; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Several studies found associations between exposure to airborne fungi and allergy, infection, or irritation. This study aimed to characterize airborne fungi populations present in public primary schools in Porto, Portugal, during winter through quantification and identification procedures. Fungal concentration levels and identification were obtained in a total of 73 classrooms. The AirIdeal portable air sampler was used in combination with chloramphenicol malt extract agar. Results showed a wide range of indoor fungi levels, with indoor concentrations higher than outdoors. The most prevalent fungi found indoors were Penicillium sp. (>70%) and Cladosporium sp. As evidence indicates that indoor fungal exposures plays a role in asthma clinical status, these results may contribute to (1) promoting and implementing public health prevention programs and (2) formulating recommendations aimed at providing healthier school environments.

  5. Airborne mapping of earth-atmosphere exchange processes and remote sensing of surface characteristics over heterogeneous areas

    SciTech Connect

    Schuepp, P.H.; Ogunjemiyo, S.; Mitic, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    Given the spatial heterogeneity of much of the biosphere, and the difficulty in establishing representative observation points at the surface, airborne flux observations coupled with airborne and satellite-based remote sensing plays an increasing role in the description of surface-atmosphere exchange processes. Our paper summarizes flux mapping procedures based on low level airborne sampling by the Canadian Twin Otter research aircraft, over three ecosystems with different degrees of spatial heterogeneity (grassland, mixed agricultural land and boreal forest). Observations show that the degree to which flux maps for heat, moisture and trace gases are correlated, among themselves and with maps of radiometrically observable surface features, cannot be generalized. This means that, wherever possible, algorithms for the prediction of surface-atmosphere exchange processes based on remote sensing observations should be developed for - and tested in - each structurally different ecosystem. The flexibility of deployment of aircraft serves well, both for the gathering of data to develop such algorithms, as well as for their testing at scales that integrate over an adequate sample of the various components that constitute a spatially heterogeneous ecosystem. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Validating surface energy balance fluxes derived from airborne remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Eguez, Jose Luis

    Remote sensing-derived energy balance components were compared against measured eddy covariance energy balance terms using heat flux source area models to validate the airborne multispectral remote sensing procedure in the estimation of instantaneous and daily evapotranspiration rates. A procedure was developed to generate raster layers of the footprint weights for weighting/integrating the different components of the energy balance model and obtain meaningful comparisons to similar energy balance terms measured at eddy covariance and/or Bowen ratio stations. Soil heat flux and surface aerodynamic temperature models were studied in an effort to improve the remote sensing estimation of distributed evapotranspiration rates. Aerial and ground data were acquired over a riparian corridor (Salt Cedar, Tamarix grove), soybean and cornfields (rainfed crops) in different ecosystems. The results confirmed that net radiation is well estimated with the remote sensing technique showing an estimation error of only -4.8 +/- 20.7 W m-2, (-0.5 +/- 3.6%). Linear and exponential soil heat flux models were found to correlate strongly to leaf area index and net radiation. The surface aerodynamic temperature term in the sensible heat flux equation was parameterized using surface radiometric temperature, air temperature, wind speed, and leaf area index. It is suggested that the surface aerodynamic temperature model be tested for a wide range of vegetation types, atmospheric stability conditions, surface heterogeneity, and ecosystems to assess the model limitations. The flux source area footprint model "FSAM" integrated heat flux pixels that compared better to measured values and it is recommended as a standard procedure to compare airborne remote sensing-derived heat fluxes against measured fluxes by eddy covariance systems; when compared to the "FASOWG" footprint model and simple arithmetic averages. Finally, the method that uses alfalfa reference daily evapotranspiration in

  7. An Algorithm to Atmospherically Correct Visible and Thermal Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug L.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Schiller, Stephen; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The program Watts implements a system of physically based models developed by the authors, described elsewhere, for the removal of atmospheric effects in multispectral imagery. The band range we treat covers the visible, near IR and the thermal IR. Input to the program begins with atmospheric pal red models specifying transmittance and path radiance. The system also requires the sensor's spectral response curves and knowledge of the scanner's geometric definition. Radiometric characterization of the sensor during data acquisition is also necessary. While the authors contend that active calibration is critical for serious analytical efforts, we recognize that most remote sensing systems, either airborne or space borne, do not as yet attain that minimal level of sophistication. Therefore, Watts will also use semi-active calibration where necessary and available. All of the input is then reduced to common terms, in terms of the physical units. From this it Is then practical to convert raw sensor readings into geophysically meaningful units. There are a large number of intricate details necessary to bring an algorithm or this type to fruition and to even use the program. Further, at this stage of development the authors are uncertain as to the optimal presentation or minimal analytical techniques which users of this type of software must have. Therefore, Watts permits users to break out and analyze the input in various ways. Implemented in REXX under OS/2 the program is designed with attention to the probability that it will be ported to other systems and other languages. Further, as it is in REXX, it is relatively simple for anyone that is literate in any computer language to open the code and modify to meet their needs. The authors have employed Watts in their research addressing precision agriculture and urban heat island.

  8. Dual channel airborne hygrometer for climate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatrai, David; Gulyas, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-04-01

    Airborne hygrometry has an increasing role in climate research and nowadays the determination of cloud content especially of cirrus clouds is gaining high interest. The greatest challenges for such measurements are being used from ground level up to the lower stratosphere with appropriate precision and accuracy the low concentration and varying environment pressure. Such purpose instrument was probably presented first by our research group [1-2]. The development of the system called WaSUL-Hygro and some measurement results will be introduced. The measurement system is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and contains two measuring cells, one is used to measure water vapor concentration which is typically sampled by a sideward or backward inlet, while the second one measures total water content (water vapor plus ice crystals) after evaporation in a forward facing sampler. The two measuring cells are simultaneously illuminated through with one distributed feedback diode laser (1371 or 1392 nm). Two early versions have been used within the CARIBIC project. During the recent years, efforts were made to turn the system into a more reliable and robust one [3]. The first important development was the improvement of the wavelength stabilization method of the applied laser. As a result the uncertainty of the wavelength is less than 40fm, which corresponds to less than 0.05% of PA signal uncertainty. This PA signal uncertainty is lower than the noise level of the system itself. The other main development was the improvement of the concentration determination algorithm. For this purpose several calibration and data evaluation methods were developed, the combination of the latest ones have made the system traceable to the humidity generator applied during the calibration within 1.5% relative deviation or within noise level, whichever is greater. The improved system was several times blind tested at the Environmental Simulation Facility (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany) in

  9. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  10. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  11. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  12. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  13. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  14. Radiometric age file for Alaska: A section in The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shew, Nora; Wilson, Frederic H.

    1982-01-01

    The Alaska radiometric age file of the Branch of Alaskan Geology is a computer-based compilation of radiometric dates from the state of Alaska and the western parts of the Yukon Territory and British Columbia. More than 1800 age determinations from over 250 references have been entered in the file. References date back to 1958 and include both published and unpublished sources. The file is the outgrowth of an original radiometric age file compiled by Don Grybeck and students at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks (Turner and others, 1975).

  15. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  16. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  17. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  18. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  19. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  20. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  1. Airborne Global Positioning System Antenna System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-14

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ANTENNA SYSTEM DISTRIBUTION: SMC/ GP (3 cys); AFFSA...standard that airborne Global Positioning System ( GPS ) antenna system must meet to be identified with the applicable MSO marking. The similarity of...UNCLASSIFIED DOCUMENT NO. DATE NO. MSO-C144 14 Oct 04 Initial Release REV: REV: SHEET 1 OF 16 TITLE: AIRBORNE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

  2. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  3. Detecting subtle environmental change: a multi-temporal airborne imaging spectroscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, Ian J.; Pullanagari, Reddy R.; Kereszturi, G.

    2016-10-01

    Airborne and satellite hyperspectral remote sensing is a key technology to observe finite change in ecosystems and environments. The role of such sensors will improve our ability to monitor and mitigate natural and agricultural environments on a much larger spatial scale than can be achieved using field measurements such as soil coring or proximal sensors to estimate the chemistry of vegetation. Hyperspectral sensors for commentarial and scientific activities are increasingly available and cost effective, providing a great opportunity to measure and detect changes in the environment and ecosystem. This can be used to extract critical information to develop more advanced management practices. In this research, we provide an overview of the data acquisition, processing and analysis of airborne, full-spectrum hyperspectral imagery from a small-scale aerial mapping project in hill-country farms in New Zealand, using an AISA Fenix sensor (Specim, Finland). The imagery has been radiometrically and atmospherically corrected, georectified and mosaicked. The hyperspectral data cube was then spectrally and spatially smoothed using Savitzky-Golay and median filter, respectively. The mosaicked imagery used to calculate bio-chemical properties of surface vegetation, such as pasture. Ground samples (n = 200) were collected a few days after the over-flight are used to develop a calibration model using partial least squares regression method. In-leaf nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous concentration were calculated using the reflectance values from the airborne hyperspectral imagery. In total, three surveys of an example property have been acquired that show changes in the pattern of availability of a major element in vegetation canopy, in this case nitrogen.

  4. Airborne observations of far-infrared upwelling radiance in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libois, Quentin; Ivanescu, Liviu; Blanchet, Jean-Pierre; Schulz, Hannes; Bozem, Heiko; Leaitch, W. Richard; Burkart, Julia; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Herber, Andreas B.; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Girard, Éric

    2016-12-01

    The first airborne measurements of the Far-InfraRed Radiometer (FIRR) were performed in April 2015 during the panarctic NETCARE campaign. Vertical profiles of spectral upwelling radiance in the range 8-50 µm were measured in clear and cloudy conditions from the surface up to 6 km. The clear sky profiles highlight the strong dependence of radiative fluxes to the temperature inversion typical of the Arctic. Measurements acquired for total column water vapour from 1.5 to 10.5 mm also underline the sensitivity of the far-infrared greenhouse effect to specific humidity. The cloudy cases show that optically thin ice clouds increase the cooling rate of the atmosphere, making them important pieces of the Arctic energy balance. One such cloud exhibited a very complex spatial structure, characterized by large horizontal heterogeneities at the kilometre scale. This emphasizes the difficulty of obtaining representative cloud observations with airborne measurements but also points out how challenging it is to model polar clouds radiative effects. These radiance measurements were successfully compared to simulations, suggesting that state-of-the-art radiative transfer models are suited to study the cold and dry Arctic atmosphere. Although FIRR in situ performances compare well to its laboratory performances, complementary simulations show that upgrading the FIRR radiometric resolution would greatly increase its sensitivity to atmospheric and cloud properties. Improved instrument temperature stability in flight and expected technological progress should help meet this objective. The campaign overall highlights the potential for airborne far-infrared radiometry and constitutes a relevant reference for future similar studies dedicated to the Arctic and for the development of spaceborne instruments.

  5. Radiometric ages for basement rocks from the Emperor Seamounts, ODP Leg 197

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Robert A.; Keller, Randall A.

    2004-08-01

    The Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain is the "type" example of an age-progressive, hot spot-generated intraplate volcanic lineament. However, our current knowledge of the age distribution within this province is based largely on radiometric ages determined several decades ago. Improvements in instrumentation, sample preparation methods, and new material obtained by recent drilling warrant a reexamination of the age relations among the older Hawaiian volcanoes. We report new age determinations (40Ar-39Ar incremental heating method) on whole rocks and feldspar separates from Detroit (Sites 1203 and 1204), Nintoku (Site 1205), and Koko (Site 1206) Seamounts (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 197) and Meiji Seamount (Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 19, Site 192). Plateaus in incremental heating age spectra for Site 1203 lava flows give a mean age of 75.8 ± 0.6 (2σ) Ma, which is consistent with the normal magnetic polarity directions observed and biostratigraphic age assignments. Site 1204 lavas produced discordant spectra, indicating Ar loss by reheating and K mobilization. Six plateau ages from lava flows at Site 1205 give a mean age of 55.6 ± 0.2 Ma, corresponding to Chron 24r. Drilling at Site 1206 intersected a N-R-N magnetic polarity sequence of lava flows, from which six plateau ages give a mean age of 49.1 ± 0.2 Ma, corresponding to the Chron 21n-22r-22n sequence. Plateau ages from two feldspar separates and one lava from DSDP Site 192 range from 34 to 41 Ma, significantly younger than the Cretaceous age of overlying sediments, which we relate to postcrystallization K mobilization. Combined with new dating results from Suiko Seamount (DSDP Site 433) and volcanoes near the prominent bend in the lineament [, 2002], the overall trend is increasing volcano age from south to north along the Emperor Seamounts, consistent with the hot spot model. However, there appear to be important departures from the earlier modeled simple linear age progression, which we

  6. Radon potential mapping of the Tralee-Castleisland and Cavan areas (Ireland) based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and geology.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Doyle, E; Fenton, D; Organo, C

    2011-06-01

    The probability of homes in Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is estimated on the basis of known in-house radon measurements averaged over 10 km × 10 km grid squares. The scope for using airborne gamma-ray spectrometer data for the Tralee-Castleisland area of county Kerry and county Cavan to predict the radon potential (RP) in two distinct areas of Ireland is evaluated in this study. Airborne data are compared statistically with in-house radon measurements in conjunction with geological and ground permeability data to establish linear regression models and produce radon potential maps. The best agreement between the percentage of dwellings exceeding the reference level (RL) for radon concentrations in Ireland (% > RL), estimated from indoor radon data, and modelled RP in the Tralee-Castleisland area is produced using models based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry equivalent uranium (eU) and ground permeability data. Good agreement was obtained between the % > RL from indoor radon data and RP estimated from eU data in the Cavan area using terrain specific models. In both areas, RP maps derived from eU data are spatially more detailed than the published 10 km grid map. The results show the potential for using airborne radiometric data for producing RP maps.

  7. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  8. Magnetic characterization of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Doh, S.; Yu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Burning fossil fuels from vehicles, domestics, industries and power plants in the large urban or industrial areas emit significant quantity of anthropogenic particulates which become a potential threat to human health. Here, we present temporal variability of particulate pollution associated with compositional differences, using magnetic measurements and electron microscopic observations. Six different grain-sizes of airborne particulates have been collected by filtering from 10 precipitation events in Seoul, Korea from February 2009 to June 2009. Magnetic concentration proxies show relatively better (R2 >0.6) and poorer correlations (R2 <0.3) with the masses of samples filtered by >0.45 μm and <0.45 μm sizes, respectively, suggesting the usefulness of magnetic characterization for the >0.45 μm particulates. Temporally, magnetic concentrations are higher in the cold season than the warm season. In particular, a significant increase of magnetic concentration is observed in 3 μm and 1 μm filters after the Chinese wind-blown dust events, indicating additional influx of fine-grained anthropogenic particulates into Seoul. Microscopic observations identify that increase of magnetic concentration is highly linked with the frequent occurrence of combustion derived particulates (i.e., carbon and/or sulfur mixed particles) than natural alumino-silicates. Overall, the present study demonstrates that magnetic measurements efficiently reflect the concentration of particulates produced from fossil-fuel combustion among the airborne particles from various sources.

  9. Airborne asbestos exposures associated with gasket and packing replacement: a simulation study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Hollins, Dana M; Devlin, Kathryn D; Donovan, Ellen P; Dopart, Pamela J; Scott, Paul K; Perez, Angela L

    2014-08-01

    Exposures to airborne asbestos during the removal and installation of internal gaskets and packing associated with a valve overhaul were characterized and compared to published data according to different variables (e.g., product, equipment, task, tool, setting, duration). Personal breathing zone and area samples were collected during twelve events simulating gasket and packing replacement, clean-up and clothing handling. These samples were analyzed using PCM and TEM methods and PCM-equivalent (PCME) airborne asbestos concentrations were calculated. A meta-analysis was performed to compare these data with airborne asbestos concentrations measured in other studies involving gaskets and packing. Short-term mechanic and assistant airborne asbestos concentrations during valve work averaged 0.013f/cc and 0.008f/cc (PCME), respectively. Area samples averaged 0.008f/cc, 0.005f/cc, and 0.003f/cc (PCME) for center, bystander, and remote background, respectively. Assuming a tradesman conservatively performs 1-3 gasket and/or packing replacements daily, an average 8-h TWA was estimated to be 0.002-0.010f/cc (PCME). Combining these results in a meta-analysis of the published exposure data showed that the majority of airborne asbestos exposures during work with gaskets and packing fall within a consistent and low range. Significant differences in airborne concentrations were observed between power versus manual tools and removal versus installation tasks. Airborne asbestos concentrations resulting from gasket and packing work during a valve overhaul are consistent with historical exposure data on replacement of asbestos-containing gasket and packing materials involving multiple variables and, in nearly all plausible scenarios, result in average airborne asbestos concentrations below contemporaneous occupational exposure limits for asbestos.

  10. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Hair, J.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Kleinman, L.; Clarke, A.; Russell, P.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Szykman, J.; Al-Saadi, J.

    2007-05-01

    . Several B200 flights conducted during MILAGRO were coordinated with flights carried out by the Department of Energy G-1 aircraft, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 aircraft, and/or the Sky Research J-31 aircraft. In situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties acquired on G-1 and C-130 are being used to investigate the ability to discern various aerosol types using the HSRL data. Aerosol extinction profiles derived from the in situ measurements and from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer on board the J-31 are being used to assess the HSRL aerosol extinction profiles. Additional applications of airborne HSRL data to be discussed include: 1) characterization of the spatial and vertical distributions of aerosols, 2) investigation of aerosol variability near clouds, 3) evaluation of model simulations of aerosol transport, and 4) assessments of aerosol optical properties derived from a combination of surface, airborne, and satellite measurements.

  11. Space-Wise approach for airborne gravity data modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampietro, D.; Capponi, M.; Mansi, A. H.; Gatti, A.; Marchetti, P.; Sansò, F.

    2016-12-01

    Regional gravity field modelling by means of remove-compute-restore procedure is nowadays widely applied in different contexts: it is the most used technique for regional gravimetric geoid determination, and it is also used in exploration geophysics to predict grids of gravity anomalies (Bouguer, free-air, isostatic, etc.), which are useful to understand and map geological structures in a specific region. Considering this last application, due to the required accuracy and resolution, airborne gravity observations are usually adopted. However, due to the relatively high acquisition velocity, presence of atmospheric turbulence, aircraft vibration, instrumental drift, etc., airborne data are usually contaminated by a very high observation error. For this reason, a proper procedure to filter the raw observations in both the low and high frequencies should be applied to recover valuable information. In this work, a software to filter and grid raw airborne observations is presented: the proposed solution consists in a combination of an along-track Wiener filter and a classical Least Squares Collocation technique. Basically, the proposed procedure is an adaptation to airborne gravimetry of the Space-Wise approach, developed by Politecnico di Milano to process data coming from the ESA satellite mission GOCE. Among the main differences with respect to the satellite application of this approach, there is the fact that, while in processing GOCE data the stochastic characteristics of the observation error can be considered a-priori well known, in airborne gravimetry, due to the complex environment in which the observations are acquired, these characteristics are unknown and should be retrieved from the dataset itself. The presented solution is suited for airborne data analysis in order to be able to quickly filter and grid gravity observations in an easy way. Some innovative theoretical aspects focusing in particular on the theoretical covariance modelling are presented too

  12. Geometric, Kinematic and Radiometric Aspects of Image-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses theoretical foundations of quantitative image-based measurements for extracting and reconstructing geometric, kinematic and dynamic properties of observed objects. New results are obtained by using a combination of methods in perspective geometry, differential geometry. radiometry, kinematics and dynamics. Specific topics include perspective projection transformation. perspective developable conical surface, perspective projection under surface constraint, perspective invariants, the point correspondence problem. motion fields of curves and surfaces. and motion equations of image intensity. The methods given in this paper arc useful for determining morphology and motion fields of deformable bodies such as elastic bodies. viscoelastic mediums and fluids.

  13. Real-Time EDL Navigation Performance Using Spacecraft to Spacecraft Radiometric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Ely, Todd; Duncan, Courtney; Lightsey, Glenn; Campbell, Todd; Mogensen, Andy

    2006-01-01

    A two-year task sponsored by NASA's Mars Technology Program's Advanced Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) work area includes investigation of improvements to EDL navigation by processing spacecraft-to-spacecraft radiometric data. Spacecraft-to- spacecraft navigation will take advantage of the UHF link between two spacecraft (i.e. to an orbiter from an approaching lander for EDL telemetry relay) to build radiometric data, specifically the velocity between the two spacecraft along the radio beam, that are processed to determine position and velocity in real time. The improved onboard state knowledge provided by spacecraft-to-spacecraft navigation will improve the performance of entry guidance by providing a more accurate state estimate and ultimately reduce the landed position error. Work on the final year of this task is reported here.

  14. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. . In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  15. Radiometric and dosimetric characteristics of HgI/sub 2/ detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zaletin, V.M.; Krivozubov, O.V.; Torlin, M.A.; Fomin, V.I.

    1988-04-01

    The characteristics of HgI/sub 2/ detectors in x-ray and gamma detection in applications to radiometric and dosimetric monitoring and as portable instruments for such purposes was considered. Blocks with mosaic and sandwich structures were prepared and tested against each other and, for comparative purposes, against CdTe detectors for relative sensitivities at various gamma-quanta energies. Sensitivity dependencies on gamma radiation energy were plotted for the detector materials and structures as were current dependencies on the dose rate of x rays. Results indicated that the mercury iodide detectors could be used in radiometric and dosimetric measurements at gamma quantum energies up to and in excess of 1000 KeV.

  16. Mississippi exploration field trials using microbial, radiometrics, free soil gas, and other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.S.; Brown, L.R.; Thieling, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Mississippi Office of Geology has conducted field trials using the surface exploration techniques of geomicrobial, radiometrics, and free soil gas. The objective of these trials is to determine if Mississippi oil and gas fields have surface hydrocarbon expression resulting from vertical microseepage migration. Six fields have been surveyed ranging in depth from 3,330 ft to 18,500 ft. The fields differ in trapping styles and hydrocarbon type. The results so far indicate that these fields do have a surface expression and that geomicrobial analysis as well as radiometrics and free soil gas can detect hydrocarbon microseepage from pressurized reservoirs. All three exploration techniques located the reservoirs independent of depth, hydrocarbon type, or trapping style.

  17. An information theory characterization of radar images and a new definition for radiometric resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The noise properties of the radar image formation process are used in the present modeling of a communication channel in which the desired target properties are the information transmitted, and the final image represents the received signal. The average information rate over this communication channel is calculated together with appropriate bounds and approximations, and is found to be small on a per-sample basis. As a result, many samples must be averaged to allow for the discrimination, or classification, of several levels of target reflectivity. These information rate properties are consistent with known results concerning target detection and image quality in speckle, and the rate is applicable to the definition of radar image radiometric resolution. Radiometric resolution is functionally related to the degree of noncoherent averaging performed by the sensor.

  18. Radiometric responsivity determination for Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE) flown on space shuttle mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. G.; Davis, R. E.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Bullock, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure was developed to obtain the radiometric (radiance) responsivity of the Feature Identification and Local Experiment (FILE) instrument in preparation for its flight on Space Shuttle Mission 41-G (November 1984). This instrument was designed to obtain Earth feature radiance data in spectral bands centered at 0.65 and 0.85 microns, along with corroborative color and color-infrared photographs, and to collect data to evaluate a technique for in-orbit autonomous classification of the Earth's primary features. The calibration process incorporated both solar radiance measurements and radiative transfer model predictions in estimating expected radiance inputs to the FILE on the Shuttle. The measured data are compared with the model predictions, and the differences observed are discussed. Application of the calibration procedure to the FILE over an 18-month period indicated a constant responsivity characteristic. This report documents the calibration procedure and the associated radiometric measurements and predictions that were part of the instrument preparation for flight.

  19. Determination of in vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to cephalosporins by radiometric and conventional methods.

    PubMed Central

    Heifets, L B; Iseman, M D; Cook, J L; Lindholm-Levy, P J; Drupa, I

    1985-01-01

    Among eight cephalosporins and cephamycins tested in preliminary in vitro screening against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the most promising for further study was found to be ceforanide, followed by ceftizoxime, cephapirin, and cefotaxime. Moxalactam, cefoxitin, cefamandole, and cephalothin were found to be not active enough against M. tuberculosis to be considered for further in vitro studies. The antibacterial activity of various ceforanide concentrations was investigated by three methods: (i) the dynamics of radiometric readings (growth index) in 7H12 broth; (ii) the number of CFU in the same medium; and (iii) the proportion method on 7H11 agar plates. There was a good correlation among the results obtained with these methods. The MIC for most strains ranged from 6.0 to 25.0 micrograms/ml. The BACTEC radiometric method is a reliable, rapid, and convenient method for preliminary screening and determination of the level of antibacterial activity of drugs not commonly used against M. tuberculosis. PMID:3920957

  20. Recovery and susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from extrapulmonary specimens by the BACTEC radiometric method.

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, G; Roe, S L

    1984-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the sensitivity and rapidity of the BACTEC radiometric techniques for isolation and susceptibility testing of mycobacteria from extrapulmonary specimens. Concentrated specimens of urine, pleural fluid, and blood as well as other extrapulmonary specimens were processed for the recovery of mycobacteria and for drug susceptibility testing, employing conventional and BACTEC radiometric methods. Out of 483 specimens processed, 20 were found to be positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the conventional Lowenstein -Jensen medium, and 19 were found to be positive in the BACTEC 7H12 medium. Average recovery times were 22.5 days for the conventional method and 10.9 days for the BACTEC method. When isolated cultures were tested for susceptibility to streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol, results were reported at an average time of 22 and 5.4 days for the conventional and BACTEC methods, respectively, with good correlation. PMID:6429193

  1. A liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference cold load for long-wavelength radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensadoun, Marc; Witebsky, Chris; Smoot, George; De Amici, Giovanni; Kogut, AL; Levin, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Design, radiometric and thermal performance, and operation of a large diameter (78 cm) liquid-helium-cooled blackbody absolute reference cold load (CL) for the calibration of microwave radiometers is described. CL provides an absolute calibration near the liquid-helium (LHe) boiling point, with total uncertainty in the radiometric temperature of less than 30 mK over the 2.5-23 cm wavelength operating range. CL was used at several wavelengths at the South Pole, Antarctica and the White Mountain Research Center, California. Results show that, for the instruments operated at 20-, 12-, 7.9-, and 4.0 cm wavelength at the South Pole, the total corrections to the LHe boiling-point temperature (about 3.8 K) were 48 +/-23, 18 +/-10, 10 +/-18, and 15 +/-mK.

  2. Direct antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the radiometric method

    SciTech Connect

    Libonati, J.P.; Stager, C.E.; Davis, J.R.; Siddiqi, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Direct-drug-susceptibility tests were performed on clinical specimens positive for acid-fast bacilli by either Ziehl-Neelsen or fluorochrome staining. The results of conventional agar dilution and a modified radiometric (BACTEC) method were compared. A total of 580 smear-positive specimens were tested by the BACTEC method at three separate sites. Three hundred and seventy-seven of these were culture positive for M. tuberculosis, and 343 (91%) yielded acceptable direct-susceptibility-test results. We used the conventional method to determine that 343 of 519 smear-positive specimens were culture positive for M. tuberculosis, and 212 (62%) produced acceptable results within 3 wks. Conventional results were reported in 3-4 wks, while the time required to obtain results with the BACTEC method ranged from 5 to 21 days (average 11.5 days). Results indicate that the radiometric method provides reportable results more frequently with time savings as compared to the conventional method.

  3. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Source For System-Level Testing Of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance.

  4. Improving Ocean Color Data Products using a Purely Empirical Approach: Reducing the Requirement for Radiometric Calibration Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric calibration is the foundation upon which ocean color remote sensing is built. Quality derived geophysical products, such as chlorophyll, are assumed to be critically dependent upon the quality of the radiometric calibration. Unfortunately, the goals of radiometric calibration are not typically met in global and large-scale regional analyses, and are especially deficient in coastal regions. The consequences of the uncertainty in calibration are very large in terms of global and regional ocean chlorophyll estimates. In fact, stability in global chlorophyll requires calibration uncertainty much greater than the goals, and outside of modern capabilities. Using a purely empirical approach, we show that stable and consistent global chlorophyll values can be achieved over very wide ranges of uncertainty. Furthermore, the approach yields statistically improved comparisons with in situ data, suggesting improved quality. The results suggest that accuracy requirements for radiometric calibration cab be reduced if alternative empirical approaches are used.

  5. Improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source for system-level testing of remote optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance. Keywords: Calibration, radiometry, remote sensing, source.

  6. Summary of the Flight Technology Improvement Workshop. [spaceborne optical radiometric instruments, attitude control, and electromechanical and power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Spaceborne instrumentation technology deficiencies are summarized. Recommendations are given for technology development, improvements in existing technology, and policy changes needed to facilitate the use of improved technology. Optical radiometric instruments, attitude control, and electromechanical and power subsystems are considered.

  7. Can airborne ultrasound monitor bubble size in chocolate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, N.; Hazlehurst, T.; Povey, M.; Vieira, J.; Sundara, R.; Sandoz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    Aerated chocolate products consist of solid chocolate with the inclusion of bubbles and are a popular consumer product in many countries. The volume fraction and size distribution of the bubbles has an effect on their sensory properties and manufacturing cost. For these reasons it is important to have an online real time process monitoring system capable of measuring their bubble size distribution. As these products are eaten by consumers it is desirable that the monitoring system is non contact to avoid food contaminations. In this work we assess the feasibility of using an airborne ultrasound system to monitor the bubble size distribution in aerated chocolate bars. The experimental results from the airborne acoustic experiments were compared with theoretical results for known bubble size distributions using COMSOL Multiphysics. This combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to develop a greater understanding of how ultrasound propagates through aerated chocolate and to assess the feasibility of using airborne ultrasound to monitor bubble size distribution in these systems. The results indicated that a smaller bubble size distribution would result in an increase in attenuation through the product.

  8. Airborne endotoxin in fine particulate matter in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Tianjia; Yao, Maosheng; Wang, Junxia; Fang, Yanhua; Hu, Songhe; Wang, Yan; Dutta, Anindita; Yang, Junnan; Wu, Yusheng; Hu, Min; Zhu, Tong

    2014-11-01

    Endotoxin is an important biological component of particulate matter (PM) which, upon inhalation, can induce adverse health effects, and also possibly complicate the diseases in combination with other pollutants. From 1 March 2012 to 27 February 2013 we collected air samples using quartz filters daily for the quantification of airborne endotoxin and also fine PM (PM2.5) in Beijing, China. The geometric means for endotoxin concentration and the fraction of endotoxin in PM were 0.65 EU/m3 (range: 0.10-75.02) and 10.25 EU/mg PM2.5 (range: 0.38-1627.29), respectively. The endotoxin concentrations were shown to vary greatly with seasons, typically with high values in the spring and winter seasons. Temperature and relative humidity, as well as concentrations of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides were found to be significantly correlated with airborne endotoxin concentrations (p < 0.05). Additionally, positive correlations were also detected between endotoxin concentrations and natural sources of Na+, K+, Mg2+, and F-, while negative correlations were observed between endotoxin concentrations and anthropogenic sources of P, Co, Zn, As, and Tl. Oxidative potential analysis revealed that endotoxin concentrations were positively correlated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not dithiothreitol (DTT) of PM. This study provided the first continuous time series of airborne endotoxin concentrations in Beijing, and identifies its potential associations with atmospheric factors. The information developed here can assist in the assessment of health effects of air pollution in Beijing.

  9. Emissivity Model Sensitivity on Radiometric Inter-calibration between the GMI and Its Constellation Imager Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.

    2015-12-01

    The inter-satellite radiometric calibration technique (also known as XCAL) has been applied with great success between the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) -calibration transfer standard- and its constellation imagers, namely, WindSat, AMSR2 and SSMIS. However, while the TRMM mission has now ended, it is now time to change the radiometric transfer standard from the previous TMI to the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). In this paper, we conduct the inter-calibration between GMI and other imager instruments in its constellation using two different radiative transfer models (RTM), namely XCAL RTM which has been used by XCAL group over the past 10 years, and RSS RTM developed by Remote Sensing Systems (RSS). The main difference between these two RTMs lies in calculating the ocean surface emissivity which is crucial for the measurement of spaceborne microwave radiometers. By comparing the simulated Tb's from two RTMs applied on 9 microwave channels ranging from 10 to 90 GHz, we are able to evaluate the robustness of our XCAL RTM, especially the Elsaesser Ocean Surface Emissivity model that has been used within this model. Besides discussing the reliability of these two RTMs, an XCAL approach known as Double Difference (DD) that has been developed and successfully validated by the Central Florida Remote Sensing Lab will be performed between GMI and its constellation imagers, from which the results will enable us to prescreen the consistency of GMI as the new radiometric transfer standard for imager radiometers as well as assessing the impact of the ocean surface emissivity on radiometric inter-calibration of radiometers at imager channels. Index: Inter-satellite calibration, ocean surface emissivity, radiative transfer model, microwave radiometry

  10. Impact of the cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determining spectral reflectance coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orych, A.; Walczykowski, P.; Jenerowicz, A.; Zdunek, Z.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays remote sensing plays a very important role in many different study fields, i.e. environmental studies, hydrology, mineralogy, ecosystem studies, etc. One of the key areas of remote sensing applications is water quality monitoring. Understanding and monitoring of the water quality parameters and detecting different water contaminants is an important issue in water management and protection of whole environment and especially the water ecosystem. There are many remote sensing methods to monitor water quality and detect water pollutants. One of the most widely used method for substance detection with remote sensing techniques is based on usage of spectral reflectance coefficients. They are usually acquired using discrete methods such as spectrometric measurements. These however can be very time consuming, therefore image-based methods are used more and more often. In order to work out the proper methodology of obtaining spectral reflectance coefficients from hyperspectral and multispectral images, it is necessary to verify the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determination of them. This paper presents laboratory experiments that were conducted using two monochromatic XEVA video sensors (400-1700 nm spectral data registration) with two different radiometric resolutions (12 and 14 bits). In view of determining spectral characteristics from images, the research team used set of interferometric filters. All data collected with multispectral digital video cameras were compared with spectral reflectance coefficients obtained with spectroradiometer. The objective of this research is to find the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on reflectance values in chosen wavelength. The main topic of this study is the analysis of accuracy of spectral coefficients from sensors with different radiometric resolution. By comparing values collected from images acquired with XEVA sensors and with the curves obtained with spectroradiometer it

  11. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Ding, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The need for independent, redundant absolute radiometric calibration methods is discussed with reference to the Thematic Mapper. Uncertainty requirements for absolute calibration of between 0.5 and 4 percent are defined based on the accuracy of reflectance retrievals at an agricultural site. It is shown that even very approximate atmospheric corrections can reduce the error in reflectance retrieval to 0.02 over the reflectance range 0 to 0.4.

  12. A procedure for radiometric recalibration of Landsat 5 TM reflective-band data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Haque, M.O.; Micijevic, E.; Barsi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the Earth science user community has been benefiting from a historical record of remotely sensed data. The multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone for this extensive archive. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for the L5 TM imagery used the detectors' response to the internal calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset for each detector. The IC system degraded with time, causing radiometric calibration errors up to 20%. In May 2003, the L5 TM data processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science Center through the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) were updated to use a lifetime lookup-table (LUT) gain model to radiometrically calibrate TM data instead of using scene-specific IC gains. Further modification of the gain model was performed in 2007. The L5 TM data processed using IC prior to the calibration update do not benefit from the recent calibration revisions. A procedure has been developed to give users the ability to recalibrate their existing level-1 products. The best recalibration results are obtained if the work-order report that was included in the original standard data product delivery is available. However, if users do not have the original work-order report, the IC trends can be used for recalibration. The IC trends were generated using the radiometric gain trends recorded in the NLAPS database. This paper provides the details of the recalibration procedure for the following: 1) data processed using IC where users have the work-order file; 2) data processed using IC where users do not have the work-order file; 3) data processed using prelaunch calibration parameters; and 4) data processed using the previous version of the LUT (e.g., LUT03) that was released before April 2, 2007.

  13. A New Automatic System for Angular Measurement and Calibration in Radiometric Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements. PMID:22319320

  14. A new automatic system for angular measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  15. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  16. Translating Radiometric Requirements for Satellite Sensors to Match International Standards

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, Aaron; Datla, Raju; Kacker, Raghu; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    International scientific standards organizations created standards on evaluating uncertainty in the early 1990s. Although scientists from many fields use these standards, they are not consistently implemented in the remote sensing community, where traditional error analysis framework persists. For a satellite instrument under development, this can create confusion in showing whether requirements are met. We aim to create a methodology for translating requirements from the error analysis framework to the modern uncertainty approach using the product level requirements of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) that will fly on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R). In this paper we prescribe a method to combine several measurement performance requirements, written using a traditional error analysis framework, into a single specification using the propagation of uncertainties formula. By using this approach, scientists can communicate requirements in a consistent uncertainty framework leading to uniform interpretation throughout the development and operation of any satellite instrument. PMID:26601032

  17. A Study on Optimal Strategy in Relative Radiometric Calibration for Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kai; Liu, Suhong; Zhao, Yongchao

    2017-01-01

    Based on the analysis of three main factors involved in the relative radiometric calibration for optical sensors, namely: the number of radiance level; the number of measurements at each level; and the radiance level grouping method, an optimal strategy is presented in this paper for relative radiometric calibration. First, the maximization to the possible extent of either the number of the radiance level or the number of measurements at each level can improve the precision of the calibration results, where the recommended number of measurements is no less than 20. Second, when the number of the radiance level is divisible by four, dividing all the levels evenly into four groups by intensity gradient order and conducting averages for each group could achieve calibration results with the highest precision, which is higher than the result of no grouping or any other grouping method with the mean square error being 22Mn/IT (where Mn is the mean square error of noise in the calibration data, I is the number of the radiance level, and T is the number of measurements for each level. In this case, the first two factors had an equivalent effect and showed their strongest effect on the precision. Third, when the calibration data were not evenly divided, the number of measurements demonstrated a stronger effect than the number of the radiance level. These cognitions are helping to achieve more precise relative radiometric calibration of optical sensors. PMID:28257083

  18. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-05-13

    We present successful (81)Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The (81)Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) (85)Kr and (39)Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the (81)Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA (81)Kr analysis requires a 40-80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, (81)Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility.

  19. Long-Term Radiometric Performance of the SCIAMACHY Quartz Tungsten Halogen Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, S.; Bramstedt, K.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.; Gottwald, M.; Krieg, E.

    2009-04-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) is part of the atmospheric chemistry payload of ESAś Environmental Satellite ENVISAT. Since 2002, SCIAMACHY provides the amount and global distribution of various atmospheric constituents relevant in the contexts of ozone chemistry, air pollution and climate change. Originally designed for a 5-year mission, the SCIAMACHY instrument is still working well and ready for the planned mission extension until 2010 or even further. Calibration and monitoring of the instrument performance are a pre-requisite for a continuously high data product quality. Here, results from the monitoring of the optical performance of the SCIAMACHY instrument are presented. Emphasis is placed on the investigation of the performance of the SCIAMACHY internal Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH) lamp. This type of lamp has been used for monitoring the radiometric performance of an UV-VIS-SWIR Earth observation sensor over mission lifetime for the first time. The analysis of regular in-flight measurements has shown the radiometric stability of the SCIAMACHY QTH lamp over time especially in the visible/NIR spectral range. Lamps of this type are therefore considered as useful components for further space-borne spectroscopic missions, as they provide a relatively cheap and reliable mean for (at least relative) radiometric calibration and monitoring.

  20. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Brook, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130–115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA 81Kr analysis requires a 40–80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, 81Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility. PMID:24753606

  1. Radiometric resolution enhancement by lossy compression as compared to truncation followed by lossless compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Manohar, Mareboyana

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology make it possible to obtain imagery data of the Earth at high spatial, spectral and radiometric resolutions from Earth orbiting satellites. The rate at which the data is collected from these satellites can far exceed the channel capacity of the data downlink. Reducing the data rate to within the channel capacity can often require painful trade-offs in which certain scientific returns are sacrificed for the sake of others. In this paper we model the radiometric version of this form of lossy compression by dropping a specified number of least significant bits from each data pixel and compressing the remaining bits using an appropriate lossless compression technique. We call this approach 'truncation followed by lossless compression' or TLLC. We compare the TLLC approach with applying a lossy compression technique to the data for reducing the data rate to the channel capacity, and demonstrate that each of three different lossy compression techniques (JPEG/DCT, VQ and Model-Based VQ) give a better effective radiometric resolution than TLLC for a given channel rate.

  2. Calibrating Late Quaternary terrestrial climate signals: radiometrically dated pollen evidence from the southern Sierra Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Durika, Nancy J.; Smith, George I.

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a radiometrically calibrated proxy record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change exceeding 230,000 yr duration, using pollen profiles from two cores taken through age-equivalent dry lakes - one core having greater age control (via 230Th alpha mass-spectrometry) and the other having greater stratigraphic completeness. The better dated of these two serial pollen records (Searles Lake) served as a reference section for improving the effective radiometric age control in a nearby and more complete pollen record (Owens Lake) because they: (1) are situated ~90 km apart in the same drainage system (on, and immediately leeward of, the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada), and (2) preserved strikingly similar pollen profiles and concordant sequences of sedimentological changes. Pollen assemblages from both lakes are well preserved and diverse, and document serial changes in Late Pleistocene and Holocene plant zone distribution and composition in the westernmost Great Basin; they consist of taxa now inhabiting montane forest, woodland, steppe, and desert-scrub environments. The studied core intervals are interpreted here to be the terrestrial equivalent of marine δ18O stages 1 through 9; these pollen profiles now appear to be among the best radiometrically dated Late Pleistocene records of terrestrial climate change known.

  3. Relative Radiometric Normalization and Atmospheric Correction of a SPOT 5 Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Mahmoud El; Bégué, Agnès; Lafrance, Bruno; Hagolle, Olivier; Dedieu, Gérard; Rumeau, Matthieu

    2008-01-01

    Multi-temporal images acquired at high spatial and temporal resolution are an important tool for detecting change and analyzing trends, especially in agricultural applications. However, to insure a reliable use of this kind of data, a rigorous radiometric normalization step is required. Normalization can be addressed by performing an atmospheric correction of each image in the time series. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining an atmospheric characterization at a given acquisition date. In this paper, we investigate whether relative radiometric normalization can substitute for atmospheric correction. We develop an automatic method for relative radiometric normalization based on calculating linear regressions between unnormalized and reference images. Regressions are obtained using the reflectances of automatically selected invariant targets. We compare this method with an atmospheric correction method that uses the 6S model. The performances of both methods are compared using 18 images from of a SPOT 5 time series acquired over Reunion Island. Results obtained for a set of manually selected invariant targets show excellent agreement between the two methods in all spectral bands: values of the coefficient of determination (r2 exceed 0.960, and bias magnitude values are less than 2.65. There is also a strong correlation between normalized NDVI values of sugarcane fields (r2 = 0.959). Despite a relative error of 12.66% between values, very comparable NDVI patterns are observed. PMID:27879849

  4. Improved detection of Mycobacterium avium complex with the Bactec radiometric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffner, S.E.

    1988-05-01

    A reconsideration of the laboratory methods used for primary isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis is needed due to the increasingly recognized importance of such mycobacterial infections in immunocompromised patients. One example of this is the severe opportunistic infections caused by Mycobacterium avium complex among AIDS patients. In this study, the Bactec radiometric system was compared to conventional culture on solid medium for the detection of M. avium complex in 3,612 selected clinical specimens, mainly of extrapulmonary origin. Of a total number of 63 M. avium complex isolates, the Bactec system detected 58 (92%), compared to 37 (59%) for conventional culture. A much more rapid detection was attained with radiometric technique than with conventional culture. The mean detection time for the cultures positive with both methods was 7.1 and 28.3 days, respectively. The Bactec radiometric system achieves a rapid and significantly more sensitive detection and seems to be an excellent complement to conventional culture in the laboratory diagnosis of infections with the M. avium complex.

  5. A fast smoothing algorithm for post-processing of surface reflectance spectra retrieved from airborne imaging spectrometer data.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Liu, Ming

    2013-10-14

    Surface reflectance spectra retrieved from remotely sensed hyperspectral imaging data using radiative transfer models often contain residual atmospheric absorption and scattering effects. The reflectance spectra may also contain minor artifacts due to errors in radiometric and spectral calibrations. We have developed a fast smoothing technique for post-processing of retrieved surface reflectance spectra. In the present spectral smoothing technique, model-derived reflectance spectra are first fit using moving filters derived with a cubic spline smoothing algorithm. A common gain curve, which contains minor artifacts in the model-derived reflectance spectra, is then derived. This gain curve is finally applied to all of the reflectance spectra in a scene to obtain the spectrally smoothed surface reflectance spectra. Results from analysis of hyperspectral imaging data collected with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data are given. Comparisons between the smoothed spectra and those derived with the empirical line method are also presented.

  6. A Fast Smoothing Algorithm for Post-Processing of Surface Reflectance Spectra Retrieved from Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Liu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Surface reflectance spectra retrieved from remotely sensed hyperspectral imaging data using radiative transfer models often contain residual atmospheric absorption and scattering effects. The reflectance spectra may also contain minor artifacts due to errors in radiometric and spectral calibrations. We have developed a fast smoothing technique for post-processing of retrieved surface reflectance spectra. In the present spectral smoothing technique, model-derived reflectance spectra are first fit using moving filters derived with a cubic spline smoothing algorithm. A common gain curve, which contains minor artifacts in the model-derived reflectance spectra, is then derived. This gain curve is finally applied to all of the reflectance spectra in a scene to obtain the spectrally smoothed surface reflectance spectra. Results from analysis of hyperspectral imaging data collected with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data are given. Comparisons between the smoothed spectra and those derived with the empirical line method are also presented. PMID:24129022

  7. Evaluation of radioactive environmental hazards in Area-3, Northern Palmyrides, Central Syria using airborne spectrometric gamma technique.

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Aissa, M; Al-Hent, R

    2016-01-01

    Airborne spectrometric gamma data are used in this paper to estimate the degree of radioactive hazard on humanity in Area-3, Northern Palmyrides, Central Syria. Exposure Rate (ER), Absorbed Dose Rate (ADR), Annual Effective Dose Rate (AEDR), and Heat Production (HP) of the eleven radiometric units included in the established lithological scored map in the study area have been computed to evaluate the radiation background influence in humans. The results obtained indicate that a human body in Area-3 is subjected to radiation hazards in the acceptable limits for long duration exposure. The highest radiogenetic heat production values in Area-3 correspond to the phosphatic locations characterized by relatively high values of uranium and thorium.

  8. A comparison of LOWTRAN-7 corrected Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data with ground spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Peng-Yang; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric correction of imaging spectroscopy data is required for quantitative analysis. Different models were proposed for atmospheric correction of these data. LOWTRAN-7 is a low-resolution model and computer code for predicting atmospheric transmittance and background radiance from 0 to 50,00 cm(sup -1) which was developed by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data used are radiometrically calibrated and include the 28 Sep. 1989 Providence Fan flight line segment 07, California. It includes a dark gravel surface defined as a calibration site by the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE). Several ground measurements of portable spectrometer DAEDALUS AA440 Spectrafax were taken during the GRSFE, July 1989 field campaign. Comparisons of the LOWTRAN-7 corrected AVIRIS data with the ground spectrometer measurement were made.

  9. Airborne thermography or infrared remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Goillot, C C

    1975-01-01

    Airborne thermography is part of the more general remote sensing activity. The instruments suitable for image display are infrared line scanners. A great deal of interest has developed during the past 10 years in airborne thermal remote sensing and many applications are in progress. Infrared scanners on board a satellite are used for observation of cloud cover; airborne infrared scanners are used for forest fire detection, heat budget of soils, detecting insect attack, diseases, air pollution damage, water stress, salinity stress on vegetation, only to cite some main applications relevant to agronomy. Using this system it has become possible to get a 'picture' of our thermal environment.

  10. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  11. Calibration and Data Efforts of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Airborne Observation Platform during its Engineering Development Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, J.; Goulden, T.; Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Musinsky, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) has collected airborne photographic, lidar, and imaging spectrometer data in 5 of 20 unique ecological climate regions (domains) within the United States. As part of its mission to detect and forecast ecological change at continental scales over multiple decades, NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) will aerially survey the entire network of 60 core and re-locatable terrestrial sites annually, each of which are a minimum of 10km-by-10km in extent. The current effort encompasses three years of AOP engineering test flights; in 2017 NEON will transition to full operational status in all 20 domains. To date the total airborne data collected spans 34 Terabytes, and three of the five sampled domain's L1 data are publically available upon request. The large volume of current data, and the expected data collection over the remaining 15 domains, is challenging NEON's data distribution plans, backup capability, and data discovery processes. To provide the public with the highest quality data, calibration and validation efforts of the camera, lidar, and spectrometer L0 data are implemented to produce L1 datasets. Where available, the collected airborne measurements are validated against ground reference points and surfaces and adjusted for instrumentation and atmospheric effects. The imaging spectrometer data is spectrally and radiometrically corrected using NIST-traceable procedures. This presentation highlights three years of flight operation experiences including:1) Lessons learned on payload re-configuration, data extraction, data distribution, permitting requirements, flight planning, and operational procedures2) Lidar validation through control data comparisons collected at the Boulder Municipal Airport (KBDU), the site of NEON's new hangar facility3) Spectrometer calibration efforts, to include both the laboratory and ground observations

  12. [VMTBB-Based Spectral Radiometric Calibration of NIR Fiber Coupled Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Li-ying; Liu, Xiao-xi; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Guo-yu; Huan, Ke-wei

    2015-09-01

    The medium temperature black body (MTBB) is conventional high precision equipment used as spectral radiometric scale in infrared spectral region. However, in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, there are few papers about spectral radiometric calibration by using MTBB, that is because NIR spectral region is the borderland of its effective spectral region. The main research of this paper is spectral radiometric calibration method by using MTBB in NIR spectral region. Accordingly, this paper is devoted mostly to a discussion of how the calibration precision could be affected by selecting different structural parameters of calibration model. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research and provide technical reference for improving the traceability in NIR spectral radiometric calibration. In this paper, a NIR fiber coupled spectrometer, whose wavelength range covers from 950 to 1700 nm, has been calibrated by a MTBB with adjustable temperature range from 50 to 1050 °C. Concentrating on calibration process, two key points have been discussed. For one thing, the geometric factors of radiation transfer model of the calibration systems have been compared between traditional structure and fiber direct-coupled structure. Because the fiber direct-coupled model is simple and effective, it has been selected instead of traditional model based on the radiation transfer between two coaxial discs. So, it is an advantaged radiation transfer model for radiometric calibration of fiber coupled spectrometer. For another thing, the relation between calibration accuracy and structural parameters of calibration model has been analyzed intensively. The root cause is scale feature of attribute of calibration data itself, which is the nonlinear structure in scales of spectral data. So, the high precision calibration needs nonlinear calibration model, and the uniform sampling for scale feature is also very important. Selecting sample is an inevitable problem when the

  13. San Bernardino Cave (Italy) and the appearance of Levallois technology in Europe: results of a radiometric and technological reassessment.

    PubMed

    Picin, Andrea; Peresani, Marco; Falguères, Christophe; Gruppioni, Giulia; Bahain, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Levallois technology in Europe marked the transition from the Lower to the early Middle Paleolithic. This new method of flake production was accompanied by significant behavioral changes in hominin populations. The emergence of this technological advance is considered homogeneous in the European archaeological record at the Marine isotopic stage (MIS) 9/MIS 8 boundary. In this paper we report a series of combined electron spin resonance/U-series dates on mammal bones and teeth recovered from the lower units of San Bernardino Cave (Italy) and the technological analyses of the lithic assemblages. The San Bernardino Cave has yielded the earliest evidence of Levallois production on the Italian Peninsula recovered to date. In addition to our results and the review of the archaeological record, we describe the chronological and geographical differences between European territories and diversities in terms of technological developments. The belated emergence of Levallois technology in Italy compared to western Europe corresponds to the late Italian Neanderthal speciation event. The new radiometric dates and the technological analyses of San Bernardino Cave raise the issue of the different roles of glacial refugia in the peopling and the spread of innovative flaking strategies in Europe during the late Middle Pleistocene.

  14. Absolute ages from crater statistics: Using radiometric ages of Martian samples for determining the Martian cratering chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neukum, G.

    1988-01-01

    In the absence of dates derived from rock samples, impact crater frequencies are commonly used to date Martian surface units. All models for absolute dating rely on the lunar cratering chronology and on the validity of its extrapolation to Martian conditions. Starting from somewhat different lunar chronologies, rather different Martian cratering chronologies are found in the literature. Currently favored models are compared. The differences at old ages are significant, the differences at younger ages are considerable and give absolute ages for the same crater frequencies as different as a factor of 3. The total uncertainty could be much higher, though, since the ratio of lunar to Martian cratering rate which is of basic importance in the models is believed to be known no better than within a factor of 2. Thus, it is of crucial importance for understanding the the evolution of Mars and determining the sequence of events to establish an unambiguous Martian cratering chronology from crater statistics in combination with clean radiometric ages of returned Martian samples. For the dating goal, rocks should be as pristine as possible from a geologically simple area with a one-stage emplacement history of the local formation. A minimum of at least one highland site for old ages, two intermediate-aged sites, and one very young site is needed.

  15. San Bernardino Cave (Italy) and the Appearance of Levallois Technology in Europe: Results of a Radiometric and Technological Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Picin, Andrea; Peresani, Marco; Falguères, Christophe; Gruppioni, Giulia; Bahain, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Levallois technology in Europe marked the transition from the Lower to the early Middle Paleolithic. This new method of flake production was accompanied by significant behavioral changes in hominin populations. The emergence of this technological advance is considered homogeneous in the European archaeological record at the Marine isotopic stage (MIS) 9/MIS 8 boundary. In this paper we report a series of combined electron spin resonance/U-series dates on mammal bones and teeth recovered from the lower units of San Bernardino Cave (Italy) and the technological analyses of the lithic assemblages. The San Bernardino Cave has yielded the earliest evidence of Levallois production on the Italian Peninsula recovered to date. In addition to our results and the review of the archaeological record, we describe the chronological and geographical differences between European territories and diversities in terms of technological developments. The belated emergence of Levallois technology in Italy compared to western Europe corresponds to the late Italian Neanderthal speciation event. The new radiometric dates and the technological analyses of San Bernardino Cave raise the issue of the different roles of glacial refugia in the peopling and the spread of innovative flaking strategies in Europe during the late Middle Pleistocene. PMID:24146836

  16. Cloud detection using disposable airborne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, K.; Harrison, R. G.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements from airborne platforms are important for studies of clouds' impact on the radiation balance and on precipitation. A range of small, low cost, disposable sensors has been developed for cloud detection from unmanned balloon or UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) platforms (Nicoll and Harrison, 2010). The techniques already deployed include exploiting the associated solar radiation modification, electric charge changes, and optical fluctuations due to cloud droplets. As well as needing to be inexpensive, the sensors are required to be lightweight (mass typically ~ 100g) with low consumption (typical power ~100mW), and have been tested alongside standard meteorological radiosondes, as well as on a small UAS (SUMO - Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (Reuder et al 2009)). Design criteria for these sensors will be discussed, as well as measurements from the test flights, through a variety of different cloud layers. The advantages of using optical and charge methods of cloud detection over the normal thermodynamic method deployed with conventional radiosondes (capacitative sensing of relative humidity combined with temperature measurements), will also be discussed. Nicoll K.A. and R.G. Harrison. Research Radiosondes, Met. Tech. Int. Nov 2010, 140 (2010). Reuder J., P. Brisset, M. Jonassen, M. Muller, S. Mayer. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: A new tool for atmospheric boundary layer research Meteorologische Zeitschrift, Vol. 18, No. 2, 141-147 (2009).

  17. Airborne LIDAR point cloud tower inclination judgment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    liang, Chen; zhengjun, Liu; jianguo, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Inclined transmission line towers for the safe operation of the line caused a great threat, how to effectively, quickly and accurately perform inclined judgment tower of power supply company safety and security of supply has played a key role. In recent years, with the development of unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with a laser scanner, GPS, inertial navigation is one of the high-precision 3D Remote Sensing System in the electricity sector more and more. By airborne radar scan point cloud to visually show the whole picture of the three-dimensional spatial information of the power line corridors, such as the line facilities and equipment, terrain and trees. Currently, LIDAR point cloud research in the field has not yet formed an algorithm to determine tower inclination, the paper through the existing power line corridor on the tower base extraction, through their own tower shape characteristic analysis, a vertical stratification the method of combining convex hull algorithm for point cloud tower scarce two cases using two different methods for the tower was Inclined to judge, and the results with high reliability.

  18. Simulation of whitecaps and their radiometric properties in the SWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric; Repasi, Endre

    2016-05-01

    A 3D simulation of the dynamic sea surface populated with whitecaps is presented. The simulation considers the dynamic evolution of whitecaps depending on wind speed and fetch. It is suitable for imaging simulations of maritime scenarios. The calculation of whitecap radiance is done in the SWIR spectral band by considering wave hiding and shadowing, especially occurring at low viewing angles. Our computer simulation combines the 3D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) considering whitecaps with the simulation of light from a light source (e.g. laser light) reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. The whitecap generation is deduced from the vertical acceleration of the sea surface, i.e. from the second moment of the wave power density spectrum. To predict the view of a camera, the sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband with the emitted sea surface radiance and the specularly reflected sky radiance as components. The radiances of light specularly reflected at the windroughened sea surface without whitecaps are modeled by considering an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function). A specific BRDF of whitecaps is used by taking into account their shadowing function. The simulation model is suitable for the pre-calculation of the reflected radiance of a light source for near horizontal incident angles where slope-shadowing of waves has to be considered. The whitecap coverage is determined from the simulated image sequences for different wind speeds and is compared with whitecap coverage functions from literature. A SWIR-image of the water surface of a lake populated with whitecaps is compared with the corresponding simulated image. Additionally, the impact of whitecaps on the radiation balance for a bistatic configuration of light source and receiver is calculated for different wind speeds.

  19. Radiometric cross-calibration of Terra ASTER and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Karen; Thome, Kurt; McCorkel, Joel

    2015-09-01

    combined absolute uncertainties. There is no statistically significant temporal trend between the two and this should allow the correction between the two to within 0.5% over the 10 years studied here.

  20. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.