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Sample records for airborne diesel soot

  1. Soot formation in diesel combustion under high-EGR conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Idicheria, Cherian A.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2005-06-01

    Experiments were conducted in an optically accessible constant-volume combustion vessel to investigate soot formation at diesel combustion conditions - in a high exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) environment. The ambient oxygen concentration was decreased systematically from 21% to 8% to simulate a wide range of EGR conditions. Quantitative measurements of in-situ soot in quasi-steady n-heptane and No.2 diesel fuel jets were made by using laser extinction and planar laser-induced incandescence (PLII) measurements. Flame lift-off length measurements were also made in support of the soot measurements. At constant ambient temperature, results show that the equivalence ratio estimated at the lift-off length does not vary with the use of EGR, implying an equal amount of fuel-air mixing prior to combustion. Soot measurements show that the soot volume fraction decreases with increasing EGR. The regions of soot formation are effectively 'stretched out' to longer axial and radial distances from the injector with increasing EGR, according to the dilution in ambient oxygen. However, the axial soot distribution and location of maximum soot collapses if plotted in terms of a 'flame coordinate', where the relative fuel-oxygen mixture is equivalent. The total soot in the jet cross-section at the maximum axial soot location initially increases and then decreases to zero as the oxygen concentration decreases from 21% to 8%. The trend is caused by competition between soot formation rates and increasing residence time. Soot formation rates decrease with decreasing oxygen concentration because of the lower combustion temperatures. At the same time, the residence time for soot formation increases, allowing more time for accumulation of soot. Increasing the ambient temperature above nominal diesel engine conditions leads to a rapid increase in soot for high-EGR conditions when compared to conditions with no EGR. This result emphasizes the importance of EGR cooling and its beneficial

  2. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  3. Changes of hygroscopicity and morphology during ageing of diesel soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritscher, Torsten; Jurányi, Zsófia; Martin, Maria; Chirico, Roberto; Gysel, Martin; Heringa, Maarten F.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Sierau, Berko; Prévôt, André S. H.; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2011-07-01

    Soot particles are an important component of atmospheric aerosol and their interaction with water is important for their climate effects. The hygroscopicity of fresh and photochemically aged soot and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from diesel passenger car emissions was studied under atmospherically relevant conditions in a smog chamber at sub-and supersaturation of water vapor. Fresh soot particles show no significant hygroscopic growth nor cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. Ageing by condensation of SOA formed by photooxidation of the volatile organic carbon (VOC) emission leads to increased water uptake and CCN activity as well as to a compaction of the initially non-spherical soot particles when exposed to high relative humidity (RH). It is important to consider the latter effect for the interpretation of mobility based measurements. The vehicle with oxidation catalyst (EURO3) emits much fewer VOCs than the vehicle without after-treatment (EURO2). Consequently, more SOA is formed for the latter, resulting in more pronounced effects on particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity. Nevertheless, the aged soot particles did not reach the hygroscopicity of pure SOA particles formed from diesel VOC emissions, which are similarly hygroscopic (0.06 < κH - TDMA < 0.12 and 0.09 < κCCN < 0.14) as SOA from other precursor gases investigated in previous studies.

  4. Uncatalysed and catalysed soot combustion under NO{sub x} + O{sub 2}: Real diesel versus model soots

    SciTech Connect

    Atribak, I.; Bueno-Lopez, A.; Garcia-Garcia, A.

    2010-11-15

    In this work, the uncatalysed and catalysed combustion of two commercial carbon blacks and three diesel soot samples were analysed and related to the physico-chemical properties of these carbon materials. Model soot samples are less reactive than real soot samples, which can be attributed, mainly, to a lower proportion in heteroatoms and a higher graphitic order for the case of one of the carbon blacks. Among the diesel soot samples tested, the most relevant differences are the volatile matter/fixed carbon contents, which are directly related to the engine operating conditions (idle or loaded) and to the use of an oxidation catalyst or not in the exhaust. The soot collected after an oxidation catalyst (A-soot) is more reactive than the counterpart virgin soot obtained under the same engine operating modes but before the oxidation catalyst. The reactivity of the different soot samples follows the same trend under uncatalysed and catalysed combustion, the combustion profiles being always shifted towards lower temperatures for the catalysed reactions. The differences between the soot samples become less relevant in the presence of a catalyst. The ceria-zirconia catalysts tested are very effective not only to oxidise soot but also to combust the soluble organic fraction emitted at low temperatures. The most reactive soot (A-soot) exhibits a T{sub 50%} parameter of 450 C when using the most active catalyst. (author)

  5. Aggregation Kinetics of Diesel Soot Nanoparticles in Wet Environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengyu; Huang, Weilin

    2017-02-21

    Soot produced during incomplete combustion consists mainly of carbonaceous nanoparticles (NPs) with severe adverse environmental and health effects, and its environmental fate and transport are largely controlled by aggregation. In this study, we examined the aggregation behavior for diesel soot NPs under aqueous condition in an effort to elucidate the fundamental processes that govern soot particle-particle interactions in wet environments such as rain droplets or surface aquatic systems. The influence of electrolytes and aqueous pH on colloidal stability of these NPs was investigated by measuring their aggregation kinetics in different aqueous solution chemistries. The results showed that the NPs had negatively charged surfaces and exhibited both reaction- and diffusion-limited aggregation regimes with rates depended upon solution chemistry. The aggregation kinetics data were in good agreement with the classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) were quantified and the Hamaker constant was derived for the soot (1.4 × 10(-20) J) using the colloidal chemistry approach. The study indicated that, depending upon local aqueous chemistry, single soot NPs could remain stable against self-aggregation in typical freshwater environments and in neutral cloud droplets but are likely to aggregate under salty (e.g., estuaries) or acidic (e.g., acid rain droplets) aquatic conditions or both.

  6. Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L.

    2008-12-15

    This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

  7. Cytotoxicity and inflammatory potential of soot particles of low-emission diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Su, Dang Sheng; Serafino, Annalucia; Müller, Jens-Oliver; Jentoft, Rolf E; Schlögl, Robert; Fiorito, Silvana

    2008-03-01

    We evaluated, in vitro, the inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of soot particles from current low-emission (Euro IV) diesel engines toward human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophage cells. The result is surprising. At the same mass concentration, soot particles produced under low-emission conditions exhibit a much highertoxic and inflammatory potential than particles from an old diesel engine operating under black smoke conditions. This effect is assigned to the defective surface structure of Euro IV diesel soot, rendering it highly active. Our findings indicate that the reduction of soot emission in terms of mass does not automatically lead to a reduction of the toxic effects toward humans when the structure and functionality of the soot is changed, and thereby the biological accessibility and inflammatory potential of soot is increased.

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of diesel soot reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Marcuccilli, F; Gilot, P.; Stanmore, B.; Prado, G.

    1994-12-31

    In order to provide data for modelling the performance of a regenerative soot filter, a study of the oxidation kinetics of diesel soot in the temperature range from 600 C to 800 C was undertaken. Isothermal burning rates at a number of temperatures were measured in rectangular soot beds within a thermobalance. The technique was easy to use, but the combustion rate was found to depend on bed mass. The oxidation process was thus limited by mass transfer effects. A two-dimensional mathematical model of oxygen transfer was developed to extract the true kinetic rates from experimental data. The two-dimensional approach was required because significant oxygen depletion occurred along both axes. Using assumed kinetic rates, oxygen concentration profiles in the gas phase above the bed and within the bed were calculated. The true kinetics at a number of temperatures were, then established by matching predicted oxygen consumption with measured consumption. Application of the model required values of the effective diffusion coefficient for oxygen within the bed. Accordingly, the structure and properties of the soot aggregates were determined. A supplements study was carried out to identify the appropriate primary reaction products. The measured kinetic rates were then used in a simpler, monodimensional model to evaluate the mean oxygen mass transfer coefficients to the surface of the bed. The results show that burning below about 730 C is in regime 1 and can be described by K = 6.9 {times} 10{sup 12} exp ({minus}207,000/RT) (s{sup {minus}1}) with R = 8.314 J/mol {times} K. Above, 730 C, there is a decrease in apparent activation energy, probably due to thermal ``annealing,`` which changes the microstructure of the carbon. As a result, the inherent reactivity declines and/or the bed becomes less accessible to oxygen.

  9. Soot particle trajectories of a Di diesel engine at 18° ATDC crankshaft angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafidzal, M. H. M.; Mahmood, W. M. F. W.; Manaf, M. Z. A.; Zakaria, M. S.; Saadun, M. N. A.; Nordin, M. N. A.

    2013-12-01

    Among the major pollutants of diesel engine is soot. Soot is formed as an unwelcome product in combustion systems. Soot emission to the atmosphere leads to global air warming and health problems. Furthermore, deposition of soot particles on cylinder walls contaminates lubricant oil hence increases its viscosity. This reduces durability of lubricant oil, causing pumpability problems and increasing wear. Therefore, it is necessary to study soot formation and its movement in diesel engines. This study focuses on soot particle trajectories in diesel engines by considering the diameter of soot particles that were formed at 18° ATDC crankshaft angle. These soot particle movements are under the influence of drag force with different radial, axial and angular settings and simulated by using MATLAB routine. The mathematical algorithm which was used in the MATLAB routine is trilinear interpolation and 4th order of Runge Kutta. Simulation was carried out for a combustion system of 4 valves DI diesel engine from inlet valve closing (IVC) to exhaust valve opening (EVO). The results show that small diameter of soot particles were transferred near the cylinder wall while bigger soot particle mostly moved in inner radius of the combustion chamber.

  10. Understanding the difference in oxidative properties between flame and diesel soot nanoparticles: the role of metals.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Fletcher, R A; Zachariah, M R

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the differences observed in the oxidative kinetics between flame and diesel derived soots. In particular, it has been observed that flame soot has a significantly higher activation energy for oxidation than does diesel soot. The hypothesis tested in this paper is that metals, possibly coming from lubricating oils, within diesel generated soot particles may be responsible for this effect. This is supported by the fact that addition of metal additives to diesel fuel is shown to have no effect on the activation energy of soot oxidation. The subject of this paper lies in testing the hypothesis by adding metal directly to a flame and extracting oxidation kinetics. Using a high temperature oxidation tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTO-TDMA) we extract particle size dependent kinetics for the oxidation of flame-derived soot doped with and without iron. We found that indeed addition of iron to a flame reduced the activation energy significantly from approximately 162 +/- 3 kJ/mol to approximately 116 +/- 3 kJ/mol, comparable with diesel engine generated soot with an activation energy approximately 110 kJ/mol. These results are consistent with the idea that small quantities of metals during diesel combustion may play an important role in soot abatement.

  11. Is Carbon Black a Suitable Model Colloidal Substrate for Diesel Soot?

    PubMed

    Growney, David J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Middlemiss, Laurence; Fielding, Lee A; Derry, Matthew J; Aragrag, Najib; Lamb, Gordon D; Armes, Steven P

    2015-09-29

    Soot formation in diesel engines is known to cause premature engine wear. Unfortunately, genuine diesel soot is expensive to generate, so carbon blacks are often used as diesel soot mimics. Herein, the suitability of a commercial carbon black (Regal 250R) as a surrogate for diesel soot dispersed in engine base oil is examined in the presence of two commonly used polymeric lubricant additives. The particle size, morphology, and surface composition of both substrates are assessed using BET surface area analysis, TEM, and XPS. The extent of adsorption of a poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (dOCP) statistical copolymer or a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymer onto carbon black or diesel soot from n-dodecane is compared indirectly using a supernatant depletion assay technique via UV spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis is also used to directly determine the extent of copolymer adsorption. Degrees of dispersion are examined using optical microscopy, TEM, and analytical centrifugation. SAXS studies reveal some structural differences between carbon black and diesel soot particles. The mean radius of gyration determined for the latter is significantly smaller than that calculated for the former, and in the absence of any copolymer, diesel soot suspended in n-dodecane forms relatively loose mass fractals compared to carbon black. SAXS provides evidence for copolymer adsorption and indicates that addition of either copolymer transforms the initially compact agglomerates into relatively loose aggregates. Addition of dOCP or PS-PEP does not significantly affect the structure of the carbon black primary particles, with similar results being observed for diesel soot. In favorable cases, remarkably similar data can be obtained for carbon black and diesel soot when using dOCP and PS-PEP as copolymer dispersants. However, it is not difficult to identify simple copolymer-particle-solvent combinations for which substantial differences can be observed

  12. Influence of diesel engine combustion parameters on primary soot particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Urs; Mohr, Martin; Kaegi, Ralf; Bertola, Andrea; Boulouchos, Konstantinos

    2005-03-15

    Effects of engine operating parameters and fuel composition on both primary soot particle diameter and particle number size distribution in the exhaust of a direct-injected heavy-duty diesel engine were studied in detail. An electrostatic sampler was developed to deposit particles directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Using TEM, the projected area equivalent diameter of primary soot particles was determined. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used for the measurement of the particle number size distribution. Variations in the main engine operating parameters (fuel injection system, air management, and fuel properties) were made to investigate soot formation and oxidation processes. Primary soot particle diameters determined by TEM measurements ranged from 17.5 to 32.5 nm for the diesel fuel and from 24.1 to 27.2 nm for the water-diesel emulsion fuel depending on the engine settings. For constant fuel energy flow rate, the primary particle size from the water-diesel emulsion fuel was slightly larger than that from the diesel fuel. A reduction in primary soot particle diameter was registered when increasing the fuel injection pressure (IP) or advancing the start of injection (SOI). Larger primary soot particle diameters were measured while the engine was operating with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Heat release rate analysis of the combustion process revealed that the primary soot particle diameter decreased when the maximum flame temperature increased for the diesel fuel.

  13. Nepheline from K2CO3/nanosized sodalite as a prospective candidate for diesel soot combustion.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Riichiro; Wakabayashi, Junji; Elangovan, S P; Ogura, Masaru; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2008-10-01

    Nepheline group materials obtained by a thermal treatment of K2CO3-supported nanosized sodalite are identified as cost-effective materials which show promising activity and durability toward diesel soot combustion.

  14. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Diesel Carbon Soot Combustion under Simulated Catalytic-Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohsuke; Watanabe, Keitaro; Sato, Takeshi; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2015-05-18

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) is used to monitor the catalytic combustion of diesel carbon soot upon exposure to molecular oxygen at elevated temperatures by using a gas-injection specimen heating holder. The reaction conditions simulated in the ETEM experiments reconstruct real conditions effectively. This study demonstrated for the first time that soot combustion occurs at the soot-catalyst interface for both Ag/CeO2 and Cu/BaO/La2 O3 catalysts.

  15. Comparative Study of Different Methods for Soot Sensing and Filter Monitoring in Diesel Exhausts

    PubMed Central

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Hottner, Kathrin; Redel, Sabrina; Müller, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasingly tighter emission limits for diesel and gasoline engines, especially concerning particulate matter emissions, particulate filters are becoming indispensable devices for exhaust gas after treatment. Thereby, for an efficient engine and filter control strategy and a cost-efficient filter design, reliable technologies to determine the soot load of the filters and to measure particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gas during vehicle operation are highly needed. In this study, different approaches for soot sensing are compared. Measurements were conducted on a dynamometer diesel engine test bench with a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The DPF was monitored by a relatively new microwave-based approach. Simultaneously, a resistive type soot sensor and a Pegasor soot sensing device as a reference system measured the soot concentration exhaust upstream of the DPF. By changing engine parameters, different engine out soot emission rates were set. It was found that the microwave-based signal may not only indicate directly the filter loading, but by a time derivative, the engine out soot emission rate can be deduced. Furthermore, by integrating the measured particulate mass in the exhaust, the soot load of the filter can be determined. In summary, all systems coincide well within certain boundaries and the filter itself can act as a soot sensor. PMID:28218700

  16. Comparative Study of Different Methods for Soot Sensing and Filter Monitoring in Diesel Exhausts.

    PubMed

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Hottner, Kathrin; Redel, Sabrina; Müller, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2017-02-18

    Due to increasingly tighter emission limits for diesel and gasoline engines, especially concerning particulate matter emissions, particulate filters are becoming indispensable devices for exhaust gas after treatment. Thereby, for an efficient engine and filter control strategy and a cost-efficient filter design, reliable technologies to determine the soot load of the filters and to measure particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gas during vehicle operation are highly needed. In this study, different approaches for soot sensing are compared. Measurements were conducted on a dynamometer diesel engine test bench with a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The DPF was monitored by a relatively new microwave-based approach. Simultaneously, a resistive type soot sensor and a Pegasor soot sensing device as a reference system measured the soot concentration exhaust upstream of the DPF. By changing engine parameters, different engine out soot emission rates were set. It was found that the microwave-based signal may not only indicate directly the filter loading, but by a time derivative, the engine out soot emission rate can be deduced. Furthermore, by integrating the measured particulate mass in the exhaust, the soot load of the filter can be determined. In summary, all systems coincide well within certain boundaries and the filter itself can act as a soot sensor.

  17. Impacts of fuel formulation and engine operating parameters on the nanostructure and reactivity of diesel soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehliu, Kuen

    This study focuses on the impacts of fuel formulations on the reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The impacts of engine operating modes and the start of combustion on soot reactivity were investigated first. Based on preliminary investigations, a test condition of 2400 rpm and 64 Nm, with single and split injection strategies, was chosen for studying the impacts of fuel formulation on the characteristics of diesel soot. Three test fuels were used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gas-to-liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures were adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing, thereby facilitating comparisons between soots from the different fuels. Soot reactivity was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis followed by BP15 and FT derived soots in order of apparent rate constant. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates no relation between the surface oxygen content and the soot reactivity. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The basal plane diameter obtained from XRD was inversely related to the apparent rate constants for soot oxidation. For comparison, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) provided images of the graphene layers. Quantitative image analysis proceeded by a custom algorithm. B100 derived soot possessed the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. This suggests soot (nano)structural disorder correlates with a faster oxidation rate. Such results are in agreement with the X-ray analysis, as the observed fringe length is a measure of basal plane diameter. Moreover the relation

  18. Chemical kinetic modeling study of the effects of oxygenated hydrocarbons on soot emissions from diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Charles K; Pitz, William J; Curran, Henry J

    2006-06-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic modeling approach is used to examine the phenomenon of suppression of sooting in diesel engines by the addition of oxygenated hydrocarbon species to the fuel. This suppression, which has been observed experimentally for a few years, is explained kinetically as a reduction in concentrations of soot precursors present in the hot products of a fuel-rich diesel ignition zone when oxygenates are included. The kinetic model is also used to show how different oxygenates, ester structures in particular, can have different soot-suppression efficiencies due to differences in the molecular structure of the oxygenated species.

  19. Experimental study of soot formation from a diesel fuel surrogate in a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Olivier; Djebaili-Chaumeix, Nabiha; Paillard, Claude-Etienne; Douce, Francoise

    2009-08-15

    The soot tendency (soot induction delay time and soot yield) of a diesel fuel surrogate and of the hydrocarbons that constitute this mixture was studied in a heated shock tube. The surrogate is composed of three hydrocarbons representative of major chemical families of diesel fuels (39% n-propylcyclohexane, 28% n-butylbenzene, and 33% 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane in mass proportion). Experiments were carried out for highly diluted mixtures in argon; in the case of pyrolysis and at two equivalence ratios: 18 and 5. The pressure range was relatively high (1090-1870 kPa) and the carbon atom concentration was kept constant at around 2 x 10{sup +18} atoms cm{sup -3}. The effects of the nature of the hydrocarbon, the oxygen addition, and the temperature on the soot induction delay time and soot yield were investigated. A second growth stage of the soot volume fraction was observed. The influence of several parameters on the existence and/or on the amplitude of this second growth seems to indicate the chemical nature of this phenomenon. Results for the soot tendency show that the soot induction delay time and soot yield depend strongly on the structure of the hydrocarbon and on the concentration of oxygen. The study of the diesel surrogate shows that the soot inception process does not depend on synergistic effects between hydrocarbons but seems to be initiated by the constituent of the surrogate that produces soot fastest, while other constituents were consumed later during the soot growth. (author)

  20. Effect of fuel formulation on soot properties and regeneration of diesel particulate filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Juhun

    A critical requirement for implementation of particulate filters on diesel applications is having a low "break even temperature" (BET), defined as the exhaust temperature at which particulate removal occurs at roughly the same rate as particulate deposition. This needs to occur at sufficiently low temperatures either to fit within the exhaust temperature range of the typical duty cycle for a diesel vehicle or to require a minimum of active regeneration. Since catalytic coating on the diesel particulate filter was used in this study, one important factor in lowering the BET is catalyst activity for NO conversion to NO2, which can be adversely affected by sulfur content in the fuel, because the sulfur dioxide generated during diesel combustion can poison catalyst activity. However, a second important factor that significantly affects DPF regeneration behavior is particulate reactivity, which is related to the chemical and physical properties of diesel particulates. Differences in diesel combustion characteristics and fuel formulation can be a source of variation in these soot properties. The first phase of this work considered low sulfur diesel fuel (325 ppm sulfur), ultra low sulfur fuel (15 ppm sulfur) and 20 wt.% biodiesel blends. The lowest break even temperature was observed for the 325 ppm sulfur fuel blended with 20 wt.% biodiesel, due in part to increased engine-out NOx emissions with the B20 blend, which shows that engine-out exhaust composition can be as or more important than sulfur content. Furthermore, examination of the soot generated with these fuels shows a variation in the nanostructure and the oxidative reactivity for soots derived from the different fuels. The second phase of work has been performed by adding neat alternative fuels such as Biodiesel (B100) and Fisch-Tropsch (FT) fuel. B100 soot displays a similar initial soot structure as soot from three other fuels, ultra low sulfur diesel, B20 (a 20 wt.% blend of biodiesel and ultra low sulfur

  1. Ice nucleation activity of diesel soot particles at Cirrus relevant conditions: Effects of hydration, secondary organics coating, hydration, soot morphology, and coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; China, Swarup; Liu, Shang; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Sharma, Noopur; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Aiken, A. C.; Chand, Duli; Laskin, Alexander; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shilling, John E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2016-04-16

    The role of atmospheric relevant soot particles that are processed in the atmosphere toward ice nucleation at cirrus cloud condition is poorly understood. In this study, the ice nucleating properties of diesel soot particles subjected to various physical and chemical aging treatments were investigated at temperatures ranging from -40 to -50 °C. We show that bare soot particles nucleate ice in deposition mode, but coating with secondary organics suppresses the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of soot particles requiring homogeneous freezing threshold conditions. However, the ice nucleation efficiency of soot particles coated with an aqueous organic layer was similar to bare soot particles. Hydration of bare soot particles slightly enhanced the ice nucleation efficiency, and the IN abilities of compact soot particles (roundness = ~ 0.6) were similar to bare lacey soot particles (roundness = ~ 0.4). These results indicate that ice nucleation properties are sensitive to the various aging treatments.

  2. Infrared absorptivities of several diesel engine soots; application to the analysis of soot in used engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Ryason, P.R.; Hillyer, M.J.; Hansen, T.P.

    1994-10-01

    Soot was recovered from end-of-test (EOT) oils from several different Diesel engines. After resuspending the recovered soots in fresh high dispersancy engine oil, the infrared absorptivities of the soots were determined over a range of frequencies. On the basis of a statistical analysis of the data, recommended 1870 c{sup -1} absorptivities for soots from various engine tests are: GM 6.2 L, Mack T-8, Cummins L-10 HST, 59.0 {+-} 0.5; GM 6.2 L, Mack T-8, Caterpillar 3176, 0.02% sulfur fuel, 58.2 {+-} 0.4; Caterpillar 3176, 0.02% sulfur fuel and 0.2% sulfur fuel, 56.7 {+-} 0.3; Caterpillar 3116, 53.3{+-} 0.4 and OM 602A, 47.8 {+-} 0.2. In all cases, the units for the absorptivity are cm{sup -2}/centigram. Over the range of 3800 cm{sup -1} to 1870 cm{sup -1}, the dependence of absorptivity on frequency was linear for all the soots. Use of these absorptivities to determine soot concentrations in used engine oils is discussed. Of particular concern are the procedures required to obtain reproducible results. Special care must be taken to assure compositional uniformity of samples. 6 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Comparison of the tribology performance of nano-diesel soot and graphite particles as lubricant additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zu-chuan; Cai, Zhen-bing; Peng, Jin-fang; Zhu, Min-hao

    2016-02-01

    The tribology behavior of exhaust diesel soot as a lubricant additive was investigated and then compared with that of a selection of commercial nano-graphite particles. Specifically, 0.01 wt% particles were dispersed in PAO4 oil with 1 wt% sorbitan monooleate (Span 80) as a dispersing agent, and wear tests based on the ball against plate mode were conducted at various temperatures. Different analytical techniques (e.g. transmission electron, scanning electron and infrared microscopy; energy dispersive x-ray and Raman spectroscopy; and charge measurement) were employed to characterize the chemistry and morphology of the additives and their tribology performance. The oil containing only 0.01 wt% diesel soot clearly improved wear resistance over 60 °C. In particular, at 100 °C the wear rate decreased by approximately 90% compared to the function of base oil. In the same test conditions, diesel soot exhibited better anti-wear performance than nano-graphite at high temperatures. The potential measure showed that the nano-graphite had positive charge and the diesel soot had negative charge. Electrochemical action may play an important role in the lubricant mechanisms of diesel soot and graphite as oil additives.

  4. The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot production in direct-injection diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.; Mueller, Charles J.; Martin, Glen M.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2003-06-01

    A combined experimental and kinetic modeling study of soot formation in diesel engine combustion has been used to study the addition of oxygenated species to diesel fuel to reduce soot emissions. This work indicates that the primary role of oxygen atoms in the fuel mixture is to reduce the levels of carbon atoms available for soot formation by fixing them in the form of CO or COz. When the structure of the oxygenate leads to prompt and direct formation of CO2, the oxygenate is less effective in reducing soot production than in cases when all fuel-bound 0 atoms produce only CO. The kinetic and molecular structure principles leading to this conclusion are described.

  5. Bulk and surface structural investigations of diesel engine soot and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Müller, J-O; Su, D S; Wild, U; Schlögl, R

    2007-08-14

    The microstructure and electronic structure of environmentally relevant carbons such as Euro IV heavy duty diesel engine soot, soot from a black smoking diesel engine, spark discharge soot as model aerosol, commercial furnace soot and lamp black are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The materials exhibit differences in the predominant bonding, which influences microstructure as well as surface functionalization. These chemical and physical properties depend on the formation history of the investigated carbonaceous materials. In this work, a correlation of the microstructure of the samples to the predominant bonding and incorporation of oxygen into the carbons is obtained. It is shown that a high amount of defects and the deviation of the carbons from a perfect graphitic structure results in a increased incorporation of oxygen and hydrogen. A correlation between the length and curvature of graphene layers with the bonding state of carbon atoms and incorporation of oxygen and hydrogen is established.

  6. Evolution of In-Cylinder Diesel Engine Soot and Emission Characteristics Investigated with Online Aerosol Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malmborg, V B; Eriksson, A C; Shen, M; Nilsson, P; Gallo, Y; Waldheim, B; Martinsson, J; Andersson, Ö; Pagels, J

    2017-02-07

    To design diesel engines with low environmental impact, it is important to link health and climate-relevant soot (black carbon) emission characteristics to specific combustion conditions. The in-cylinder evolution of soot properties over the combustion cycle and as a function of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated in a modern heavy-duty diesel engine. A novel combination of a fast gas-sampling valve and a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) enabled online measurements of the in-cylinder soot chemistry. The results show that EGR reduced the soot formation rate. However, the late cycle soot oxidation rate (soot removal) was reduced even more, and the net effect was increased soot emissions. EGR resulted in an accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during combustion, and led to increased PAH emissions. We show that mass spectral and optical signatures of the in-cylinder soot and associated low volatility organics change dramatically from the soot formation dominated phase to the soot oxidation dominated phase. These signatures include a class of fullerene carbon clusters that we hypothesize represent less graphitized, C5-containing fullerenic (high tortuosity or curved) soot nanostructures arising from decreased combustion temperatures and increased premixing of air and fuel with EGR. Altered soot properties are of key importance when designing emission control strategies such as diesel particulate filters and when introducing novel biofuels.

  7. Effects of native organic material and water on sorption properties of reference diesel soot.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Grathwohl, Peter; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2009-05-01

    Soot has been considered as a potentially important sorbent for organic contaminants in soils, sediments, and aerosols. This paper demonstrates that native (authigenic) extractable organic material (EOM) and surface-covering water on soot may have a substantial influence on sorption properties of the soot. Sorption isotherms were determined for apolar and weakly polar sorbates (n-octane, cyclooctane, n-propylbenzene, naphthalene) from an aqueous solution to a standard reference material of diesel soot (SRM 2975) in the original state and after extraction with methanol. For all sorbates tested, removal of EOM from soot by methanol caused the sorption isotherms to be more nonlinear (decrease of Freundlich exponents by 0.19-0.25) compared to the untreated soot. The changes in the isotherms depend on both sorbate structure and sorbate concentration and can be accounted for by two opposing roles that EOM could have on the sorption properties of soot (i) enhancing the overall sorption by absorbing the sorbate into the EOM phase, and (ii) attenuating the sorbate adsorption to the soot carbon surface through sorption competition or site blockage. The n-alkane-to-cycloalkane sorption coefficient ratios (Kn/Kc) indicated that the removal of EOM altered the sorption mode for alkanes from absorption to adsorption. A comparison of the sorption isotherms measured in aqueous suspensions with the soot-air sorption coefficients reported for SRM 2975 in the literature showed that sorption to "soot in water" is significantly weaker than sorption to "soot in air", indicating that complete surface coverage with water suppresses the sorption by soot.

  8. Gradient effects on two-color soot optical pyrometry in a heavy-duty DI diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P.B.; Singh, Satbir; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2008-04-15

    Two-color soot optical pyrometry is a widely used technique for measuring soot temperature and volume fraction in many practical combustion devices, but line-of-sight soot temperature and volume fraction gradients can introduce significant uncertainties in the measurements. For diesel engines, these uncertainties usually can only be estimated based on assumptions about the soot property gradients along the line of sight, because full three-dimensional transient diesel soot distribution data are not available. Such information is available, however, from multidimensional computer model simulations, which are phenomenologically based, and have been validated against available in-cylinder soot measurements and diesel engine exhaust soot emissions. Using the model-predicted in-cylinder soot distributions, uncertainties in diesel two-color pyrometry data are assessed, both for a conventional high-sooting, high-temperature combustion (HTC) operating condition, and for a low-sooting, low-temperature combustion (LTC) condition. The simulation results confirm that the two-color soot measurements are strongly biased toward the properties of the hot soot. For the HTC condition, line-of-sight gradients in soot temperature span 600 K, causing relatively large errors. The two-color temperature is 200 K higher than the soot-mass-averaged value, while the two-color volume fraction is 50% lower. For the LTC condition, the two-color measurement errors are half as large as for the HTC condition, because the model-predicted soot temperature gradients along the line of sight are half as large. By contrast, soot temperature and volume fraction gradients across the field of view introduce much smaller errors of less than 50 K in temperature and 20% in volume fraction. (author)

  9. Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff

    2005-07-01

    Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

  10. Further theoretical studies of modified cyclone separator as a diesel soot particulate emission arrester.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, N; Bose, P K

    2009-10-01

    Soot particulate emission reduction from diesel engine is one of the most emerging problems associated with the exhaust pollution. Diesel particulate filters (DPF) hold out the prospects of substantially reducing regulated particulate emissions but the question of the reliable regeneration of filters still remains a difficult hurdle to overcome. Many of the solutions proposed to date suffer from design complexity, cost, regeneration problem and energy demands. This study presents a computer aided theoretical analysis for controlling diesel soot particulate emission by cyclone separator--a non contact type particulate removal system considering outer vortex flow, inner vortex flow and packed ceramic fiber filter at the end of vortex finder tube. Cyclone separator with low initial cost, simple construction produces low back pressure and reasonably high collection efficiencies with reduced regeneration problems. Cyclone separator is modified by placing a continuous ceramic packed fiber filter placed at the end of the vortex finder tube. In this work, the grade efficiency model of diesel soot particulate emission is proposed considering outer vortex, inner vortex and the continuous ceramic packed fiber filter. Pressure drop model is also proposed considering the effect of the ceramic fiber filter. Proposed model gives reasonably good collection efficiency with permissible pressure drop limit of diesel engine operation. Theoretical approach is predicted for calculating the cut size diameter considering the effect of Cunningham molecular slip correction factor. The result shows good agreements with existing cyclone and DPF flow characteristics.

  11. Chemical characterization of diesel and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) soot after reactive gas probing using diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS).

    PubMed

    Tapia, A; Salgado, M S; Martín, M P; Rodríguez-Fernández, J; Rossi, M J; Cabañas, B

    2017-01-23

    A chemical characterization of diesel and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) soot has been developed using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) before and after the reaction with different probe gases. Samples were generated under combustion conditions corresponding to an urban operation mode of a diesel engine and were reacted with probe gas-phase molecules in a Knudsen flow reactor. Specifically, NH2OH, O3 and NO2 were used as reactants (probes) and selected according to their reactivities towards specific functional groups on the sample surface. Samples of previously ground soot were diluted with KBr and were introduced in a DRIFTS accessory. A comparison between unreacted and reacted soot samples was made in order to establish chemical changes on the soot surface upon reaction. It was concluded that the interface of diesel and HVO soot before reaction mainly consists polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitro and carbonyl compounds, as well as ether functionalities. The main difference between both soot samples was observed in the band of the C=O groups that in diesel soot was observed at 1719 cm(-1) but not in HVO soot. After reaction with probe gases, it was found that nitro compounds remain on the soot surface, that the degree of unsaturation decreases for reacted samples, and that new spectral bands such as hydroxyl groups are observed.

  12. X-ray scattering and spectroscopy studies on diesel soot from oxygenated fuel under various engine load conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braun, Andreas; Shah, N.; Huggins, Frank E.; Kelly, K.E.; Sarofim, A.; Jacobsen, C.; Wirick, S.; Francis, H.; Ilavsky, J.; Thomas, G.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Diesel soot from reference diesel fuel and oxygenated fuel under idle and load engine conditions was investigated with X-ray scattering and X-ray carbon K-edge absorption spectroscopy. Up to five characteristic size ranges were found. Idle soot was generally found to have larger primary particles and aggregates but smaller crystallites, than load soot. Load soot has a higher degree of crystallinity than idle soot. Adding oxygenates to diesel fuel enhanced differences in the characteristics of diesel soot, or even reversed them. Aromaticity of idle soot from oxygenated diesel fuel was significantly larger than from the corresponding load soot. Carbon near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was applied to gather information about the presence of relative amounts of carbon double bonds (CC, CO) and carbon single bonds (C-H, C-OH, COOH). Using scanning X-ray transmission microspectroscopy (STXM), the relative amounts of these carbon bond states were shown to vary spatially over distances approximately 50 to 100 nm. The results from the X-ray techniques are supported by thermo-gravimetry analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidation of diesel soot on binary oxide CuCr(Co)-based monoliths.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Sergiy O; Kapran, Andriy Y; Kurylets, Yaroslava P

    2015-02-01

    Binary oxide systems (CuCr2O4, CuCo2O4), deposited onto cordierite monoliths of honeycomb structure with a second support (finely dispersed Al2O3), were prepared as filters for catalytic combustion of diesel soot using internal combustion engine's gas exhausts (O2, NOx, H2O, CO2) and O3 as oxidizing agents. It is shown that the second support increases soot capacity of aforementioned filters, and causes dispersion of the particles of spinel phases as active components enhancing thereby catalyst activity and selectivity of soot combustion to CO2. Oxidants used can be arranged with reference to decreasing their activity in a following series: O3≫NO2>H2O>NO>O2>CO2. Ozone proved to be the most efficient oxidizing agent: the diesel soot combustion by O3 occurs intensively (in the presence of copper chromite based catalyst) even at closing to ambient temperatures. Results obtained give a basis for the conclusion that using a catalytic coating on soot filters in the form of aforementioned binary oxide systems and ozone as the initiator of the oxidation processes is a promising approach in solving the problem of comprehensive purification of automotive exhaust gases at relatively low temperatures, known as the "cold start" problem.

  14. Determination of light extinction efficiency of diesel soot from smoke opacity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuerta, Magín; Martos, Francisco J.; Cárdenas, M. Dolores

    2005-10-01

    An experimental method for the indirect determination of the light extinction efficiency of the exhaust gas emitted by diesel engines is proposed in this paper, based on the simultaneous measurement of spot opacity and continuous opacity, together with the double modelling of the associated soot concentration. The first model simulates the projection of a differently sized soot particle population enclosed in an exhaust gas sample on the filter of a spot opacimeter. The second one simulates the light extinction caused by the soot particles flowing in the exhaust gas stream in an online continuous opacimeter, on the basis of the Beer-Lambert law. This method is an alternative to other theoretical or semi-empirical complex methods which have proved to be inadequate in the case of soot agglomerates. The application of this method to a set of experimental smoke measurements from a commercial light-duty DI diesel engine typical of vehicle road transportation permitted us to draw conclusions about the effect of different engine conditions on the mean light extinction efficiency of the soot particles flowing in the raw exhaust gas stream.

  15. High sensitivity of diesel soot morphological and optical properties to combustion temperature in a shock tube.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chong; Khalizov, Alexei F; Hogan, Brian; Petersen, Eric L; Zhang, Renyi

    2014-06-03

    Carbonaceous particles produced from combustion of fossil fuels have strong impacts on air quality and climate, yet quantitative relationships between particle characteristics and combustion conditions remain inadequately understood. We have used a shock tube to study the formation and properties of diesel combustion soot, including particle size distributions, effective density, elemental carbon (EC) mass fraction, mass-mobility scaling exponent, hygroscopicity, and light absorption and scattering. These properties are found to be strongly dependent on the combustion temperature and fuel equivalence ratio. Whereas combustion at higher temperatures (∼2000 K) yields fractal particles of a larger size and high EC content (90 wt %), at lower temperatures (∼1400 K) smaller particles of a higher organic content (up to 65 wt %) are produced. Single scattering albedo of soot particles depends largely on their organic content, increasing drastically from 0.3 to 0.8 when the particle EC mass fraction decreases from 0.9 to 0.3. The mass absorption cross-section of diesel soot increases with combustion temperature, being the highest for particles with a higher EC content. Our results reveal that combustion conditions, especially the temperature, may have significant impacts on the direct and indirect climate forcing of atmospheric soot aerosols.

  16. Controlling soot formation with filtered EGR for diesel and biodiesel fuelled engines.

    PubMed

    Gill, S S; Turner, D; Tsolakis, A; York, A P E

    2012-04-03

    Although exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is an effective strategy for controlling the levels of nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) emitted from a diesel engine, the full potential of EGR in NO(X)/PM trade-off and engine performance (i.e., fuel economy) has not fully been exploited. Significant work into the cause and control of particulate matter (PM) has been made over the past decade with new cleaner fuels and after-treatment devices emerging to comply with the current and forthcoming emission regulations. In earlier work, we demonstrated that engine operation with oxygenated fuels (e.g., biodiesel) reduces the PM emissions and extends the engine tolerance to EGR before it reaches smoke-limited conditions. The same result has also been reported when high cetane number fuels such as gas-to-liquid (GTL) are used. To further our understanding of the relationship between EGR and PM formation, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) was integrated into the EGR loop to filter the recirculated soot particulates. The control of the soot recirculation penalty through filtered EGR (FEGR) resulted in a 50% engine-out soot reduction, thus showing the possibility of extending the maximum EGR limit or being able to run at the same level of EGR with an improved NO(X)/soot trade-off.

  17. Insights on postinjection-associated soot emissions in direct injection diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Arregle, Jean; Pastor, Jose V.; Lopez, J. Javier; Garcia, Antonio

    2008-08-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out in order to better understand combustion behavior in a direct injection diesel engine when using postinjections. More specifically, the aim of the study is twofold: (1) to better understand the mechanism of a postinjection to reduce soot and (2) to improve the understanding of the contribution of the postinjection combustion on the total soot emissions by looking at the effect of the postinjection timing variation and the postinjection mass variation on the soot emissions associated with the postinjection. The study is focused only on far postinjections, and the explored operating conditions include the use of EGR. The first objective was fulfilled analyzing some results from a previous work adding only a few complementary results. Concerning the second objective, the basic idea behind the analysis performed is the search of appropriate parameters physically linked to the processes under analysis. These parameters are found based on the state-of-the-art of diesel combustion. For the effect of the postinjection timing, the physical parameter found was the temperature of the unburned gases at the end of injection, T{sub ug{sub E}}{sub oI}. It was checked that a threshold level of T{sub ug{sub E}}{sub oI} ({proportional_to}700 K for the cases explored here) exists below which soot is unable to be formed, independently of the postinjection size, and the amount of soot increases as the temperature increases beyond this threshold. For the effect of the postinjection size, the physical parameter that was found was DoI/ACT (the ratio between the actual duration of injection and the time necessary for mixing - the apparent combustion time). This parameter can quantify when the postinjection is able to produce soot (the threshold value is {proportional_to}0.37 for the cases explored here), and the amount of soot produced increases as this parameter increases beyond this threshold value. A function containing these two parameters has been

  18. A Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of the Effects of Oxygenated Hydrocarbons on Soot Emissions from Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2005-11-14

    A detailed chemical kinetic modeling approach is used to examine the phenomenon of suppression of sooting in diesel engines by addition of oxygenated hydrocarbon species to the fuel. This suppression, which has been observed experimentally for a few years, is explained kinetically as a reduction in concentrations of soot precursors present in the hot products of a fuel-rich diesel ignition zone when oxygenates are included. Oxygenates decrease the overall equivalence ratio of the igniting mixture, producing higher ignition temperatures and more radical species to consume more soot precursor species, leading to lower soot production. The kinetic model is also used to show how different oxygenates, ester structures in particular, can have different soot-suppression efficiencies due to differences in molecular structure of the oxygenated species.

  19. Effect of intrinsic organic carbon on the optical properties of fresh diesel soot.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriella; Riziq, Ali Abo; Erlick, Carynelisa; Rudich, Yinon

    2010-04-13

    This study focuses on the retrieval of the normalized mass absorption cross section (MAC) of soot using theoretical calculations that incorporate new measurements of the optical properties of organic carbon (OC) intrinsic to fresh diesel soot. Intrinsic OC was extracted by water and an organic solvent, and the complex refractive index of the extracted OC was derived at 532 and 355-nm wavelengths using cavity ring-down aerosol spectrometry. The extracted OC was found to absorb weakly in the visible wavelengths and moderately at blue wavelengths. The mass ratio of OC and elemental carbon (EC) in the collected particles was evaluated using a thermo-optical method. The measured EC/OC ratio in the soot exhibited substantial variability from measurement to measurement, ranging between 2 and 5. To test the sensitivity of the MAC to this variability, three different EC/OC ratios (21, 11, and 12) were chosen as representative. Particle size and spherule morphology were estimated using scanning electron microscopy, and the soot was found to be primarily in the form of aggregates with a dominant aggregate diameter mode in the range 200-250 nm. The measured refractive index of the extracted OC was used with a variety of theoretical models to calculate the MAC of internally mixed diesel soot at 532 and 355 nm. We conclude that Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory on clusters of coated spherules and T-matrix of a solid EC spheroid coated by intrinsic OC are both consistent with previous measurements; however, Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory provides a more realistic physical model for the calculation.

  20. Transformation from hydrophobic to hygroscopic diesel soot particles by photochemical aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritscher, T.; Juranyi, Z.; Martin, M.; Chirico, R.; Heringa, M.; Gysel, M.; Sierau, B.; Decarlo, P. F.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A. S.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-12-01

    Combustion emissions are a complex mixture of black carbon (BC), organics, and other compounds in the gas and particle phase. In global climate modeling BC is categorized in hydrophobic and hydrophilic, but the fraction of particles in each category is quite difficult to quantify. A particle is called hydrophobic, if it is non-wettable and therefore cannot act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hydrophilic particles are hygroscopic, if they can take up water at elevated RH. The hygroscopicity and the CCN activation of diesel exhaust particles were measured during experiments at the PSI smog chamber with a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) at 95% relative humidity (RH), which measures diameter growth factors (GF), the ratio of the wet (d(RH)) and the dry diameter (d0), and with a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC) at RH > 100%. Diesel exhaust from different passenger cars was introduced via heated injection system into the chamber. Fresh soot (BC and primary organic aerosol (POA)) is known to form nm-size fractal aggregates. These primary soot particles were coated with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass after lights were turned on. The figure conceptually illustrates the observed findings. Fresh soot particles are hydrophobic as they do not activate as cloud droplets even at high supersaturations like non-hygroscopic but wettable particles do. SOA coating appears on the soot aggregates after photochemical aging was started. Slightly aged particles were found to be CCN-active and thus they are hydrophilic. However, the GF of the H-TDMA was <1, indicating a shrinking of these particles. This restructuring was confirmed with a pre-humidifier, which makes the particles compact and less fractal in front of the H-TDMA. Continued aging of diesel exhaust leads to CCN-active particles with a GF >1, indicating the hygroscopicity of these particles. Our measurements show that photochemical aging with SOA formation can change a hydrophobic

  1. Adsorption of Organic Compounds to Diesel Soot: Frontal Analysis and Polyparameter Linear Free-Energy Relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; MacFarlane, John K; Gschwend, Philip M

    2016-01-05

    Black carbons (BCs) dominate the sorption of many hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in soils and sediments, thereby reducing the HOCs' mobilities and bioavailabilities. However, we do not have data for diverse HOCs' sorption to BC because it is time-consuming and labor-intensive to obtain isotherms on soot and other BCs. In this study, we developed a frontal analysis chromatographic method to investigate the adsorption of 21 organic compounds with diverse functional groups to NIST diesel soot. This method was precise and time-efficient, typically taking only a few hours to obtain an isotherm. Based on 102 soot-carbon normalized sorption coefficients (KsootC) acquired at different sorbate concentrations, a sorbate-activity-dependent polyparameter linear free-energy relationship was established: logKsootC = (3.74 ± 0.11)V + ((-0.35 ± 0.02)log ai)E + (-0.62 ± 0.10)A + (-3.35 ± 0.11)B + (-1.45 ± 0.09); (N = 102, R(2) = 0.96, SE = 0.18), where V, E, A, and B are the sorbate's McGowan's characteristic volume, excess molar refraction, and hydrogen acidity and basicity, respectively; and ai is the sorbate's aqueous activity reflecting the system's approach to saturation. The difference in dispersive interactions with the soot versus with the water was the dominant factor encouraging adsorption, and H-bonding interactions discouraged this process. Using this relationship, soot-water and sediment-water or soil-water adsorption coefficients of HOCs of interest (PAHs and PCBs) were estimated and compared with the results reported in the literature.

  2. Sorption nonlinearity for organic contaminants with diesel soot: method development and isotherm interpretation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Sabbah, Isam; Ball, William P

    2004-07-01

    An experimentally practical and precise flocculation-based method was developed, tested, and applied to determine phenanthrene and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene sorption with NIST SRM 2975 diesel particulate matter. Following an initial equilibration period, polyaluminum chloride (PACI) solution was added to the sorption tubes in order to facilitate the formation of flocculated aggregates of soot particles. After separation of the solids through centrifugation, supernatant concentrations were determined as with conventional batch methods. The flocculation-based method was tested on three kinds of soot and then used to evaluate sorption kinetics and equilibrium with SRM 2975. Kinetic results showed that wetting of the soot required more than 20 days, but that 60 days was sufficient to achieve equilibration with both water and phenanthrene. Sixty-day isotherms for both phenanthrene and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were strongly nonlinear. At approximate 10(-3) of solubility, carbon-normalized distribution coefficients (Koc) were 10-20 times higher than those for absorption to sediment organic matter. Measurements at closer to solubility indicated much lower Koc, suggesting a total sorption capacity at aqueous solubility that is of similar magnitude to that in sediment organic matter. Independent analysis of extractable hydrocarbons suggests that absorption into a native hydrocarbon phase was not a major component of sorption.

  3. The Role of Phosphorus and Soot on the Deactivation of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Scott J; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G; Toops, Todd J

    2009-01-01

    The deactivation of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) by soot contamination and lube-oil derived phosphorus poisoning is investigated. Pt/CeO2/-Al2O3 DOCs aged using three different protocols developed by the authors and six high mileage field-returned DOCs of similar formulation are evaluated for THC and CO oxidation performance using a bench-flow reactor. Collectively, these catalysts exhibit a variety of phosphorus and soot morphologies contributing to performance deactivation. To isolate and examine the contribution of each deactivation mechanism, performance evaluations are carried out for each DOC ''as received'' and after removal of surface carbon in a high-temperature oxidizing environment. In such a manner the deactivation contribution of soot contamination is de-convoluted from that of phosphorus poisoning. It will be shown that this is accomplished while preserving phosphorus (and to a lesser degree sulfur, calcium and zinc) chemistries and concentrations within the washcoat. Washcoat contaminant information and materials changes are characterized using electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), BET surface area, oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, from which the relative severity of each mechanism can be quantified. Results show that soot contamination from diesel exhaust severely degrades THC and CO oxidation performance by acting as a catalyst surface diffusion barrier. This results in a considerable increase of light-off temperatures. In contrast, phosphorus poisoning, which is considered a significant deactivation mechanism in three-way catalysts, is shown to have minimal effect on DOC oxidation performance for the conditions studied here. Material changes include the formation of both Ce(III-IV) and aluminum phosphates which do not significantly hinder the THC and CO oxidation in lean

  4. Dependence between nonvolatile nucleation mode particle and soot number concentrations in an EGR equipped heavy-duty Diesel engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Lähde, Tero; Rönkkö, Topi; Virtanen, Annele; Solla, Anu; Kytö, Matti; Söderström, Christer; Keskinen, Jorma

    2010-04-15

    Heavy duty diesel engine exhaust characteristics were studied with direct tailpipe sampling on an engine dynamometer. The exhaust particle size distributions, total particle mass, and gaseous emissions were measured with different load conditions without after-treatment. The measured particle size distributions were bimodal; distinctive accumulation and nucleation modes were detected for both volatile and dry particle samples. The condensing volatile compounds changed the characteristics of the nonvolatile nucleation mode while the soot/accumulation mode characteristics (concentration and diameter) were unchanged. A clear dependence between the soot and the nonvolatile nucleation mode number concentrations was detected. While the concentration of the soot mode decreased, the nonvolatile nucleation mode concentration increased. The soot mode number concentration decrease was related to soot-NOx trade-off; the decrease of the exhaust gas recirculation rate decreased soot emission and increased NOx emission. Simultaneously detected increase of the nonvolatile nucleation mode concentration may be caused by the decrease of the soot mode sink or by changed combustion characteristics. However, the total particle number concentration increased with decreasing soot mode number concentration. The proportion of the particle number concentration between the nonvolatile nucleation and soot mode followed the NO2:NO ratio linearly. While ratio NO2:NO increased the proportion of soot mode number concentration in total number concentration increased. Regardless of the mechanism that causes the balance between the soot mode and the nonvolatile nucleation mode emissions, the changes in the particle number size distribution should be taken into account while the particle mass emissions are controlled with combustion optimization.

  5. Morphological characterization of diesel soot agglomerates based on the Beer-Lambert law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuerta, Magín; Martos, Francisco J.; José Expósito, Juan

    2013-03-01

    A new method is proposed for the determination of the number of primary particles composing soot agglomerates emitted from diesel engines as well as their individual fractal dimension. The method is based on the Beer-Lambert law and it is applied to micro-photographs taken in high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Differences in the grey levels of the images lead to a more accurate estimation of the geometry of the agglomerate (in this case radius of gyration) than other methods based exclusively on the planar projections of the agglomerates. The method was validated by applying it to different images of the same agglomerate observed from different angles of incidence, and proving that the effect of the angle of incidence is minor, contrary to other methods. Finally, the comparisons with other methods showed that the size, number of primary particles and fractal dimension (the latter depending on the particle size) are usually underestimated when only planar projections of the agglomerates are considered.

  6. Influence of fuel injection timing and pressure on in-flame soot particles in an automotive-size diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon

    2014-07-15

    The current understanding of soot particle morphology in diesel engines and their dependency on the fuel injection timing and pressure is limited to those sampled from the exhaust. In this study, a thermophoretic sampling and subsequent transmission electron microscope imaging were applied to the in-flame soot particles inside the cylinder of a working diesel engine for various fuel injection timings and pressures. The results show that the number count of soot particles per image decreases by more than 80% when the injection timing is retarded from -12 to -2 crank angle degrees after the top dead center. The late injection also results in over 90% reduction of the projection area of soot particles on the TEM image and the size of soot aggregates also become smaller. The primary particle size, however, is found to be insensitive to the variations in fuel injection timing. For injection pressure variations, both the size of primary particles and soot aggregates are found to decrease with increasing injection pressure, demonstrating the benefits of high injection velocity and momentum. Detailed analysis shows that the number count of soot particles per image increases with increasing injection pressure up to 130 MPa, primarily due to the increased small particle aggregates that are less than 40 nm in the radius of gyration. The fractal dimension shows an overall decrease with the increasing injection pressure. However, there is a case that the fractal dimension shows an unexpected increase between 100 and 130 MPa injection pressure. It is because the small aggregates with more compact and agglomerated structures outnumber the large aggregates with more stretched chain-like structures.

  7. The monolithic lawn-like CuO-based nanorods array used for diesel soot combustion under gravitational contact mode.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yifu; Meng, Ming; Dai, Fangfang

    2013-02-07

    A simple and feasible contact mode called gravitational contact mode (GCM) was developed for the first time to imitate the practical state between soot and catalyst. By simulating rainwater adsorption on a lawn in nature, we synthesized a lawn-like CuO nanorods array, which exhibited rather good catalytic activity for diesel soot combustion under GCM. Moreover, the CuO nanorods array could serve as a support for composite catalysts through a sequential chemical bath deposition method and exhibited higher catalytic activity than a traditional supported catalyst. The monolithic macroscopic structure of such a catalyst shows its potential for large-scale preparation and application.

  8. Progression of soot cake layer properties during the systematic regeneration of diesel particulate filters measured with neutron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Toops, Todd J.; Pihl, Josh A.; Finney, Charles E. A.; Gregor, Jens; Bilheux, Hassina

    2015-01-16

    Although particulate filters (PFs) have been a key component of the emission control system for modern diesel engines, there remain significant questions about the basic regeneration behavior of the filters and how it changes with accumulation of increasing soot layers. This effort describes a systematic deposition and regeneration of particulate matter in 25-mm diameter × 76-mm long wall-flow PFs composed of silicon carbide (SiC) material. The initial soot distributions were analyzed for soot cake thickness using a nondestructive neutron imaging technique. With the PFs intact, it was then possible to sequentially regenerate the samples and reanalyze them, which was performed after nominal 20, 50, and 70 % regenerations. The loaded samples show a relatively uniform distribution of particulate with an increasing soot cake thickness and nearly identical initial density of 70 mg/cm3. Throughout regeneration, the soot cake thickness initially decreases significantly while the density increases to 80–90 mg/cm3. After ~50 % regeneration, the soot cake thickness stays relatively constant, but instead, the density decreases as pores open up in the layer (~35 mg/cm3 at 70 % regeneration). Here, complete regeneration initially occurs at the rear of the PF channels. With this information, a conceptual model of the regeneration is proposed.

  9. Progression of soot cake layer properties during the systematic regeneration of diesel particulate filters measured with neutron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Toops, Todd J.; Pihl, Josh A.; Finney, Charles E. A.; ...

    2015-01-16

    Although particulate filters (PFs) have been a key component of the emission control system for modern diesel engines, there remain significant questions about the basic regeneration behavior of the filters and how it changes with accumulation of increasing soot layers. This effort describes a systematic deposition and regeneration of particulate matter in 25-mm diameter × 76-mm long wall-flow PFs composed of silicon carbide (SiC) material. The initial soot distributions were analyzed for soot cake thickness using a nondestructive neutron imaging technique. With the PFs intact, it was then possible to sequentially regenerate the samples and reanalyze them, which was performedmore » after nominal 20, 50, and 70 % regenerations. The loaded samples show a relatively uniform distribution of particulate with an increasing soot cake thickness and nearly identical initial density of 70 mg/cm3. Throughout regeneration, the soot cake thickness initially decreases significantly while the density increases to 80–90 mg/cm3. After ~50 % regeneration, the soot cake thickness stays relatively constant, but instead, the density decreases as pores open up in the layer (~35 mg/cm3 at 70 % regeneration). Here, complete regeneration initially occurs at the rear of the PF channels. With this information, a conceptual model of the regeneration is proposed.« less

  10. Atmospheric behavior of urban diesel soot tagged with an iridium tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, A.E.; Caffrey, P.F.; Borgoul, P.V.; Ondov, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    An important source of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons depositing to the Chesapeake Bay is diesel emissions, including, those from the heavily-industrial City of Baltimore which lies < 5 km to the west. To investigate the influence of Baltimore`s urban soot plum, approximately 38 g of Ir (100 g of Ir-III 2,4-pentanedionate dissolved in 8 L toluene) were used to tag 268 m{sup 3} of diesel fuel burned by the City of Baltimore`s sanitation truck fleet for a 20-day period in August, 1995. Size-segregated aerosol was collected daily using 80-L min{sup {minus}1} dichotomous samplers at four land-bas3ed sites and aboard ship at two locations on the Chesapeake Bay. Shipboard samples were collected on the EPA`s Research Vessel Anderson, either east or southeast of Baltimore, off Annapolis. Three of the land sites, i.e., those at Catonsville, MD, the Eastern Avenue Fire Station (14 km from the Bay), and the Coast Guard Station at Still pond (30 km northeast of Baltimore) were chosen to be aligned with prevailing westerly winds. The fourth site was located on Hart Miller Island, about 14 km southeast of the Fire Station to take advantage of drainage flow along the Patapsco River. In addition, 10-stage Micro-Orifice Impactors were operated daily aboard ship and at all but the Catonsville site. Deposition plates were exposed aboard ship and at two of the land sites. Finally, several samples of tagged diesel emissions were collected with an MOI mounted on one of the sanitation trucks. Iridium and {le} 40 other elements were determined by neutron activation analysis or X-ray fluorescence; graphitic carbon by light transmission, and aerosol mass by gravimetry.

  11. The impact of carbon dioxide and exhaust gas recirculation on the oxidative reactivity of soot from ethylene flames and diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid O.

    Restrictive emissions standards to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from diesel engines necessitate the development of advanced emission control technology. The engine manufacturers in the United States have implemented the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and diesel particulate filters (DPF) to meet the stringent emissions limits on NOx and PM, respectively. Although the EGR-DPF system is an effective means to control diesel engine emissions, there are some concerns associated with its implementation. The chief concern with this system is the DPF regenerability, which depends upon several factors, among which are the physicochemical properties of the soot. Despite the plethora of research that has been conducted on DPF regenerability, the impact of EGR on soot reactivity and DPF regenerability is yet to be examined. This work concerns the impact of EGR on the oxidative reactivity of diesel soot. It is part of ongoing research to bridge the gap in establishing a relationship between soot formation conditions, properties, and reactivity. This work is divided into three phases. In the first phase, carbon dioxide (CO2) was added to the intake charge of a single cylinder engine via cylinders of compressed CO2. This approach simulates the cold-particle-free EGR. The results showed that inclusion of CO2 changes the soot properties and yields synergistic effects on the oxidative reactivity of the resulting soot. The second phase of this research was motivated by the findings from the first phase. In this phase, post-flame ethylene soot was produced from a laboratory co-flow laminar diffusion flame to better understand the mechanism by which the CO2 affects soot reactivity. This phase was accomplished by successfully isolating the dilution, thermal, and chemical effects of the CO2. The results showed that all of these effects account for a measurable increase in soot reactivity. Nevertheless, the thermal effect was found to be the most

  12. The monolithic lawn-like CuO-based nanorods array used for diesel soot combustion under gravitational contact mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yifu; Meng, Ming; Dai, Fangfang

    2013-01-01

    A simple and feasible contact mode called gravitational contact mode (GCM) was developed for the first time to imitate the practical state between soot and catalyst. By simulating rainwater adsorption on a lawn in nature, we synthesized a lawn-like CuO nanorods array, which exhibited rather good catalytic activity for diesel soot combustion under GCM. Moreover, the CuO nanorods array could serve as a support for composite catalysts through a sequential chemical bath deposition method and exhibited higher catalytic activity than a traditional supported catalyst. The monolithic macroscopic structure of such a catalyst shows its potential for large-scale preparation and application.A simple and feasible contact mode called gravitational contact mode (GCM) was developed for the first time to imitate the practical state between soot and catalyst. By simulating rainwater adsorption on a lawn in nature, we synthesized a lawn-like CuO nanorods array, which exhibited rather good catalytic activity for diesel soot combustion under GCM. Moreover, the CuO nanorods array could serve as a support for composite catalysts through a sequential chemical bath deposition method and exhibited higher catalytic activity than a traditional supported catalyst. The monolithic macroscopic structure of such a catalyst shows its potential for large-scale preparation and application. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The photo of mimic target and SEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33269h

  13. Investigation of a tripropylene-glycol monomethyl ether and diesel blend for soot-free combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.; Kurtz, Eric

    2015-12-31

    Natural luminosity and chemiluminescence imaging diagnostics were employed to investigate if a 50/50 blend by volume of tripropylene-glycol monomethyl ether (TPGME) and ultra-low sulfur #2 diesel certification fuel (CF) could enable leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC), a non-sooting mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with equivalence ratios below approximately 2. The experiments were performed in a singlecylinder heavy-duty optical compression-ignition engine at three injection pressures and three dilution levels. Results indicate that TPGME addition effectively eliminated engine-out smoke emissions by curtailing soot production and/or increasing soot oxidation during and after the end of fuel injection. TPGME greatly reduced soot luminosity when compared with neat CF, but did not enable LLFC because the equivalence ratios at the lift-off length, $\\phi$(H), never reached the non-sooting limit. Nevertheless, this study showed that TPGME addition has the potential to enable LLFC under different experimental conditions that would further decrease $\\phi$(H) to ~ 2 and below. Concerning other engine-out emissions, injection pressure influenced the effects of TPGME addition on NOx emissions. Finally, HC and CO emissions were higher compared to baseline fuel likely due to the lower net heat of combustion of TPGME and the need to limit fuel-injection duration for valid optical measurements.

  14. Investigation of a tripropylene-glycol monomethyl ether and diesel blend for soot-free combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.; Kurtz, Eric

    2015-12-31

    Natural luminosity and chemiluminescence imaging diagnostics were employed to investigate if a 50/50 blend by volume of tripropylene-glycol monomethyl ether (TPGME) and ultra-low sulfur #2 diesel certification fuel (CF) could enable leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC), a non-sooting mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with equivalence ratios below approximately 2. The experiments were performed in a singlecylinder heavy-duty optical compression-ignition engine at three injection pressures and three dilution levels. Results indicate that TPGME addition effectively eliminated engine-out smoke emissions by curtailing soot production and/or increasing soot oxidation during and after the end of fuel injection. TPGME greatly reduced soot luminosity when compared with neat CF, but did not enable LLFC because the equivalence ratios at the lift-off length,more » $$\\phi$$(H), never reached the non-sooting limit. Nevertheless, this study showed that TPGME addition has the potential to enable LLFC under different experimental conditions that would further decrease $$\\phi$$(H) to ~ 2 and below. Concerning other engine-out emissions, injection pressure influenced the effects of TPGME addition on NOx emissions. Finally, HC and CO emissions were higher compared to baseline fuel likely due to the lower net heat of combustion of TPGME and the need to limit fuel-injection duration for valid optical measurements.« less

  15. Atmospheric Chemistry Special Feature: Effect of intrinsic organic carbon on the optical properties of fresh diesel soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Gabriella; Abo Riziq, Ali; Erlick, Carynelisa; Rudich, Yinon

    2010-04-01

    This study focuses on the retrieval of the normalized mass absorption cross section (MAC) of soot using theoretical calculations that incorporate new measurements of the optical properties of organic carbon (OC) intrinsic to fresh diesel soot. Intrinsic OC was extracted by water and an organic solvent, and the complex refractive index of the extracted OC was derived at 532 and 355-nm wavelengths using cavity ring-down aerosol spectrometry. The extracted OC was found to absorb weakly in the visible wavelengths and moderately at blue wavelengths. The mass ratio of OC and elemental carbon (EC) in the collected particles was evaluated using a thermo-optical method. The measured EC/OC ratio in the soot exhibited substantial variability from measurement to measurement, ranging between 2 and 5. To test the sensitivity of the MAC to this variability, three different EC/OC ratios (2∶1, 1∶1, and 1∶2) were chosen as representative. Particle size and spherule morphology were estimated using scanning electron microscopy, and the soot was found to be primarily in the form of aggregates with a dominant aggregate diameter mode in the range 200-250 nm. The measured refractive index of the extracted OC was used with a variety of theoretical models to calculate the MAC of internally mixed diesel soot at 532 and 355 nm. We conclude that Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory on clusters of coated spherules and T-matrix of a solid EC spheroid coated by intrinsic OC are both consistent with previous measurements; however, Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory provides a more realistic physical model for the calculation

  16. Molecular Characterization of the Gas-Particle Interface of Soot Sampled from a Diesel Engine Using a Titration Method.

    PubMed

    Tapia, A; Salgado, M S; Martín, María Pilar; Lapuerta, M; Rodríguez-Fernández, J; Rossi, M J; Cabañas, B

    2016-03-15

    Surface functional groups of two different types of combustion aerosols, a conventional diesel (EN 590) and a hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) soot, have been investigated using heterogeneous chemistry (i.e., gas-particle surface reactions). A commercial sample of amorphous carbon (Printex XE2-B) was analyzed as a reference substrate. A Knudsen flow reactor was used to carry out the experiments under molecular flow conditions. The selected gases for the titration experiments were: N(CH3)3 for the identification of acidic sites, NH2OH for the presence of carbonyl groups, CF3COOH and HCl for basic sites of different strength, and O3 and NO2 for reducing groups. Reactivity with N(CH3)3 indicates a lower density of acidic functionalities for Printex XE2-B in relation to diesel and HVO soot. Results for NH2OH experiments indicates that commercial amorphous carbon exhibits a lower abundance of available carbonyl groups at the interface compared to the results from diesel and HVO soot, the latter being the one with the largest abundance of carbonyl functions. Reactions with acids indicate the presence of weak basic oxides on the particle surface that preferentially interact with the strong acid CF3COOH. Finally, reactions with O3 and NO2 reveal that diesel and especially HVO have a significantly higher reactivity with both oxidizers compared to that of Printex XE2-B because they have more reducing sites by roughly a factor of 10 and 30, respectively. The kinetics of titration reactions have also been investigated.

  17. On source identification and alteration of single diesel and wood smoke soot particles in the atmosphere; an X-ray microspectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, M G C; Mohr, M; Tzvetkov, G; Zelenay, V; Huthwelker, T; Kaegi, R; Gehrig, R; Grobéty, B

    2009-07-15

    Diesel and wood combustion are major sources of carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere. It is very hard to distinguish between the two sources by looking at soot particle morphology, but clear differences in the chemical structure of single particles are revealed by C(1s) NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) microspectroscopy. Soot from diesel combustion has a dominant spectral signature at approximately 285 eV from aromatic pi-bonds, whereas soot from wood combustion has the strongest signature at approximately 287 eV from phenolic carbon bonds. To investigate if it is possible to use these signatures for source apportionment purposes, we collected atmospheric samples with either diesel or wood combustion as a dominant particle source. No spectra obtained from the atmospheric particles completely matched the emission spectra. Especially particles from the wood dominated location underwent large modifications; the phenolic spectral signature at approximately 287 eV is greatly suppressed and surpassed by the peak attributed to the aromatic carbon groups at approximately 285 eV. Comparison with spectra from diesel soot samples experimentally aged with ozone show that very fast modification of the carbon structure of soot particles occurs as soon as they enter the atmosphere. Source attribution of single soot particles with microspectroscopy is thus hardly possible, but NEXAFS remains a powerful tool to study aging effects.

  18. 3-D simulation of soot formation in a direct-injection diesel engine based on a comprehensive chemical mechanism and method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bei-Jing; Dang, Shuai; Song, Ya-Na; Gong, Jing-Song

    2012-02-01

    Here, we propose both a comprehensive chemical mechanism and a reduced mechanism for a three-dimensional combustion simulation, describing the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in a direct-injection diesel engine. A soot model based on the reduced mechanism and a method of moments is also presented. The turbulent diffusion flame and PAH formation in the diesel engine were modelled using the reduced mechanism based on the detailed mechanism using a fixed wall temperature as a boundary condition. The spatial distribution of PAH concentrations and the characteristic parameters for soot formation in the engine cylinder were obtained by coupling a detailed chemical kinetic model with the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model. Comparison of the simulated results with limited experimental data shows that the chemical mechanisms and soot model are realistic and correctly describe the basic physics of diesel combustion but require further development to improve their accuracy.

  19. Impact of Ferrocene on the Structure of Diesel Exhaust Soot as Probed with Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering and C(1s) NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun,A.; Huggins, F.; Kelly, K.; Mun, B.; Ehrlich, S.; Huffman, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the structure of a set of diesel exhaust samples that were obtained from reference diesel fuel and diesel fuel mixed with ferrocene. Characterization was carried out with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (C(1s) NEXAFS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The reference diesel soot shows a pronounced graphite-like microstructure and molecular structure, with a strong (0 0 2) graphite Bragg reflex and a strong aromatic C{double_bond}C resonance at 285 eV. The mineral matter in the reference soot could be identified as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hematite. The soot specimen from the diesel mixed with ferrocene has an entirely different structure and lacks significantly in graphite-like characteristics. NEXAFS spectra of such soot barely show aromatics but pronounced contributions from aliphatic structures. WAXS patterns show almost no intensity at the Bragg (0 0 2) reflection of graphite, but a strong aliphatic {gamma}-side band. The iron from the ferrocene transforms to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} maghemite.

  20. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions, with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in BC and OA emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. Cycloalkanes predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. The presence of trace elements in vehicle exhaust raises the concern that ash deposits may accumulate over time in diesel particle filter systems, and may eventually lead to performance problems that require servicing.

  1. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions (N = 293), with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. OA mass spectra measured for HD truck exhaust plumes show cycloalkanes are predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in OA and BC emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. This finding indicates a large fraction of OA in gasoline exhaust is lubricant-derived as well. The similarity in OA and BC mass spectra for gasoline and diesel engine exhaust is likely to confound ambient source apportionment efforts to determine contributions to air pollution from these two important sources.

  2. Combined Catalyzed Soot Filter and SCR Catalyst System for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R.M.

    2000-08-20

    Substantially reduces particulate emission for diesel vehicles Up to 90% effective against carbonaceous particulate matter Significantly reduces CO and HC Filter regenerates at normal diesel operation temperatures Removable design for easy cleaning and maintenance.

  3. The use of heterogeneous chemistry for the characterization of functional groups at the gas/particle interface of soot from a diesel engine at a particular running condition.

    PubMed

    Tapia, A; Salgado, M S; Martín, M P; Sánchez-Valdepeñas, J; Rossi, M J; Cabañas, B

    2015-04-01

    Two gases, O3 and NO2, were selected to probe the surface of a diesel fuel combustion aerosol sample, diesel soot, and amorphous carbon nanoparticles (PRINTEX XE2-B) using heterogeneous (i.e., gas-surface reactions). The gas uptake to saturation of the probes was measured under molecular flow conditions using a Knudsen flow reactor in order to quantify and characterize surface functional groups. Specifically, O3 and NO2 are used for the titration of oxidizable groups. Diesel soot samples interacted with the probe gases to various extents which points to the coexistence of different functional groups on the same aerosol surface such as reduced groups. The carbonaceous particles displayed significant differences: PRINTEX XE2-B amorphous carbon had a significantly lower surface functional group density of both total and strongly reducing groups despite its significantly larger internal surface area, compared to diesel soot. The uptake kinetics of the gas-phase probe molecules (uptake probabilities) were also measured in order to obtain further information on the reactivity of emitted soot aerosols in order to enable the potential prediction of health effects.

  4. An In-Cylinder Study of Soot and NO in a DI Diesel Engine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Litzinger, T.A.

    1995-10-18

    Clearly the reduction of NOx and particulate emissions remains a major challenge to Diesel engine manufacturers due to increasingly stringent emission standards in the US and other countries. The well documented NOx/particulate trade-off observed in Diesel engines makes the simultaneous reduction of both emissions particularly difficult for manufacturers to achieve. In an effort to provide an improved understanding of the fundamental processes which result in this trade-off, a program was carried out at Penn State to develop the appropriate engine facilities and laser diagnostics to permit in-cylinder studies of Diesel combustion and emissions production with the support of the Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Technology Division . This work has also been supported by the Cummins Engine Company, Lubrizol Corporation and the National Science Foundation. An optically accessible, direct injection, Diesel engine was constructed for these studies. The major objective of the, design of the engine was to maximize optical access under conditions representative of Diesel engine combustion in small bore, commercial engines. Intake air is preheated and boosted in pressure to make the in-cylinder conditions of heat release and pressure as realistic as possible. Another important objective of the design was flexibility in combustion chamber geometry to permit a variety of head and bowl geometries to be studied. In all the results reported in this report a square bowl was used to simplify the introduction of laser light sheets into the engine.

  5. Influence of turbulence-chemistry interaction for n-heptane spray combustion under diesel engine conditions with emphasis on soot formation and oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolla, Michele; Farrace, Daniele; Wright, Yuri M.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) for n-heptane sprays under diesel engine conditions has been investigated by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The conditional moment closure approach, which has been previously validated thoroughly for such flows, and the homogeneous reactor (i.e. no turbulent combustion model) approach have been compared, in view of the recent resurgence of the latter approaches for diesel engine CFD. Experimental data available from a constant-volume combustion chamber have been used for model validation purposes for a broad range of conditions including variations in ambient oxygen (8-21% by vol.), ambient temperature (900 and 1000 K) and ambient density (14.8 and 30 kg/m3). The results from both numerical approaches have been compared to the experimental values of ignition delay (ID), flame lift-off length (LOL), and soot volume fraction distributions. TCI was found to have a weak influence on ignition delay for the conditions simulated, attributed to the low values of the scalar dissipation relative to the critical value above which auto-ignition does not occur. In contrast, the flame LOL was considerably affected, in particular at low oxygen concentrations. Quasi-steady soot formation was similar; however, pronounced differences in soot oxidation behaviour are reported. The differences were further emphasised for a case with short injection duration: in such conditions, TCI was found to play a major role concerning the soot oxidation behaviour because of the importance of soot-oxidiser structure in mixture fraction space. Neglecting TCI leads to a strong over-estimation of soot oxidation after the end of injection. The results suggest that for some engines, and for some phenomena, the neglect of turbulent fluctuations may lead to predictions of acceptable engineering accuracy, but that a proper turbulent combustion model is needed for more reliable results.

  6. Using Carbon-14 Isotope Tracing to Investigate Molecular Structure Effects of the Oxygenate Dibutyl Maleate on Soot Emissions from a DI Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Upatnieks, A; Martin, G C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2004-01-07

    The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot emissions from a DI diesel engine was examined using carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) isotope tracing. Carbon atoms in three distinct chemical structures within the diesel oxygenate dibutyl maleate (DBM) were labeled with {sup 14}C. The {sup 14}C from the labeled DBM was then detected in engine-out particulate matter (PM), in-cylinder deposits, and CO{sub 2} emissions using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The results indicate that molecular structure plays an important role in determining whether a specific carbon atom either does or does not form soot. Chemical-kinetic modeling results indicate that structures that produce CO{sub 2} directly from the fuel are less effective at reducing soot than structures that produce CO before producing CO{sub 2}. Because they can follow individual carbon atoms through a real combustion process, {sup 14}C isotope tracing studies help strengthen the connection between actual engine emissions and chemical-kinetic models of combustion and soot formation/oxidation processes.

  7. Infrared measurements of soot formation and droplet sizes in diesel sprays. Final report, June 6, 1987--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, T.E.; Morency, J.R.; Foutter, R.R.; Rawlins, W.T.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes an investigation of diesel sprays using a combination of infrared wavelength optical diagnostics to probe the high droplet number density region surrounding the injector tip. Infrared wavelengths were shown to be more effective than visible or ultraviolet wavelength light at penetrating this region of the spray. This success is easily explained by the decrease in optical cross section of small diameter drops (less than 10 {mu}m) for a wavelength shift from the visible to wavelengths near 10 {mu}m. Two types of diagnostics were implemented. First, a custom manufactured, high speed infrared spectrometer was used to monitor the spectral region between 6 and 12 {mu}m in 0.5 {mu}m intervals. Spectra from this instrument, for specific locations in the combusting spray were used to monitor the development of soot in the spray. The second diagnostic technique used three collinear laser beams focussed into a 0.25 mm beam to monitor the droplet size in the spray. This measurement uses a ratio of signals to remove the droplet number density as a variable and the observed signal ratio is a direct indication of the average (using an approximate radius to the fourth power weighting function) droplet size. The experiments were performed using a shock tube to simulate the conditions typical of diesel combustion (700 to 900 K in temperature and approximately 3.0 MPa in pressure) and a custom manufactured single shot fuel injection system. Optical access in the shock tube included visible and infrared transmissive windows arranged to provide orthogonal access in two directions and perpendicular to the spray axis. The fuel injection system for this work was configured to produce approximately 20 MPa of injection pressure and produced a single injection approximately 2 ms after the injection trigger. This system could therefore be controlled to inject into the quiescent reflected region of the shock tube after the incident shock reflection from the end wall.

  8. Toxicological characterization of diesel engine emissions using biodiesel and a closed soot filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooter, Ingeborg M.; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Jedynska, Aleksandra D.; Tromp, Peter C.; Houtzager, Marc M. G.; Verbeek, Ruud P.; Kadijk, Gerrit; Mulderij, Mariska; Krul, Cyrille A. M.

    2011-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the toxicity (oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity) in extracts of combustion aerosols. A typical Euro III heavy truck engine was tested over the European Transient Cycle with three different fuels: conventional diesel EN590, biodiesel EN14214 as B100 and blends with conventional diesel (B5, B10, and B20) and pure plant oil DIN51605 (PPO). In addition application of a (wall flow) diesel particulate filter (DPF) with conventional diesel EN590 was tested. The use of B100 or PPO as a fuel or the DPF reduced particulate matter (PM) mass and numbers over 80%. Similarly, significant reduction in the emission of chemical constituents (EC 90%, (oxy)-PAH 70%) were achieved. No significant changes in nitro-PAH were observed. The use of B100 or PPO led to a NOx increase of about 30%, and no increase for DPF application. The effects of B100, PPO and the DPF on the biological test results vary strongly from positive to negative depending on the biological end point. The oxidative potential, measured via the DTT assay, of the B100 and PPO or DPF emissions is reduced by 95%. The cytotoxicity is increased for B100 by 200%. The measured mutagenicity, using the Ames assay test with TA98 and YG1024 strains of Salmonella typhimurium indicate a dose response for the nitroarene sensitive YG1024 strain for B100 and PPO (fold induction: 1.6). In summary B100 and PPO have good potential for the use as a second generation biofuel resulting in lower PM mass, similar to application of a DPF, but caution should be made due to potential increased toxicity. Besides regulation via mass, the biological reactivity of exhaust emissions of new (bio)fuels and application of new technologies, needs attention. The different responses of different biological tests as well as differences in results between test laboratories underline the need for harmonization of test methods and international cooperation.

  9. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals. PMID:26177695

  10. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-07-16

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals.

  11. Evaluation and optimisation of phenomenological multi-step soot model for spray combustion under diesel engine-like operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Jangi, Mehdi; Bai, Xue-Song; Schramm, Jesper

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics study is reported of an n-heptane combustion event and the associated soot formation process in a constant volume combustion chamber. The key interest here is to evaluate the sensitivity of the chemical kinetics and submodels of a semi-empirical soot model in predicting the associated events. Numerical computation is performed using an open-source code and a chemistry coordinate mapping approach is used to expedite the calculation. A library consisting of various phenomenological multi-step soot models is constructed and integrated with the spray combustion solver. Prior to the soot modelling, combustion simulations are carried out. Numerical results show that the ignition delay times and lift-off lengths exhibit good agreement with the experimental measurements across a wide range of operating conditions, apart from those in the cases with ambient temperature lower than 850 K. The variation of the soot precursor production with respect to the change of ambient oxygen levels qualitatively agrees with that of the conceptual models when the skeletal n-heptane mechanism is integrated with a reduced pyrene chemistry. Subsequently, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis is carried out to appraise the existing soot formation and oxidation submodels. It is revealed that the soot formation is captured when the surface growth rate is calculated using a square root function of the soot specific surface area and when a pressure-dependent model constant is considered. An optimised soot model is then proposed based on the knowledge gained through this exercise. With the implementation of optimised model, the simulated soot onset and transport phenomena before reaching quasi-steady state agree reasonably well with the experimental observation. Also, variation of spatial soot distribution and soot mass produced at oxygen molar fractions ranging from 10.0 to 21.0% for both low and high density conditions are reproduced.

  12. Bilateral vagotomy or atropine pre-treatment reduces experimental diesel-soot induced lung inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, D.S. . E-mail: D.S.McQueen@ed.ac.uk; Donaldson, K.; McNeilly, J.D.; Barton, N.J.; Duffin, R.

    2007-02-15

    To investigate the role of the vagus nerve in acute inflammatory and cardiorespiratory responses to diesel particulate (DP) in the rat airway, we measured changes in respiration, blood pressure and neutrophils in lungs of urethane anesthetized Wistar rats 6-h post-instillation of DP (500 {mu}g) and studied the effect of mid-cervical vagotomy or atropine (1 mg kg{sup -1}) pre-treatment. In conscious rats, we investigated DP, with and without atropine pre-treatment. DP increased neutrophil level in BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) fluid from intact anesthetized rats to 2.5 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8), compared with saline instillation (0.3 {+-} 0.1 x 10{sup 6}, n = 7; P < 0.05). Vagotomy reduced DP neutrophilia to 0.8 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8; P < 0.05 vs. intact); atropine reduced DP-induced neutrophilia to 0.3 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} (n = 4; P < 0.05). In conscious rats, DP neutrophilia of 8.5 {+-} 1.8 x 10{sup 6}, n = 4, was reduced by pre-treatment with atropine to 2.2 {+-} 1.2 x 10{sup 6} cells, n = 3. Hyperventilation occurred 6 h after DP in anesthetized rats with intact vagi, but not in bilaterally vagotomized or atropine pre-treated animals and was abolished by vagotomy (P < 0.05, paired test). There were no significant differences in the other variables (mean blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate variability) measured before and 360 min after DP. In conclusion, DP activates a pro-inflammatory vago-vagal reflex which is reduced by atropine. Muscarinic ACh receptors in the rat lung are involved in DP-induced neutrophilia, and hence muscarinic antagonists may reduce airway and/or cardiovascular inflammation evoked by inhaled atmospheric DP in susceptible individuals.

  13. Soot Imaging and Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Soot, sometimes referred to as smoke, is made up primarily of the carbon particles generated by most combustion processes. For example, large quantities of soot can be seen issuing from the exhaust pipes of diesel-powered vehicles. Heated soot also is responsible for the warm orange color of candle flames, though that soot is generally consumed before it can exit the flame. Research has suggested that heavy atmospheric soot concentrations aggravate conditions such as pneumonia and asthma, causing many deaths each year. To understand the formation and oxidation of soot, NASA Lewis Research Center scientists, together with several university investigators, are investigating the properties of soot generated in reduced gravity, where the absence of buoyancy allows more time for the particles to grow. The increased time allows researchers to better study the life cycle of these particles, with the hope that increased understanding will lead to better control strategies. To quantify the amount of soot present in a flame, Lewis scientists developed a unique imaging technique that provides quantitative and qualitative soot data over a large field of view. There is significant improvement over the single-point methods normally used. The technique is shown in the sketch, where light from a laser is expanded with a microscope objective, rendered parallel, and passed through a flame where soot particles reduce the amount of light transmitted to the camera. A filter only allows light at the wavelength of the laser to pass to the camera, preventing any extraneous signals. When images of the laser light with and without the flame are compared, a quantitative map of the soot concentration is produced. In addition to that data, a qualitative image of the soot in the flame is also generated, an example of which is displayed in the photo. This technique has the potential to be adapted to real-time process control in industrial powerplants.

  14. Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Peng; Vander Wal, Randy; Boehman, Andre L.; Toops, Todd J.; Daw, C. Stuart; Sun, Chenxi; Lapuerta, Magin; Agudelo, John

    2014-12-26

    The effect of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the morphology of exhaust particulate agglomerates and the nanostructure of primary particles (soot) was investigated with a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The engine was operated at steady state on a dynamometer running at moderate speed with both low (30%) and medium–high (60%) fixed loads, and exhaust particulate was sampled for analysis. Ultra-low sulfur diesel and its 20% v/v blends with soybean methyl ester biodiesel were used. Fuel injection occurred in a single event around top dead center at three different injection pressures. Exhaust particulate samples were characterized with TEM imaging, scanning mobility particle sizing, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and XRD analysis. Particulate morphology and oxidative reactivity were found to vary significantly with rail pressure and with biodiesel blend level. Higher biodiesel content led to increases in the primary particle size and oxidative reactivity but did not affect nanoscale disorder in the as-received samples. For particulates generated with higher injection pressures, the initial oxidative reactivity increased, but there was no detectable correlation with primary particle size or nanoscale disorder.

  15. Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Peng; Vander Wal, Randy; Boehman, Andre L.; ...

    2014-12-26

    The effect of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the morphology of exhaust particulate agglomerates and the nanostructure of primary particles (soot) was investigated with a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The engine was operated at steady state on a dynamometer running at moderate speed with both low (30%) and medium–high (60%) fixed loads, and exhaust particulate was sampled for analysis. Ultra-low sulfur diesel and its 20% v/v blends with soybean methyl ester biodiesel were used. Fuel injection occurred in a single event around top dead center at three different injection pressures. Exhaust particulate samples were characterized with TEMmore » imaging, scanning mobility particle sizing, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and XRD analysis. Particulate morphology and oxidative reactivity were found to vary significantly with rail pressure and with biodiesel blend level. Higher biodiesel content led to increases in the primary particle size and oxidative reactivity but did not affect nanoscale disorder in the as-received samples. For particulates generated with higher injection pressures, the initial oxidative reactivity increased, but there was no detectable correlation with primary particle size or nanoscale disorder.« less

  16. VALIDATION AND RESULTS OF A PSEUDO-MULTI-ZONE COMBUSTION TRAJECTORY PREDICTION MODEL FOR CAPTURING SOOT AND NOX FORMATION ON A MEDIUM DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Bittle, Joshua A.; Gao, Zhiming; Jacobs, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    A pseudo-multi-zone phenomenological model has been created with the ultimate goal of supporting efforts to enable broader commercialization of low temperature combustion modes in diesel engines. The benefits of low temperature combustion are the simultaneous reduction in soot and nitric oxide emissions and increased engine efficiency if combustion is properly controlled. Determining what qualifies as low temperature combustion for any given engine can be difficult without expensive emissions analysis equipment. This determination can be made off-line using computer models or through factory calibration procedures. This process could potentially be simplified if a real-time prediction model could be implemented to run for any engine platform this is the motivation for this study. The major benefit of this model is the ability for it to predict the combustion trajectory, i.e. local temperature and equivalence ratio in the burning zones. The model successfully captures all the expected trends based on the experimental data and even highlights an opportunity for simply using the average reaction temperature and equivalence ratio as an indicator of emissions levels alone - without solving formation sub-models. This general type of modeling effort is not new, but a major effort was made to minimize the calculation duration to enable implementation as an input to real-time next-cycle engine controller Instead of simply using the predicted engine out soot and NOx levels, control decisions could be made based on the trajectory. This has the potential to save large amounts of calibration time because with minor tuning (the model has only one automatically determined constant) it is hoped that the control algorithm would be generally applicable.

  17. Examination of the oxidation behavior of biodiesel soot

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Juhun; Alam, Mahabubul; Boehman, Andre L.; Kim, Unjeong

    2006-09-15

    In this work, we expand upon past work relating the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of soot. This work shows that the initial structure alone does not dictate the reactivity of diesel soot and rather the initial oxygen groups have a strong influence on the oxidation rate. A comparison of the complete oxidation behavior and burning mode was made to address the mechanism by which biodiesel soot enhances oxidation. Diesel soot derived from neat biodiesel (B100) is far more reactive during oxidation than soot from neat Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel (FT100). B100 soot undergoes a unique oxidation process leading to capsule-type oxidation and eventual formation of graphene ribbon structures. The results presented here demonstrate the importance of initial properties of the soot, which lead to differences in burning mode. Incorporation of greater surface oxygen functionality in the B100 soot provides the means for more rapid oxidation and drastic structural transformation during the oxidation process. (author)

  18. Comparison of hot Soxhlet and accelerated solvent extractions with microwave and supercritical fluid extractions for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated derivatives strongly adsorbed on soot collected inside a diesel particulate filter.

    PubMed

    Oukebdane, K; Portet-Koltalo, F; Machour, N; Dionnet, F; Desbène, P L

    2010-06-30

    Several methods of extraction were optimized to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), their nitrated derivatives and heavy n-alkanes from a highly adsorptive particulate matter resulting from the combustion of diesel fuel in a diesel engine. This particular carbonaceous particulate matter, collected at high temperatures in cordierite diesel particulate filters (DPF), which are optimized for removing diesel particles from diesel engine exhaust emissions, appeared extremely refractory to extractions using the classical extracting conditions for these pollutants. In particular, the method of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) is described in detail here. Optimization was performed through experimental design to understand the impact of each factor studied and the factors' possible interactions on the recovery yields. The conventional extraction technique, i.e., Soxhlet extraction, was also carried out, but the lack of quantitative extractions led us to use a more effective approach: hot Soxhlet. It appeared that the extraction of the heaviest PAHs and nitroPAHs by either the optimized ASE or hot Soxhlet processes was far from complete. To enhance recovery yields, we tested original solvent mixtures of aromatic and heteroaromatic solvents. Thereafter, these two extraction techniques were compared to microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). In every case, the only solvent mixture that permitted quantitative extraction of the heaviest PAHs from the diesel soot was composed of pyridine and diethylamine, which has a strong electron-donor character. Conversely, the extraction of the nitrated PAHs was significantly improved by the use of an electron-acceptor solvent or by introducing a small amount of acetic acid into the pyridine. It was demonstrated that, for many desirable features, no single extraction technique stound out as the best: ASE, MAE or SFE could all challenge hot Soxhlet for favourable extractions

  19. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  20. Liquid Cloud Responses to Soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Although soot absorption warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its effects on liquid clouds, including contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and semi-direct effects. Six global models that include aerosol microphysical schemes conducted three soot experiments. The average model cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.12 Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct atmospheric warming. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon only experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because the soot provided a deposition sink for sulfate, decreasing formation of more viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models < ±0.06 Wm-2 from clouds. The net semi-direct effect alone may also be negative in global models, as found by several previous studies. The soot-cloud effects are quite uncertain. The range of model responses was large and interrannual variability for each model can also be large. Furthermore the aerosol microphysical schemes are poorly constrained, and the non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes. However, results so far suggest that soot-induced cloud-cooling effects are comparable in magnitude to the direct warming effects from soot absorption.

  1. Kinetics of soot oxidation by NO2.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Manish; Nguyen, Anh; Zheng, Zhongqing; Wu, Hao-Wei; Jung, Heejung S

    2010-06-15

    Modern technologies use NO(2) to promote low-temperature soot oxidation for diesel particulate filter regeneration. In this study, the online aerosol technique of high-temperature oxidation tandem differential mobility analysis is used to study kinetics of soot oxidation by NO(2). Soot particles are exposed to varying temperature and NO(2) mixing ratio inside the furnace resulting from thermal decomposition of NO(2) to NO. This causes soot oxidation rates to vary throughout the furnace. Variations in temperatures and NO(2) mixing ratio are thoroughly accounted for the first time. Soot oxidation rates are calculated as a function of frequency factor A(soot), activation energy E(soot), and concentration of NO(2) within the furnace at temperatures ranging from 500 to 950 degrees C. Results suggest A(soot) and E(soot) values for soot oxidation of 2.4 x 10(-14) (nm K(-0.5) s(-1) cm(3) molecule(-1)) and 47.1 kJ mol(-1), respectively, when reaction order to NO(2) is assumed as unity. The activation energy for soot oxidation with NO(2) is significantly lower than oxidation with air. However, parts per million levels of NO(2) cause soot oxidation at low temperatures suggesting NO(2) is a stronger oxidant than O(2).

  2. Catalytic evaluation of promoted CeO2-ZrO2 by transition, alkali, and alkaline-earth metal oxides for diesel soot oxidation.

    PubMed

    Alinezhadchamazketi, Ali; Khodadadi, Abas Ali; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Nemati, Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    Series of mixed metal oxides were synthesized by gel-combustion method and their catalytic activities for soot oxidation were investigated. The catalysts were M-Ce-Zr (M = Mn, Cu, Fe, K, Ba, Sr), and xK-20Mn-Ce-Zr (x = 0, 5, 10, 20), they were characterized by XRD, SEM, TPR and BET surface area techniques. The results of soot temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) in an O2 oxidizing atmosphere indicate that K-Ce-Zr has the highest catalytic activity for soot oxidation under loose contact condition, due to enhancement of the soot and catalyst contacts. On the other hand, under a tight contact condition, Mn-Ce-Zr and Cu-Ce-Zr nano-composites have high activities for soot oxidation and lower the soot TPO peak temperatures by about 280 and 270 degrees C, respectively, as compared to non-catalytic soot oxidation. Furthermore, the addition of up to 10 wt.% potassium oxides into Mn-Ce-Zr increases its catalytic activity and further reduces the soot TPO peak temperature by about 40 degrees C under loose contact condition.

  3. Kinetics of soot oxidation by NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Zheng, Zhongqing; Wu, Hao-Wei; Jung, Hee-Jung

    2010-06-15

    Modern technologies use NO2 to promote low temperature soot oxidation for diesel particulate filter regeneration. Most previous methods studied soot oxidation with NO2 using offline methods such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). In this study, the online aerosol-technique of high-temperature oxidation tandem differential mobility analysis (HTO-TDMA) is used to study kinetics of soot oxidation with NO2 under N2 environment. This method has significant advantages over previous offline methods in reducing heat and mass transfer diffusion limitations to the soot surface. Soot particles are exposed to varying temperature and NO2 concentration inside the furnace resulting from thermal decomposition of NO2 to NO. This causes soot oxidation rates to vary throughout the furnace. In this study, variations in temperatures, NO2 concentrations and particle residence times are thoroughly accounted for the first time, and soot oxidation rates are derived. Soot oxidation rate is calculated as a function of Arrhenius rate constant Asoot, activation energy Esoot, and partial pressure of NO2 PNO2 within the furnace at temperatures ranging 500- 950 C. Results suggest Asoot and Esoot values for soot oxidation with NO2 of 1.68 nm K-0.5 s-1 (Nm-2)-n and 46.5 kJ mol-1 respectively. The activation energy for soot oxidation with NO2 is significantly lower than oxidation with air. However, ppm levels of NO2 cause soot oxidation at low temperatures suggesting NO2 is a stronger oxidant than O2. This study also shows that a semi-empirical approach with just a few kinetic parameters could represent varying soot oxidation rates in a diesel engine cylinder or on a diesel particulate filter. Further studies should be directed towards understanding synergistic effects of other oxidants as O2 and H2O in addition to NO2 using the HTO-TDMA method.

  4. Particulate morphology of waste cooking oil biodiesel and diesel in a heavy duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Joonsik; Jung, Yongjin; Bae, Choongsik

    2014-08-01

    The effect of biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil (WCO) on the particulate matters (PM) of a direct injection (DI) diesel engine was experimentally investigated and compared with commercial diesel fuel. Soot agglomerates were collected with a thermophoretic sampling device installed in the exhaust pipe of the engine. The morphology of soot particles was analyzed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The elemental and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were also conducted to study chemical composition of soot particles. Based on the TEM images, it was revealed that the soot derived from WCO biodiesel has a highly graphitic shell-core arrangement compared to diesel soot. The mean size was measured from averaging 400 primary particles for WCO biodiesel and diesel respectively. The values for WCO biodiesel indicated 19.9 nm which was smaller than diesel's 23.7 nm. From the TGA results, WCO biodiesel showed faster oxidation process. While the oxidation of soot particles from diesel continued until 660°C, WCO biodiesel soot oxidation terminated at 560°C. Elemental analysis results showed that the diesel soot was mainly composed of carbon and hydrogen. On the other hand, WCO biodiesel soot contained high amount of oxygen species.

  5. Conductometric Sensor for Soot Mass Flow Detection in Exhausts of Internal Combustion Engines.

    PubMed

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Müller, Andreas; Schott, Andreas; Zöllner, Christian; Brüggemann, Dieter; Moos, Ralf

    2015-11-13

    Soot sensors are required for on-board diagnostics (OBD) of automotive diesel particulate filters (DPF) to detect filter failures. Widely used for this purpose are conductometric sensors, measuring an electrical current or resistance between two electrodes. Soot particles deposit on the electrodes, which leads to an increase in current or decrease in resistance. If installed upstream of a DPF, the "engine-out" soot emissions can also be determined directly by soot sensors. Sensors were characterized in diesel engine real exhausts under varying operation conditions and with two different kinds of diesel fuel. The sensor signal was correlated to the actual soot mass and particle number, measured with an SMPS. Sensor data and soot analytics (SMPS) agreed very well, an impressing linear correlation in a double logarithmic representation was found. This behavior was even independent of the used engine settings or of the biodiesel content.

  6. Conductometric Sensor for Soot Mass Flow Detection in Exhausts of Internal Combustion Engines

    PubMed Central

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Müller, Andreas; Schott, Andreas; Zöllner, Christian; Brüggemann, Dieter; Moos, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Soot sensors are required for on-board diagnostics (OBD) of automotive diesel particulate filters (DPF) to detect filter failures. Widely used for this purpose are conductometric sensors, measuring an electrical current or resistance between two electrodes. Soot particles deposit on the electrodes, which leads to an increase in current or decrease in resistance. If installed upstream of a DPF, the “engine-out” soot emissions can also be determined directly by soot sensors. Sensors were characterized in diesel engine real exhausts under varying operation conditions and with two different kinds of diesel fuel. The sensor signal was correlated to the actual soot mass and particle number, measured with an SMPS. Sensor data and soot analytics (SMPS) agreed very well, an impressing linear correlation in a double logarithmic representation was found. This behavior was even independent of the used engine settings or of the biodiesel content. PMID:26580621

  7. Diesel particulate emission control without engine modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Filowitz, M.S.; Vataru, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an ashless, fuel supplement which was found to typically reduce diesel particulate emissions by over 30% while significantly improving fuel economy and power output without any modifications to existing diesel engines or fuels. The treating cost is an order of magnitude less than the estimated cost of reducing aromatic content at the refinery to achieve particulate reductions. The particulate reduction is virtually all from the carbon (soot) fraction. The reduced soot formation translates into less abrasives and less soot-loading stress on the engine oil. Diesel tests conducted are also discussed.

  8. Soot Optical Property Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aung, K. T.; Hassan, M. I.; Krishnan, S. S.; Lin, K.-C.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent past studies of soot reaction processes in laminar premixed and nonpremixed flames generally have used the intrusive technique of thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to observe soot structure and obtain important fundamental information about soot particle properties, such as soot primary particle diameters, the rate of change of soot primary particle diameter as a function of time (or rate of soot surface growth or oxidation), the amount of soot particle reactive surface area per unit volume, the number of primary soot particles per unit volume, and the rate of formation of primary soot particles (or the rate of soot primary particle nucleation). Given the soot volume per unit volume of the flame (or the soot volume fraction), all these properties are readily found from a measurement of the soot primary particle diameter (which usually is nearly a constant for each location within a laminar flame). This approach is not possible within freely propagating flames, however, because soot properties at given positions in such flames vary relatively rapidly as a function of time in the soot formation and oxidation regions compared to the relatively lengthy sampling times needed to accumulate adequate soot samples and to minimize effects of soot collected on the sampling grid as it moves to and from the sampling position through other portions of the flame. Thus, nonintrusive optical methods must be used to find the soot primary particle diameters needed to define the soot surface reaction properties mentioned earlier. Unfortunately, approximate nonintrusive methods used during early studies of soot reaction properties in flames, found from laser scattering and absorption measurements analyzed assuming either Rayleigh scattering or Mie scattering from polydisperse effective soot particles having the same mass of soot as individual soot aggregates, have not been found to be an effective way to estimate the soot surface

  9. Airborne concentrations of PM(2.5) and diesel exhaust particles on Harlem sidewalks: a community-based pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kinney, P L; Aggarwal, M; Northridge, M E; Janssen, N A; Shepard, P

    2000-03-01

    Residents of the dense urban core neighborhoods of New York City (NYC) have expressed increasing concern about the potential human health impacts of diesel vehicle emissions. We measured concentrations of particulate matter [less than/equal to] 2.5 micro in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on sidewalks in Harlem, NYC, and tested whether spatial variations in concentrations were related to local diesel traffic density. Eight-hour (1000-1800 hr) air samples for PM(2.5 )and elemental carbon (EC) were collected for 5 days in July 1996 on sidewalks adjacent to four geographically distinct Harlem intersections. Samples were taken using portable monitors worn by study staff. Simultaneous traffic counts for diesel trucks, buses, cars, and pedestrians were carried out at each intersection on [Greater/equal to] 2 of the 5 sampling days. Eight-hour diesel vehicle counts ranged from 61 to 2,467 across the four sites. Mean concentrations of PM(2.5) exhibited only modest site-to-site variation (37-47 microg/m(3)), reflecting the importance of broader regional sources of PM(2.5). In contrast, EC concentrations varied 4-fold across sites (from 1.5 to 6 microg/m(3)), and were associated with bus and truck counts on adjacent streets and, at one site, with the presence of a bus depot. A high correlation (r = 0.95) was observed between EC concentrations measured analytically and a blackness measurement based on PM(2.5) filter reflectance, suggesting the utility of the latter as a surrogate measure of DEP in future community-based studies. These results show that local diesel sources in Harlem create spatial variations in sidewalk concentrations of DEP. The study also demonstrates the feasibility of a new paradigm for community-based research involving full and active partnership between academic scientists and community-based organizations.

  10. Biomass burning layers measured with an airborne Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimerl, K.; Weinzierl, B.; Minikin, A.; Sauer, D. N.; Fütterer, D.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Fahey, D. W.; Huntrieser, H.

    2013-12-01

    The 2012 wildfire season in the U.S. was one of the worst in the past decade. Coinciding with the period of intense wildfires in the western U.S., the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June of 2012. Although the main goal of this experiment was to characterize chemical processes in and around thunderstorms, biomass burning plumes from wildfires were also measured during almost every flight. Measurements were performed with three different research aircraft (NCAR GV, NASA DC8 and DLR Falcon 20E), accompanied by ground based measurements with radars and radiosondes, and measurements of meteorological parameters and lightning. The instrumentation aboard the DLR Falcon included measurements of the trace gases NO, CO, O3, CO2, CH4, SO2, volatile organic compounds, and a variety of aerosol microphysical parameters. To cover a wide range of aerosol particle sizes, the DLR Falcon payload included optical particle counters (UHSAS-A, FSSP-300, FSSP-100, PCASP-100X/SPP-200 and Sky-OPC 1.129), a multi-channel CPC system for measuring total and non-volatile particle concentrations and, for absorbing particles, a three-wavelength PSAP and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We will focus on the latter in this presentation. The SP2 measures both the mass of refractory black carbon (rBC) particles as well as their optical size, providing information about the mixing state of particles in the biomass burning layers. Most biomass burning layers were found between 3 and 8 km altitude. We will discuss measurements of plumes originating from New Mexico wildfires (Little Bear wildfire on June 11th of 2012 and Whitewater-Baldy wildfire on May 29th and 30th of 2012). Peaks of the rBC mass concentration in the plumes were as high as 2μg/m3, the fraction of rBC particles with thick coatings was higher than what is usually found in the boundary layer. During the Falcon transfer flights from Germany to the U.S. and back

  11. PORE STRUCTURE OF SOOT DEPOSITS FROM SEVERAL COMBUSTION SOURCES. (R825303)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Soot was harvested from five combustion sources: a dodecane flame, marine and bus diesel engines, a wood stove, and an oil furnace. The soots ranged from 20% to 90% carbon by weight and molar C/H ratios from 1 to 7, the latter suggesting a highly condensed aro...

  12. Soot oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Oxidation of soot by corona plasma was investigated at conditions of exhaust gases from diesel engines, both in the absence and presence of CoOx as a catalyst. The CoOx catalyst nanoparticles were synthesized by a precipitation method. The BET surface area of the catalyst was 50 m2/g, corresponding to 23 nm particles. An aluminum grid was sequentially dip-coated for several times by suspensions of the soot in toluene and/or fine catalyst powder in DI water. The grid was used as the plate of a pin-to-plate corona reactor. Air at 180 °C was passed through the corona reactor to oxidize the soot, oxidation products of which were analyzed by both gas chromatograph and FTIR with a gas cell. Soot oxidation rate linearly increased with an increase of input energy. When the soot was deposited on a layer of the CoOx catalyst, the soot oxidation rate increased up to 2 times. The only product of the plasma (catalytic) oxidation of soot was CO2 determined by FTIR. O produced in the plasma discharge oxidized the soot and the active surface oxygen enhanced its rate.

  13. Development and Characterization of Laser-Induced Incandescence Towards Nanoparticle (Soot) Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2000-01-01

    The production of particulates, notably soot, during combustion has both positive and negative ramifications. Exhaust from diesel engines under load (for example, shifting gears), flickering candle flames and fireplaces all produce soot leaving a flame. From an efficiency standpoint, emission of soot from engines, furnaces or even a simple flickering candle flame represents a loss of useful energy. The emission of soot from diesel engines, furnaces, power generation facilities, incinerators and even simple flames poses a serious environmental problem and health risk. Yet some industries intentionally produce soot as carbon black for use in inks, copier toner, tires and as pigments. Similarly, the presence of soot within flames can act both positively and negatively. Energy transfer from a combustion process is greatly facilitated by the radiative heat transfer from soot yet radiative heat transfer also facilitates the spread of unwanted fires. To understand soot formation and develop control strategies for soot emission/formation, measurements of soot concentration in both practical devices such as engines and controlled laboratory flames are necessary. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has been developed and characterized to address this need, as described here.

  14. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. -C.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science for several reasons: soot emissions are responsible for more deaths than any other combustion pollutant, thermal loads due to continuum radiation from soot limit the durability of combustors, thermal radiation from soot is mainly responsible for the growth and spread of unwanted fires, carbon monoxide associated with soot emissions is responsible for most fire deaths, and limited understanding of soot processes is a major impediment to the development of computational combustion. Thus, soot processes within laminar nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are being studied, emphasizing space-based experiments at microgravity. The study is limited to laminar flames due to their experimental and computational tractability, noting the relevance of these results to practical flames through laminar flamelet concepts. The microgravity environment is emphasized because buoyancy affects soot processes in laminar diffusion flames whereas effects of buoyancy are small for most practical flames. Results discussed here were obtained from experiments carried out on two flights of the Space Shuttle Columbia. After a brief discussion of experimental methods, results found thus far are described, including soot concentration measurements, laminar flame shapes, laminar smoke points and flame structure. The present discussion is brief.

  15. Soot Reaction Properties (Ground-Based Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three major soot reaction processes are needed to predict soot properties in flame environments: soot growth, or the formation of soot on soot nuclei and soot particles; soot oxidation, or the reaction of soot with oxidizing species to yield the combustion products of soot oxidation; and soot nucleation, or the formation of soot nuclei from soot precursors having large molecular weights (generally thought to be large and particularly stable PAH molecules in flame environments, called stabilomers). These processes are addressed in the following, considering soot growth, oxidation and nucleation, in turn, by exploiting the soot and flame structure results for premixed and diffusion flames already discussed in Section 2.

  16. Morphology, composition, and atmospheric processing of soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Jay G.

    Combustion-generated soot aerosols play an important role in climate forcing due to their strong light-absorbing properties. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. The task is further complicated because of the lack of an unambiguous chemical definition of the material. Here we present the development and application of a new technique for determining particle morphology and composition. Simultaneous measurements of mobility diameter, vacuum aerodynamic diameter, and non-refractory composition were used to determine the particle mass, volume, density, composition, dynamic shape factor, and fractal dimension. Under certain conditions, particle surface area and the number and size of the primary spherules composing the soot fractal aggregates were also determined. The particle characterization technique described above was applied to the following four studies: (1) Characterization of flame-generated soot particles. Depending on flame conditions, either fractal or near-spherical particles were generated and their properties interpreted in terms of the mechanism for soot formation. (2) Coating and denuding experiments were performed on soot particles. The results yielded information about morphology changes to the entire soot particle and to the internal black carbon structure due to atmospheric processing. The denuding experiments also provided particle surface area, which was used to determine the atmospheric lifetime of fractal soot particles relative to spheres. (3) An inter-comparison study of instruments measuring the black carbon content of soot particles was conducted. The detailed characterization of soot particles enabled a number of assumptions about the operation of the selected instruments to be tested. (4) Ambient particles were sampled in Mexico City. In the early morning, ambient particles were detected with a fractal morphology similar to that of diesel

  17. Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of airborne particulate matter emitted from stationary engine fuelled with diesel and waste cooking oil-derived biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betha, Raghu; Pavagadhi, Shruti; Sethu, Swaminathan; Hande, M. Prakash; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2012-12-01

    Biodiesel derived from waste cooking oil (WCO) is gaining increased attention as an alternative fuel due to lower particulate emissions and other beneficial factors such as low cost and utilization of waste oil. However, very little information is available on toxicity of airborne particulate matter (PM) emitted from biodiesel combustion. In this study, PM emitted from WCO-derived biodiesel (B100) was analyzed for its toxic potential together with ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD) as a reference fuel and their blend (B50). Human lung epithelial carcinoma cells (A549) were used for this comparative toxicity study. Results indicate that cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were higher for B100 relative to ULSD. Furthermore, caspase 3/7 activity indicates that cell death induced by B100 was due to either caspase independent apoptotic process or other programmed cell death pathways. The toxicity was also evaluated for different engine load conditions. It was observed that at lower loads there was no significant difference in the toxicological response of B100 and ULSD. However, with increase in the engine load, B100 and B50 showed significantly higher toxicity and oxidative stress compared to ULSD.

  18. Fullerene Soot in Eastern China Air: Results from Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Ge, X.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, H.; Sun, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collier, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present for the first time, the observation and quantification of fullerenes in ambient airborne particulate using an Aerodyne Soot Particle - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) deployed during 2015 winter in suburban Nanjing, a megacity in eastern China. The laser desorption and electron impact ionization techniques employed by the SP-AMS allow us to differentiate various fullerenes from other aerosol components. Mass spectrum of the identified fullerene soot is consisted by a series of high molecular weight carbon clusters (up to m/z of 2000 in this study), almost identical to the spectral features of commercially available fullerene soot, both with C70 and C60 clusters as the first and second most abundant species. This type of soot was observed throughout the entire study period, with an average mass loading of 0.18 μg/m3, accounting for 6.4% of the black carbon mass, 1.2% of the total organic mass. Temporal variation and diurnal pattern of fullerene soot are overall similar to those of black carbon, but are clearly different in some periods. Combining the positive matrix factorization, back-trajectory and analyses of the meteorological parameters, we identified the petrochemical industrial plants situating upwind from the sampling site, as the major source of fullerene soot. In this regard, our findings imply the ubiquitous presence of fullerene soot in ambient air of industry-influenced area, especially the oil and gas production regions. This study also offers new insights into the characterization of fullerenes from other environmental samples via the advanced SP-AMS technique.

  19. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Image of soot (smoke) plume made for the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment during the Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 mission in 1997. LSP-2 will fly in the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. The principal investigator is Dr. Gerard Faeth of the University of Michigan. LSP uses a small jet burner, similar to a classroom butane lighter, that produces flames up to 60 mm (2.3 in) long. Measurements include color TV cameras and a temperature sensor, and laser images whose darkness indicates the quantity of soot produced in the flame. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  20. Laminar Soot Processes (LSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Krishnan, S. S.; Lin, K.-C.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering the structure and the soot surface reaction properties of laminar nonpremixed (diffusion) flames. The study was limited to ground-based measurements of buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at pressures of 0.1-1.0 atm. The motivation for the research is that soot formation in flames is a major unresolved problem of combustion science that influences the pollutant emissions, durability and performance of power and propulsion systems, as well as the potential for developing computational combustion. The investigation was divided into two phases considering the structure of laminar soot-containing diffusion flames and the soot surface reaction properties (soot surface growth and oxidation) of these flames, in turn. The first phase of the research addressed flame and soot structure properties of buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at various pressures. The measurements showed that H, OH and O radical concentrations were generally in superequilibrium concentrations at atmospheric pressure but tended toward subequilibrium concentrations as pressures decreased. The measurements indicated that the original fuel decomposed into more robust compounds at elevated temperatures, such as acetylene (unless the original fuel was acetylene) and H, which are the major reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. The second phase of the research addressed soot surface reaction properties, e.g., soot surface growth and surface oxidation. It was found that soot surface growth rates in both laminar premixed and diffusion flames were in good agreement, that these rates were relatively independent of fuel type, and that these rates could be correlated by the Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) mechanisms of Colket and Hall (1994), Frenklach et al. (1990,1994), and Kazakov et al. (1995). It was also

  1. Catalytic combustion of soot over ceria-zinc mixed oxides catalysts supported onto cordierite.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Leandro Fontanetti; Martins, Renata Figueredo; Silva, Rodrigo Ferreira; Serra, Osvaldo Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Modified substrates as outer heterogeneous catalysts was employed to reduce the soot generated from incomplete combustion of diesel or diesel/biodiesel blends, a process that harms the environment and public health. The unique storage properties of ceria (CeO2) makes it one of the most efficient catalysts available to date. Here, we proposed that ceria-based catalysts can lower the temperature at which soot combustion occurs; more specifically, from 610°C to values included in the diesel exhausts operation range (300-450°C). The sol-gel method was used to synthesize mixed oxide-based catalysts (CeO2:ZnO); the resulting catalysts were deposited onto cordierite substrates. In addition, the morphological and structural properties of the material were evaluated by XRD, BET, TPR-H2, and SEM. Thermogravimetric (TG/DTA) analysis revealed that the presence of the catalyst decreased the soot combustion temperature by 200°C on average, indicating that the oxygen species arise at low temperatures in this situation, promoting highly reactive oxidation reactions. Comparative analysis of soot emission by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) showed that catalyst-impregnated cordierite samples efficiently oxidized soot in a diesel/biodiesel stationary motor: soot emission decreased by more than 70%.

  2. CeO2-based catalysts with engineered morphologies for soot oxidation to enhance soot-catalyst contact

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As morphology plays a relevant role in solid/solid catalysis, where the number of contact points is a critical feature in this kind of reaction, three different ceria morphologies have been investigated in this work as soot oxidation catalysts: ceria nanofibers, which can become organized as a catalytic network inside diesel particulate filter channels and thus trap soot particles at several contact points but have a very low specific surface area (4 m2/g); solution combustion synthesis ceria, which has an uncontrolled morphology but a specific surface area of 31 m2/g; and three-dimensional self-assembled (SA) ceria stars, which have both high specific surface area (105 m2/g) and a high availability of contact points. A high microporous volume of 0.03 cm3/g and a finer crystallite size compared to the other morphologies suggested that self-assembled stars could improve their redox cycling capability and their soot oxidation properties. In this comparison, self-assembled stars have shown the best tendency towards soot oxidation, and the temperature of non-catalytic soot oxidation has dropped from 614°C to 403°C in tight and to 552°C in loose contact conditions, respectively. As far as the loose contact results are concerned, this condition being the most realistic and hence the most significant, self-assembled stars have exhibited the lowest T10% onset temperature of this trio (even after ageing), thus proving their higher intrinsic activity. Furthermore, the three-dimensional shape of self-assembled stars may involve more of the soot cake layer than the solution combustion synthesis or nanofibers of ceria and thus enhance the total number of contact points. The results obtained through this work have encouraged our efforts to understand soot oxidation and to transpose these results to real diesel particulate filters. PMID:24940178

  3. CeO2-based catalysts with engineered morphologies for soot oxidation to enhance soot-catalyst contact.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Paolo; Bensaid, Samir; Russo, Nunzio; Fino, Debora

    2014-01-01

    AS MORPHOLOGY PLAYS A RELEVANT ROLE IN SOLID/SOLID CATALYSIS, WHERE THE NUMBER OF CONTACT POINTS IS A CRITICAL FEATURE IN THIS KIND OF REACTION, THREE DIFFERENT CERIA MORPHOLOGIES HAVE BEEN INVESTIGATED IN THIS WORK AS SOOT OXIDATION CATALYSTS: ceria nanofibers, which can become organized as a catalytic network inside diesel particulate filter channels and thus trap soot particles at several contact points but have a very low specific surface area (4 m(2)/g); solution combustion synthesis ceria, which has an uncontrolled morphology but a specific surface area of 31 m(2)/g; and three-dimensional self-assembled (SA) ceria stars, which have both high specific surface area (105 m(2)/g) and a high availability of contact points. A high microporous volume of 0.03 cm(3)/g and a finer crystallite size compared to the other morphologies suggested that self-assembled stars could improve their redox cycling capability and their soot oxidation properties. In this comparison, self-assembled stars have shown the best tendency towards soot oxidation, and the temperature of non-catalytic soot oxidation has dropped from 614°C to 403°C in tight and to 552°C in loose contact conditions, respectively. As far as the loose contact results are concerned, this condition being the most realistic and hence the most significant, self-assembled stars have exhibited the lowest T 10% onset temperature of this trio (even after ageing), thus proving their higher intrinsic activity. Furthermore, the three-dimensional shape of self-assembled stars may involve more of the soot cake layer than the solution combustion synthesis or nanofibers of ceria and thus enhance the total number of contact points. The results obtained through this work have encouraged our efforts to understand soot oxidation and to transpose these results to real diesel particulate filters.

  4. Effect of relative humidity on soot - secondary organic aerosol mixing: A case study from the Soot Aerosol Aging Study (PNNL-SAAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, N.; China, S.; Zaveri, R. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Pekour, M. S.; Liu, S.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, M. K.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R.; Gilles, M. K.; Gourihar, K.; Chand, D.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Subramanian, R.; Onasch, T. B.; Laskin, A.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric processing of fresh soot particles emitted by anthropogenic as well as natural sources alters their physical and chemical properties. For example, fresh and aged soot particles interact differently with incident solar radiation, resulting in different overall radiation budgets. Varying atmospheric chemical and meteorological conditions can result in complex soot mixing states. The Soot Aerosol Aging Study (SAAS) was conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in November 2013 and January 2014 as a step towards understanding the evolution of mixing state of soot and its impact on climate-relevant properties. Aging experiments on diesel soot were carried out in a controlled laboratory chamber, and the effects of condensation and coagulation processes were systematically explored in separate sets of experiments. In addition to online measurement of aerosol properties, aerosol samples were collected for offline single particle analysis to investigate the evolution of the morphology, elemental composition and fine structure of sample particles from different experiments. Condensation experiments focused on the formation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol on diesel soot aerosol seeds. Experiments were conducted to study the aging of soot under dry (RH < 2%) and humid conditions (RH ~ 80%). We present an analysis of the morphology of soot, its evolution, and its correlation with optical properties, as the condensation of α-pinene SOA is carried out for the two different RH conditions. The analysis was performed by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission x-ray microscopy and atomic force microscopy for single particle characterization. In addition, particle size, mass, composition, shape, and density were characterized in-situ, as a function of organics condensed on soot seeds, using single particle mass spectrometer.

  5. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  6. Conductometric Soot Sensor for Automotive Exhausts: Initial Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Gunter; Feistkorn, Constanze; Wiegärtner, Sven; Heinrich, Andreas; Brüggemann, Dieter; Moos, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    In order to reduce the tailpipe particulate matter emissions of Diesel engines, Diesel particulate filters (DPFs) are commonly used. Initial studies using a conductometric soot sensor to monitor their filtering efficiency, i.e., to detect a malfunction of the DPF, are presented. The sensors consist of a planar substrate equipped with electrodes on one side and with a heater on the other. It is shown that at constant speed-load points, the time until soot percolation occurs or the resistance itself are reproducible means that can be well correlated with the filtering efficiency of a DPF. It is suggested to use such a sensor setup for the detection of a DPF malfunction. PMID:22294888

  7. Conductometric soot sensor for automotive exhausts: initial studies.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Gunter; Feistkorn, Constanze; Wiegärtner, Sven; Heinrich, Andreas; Brüggemann, Dieter; Moos, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    In order to reduce the tailpipe particulate matter emissions of Diesel engines, Diesel particulate filters (DPFs) are commonly used. Initial studies using a conductometric soot sensor to monitor their filtering efficiency, i.e., to detect a malfunction of the DPF, are presented. The sensors consist of a planar substrate equipped with electrodes on one side and with a heater on the other. It is shown that at constant speed-load points, the time until soot percolation occurs or the resistance itself are reproducible means that can be well correlated with the filtering efficiency of a DPF. It is suggested to use such a sensor setup for the detection of a DPF malfunction.

  8. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Interior of the Equipment Module for the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP-2) experiment that fly in the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 (LSP-1 flew on Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 mission in 1997). The principal investigator is Dr. Gerard Faeth of the University of Michigan. LSP uses a small jet burner (yellow ellipse), similar to a classroom butane lighter, that produces flames up to 60 mm (2.3 in) long. Measurements include color TV cameras and a radiometer or heat sensor (blue circle), and laser images whose darkness indicates the quantity of soot produced in the flame. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  9. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment under way during the Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 mission in 1997. LSP-2 will fly in the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001. The principal investigator is Dr. Gerard Faeth of the University of Michigan. LSP uses a small jet burner, similar to a classroom butane lighter, that produces flames up to 60 mm (2.3 in) long. Measurements include color TV cameras and a temperature sensor, and laser images whose darkness indicates the quantity of soot produced in the flame. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  10. Mutagenicity spectra in bacterial strains of airborne and engine exhaust particulate extracts.

    PubMed

    Crebelli, R; Fuselli, S; Conti, G; Conti, L; Carere, A

    1991-12-01

    The mutagenicity spectra of the organic extracts of both airborne particulate matter and diesel and gasoline soot particles were determined using a battery of 9 bacterial strains of different genetic specificity. The assays with crude extracts and with fractionated acidic, neutral and basic components revealed striking differences in the patterns of mutagenic responses produced by each of the complex mixtures investigated. The mutagenicity of air particulate matter was shown to depend mainly on direct-acting acidic and neutral compounds, with a lesser contribution of basic promutagens which required exogenous metabolic activation by liver S9. The assays with a diesel soot extract indicated the prevailing contribution of direct-acting acidic and neutral compounds, and suggested an important role also for nitro derivatives other than nitropyrenes. The gasoline exhaust was characterized by powerful promutagenic compounds, belonging to either the acidic, neutral or basic fractions. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the contribution of engine exhausts to air pollution, and the possible use of mutagenicity spectra in the analysis of environmental complex mixtures.

  11. Forensics of Soot: Nanostructure as a Diagnostic of In-Cylinder Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wal, Dr. Randy; Strzelec, Dr. Andrea; Toops, Todd J; Daw, C Stuart

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of changes in the microstructure of soot from an experimental light-duty diesel engine, produced with varying levels of biodiesel fuel blending. Based on these changes, we propose a hypothesis for how these changes relate to in-cylinder combustion chemistry. Our hypothesis centers on the assumption that fullerenic lamellar structures in soot trace their origin to 5-membered rings (C5s) formed early in the combustion process from gas-phase reaction intermediates. We also speculate that fullerenic microstructures may be a general feature of soot produced with oxygenated fuels and might be useful for diagnosing important changes in combustion trajectories.

  12. Soot-driven reactive oxygen species formation from incense burning.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Jones, Tim P; Lung, Shih-Chun C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2011-10-15

    This study investigated the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated as a function of the physicochemistry of incense particulate matter (IPM), diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and carbon black (CB). Microscopical and elemental analyses were used to determine particle morphology and inorganic compounds. ROS was determined using the reactive dye, Dichlorodihydrofluorescin (DCFH), and the Plasmid Scission Assay (PSA), which determine DNA damage. Two common types of soot were observed within IPM, including nano-soot and micro-soot, whereas DEP and CB mainly consisted of nano-soot. These PM were capable of causing oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, especially IPM and DEP. A dose of IPM (36.6-102.3μg/ml) was capable of causing 50% oxidative DNA damage. ROS formation was positively correlated to smaller nano-soot aggregates and bulk metallic compounds, particularly Cu. These observations have important implications for respiratory health given that inflammation has been recognised as an important factor in the development of lung injury/diseases by oxidative stress. This study supports the view that ROS formation by combustion-derived PM is related to PM physicochemistry, and also provides new data for IPM.

  13. Role of engine age and lubricant chemistry on the characteristics of EGR soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeniran, Olusanmi Adeniji

    Exhaust products of Diesel Engines serves as an environmental hazard, and to curtail this problem a Tier 3 emission standard was introduced which involves change in engine designs and introduction of EGR systems in Diesel engines. EGR systems, however has the challenge of generating soot which are abrasive and are major causes of wear in Diesel engines. This work has studied the characteristics of EGR soot formed in different range of engine age and in different lubricant chemistries of Mineral and Synthetic based diesel Oils. It is found that lubricant degradation is encouraged by less efficient combustion as engine age increases, and these are precursors to formation of crystalline and amorphous particles that are causes of wear in Diesel Engines. It is found that soot from new engine is dominated by calcium based crystals which are from calcium sulfonate detergent, which reduces formation of second phase particles that can be abrasive. Diversity and peak intensity is seen to increase in soot samples as engine age increases. This understanding of second phase particles formed in engines across age ranges can help in the durability development of engine, improvement of Oil formulation for EGR engines, and in development of chemistries for after-treatment Oil solutions that can combat formation of abrasive particles in Oils.

  14. Electron spin resonance of particulate soot samples from automobiles to help environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, C; Matsuda, T; Ikeya, M

    2005-02-01

    The application of electron spin resonance (ESR) was studied for diesel soot samples and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from automobile engines. Soot samples or diesel exhaust particles (DEP) were recovered at various points: in the exhaust pipe of a diesel engine, at the dust sampler of a highway tunnel (standard DEP), on the soundproofing wall alongside a heavy traffic road, and on the filters of a dust sampler for SPM. The diesel soot samples apparently showed two ESR spectra: one was a broad spectrum at g=2.1 with a line width of ca. 80-120 mT and the other was a sharp signal of a carbon radical at g=2.003 with a line width of 0.4 mT. Annealing experiments with a DEP sample at 250 degrees C revealed drastic enhancement of the sharp ESR signal, which suggested a thermal process of carbonization of remnant organics. An oximetric study by ESR showed an enhancement of the broad signal in the diesel soot sample as well as in the sharp ESR signal. Therefore, the main part of the broad ESR signal would be attributed to carbon radicals, which form a different configuration, probably closely interacting aggregates. Enhancement of the sharp ESR signal was not observed in the standard DEP sample under vacuum condition, which suggested less adsorption sites on the surface of DEP samples.

  15. Tackling a Hot Paradox: Laminar Soot Processes-2 (LSP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, Gerard M.; Urban, David L.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last place you want to be in traffic is behind the bus or truck that is belching large clouds of soot onto your freshly washed car. Besides looking and smelling bad, soot is a health hazard. Particles range from big enough to see to microscopic and can accumulate in the lungs, potentially leading to debilitating or fatal lung diseases. Soot is wasted energy, and therein lies an interesting paradox: Soot forms in a flame's hottest regions where you would expect complete combustion and no waste. Soot enhances the emissions of other pollutants (carbon monoxide and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) from flames and radiates unwanted heat to combustion chambers (a candle's yellowish glow is soot radiating heat), among other effects. The mechanisms of soot formation are among the most important unresolved problems of combustion science because soot affects contemporary life in so many ways. Although we have used fire for centuries, many fundamental aspects of combustion remain elusive, in part because of limits imposed by the effects of gravity on Earth. Hot or warm air rises quickly and draws in fresh cold air behind it, thus giving flames the classical teardrop shape. Reactions occur in a very small zone, too fast for scientists to observe, in detail, what is happening inside the flame. The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP-2) experiments aboard STS-107 will use the microgravity environment of space to eliminate buoyancy effects and thus slow the reactions inside a flame so they can be more readily studied. 'Laminar' means a simple, smooth fuel jet burning in air, somewhat like a butane lighter. This classical flame approximates combustion in diesel engines, aircraft jet propulsion engines, and furnaces and other devices. LSP-2 will expand on surprising results developed from its first two flights in 1997. The data suggest the existence of a universal relationship, the soot paradigm, that, if proven, will be used to model and control combustion systems on Earth. STS-107

  16. Soot Structure and Reactivity Analysis by Raman Microspectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Oxidation, and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, Markus; Schuster, Manfred E.; Su, Dangsheng; Schlögl, Robert; Niessner, Reinhard; Ivleva, Natalia P.

    2009-11-01

    Raman microspectroscopy (RM), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were combined to get comprehensive information on the relationship between structure and reactivity of soot in samples of spark discharge (GfG), heavy duty engine diesel (EURO VI and IV) soot, and graphite powder upon oxidation by oxygen at increasing temperatures. GfG soot and graphite powder represent the higher and lower reactivity limits. Raman microspectroscopic analysis was conducted by determination of spectral parameters using a five band fitting procedure (G, D1-D4) as well as by evaluation of the dispersive character of the D mode. The analysis of spectral parameters shows a higher degree of disorder and a higher amount of molecular carbon for untreated GfG soot samples than for samples of untreated EURO VI and EURO IV soot. The structural analysis based on the dispersive character of the D mode revealed substantial differences in ordering descending from graphite powder, EURO IV, VI to GfG soot. HRTEM images and EELS analysis of EURO IV and VI samples indicated a different morphology and a higher structural order as compared to GfG soot in full agreement with the Raman analysis. These findings are also confirmed by the reactivity of soot during oxidation (TPO), where GfG soot was found to be the most reactive and EURO IV and VI soot samples exhibited a moderate reactivity.

  17. Soot Formation and Destruction in High-Pressure Flames with Real Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-18

    Optical investigations on soot forming methane - oxygen flames,‟ Combust. Sci. Tech. 5, 263 (1972). D‟Anna, D. and Kent, J.H., „Aromatic formation...07/31/2013 8.00 Wei Jing, William L. Roberts, Tiegang Fang. Effects of Temperature and Oxygen on Spray and Combustion Characteristics of Diesel and...Temperature and Oxygen Concentration on Diesel Spray Combustion Using a Single-Nozzle Injector in a Constant Volume Combustion Chamber, Combustion

  18. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on the toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Wolff, R.K. )

    1989-10-01

    This project examined the influence of preexisting, experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema on the adverse health effects in rats of chronic inhalation exposure to either nitrogen dioxide or automotive diesel-engine exhaust. Previous reports indicated that humans with chronic lung disease were among those most severely affected by episodic exposures to high concentrations of airborne toxicants. There were no previous reports comparing the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to components of automotive emissions in emphysematous and normal animals. The hypothesis tested in this project was that rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of the toxicant exposures. Young adult rats were housed continuously in inhalation exposure chambers and exposed seven hours per day, five days per week, for 24 months to nitrogen dioxide at 9.5 parts per million (ppm)2, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as control animals. These concentrations were selected to produce mild, but distinct, effects in rats with normal lungs. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of the proteolytic enzyme elastase six weeks before the toxicant exposures began. Health effects were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. The measurements included respiratory function, clearance of inhaled radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses to instilled antigen, biochemistry and cytology of airway fluid, total lung collagen, histopathology, lung morphometry, and lung burdens of diesel soot. The significance of influences of emphysema and toxicant exposure, and interactions between influences of the two treatments, were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  19. Environmental implications of iron fuel borne catalysts and their effects on diesel particulate formation and composition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal fuel borne catalysts can be used with diesel fuels to effectively reduce engine out particle mass emissions. Mixed with the fuel, the metals become incorporated as nanometer-scale occlusions with soot during its formation and are available to promote in-cylinder soot oxida...

  20. [Preparation of ethanol-diesel fuel blends and exhausts emission characteristics in diesel engine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runduo; He, Hong; Zhang, Changbin; Shi, Xiaoyan

    2003-07-01

    The technology that diesel oil is partly substituted by ethanol can reduce diesel engine exhausts emission, especially fuel soot. This research is concentrated on preparation of ethanol-diesel blend fuel and exhausts emission characteristics using diesel engine bench. Absolute ethanol can dissolve into diesel fuel at an arbitrary ratio. However, a trace of water (0.2%) addition can lead to the phase separation of blends. Organic additive synthesized during this research can develop the ability of resistance to water and maintain the stability of ethanol-diesel-trace amounts of water system. The effects of 10%, 20%, and 30% ethanol-diesel fuel blends on exhausts emission, were compared with that of diesel fuel in direct injection (DI) diesel engine. The optimum ethanol percentage for ethanol-diesel fuel blends was 20%. Using 20% ethanol-diesel fuel blend with 2% additive of the total volume, bench diesel engine showed a large amount decrease of exhaust gas, e.g. 55% of Bosch smoke number, 70% of HC emission, and 45% of CO emission at 13 kW and 1540 r/min. Without the addition of additive, the blend of ethanol produced new organic compounds such as ethanol and acetaldehyde in tail gas. However, the addition of additive obviously reduced the emission of ethanol and acetaldehyde.

  1. Discriminating bacterial spores from inert airborne particles by classification of optical scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Pan, Yongle; Videen, Gorden

    2014-05-01

    Scattering patterns are made available by the TAOS (Two-dimensional Angle-resolved Optical Scattering) method, which consists of detecting micrometer-sized single airborne aerosol particles and collecting the intensity of the light they scatter from a pulsed, monochromatic laser beam. TAOS patterns have been classified by a learning machine, the training stage of which depends on many control parameters. Patterns due to single bacterial spores (Bq class) have to be discriminated from those produced by outdoor aerosol particles (Kq set) and diesel soot aggregates (sq set), where both Kq and sq are assumed not to contain patterns of bacterial origin. This work describes two directions along which classification continues to develop: the enlargement of the control parameter set and the simultaneous processing of two areas (sectors) selected from the TAOS pattern. The latter algorithm is meant to make the classifier sensitive to simmetry exhibited by some patterns. The available classification scheme is summarized, as well as the rule by which discrimination is rated off-line. Discrimination based on one pattern sector alone scores fewer than 15% false negatives (misclassified Bq patterns) and false positives from Kq and sq. Discrimination based on the symmetry of two pattern sectors fails to recognize 30% of the Bq (bacterial) patterns, whereas < 5% Kq (environmental) patterns are assigned to the Bq class; false positives from sq (diesel) patterns drop to zero. The issue of false positives is briefly discussed in relation to the fraction of airborne bacteria found in aerosols.

  2. Characterisation of nano- and micron-sized airborne and collected subway particles, a multi-analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Midander, Klara; Elihn, Karine; Wallén, Anna; Belova, Lyuba; Karlsson, Anna-Karin Borg; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2012-06-15

    Continuous daily measurements of airborne particles were conducted during specific periods at an underground platform within the subway system of the city center of Stockholm, Sweden. Main emphasis was placed on number concentration, particle size distribution, soot content (analyzed as elemental and black carbon) and surface area concentration. Conventional measurements of mass concentrations were conducted in parallel as well as analysis of particle morphology, bulk- and surface composition. In addition, the presence of volatile and semi volatile organic compounds within freshly collected particle fractions of PM(10) and PM(2.5) were investigated and grouped according to functional groups. Similar periodic measurements were conducted at street level for comparison. The investigation clearly demonstrates a large dominance in number concentration of airborne nano-sized particles compared to coarse particles in the subway. Out of a mean particle number concentration of 12000 particles/cm(3) (7500 to 20000 particles/cm(3)), only 190 particles/cm(3) were larger than 250 nm. Soot particles from diesel exhaust, and metal-containing particles, primarily iron, were observed in the subway aerosol. Unique measurements on freshly collected subway particle size fractions of PM(10) and PM(2.5) identified several volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, the presence of carcinogenic aromatic compounds and traces of flame retardants. This interdisciplinary and multi-analytical investigation aims to provide an improved understanding of reported adverse health effects induced by subway aerosols.

  3. The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) Experiment Mounting Structure (EMS) was used to conduct the LSP experiment on Combustion Module-1. The EMS was inserted into the nozzle on the EMS and ignited by a hot wire igniter. The flame and its soot emitting properties were studied.

  4. Photoacoustic sensor system for the quantification of soot aerosols (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, C.; Beck, H.; Niessner, R.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of soot particles on human health as well as global and local climate is well established by now. Hence, the need for fast and sensitive soot detection in urban and remote areas is obvious. The state of the art thermochemical detection methods for soot analysis is based on filter sampling and subsequent wet chemical analysis and combustion, which requires laborious and time consuming sample preparation. Due to the integration on a filter, a time-resolved analysis is not possible. The presented photoacoustic sensor system is optimized for a highly sensitive and fast on-line and in situ quantification of soot. Soot particles, as classical "black absorbers," absorb electromagnetic radiation over the whole spectrum. Two similar systems are introduced. The first system is designed for the development and testing of combustion engines, mainly the next generation of diesel engines. In the next decade, legal thresholds for extremely low particle emissions are foreseen. Their implementation will be only possible if a time-resolved soot detection with sufficient sensitivity can be realized as the highest particle emissions from diesel engines are generated only for seconds during load changes. During a load change, the emitted soot concentrations can rise several orders of magnitude for only a period of few seconds. The system combines a time resolution of 1 s (sampling rate 1 Hz) with an aerosol mass sensitivity better than 10 μg m-3. Up to a maximum dimension of about 800 nm the signal is independent of the particle size. The systems consist of two photoacoustic cells, which are operated in a differential mode to avoid cross sensitivities. The cells are built as acoustical resonators to increase sensitivity. A diode laser with a wavelength of 810 nm and an output power of 1.1 W is employed for excitation. Its collimated beam passes first through the reference cell and then through the measurement cell. To avoid condensation of water, the cells are heated to

  5. Asymptotic analysis soot model and experiment for a directed injection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Pei, Pucheng; Xiong, Qinghui; Lu, Yong

    2012-09-01

    The existing soot models are either too complex and can not be applied to the internal combustion engine, or too simple to make calculation errors. Exploring the soot model becomes the pursuit of the goal of many researchers within the error range in the current computer speed. On the basis of the latest experimental results, TP (temperature phases) model is presented as a new soot model to carry out optimization calculation for a high-pressure common rail diesel engine. Temperature and excess air factor are the most important two parameters in this model. When zone temperature T<1 500 K and excess air factor Φ>0.6, only the soot precursors—polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAH) is created and there is no soot emission. When zone temperature T ⩾ 1 500 K and excess air factor Φ<0.6, PAHs and soot source terms (particle inception, surface growth, oxidation, coagulation) are calculated. The TP model is then implemented in KIVA code instead of original model to carry out optimizing. KIVA standard model and experimental data are analyzed for the results of cylinder pressures, the corresponding heat release rates, and soot with variation of injection time, variation of rail pressure and variation of speed among TP models. The experimental results indicate that the TP model can carry out optimization and computational fluid dynamics can be a tool to calculate for a high-pressure common rail directed injection diesel engine. The TP model result is closer than the use of the original KIVA-3V results of soot model accuracy by about 50% and TP model gives a new method for engine researchers.

  6. Optimizing electro-thermo Helds for soot oxidation using microwave heating and metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Wakeel, Haitham B.; Karim, Z. A. Abdul; Al-Kayiem, Hussain H.

    2015-04-01

    Soot is produced by incomplete combustion of various carbon-containing compounds. Soot is one of the main environmental pollutants and has become an important environmental and specific objective. To reduce soot from exhaust emission of diesel engine, a new technique is proposed and implemented by using metal inserted in the soot exposed to electromagnetic radiation. This paper presents a simulation to obtain optimum metal length and shape that give optimum electric field for attaining temperature enough for soot oxidation using microwave heating and a thin metal rod. Four cases were numerically examined to investigate the electric field and temperature distributions in a mono-mode TE10 microwave cavity having closed surfaces of perfect electric conductors. The operating frequency is 2.45 GHz, and power supply is 1500 W. The simulation methodology is coupling the absorbed electromagnetic energy with heat transfer energy. The absorbed electromagnetic energy is found from the electric field within the soot. The simulation was run using ANSYS based on finite element method. The results of the four simulation cases show that the optimum simulation is represented by case 2 where the value of electric field is 39000 V/m and heating time to arrive at the oxidation temperature (873 K) is 35 s using cylindrical metal rod of 8 mm length. It is revealed that the concept of achieving high temperature for soot oxidation by using thin metal rod inside a microwave cavity can be applied.

  7. Effects of soot deposition on particle dynamics and microbial processes in marine surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Xavier; Lefèvre, Jérôme; Torréton, Jean-Pascal; Bettarel, Yvan; Pringault, Olivier; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Marchesiello, Patrick; Menkes, Christophe; Rodier, Martine; Migon, Christophe; Motegi, Chiaki; Weinbauer, Markus G.; Legendre, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Large amounts of soot are continuously deposited on the global ocean. Even though significant concentrations of soot particles are found in marine waters, the effects of these aerosols on ocean ecosystems are currently unknown. Using a combination of in situ and experimental data, and results from an atmospheric transport model, we show that the deposition of soot particles from an oil-fired power plant impacted biogeochemical properties and the functioning of the pelagic ecosystem in tropical oligotrophic oceanic waters off New Caledonia. Deposition was followed by a major increase in the volume concentration of suspended particles, a change in the particle size spectra that resulted from a stimulation of aggregation processes, a 5% decrease in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a decreases of 33 and 23% in viral and free bacterial abundances, respectively, and a factor ~2 increase in the activity of particle-attached bacteria suggesting that soot introduced in the system favored bacterial growth. These patterns were confirmed by experiments with natural seawater conducted with both soot aerosols collected in the study area and standard diesel soot. The data suggest a strong impact of soot deposition on ocean surface particles, DOC, and microbial processes, at least near emission hot spots.

  8. Soot in the atmosphere and snow surface of Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.G. ); Clarke, A.D. )

    1990-02-20

    Samples of snow collected near the south pole during January and February 1986 were analyzed for the presence of light-absorbing particles by passing the melted snow through a nuclepore filter. Transmission of light through the filter showed that snow far from the station contains the equivalent of 0.1-0.3 ng of carbon per gram of snow (ng/g). Samples of ambient air were filtered and found to contain about 1-2 ng of carbon per kilogram of air, giving a scavenging ratio of about 150. The snow downwind of the station exhibited a well-defined plume of soot due to the burning of diesel fuel, but even in the center of the plume 1 km downwind, the soot concentration was only 3 ng/g, too small to affect snow albedo significantly. Measurements of snow albedo near large inland stations are therefore probably representative of their surrounding regions.

  9. Soot formation and burnout in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prado, B.; Bittner, J. D.; Neoh, K.; Howard, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The amount of soot formed when burning a benzene/hexane mixture in a turbulent combustor was examined. Soot concentration profiles in the same combustor for kerosene fuel are given. The chemistry of the formation of soot precursors, the nucleation, growth and subsequent burnout of soot particles, and the effect of mixing on the previous steps were considered.

  10. Surface sensitive study to determine the reactivity of soot with the focus on the European emission standards IV and VI.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Manfred E; Hävecker, Michael; Arrigo, Rosa; Blume, Raoul; Knauer, Markus; Ivleva, Natalia P; Su, Dang Sheng; Niessner, Reinhard; Schlögl, Robert

    2011-03-31

    Diesel soot (Euro IV and Euro VI) was investigated with spectroscopic methods such as near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). C and O K-edge NEXAFS show that structural disorder on the surface is accompanied by a higher amount of oxygen functional groups. O K-edge NEXAFS and O1s XPS results are discussed with the aim to elucidate the nature of the oxygen surface species. The analysis of the data presented here allows the postulation of a hypothetical structure for soot samples emitted by diesel engines.

  11. Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic composition and trace element characteristics of coarse airborne particles collected with passive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoàng-Hòa, Thi Bich; Stille, Peter; Dietze, Volker; Guéguen, Florence; Perrone, Thierry; Gieré, Reto

    2015-09-01

    Passive samplers for collection of coarse airborne particulate matter have been installed in and around the coal-mining town of Cam Pha, Quang Ninh Province (Vietnam). Analysis of Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope ratios and of major and trace element distribution patterns in atmospheric particulates collected at three stations allowed for the identification of four important dust components: (1) coal dust from an open-pit mine and fly ash particles from a coal-fired power station, (2) diesel soot, (3) traffic dust from metal, tire and pavement abrasion, and (4) limestone-derived dust. Outside of the coal-mining area, traffic-derived dust defines the atmospheric baseline composition of the studied environment.

  12. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  13. Diesel Engine Light Truck Application

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-31

    The Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program consists of two major contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). The first one under DE-FC05-97-OR22606, starting from 1997, was completed in 2001, and consequently, a final report was submitted to DOE in 2003. The second part of the contract was under DE-FC05-02OR22909, covering the program progress from 2002 to 2007. This report is the final report of the second part of the program under contract DE-FC05-02OR22909. During the course of this contract, the program work scope and objectives were significantly changed. From 2002 to 2004, the DELTA program continued working on light-duty engine development with the 4.0L V6 DELTA engine, following the accomplishments made from the first part of the program under DE-FC05-97-OR22606. The program work scope in 2005-2007 was changed to the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment. This final report will cover two major technical tasks. (1) Continuation of the DELTA engine development to demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies and to demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages, covering progress made from 2002 to 2004. (2) DPF soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment from 2005-2007.

  14. Clean Diesel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Diesel Program offers DERA funding in the form of grants and rebates as well as other support for projects that protect human health and improve air quality by reducing harmful emissions from diesel engines.

  15. A coke/soot formation model for multiphase reacting flow simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C.Q. |

    1997-03-01

    Coke is a by-product in petroleum fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) processes. The concentration of coke in an FCC riser reactor is a critical parameter used to evaluate the riser performance. A coke formation and transport model was developed. It was incorporated into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) computer code, ICRKFLO, to simulate the coke formation processes in an FCC riser reactor. Based on a similar process, a soot formation model can be derived from the coke formation model and used for diesel combustion processes, where soot is emitted as one of the primary pollutants.

  16. Thermogravimetric analysis of diesel particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuerta, M.; Ballesteros, R.; Rodríguez-Fernández, J.

    2007-03-01

    The regulated level of diesel particulate mass for 2008 light-duty diesel on-road engines will be 0.005 g km-1 in Europe. Measurements by weighing and analysis of this low level of particulate mass based on chemical extraction are costly, time consuming and hazardous because of the use of organic solvents, potentially carcinogenic. An alternative to this analysis is proposed here: a thermal mass analyser that measures the volatile fraction (VOF) as well as the soot fraction of the particulate matter (PM) collected on a cleaned fibre glass filter. This paper evaluates this new thermal mass measurement (TGA) as a possible alternative to the conventional chemical extraction method, and presents the results obtained with both methods when testing a diesel engine fuelled with a reference diesel fuel (REF), a pure biodiesel fuel (B100) and two blends with 30% and 70% v/v biodiesel (B30 and B70, respectively).

  17. Structure of laminar sooting inverse diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mikofski, Mark A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Blevins, Linda G.

    2007-06-15

    The flame structure of laminar inverse diffusion flames (IDFs) was studied to gain insight into soot formation and growth in underventilated combustion. Both ethylene-air and methane-air IDFs were examined, fuel flow rates were kept constant for all flames of each fuel type, and airflow rates were varied to observe the effect on flame structure and soot formation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of hydroxyl radicals (OH PLIF) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH PLIF), planar laser-induced incandescence of soot (soot PLII), and thermocouple-determined gas temperatures were used to draw conclusions about flame structure and soot formation. Flickering, caused by buoyancy-induced vortices, was evident above and outside the flames. The distances between the OH, PAH, and soot zones were similar in IDFs and normal diffusion flames (NDFs), but the locations of those zones were inverted in IDFs relative to NDFs. Peak OH PLIF coincided with peak temperature and marked the flame front. Soot appeared outside the flame front, corresponding to temperatures around the minimum soot formation temperature of 1300 K. PAHs appeared outside the soot layer, with characteristic temperature depending on the wavelength detection band. PAHs and soot began to appear at a constant axial position for each fuel, independent of the rate of air flow. PAH formation either preceded or coincided with soot formation, indicating that PAHs are important components in soot formation. Soot growth continued for some time downstream of the flame, at temperatures below the inception temperature, probably through reaction with PAHs. (author)

  18. Experimental investigation of the gasification mechanism and sooting characteristics of pure and multicomponent fuel droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The fuels considered include aromatic and straight chain hydrocarbons, diesel, organic azides, hydrocarbons blended with alcohols and emulsions with water. A mono-disperse stream produced using the ink-jet printing technique is projected downward through a flat-flame burner into a burning/vaporization chamber. Specially designed probes are then used to quench and collect liquid and soot samples throughout the droplet life. Microphotography is utilized to provide a history of the droplet gasification rate and velocity profile. Results show that for most fuels soot is confined inside the envelope flame. Oxidation efficiently destroys all soot as it passes through the flame-front. The extremely sooty 1-methylnaphthalene is an exception to this. The reduction in sooting achieved by blending sooty fuels with non-sooty fuels is generally limited to a specific portion of the droplet life depending on the relative volatilities of the constituents. Neither alcohol nor water blending reduce sooting via a predominate kinetic oxidation of soot precursors, but the high Lewis number of water/oil macroemulsions does cause micro-explosion. The virtually immobile water cells get trapped in the droplet interior and are subsequently heated to their limit of superheat. This explosion does not enhance sooting because the heat required for instant gasification causes the flame to collapse, thus consuming much of the associated soot. Micro-explosion can also be caused by the thermal decomposition of unstable fuels. The burning times of organic diazides can be reduced by as much as 90% versus comparable paraffins by this mechanism.

  19. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Easter, R. C.; Ferrachat, S.; Ghan, S. J.; Hoose, C.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevâg, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, X.; Lohmann, U.; Menon, S.; Quaas, J.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Takemura, T.; Yan, N.

    2010-10-01

    We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11 Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a~positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models <±0.06 Wm-2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes.

  20. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Easter, R. C.; Ferrachat, S.; Ghan, S. J.; Hoose, C.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, X.; Lohmann, U.; Menon, S.; Quaas, J.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Takemura, T.; Yan, N.

    2011-02-01

    We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on liquid clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11 Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models <±0.06 Wm-2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes.

  1. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D; Balkanski, Y; Bauer, S; Easter, Richard C; Ferrachat, S; Ghan, Steven J; Hoose, C; Iversen, T; Kirkevag, A; Kristjansson, J E; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, J; Schulz, M; Seland, O; Takemura, T; Yan, N

    2011-02-10

    We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on liquid clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five Correspondence to: D. Koch (dorothy.koch@science.doe.gov) of the models <±0.06Wm-2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experimen

  2. Laser-induced incandescence measurements in a fired diesel engine at 3 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, I. G.; Heinold, O.; Geigle, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced incandescence (LII) was performed at 3 kHz in an optically accessible cylinder of a fired diesel engine using a commercially available diode-pumped solid-state laser and an intensified CMOS camera. The resulting images, acquired every 3° of crank angle, enabled the spatiotemporal tracking of soot structures during the expansion/exhaust stroke of the engine cycle. The image sequences demonstrate that soot tends to form in thin sheets that propagate and interact with the in-cylinder flow. These sheets tend to align parallel to the central axis of the cylinder and are frequently wrapped into conical spirals by aerodynamic swirl. Most of the soot is observed well away from the cylinder walls. Quantitative soot measurements were beyond the scope of this study but the results demonstrate the practical utility of using kHz-rate LII to acquire ensemble-averaged statistical data with high crank angle resolution over a complete engine cycle. Based on semi-quantitative measures of soot distribution, it was possible to identify soot dynamics related to incomplete charge exchange. This study shows that long-duration, multi-kHz acquisition rate LII measurements are viable in a fired diesel engine with currently available laser and camera technology, albeit only in the expansion and exhaust phase of the cycle at present. Furthermore, such measurements yield useful insight into soot dynamics and therefore constitute an important new tool for the development and optimization of diesel engine technology.

  3. The importance of an extensive elemental analysis of single-walled carbon nanotube soot.

    PubMed

    Braun, Elizabeth I; Pantano, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Few manufacturers provide elemental analysis information on the certificates of analysis of their single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) soot products, and those who do primarily perform surface sensitive analyses that may not accurately represent the bulk properties of heterogeneous soot samples. Since the accurate elemental analysis of SWCNT soot is a requisite for exacting assessments of product quality and environmental health and safety (EH&S) risk, the purpose of this work was to develop a routine laboratory procedure for an extensive elemental analysis of SWCNT soot using bulk methods of analyses. Herein, a combination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen (CHNS/O) combustion analyses, oxygen flask combustion/anion chromatography (OFC/AC), graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to generate a 77-element analysis of two as-received CoMoCAT(®) SWCNT soot products. Fourteen elements were detected in one product, nineteen in the other, and each data set was compared to its respective certificate of analysis. The addition of the OFC/AC results improved the accuracy of elements detected by GF-AAS and ICP-MS, and an assessment was performed on the results that concluded that the trace elemental impurities should not pose an EH&S concern if these soot products became airborne.

  4. The importance of an extensive elemental analysis of single-walled carbon nanotube soot

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Elizabeth I.; Pantano, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Few manufacturers provide elemental analysis information on the certificates of analysis of their single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) soot products, and those who do primarily perform surface sensitive analyses that may not accurately represent the bulk properties of heterogeneous soot samples. Since the accurate elemental analysis of SWCNT soot is a requisite for exacting assessments of product quality and environmental health and safety (EH&S) risk, the purpose of this work was to develop a routine laboratory procedure for an extensive elemental analysis of SWCNT soot using bulk methods of analyses. Herein, a combination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen (CHNS/O) combustion analyses, oxygen flask combustion/anion chromatography (OFC/AC), graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to generate a 77-element analysis of two as-received CoMoCAT® SWCNT soot products. Fourteen elements were detected in one product, nineteen in the other, and each data set was compared to its respective certificate of analysis. The addition of the OFC/AC results improved the accuracy of elements detected by GF-AAS and ICP-MS, and an assessment was performed on the results that concluded that the trace elemental impurities should not pose an EH&S concern if these soot products became airborne. PMID:25110357

  5. Catalytic soot oxidation in microscale experiments: Simulation of interactions between co-deposited graphitic nanoparticle agglomerates and platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seipenbusch, Martin; Friedlander, Sheldon K.

    2004-12-01

    Continuously regenerating catalytic soot traps are under development to reduce particulate emissions from diesel exhaust. A good understanding of the processes that take place during soot oxidation is needed to optimize diesel soot trap performance. To gain insight into these processes from the perspective of nanoparticle technology, the effects of catalyst particle size and the interparticle distance between soot and catalyst particles were measured. A model catalyst was prepared by depositing Pt nanoparticles on a SiO/SiO2-coated transmission electron microscope (TEM) grid. A soot surrogate composed of graphitic nanoparticle agglomerates generated by laser ablation was deposited on the same surface. This system simulates, morphologically, catalytic soot traps used in practice. The reaction was carried out in a tubular flow reactor in which the gas phase simulated diesel exhaust gas, composed of a mixture of 10% O2 and 1000 ppm NO with the remainder N2. The progress of the carbon nanoparticle oxidation was monitored off-line by analysis of electron microscopy images of the agglomerates before and after reaction. This experimental method permitted the correlation of reaction rate with particle sizes and separation distances as well as catalyst surface area in the direct environs of the soot particles. The experimental results revealed no effect of Pt catalyst particle size in the range 7-31 nm on the rate of reaction. Also observed were a decrease in the rate of reaction with increasing distance between carbon agglomerates and catalyst particles and a linear dependence of the reaction rate on the fractional catalyst surface area coverage.

  6. Maternal Diesel Inhalation Increases Airway Hyperreactivity in Ozone Exposed Offspring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant exposure is linked with childhood asthma incidence and exacerbations, and maternal exposure to airborne pollutants during pregnancy increases airway hyperreactivity (ARR) in offspring. To determine if exposure to diesel exhaust during pregnancy worsened postnatal oz...

  7. TEM and HRTEM of Soot-in-oil particles and agglomerates from internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, M. W.; La Rocca, A.; Shayler, P. J.

    2014-06-01

    Over time, the performance of lubricating oil in a diesel engine is affected by the build-up of carbon soot produced by the combustion process. TEM and HRTEM are commonly used to investigate the characteristics of individual and agglomerated particles from diesel exhaust, to understand the structure and distribution of the carbon sheets in the primary particles and the nanostructure morphology. However, high resolution imaging of soot-in-oil is more challenging, as mineral oil is a contaminant for the electron microscope and leads to instability under the electron beam. In this work we compare solvent extraction and centrifugation techniques for removing the mineral oil contaminant, and the effect on particle size distribution.

  8. Combustion energy of fullerene soot

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Naoki; Nagano, Yatsuhisa; Kiyobayashi, Tetsu; Sakiyama, Minoru )

    1995-02-23

    The standard energy of combustion of fullerene soot generated in arc discharge was determined to be [minus]36.0 [+-] 0.5 kJ g[sup [minus]1] by oxygen-bomb combustion calorimetry. The value was much closer to those of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] than that of graphite. This result provides an energetic reason for the remarkable yield of fullerenes in arc discharge and supports the mechanism of fullerene formation, where fullerenes are the lowest energy products. Fullerene onion formation is interpreted in terms of energy relaxation of the fullerene soot. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Soot volume fractions and primary particle size estimate by means of the simultaneous two-color-time-resolved and 2D laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarciuc, A.; Foucher, F.; Mounaïm-Rousselle, C.

    2006-06-01

    An original approach of laser-induced incandescence consisting in the simultaneous recording of the two-color-time-resolved and 2D LII signal is described in this paper. The application of this approach in an atmospheric pressure diffusion flame fueled with isooctane as well as inside the combustion chamber of a diesel engine is presented. Soot volume fraction and primary particle diameters are calculated, and the results are discussed. The mean diameter estimated by fitting the LII modeled curve on the experimental one is compared with the results obtained through soot sampling and microscope analyzing. The influence of the thermal accommodation coefficient and soot refractive index function is also discussed.

  10. Cloud droplet activity changes of soot aerosol upon smog chamber ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittbom, C.; Pagels, J. H.; Rissler, J.; Eriksson, A. C.; Carlsson, J. E.; Roldin, P.; Nordin, E. Z.; Nilsson, P. T.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.

    2014-04-01

    Particles containing soot, or black carbon, are generally considered to contribute to global warming. However, large uncertainties remain in the net climate forcing resulting from anthropogenic emissions of black carbon (BC), to a large extent due to the fact that BC is co-emitted with gases and primary particles, both organic and inorganic, and subject to atmospheric ageing processes. In this study, diesel exhaust particles and particles from a flame soot generator spiked with light aromatic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors were processed by UV-radiation in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber in the presence of NOx. The time-dependent changes of the soot nanoparticle properties were characterised using a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter, an Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer and a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The results show that freshly emitted soot particles do not activate into cloud droplets at supersaturations ≤ 2%, i.e. the black carbon core coated with primary organic aerosol (POA) from the exhaust is limited in hygroscopicity. Before the onset of UV radiation it is unlikely that any substantial SOA formation is taking place. An immediate change in cloud-activation properties occurs at the onset of UV exposure. This change in hygroscopicity is likely attributed to SOA formed from intermediate volatile organic compounds (IVOC) in the diesel engine exhaust. The change of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties at the onset of UV radiation implies that the lifetime of soot particles in the atmosphere is affected by the access to sunlight, which differs between latitudes. The ageing of soot particles progressively enhances their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei, due to changes in: (I) organic fraction of the particle, (II) chemical properties of this fraction (POA or SOA), (III) particle size, and (IV) particle morphology. Applying κ-Köhler theory, using a κSOA value of 0.13 (derived from independent input parameters describing the

  11. Cloud droplet activity changes of soot aerosol upon smog chamber ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittbom, C.; Eriksson, A. C.; Rissler, J.; Carlsson, J. E.; Roldin, P.; Nordin, E. Z.; Nilsson, P. T.; Swietlicki, E.; Pagels, J. H.; Svenningsson, B.

    2014-09-01

    Particles containing soot, or black carbon, are generally considered to contribute to global warming. However, large uncertainties remain in the net climate forcing resulting from anthropogenic emissions of black carbon (BC), to a large extent due to the fact that BC is co-emitted with gases and primary particles, both organic and inorganic, and subject to atmospheric ageing processes. In this study, diesel exhaust particles and particles from a flame soot generator spiked with light aromatic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors were processed by UV radiation in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber in the presence of NOx. The time-dependent changes of the soot nanoparticle properties were characterised using a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter, an Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer and a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The results show that freshly emitted soot particles do not activate into cloud droplets at supersaturations ≤2%, i.e. the BC core coated with primary organic aerosol (POA) from the exhaust is limited in hygroscopicity. Before the onset of UV radiation it is unlikely that any substantial SOA formation is taking place. An immediate change in cloud-activation properties occurs at the onset of UV exposure. This change in hygroscopicity is likely attributed to SOA formed from intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) in the diesel engine exhaust. The change of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties at the onset of UV radiation implies that the lifetime of soot particles in the atmosphere is affected by the access to sunlight, which differs between latitudes. The ageing of soot particles progressively enhances their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei, due to changes in: (I) organic fraction of the particle, (II) chemical properties of this fraction (e.g. primary or secondary organic aerosol), (III) particle size, and (IV) particle morphology. Applying κ-Köhler theory, using a κSOA value of 0.13 (derived from independent input

  12. Characterisation of solid particles emitted from diesel and petrol engines as a contribution to the determination of the origin of carbonaceous particles in urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalik, M.; Brzeżański, M.; Wilczyńska-Michalik, W.; Fisior, K.; Klimas, B.; Samek, L.; Pietras, B.

    2016-09-01

    Solid particles emitted from diesel and petrol engines were studied using a scanning electron microscope fitted with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The soot emitted from different engines under different operating conditions differed in particle size, and the form and size of aggregates. Identification of the soot particles emitted from diesel or petrol engines in urban aerosol based on their size and morphology was found to be impossible.

  13. Combustion and emission analysis of heavy-duty vehicle diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhixin; Wang, Xue; Wang, Xiancheng; Zhou, Jingkai

    2017-03-01

    Aiming at the research on combustion and emission characteristics of heavy-duty vehicle diesel engine, a bench test was carried out for PM and NOx emission for a certain type diesel engine under different speed and loads. Results shows that for this type of heavy-duty vehicle diesel engine, ignition delay is longer and the proportion of diffusion combustion increases under high speed of external characteristics conditions. Under the speed of 1400 r/min, ignition delay decreases with load increases, combustion duration shortened at first, then increases, the proportion of diffusion combustion increases. The ignition delay is longer and cylinder temperature is higher under lower speed external characteristics of diesel engine, the emissions of soot and NOx are heavier; with large load of external characteristics of diesel engine, the emissions of soot and NOx are heavy as well.

  14. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Krishnan, S. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon-fueled flames affect emissions of pollutant soot, thermal loads on combustors, hazards of unwanted fires and capabilities for computational combustion. In view of these observations, the present study is considering processes of soot formation in both burner-stabilized and freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. These flames are being studied in order to simplify the interpretation of measurements and to enhance computational tractability compared to the diffusion flame environments of greatest interest for soot processes. In addition, earlier studies of soot formation in laminar premixed flames used approximations of soot optical and structure properties that have not been effective during recent evaluations, as well as questionable estimates of flow residence times). The objective of present work was to exploit methods of avoiding these difficulties developed for laminar diffusion flames to study soot growth in laminar premixed flames. The following description of these studies is brief.

  15. Finding synergies in fuels properties for the design of renewable fuels--hydroxylated biodiesel effects on butanol-diesel blends.

    PubMed

    Sukjit, E; Herreros, J M; Piaszyk, J; Dearn, K D; Tsolakis, A

    2013-04-02

    This article describes the effects of hydroxylated biodiesel (castor oil methyl ester - COME) on the properties, combustion, and emissions of butanol-diesel blends used within compression ignition engines. The study was conducted to investigate the influence of COME as a means of increasing the butanol concentration in a stable butanol-diesel blend. Tests were compared with baseline experiments using rapeseed methyl esters (RME). A clear benefit in terms of the trade-off between NOX and soot emissions with respect to ULSD and biodiesel-diesel blends with the same oxygen content was obtained from the combination of biodiesel and butanol, while there was no penalty in regulated gaseous carbonaceous emissions. From the comparison between the biodiesel fuels used in this work, COME improved some of the properties (for example lubricity, density and viscosity) of butanol-diesel blends with respect to RME. The existence of hydroxyl group in COME also reduced further soot emissions and decreased soot activation energy.

  16. A Parametric Study of Low-Temperature, Late-Injection Combustion in a HSDI Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dae; Miles, Paul C.; Yun, Hanho; Reitz, Rolf D.

    A parametric study of automotive diesel combustion in a low-temperature, late-injection combustion regime is described. Injection pressure was varied from 600-1200 bar, swirl ratio from 1.44-7.12, and intake temperature from 30-110°C. In-cylinder pressure records, heat release analysis, spatially-integrated soot luminosity, and images of the spatial distribution of combustion luminosity are employed to study the influence of these parameters on the combustion and soot formation/oxidation processes. Load points of 3 and 6 bar gross IMEP at 1500RPM and an O2 concentration of 0.15 are considered. Increased injection pressure is found to enhance the early mixture formation process, resulting in increased peak apparent heat release, generally decreased soot luminosity, and modestly increased light-load soot oxidation rates. At lower injection pressures, more soot luminosity is observed from the squish volume. In contrast, variation of flow swirl impacts the latter half of the combustion process, and affects the initial combustion only slightly. An optimum Ricardo swirl ratio of roughly 3 is found for best moderate-load efficiency and soot oxidation. A marked reduction in early heat release rates and peak soot luminosity is observed with decreased intake temperature. Nevertheless, significant in-cylinder soot luminosity is observed even at the lowest intake temperatures, indicating that complete suppression of in-cylinder soot formation is difficult with the fuel injection and combustion system characteristics employed.

  17. Effects of Soot Structure on Soot Oxidation Kinetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    of Figures    Figure 1. Distribution of activation energies for oxygen adsorbed on soot determined by temperature programmed desorption (Du et al...25  Figure 20. Thermophoretic sampling system for transmission electron microscopy analysis. .... 26  Figure 21. The relative...HAB: Height above the top burner HP: High pass HR-TEM: High-resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy LP: Low pass NSC: Nagle-Strickland

  18. On droplet combustion of biodiesel fuel mixed with diesel/alkanes in microgravity condition

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Li, Je-Wei; Chen, Chien-Pei; Wang, Ching-Hua

    2009-10-15

    The burning characteristics of a biodiesel droplet mixed with diesel or alkanes such as dodecane and hexadecane were experimentally studied in a reduced-gravity environment so as to create a spherically symmetrical flame without the influence of natural convection due to buoyancy. Small droplets on the order of 500 {mu}m in diameter were initially injected via a piezoelectric technique onto the cross point intersected by two thin carbon fibers; these were prepared inside a combustion chamber that was housed in a drag shield, which was freely dropped onto a foam cushion. It was found that, for single component droplets, the tendency to form a rigid soot shell was relatively small for biodiesel fuel as compared to that exhibited by the other tested fuels. The soot created drifted away readily, showing a puffing phenomenon; this could be related to the distinct molecular structure of biodiesel leading to unique soot layers that were more vulnerable to oxidative reactivity as compared to the soot generated by diesel or alkanes. The addition of biodiesel to these more traditional fuels also presented better performance with respect to annihilating the soot shell, particularly for diesel. The burning rate generally follows that of multi-component fuels, by some means in terms of a lever rule, whereas the mixture of biodiesel and dodecane exhibits a somewhat nonlinear relation with the added fraction of dodecane. This might be related to the formation of a soot shell. (author)

  19. Experimental investigation of submicron and ultrafine soot particle removal by tree leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hee-Jae; Yook, Se-Jin; Ahn, Kang-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Soot particles emitted from vehicles are one of the major sources of air pollution in urban areas. In this study, five kinds of trees were selected as Pinus densiflora, Taxus cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba, and the removal of submicron (<1 μm) and ultrafine (<0.1 μm) soot particles by tree leaves was quantitatively compared in terms of deposition velocity. Soot particles were produced by a diffusion flame burner using acetylene as the fuel. The sizes of monodisperse soot particles classified with the Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMA) were 30, 55, 90, 150, 250, 400, and 600 nm. A deposition chamber was designed to simulate the omni-directional flow condition around the tree leaves. Deposition velocities onto the needle-leaf trees were higher than those onto the broadleaf trees. P. densiflora showed the greatest deposition velocity, followed by T. cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba. In addition, from the comparison of deposition velocity between two groups of Platanus occidentalis leaves, i.e. one group of leaves with front sides only and the other with back sides only, it was supposed in case of the broadleaf trees that the removal of airborne soot particles of submicron and ultrafine sizes could be affected by the surface roughness of tree leaves, i.e. the veins and other structures on the leaves.

  20. First in-flight synchrotron X-ray absorption and photoemission study of carbon soot nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ouf, F-X; Parent, P; Laffon, C; Marhaba, I; Ferry, D; Marcillaud, B; Antonsson, E; Benkoula, S; Liu, X-J; Nicolas, C; Robert, E; Patanen, M; Barreda, F-A; Sublemontier, O; Coppalle, A; Yon, J; Miserque, F; Mostefaoui, T; Regier, T Z; Mitchell, J-B A; Miron, C

    2016-11-24

    Many studies have been conducted on the environmental impacts of combustion generated aerosols. Due to their complex composition and morphology, their chemical reactivity is not well understood and new developments of analysis methods are needed. We report the first demonstration of in-flight X-ray based characterizations of freshly emitted soot particles, which is of paramount importance for understanding the role of one of the main anthropogenic particulate contributors to global climate change. Soot particles, produced by a burner for several air-to-fuel ratios, were injected through an aerodynamic lens, focusing them to a region where they interacted with synchrotron radiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy were performed and compared to those obtained for supported samples. A good agreement is found between these samples, although slight oxidation is observed for supported samples. Our experiments demonstrate that NEXAFS characterization of supported samples provides relevant information on soot composition, with limited effects of contamination or ageing under ambient storage conditions. The highly surface sensitive XPS experiments of airborne soot indicate that the oxidation is different at the surface as compared to the bulk probed by NEXAFS. We also report changes in soot's work function obtained at different combustion conditions.

  1. Retention modeling of diesel exhaust particles in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Yu, C P; Yoon, K J

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study was to predict the lung burden in rats and humans of diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions by means of a mathematical model. We previously developed a model to predict the deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs of these species. In this study, the clearance and retention of diesel exhaust particles deposited in the lung are examined. A diesel particle is composed of a carbonaceous core (soot) and adsorbed organics. These materials can be removed from the lung after deposition by two mechanisms: (1) mechanical clearance, provided by mucociliary transport in the ciliated airways as well as macrophage phagocytosis and migration in the nonciliated airways, and (2) clearance by dissolution. To study the clearance of diesel exhaust particles from the lung, we used a compartmental model consisting of four anatomical compartments: nasopharyngeal, tracheobronchial, alveolar, and the lung-associated lymph node compartments. We also assumed a particle model made up of material components according to the characteristics of clearance: (1) a carbonaceous core of about 80 percent of particle mass, (2) slowly cleared organics of about 10 percent of particle mass, and (3) fast-cleared organics accounting for the remaining 10 percent of particle mass. The kinetic equations of the retention model were first developed for Fischer-344 rats. The transport rates of each material component of diesel exhaust particles (soot, slowly cleared organics, and fast-cleared organics) were derived using available experimental data and several mathematical approximations. The lung burden results calculated from the model showed that although the organics were cleared at nearly constant rates, the alveolar clearance rate of diesel soot decreased with increasing lung burden. This is consistent with existing experimental observations. At low lung burdens, the alveolar clearance rate of diesel soot was a constant, equal to the normal clearance rate

  2. Mechanistic Models of Soot Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    incorporating a soot formation model into a flame code, the effects of changes in the thermodynamics of the average PAH moiety as PAH’s increase in size is...thermodynamics can have a substantial effect on the equilibrium situation between a fuel, molecular hydrogen and the polyaromatic product. For example, consider a...one atm-cm or more, it was shown that optical thickness effects can become important and an expression was derived for self-absorption 5 . Radiative

  3. Light changes the atmospheric reactivity of soot

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Maria Eugenia; D’Anna, Barbara; Mazri, Linda; Giroir-Fendler, Anne; Ammann, Markus; Donaldson, D. J.; George, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Soot particles produced by incomplete combustion processes are one of the major components of urban air pollution. Chemistry at their surfaces lead to the heterogeneous conversion of several key trace gases; for example NO2 interacts with soot and is converted into HONO, which rapidly photodissociates to form OH in the troposphere. In the dark, soot surfaces are rapidly deactivated under atmospheric conditions, leading to the current understanding that soot chemistry affects tropospheric chemical composition only in a minor way. We demonstrate here that the conversion of NO2 to HONO on soot particles is drastically enhanced in the presence of artificial solar radiation, and leads to persistent reactivity over long periods. Soot photochemistry may therefore be a key player in urban air pollution. PMID:20080580

  4. Light changes the atmospheric reactivity of soot.

    PubMed

    Monge, Maria Eugenia; D'Anna, Barbara; Mazri, Linda; Giroir-Fendler, Anne; Ammann, Markus; Donaldson, D J; George, Christian

    2010-04-13

    Soot particles produced by incomplete combustion processes are one of the major components of urban air pollution. Chemistry at their surfaces lead to the heterogeneous conversion of several key trace gases; for example NO(2) interacts with soot and is converted into HONO, which rapidly photodissociates to form OH in the troposphere. In the dark, soot surfaces are rapidly deactivated under atmospheric conditions, leading to the current understanding that soot chemistry affects tropospheric chemical composition only in a minor way. We demonstrate here that the conversion of NO(2) to HONO on soot particles is drastically enhanced in the presence of artificial solar radiation, and leads to persistent reactivity over long periods. Soot photochemistry may therefore be a key player in urban air pollution.

  5. Imaging of Flame Temperature in a Combustion Chamber of Diesel Engine at Transient Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Hidenori; Sumi, Nariaki

    In this study, the flame temperature is visualized in a newly designed optical access diesel engine in order to investigate the mechanism of soot emission at transient operation mode. This single cylinder diesel engine has hydraulic variable valve system and an optical access window instead of an exhaust valve. Optical access window has cleaned by the laser cleaning technique in which the soot on the window is vaporized by the Nd:YAG laser incident. Using this optical engine, high speed photographs of flame were taken under transient operation, and flame temperature was analyzed by two color pyrometry.

  6. Mathematical Model For Deposition Of Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makel, Darby B.

    1991-01-01

    Semiempirical mathematical model predicts deposition of soot in tubular gas generator in which hydrocarbon fuel burned in very-fuel-rich mixture with pure oxygen. Developed in response to concern over deposition of soot in gas generators and turbomachinery of rocket engines. Also of interest in terrestrial applications involving fuel-rich combustion or analogous process; e.g., purposeful deposition of soot to manufacture carbon black pigments.

  7. Light Absorption By Coated Soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the IPCC best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of the uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. With the advent of techniques that can directly measure aerosol light absorption without influences due to collection substrate or light scattering (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (Arnott et al., 2005; Lack et al., 2006) and photothermal interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007)) the potential exists for quantifying this interdependence. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve this objective measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated and denuded conditions were conducted. In this paper, light absorption by dioctyl sebacate (DOS) encapsulated soot and sulfuric acid coated soot using the technique of photothermal interferometry will be presented. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a monotonic increase in light absorption as a function DOS coating thickness to nearly 100% is observed. This observation is consistent with a coating-induced amplification in particle light absorption. (Bond et al. 2006) However

  8. Structural group analysis for soot reduction tendency of oxygenated fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.; Malhotra, R.; Kirby, S.R.; Boehman, A.L.

    2008-07-15

    Oxygenated additives are known to reduce soot formation in diesel engines. Numerous studies, both experimental and numerical, have reported that the reduction of particulate emissions depends on the molecular structure of the additives. In this paper, a structural group contribution approach is proposed to interpret experimental observations on the effect of oxygenated additives on the sooting propensities of hydrocarbon fuels. The statistically based method makes it possible to distinguish between chemical effects caused by the presence of oxygenated groups in the fuel mixture and mere dilution of the original fuel by the additive. The analysis was carried out on several experimental databases encompassing both premixed and nonpremixed configurations that include a new extensive set of smoke point measurements for mixtures of a given fuel with several oxygenated molecules. The current approach unifies the conclusions on the relative efficiency of the various oxygenated functionalities such as alcohols, esters, ethers, and carbonyl groups and provides a potential explanation for the seemingly contradictory trends exhibited by some raw experimental data. (author)

  9. Experimental study on particulate and NOx emissions of a diesel engine fueled with ultra low sulfur diesel, RME-diesel blends and PME-diesel blends.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Wugao; Liu, Wei; Huang, Zhen

    2010-02-01

    Ultra low sulfur diesel and two different kinds of biodiesel fuels blended with baseline diesel fuel in 5% and 20% v/v were tested in a Cummins 4BTA direct injection diesel engine, with a turbocharger and an intercooler. Experiments were conducted under five engine loads at two steady speeds (1500 rpm and 2500 rpm). The study aims at investigating the engine performance, NO(x) emission, smoke opacity, PM composition, PM size distribution and comparing the impacts of low sulfur content of biodiesel with ULSD on the particulate emission. The results indicate that, compared to base diesel fuel, the increase of biodiesel in blends could cause certain increase in both brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency. Compared with baseline diesel fuel, the biodiesel blends bring about more NO(x) emissions. With the proportion of biodiesel increase in blends, the smoke opacity decreases, while total particle number concentration increases. Meanwhile the ULSD gives lower NO(x) emissions, smoke opacity and total number concentration than those of baseline diesel fuel. In addition, the percentages of SOF and sulfate in particulates increase with biodiesel in blends, while the dry soot friction decreases obviously. Compared with baseline diesel fuel, the biodiesel blends increase the total nucleation number concentration, while ULSD reduces the total nucleation number concentration effectively, although they all have lower sulfur content. It means that, for ULSD, the lower sulfur content is the dominant factor for suppressing nucleation particles formation, while for biodiesel blends, lower volatile, lower aromatic content and higher oxygen content of biodiesel are key factors for improving the nucleation particles formation. The results demonstrate that the higher NO(x) emission and total nucleation number concentration are considered as the big obstacles of the application of biodiesel in diesel engine.

  10. Soot effects on clouds and solar absorption: Understanding the differences in recently published soot mitigation experiments. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.

    2010-12-01

    Attention has been drawn to black carbon aerosols, as a target for short-term mitigation of climate warming. This measure seems attractive because soot is assumed to warm the atmosphere and at the same time has a lifetime of just a few days. Therefore regulating soot emissions could, as a short-term action, potentially buy time by slowing global warming until regulations for longer lived greenhouse gases are set in place. Currently the scientific community debates the impacts of such mitigation measures, especially when considering indirect effects. We tested with the GISS/MATRIX model, a global climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics, the effect of reducing fossil fuel emissions and bio-fuel emissions and found that opposite changes in cloud droplet number concentration lead to positive cloud forcing numbers in the bio-fuel reduction case and negative forcing numbers in the diesel mitigation case. Similar experiments have been carried out and have recently been published by other modeling groups, finding partly similar partly contradicting results to our study. In this presentation we want to explain the differences in black carbon research carried out with complex microphysical models, by focusing on the treatment of mixing state, and separation between forcings and feedbacks.

  11. Distinct oxidative stabilities of char versus soot black carbon: Implications for quantification and environmental recalcitrance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmquist, Marie; Cornelissen, Gerard; Kukulska, Zofia; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2006-06-01

    Sequestration in sediments of black carbon (BC) from vegetation fires and fuel combustion may constitute a significant sink of otherwise rapidly cycling carbon from the atmosphere-biosphere cycle. It also has the potential to provide a historical record of atmospheric BC loadings. Previous treatments of BC as one homogeneous entity are being replaced with the growing awareness of a BC combustion continuum, a range spanning from slightly charred biomass to soot and graphite. Here the relative recalcitrance of different BC forms is evaluated, and implications for both BC quantification and environmental stability are considered. The stabilities of four BC reference materials against thermal oxidation in air were quite distinct with T50%BC values (i.e., the temperature where 50% BC remained in the residue) of 444°C (diesel soot-BC), 388°C (n-hexane soot-BC), 338°C (wood char-BC), and 266°C (grass char-BC). The implications for BC quantification have been illustrated for a thermal oxidation (the CTO-375) method commonly applied to study BC in sediments. This technique measured BC:TOC ratios of 78.3 ± 1.3% for the diesel soot-BC and 45.3 ± 6.1% for n-hexane soot-BC, whereas no CTO375-BC was detected for the two analyzed char-BC materials. The greater lability of char-BC compared to soot-BC likely reflects higher accessibility to internal microporosity in char-BC, facilitating internal O2 transfer. Decreasing the temperature cutoff below 375°C to also include char-BC is not possible as thermograms of nonpyrogenic reference materials indicated that such material would then be artifactually quantified as BC. The presence of mineral oxides in the sediment matrix may lead to a catalytically mediated lowering of the activation energy for soot-BC oxidation but not for char-BC or nonpyrogenic organic material. Several recent studies combine to challenge the proposition of complete recalcitrance of BC. Particularly, the thermal lability of char-BC from grassland fires

  12. Influence of Various Promotors and Inhibitors of Soot Formation on the Production of Soot Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, G. L.; Lyubimov, A. V.; Smirnov, V. N.; Sokolova, I. L.; Tereza, A. M.; Vlasov, P. A.

    Soot formation during pyrolysis and oxidation of rich mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with single and multiple bonds in the presence of promotors (aromatic and metalorganic compounds) and inhibitors (hydrogen additives) of soot formation is experimentally studied behind reflected shock waves and simulated within the framework of a proposed kinetic mechanism. The influence of small additives of toluene to propane was demonstrated to substantially promote soot formation, whereas iron pentacarbonyl addition to propane and acetylene was shown to dramatically widen the temperature interval of soot formation both to higher and lower temperatures. Soot particles formed in the presence of iron pentacarbonyl gained magnetic properties due to the formation of an iron core inside the soot particle. The influence of acetone and propane additives to acetylene/argon mixtures was also studied. This is important to estimate the influence of impurities inherent to commercially manufactured acetylene. Hydrogen additives to acetylene/Ar mixtures were found to suppress the process of soot formation.

  13. T-Matrix Modeling of Linear Depolarization by Morphologically Complex Soot and Soot-Containing Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    We use state-of-the-art public-domain Fortran codes based on the T-matrix method to calculate orientation and ensemble averaged scattering matrix elements for a variety of morphologically complex black carbon (BC) and BC-containing aerosol particles, with a special emphasis on the linear depolarization ratio (LDR). We explain theoretically the quasi-Rayleigh LDR peak at side-scattering angles typical of low-density soot fractals and conclude that the measurement of this feature enables one to evaluate the compactness state of BC clusters and trace the evolution of low-density fluffy fractals into densely packed aggregates. We show that small backscattering LDRs measured with groundbased, airborne, and spaceborne lidars for fresh smoke generally agree with the values predicted theoretically for fluffy BC fractals and densely packed near-spheroidal BC aggregates. To reproduce higher lidar LDRs observed for aged smoke, one needs alternative particle models such as shape mixtures of BC spheroids or cylinders.

  14. Sooting behavior of ethanol droplet combustion at elevated pressures under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Bradley D.; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Kazakov, Andrei; Dryer, Frederick L.; Yozgatligil, Ahmet; Choi, Mun Young; Manzello, Samuel L.; Lee, Kyeong Ook; Dobashi, Ritsu

    2004-09-01

    Liquid ethanol is widely used in practical fuels as a means to extend petroleum-derived resources or as a fuel additive to reduce emissions of carbon monoxide from spark ignition engines. Recent research has also suggested that ethanol and other oxygenates could be added to diesel fuel to reduce particulate emissions. In this cursory study, the combustion of small ethanol droplets in microgravity environments was observed to investigate diffusion flame characteristics at higher ambient pressures and at various oxygen indices, all with nitrogen as the diluent species. At the NASA Glenn Research Center 2.2-second drop tower, free ethanol droplets were ignited in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) apparatus, and backlit and flame view data were collected to evaluate flame position and burning rate. Profuse sooting was noted above 3 atm ambient pressure. In experiments performed at the Japan Microgravity Center 10-second (JAMIC) drop shaft with Sooting Effects in Droplet Combustion (SEDC) apparatus, the first data that displayed a spherical sootshell for ethanol droplet combustion was obtained. Because of the strong sensitivity of soot formation to small changes in an easily accessible range of pressures, ethanol appears to be a simple liquid fuel suitable for fundamental studies of soot formation effects on spherical diffusion flames. The results impact discussions regarding the mechanism of particulate reduction by ethanol addition to fuels in high-pressure practical combustors.

  15. Airborne Radar Search for Diesel Submarines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-15

    Agency, 1995. CASA, Flight Manual to Operators CASA 212 S43 Aircraft, Spain. Comando Naval de Operaciones , Venezuelan Navy, Manual de Doctrina de...Empleo del Comando de la Aviaci6n Naval (MAN-DC-CNAOP-0004), 2001. Comando Naval de Operaciones Venezuelan Navy. Observatorio Naval Cajigal, Aguas Marinas

  16. Diesel fuel containing wax oxidates to reduce particulate emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, H.G.; Sweeney, W.M.

    1980-09-16

    Addition of 0.1 to 1.5 percent by weight of wax oxidates to a diesel fuel is found to reduce the amount of soot and invisible particles produced when the fuel is used in a diesel engine. The wax oxidates act synergistically with fuel-soluble organometallic compounds such as alkyl cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex salts in reducing particulates. The wax oxidates used have a ratio of neutralization number to saponification number below about 0.40 and a saybolt universal viscosity at 210* F. Higher than 1600.

  17. Inhibition of progesterone receptor activity in recombinant yeast by soot from fossil fuel combustion emissions and air particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Xie, Ping; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2005-10-15

    Numerous environmental pollutants have been detected for estrogenic activity by interacting with the estrogen receptor, but little information is available about their interactions with the progesterone receptor. In this study, emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion (FFC) and air particulate material (APM) collected from an urban location near a traffic line in a big city of China were evaluated to interact with the human progesterone receptor (hPR) signaling pathway by examining their ability to interact with the activity of hPR expressed in yeast. The results showed that the soot of a petroleum-fired vehicle possessed the most potent anti-progesteronic activity, that of coal-fired stove and diesel fired agrimotor emissions took the second place, and soot samples of coal-fired heating work and electric power station had lesser progesterone inhibition activity. The anti-progesteronic activity of APM was between that of soot from petroleum-fired vehicle and soot from coal-fired establishments and diesel fired agrimotor. Since there was no other large pollution source near the APM sampling sites, the endocrine disrupters were most likely from vehicle emissions, tire attrition and house heating sources. The correlation analysis showed that a strong relationship existed between estrogenic activity and anti-progesteronic activity in emissions of fossil fuel combustion. The discoveries that some environmental pollutants with estrogenic activity can also inhibit hPR activity indicate that further studies are required to investigate potential mechanisms for the reported estrogenic activities of these pollutants.

  18. Investigation of morphology, structure and composition of biomass-oil soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Xianguo; Liu, Tianxia; Liu, Yiming; Song, Ruhong; Chen, Yazhou

    2013-04-01

    Biomass-oil soot (BS) particles were characterized by a range of analytical techniques. A comparative analysis with commercial carbon black (CB), a surrogate for diesel soot particles, was carried out. The experimental results showed that the morphologies of BS and CB particles were both spherical, with average diameters of 50 and 40 nm, respectively. There were only a few differences between the elemental composition of BS and CB. The groups (Cdbnd O, Osbnd Csbnd O and Csbnd Osbnd C) were presented on the surfaces of CB and BS. Moreover, it was also found that Csbnd OH group was appeared on the surface of BS. BS contained more acidic and basic sites than CB, which was ascribed to the complex mixtures of biomass oil. Both BS and CB had virtually indistinguishable perturbed graphitic or turbostratic internal structures. Thus, CB can be a potential alternative to evaluate the aggregation and tribological behavior of BS in lubricating oils.

  19. Spectral radiance measurements and calculated soot concentrations along the length of an experimental combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Radiometric data were obtained over a range of parametric test conditions at three positions along the length of an experimental combustor segment corresponding to the primary, intermediate, and dilution zones. The concentration of soot entrained in the combustion gases was calculated by a technique using spectral radiance measurements. Tests were conducted primarily with Jet A fuel, although limited data were taken with two fuels having higher aromatic content, diesel oil number 2 and a blend of 40 percent tetralin in Jet A fuel. Radiometric observation of the combustion gases indicated that the maximum total radiance peaked at the intermediate zone, which was located immediately upstream of the dilution holes. Soot concentrations calculated from optical measurements in the dilution zone compared favorably with those obtained by in situ gas sampling at the exhaust. The total radiance increased with the higher aromatic content fuels.

  20. Light changes the atmospheric reactivity of soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Monge, Maria-Eugenia; George, Christian; Ammann, Markus; Donaldson, D. Jamie

    2010-05-01

    Soot particles formed by incomplete combustion processes comprise a significant portion of the fine aerosol loading (below 1micron). These particles affect the radiative forcing contributing to global warming and have increased toxicity relative to larger particles because they may settle and persist in the deeper respiratory tract, and can even cross biological barriers. In addition, they are often coated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Soot particles exhibit a large specific surface area, approx. 100 m2 g-1, which suggests a potential for heterogeneous interactions with atmospheric trace gases. Consequently, soot was suggested to be an important sink for some atmospheric oxidants such as O3 or NOx and its heterogeneous chemistry has been largely investigated in the past years. However, its atmospheric impact was suggested to be negligible due to a rapid soot surface deactivation under atmospheric conditions. As previous studies were done under dark conditions, we decided to investigate the effect of light on the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on various soot samples. As well, we studied the effect of O3 and light exposure on the aging of soot samples. The heterogeneous reaction between soot particles and NO2 was studied by means of a coated flow tube equipped with near-UV emitting lamps (300-420 nm). The effect of O3 and light on the wettability of soot was studied by contact angle measurements. The characterization of the soot particles was performed by TEM, ESEM and AMS. Different combustion conditions were used to produce the soot samples, which were generated with a mini-CAST soot generator using propane as fuel. We determined the uptake coefficients for different gas phase NO2 concentrations (15-120 ppbv) under near UV irradiation. The results showed that the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 and soot under irradiation leads to NO and HONO production with different yields according to the combustion conditions of the generated soot particles. The

  1. First in-flight synchrotron X-ray absorption and photoemission study of carbon soot nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouf, F.-X.; Parent, P.; Laffon, C.; Marhaba, I.; Ferry, D.; Marcillaud, B.; Antonsson, E.; Benkoula, S.; Liu, X.-J.; Nicolas, C.; Robert, E.; Patanen, M.; Barreda, F.-A.; Sublemontier, O.; Coppalle, A.; Yon, J.; Miserque, F.; Mostefaoui, T.; Regier, T. Z.; Mitchell, J.-B. A.; Miron, C.

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have been conducted on the environmental impacts of combustion generated aerosols. Due to their complex composition and morphology, their chemical reactivity is not well understood and new developments of analysis methods are needed. We report the first demonstration of in-flight X-ray based characterizations of freshly emitted soot particles, which is of paramount importance for understanding the role of one of the main anthropogenic particulate contributors to global climate change. Soot particles, produced by a burner for several air-to-fuel ratios, were injected through an aerodynamic lens, focusing them to a region where they interacted with synchrotron radiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy were performed and compared to those obtained for supported samples. A good agreement is found between these samples, although slight oxidation is observed for supported samples. Our experiments demonstrate that NEXAFS characterization of supported samples provides relevant information on soot composition, with limited effects of contamination or ageing under ambient storage conditions. The highly surface sensitive XPS experiments of airborne soot indicate that the oxidation is different at the surface as compared to the bulk probed by NEXAFS. We also report changes in soot’s work function obtained at different combustion conditions.

  2. First in-flight synchrotron X-ray absorption and photoemission study of carbon soot nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ouf, F.-X.; Parent, P.; Laffon, C.; Marhaba, I.; Ferry, D.; Marcillaud, B.; Antonsson, E.; Benkoula, S.; Liu, X.-J.; Nicolas, C.; Robert, E.; Patanen, M.; Barreda, F.-A.; Sublemontier, O.; Coppalle, A.; Yon, J.; Miserque, F.; Mostefaoui, T.; Regier, T. Z.; Mitchell, J.-B. A.; Miron, C.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on the environmental impacts of combustion generated aerosols. Due to their complex composition and morphology, their chemical reactivity is not well understood and new developments of analysis methods are needed. We report the first demonstration of in-flight X-ray based characterizations of freshly emitted soot particles, which is of paramount importance for understanding the role of one of the main anthropogenic particulate contributors to global climate change. Soot particles, produced by a burner for several air-to-fuel ratios, were injected through an aerodynamic lens, focusing them to a region where they interacted with synchrotron radiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy were performed and compared to those obtained for supported samples. A good agreement is found between these samples, although slight oxidation is observed for supported samples. Our experiments demonstrate that NEXAFS characterization of supported samples provides relevant information on soot composition, with limited effects of contamination or ageing under ambient storage conditions. The highly surface sensitive XPS experiments of airborne soot indicate that the oxidation is different at the surface as compared to the bulk probed by NEXAFS. We also report changes in soot’s work function obtained at different combustion conditions. PMID:27883014

  3. Pressure effect on soot formation in turbulent diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Roditcheva, O V; Bai, X S

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation in a methane air turbulent jet diffusion flame is investigated numerically using a semi-empirical model. The temperature, density and species (the soot precursor C2H2) fields are calculated using detailed chemical kinetic mechanism based on the flamelet library approach. The influence of pressure on the soot formation and the behavior of the semi-empirical model in different flame situations are investigated. It is found that the flame shape and the flame temperature can be well predicted by the flamelet library approach. The calculated soot yield is mostly sensitive to the soot surface growth rate and the increase of pressure. The increase of pressure leads to the increase of soot surface growth rate and therefore to the increase of soot volume fraction. By adjusting a model constant in the soot surface growth rate, the soot emissions in both pressure p = 1 atm and p = 3 atm are properly simulated by the current semi-empirical soot model.

  4. Soot Aerosol Properties in Laminar Soot-Emitting Microgravity Nonpremixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konsur, Bogdan; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1999-01-01

    The 0-g flame soot measurements reported in previous studies are extended by adding new 0-g data for different fuel flow rates and burner diameters. The new flame conditions allow more conclusive comparisons regarding the effect of characteristic flow residence times on soot field structure, the influence of fuel preheat on fuel pyrolysis rates near the flame centerline, and the premature cessation of soot growth along the soot annulus in 0-g when the fuel is preheated. The paper also reports on the implementation of thermophoretic soot sampling in a specific 0-g flame featuring burner exit velocities typical of buoyant flames and presents quantitative data on the radial variation of soot microstructure at a fixed height above the burner mouth.

  5. Electrically heated particulate matter filter soot control system

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2016-03-15

    A regeneration system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A control module determines a current soot loading level of the PM filter and compares the current soot loading level to a predetermined soot loading level. The control module permits regeneration of the PM filter when the current soot loading level is less than the predetermined soot loading level.

  6. Lube oil-dependent ash chemistry on soot oxidation reactivity in a gasoline direct-injection engine

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seungmok; Seong, Heeje

    2016-09-30

    Gasoline particulate filters (GPF) are considered an enabling technology to meet stringent particulate matter (PM) regulations for gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engines, which are known to produce significant PM emissions. While ash loading in filters has been recognized to be detrimental in filter performance by increasing back pressure, increased ash fractions in soot were observed to enhance soot oxidation. In this study, GDI soot samples derived from different gasoline/lube oil blends were evaluated to identify potential promoting factors when formulated lube oils were dosed into gasoline fuel. Ca-derived ash enhanced soot oxidation remarkably, while P- and ZDDP-derived ash deteriorated soot oxidation. It is apparent that the promoting effect of lube oil-derived ash is due mainly to the Ca component that is the most abundant among additive components in lube oil. Bulk and surface analyses of these ash compounds indicate that Ca-derived ash would be complex compounds, while the contribution of CaSO4, which is one of the most abundant ash compounds from diesel engines, is almost negligible. For the validation of the ash promoting impact in filters, the regeneration experiments were compared for a TWC-coated GPF in a GDI engine before and after ash loading was performed. The pressure drop of the ash-loaded GPF decreased noticeably in the initial regeneration stage and it increased gradually, whereas that of no ash-loaded GPF increased gradually without any reduction. So, it is concluded that the ash layer in the GPF assisted soot oxidation in the early regeneration stage when it was in close contact with soot.

  7. Lube oil-dependent ash chemistry on soot oxidation reactivity in a gasoline direct-injection engine

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Seungmok; Seong, Heeje

    2016-09-30

    Gasoline particulate filters (GPF) are considered an enabling technology to meet stringent particulate matter (PM) regulations for gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engines, which are known to produce significant PM emissions. While ash loading in filters has been recognized to be detrimental in filter performance by increasing back pressure, increased ash fractions in soot were observed to enhance soot oxidation. In this study, GDI soot samples derived from different gasoline/lube oil blends were evaluated to identify potential promoting factors when formulated lube oils were dosed into gasoline fuel. Ca-derived ash enhanced soot oxidation remarkably, while P- and ZDDP-derived ash deteriorated soot oxidation.more » It is apparent that the promoting effect of lube oil-derived ash is due mainly to the Ca component that is the most abundant among additive components in lube oil. Bulk and surface analyses of these ash compounds indicate that Ca-derived ash would be complex compounds, while the contribution of CaSO4, which is one of the most abundant ash compounds from diesel engines, is almost negligible. For the validation of the ash promoting impact in filters, the regeneration experiments were compared for a TWC-coated GPF in a GDI engine before and after ash loading was performed. The pressure drop of the ash-loaded GPF decreased noticeably in the initial regeneration stage and it increased gradually, whereas that of no ash-loaded GPF increased gradually without any reduction. So, it is concluded that the ash layer in the GPF assisted soot oxidation in the early regeneration stage when it was in close contact with soot.« less

  8. Soot Aerosol Properties in Laminar Soot-Emitting Microgravity Nonpremixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konsur, Bogdan; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1999-01-01

    The spatial distributions and morphological properties of the soot aerosol are examined experimentally in a series of 0-g laminar gas-jet nonpremixed flames. The methodology deploys round jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted acetylene fuel burning in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure. Full-field laser-light extinction is utilized to determine transient soot spatial distributions within the flames. Thermophoretic sampling is employed in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy to define soot microstructure within the soot-emitting 0-g flames. The microgravity tests indicate that the 0-g flames attain a quasi-steady state roughly 0.7 s after ignition, and sustain their annular structure even beyond their luminous flame tip. The measured peak soot volume fractions show a complex dependence on burner exit conditions, and decrease in a nonlinear fashion with decreasing characteristic flow residence times. Fuel preheat by approximately 140 K appears to accelerate the formation of soot near the flame axis via enhanced fuel pyrolysis rates. The increased soot presence caused by the elevated fuel injection temperatures triggers higher flame radiative losses, which may account for the premature suppression of soot growth observed along the annular region of preheated-fuel flames. Electron micrographs of soot aggregates collected in 0-g reveal the presence of soot precursor particles near the symmetry axis at midflame height, The observations also verify that soot primary particle sizes are nearly uniform among aggregates present at the same flame location, but vary considerably with radius at a fixed distance from the burner. The maximum primary size in 0-g is found to be by 40% larger than in 1-g, under the same burner exit conditions. Estimates of the number concentration of primary particles and surface area of soot particulate phase per unit volume of the combustion gases are also made for selected in-flame locations.

  9. Oxidation kinetics and soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1983-01-01

    The research objective is to clarify the role of aromaticity in the soot nucleation process by determining the relative importance of phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions in the complex combustion of aromatic compounds. Three sets of chemical flow reactor experiments have been designed to determine the relative importance of the phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions. The essential elements of these experiments are 1) the use of cresols and anisole formed during the high temperature oxidation of toluene as chemical reaction indicators; 2) the in situ photolysis of molecular oxygen to provide an oxygen atom perturbation in the reacting aromatic system; and 3) the high temperature pyrolysis of phenol, the cresols and possibly anisole.

  10. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  11. Effects of nucleating species on soot formation in turbulent non-premixed sooting jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Abhishek; Xuan, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Soot nucleation is one of the most unknown processes in the soot life cycle, and it is believed to occur from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) generated from the combustion of various fuel sources under locally fuel-rich conditions. Current soot nucleation models may include as few as one (typically naphthalene) or as many as a dozen of nucleating species. In this study, the effects of PAH inclusion in the soot nucleation model on soot yield and distribution are studied by means of Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of two piloted turbulent non-premixed sooting jet flames, using ethylene and a jet fuel surrogate, respectively. Two sets of simulations are performed for each flame, one considering only a single nucleating PAH (naphthalene) and the other one considering a range of nucleating PAH from naphthalene to cyclopenta[cd]pyrene. Flamelet-based chemistry tabulation is used for the major thermochemical quantities, and a recently developed relaxation model is used for PAH species to account for the interactions between turbulence and their chemistry. The effects of nucleating PAH species on soot are highlighted by comparing the mean soot volume fraction distributions and statistical characteristics of soot obtained from both sets of simulations against experimental measurements. Graduate Student, MNE.

  12. Effect of some Turkish vegetable oil-diesel fuel blends on exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Ergeneman, M.; Oezaktas, T.; Cigizoglu, K.B.; Karaosmanoglu, F.; Arslan, E.

    1997-10-01

    For different types of vegetable oils of Turkish origin (sunflower, corn, soybean, and olive oil) were blended with grade No. 2-D diesel fuel at a ratio of 20/80 (v/v). The effect of the compression ratio on exhaust emissions is investigated in an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)-cooperative fuel research (CFR) engine working with the mentioned fuel blends and a baseline diesel fuel. A decrease in soot, CO, CO{sub 2}, and HC emissions and an increase in NO{sub x} emissions have been observed for fuel blends compared to diesel fuel.

  13. IR spectroscopic investigation of the structure of water-fuel microemulsion for diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Lozhkin, V. N.; Morozov, V. A.; Lozhkina, O. V.; Pimenov, Yu. A.

    2016-09-01

    The structures of a microemulsion formed by a surfactant (ammonium oleate), water drops of a linear size of 1-3 µm, and a diesel fuel has been investigated using IR spectroscopy. It has been found that ammonium oleate molecules in the microemulsion are dissociated on the positive NH4 + ion and the negative ion of the remaining part of the molecule, which forms the hydrogen bond with water molecules. This increases the rate of water, evaporation and leads to the more complete combustion of the diesel fuel. As a result, the concentration of harmful nitrogen oxides and soot particles in the exhaust gas of the diesel engine decreases.

  14. Diesel combustion: an integrated view combining laser diagnostics, chemical kinetics, and empirical validation

    SciTech Connect

    Akinyami, O C; Dec, J E; Durrett, R P; Flynn, P F; Hunter, G L; Loye, A O; Westbrook, C

    1999-02-01

    This paper proposes a structure for the diesel combustion process based on a combination of previously published and new results. Processes are analyzed with proven chemical kinetic models and validated with data from production-like direct injection diesel engines. The analysis provides new insight into the ignition and particulate formation processes, which combined with laser diagnostics, delineates the two-stage nature of combustion in diesel engines. Data are presented to quantify events occurring during the ignition and initial combustion processes that form soot precursors. A framework is also proposed for understanding the heat release and emission formation processes.

  15. Estimating soot emissions from an elevated flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanza, Victor; Sosa, Gustavo

    2009-11-01

    Combustion aerosols are one of the major concerns in flaring operations, due to both health and environmental hazards. Preliminary results are presented for a 2D transient simulation of soot formation in a reacting jet with exit velocity of 130 m/s under a 5 m/s crossflow released from a 50 m high elevated flare and a 50 cm nozzle. Combustion dynamics was simulated with OpenFOAM. Gas-phase non-premixed combustion was modeled with the Chalmers PaSR approach and a κ-ɛ turbulence model. For soot formation, Moss model was used and the ISAT algorithm for solving the chemistry. Sulfur chemistry was considered to account for the sourness of the fuel. Gas composition is 10 % H2S and 90 % C2H4. A simplified Glassman reaction mechanism was used for this purpose. Results show that soot levels are sensitive to the sulfur present in the fuel, since it was observed a slight decrease in the soot volume fraction. NSC is the current oxidation model for soot formation. Predicted temperature is high (about 2390 K), perhaps due to soot-radiation interaction is not considered yet, but a radiation model implementation is on progress, as well as an oxidation mechanism that accounts for OH radical. Flame length is about 50 m.

  16. Conductivity for soot sensing: possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Grob, Benedikt; Schmid, Johannes; Ivleva, Natalia P; Niessner, Reinhard

    2012-04-17

    In this study we summarize the possibilities and limitations of a conductometric measurement principle for soot sensing. The electrical conductivity of different carbon blacks (FW 200, lamp black 101, Printex 30, Printex U, Printex XE2, special black 4, and special black 6), spark discharge soot (GfG), and graphite powder was measured by a van der Pauw arrangement. Additionally the influence of inorganic admixtures on the conductivity of carbonaceous materials was proven to follow the percolation theory. Structural and oxidation characteristics obtained with Raman microspectroscopy and temperature programmed oxidation, respectively, were correlated with the electrical conductivity data. Moreover, a thermophoretic precipitator has been applied to deposit soot particles from the exhaust stream between interdigital electrodes. This combines a controlled and size independent particle collection method with the conductivity measurement principle. A test vehicle was equipped with the AVL Micro Soot Sensor (photoacoustic soot sensor) to prove the conductometric sensor principle with an independent and reliable technique. Our results demonstrate promising potential of the conductometric sensor for on-board particle diagnostic. Furthermore this sensor can be applied as a simple, rapid, and cheap analytical tool for characterization of soot structure.

  17. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  18. Research on soot of black smoke from ceramic furnace flue gas: characterization of soot.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Xie, Xuwen; Cai, Zhihong; Zhou, Yangxin; Zhao, Yapei; Zhan, Qi; Zeng, Zheng

    2012-01-15

    In this study, the characterizations of soot from ceramic furnace flue gas were studied using environmental scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle size distribution, specific surface area measurements, crystal characterizations and organic pollutant analysis. Soot particles were mainly spherical nanoparticles with diameters less than 100 nm. However, the particles could be aggregated into larger ones with a median diameter of 3.66 μm. Nanometer pores with diameters ranging 2-4 nm were also detected in the soot particles. Because of their large surface areas and pore volumes, other pollutants in the environment can be adsorbed to soot particles potentially making them more hazardous. Several elements, including C, O and Pb, were detected in the soot, but only small amounts of crystalline materials were observed. This is because most of the detected carbon and metals/metal oxides/metal salts were amorphous. Approximately 90 different organic pollutants were detected in the soot, including aromatic compounds and other hydrocarbons. Because of the carcinogenic properties of aromatic compounds and the photochemical effects of hydrocarbons, soot could have serious health and environmental impacts. The results suggest that soot particles are hazardous material and urgently need to be controlled.

  19. A study of jet fuel sooting tendency using the threshold sooting index (TSI) model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yi; Boehman, Andre L.; Santoro, Robert J.

    2007-04-15

    Fuel composition can have a significant effect on soot formation during gas turbine combustion. Consequently, this paper contains a comprehensive review of the relationship between fuel hydrocarbon composition and soot formation in gas turbine combustors. Two levels of correlation are identified. First, lumped fuel composition parameters such as hydrogen content and smoke point, which are conventionally used to represent fuel sooting tendency, are correlated with soot formation in practical combustors. Second, detailed fuel hydrocarbon composition is correlated with these lumped parameters. The two-level correlation makes it possible to predict soot formation in practical combustors from basic fuel composition data. Threshold sooting index (TSI), which correlates linearly with the ratio of fuel molecular weight and smoke point in a diffusion flame, is proposed as a new lumped parameter for sooting tendency correlation. It is found that the TSI model correlates excellently with hydrocarbon compositions over a wide range of fuel samples. Also, in predicting soot formation in actual combustors, the TSI model produces the best results overall in comparison with other previously reported correlating parameters, including hydrogen content, smoke point, and composite predictors containing more than one parameter. (author)

  20. Soot Deposit Properties in Practical Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Preciado, Ignacio; Eddings, Eric G.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Porter, Wallace D; Lance, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Soot deposition from hydrocarbon flames was investigated in order to evaluate the evolution of the deposits during the transient process of heating an object that starts with a cold metal surface that is exposed to a flame. The study focused on the fire/metal surface interface and the critical issues associated with the specification of the thermal boundaries at this interface, which include the deposition of soot on the metal surface, the chemical and physical properties of the soot deposits and their subsequent effect on heat transfer to the metal surface. A laboratory-scale device (metallic plates attached to a water-cooled sampling probe) was designed for studying soot deposition in a laminar ethylene-air premixed flame. The metallic plates facilitate the evaluation of the deposition rates and deposit characteristics such as deposit thickness, bulk density, PAH content, deposit morphology, and thermal properties, under both water-cooled and uncooled conditions. Additionally, a non-intrusive Laser Flash Technique (in which the morphology of the deposit is not modified) was used to estimate experimental thermal conductivity values for soot deposits as a function of deposition temperature (water-cooled and uncooled experiments), location within the flame and chemical characteristics of the deposits. Important differences between water-cooled and uncooled surfaces were observed. Thermophoresis dominated the soot deposition process and enhanced higher deposition rates for the water-cooled experiments. Cooler surface temperatures resulted in the inclusion of increased amounts of condensable hydrocarbons in the soot deposit. The greater presence of condensable material promoted decreased deposit thicknesses, larger deposit densities, different deposit morphologies, and higher thermal conductivities.

  1. Sensitivity and bias of molecular marker-based aerosol source apportionment models to small conltibutions of coal combustion soot.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Andrew P; Snyder, David C; Schauer, James J; DeMinter, Jeff; Shelton, Brandon

    2009-10-15

    Carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM25) collected in the midwestern United States revealed that soot emissions from incomplete coal combustion were important sources of several organic molecular markers used in source apportionment studies. Despite not constituting a major source of organic carbon in the PM25, coal soot was an important source of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, hopanes, and elemental carbon. These marker compounds are becoming widely used for source apportionment of atmospheric organic PM, meaning that significant emissions of these marker compounds from unaccounted sources such as coal soot could bias apportionment results. This concept was demonstrated using measurements of atmospheric PM collected on a 1-in-6 day schedule at three monitoring sites in Ohio: Mingo Junction (near Steubenville), Cincinnati, and Cleveland. Impacts of coal sootwere measured to be significant at Mingo Junction and small at Cleveland and Cincinnati. As a result, biases in apportionment results were substantial at Mingo Junction and insignificant at Cleveland and Cincinnati. Misapportionments of organic carbon mass at Mingo Junction were significant when coal soot was detected in the particulate samples as identified bythe presence of picene, but when coal soot was not included in the model: gasoline engines (+8% to +58% of OC), smoking engines (0% to -17% of OC), biomass combustion (+1% to +11% of OC), diesel engines (-1% to -2% of OC), natural gas combustion (0% to -2% of OC), and unapportioned OC (0% to -47% of OC). These results suggest that the role of coal soot in source apportionment studies needs to be better examined in many parts of the United States and other parts of the world.

  2. Series of Laminar Soot Processes Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (189KB JPEG, 1350 x 1517 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300183.html.

  3. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-04-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify, and to confirm or determine rate constants for, the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize soot and fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics. Stable and radical species profiles in the aromatics oxidation study are measured using molecular beam sampling with on-line mass spectrometry. The rate of soot formation measured by conventional optical techniques is found to support the hypotheses that particle inception occurs through reactive coagulation of high molecular weight PAH in competition with destruction by OHattack, and that the subsequent growth of the soot mass occurs through addition reactions of PAH and C[sub 2]H[sub 2] with the soot particles. During the first year of this reporting period, fullerenes C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] in substantial quantities were found in the flames being studied. The fullerenes were recovered, purified and spectroscopically identified. The yields of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] were then determined over ranges of conditions in low-pressure premixed flames of benzene and oxygen.

  4. Scattering and radiative properties of complex soot and soot-containing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Mackowski, D. W.; Dlugach, J.

    2012-12-01

    Tropospheric soot and soot containing aerosols often exhibit nonspherical overall shapes and complex morphologies. They can externally, semi-externally, and internally mix with other aerosol species. This poses a tremendous challenge in particle characterization, remote sensing, and global climate modeling studies. To address these challenges, we used the new numerically exact public-domain Fortran-90 code based on the superposition T-matrix method (STMM) and other theoretical models to analyze the potential effects of aggregation and heterogeneity on light scattering and absorption by morphologically complex soot containing particles. The parameters we computed include the whole scattering matrix elements, linear depolarization ratios, optical cross-sections, asymmetry parameters, and single scattering albedos. It is shown that the optical characteristics of soot and soot containing aerosols very much depend on particle sizes, compositions, and aerosol overall shapes. The soot particle configurations and heterogeneities can have a substantial effect that can result in a significant enhancement of extinction and absorption relative to those computed from the Lorenz-Mie theory. Meanwhile the model calculated information combined with in-situ and remote sensed data can be used to constrain soot particle shapes and sizes which are much needed in climate models.

  5. Digital camera measurements of soot temperature and soot volume fraction in axisymmetric flames.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiqing; Castillo, Jose A; Sunderland, Peter B

    2013-11-20

    New diagnostics are presented that use a digital camera to measure full-field soot temperatures and soot volume fractions in axisymmetric flames. The camera is a Nikon D700 with 12 megapixels and 14 bit depth in each color plane, which was modified by removing the infrared and anti-aliasing filters. The diagnostics were calibrated with a blackbody furnace. The flame considered here was an 88 mm long ethylene/air co-flowing laminar jet diffusion flame on a round 11.1 mm burner. The resolution in the flame plane is estimated at between 0.1 and 0.7 mm. Soot temperatures were measured from soot radiative emissions, using ratio pyrometry at 450, 650, and 900 nm following deconvolution. These had a range of 1600-1850 K, a temporal resolution of 125 ms, and an estimated uncertainty of ±50  K. Soot volume fractions were measured two ways: from soot radiative emissions and from soot laser extinction at 632.8 nm, both following deconvolution. Soot volume fractions determined from emissions had a range of 0.1-10 ppm, temporal resolutions of 125 ms, and an estimated uncertainty of ±30%. Soot volume fractions determined from laser extinction had a range of 0.2-10 ppm, similar temporal resolutions, and an estimated uncertainty of ±10%. The present measurements agree with past measurements in this flame using traversing optics and probes; however, they avoid the long test times and other complications of such traditional methods.

  6. Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Rose, Leanna S

    2002-04-20

    Solar-reflective roofs remain cooler than absorptive roofs and thus conserve electricity otherwise needed for air conditioning. A currently controversial aspect of solar-reflective cool roofing is the extent to which an initially high solar reflectance decreases with time. We present experimental data on the spectral absorption of deposits that accumulate on roofs, and we attribute most of the absorption to carbon soot originally produced by combustion. The deposits absorb more at short wavelengths (e.g., in the blue) than in the red and infrared, imparting a slightly yellow tinge to formerly white surfaces. The initial rate of reflectance reduction by soot accumulation is consistent with known emission rates that are due to combustion. The long-term reflectance change appears to be determined by the ability of the soot to adhere to the roof, resisting washout by rain.

  7. Soot agglomeration in isolated, free droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, M. Y.; Dryer, F. L.; Green, G. J.; Sangiovanni, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Under the conditions of an isolated, free droplet experiment, hollow, carbonaceous structures, called soot spheres, were observed to form during the atmospheric pressure, low Reynolds number combustion of 1-methylnaphthalene. These structures which are agglomerates composed of smaller spheroidal units result from both thermophoretic effects induced by the envelope flame surrounding each drop and aerodynamic effects caused by changes in the relative gas/drop velocities. A chemically reacting flow model was used to analyze the process of sootshell formation during microgravity droplet combustion. The time-dependent temperature and gas property field surrounding the droplet was determined, and the soot cloud location for microgravity combustion of n-heptane droplets was predicted. Experiments showed that the sooting propensity of n-alkane fuel droplets can be varied through diluent substitution, oxygen-index variations, and ambient pressure reductions.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this work was on kinetic modeling. The specific objectives were: detailed modeling of soot formation in premixed flames, elucidation of the effects of fuel structure on the pathway to soot, and the development of a numerical technique for accurate modeling of soot particle coagulation and surface growth. Those tasks were successfully completed and are briefly summarized.

  9. Soot precursor measurements in benzene and hexane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Furuhata, T.; Amagai, K.; Arai, M.

    2008-08-15

    To clarify the mechanism of soot formation in diffusion flames of liquid fuels, measurements of soot and its precursors were carried out. Sooting diffusion flames formed by a small pool combustion equipment system were used for this purpose. Benzene and hexane were used as typical aromatic and paraffin fuels. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method was used to obtain spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are considered as soot particles. Spatial distributions of soot in test flames were measured by a laser-induced incandescence (LII) method. Soot diameter was estimated from the temporal change of LII intensity. A region of transition from PAHs to soot was defined from the results of LIF and LII. Flame temperatures, PAH species, and soot diameters in this transition region were investigated for both benzene and hexane flames. The results show that though the flame structures of benzene and hexane were different, the temperature in the PAHs-soot transition region of the benzene flame was similar to that of the hexane flame. Furthermore, the relationship between the PAH concentrations measured by gas chromatography in both flames and the PAH distributions obtained from LIF are discussed. It was found that PAHs with smaller molecular mass, such as benzene and toluene, remained in both the PAHs-soot transition and sooting regions, and it is thought that molecules heavier than pyrene are the leading candidates for soot precursor formation. (author)

  10. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

  11. Influence of preexisting pulmonary emphysema on susceptibility of rats to inhaled diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Griffith, W.C.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Wolff, R.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The susceptibilities of normal rats and rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema to chronically inhaled diesel exhaust were compared. Rats were exposed 7 h/day, 5 days/wk for 24 months to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as controls. Emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of elastase 6 wk before exhaust exposure. Measurements included lung burdens of diesel soot, respiratory function, bronchoalveolar lavage, clearance of radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses, lung collagen, excised lung weight and volume, histopathology, and mean linear intercept of terminal air spaces. Parameters indicated by analysis of variance to exhibit significant interactions between the influences of emphysema and exhaust were examined to determine if the effects were more than additive (indicating increased susceptibility). Although 14 of 63 parameters demonstrated emphysema-exhaust interactions, none indicated increased susceptibility. Less soot accumulated in lungs of emphysematous rats than in those of nonemphysematous rats, and the reduced accumulation had a sparing effect in the emphysematous rats. The results did not support the hypothesis that emphysematous lungs are more susceptible than are normal lungs to chronic exposure to high levels of diesel exhaust. The superimposition of effects of emphysema and exhaust, however, might still warrant special concern for heavy exposures of emphysematous subjects.

  12. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  13. Automated classification of single airborne particles from two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns by non-linear filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Pan, Yong-Le; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Casati, Caterina; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Chang, Richard K.; Videen, Gorden W.

    2013-12-01

    Measurement of two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns is an attractive technique for detecting and characterizing micron-sized airborne particles. In general, the interpretation of these patterns and the retrieval of the particle refractive index, shape or size alone, are difficult problems. By reformulating the problem in statistical learning terms, a solution is proposed herewith: rather than identifying airborne particles from their scattering patterns, TAOS patterns themselves are classified through a learning machine, where feature extraction interacts with multivariate statistical analysis. Feature extraction relies on spectrum enhancement, which includes the discrete cosine FOURIER transform and non-linear operations. Multivariate statistical analysis includes computation of the principal components and supervised training, based on the maximization of a suitable figure of merit. All algorithms have been combined together to analyze TAOS patterns, organize feature vectors, design classification experiments, carry out supervised training, assign unknown patterns to classes, and fuse information from different training and recognition experiments. The algorithms have been tested on a data set with more than 3000 TAOS patterns. The parameters that control the algorithms at different stages have been allowed to vary within suitable bounds and are optimized to some extent. Classification has been targeted at discriminating aerosolized Bacillus subtilis particles, a simulant of anthrax, from atmospheric aerosol particles and interfering particles, like diesel soot. By assuming that all training and recognition patterns come from the respective reference materials only, the most satisfactory classification result corresponds to 20% false negatives from B. subtilis particles and <11% false positives from all other aerosol particles. The most effective operations have consisted of thresholding TAOS patterns in order to reject defective ones

  14. Diesel exhaust, diesel fumes, and laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Muscat, J E; Wynder, E L

    1995-03-01

    A hospital-based, case-control study of 235 male patients with laryngeal cancer and 205 male control patients was conducted to determine the effects of exposure to diesel engine exhaust and diesel fumes and the risk of laryngeal cancer. All patients were interviewed directly in the hospital with a standardized questionnaire that gathered information on smoking habits, alcohol consumption, employment history, and occupational exposures. Occupations that involve substantial exposure to diesel engine exhaust include mainly truck drivers, as well as mine workers, firefighters, and railroad workers. The odds ratio for laryngeal cancer associated with these occupations was 0.96 (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 1.8). The odds ratio for self-reported exposure to diesel exhaust was 1.47 (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 4.1). An elevated risk was found for self-reported exposure to diesel fumes (odds ratio, 6.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 22.6). No association was observed between jobs that entail exposure to diesel fumes, such as automobile mechanics, and the risk of laryngeal cancer. These results show that diesel engine exhaust is unrelated to laryngeal cancer risk. The different findings for self-reported diesel fumes and occupations that involve exposure to diesel fumes could reflect a recall bias.

  15. The many faces of soot: characterization of soot nanoparticles produced by engines.

    PubMed

    Niessner, Reinhard

    2014-11-10

    Soot nanoparticles produced by engines constitute a threat to human health. For the analytical chemist, soot is a hard nut to crack as the released particles undergo rapid changes in their size, shape, and number concentration. The complete characterization of soot will be essential to meet future low-emission standards. Besides measuring the light extinction, modern analytical chemistry can determine a variety of less-known effects, such as condensation properties, immune response in vertebrates, and impact on the cardiovascular function of a beating heart. Photon emission and in particular Raman spectroscopy provides information on the nanocrystallinity, while thermoelectron emission allows the number of electrical particles to be counted. Even the "simple" combustion of soot nanoparticles offers potential for the characterization of the particles.

  16. PM0.1 emissions during diesel trap regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cauda, E; Hernandez, S; Fino, D; Saracco, G; Specchia, V

    2006-09-01

    A nanostructured spinel-type oxide catalyst (CoCr2O4) prepared by solution combustion synthesis was developed and deposited over a SiC wall-flow trap for diesel particulate removal. Bench tests proved that, after soot loading, the developed trap enables a faster and more complete regeneration at 550 degrees C than a commercial Pt-catalyst based trap or a noncatalyzed trap. On the other hand, secondary nanoparticle emission occurs during the fast regeneration promoted by the CoCr2O4-catalyzed trap. This is a likely consequence of oxidative fragmentation of the trapped soot agglomerates. This problem can be resolved by performing a "mild" regeneration at lower temperatures (e.g., 450 degrees C).

  17. Diesel combustion and emissions, congress and exposition, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The volume contains 23 technical papers discussing combustion and emissions of light diesel engines of the direct and indirect injection types used in passenger cars and light trucks. Information includes methods of generating data (optically, by gas and soot sampling, by hot-wire anemometry, from gas-flame temperature, and from pressure). Variables measured include piston-bowl shape, injection timing, load, speed, and fuel. Computed or analyzed results, as a function of combustion chamber location and crank angle, include local fuel equivalence ratio, soot formation and destruction, chemical species, air entrainment, and turbulence. Data, and analysis techniques useful in modeling are described. Effects on exhaust pollution measurements arising from dilution ratio, filter temperature, and engine-oil consumption are also discussed. 12 papers are indexed separately.

  18. Diesel combustion and emissions, congress and exposition, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The volume contains 23 technical papers discussing combustion and emissions of light diesel engines of the direct and indirect injection types used in passenger cars and light trucks. Information includes methods of generating data (optically, by gas and soot sampling, by hot-wire anemometry, from gas-flame temperature, and from pressure). Variables measured include piston-bowl shape, injection timing, load, speed, and fuel. Computed or analyzed results, as a function of combustion chamber location and crank angle, include local fuel equivalence ratio, soot formation and destruction, chemical species, air entrainment, and turbulence. Data, and analysis techniques useful in modeling are described. Effects on exhaust pollution measurements arising from dilution ratio, filter temperature, and engine-oil consumption are also discussed. All 23 papers are indexed separately.

  19. [Backscattering spectrum analysis of nonspheroid soot particle].

    PubMed

    Xing, Jian; Sun, Xiao-gang; Yuan, Gui-bin; Qi, Xu; Tang, Hong

    2010-08-01

    In the process of measuring soot concentration and grain diameter, the backscattering spectrum of soot particle model was calculated to ascertain and analyze main effective factor of backscattering intensity. In the present paper, ellipsoid, column and generalized Chebyshev, three nonspheroid models, were selected according to micrograph of practical soot particle, which aims to simulate practical soot particle with equivalent diameter of about 1 microm. T-matrix method was used to calculate backscattering spectrum of the three nonspheriod models, and the main effective factor curves of intensity were obtained, too. Both numerical computer simulations and experimental results illustrate that nonspheroid particle backscattering intensity is stronger than that of spheroid particle in the visible/infrared spectrum band, especially for generalized Chebyshev model, whose backscattering intensity can be even 3.5 times higher than that of forward scattering. Meanwhile, the absorbency non-spheroid particle (complex refractive index m = 1.57 - 0.56i) backscattering intensity is stronger than that of non-absorbency nonspheriod particle (complex refractive index m = 1.57 - 0.001i). Furthermore, with the increase in particle equivalent radius, the light source wavelength also needs to be increase to obtain more light intensity information. The backscattering light spectrum information provides a reasonable basis for selecting light source and measure angle.

  20. Soot profiles in boundary-layer flames

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, R.A.; Pagni, P.J.

    1981-12-01

    Carbon particulate volume fractions and approximate particle size distributions are measured in a free laminar combusting boundary layer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, cyclohexene, toluene) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). A multiwavelength laser transmission technique determines a most probable radius and the total particle concentration, which are two parameters in an assumed form for the size distribution. In the combusting boundary layer, a sooting region exists between the pyrolyzing fuel surface and the flame zone. The liquid fuel soot volume fractions, f/sub v/, range from f/sub v/ approx. 10/sup -7/ for n-heptane, a paraffin, to f/sub v approx. 10/sup -5/ for toluene, an aromatic. The PMMA volume fractions, f/sub v/ approx. 5 X 10/sup -7/, are approximately the same as the values previously reported for pool fires. The soot volume fractions increase with height; convection of carbon particles downstream widens the soot region with height. For all fuels tested, the most probable radius is between 20 nm and 50 nm, and it changes only slightly with height and distance from the fuel surface.

  1. Precursor soot synthesis of fullerenes and nanotubes without formation of carbonaceous soot

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2007-03-20

    The present invention is a method for the synthesis of fullerenes and/or nanotubes from precursor soot without the formation of carbonaceous soot. The method comprises the pyrolysis of a hydrocarbon fuel source by heating the fuel source at a sufficient temperature to transform the fuel source to a condensed hydrocarbon. The condensed hydrocarbon is a reaction medium comprising precursor soot wherein hydrogen exchange occurs within the reaction medium to form reactive radicals which cause continuous rearrangement of the carbon skeletal structure of the condensed hydrocarbon. Then, inducing dehydrogenation of the precursor soot to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes free from the formation of carbonaceous soot by continued heating at the sufficient temperature and by regulating the carbon to hydrogen ratio within the reaction medium. The dehydrogenation process produces hydrogen gas as a by-product. The method of the present invention in another embodiment is also a continuous synthesis process having a continuous supply of the fuel source. The method of the present invention can also be a continuous cyclic synthesis process wherein the reaction medium is fed back into the system as a fuel source after extraction of the fullerenes and/or nanotube products. The method of the present invention is also a method for producing precursor soot in bulk quantity, then forming fullerenes and/or nanotubes from the precursor bulk.

  2. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  3. Learn About Clean Diesel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The clean diesel program is designed to aggressively reduce the pollution emitted from diesel engines across the country through the implementation of varied control strategies and the aggressive involvement of national, state, and local partners.

  4. Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative (MCDI) is a collaboration of federal, state and local agencies, along with communities, non-profit organizations and private companies working together by reducing exposure to emissions from diesel engines

  5. Clean Diesel Tribal Grants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The DERA Tribal Program awards clean diesel grants specifically for tribal nations. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication Numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  6. Clean Diesel National Grants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    National Funding Assistance Program administers competitive grants for clean diesel projects. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  7. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  8. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  9. Diesel Vehicle Maintenance Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Robert; And Others

    Designed to provide a model set of competencies, this manual presents tasks which were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary diesel vehicle maintenance curriculum. The tasks are divided into seven major component areas of instruction: chassis and suspension, diesel engines, diesel fuel, electrical,…

  10. Application of an Ir tracer to determine soot exposure to students commuting to school on Baltimore public buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Charles C.; Suarez, Ana E.; Lin, Zhibo; Kidwell, Christopher B.; Borgoul, Polina V.; Caffrey, Peter F.; Ondov, John M.; Sattler, Barbara

    An important component of urban aerosol, diesel soot is a known respiratory irritant and contains mutagenic and carcinogenic organic compounds. To estimate student exposures to soot emitted from public diesel buses during commutes to city high schools, a portion of the Baltimore municipal fuel supply was tagged with an iridium tracer and exposure was monitored during commutes with personal aerosol monitors as a part of an Environmental Justice Project. A total of 68.2 g of Ir as iridium(III)-2,4-pentanedionate were used to induce a concentration of 48.5 μg Ir ℓ -1 of fuel. Twenty samples were collected over 10 days while four students commuted on regularly scheduled buses and a fifth student commuted by private car. Individual samples integrated from 1 to 4 round trips. Iridium analyses were performed instrumentally after neutron activation with a detection limit (DL) of about 500 fg. For students commuting by bus and following protocols, Ir tracer concentrations ranged from 53±38 to >1980±49 fg m -3. Concentrations up to 3530±220 fg m -3 were observed for student #5, who sampled only when boarding and disembarking. Exposure were greatest for students commuting through the heavily trafficked central business district. Corresponding estimates of exposures to soot emitted from municipal buses ranged from ⩽3 to 82 ng soot m -3 (⩽145 ng m -3 for student #5), i.e. well below the exposure level of 2-10 μg m -3 total C from all sources, including the more than 30,000 diesel trucks which pass through the city's major toll facilities each day. Ir was undetectable in samples collected by the student commuting by car when its windows were closed, but comparable to those of the other students when commutes were made with windows open. The Ir tracer DL corresponds to about 21 ng soot, about half of which is carbon. This is far below the 230 ng reported for analysis by a highly sensitive thermal-optical technique.

  11. Diesel emissions in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, H.; Kreiner, I.; Norek, C.; Preining, O.; Georgi, B.

    The aerosol in a non-industrial town normally is dominated by emissions from vehicles. Whereas gasoline-powered cars normally only emit a small amount of particulates, the emission by diesel-powered cars is considerable. The aerosol particles produced by diesel engines consist of graphitic carbon (GC) with attached hydrocarbons (HCs) including also polyaromatic HCs. Therefore the diesel particles can be carcinogenic. Besides diesel vehicles, all other combustion processes are also a source for GC; thus source apportionment of diesel emissions to the GC in the town is difficult. A direct apportionment of diesel emissions has been made possible by marking all the diesel fuel used by the vehicles in Vienna by a normally not occurring and easily detectable substance. All emitted diesel particles thus were marked with the tracer and by analyzing the atmospheric samples for the marking substance we found that the mass concentrations of diesel particles in the atmosphere varied between 5 and 23 μg m -3. Busy streets and calm residential areas show less difference in mass concentration than expected. The deposition of diesel particles on the ground has been determined by collecting samples from the road surface. The concentration of the marking substance was below the detection limit before the marking period and a year after the period. During the period when marked diesel fuel was used, the concentrations of the diesel particles settling to the ground was 0.012-0.07 g g -1 of collected dust. A positive correlation between the diesel vehicle density and the sampled mass of diesel vehicles exists. In Vienna we have a background diesel particle concentration of 11 μg m -3. This value increases by 5.5 μg m -3 per 500 diesel vehicles h -1 passing near the sampling location. The mass fraction of diesel particles of the total aerosol mass varied between 12.2 and 33%; the higher values were found in more remote areas, since diesel particles apparently diffuse easily

  12. Effect of soot microstructure on its ozonization reactivity.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; He, Hong

    2012-08-28

    Large uncertainty among the measured uptake coefficients of O(3) on soot highlights the importance of the sources and chemical structures of soot samples in this reaction. Soot samples with different microstructures were prepared by combusting n-hexane under controlled conditions. Their reactivities to O(3) were further investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The fuel/oxygen ratio in the combustion experiments not only affected the diameter of the primary particles, but also influenced the micro-chemical structure of soot. Average diameters of soot particles decreased with the decreasing fuel/oxygen ratio. Compared to the "fuel-rich" flame soot, the "fuel-lean" flame soot showed lower structural uniformity with higher disordered carbon content at the graphene layer edges (D1 band) and the surface graphene layers (D2 band) and the amorphous carbon content (D3 band). This disordered carbon was identified as the reactive component for the ozonization of both the "fuel-rich" and "fuel-lean" flame soot samples. The kinetics study demonstrated that the disordered carbon at the surface graphene layers was more active than that at the graphene layer edges in one sample, and the reactivity of these two microstructures types to O(3) in the "fuel-rich" flame soot was higher than that in the "fuel-lean" flame soot.

  13. Combustion Performance and Exhaust Emission of DI Diesel Engine Using Various Sources of Waste Cooking Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afiq, Mohd; Azuhairi, Mohd; Jazair, Wira

    2010-06-01

    In Malaysia, more than 200-tone of cooking oil are used by domestic users everyday. After frying process, about a quarter of these cooking oil was remained and drained into sewage system. This will pollutes waterways and affects the ecosystem. The use of waste cooking oil (WCO) for producing bio-diesel was considered in economical factor which current production cost of bio-diesel production is higher in Malaysia due to higher price of palm oil. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the most suitable source of WCO to become a main source of bio-diesel for bio-diesel production in this country. To perform this research, three type of WCO were obtained from house's kitchen, cafeteria and mamak's restaurant. In this study, prospect of these bio-diesel source was evaluated based on its combustion performance and exhaust emissions operated in diesel engine in the form of waste cooking oil methyl ester (WCOME) and have been compared with pure diesel fuel. A 0.6 liter, single-cylinder, air-cooled direct injection diesel engine was used to perform this experiment. Experiment was done at variable engine loads and constant engine speed. As the result, among three stated WCOMEs, the one collected from house's kitchen gives the best performance in term of brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) and brake power (BP) with lowest soot emission.

  14. The combustion behavior of diesel/CNG mixtures in a constant volume combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmansyah; Aziz, A. R. A.; Heikal, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The stringent emissions and needs to increase fuel efficiency makes controlled auto-ignition (CAI) based combustion an attractive alternative for the new combustion system. However, the combustion control is the main obstacles in its development. Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) that employs two fuels with significantly different in reactivity proven to be able to control the combustion. The RCCI concept applied in a constant volume chamber fuelled with direct injected diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) was tested. The mixture composition is varied from 0 - 100% diesel/CNG at lambda 1 with main data collection are pressure profile and combustion images. The results show that diesel-CNG mixture significantly shows better combustion compared to diesel only. It is found that CNG is delaying the diesel combustion and at the same time assisting in diesel distribution inside the chamber. This combination creates a multipoint ignition of diesel throughout the chamber that generate very fast heat release rate and higher maximum pressure. Furthermore, lighter yellow color of the flame indicates lower soot production in compared with diesel combustion.

  15. Effects of diesel exhaust on lung inflammation related to bacterial endotoxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-Ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Sakurai, Miho; Ueki, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that intratracheal instillation of diesel exhaust particles enhances lung inflammation and lung expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines related to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in mice. The present study was designed to elucidate the effects of inhalation of diesel exhaust on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide. ICR mice were exposed for 12 hr to clean air or diesel exhaust at a soot concentration of 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m(3) after intratracheal challenge with 125 microg/kg of lipopolysaccharide. Lung inflammation and lung expression of proinflammatory chemokines such as macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and keratinocyte chemoattractant were evaluated 24 hr after intratracheal administration. Diesel exhaust inhalation decreased lipopolysaccharide-elicited inflammatory cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as compared with clean air inhalation. Histological study demonstrated that exposure to diesel exhaust did not affect lipopolysaccharide-enhanced neutrophil recruitment into the lung parenchyma. Lipopolysaccharide instillation elevated lung expression of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and keratinocyte chemoattractant under clean air or diesel exhaust inhalation. However, diesel exhaust exposure did not influence but rather did suppress these levels in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. These results suggest that short-term exposure to diesel exhaust did not exacerbate lung inflammation related to bacterial endotoxin.

  16. Carbon Nanotube-like Materials in the Exhaust from a Diesel Engine Using Gas Oil/Ethanol Mixing Fuel with Catalysts and Sulphur.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Mori, Shinsuke

    2017-02-28

    Particle matters from a diesel engine including soot and carbon nanomaterials were collected on a sampling holder and their structure was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a result of employing gas oil/ethanol mixing fuel with sulphur and ferrocene/molybdenum as catalyst sources, formation of carbon nanotubes (CNT)-like materials in addition to soot was observed in the exhaust gas from a diesel engine. It was revealed that CNT-like materials were included among soot in our system only when following three conditions were satisfied simultaneously; high ethanol fraction in fuel, high sulphur loading and presence of catalyst sources in fuel. This report confirmed that if at least one of above three conditions was not satisfied, CNT-like materials were not observed in the exhaust from a diesel engine. These experimental results shown in this work will provide insights into understanding of CNT-like material formation mechanism in a diesel engine. Implications Recent papers reported that carbon nanotube-like materials were included in the exhaust gas from engines, but investigating conditions for carbon nanotube-like material formation has not been well studied. This work provides required conditions for carbon nanotube-like material growth in a diesel engine and this will be helpful for understanding of carbon nanotube-like material formation mechanism and taking countermeasures to preventing carbon nanotube-like material formation in a diesel engine.

  17. Fuel property effects on fuel/air mixing in an experimental diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, K.R.; Patridge, I.M.; Greeves, G.

    1986-01-01

    Fuels of widely varying properties are studied by injection of a single and well defined spray into an experimental diesel engine. Three optical techniques were developed to visualise liquid fuel, fuel vapour, flame, soot and individual droplets and their associated vapour trails. Liquid core length measurements are presented for diesel fuel, toluene, ethanol and sunflower oil. Computer model predictions show that an increase of the fuel mid-boiling point by 40/sup 0/C gives a similar effect on liquid core length to an increase of 0.03mm in the nozzle hole diameter.

  18. Evaluation of catalyzed and electrically heated filters for removal of particulate emissions from diesel-A- and JP-8-fueled engines.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kerry E; Wagner, David A; Lighty, JoAnn S; Sarofim, Adel F; Bretecher, Brad; Holden, Bruce; Helgeson, Norm; Sahay, Keshav; Nardi, Zack

    2004-01-01

    In-service diesel engines are a significant source of particulate matter (PM) emissions, and they have been subjected to increasingly strict emissions standards. Consequently, the wide-scale use of some type of particulate filter is expected. This study evaluated the effect of an Engelhard catalyzed soot filter (CSF) and a Rypos electrically heated soot filter on the emissions from in-service diesel engines in terms of PM mass, black carbon concentration, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration, and size distribution. Both filters capture PM. The CSF relies on the engine's exhaust to reach the catalyst regeneration temperature and oxidize soot, whereas the electrically heated filter contains a heating element to oxidize soot. The filters were installed on several military diesel engines. Particle concentrations and compositions were measured before and after installation of the filter and again after several months of operation. Generally, the CSF removed at least 90% of total PM, and the removal efficiency improved or remained constant after several months of operation. In contrast, the electrical filters removed 44-69% of PM mass. In addition to evaluating the soot filters, the sampling team also compared the results of several real-time particle measurement instruments to traditional filter measurements of total mass.

  19. Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2010-08-01

    The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial

  20. Characterisation of diesel particulate emission from engines using commercial diesel and biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Utry, N.; Kiss-Albert, G.; Gulyás, G.; Pusztai, P.; Puskás, R.; Bereczky, Á.; Szabados, Gy.; Szabó, G.; Kónya, Z.; Bozóki, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the number concentration and the size distribution of diluted diesel exhaust particulate matter were measured at three different engine operating points in the speed-load range of the engine as follows: 1600 rpm; 50% load, 1900 rpm; 25% load, 1900 rpm; 75% load, adopted from the UN ECE Vehicle Regulation no. 49 (Revision 2) test protocol using pure diesel and biodiesel fuels, as well as their controlled blends. The emitted particulate assembly had lognormal size distribution in the accumulation mode regardless of the engine operational condition and the type of fuel. The total number and volume concentration emitted by the diesel engine decreased with increasing revolution per minute and rated torque in case of all the fuel types. The mixing ratio of the fuels did not linearly affect the total emission but had a minimum at 75% biodiesel content. We also studied the thermal evolution of the emitted particulates using a specially designed thermodenuder (TD) heated at specific temperatures (50 °C, 120 °C, and 250 °C). The first transition, when the temperature was increased from 50 °C to 120 °C resulted in lower number concentrations with small relative shifts of the peak position. However, in case of the second transition, when the temperature reached 250 °C the individual volatile particulates adsorbed onto the surface of soot particles were completely or partly vaporised resulting in lower total number concentrations with a substantial shift in peak position.

  1. The optical properties of hygroscopic soot aggregates with water coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols, such as soot, have modified the Earth's radiation balance by scattering and absorbing solar and long-wave radiative transmission, which have largely influenced the global climate change since the industrial era. Based on transmission electron microscope images (TEM), soot particles are shown as the complex, fractal-like aggregate structures. In humid atmospheric environments, these soot aggregates tend to acquire a water coating, which introduces further complexity to the problem of determining the optical properties of the aggregates. The hygroscopic growth of soot aggregates is important for the aging of these absorbing aerosols, which can significantly influence the optical properties of these kinds of soot particles. In this paper, according to the specific volume fractions of soot core in the water coated soot particle, the monomers of fractal soot aggregates are modeled as semi-external mixtures (physical contact) with constant radius of soot core and variable size of water coating. The single scattering properties of these hygroscopic soot particles, such as scattering matrices, the cross sections of extinction, absorption and scattering, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (ASY), are calculated using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The morphological effects are compared with different monomer numbers and fractal dimensions of the soot aggregates, as well as different size of water coating for these concentric spherical monomers. The results have shown that SSA, cross sections of extinction and absorption are increased for soot aggregates with thicker weakly absorbing coating on the monomers. It is found that the SSA of aged soot aggregates with hygroscopic grown are remarkably (~50% for volume fraction of soot aggregates is 0.5, at 0.670μm) larger than fresh soot particles without the consideration of water coating, due to the size of water coating and the morphological features, such as the

  2. Structure and Early Soot Oxidation Properties of Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Soot is an important unsolved problem of combustion science because it is present in most hydrocarbon-fueled flames and current understanding of the reactive and physical properties of soot in flame environments is limited. This lack of understanding affects progress toward developing reliable predictions of flame radiation properties, reliable predictions of flame pollutant emission properties and reliable methods of computational combustion, among others. Motivated by these observations, the present investigation extended past studies of soot formation in this laboratory, to consider soot oxidation in laminar diffusion flames using similar methods. Early work showed that O2 was responsible for soot oxidation in high temperature O2-rich environments. Subsequent work in high temperature flame environments having small O2 concentrations, however, showed that soot oxidation rates substantially exceeded estimates based on the classical O2 oxidation rates of Nagle and Strickland-Constable and suggests that radicals such as O and OH might be strong contributors to soot oxidation for such conditions. Neoh et al. subsequently made observations in premixed flames, supported by later work, that showed that OH was responsible for soot oxidation at these conditions with a very reasonable collision efficiency of 0.13. Subsequent studies in diffusion flames, however, were not in agreement with the premixed flame studies: they agreed that OH played a dominant role in soot oxidation in flames, but found collision efficiencies that varied with flame conditions and were not in good agreement with each other or with Neoh et al. One explanation for these discrepancies is that optical scattering and extinction properties were used to infer soot structure properties for the studies that have not been very successful for representing the optical properties of soot. Whatever the source of the problem, however, these differences among observations of soot oxidation in premixed and

  3. Carbon stardust: From soot to diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of carbon dust in the outflow from stars and the subsequent evolution of this so called stardust in the interstellar medium is reviewed. The chemical and physical processes that play a role in carbon stardust formation are very similar to those occurring in sooting flames. Based upon extensive laboratory studies of the latter, the structure and physical and chemical properties of carbon soot are reviewed and possible chemical pathways towards carbon stardust are discussed. Grain-grain collisions behind strong interstellar shocks provide the high pressures required to transform graphite and amorphous carbon grains into diamond. This process is examined and the properties of shock-synthesized diamonds are reviewed. Finally, the interrelationship between carbon stardust and carbonaceous meteorites is briefly discussed.

  4. Particulate Emissions from the Combustion of Diesel Fuel with a Fuel-Borne Nanoparticulate Cerium Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Willis, R. D.; Weinstein, J. P.; Krantz, T.; King, C.

    2013-12-01

    To address the adverse impacts on health and climate from the use of diesel-fueled vehicles, a number of technological solutions have been developed for reducing diesel soot emissions and to improve fuel economy. One such solution is the use fuel-borne metal oxide catalysts. Of current interest are commercially-available fuel additives consisting of nanoparticulate cerium oxide (CeO2). In response to the possible use of CeO2-containing fuels in on-road vehicles in the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency is conducting research to address the potential toxicity and environmental effects of particulate CeO2 emitted with diesel soot. In this study, emissions from a diesel-fueled electric generator were size-segregated on polished silicon wafers in a nanoparticle cascade impactor. The diesel fuel contained 10 ppm Ce by weight in the form of crystalline CeO2 nanoparticles 4 nm to 7.5 nm in size. Primary CeO2 nanoparticles were observed in the diesel emissions as well as CeO2 aggregates encompassing a broad range of sizes up to at least 200 nm. We report the characterization of individual particles from the size-resolved samples with focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Results show a dependency between the impactor size range and CeO2 agglomeration state: in the larger size fractions of the impactor (e.g., 560 nm to 1000 nm) CeO2 nanoparticles were predominantly attached to soot particles. In the smaller size fractions of the impactor (e.g., 100 nm to 320 nm), CeO2 aggregates tended to be larger and unattached to soot. The result is important because the deposition of CeO2 nanoparticles attached to soot particles in the lung or on environmental surfaces such as plant tissue will likely present different consequences than the deposition of unagglomerated CeO2 particles. Disclaimer The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development funded and collaborated in the research described

  5. Sooting characteristics of surrogates for jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mensch, Amy; Santoro, Robert J.; Litzinger, Thomas A.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, modeling the combustion of aviation fuels, such as JP-8 and JetA, is not feasible due to the complexity and compositional variation of these practical fuels. Surrogate fuel mixtures, composed of a few pure hydrocarbon compounds, are a key step toward modeling the combustion of practical aviation fuels. For the surrogate to simulate the practical fuel, the composition must be designed to reproduce certain pre-designated chemical parameters such as sooting tendency, H/C ratio, autoignition, as well as physical parameters such as boiling range and density. In this study, we focused only on the sooting characteristics based on the Threshold Soot Index (TSI). New measurements of TSI values derived from the smoke point along with other sooting tendency data from the literature have been combined to develop a set of recommended TSI values for pure compounds used to make surrogate mixtures. When formulating the surrogate fuel mixtures, the TSI values of the components are used to predict the TSI of the mixture. To verify the empirical mixture rule for TSI, the TSI values of several binary mixtures of candidate surrogate components were measured. Binary mixtures were also used to derive a TSI for iso-cetane, which had not previously been measured, and to verify the TSI for 1-methylnaphthalene, which had a low smoke point and large relative uncertainty as a pure compound. Lastly, surrogate mixtures containing three components were tested to see how well the measured TSI values matched the predicted values, and to demonstrate that a target value for TSI can be maintained using various components, while also holding the H/C ratio constant. (author)

  6. Production Of Fullerenic Soot In Flames

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.; Chowdhury, K. Das

    2000-12-19

    A method for the production of fullerenic nanostructures is described in which unsaturated hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen are combusted in a burner chamber at a sub-atmospheric pressure, thereby establishing a flame. The condensibles of the flame are collected at a post-flame location. The condensibles contain fullerenic nanostructures, such as single and nested nanotubes, single and nested nanoparticles and giant fullerenes. The method of producing fullerenic soot from flames is also described.

  7. Real-Time Characterization of Particle and Gas Phase Diesel Emissions - Understanding the Influence of a Diesel Particulate Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Sappok, A.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Jayne, J.; Wong, V.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diesel engine emissions constitute an important source of particulate black carbon (BC) and gas phase organics in the atmosphere. Particles composed of black carbon absorb incoming solar radiation having a net positive radiative forcing effect on the climate. Black carbon also has major air quality implications as BC particles from combustion sources are often coated with poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and are generally emitted in higher concentrations close to population centers. Regulations of diesel emissions target the mass of particulate matter (PM) and concentration of volatile gas phase organic compounds (VOC) produced. A third, potentially important component of diesel exhaust, is low volatility organic compounds (LVOC). Both the VOCs and LVOCs can lead to the formation of ultrafine particles (via homogeneous nucleation) and secondary organic aerosols (via oxidation). Recent development of mass spectrometric techniques to measure particulate black carbon and gas phase organics provide the opportunity to quantify and chemically characterize diesel emissions in real-time. Measurements of both the particulate and gas phase emissions from a medium-duty diesel engine will be presented. The experimental apparatus includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) integrated in the exhaust line, which is a requirement for all 2007 and newer on-road diesel engines in the U.S. Measurements taken over the regeneration cycle of the DPF provide insight into how this after-treatment technology influences the gas phase and particle phase composition of the emissions. Gas phase measurements were made with a newly developed Total Gas-Phase Organic (TGO) instrument. Particulate species were characterized with a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). The combined utility of the TGO and SP-AMS instruments for emissions characterization studies will be demonstrated.

  8. A study on emission performance of a diesel engine fueled with five typical methyl ester biodiesels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fujia; Wang, Jianxin; Chen, Wenmiao; Shuai, Shijin

    As an alternative and renewable fuel, biodiesel can effectively reduce diesel engine emissions, especially particulate matter and dry soot. However, the biodiesel effects on emissions may vary as the source fuel changes. In this paper, the performance of five methyl esters with different sources was studied: cottonseed methyl ester (CME), soybean methyl ester (SME), rapeseed methyl ester (RME), palm oil methyl ester (PME) and waste cooking oil methyl ester (WME). Total particulate matter (PM), dry soot (DS), non-soot fraction (NSF), nitrogen oxide (NO x), unburned hydrocarbon (HC), and carbon monoxide (CO) were investigated on a Cummins ISBe6 Euro III diesel engine and compared with a baseline diesel fuel. Results show that using different methyl esters results in large PM reductions ranging from 53% to 69%, which include the DS reduction ranging from 79% to 83%. Both oxygen content and viscosity could influence the DS emission. Higher oxygen content leads to less DS at high load while lower viscosity results in less DS at low load. NSF decreases consistently as cetane number increases except for PME. The cetane number could be responsible for the large NSF difference between different methyl esters.

  9. Metal particle emissions in the exhaust stream of diesel engines: an electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Liati, Anthi; Schreiber, Daniel; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis; Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira

    2013-12-17

    Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to investigate the morphology, mode of occurrence and chemical composition of metal particles (diesel ash) in the exhaust stream of a small truck outfitted with a typical after-treatment system (a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a downstream diesel particulate filter (DPF)). Ash consists of Ca-Zn-P-Mg-S-Na-Al-K-phases (lube-oil related), Fe, Cr, Ni, Sn, Pb, Sn (engine wear), and Pd (DOC coating). Soot agglomerates of variable sizes (<0.5-5 μm) are abundant upstream of the DPF and are ash-free or contain notably little attached ash. Post-DPF soot agglomerates are very few, typically large (>1-5 μm, exceptionally 13 μm), rarely <0.5 μm, and contain abundant ash carried mostly from inside the DPF. The ash that reaches the atmosphere also occurs as separate aggregates ca. 0.2-2 μm in size consisting of sintered primary phases, ca. 20-400 nm large. Insoluble particles of these sizes may harm the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The DPF probably promotes breakout of large soot agglomerates (mostly ash-bearing) by favoring sintering. Noble metals detached from the DOC coating may reach the ambient air. Finally, very few agglomerates of Fe-oxide nanoparticles form newly from engine wear and escape into the atmosphere.

  10. Effect of Soot Particles on Supersonic Rocket Plume Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaissinski, Igor; Levy, Yeshayahou; Lev, Mikhael; Sherbaum, Valery

    2012-06-01

    Plumes from hydrocarbon-fueled rockets usually contain some amount of soot. In spite of the small amount, such soot particles can play a critical role in the characteristics of the infrared radiation emission since soot radiates a continuous, near-blackbody spectrum. The contribution of the soot to the plume radiation depends on the amount of soot, the physical properties of the particles, their concentration, and their temperature distribution in the flow field. The trajectories of solid particles and their temperatures can differ from those of the gas due to the particle mechanical and thermal inertia. CFD FLUENT code for solving two-phase Navier-Stokes equations coupled with chemical reactions and soot particle combustion was applied for exhaust plume simulations. Exhaust plumes with soot mass loading of 2% were simulated for three altitudes of 2 km, 8 km and 16 km. Radial distributions of the cloud particle density were obtained for different distances downstream the exhaust nozzle. As a result of the particle deceleration at the boundary layer inside the nozzle the particle concentration increased at the plume periphery. The particle temperature was higher than the gaseous temperature of the plume. The temperature difference between the soot particle and gas along corresponding trajectories was about 5-10%. The infrared radiation from the plumes with carbon soot was calculated. Its intensity was found to be dependent on the particle distribution in the plume.

  11. Role of the hydroxyl radical in soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Galen B.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of the hydroxyl radical during formation of soot. Correlations will be sought between OH concentration and (1) the critical equivalence ratio for incipient soot formation and (2) soot yield as a function of higher equivalence ratios. The ultimate aim is the development of a quasi-global kinetic model for the pre-particulate chemistry leading to soot nucleation. Hydroxyl radical concentration profiles are measured directly in both laminar premixed and diffusion flames using the newly developed technique, laser saturated fluorescence (LSF). This method is capable of measuring OH in the presence of soot particles. Aliphatic and aromatic fuels will be used to assess the influence of fuel type on soot formation. The influence of flame temperature on the critical equivalence ratio and soot yield will be related to changes in the OH concentration profiles. LSF measurements will be augmented with auxiliary measurements of soot and PAH concentrations to allow the development of a quasi-global model for soot formation.

  12. VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, CONDENSERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, CONDENSERS AND ORE BIN FOUNDATION ABOVE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  13. 18. VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, CONDENSERS, AND ORE BIN FOUNDATION ABOVE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  14. Comparative Soot Diagnostics: 1 Year Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Gard, Melissa Y.

    1998-01-01

    The motivation for the Comparative Soot Diagnostics (CSD) experiment lies in the broad practical importance of understanding combustion generated particulate. Depending upon the circumstances, particulate matter can affect the durability and performance of combustion equipment, can be a pollutant, can be used to detect fires and, in the form of soot, can be the dominant source of radiant energy from flames. Bright sooty fires are desirable for efficient energy extraction in furnaces and power equipment. In contrast, soot-enhanced radiation is undesirable in many propulsion systems (e.g. jet engines). The non-buoyant structure of most flames of practical interest (turbulent) makes understanding of soot processes in low gravity flames important to our ability to predict fire behavior on earth. These studies also have direct applications to fire safety in human-crew spacecraft, since smoke is the indicator used for automated detection in current spacecraft. In addition, recent tests conducted on MIR showed that a candle in a truly quiescent spacecraft environment can burn for tens of minutes. Consequently, this test and many earlier tests have demonstrated that fires in spacecraft can be considered a credible risk. In anticipation of this risk, NASA has included fire detectors on Skylab, smoke detectors on the Space Shuttle (STS), and smoke detectors in the design for the International Space Station (ISS). In the CSD experiment, these smoke detectors were tested using, quasi-steady, low-gravity, particulate generating materials. Samples of the particulate were also obtained from these low-gravity sources. This experiment provides the first such measurements aimed toward understanding of soot processes here on earth and for the testing and design of advanced spacecraft smoke detection systems. This paper describes the operation and preliminary results of the CSD experiment which was was conducted in the Middeck Glovebox Facility (MGBX) on USMP-3. The objectives of CSD

  15. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Corbin, J. C.; Mensah, A. A.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Sierau, B.

    2012-07-01

    The single particle soot photometer (SP2) uses laser-induced incandescence (LII) for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC) particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit (LDL). It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of femtograms BC in order to be detected by the SP2. Here we show the unexpected result that BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM), is clearly above the typical LDL of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST), fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R) reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's LDL. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely-packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, the PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to vaporisation because of their small size (primary particle diameter ~5-10 nm). It is not surprising that particle morphology can have an effect on the SP2's LDL, however, such a dramatic effect as reported here for PALAS soot was not expected. In conclusion, the SP2's LDL at a certain laser power depends on total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective density. However, for fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles and low fractal dimension, the BC mass per primary particle determines the limit of detection, independent of the total particle mass

  16. An Analysis of Direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) soot morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Teresa L; Storey, John Morse; Youngquist, Adam D; Szybist, James P

    2012-01-01

    We have characterized particle emissions produced by a 4-cylinder, 2.0 L DISI engine using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and image analysis. Analyses of soot morphology provide insight to particle formation mechanisms and strategies for prevention. Particle emissions generated by two fueling strategies were investigated, early injection and injection modified for low particle number concentration emissions. A blend of 20% ethanol and 80% emissions certification gasoline was used for the study given the likelihood of increased ethanol content in widely available fuel. In total, about 200 particles and 3000 primary soot spherules were individually measured. For the fuel injection strategy which produced low particle number concentration emissions, we found a prevalence of single solid sub-25 nm particles and fractal-like aggregates. The modal diameter of single solid particles and aggregate primary particles was between 10 and 15 nm. Solid particles as small as 6 nm were present. Although nanoparticle aggregates had fractal-like morphology similar to diesel soot, the average primary particle diameter per aggregate had a much wider range that spanned from 7 to 60 nm. For the early fuel injection strategy, liquid droplets were prevalent, and the modal average primary particle diameter was between 20 and 25 nm. The presence of liquid droplets may have been the result of unburned fuel and/or lubricating oil originating from fuel impingement on the piston or cylinder wall; the larger modal aggregate primary particle diameter suggests greater fuel-rich zones in-cylinder than for the low particle number concentration point. However, both conditions produced aggregates with a wide range of primary particle diameters, which indicates heterogeneous fuel and air mixing.

  17. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.; Dorsey, George F.; West, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  18. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  19. Atmospheric Aging and Its Impacts on Physical Properties of Soot Aerosols: Results from the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zheng, J.; Reed, C. C.; Collins, D. R.; Olaguer, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impact the Earth energy balance directly by scattering solar radiation back to space and indirectly by changing the albedo, frequency, and lifetime of clouds. Carbon soot (or black carbon) produced from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning represents a major component of primary aerosols. Because of high absorption cross-sections over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. In areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many megacities, solar heating by soot-containing aerosols is roughly comparable to heating due to greenhouse gases. In addition, light absorbing soot aerosols may reduce photolysis rates at the surface level, producing a noticeable impact on photochemistry. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by soot can stabilize the atmosphere, retarding vertical transport and exacerbating accumulation of gaseous and particulate matter (PM) pollutants within the planetary boundary layer. Less surface heating and atmospheric stabilization may decrease formation of clouds, and warming in the atmosphere can evaporate existing cloud droplets by lowering relative humidity. Furthermore, soot-containing aerosols represent a major type of PM that has adverse effects on human health. When first emitted, soot particles are low-density aggregates of loosely connected primary spherules. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically hydrophobic, but may become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during atmospheric aging by acquiring hydrophilic coatings. Hygroscopic soot particles, being efficient CCN, can exert indirect forcing on climate. In this talk, results will be presented on measurements of soot properties during the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign. Ambient aerosols and fresh soot particles injected into a captured air chamber were monitored to

  20. Modeling pollution formation in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.

    1997-12-31

    Modeling combustion under conditions that prevail in Diesel engine presents a great challenge. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has invested Laboratory Directed Research and Development Funds to accelerate progress in this area. Research has been concerned with building a chemical mechanism to interface with a high fidelity fluid code to describe aspects of Diesel combustion. The complexity of these models requires implementation on massively parallel machines. The author will describe his efforts concerned with building such a complex mechanism. He begins with C and CO{sub 2} chemistry and adds sequentially higher hydrocarbon chemistry, aromatic production chemistry, soot chemistry, and chemistry describing NO{sub x} production. The metrics against which this chemistry is evaluated are flame velocities, induction times, ignition delay times, flammability limits, flame structure measurements, and light scattering. He assembles a set of elementary reactions, kinetic rate coefficients, and thermochemistry. He modifies existing Sandia codes to be able to investigate the behavior of the mechanism in well-stirred reactors, plug flow reactors, and one-dimensional flames. The modified combustion code with a chemical mechanism at the appropriate level of complexity is then interfaced with the high fidelity fluids code. The fluids code is distinguished by its ability to solve the requisite partial differential equations with adaptively refined grids necessary to describe the strong variation in spatial scales in combustion.

  1. SUPPRESSION OF BASAL AND CYTOKINE INDUCED EXPRESSION OF ANTIGEN PRESENTATION MARKERS ON MOUSE LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) constitute a significant component of airborne particulates in urban environment. Exposure to DEP is known to enhance susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. We hypothesized that DEP could partially exert its effect on disease susceptibili...

  2. Diesel Engine Technology Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    AFWAL-TR-87-20 54 83-021-DET DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY UPDATE Kaupert, Andrew W., Lt. Col. USAFR Air Force Reserves Detroit Detachment 2 Ann Arbor, MI...nn AFR OH 45433-6563 63723F 3139 1 01 01 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY UPDATE 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kaupert...methodology for technology prediction. The objective of the present report is to update the technology transfer/ 0 development status of diesel engine

  3. Large eddy simulation of soot evolution in an aircraft combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael E.; Pitsch, Heinz

    2013-11-01

    An integrated kinetics-based Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach for soot evolution in turbulent reacting flows is applied to the simulation of a Pratt & Whitney aircraft gas turbine combustor, and the results are analyzed to provide insights into the complex interactions of the hydrodynamics, mixing, chemistry, and soot. The integrated approach includes detailed models for soot, combustion, and the unresolved interactions between soot, chemistry, and turbulence. The soot model is based on the Hybrid Method of Moments and detailed descriptions of soot aggregates and the various physical and chemical processes governing their evolution. The detailed kinetics of jet fuel oxidation and soot precursor formation is described with the Radiation Flamelet/Progress Variable model, which has been modified to account for the removal of soot precursors from the gas-phase. The unclosed filtered quantities in the soot and combustion models, such as source terms, are closed with a novel presumed subfilter PDF approach that accounts for the high subfilter spatial intermittency of soot. For the combustor simulation, the integrated approach is combined with a Lagrangian parcel method for the liquid spray and state-of-the-art unstructured LES technology for complex geometries. Two overall fuel-to-air ratios are simulated to evaluate the ability of the model to make not only absolute predictions but also quantitative predictions of trends. The Pratt & Whitney combustor is a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor in which combustion first occurs in a fuel-rich primary zone characterized by a large recirculation zone. Dilution air is then added downstream of the recirculation zone, and combustion continues in a fuel-lean secondary zone. The simulations show that large quantities of soot are formed in the fuel-rich recirculation zone, and, furthermore, the overall fuel-to-air ratio dictates both the dominant soot growth process and the location of maximum soot volume fraction. At the higher fuel

  4. Determination of kinetic data for soot oxidation: Modeling of competition between oxygen diffusion and reaction during thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilot, P.; Bonnefoy, F.; Marcuccilli, F.; Prado, G. . Lab. Gestion des Risques et Environnement)

    1993-10-01

    Kinetic data concerning carbon black oxidation in the temperature range between 600 and 900 C have been obtained using thermogravimetric analysis. Modeling of diffusion in a boundary layer above the pan and inside the porous medium coupled to oxygen reaction with carbon black is necessary to obtain kinetic constants as a function of temperature. These calculations require the knowledge of the oxidation rate at a given constant temperature as a function of the initial mass loading m[sub o]. This oxidation rate, expressed in milligrams of soot consumed per second and per milligram of initial soot loading, decreases when m[sub o] increases, in agreement with a reaction in an intermediary regime where the kinetics and the oxygen diffusion operate. The equivalent diffusivity of oxygen inside the porous medium is evaluated assuming two degrees of porosity: between soot aggregates and inside each aggregate. Below 700 C an activation energy of about 103 kJ/mol can be related to a combustion reaction probably kinetically controlled. Beyond 700 C the activation energy of about 20 kJ/ mol corresponds to a reaction essentially controlled by oxygen diffusion leading to a constant density oxidation with oxygen consumption at or near the particle surface. To validate these data, they are used in the modeling of a Diesel particulate trap regeneration. In this particular case, the oxidizing flux is forced across the carbon black deposit, oxygen diffusion being insignificant. A good agreement between experimental results and model predictions is obtained, proving the rate constants validity.

  5. Experimental investigation on the morphology of soot aggregates from the burning of typical solid and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongmei; Guo, Chenning; Shi, Long

    2017-03-01

    Soot particles from the burning of typical fuels are one of the critical sources causing environmental problems and human disease. To understand the soot formation of these typical fuels, the size and morphology of soot aggregates produced from the burning of typical solid and liquid fuels, including diesel, kerosene, natural rubber (NR) latex foam, and wood crib, were studied by both extractive sampling and subsequent image analysis. The 2D and 3D fractal dimensions together with the diameter distribution of agglomerate and primary particles were analyzed for these four typical fuels. The average diameters of the primary particles were within 45-85 nm when sampling from different heights above the fire sources. Irregular sheet structures and flake-like masses were observed from the burning of NR latex foam and wood cribs. Superaggregates with a mean maximum length scale of over 100 μm were also found from the burning of all these four tested fuels. The fractal dimension of a single aggregate was 3 for all the tested fuels.

  6. Why make premium diesel?

    SciTech Connect

    Pipenger, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    In the last issue of Hart`s Fuel Technology & Management (Vol. 6, No. 6, pp. 62-64), a discussion of the evolution of premium diesel fuels in the US and Europe was begun. Cetane and ignition improvers were discussed. In this concluding article, different additive components such as fuel stabilizers, corrosion inhibitors and lubricity additives are reviewed--all of which are key components of any top-quality diesel fuel today. An excerpt from {open_quotes}The Making of Premium Diesel,{close_quotes} which categorizes (costs, benefits, dosage rates) the additives necessary to improve diesel quality is presented.

  7. Structure and Soot Formation Properties of Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science for several reasons: soot emissions are responsible for more deaths than any other combustion-generated pollutant, thermal loads due to continuum radiation from soot limit the durability of combustors, thermal radiation from soot is mainly responsible for the growth and spread of unwanted fires, carbon monoxide emissions associated with soot emissions are responsible for most fire deaths, and limited understanding of soot processes in flames is a major impediment to the development of computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, soot processes within laminar premixed and nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are being studied during this investigation. The study is limited to laminar flames due to their experimental and computational tractability, noting the relevance of these results to practical flames through laminar flamelet concepts. Nonbuoyant flames are emphasized because buoyancy affects soot processes in laminar diffusion flames whereas effects of buoyancy are small for most practical flames. This study involves both ground- and space-based experiments, however, the following discussion will be limited to ground-based experiments because no space-based experiments were carried out during the report period. The objective of this work was to complete measurements in both premixed and nonpremixed flames in order to gain a better understanding of the structure of the soot-containing region and processes of soot nucleation and surface growth in these environments, with the latter information to be used to develop reliable ways of predicting soot properties in practical flames. The present discussion is brief, more details about the portions of the investigation considered here can be found in refs. 8-13.

  8. Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales

    SciTech Connect

    Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis

    2010-09-15

    Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel

  9. ESEM-EDX characterisation of airborne particles from an industrialised area of northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Iordanidis, Andreas; Buckman, Jim; Triantafyllou, Athanasios G; Asvesta, Argyro

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise individual airborne particles collected from the Ptolemais-Kozani region (Western Macedonia), northern Greece. Throughout a 1-year period (March 2003 to February 2004), we collected several filters that captured airborne particles at seven sampling sites distributed throughout the area. The airborne particles captured on the filters were then characterised by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The particles were categorised as geogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic. The main anthropogenic airborne particles were fly ash (released from lignite-fired power plants) and carbonaceous (soot and char) and metalliferous (mainly iron- and copper-enriched) particulates. We present here characteristic ESEM and EDX spectra for the airborne particles and underline the presence of characteristic primary and secondary sulphates.

  10. Observations of urban airborne particle number concentrations during rush-hour conditions: analysis of the number based size distributions and modal parameters.

    PubMed

    Lingard, Justin J N; Agus, Emily L; Young, David T; Andrews, Gordon E; Tomlin, Alison S

    2006-12-01

    A summertime study of the number concentration and the size distribution of combustion derived nanometre sized particles (termed nanoparticles) from diesel and spark-ignition (SI) engine emissions were made under rush-hour and free-flow traffic conditions at an urban roadside location in Leeds, UK in July 2003. The measured total particle number concentrations (N(TOTAL)) were of the order 1.8 x 10(4) to 3.4 x 10(4) cm(-3), and tended to follow the diurnal traffic flow patterns. The N(TOTAL) was dominated by particles < or =100 nm in diameter which accounted for between 89-93% of the measured particle number. By use of a log-normal fitting procedure, the modal parameters of the number based particle size distribution of urban airborne particulates were derived from the roadside measurements. Four component modes were identified. Two nucleation modes were found, with a smaller, more minor, mode composed principally of sub-11 nm particles, believed to be derived from particles formed from the nucleation of gaseous species in the atmosphere. A second mode, much larger in terms of number, was composed of particles within the size range of 10-20 nm. This second mode was believed to be principally derived from the condensation of the unburned fuel and lube oil (the solvent organic fraction or SOF) as it cooled on leaving the engine exhaust. Third and fourth modes were noted within the size ranges of 28-65 nm and 100-160 nm, respectively. The third mode was believed to be representative of internally mixed Aitken mode particles composed of a soot/ash core with an adsorbed layer of readily volatilisable material. The fourth mode was believed to be composed of chemically aged, secondary particles. The larger nucleation and Aitken modes accounted for between 80-90% of the measured N(TOTAL), and the particles in these modes were believed to be derived from SI and diesel engine emissions. The overall size distribution, particularly in modes II-IV, was observed to be strongly

  11. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  12. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  13. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  14. Ice nucleation efficiency of soot from biomass combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umo, N. S.; Murray, B. J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Plane, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    Do Soot aerosols in the atmosphere indirectly influence the radiative budget of the Earth by modifying cloud properties, either by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or as ice nuclei (IN). The ice nucleation activity of soot remains poorly quantified and there is a need to parameterise its impact for use in cloud-aerosol models. Here, we investigate the ice nucleation activity of eugenol soot in the immersion mode at conditions relevant to mixed-phase clouds. Eugenol is used as a proxy for a biomass combustion source. The efficiency of soot as an IN was quantified using droplet freezing techniques with droplet volumes ranging from nanolitre (˜100 μm diameter) to microliter (˜1 mm diameter). We show that soot nucleates ice in our experiments at temperatures up to -14°C, although the efficiency with which it does so is less than for mineral dust on a per surface area basis. An estimation of the IN number concentration that could result from our eugenol soot showed that, on a global average basis, IN from soot is secondary in importance to mineral dust below about -20°C. However, it may be important as IN in some locations which are deficient in dust, but rich in soot particles. We conclude that its overall impact can be significant considering its relative regional and global abundance.

  15. Using Laser-Induced Incandescence To Measure Soot in Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.; Sankar, Subramanian V.

    2005-01-01

    An instrumentation system exploits laser-induced incandescence (LII) to measure the concentration of soot particles in an exhaust stream from an engine, furnace, or industrial process that burns hydrocarbon fuel. In comparison with LII soot-concentration-measuring systems, this system is more complex and more capable.

  16. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are attractive for practical applications because they avoid the stability, autoignition, flashback, etc. problems of premixed flames. Unfortunately, soot formation in practical hydrocarbon-fueled diffusion flames reduces their attractiveness due to widely-recognized public health and combustor durability problems of soot emissions. For example, more deaths are attributed to the emission of soot (15,000-60,000 deaths annually in the U.S. alone) than any other combustion-generated pollutant. In addition, continuum radiation from soot-containing flames is the principle heat load to combustor components and is mainly responsible for engine durability problems of aircraft and gas turbine engines. As a result, there is considerable interest in controlling both soot concentrations within flames and soot emissions from flames. Thus, the objective of the present investigation is to study ways to control soot formation in diffusion flames by manipulating the mixing process between the fuel and oxidant streams. In order to prevent the intrusion of gravity from masking flow properties that reduce soot formation in practical flames (where effects of gravity are small), methods developed during past work will be exploited to minimize effects of buoyant motion.

  17. Fluxes of Soot Carbon to South Atlantic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deep sea sediment samples from the South Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for soot black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), stable carbon isotope ratios (δ 13C), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Soot BC was present at low concentrations (0.04–0.17% dry weight), but ...

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PCB PLANERITY AND INTERACTIONS WITH SOOT CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in the role of soot carbon in the strong partitioning of organic contaminants to sediments. Primary interest has been focused on PAHs which have been shown to be affected by the presence of soot carbon in both their geochemical and bioavailability beh...

  19. Soot-Free Combustion Of Methane And LNG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossard, John

    1992-01-01

    Neither methane nor liquefied natural gas (LNG) produces soot when burned in turbine simulator with liquid oxygen under conditions like those in gas-generator section of rocket engine. Experiments conducted to determine if these fuels behave similarly to other hydrocarbon fuels, which give off soot coating turbomachinery and reducing performance.

  20. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  1. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M; Springston, S; Koontz, A; Aiken, A

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  2. Fuel Property Effects on Emissions from High Efficiency Clean Combustion in a Diesel Engine (SAE Paper Number 2006-01-0080)

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, Scott; Wagner, Robert M; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2006-01-01

    High-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) modes provide simultaneous reductions in diesel particulate matter and nitrogen-oxides emissions while retaining efficiencies characteristic of normal diesel engines. Fuel parameters may have significant impacts on the ability to operate in HECC modes and on the emissions produced in HECC modes. In this study, 3 diesel-range fuels and 2 oxygenated blends are burned in both normal and HECC modes at 3 different engine conditions. The results show that fuel effects play an important role in the emissions of hydrocarbons, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide but do not significantly impact NOX emissions in HECC modes. HECC modes are achievable with 5% biodiesel blends in addition to petroleum-based and oil-sands derived fuels. Soot precursor and oxygenated compound concentrations in the exhaust were observed to generally increase with the sooting tendency of the fuel in HECC modes.

  3. Transportation fuels: Desulfurizing diesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamonier, Carole

    2017-02-01

    Transportation fuels such as diesel contain organosulfur molecules that, when combusted, form sulfur oxides that are toxic and poison vehicles' catalytic convertors. Now, a method is demonstrated that can reduce the sulfur concentration of diesel fuel to very low levels at low temperatures and pressures.

  4. Diesels boost productivity, safety

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.

    1984-02-01

    In the US, the use of diesel equipment in underground coal mines is increasing, despite the controversy over the harmful effects of the emissions. The pros and cons of using diesels are discussed, and British experience is quoted. A list of manufacturers in the US, West Germany and the UK is given.

  5. Diesel Mechanics: Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foutes, William; And Others

    This publication is the first in a series of three texts for a diesel mechanics curriculum. Its purpose is to teach the basic concepts related to employment in a diesel trade. Six sections contain 29 units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of these basic components: unit and specific (performance) objectives, suggested activities for…

  6. Diesel Mechanics: Electrical Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foutes, William; And Others

    This publication is the second in a series of three texts for a diesel mechanics curriculum. Its purpose is to teach the concepts related to electricity and circuitry in a diesel trade. The text contains nine units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of these basic components: unit and specific (performance) objectives, suggested…

  7. Diesel Mechanics: Fuel Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foutes, William

    This publication is the third in a series of three texts for a diesel mechanics curriculum. Its purpose is to teach the concepts related to fuel injection systems in a diesel trade. The text contains eight units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of these basic components: unit and specific (performance) objectives, suggested activities…

  8. Diesel particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelsen, F.I. )

    1988-01-01

    Diesel particulates, because of their chemical composition and extremely small size, have raised health and welfare issues. Health experts have expressed concern that they contribute to or aggravate chronic lung diseases such as asthma, bronchitis and emphysema, and there is the lingering issue about the potential cancer risk from exposure to diesel particulate. Diesel particulates impair visibility, soil buildings, contribute to structural damage through corrosion and give off a pungent odor. Diesel trucks, buses and cars together are such a significant and growing source of particulate emissions. Such vehicles emit 30 to 70 times more particulate matter than gasoline vehicles equipped with catalytic converters. Diesel engines currently power the majority of larger trucks and buses. EPA predicted that, if left uncontrolled, diesel particulate from motor vehicles would increase significantly. Diesel particulate emissions from motor vehicles are particularly troublesome because they frequently are emitted directly into the breathing zone where we work and recreate. The U.S. Congress recognized the risks posed by diesel particulate and as part of the 1977 Clean Air Act Amendments established specific, technology-forcing requirements for controlling these emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1980 established particulate standards for automobiles and light trucks and in 1985, heavy trucks and buses. California, concerned that EPA standards would not adequately protect its citizens, adopted its own set of standards for passenger cars and light trucks. This paper discusses emerging technologies proposed to address the problem.

  9. Fundamentals of Diesel Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the fundamentals of diesel engine mechanics. Addressed in the three individual units of the course are the following topics: basic principles of diesel mechanics; principles, mechanics, and…

  10. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-02-01

    High concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere during exhaust cools and dilutes have hazardous health effects and impair visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulphur content (FSC), under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested; based on the measured gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrierless heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between GSA and semi-volatile organic vapour (for example adipic acid) combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur by the same organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) ×1012cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had opposite trend on the NUP formation, and maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, NUP formation was ceased if the GSA concentration was less than 1010cm-3 which suggests, based on the measurements, the usage of biofuel to prevent volatile particles in diesel exhaust.

  11. The effects of sooting in droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kyeong-Ook; Jensen, Kirk; Choi, Mun Young

    1995-01-01

    The study of the burning of a single droplet is an ideal problem from which to gain fundamental understanding of diffusion flame characteristics. Droplet combustion is a complex physico-chemical process that involves a chemically-reacting two-phase flow with phase changes and yet simple experiments and analysis can be used to attain important insights into the burning rate, flame dynamics, kinetic extinction and disruption processes. It is a subject that has been actively studied for the past 40 years with most of the fundamental experiments being performed under reduced-gravity conditions for direct comparisons with theoretical/computational analyses that invoke spherical symmetry assumptions. In the earlier studies, the effects of sooting on the overall burning characteristics were not considered. However, recent microgravity investigations performed at the NASA-LeRC droptowers (Droplet Combustion Experiment) and others indicate that effects of soot and sootcloud formation may be significant during the lifetime of the droplet and therefore must be included in the analysis.

  12. Measuring soot particles from automotive exhaust emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Hanspeter; Lüönd, Felix; Schlatter, Jürg; Auderset, Kevin; Jordan-Gerkens, Anke; Nowak, Andreas; Ebert, Volker; Buhr, Egbert; Klein, Tobias; Tuch, Thomas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Mamakos, Athanasios; Riccobono, Francesco; Discher, Kai; Högström, Richard; Yli-Ojanperä, Jaakko; Quincey, Paul

    2014-08-01

    The European Metrology Research Programme participating countries and the European Union jointly fund a three year project to address the need of the automotive industry for a metrological sound base for exhaust measurements. The collaborative work on particle emissions involves five European National Metrology Institutes, the Tampere University of Technology, the Joint Research Centre for Energy and Transport and the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research. On one hand, a particle number and size standard for soot particles is aimed for. Eventually this will allow the partners to provide accurate and comparable calibrations of measurement instruments for the type approval of Euro 5b and Euro 6 vehicles. Calibration aerosols of combustion particles, silver and graphite proof partially suitable. Yet, a consensus choice together with instrument manufactures is pending as the aerosol choice considerably affects the number concentration measurement. Furthermore, the consortium issued consistent requirements for novel measuring instruments foreseen to replace today's opacimeters in regulatory periodic emission controls of soot and compared them with European legislative requirements. Four partners are conducting a metrological validation of prototype measurement instruments. The novel instruments base on light scattering, electrical, ionisation chamber and diffusion charging sensors and will be tested at low and high particle concentrations. Results shall allow manufacturers to further improve their instruments to comply with legal requirements.

  13. Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of particulate matter emitted from a non-road diesel engine: comparative evaluation of biodiesel-diesel and butanol-diesel blends.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-01-15

    Combustion experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of using blends of ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) with biodiesel or n-butanol on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of particulate emissions from a non-road diesel engine. The results indicated that compared to ULSD, both the blended fuels could effectively reduce the particulate mass and elemental carbon emissions, with butanol being more effective than biodiesel. The proportion of organic carbon and volatile organic compounds in particles increased for both blended fuels. However, biodiesel blended fuels showed lower total particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emissions. The total number emissions of particles ≤560nm in diameter decreased gradually for the butanol blended fuels, but increased significantly for the biodiesel blended fuels. Both the blended fuels indicated lower soot ignition temperature and activation energy. All the particle extracts showed a decline in cell viability with the increased dose. However, the change in cell viability among test fuels is not statistically significant different with the exception of DB-4 (biodiesel-diesel blend containing 4% oxygen) used at 75% engine load.

  14. Experimental study on filtration and continuous regeneration of a particulate filter system for heavy-duty diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Cao, Dongxiao; Shuai, Shijin; Zhao, Yanguang

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the filtration and continuous regeneration of a particulate filter system on an engine test bench, consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF). Both the DOC and the CDPF led to a high conversion of NO to NO2 for continuous regeneration. The filtration efficiency on solid particle number (SPN) was close to 100%. The post-CDPF particles were mainly in accumulation mode. The downstream SPN was sensitively influenced by the variation of the soot loading. This phenomenon provides a method for determining the balance point temperature by measuring the trend of SPN concentration.

  15. Acetylene soot reaction with NO in the presence of CO.

    PubMed

    Mendiara, T; Alzueta, M U; Millera, A; Bilbao, R

    2009-07-30

    The heterogeneous reaction of soot with NO can be considered as a means of reduction of the emissions of both pollutants from combustion systems. In this paper, the influence of the presence of CO in the soot-NO reaction is studied. Soot was obtained by pyrolysis at 1373 K of 5000 ppmv acetylene in nitrogen. The study of the influence of CO on the soot-NO reaction was performed in experiments fixing NO concentration at 900 ppmv and introducing different CO concentrations among 0 and 9900 ppmv. An increase in both the carbon consumption rate and NO reduction by acetylene soot was observed as the concentration of CO increases. These results can be explained by the oxide-stripping reaction, CO+C(f)(O)-->CO(2)+C(f). The direct reaction of CO with NO catalyzed by the carbon surface, CO+NO-->CO(2)+1/2N(2) may not be considered in this case the dominant process due to the absence of mineral impurities in the acetylene soot. The influence of CO in the acetylene soot-NO reaction was also tested in the presence of oxygen (250-5000 ppmv). In these conditions and for relatively high CO/O(2) ratios, CO seems to also contribute to NO reduction by the previous oxide-stripping reaction.

  16. Short-term effects of controlling fossil-fuel soot, biofuel soot and gases, and methane on climate, Arctic ice, and air pollution health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2010-07-01

    This study examines the short-term (˜15 year) effects of controlling fossil-fuel soot (FS) (black carbon (BC), primary organic matter (POM), and S(IV) (H2SO4(aq), HSO4-, and SO42-)), solid-biofuel soot and gases (BSG) (BC, POM, S(IV), K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, NO3-, Cl- and several dozen gases, including CO2 and CH4), and methane on global and Arctic temperatures, cloudiness, precipitation, and atmospheric composition. Climate response simulations were run with GATOR-GCMOM, accounting for both microphysical (indirect) and radiative effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation. The model treated discrete size-resolved aging and internal mixing of aerosol soot, discrete size-resolved evolution of clouds/precipitation from externally and internally mixed aerosol particles, and soot absorption in aerosols, clouds/precipitation, and snow/sea ice. Eliminating FS, FS+BSG (FSBSG), and CH4 in isolation were found to reduce global surface air temperatures by a statistically significant 0.3-0.5 K, 0.4-0.7 K, and 0.2-0.4 K, respectively, averaged over 15 years. As net global warming (0.7-0.8 K) is due mostly to gross pollutant warming from fossil-fuel greenhouse gases (2-2.4 K), and FSBSG (0.4-0.7 K) offset by cooling due to non-FSBSG aerosol particles (-1.7 to -2.3 K), removing FS and FSBSG may reduce 13-16% and 17-23%, respectively, of gross warming to date. Reducing FS, FSBSG, and CH4 in isolation may reduce warming above the Arctic Circle by up to ˜1.2 K, ˜1.7 K, and ˜0.9 K, respectively. Both FS and BSG contribute to warming, but FS is a stronger contributor per unit mass emission. However, BSG may cause 8 times more mortality than FS. The global e-folding lifetime of emitted BC (from all fossil sources) against internal mixing by coagulation was ˜3 h, similar to data, and that of all BC against dry plus wet removal was ˜4.7 days. About 90% of emitted FS BC mass was lost to internal mixing by coagulation, ˜7% to wet removal, ˜3% to dry removal, and a residual

  17. Modelling the internal structure of nascent soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Totton, Tim S.; Sander, Markus; Kraft, Markus; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Wales, David J.; Misquitta, Alston J.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper we present studies of clusters assembled from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules similar in size to small soot particles. The clusters studied were comprised of coronene (C{sub 24}H{sub 12}) or pyrene (C{sub 16}H{sub 10}) molecules and represent the types of soot precursor molecule typically found in flame environments. A stochastic 'basin-hopping' global optimisation scheme was used to locate low-lying local minima on the potential energy surface of the molecular clusters. TEM-style projections of the resulting geometries show similarities with those observed experimentally in TEM images of soot particles. The mass densities of these clusters have also been calculated and are lower than bulk values of the pure crystalline PAH structures. They are also significantly lower than the standard value of 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} used in our soot models. Consequently we have varied the mass density between 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} to examine the effects of varying soot density on our soot model and observed how the shape of the particle size distribution changes. Based on similarities between nascent soot particles and PAH clusters a more accurate soot density is likely to be significantly lower than 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}. As such, for modelling purposes, we recommend that the density of nascent soot should be taken to be the value obtained for our coronene cluster of 1.12 g/cm{sup 3}. (author)

  18. Fluxes of soot black carbon to South Atlantic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Rainer; Bollinger, Kevyn; Cantwell, Mark; Feichter, Johann; Fischer-Bruns, Irene; Zabel, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Deep sea sediment samples from the South Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for soot black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Soot BC was present at low concentrations (0.04-0.17% dry weight), but accounted for 3-35% of TOC. Fluxes of soot BC were calculated on the basis of known sedimentation rates and ranged from 0.5 to 7.8 μg cm-2 a-1, with higher fluxes near Africa compared to South America. Values of δ13C indicated a marine origin for the organic carbon but terrestrial sources for the soot BC. PAH ratios implied a pyrogenic origin for most samples and possibly a predominance of traffic emissions over wood burning off the African coast. A coupled ocean-atmosphere-aerosol-climate model was used to determine fluxes of BC from 1860 to 2000 to the South Atlantic. Model simulation and measurements both yielded higher soot BC fluxes off the African coast and lower fluxes off the South American coast; however, measured sedimentary soot BC fluxes exceeded simulated values by ˜1 μg cm-2 a-1 on average (within a factor of 2-4). For the sediments off the African coast, soot BC delivery from the Congo River could possibly explain the higher flux rates, but no elevated soot BC fluxes were detected in the Amazon River basin. In total, fluxes of soot BC to the South Atlantic were ˜480-700 Gg a-1 in deep sea sediments. Our results suggest that attempts to construct a global mass balance of BC should include estimates of the atmospheric deposition of BC.

  19. Physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles.

    PubMed

    Longhin, Eleonora; Gualtieri, Maurizio; Capasso, Laura; Bengalli, Rossella; Mollerup, Steen; Holme, Jørn A; Øvrevik, Johan; Casadei, Simone; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Parenti, Paolo; Camatini, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Diesel combustion and solid biomass burning are the major sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in urbanized areas. Cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, are possible outcomes of combustion particles exposure, but differences in particles properties seem to influence their biological effects. Here the physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles, produced under controlled laboratory conditions, have been characterized. Diesel UFP were sampled from a Euro 4 light duty vehicle without DPF fuelled by commercial diesel and run over a chassis dyno. Biomass UFP were collected from a modern automatic 25 kW boiler propelled by prime quality spruce pellet. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both diesel and biomass samples showed aggregates of soot particles, but in biomass samples ash particles were also present. Chemical characterization showed that metals and PAHs total content was higher in diesel samples compared to biomass ones. Human bronchial epithelial (HBEC3) cells were exposed to particles for up to 2 weeks. Changes in the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism were observed after exposure to both UFP already after 24 h. However, only diesel particles modulated the expression of genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), increased the release of inflammatory mediators and caused phenotypical alterations, mostly after two weeks of exposure. These results show that diesel UFP affected cellular processes involved in lung and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Biomass particles exerted low biological activity compared to diesel UFP. This evidence emphasizes that the study of different emission sources contribution to ambient PM toxicity may have a fundamental role in the development of more effective strategies for air quality improvement.

  20. Aggregates and Superaggregates of Soot with Four Distinct Fractal Morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, C. M.; Kim, W.; Fry, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Soot formed in laminar diffusion flames of heavily sooting fuels evolves through four distinct growth stages which give rise to four distinct aggregate fractal morphologies. These results were inferred from large and small angle static light scattering from the flames, microphotography of the flames, and analysis of soot sampled from the flames. The growth stages occur approximately over four successive orders of magnitude in aggregate size. Comparison to computer simulations suggests that these four growth stages involve either diffusion limited cluster aggregation or percolation in either three or two dimensions.

  1. Primary and Aggregate Size Distributions of PM in Tail Pipe Emissions form Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masataka; Amagai, Kenji; Nakaji, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shinji

    Particulate matter (PM) emission exhausted from diesel engine should be reduced to keep the clean air environment. PM emission was considered that it consisted of coarse and aggregate particles, and nuclei-mode particles of which diameter was less than 50nm. However the detail characteristics about these particles of the PM were still unknown and they were needed for more physically accurate measurement and more effective reduction of exhaust PM emission. In this study, the size distributions of solid particles in PM emission were reported. PMs in the tail-pipe emission were sampled from three type diesel engines. Sampled PM was chemically treated to separate the solid carbon fraction from other fractions such as soluble organic fraction (SOF). The electron microscopic and optical-manual size measurement procedures were used to determine the size distribution of primary particles those were formed through coagulation process from nuclei-mode particles and consisted in aggregate particles. The centrifugal sedimentation method was applied to measure the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Aerodynamic diameters of nano and aggregate particles were measured with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The peak aggregate diameters detected by SMPS were fallen in the same size regime as the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Both of primary and Stokes diameters of dry-soot decreased with increases of engine speed and excess air ratio. Also, the effects of fuel properties and engine types on primary and aggregate particle diameters were discussed.

  2. Chemical and morphological characterization of soot and soot precursors generated in an inverse diffusion flame with aromatic and aliphatic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, Alexander; Mondragon, Fanor; Yang, Nancy; Eddings, Eric

    2010-01-15

    Knowledge of the chemical and physical structure of young soot and its precursors is very useful in understanding the paths leading to soot particle inception. This paper presents chemical and morphological characterization of the products generated in ethylene and benzene inverse diffusion flames (IDF) using different analytical techniques. The trend in the data indicates that the soot precursor material and soot particles generated in the benzene IDF have a higher degree of complexity than the samples obtained in the ethylene IDF, which is reflected by an increase in the aromaticity of the chloroform extracts observed by {sup 1}H NMR and FT-IR, and shape and size of soot particles obtained by TEM and HR-TEM. It is important to highlight that the soot precursor material obtained at the lower positions in the ethylene IDF has a significant contribution of aliphatic groups, which play an important role in the particle inception and mass growth processes during the early stages of soot formation. However, these groups progressively disappear in the samples taken at higher positions in the flame, due to thermal decomposition processes. (author)

  3. The diesel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    Whether for standby or baseload capacity, diesel generator sets are being used in markets worldwide. Companies are taking a variety of approaches to tapping these markets. The markets for diesel generators follow two basic paths. In the US, they are used primarily for standby or peaking applications. Outside the US, the market includes standby applications but is more often for baseload or prime-power applications.

  4. Characterization and ecological risk assessment of nanoparticulate CeO2 as a diesel fuel catalyst.

    PubMed

    Batley, Graeme E; Halliburton, Brendan; Kirby, Jason K; Doolette, Casey L; Navarro, Divina; McLaughlin, Mike J; Veitch, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide (nano-CeO2 ), when combusted as an additive to diesel fuel, was transformed from 6 nm to 14 nm sizes into particles near 43 nm, with no obvious change in the unit cell dimensions or crystalline form. Cerium sulfate, if formed during combustion, was below detection limits. Ceria nanoparticles were agglomerated within the soot matrix, with a mean aerodynamic diameter near 100 nm. The dissolution of cerium from the dried ceria catalyst in synthetic soft water was extremely small (<0.0006% or <0.2 µg Ce/L), with particles being highly agglomerated (<450 nm). Agglomeration was reduced in the presence of humic acid. In the combusted samples, soot was dominant, and the solubility of cerium in soft water showed an almost 100-fold increase in the <1 nm fraction compared to that before combustion. It appeared that the nano-CeO2 remained agglomerated within the soot matrix and would not be present as dispersed nanoparticles in aquatic or soil environments. Despite the increased dissolution, the solubility was not sufficient for the combusted ceria to represent a risk in aquatic ecosystems. The predicted environmental concentrations were still orders of magnitude below the predicted no effects concentration of near 1 mg/L. In the soil environment, any cerium released from soot materials would interact with natural colloids, decreasing cerium concentrations in soil solutions and further minimizing the potential risk to soil organisms.

  5. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATION OF UPTAKE OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES BY LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While airborne particulates like diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) exert significant toxicological effects on lungs, quantitative estimation of accumulation of DEP inside lung cells has not been reported due to a lack of an accurate and quantitative technique for this purpose. I...

  6. NASAL RESPONSES OF ASTHMATIC AND NON-ASTHMATIC VOLUNTEERS TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma rates have been increasing world-wide, and exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) may be implicated in this increase. Additionally DEP may also play a role in the increased morbidity and mortality associated with ambient airborne PM exposure. Two types of nasal respons...

  7. DIESEL EXHAUST ACTIVATES REDOX-SENSITIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND KINASES IN HUMAN AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major component of airborne particulate matter. In previous studies we have described the acute inflammatory response of the human airway to inhaled DE. This was characterized by neutrophil, mast cell, and lymphocyte infiltration into the bronchial mucosa...

  8. NASAL RESPONSES IN ASTHMATIC AND NONASTHMATIC SUBJECTS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma rates have been increasing world-wide, and exposure to diesel exhaust particles may be implicated in this increase. Additionally DEP may also play a role in the increased morbidity and mortality associated with ambient airborne PM exposure. Two types of nasal responses hav...

  9. Diesel Exhaust Modulates Ozone-induced Lung Function Decrements in Healthy Human Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effects of combinations of dilute whole diesel exhaust (DE) and ozone (03), each a common component of ambient airborne pollutant mixtures, on lung function were examined. Healthy young human volunteers were exposed for 2 hr to pollutants while exercising (~50 L/min...

  10. Soot blower using fuel gas as blowing medium

    DOEpatents

    Tanca, Michael C.

    1982-01-01

    A soot blower assembly (10) for use in combination with a coal gasifier (14). The soot blower assembly is adapted for use in the hot combustible product gas generated in the gasifier as the blowing medium. The soot blower lance (20) and the drive means (30) by which it is moved into and out of the gasifier is housed in a gas tight enclosure (40) which completely surrounds the combination. The interior of the enclosure (40) is pressurized by an inert gas to a pressure level higher than that present in the gasifier so that any combustible product gas leaking from the soot blower lance (20) is forced into the gasifier rather than accumulating within the enclosure.

  11. Brief Communication: Buoyancy-Induced Differences in Soot Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Griffin, Devon W.; Greenberg, Paul S.; Roma, John

    1995-01-01

    Reduction or elimination of buoyancy in flames affects the dominant mechanisms driving heat transfer, burning rates and flame shape. The absence of buoyancy produces longer residence times for soot formation, clustering and oxidation. In addition, soot pathlines are strongly affected in microgravity. We recently conducted the first experiments comparing soot morphology in normal and reduced-gravity laminar gas jet diffusion flames. Thermophoretic sampling is a relatively new but well-established technique for studying the morphology of soot primaries and aggregates. Although there have been some questions about biasing that may be induced due to sampling, recent analysis by Rosner et al. showed that the sample is not biased when the system under study is operating in the continuum limit. Furthermore, even if the sampling is preferentially biased to larger aggregates, the size-invariant premise of fractal analysis should produce a correct fractal dimension.

  12. A Computational Investigation of Sooting Limits of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecoustre, V. R.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Limiting conditions for soot particle inception in spherical diffusion flames were investigated numerically. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport and an optically thick radiation model. Seventeen normal and inverse flames were considered, covering a wide range of stoichiometric mixture fraction, adiabatic flame temperature, and residence time. These flames were previously observed to reach their sooting limits after 2 s of microgravity. Sooting-limit diffusion flames with residence times longer than 200 ms were found to have temperatures near 1190 K where C/O = 0.6, whereas flames with shorter residence times required increased temperatures. Acetylene was found to be a reasonable surrogate for soot precursor species in these flames, having peak mole fractions of about 0.01.

  13. HETEROGENEOUS SOOT NANOSTRUCTURE IN ATMOSPHERIC AND COMBUSTION SOURCE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microscopic images of soot emissions from wildfire and a wide range of anthropogenic combustion sources show that the nanostructures of individual particles in these emissions are predominantly heterogeneous, decidedly influenced by the fuel composition and by the particular comb...

  14. A density gradient ultracentrifugation analysis of carbon nanotube soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Nancy S.

    Knowing the absolute amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbonaceous impurities in commercial CNT soot is important for supporting and enabling advances in countless nanotechnology applications involving CNTs. However, the physiochemical characterization of CNTs and carbonaceous impurities in heterogeneous soot samples is very challenging because both components comprise sp2- and sp3-hybridized carbons; in particular, CNTs with open ends and/or defect sides could possess sp3-hybridization. Herein, we present the use of density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) to separate and quantify single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nontubular carbon (NTC) impurities in CoMoCAT(TM) soot, and the development of protocols to analyze the DGU fractions. While a complete separation of SWNTs and NTCs could not be obtained, important discoveries were made. Primarily, CoMoCAT(TM) soot contains spherical fullerenes and graphite even though no prior reports have indicated the presence of these species in this material.

  15. Initial stages of soot formation in thermal pyrolysis of acetylene. II. A model for the incipience and growth of soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.A.; Ovsyannikov, A.A.; Polak, L.S.; Popov, V.T.; Pustilnikov, V.Yu. )

    1989-03-01

    A model is developed which describes simultaneously occurring processes of the initial hydrocarbon pyrolysis, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation of soot particles. The model permits one to find the size distribution of the primary soot particles up to size 30-40 nm using a relatively small set of equations. The computed time dependence of soot particle concentration agrees satisfactorily with available experimental data. The existence of two limiting stages of the soot formation is revealed.

  16. On-line measurements of diesel nanoparticle composition and volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiromu; Tobias, Herbert J.; Park, Kihong; Zarling, Darrick; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Kittelson, David B.; McMurry, Peter H.; Ziemann, Paul J.

    A thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer (TDPBMS) and tandem differential mobility analyzers (TDMA) were used for on-line measurements of the chemical composition and volatility of nanoparticles and larger particles emitted from a modern, heavy-duty diesel engine operated at light and medium loads under laboratory conditions. Temperature-dependent TDPBMS mass spectra and mass spectra obtained using spectrally distinctive oil and synthetic Fischer-Tropsch fuel were analyzed using mass spectral matching methods to obtain quantitative information on the contributions of fuel, oil, oxidation products, and sulfuric acid to particle composition. TDMA measurements of volatility yielded information on nanoparticle vapor pressures and therefore on the composition of organic components. The results indicate that, for these operating conditions, the volatile component of both diesel nanoparticles and larger particles is comprised of at least 95% unburned lubricating oil. TDMA volatility measurements also detected residual species a few nanometers in diameter, which may be non-volatile cores (soot, metal oxide) or low-volatility organic compounds. These on-line analyses provide new insights into the mechanisms of diesel nanoparticle formation.

  17. Water interaction with hydrophobic and hydrophilic soot particles.

    PubMed

    Popovicheva, Olga; Persiantseva, Natalia M; Shonija, Natalia K; DeMott, Paul; Koehler, Kirsten; Petters, Markus; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Tishkova, Victoria; Demirdjian, Benjamin; Suzanne, Jean

    2008-05-07

    The interaction of water with laboratory soots possessing a range of properties relevant for atmospheric studies is examined by two complementary methods: gravimetrical measurement of water uptake coupled with chemical composition and porosity analysis and HTDMA (humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer) inference of water uptake accompanied by separate TEM (transmission electron microscopy) analysis of single particles. The first method clarifies the mechanism of water uptake for bulk soot and allows the classification of soot with respect to its hygroscopicity. The second method highlights the dependence of the soot aerosol growth factor on relative humidity (RH) for quasi-monodisperse particles. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic soot are qualitatively defined by their water uptake and surface polarity: laboratory soot particles are thus classified from very hydrophobic to very hydrophilic. Thermal soot particles produced from natural gas combustion are classified as hydrophobic with a surface of low polarity since water is found to cover only half of the surface. Graphitized thermal soot particles are proposed for comparison as extremely hydrophobic and of very low surface polarity. Soot particles produced from laboratory flame of TC1 aviation kerosene are less hydrophobic, with their entire surface being available for statistical monolayer water coverage at RH approximately 10%. Porosity measurements suggest that, initially, much of this surface water resides within micropores. Consequently, the growth factor increase of these particles to 1.07 at RH > 80% is attributed to irreversible swelling that accompanies water uptake. Hysteresis of adsorption/desorption cycles strongly supports this conclusion. In contrast, aircraft engine soot, produced from burning TC1 kerosene in a gas turbine engine combustor, has an extremely hydrophilic surface of high polarity. Due to the presence of water soluble organic and inorganic material it can be covered by many water

  18. Radiation properties of soot from premixed flat flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadi, M.B.; Vervisch, P.; Coppalle, A.

    1987-04-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of the radiation from luminous flames burning propane and methane fuels were carried out in the wavelength range from 0.4 ..mu..m to 5 ..mu..m and monochromatic spectra of the radiation from the soot particle cloud were measured. A large discrepancy between experimental and predicted k/sub lambda/ from Mie theory is observed. Calculations from Mie theory were performed to clarify the effect of the shape, size, and complex refractive index of soot particles.

  19. Uptake of HNO3 on hexane and aviation kerosene soots.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Ranajit K; Loukhovitskaya, Ekaterina E; Popovicheva, Olga B; Ravishankara, A R

    2006-08-10

    The uptake of HNO(3) on aviation kerosene (TC-1) soot was measured as a function of temperature (253-295 K) and the partial pressure of HNO(3), and the uptake of HNO(3) on hexane soot was studied at 295 K and over a limited partial pressure of HNO(3). The HNO(3) uptake was mostly reversible and did not release measurable amounts of gas-phase products such as HONO, NO(3), NO(2) or N(2)O(5). The heat of adsorption of HNO(3) on soot was dependent on the surface coverage. The isosteric heats of adsorption, Delta(0)H(isosteric), were determined as a function of coverage. Delta(0)H(isosteric) values were in the range -16 to -13 kcal mol(-1). The heats of adsorption decrease with increasing coverage. The adsorption data were fit to Freundlich and to Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms. The heterogeneity parameter values were close to 0.5, which suggested that a HNO(3) molecule can occupy two sites on the surface with or without being dissociated and that the soot surface could be nonuniform. Surface FTIR studies on the interaction of soot with HNO(3) did not reveal formation of any minor product such as organic nitrate or nitro compound on the soot surface. Using our measured coverage, we calculate that the partitioning of gas-phase nitric acid to black carbon aerosol is not a significant loss process of HNO(3) in the atmosphere.

  20. Darkness after the K-T impact: Effects of soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolbach, Wendy S.; Anders, Edward; Orth, Charles J.

    1988-01-01

    Dust from the K-T impact apparently settled from the atmosphere in less than 6 months, restoring sunlight to minimum photosynthesis levels in about 4 months. However, the discovery of a global soot component in the boundary clay makes it necessary to reconsider the problem, as soot particles not only are smaller (0.1 vs. about 0.5 micrometer) and thus settle more slowly, but also are better light absorbers (optical depth of 13 mg soot cm(-2) about 1800; and are more resistant to rainout. Still, the darkness cannot have lasted very much longer than 6 months, else no larger animals would have survived. Perhaps the soot coagulated with the rock dust and fell out with it. Evidence on this point may be sought at a relatively undisturbed K-T boundary site, such as Woodside Creek, N.Z. There the boundary clay and lowermost Tertiary strata are finely laminated and show large chemical and isotopic differences on a millimeter scale, apparently representing a detailed time sequence. Researchers studied a 3 m section across the boundary at this site, analyzing the principal forms of carbon (soot, elemental C, kerogen, and carbonate) as well as 33 elements. Correlations among the elements were sought. Apparently soot came early and coagulated with the ejecta, staying with them for the primary fallout and in the next 5 cm, but then parting company, perhaps due to size sorting.

  1. Influence of sulfur in fuel on the properties of diffusion flame soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies indicate that sulfur in fuel affects the hygroscopicity of soot. However, the issue of the effect of sulfur in fuel on soot properties is not fully understood. Here, the properties of soot prepared from fuel with a variable sulfur content were investigated under lean and rich flame conditions. Lean flame soot was influenced more by sulfur in fuel than rich flame soot. The majority of sulfur in fuel in lean flame was converted to gaseous SO2, while a small fraction appeared as sulfate and bisulfate (referred to as sulfate species) in soot. As the sulfur content in fuel increased, sulfate species in lean flame soot increased nonlinearly, while sulfate species on the surface of lean flame soot increased linearly. The hygroscopicity of lean flame soot from sulfur-containing fuel was enhanced mainly due to sulfate species. Meanwhile, more alkynes were formed in lean flame. The diameter of primary lean flame soot particles increased and accumulation mode particle number concentrations of lean flame soot from sulfur-containing fuel increased as a result of more alkynes. Because the potential effects of soot particles on air pollution development greatly depend on the soot properties, which are related to both chemical aging and combustion conditions, this work will aid in understanding the impacts of soot on air quality and climate.

  2. Application of the discrete ordinates method to compute radiant heat loss in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, J.; Magi, V.

    1997-05-09

    A three-dimensional model for computing flows, sprays, and combustion in internal combustion engines is modified to include radiant heat loss. Radiant heat loss is computed by solving the radiative transport equation using a discrete ordinates approximation method. Such a method solves the radiative transport equation for a set of discrete directions spanning the range of 4{pi} solid angle. Angular integrals of intensity are discretized by numerical quadrature. The resulting discrete ordinates equations are numerically solved by using a finite volume approach in contravariant formulation. Computations are made with and without radiant heat loss in a diesel engine, and the effects of the radiant heat loss on the computed temperature and NO and soot concentrations are discussed. Inclusion of radiant heat loss reduces the peak temperature by about 10%. As a result, the predicted frozen NO concentrations are found to be lowered. However, the soot concentrations are not significantly altered.

  3. A numerical investigation of the diesel particle filter regeneration process under temperature pulse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhongwei; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Chao; Yan, Yan

    2016-10-01

    A one-dimensional transient diesel particle filter (DPF) model is applied to study DPF regeneration performance. Numerical simulations are performed to predict the effects of various factors influencing regeneration performance under temperature pulse conditions, and the regeneration performances of three typical DPFs are compared and analyzed. Numerical results indicate that the thermal conductivity characteristics of DPF configurations can greatly affect soot oxidation, which in turn influences the regeneration process. The transition points of the regeneration flow rate indicate a balance between its promotion of the regeneration process and retardation owing to cooling effects. The sensitive ranges of soot loading, oxygen concentration, and inlet temperature are observed to provide a reference for controlling DPF regeneration. The multi-step exhaust condition is employed to control DPF regeneration. It was found that a transient increase in the flow rate is more effective at reducing the peak temperature and peak temperature gradient than a transient decrease of oxygen concentration.

  4. PTV analysis of the entrained air into the diesel spray at high-pressure injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Naoki; Yamashita, Hayato; Mashida, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    In order to clarify the effect of high-pressure injection on soot reduction in terms of the air entrainment into spray, the air flow surrounding the spray and set-off length indicating the distance from the nozzle tip to the flame region in diffusion diesel combustion were investigated using 300MPa injection of a multi-hole injector. The measurement of the air entrainment flow was carried out at non-evaporating condition using consecutive PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) method with a high-speed camera and a high-frequency pulse YAG laser. The set-off length was measured at highpressure and high-temperature using the combustion bomb of constant volume and optical system of shadow graph method. And the amount of air entrainment into spray until reaching set-off length in diffusion combustion was studied as a factor of soot formation.

  5. Soot Formation in Purely-Curved Premixed Flames and Laminar Flame Speeds of Soot-Forming Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Thomas; Wang, Hai

    2005-01-01

    The research addressed here is a collaborative project between University of Delaware and Case Western Reserve University. There are two basic and related scientific objectives. First, we wish to demonstrate the suitability of spherical/cylindrical, laminar, premixed flames in the fundamental study of the chemical and physical processes of soot formation. Our reasoning is that the flame standoff distance in spherical/cylindrical flames under microgravity can be substantially larger than that in a flat burner-stabilized flame. Therefore the spherical/cylindrical flame is expected to give better spatial resolution to probe the soot inception and growth chemistry than flat flames. Second, we wish to examine the feasibility of determining the laminar flame speed of soot forming flames. Our basic assumption is that under the adiabatic condition (in the absence of conductive heat loss), the amount and dynamics of soot formed in the flame is unique for a given fuel/air mixture. The laminar flame speed can be rigorously defined as long as the radiative heat loss can be determined. This laminar flame speed characterizes the flame soot formation and dynamics in addition to the heat release rate. The research involves two integral parts: experiments of spherical and cylindrical sooting flames in microgravity (CWRU), and the computational counterpart (UD) that aims to simulate sooting laminar flames, and the sooting limits of near adiabatic flames. The computations work is described in this report, followed by a summary of the accomplishments achieved to date. Details of the microgra+ experiments will be discussed in a separate, final report prepared by the co-PI, Professor C-J. Sung of CWRU. Here only a brief discussion of these experiments will be given.

  6. Nanoparticle emissions from a heavy-duty engine running on alternative diesel fuels.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Juha; Virtanen, Annele; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Murtonen, Timo

    2009-12-15

    We have studied the effect of three different fuels (fossil diesel fuel (EN590); rapeseed methyl ester (RME); and synthetic gas-to-liquid (GTL)) on heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Our main focus was on nanoparticle emissions of the engine. Our results show that the particle emissions from a modern diesel engine run with EN590, GTL, or RME consisted of two partly nonvolatile modes that were clearly separated in particle size. The concentration and geometric mean diameter of nonvolatile nucleation mode cores measured with RME were substantially greater than with the other fuels. The soot particle concentration and soot particle size were lowest with RME. With EN590 and GTL, a similar engine load dependence of the nonvolatile nucleation mode particle size and concentration imply a similar formation mechanism of the particles. For RME, the nonvolatile core particle size was larger and the concentration dependence on engine load was clearly different from that of EN590 and GTL. This indicates that the formation mechanism of the core particles is different for RME. This can be explained by differences in the fuel characteristics.

  7. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  8. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  9. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE. PROGRAM OUTLINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    INFORMATIONAL TOPICS COVERED IN THE TEXT MATERIALS AND SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL BRANCH PROGRAMED TRAINING FILMS FOR A 2-YEAR, 55 MODULE PROGRAM IN AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE ARE GIVEN. THE 30 MODULES FOR "AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1" ARE AVAILABLE AS VT 005 655 - VT 005 684, AND THE 25 MODULES FOR "AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2" ARE AVAILABLE…

  10. Turning soot into diamonds with microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Luo, J.; Pan, X.; Liu, S.

    1994-06-01

    Growth of diamond films using fullerene precursors in an argon microwave plasma without the addition of hydrogen or oxygen has recently been accomplished. Microwave discharges (2.45 GHz) were generated in C{sub 60}-containing Ar. The gas mixtures were produced by flowing Ar over fullerene-containing soot at a variety of temperatures. Optical spectroscopy shows that the spectrum is dominated by the d{sup 3}{Pi}{minus}a{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}. Swan bands of C{sub 2} and particularly the {Delta}{nu} = {minus}2, {minus}1.0, +1, and +2 sequences, that C{sub 2} is one of the products of C{sub 60} fragmentation brought about, at least in part, by collisionally-induced dissociation. The nanocrystalline films were characterized with scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Assuming a linear dependence on carbon concentration, a growth rate at least six times higher than commonly observed using methane as a precursor would be predicted at a carbon content of 1% based on C{sub 60}. Energetic and mechanistic arguments are advanced to rationalize this result based on C{sub 2} as the growth species.

  11. Cosmic: Carbon Monoxide And Soot In Microgravity Inverse Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikofski, M. A.; Blevins, L. G.; Davis, R. W.; Moore, E. F.; Mulholland, G. W.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Almost seventy percent of fire related deaths are caused by the inhalation of toxins such as CO and soot that are produced when fires become underventilated.(1) Although studies have established the importance of CO formation during underventilated burning,(2) the formation processes of CO (and soot) in underventilated fires are not well understood. The goal of the COSMIC project is to study the formation processes of CO and soot in underventilated flames. A potential way to study CO and soot production in underventilated flames is the use of inverse diffusion flames (IDFs). An IDF forms between a central air jet and a surrounding fuel jet. IDFs are related to underventilated flames because they may allow CO and soot to escape unoxidized. Experiments and numerical simulations of laminar IDFs of CH4 and C2H4 were conducted in 1-g and micro-g to study CO and soot formation. Laminar flames were studied because turbulent models of underventilated fires are uncertain. Microgravity was used to alter CO and soot pathways. A IDF literature survey, providing background and establishing motivation for this research, was presented at the 5th IWMC.(3) Experimental results from 1-g C2H4 IDFs and comparisons with simulations, demonstrating similarities between IDFs and underventilated fires, were presented at the 6th IWMC.(4) This paper will present experimental results from micro-g and 1-g IDFs of CH4 and C2H4 as well as comparisons with simulations, further supporting the relation between IDFs and underventilated flames.

  12. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, M.G.S. )

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ring'' samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased soot sensitivity'' is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  13. NOx reduction in diesel fuel flames by additions of water and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    Natural gas has the highest heating value per unit mass (50.1 MJ/kg, LHV) of any of the hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., butane, liquid diesel fuel, gasoline, etc.). Since it has the lowest carbon content per unit mass, combustion of natural gas produces much less carbon dioxide, soot particles, and oxide of nitrogen than combustion of liquid diesel fuel. In view of anticipated strengthening of regulations on pollutant emissions from diesel engines, alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) have been experimentally introduced to replace the traditional diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks, transit buses, off-road vehicles, locomotives, and stationary engines. To help in applying natural gas in Diesel engines and increasing combustion efficiency, the emphasis of the present paper is placed on the detailed flame chemistry of methane-air combustion. The present work is the continued effort in finding better methods to reduce NO{sub x}. The goal is to identify a reliable chemical reaction mechanism for natural gas in both premixed and diffusion flames and to establish a systematic reduced mechanism which may be useful for large-scale numerical modeling of combustion behavior in natural gas engines.

  14. Railway diesel crankcase lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R.L.; Zoleski, B.H.; O'Rourke, R.L.

    1987-06-30

    A railway diesel crankcase lubricant composition is described comprising a diesel lubricating oil and from about 0.25 to 2.0 weight percent of minor amount of oxidation and corrosion inhibiting agent. The reaction product is of a polyoxyisopropylene diamine, diabasic acid anhydride and polyalkylene polyamine wherein: (i) reacting a dibasic acid anhydride with a polyoxyisopropylenediamine where x is a numeral of about 2 to about 50, forming a maleamic acid; (ii) reacting the maleamic acid with a polyalkylene polyamine, forming a condensate product and; (iii) recovering the condensate product.

  15. Sorption kinetics and equilibrium of the herbicide diuron to carbon nanotubes or soot in absence and presence of algae.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Fabienne; Camenzuli, Louise; Knauer, Katja; Nowack, Bernd; Magrez, Arnaud; Sigg, Laura; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are strong sorbents for organic micropollutants, but changing environmental conditions may alter the distribution and bioavailability of the sorbed substances. Therefore, we investigated the effect of green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) on sorption of a model pollutant (diuron, synonyms: 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, DCMU) to CNT (multi-walled purified, industrial grade, pristine, and oxidized; reference material: Diesel soot). In absence of algae, diuron sorption to CNT was fast, strong, and nonlinear (Freundlich coefficients: 10(5.79)-10(6.24) μg/kgCNT·(μg/L)(-n) and 0.62-0.70 for KF and n, respectively). Adding algae to equilibrated diuron-CNT mixtures led to 15-20% (median) diuron re-dissolution. The relatively high amorphous carbon content slowed down ad-/desorption to/from the high energy sorption sites for both industrial grade CNT and soot. The results suggest that diuron binds readily, but - particularly in presence of algae - partially reversibly to CNT, which is of relevance for environmental exposure and risk assessment.

  16. The effect of soot modeling on thermal radiation in buoyant turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snegirev, A.; Kokovina, E.; Tsoy, A.; Harris, J.; Wu, T.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative impact of buoyant turbulent diffusion flames is the driving force in fire development. Radiation emission and re-absorption is controlled by gaseous combustion products, mainly CO2 and H2O, and by soot. Relative contribution of gas and soot radiation depends on the fuel sooting propensity and on soot distribution in the flame. Soot modeling approaches incorporated in big commercial codes were developed and calibrated for momentum-dominated jet flames, and these approaches must be re-evaluated when applied to the buoyant flames occurring in fires. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effect of the soot models available in ANSYS FLUENT on the predictions of the radiative fluxes produced by the buoyant turbulent diffusion flames with considerably different soot yields. By means of large eddy simulations, we assess capability of the Moss-Brooks soot formation model combined with two soot oxidation submodels to predict methane- and heptane-fuelled fires, for which radiative flux measurements are available in the literature. We demonstrate that the soot oxidation models could be equally important as soot formation ones to predict the soot yield in the overfire region. Contribution of soot in the radiation emission by the flame is also examined, and predicted radiative fluxes are compared to published experimental data.

  17. Soot and Radiation Measurements in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.

    1996-01-01

    The subject of soot formation and radiation heat transfer in microgravity jet diffusion flames is important not only for the understanding of fundamental transport processes involved but also for providing findings relevant to spacecraft fire safety and soot emissions and radiant heat loads of combustors used in air-breathing propulsion systems. Our objectives are to measure and model soot volume fraction, temperature, and radiative heat fluxes in microgravity jet diffusion flames. For this four-year project, we have successfully completed three tasks, which have resulted in new research methodologies and original results. First is the implementation of a thermophoretic soot sampling technique for measuring particle size and aggregate morphology in drop-tower and other reduced gravity experiments. In those laminar flames studied, we found that microgravity soot aggregates typically consist of more primary particles and primary particles are larger in size than those under normal gravity. Comparisons based on data obtained from limited samples show that the soot aggregate's fractal dimension varies within +/- 20% of its typical value of 1.75, with no clear trends between normal and reduced gravity conditions. Second is the development and implementation of a new imaging absorption technique. By properly expanding and spatially-filtering the laser beam to image the flame absorption on a CCD camera and applying numerical smoothing procedures, this technique is capable of measuring instantaneous full-field soot volume fractions. Results from this technique have shown the significant differences in local soot volume fraction, smoking point, and flame shape between normal and reduced gravity flames. We observed that some laminar flames become open-tipped and smoking under microgravity. The third task we completed is the development of a computer program which integrates and couples flame structure, soot formation, and flame radiation analyses together. We found good

  18. Soot Superaggregates from Flaming Wildfires and Their Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmuller,Hans; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires contribute significantly to global soot emissions, yet their aerosol formation mechanisms and resulting particle properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. The conventional view holds that soot is formed via the cluster-dilute aggregation mechanism in wildfires and emitted as aggregates with fractal dimension D(sub f) approximately equals 1.8 mobility diameter D(sub m) (is) less than or equal to 1 micron, and aerodynamic diameter D(sub a) (is) less than or equal to 300 nm. Here we report the ubiquitous presence of soot superaggregates (SAs) in the outflow from a major wildfire in India. SAs are porous, low-density aggregates of cluster-dilute aggregates with characteristic D(sub f) approximately equals 2.6,D(sub m) (is) greater than 1 micron, and D(sub a) is less than or equal to 300 nm that form via the cluster-dense aggregation mechanism.We present additional observations of soot SAs in wildfire smoke-laden air masses over Northern California, New Mexico, and Mexico City. We estimate that SAs contribute, per unit optical depth, up to 35% less atmospheric warming than freshly-emitted (D(sub f) approximately equals 1.8) aggregates, and approximately equals 90% more warming than the volume-equivalent spherical soot particles simulated in climate models.

  19. Soot superaggregates from flaming wildfires and their direct radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K; Beres, Nicholas D; Moosmüller, Hans; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I

    2014-07-01

    Wildfires contribute significantly to global soot emissions, yet their aerosol formation mechanisms and resulting particle properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. The conventional view holds that soot is formed via the cluster-dilute aggregation mechanism in wildfires and emitted as aggregates with fractal dimension Df ≈ 1.8 mobility diameter Dm ≤ 1 μm, and aerodynamic diameter Da ≤ 300 nm. Here we report the ubiquitous presence of soot superaggregates (SAs) in the outflow from a major wildfire in India. SAs are porous, low-density aggregates of cluster-dilute aggregates with characteristic Df ≈ 2.6, Dm > 1 μm, and Da ≤ 300 nm that form via the cluster-dense aggregation mechanism. We present additional observations of soot SAs in wildfire smoke-laden air masses over Northern California, New Mexico, and Mexico City. At 550 nm wavelength, [corrected] we estimate that SAs contribute, per unit optical depth, up to 35% less atmospheric warming than freshly-emitted (D(f) ≈ 1.8) [corrected] aggregates, and ≈90% more warming than the volume-equivalent spherical soot particles simulated in climate models.

  20. Soot superaggregates from flaming wildfires and their direct radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmüller, Hans; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires contribute significantly to global soot emissions, yet their aerosol formation mechanisms and resulting particle properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. The conventional view holds that soot is formed via the cluster-dilute aggregation mechanism in wildfires and emitted as aggregates with fractal dimension Df ≈ 1.8 mobility diameter Dm ≤ 1 μm, and aerodynamic diameter Da ≤ 300 nm. Here we report the ubiquitous presence of soot superaggregates (SAs) in the outflow from a major wildfire in India. SAs are porous, low-density aggregates of cluster-dilute aggregates with characteristic Df ≈ 2.6, Dm > 1 μm, and Da ≤ 300 nm that form via the cluster-dense aggregation mechanism. We present additional observations of soot SAs in wildfire smoke-laden air masses over Northern California, New Mexico, and Mexico City. We estimate that SAs contribute, per unit optical depth, up to 35% less atmospheric warming than freshly-emitted (Df ≈ 1.8) aggregates, and ≈90% more warming than the volume-equivalent spherical soot particles simulated in climate models. PMID:24981204

  1. Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) Experiment: Findings From Space Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z. G.; Aalburg, C.; Diez, F. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    2003-01-01

    The present experimental study of soot processes in hydrocarbon-fueled laminar nonbuoyant and nonpremixed (diffusion) flames at microgravity within a spacecraft was motivated by the relevance of soot to the performance of power and propulsion systems, to the hazards of unwanted fires, and to the emission of combustion-generated pollutants. Soot processes in turbulent flames are of greatest practical interest, however, direct study of turbulent flames is not tractable because the unsteadiness and distortion of turbulent flames limit available residence times and spatial resolution within regions where soot processes are important. Thus, laminar diffusion flames are generally used to provide more tractable model flame systems to study processes relevant to turbulent diffusion flames, justified by the known similarities of gas-phase processes in laminar and turbulent diffusion flames, based on the widely-accepted laminar flamelet concept of turbulent flames. Unfortunately, laminar diffusion flames at normal gravity are affected by buoyancy due to their relatively small flow velocities and, as discussed next, they do not have the same utility for simulating the soot processes as they do for simulating the gas phase processes of turbulent flames.

  2. Soot aging from OH-initiated oxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chong; Khalizov, Alexei F; Zhang, Renyi

    2012-09-04

    We have conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the impacts of secondary organic aerosol formation on soot properties from OH-initiated oxidation of toluene. Monodisperse soot particles are exposed to the oxidation products of the OH-toluene reaction in an environmental chamber, and variations in particle size, mass, organic mass faction, morphology, effective density, hygroscopicity, and optical properties are simultaneously determined by an integrated aerosol analytical system. The thickness of the organic coating, correlated to reaction time and initial reactant concentrations, is shown to largely govern the particle properties. With the development of organic coating, the soot core is changed from a highly fractal to compact form, evident from the measured effective density and dynamic shape factor. The organic coating increases the particle hygroscopicity, and further exposure of coated soot to elevated relative humidity results in a more spherical particle. The single scattering albedo and scattering and absorption cross sections are also enhanced with the organic coating. Our results suggest that the oxidation products of anthropogenic pollutants alter the composition and properties of soot particles and lead to increased particle density, hygroscopicity, and optical properties, considerably enhancing their impacts on air quality, climate forcing, and human health.

  3. Nitro-PAH formation studied by interacting artificially PAH-coated soot aerosol with NO 2 in the temperature range of 295-523 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Matteo; Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-10-01

    Diesel particulate matter poses a threat to human health, and in particular nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) found within and on the surface of these particles. Although diesel particulate filters (DPFs) have been designed and implemented to reduce these and other harmful diesel emissions, the particle loaded filters may act as a reaction chamber for the enhanced production of NPAHs from the nitration of PAHs with NO 2. Focus is on the investigation of the heterogeneous reactions that occur on soot particles by exposing laboratory produced pyrene- or benzo(a)pyrene-coated spark discharge soot particles to varying concentrations of NO 2 and temperatures while following the formation of products over time. The sole nitration product that was observed throughout the experiments with pyrene-coated soot was 1-nitropyrene (1-NPYR), which increased linearly with reaction time for all NO 2 concentrations chosen (0.11, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 ppm, m m -1). Resulting 1-NPYR formation rate increased exponentially with [NO 2]. Throughout the 3-h experiments less than 10% of pyrene has been converted to 1-NPYR and the partial reaction order with regard to [NO 2] was estimated to 1.52. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was more reactive than pyrene. After 3 h reaction time almost 80% of the BaP has been converted to 6-NBaP. Highest 1-NPYR concentrations on particles were detected at 373 K, and at higher temperatures a considerable decrease in particulate 1-NPYR was observed. A similar trend was observed in a DPF simulation system (PM-Kat ®-like) with BaP-coated soot. In this case, highest 6-NBaP concentration on particles was detected at 423 K. Backed by corroborating results from separate gas/solid-phase partition experiments with 1-NPYR and 6-NBaP, it is likely that the newly formed 1-NPYR and 6-NBaP became transferred from particle to gas phase at higher temperatures. Results from this study confirm the presence of 1-NPYR and 6-NBaP in particulate and gas phase under conditions

  4. Particulate matter, carbon emissions and elemental compositions from a diesel engine exhaust fuelled with diesel-biodiesel blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraful, A. M.; Masjuki, H. H.; Kalam, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    A comparative morphological analysis was performed on the exhaust particles emitted from a CI engine using different blending ratios of palm biodiesel at several operating conditions. It was observed from this experiment; peak particle concentration for PB10 at 1200 rpm is 1.85E + 02 and at 1500 rpm is 2.12E + 02. A slightly smaller amount of volatile material has found from the biodiesel samples compared to the diesel fuel sample. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the amount of volatile material in the soot from biodiesel fuels was slightly lower than that of diesel fuel. PB20 biodiesel blends reduced maximum 11.26% of volatile matter from the engine exhaust, while PB10 biodiesel blend reduced minimum 5.53% of volatile matter. On the other hand, the amount of fixed carbon from the biodiesel samples was slightly higher than diesel fuel. Analysis of carbon emissions, palm biodiesel (PB10) reduced elemental carbon (EC) was varies 0.75%-18%, respectively. Similarly, the emission reduction rate for PB20 was varies 11.36%-23.46% respectively. While, organic carbon (OC) emission rates reduced for PB20 was varied 13.7-49% respectively. Among the biodiesel blends, PB20 exhibited highest oxygen (O), sulfur (S) concentration and lowest silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) concentration. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images for PB20 showed granular structure particulates with bigger grain sizes compared to diesel. Particle diameter increased under the 2100-2400 rpm speed condition and it was 8.70% higher compared to the low speed conditions. Finally, the results indicated that the composition and degree of unsaturation of the methyl ester present in biodiesel, play an important role in the chemical composition of particulate matter emissions.

  5. Diesel Engine Idling Test

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

    2006-02-01

    In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

  6. Diesel Engine Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foutes, William A.

    Written in student performance terms, this curriculum guide on diesel engine repair is divided into the following eight sections: an orientation to the occupational field and instructional program; instruction in operating principles; instruction in engine components; instruction in auxiliary systems; instruction in fuel systems; instruction in…

  7. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  8. Diesel Engine Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T

    2003-08-24

    There are basically three different modes of combustion possible for use in reciprocating engines. These include, diffusion burning, as occurs in current diesel engines, flame propagation combustion such as used in conventional SI engines, and homogeneous combustion such as is used in the SwRI HCCI engine. Diesel engines currently offer significant fuel consumption benefits relative to other powerplants for on and off road applications; however, costs and efficiency may become problems as the emissions standards become even more stringent. This presentation presents a discussion of the potentials of HCCI and flame propagation engines as alternatives to the diesel engines. It is suggested that as the emissions standards become more and more stringent, the advantages of the diesel may disappear. The potential for HCCI is limited by the availability of the appropriate fuel. The potential of flame propagation engines is limited by several factors including knock, EGR tolerance, high BMEP operation, and throttling. These limitations are discussed in the context of potential for improvement of the efficiency of the flame propagation engine.

  9. Diesel Technology: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joerschke, John D.; Eichhorn, Lane C.

    Competency-based teacher and student materials are provided for an introductory course on diesel technology. Twelve units of instruction cover the following topics: workplace tools, common materials, and basic related principles. The materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, then developing…

  10. Diesel Engine Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diesel engine technicians maintain and repair the engines that power transportation equipment such as heavy trucks, trains, buses, and locomotives. Some technicians work mainly on farm machines, ships, compressors, and pumps. Others work mostly on construction equipment such as cranes, power shovels, bulldozers, and paving machines. This article…

  11. DIESEL NOX CONTROL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a project to design, develop, and demonstrate a diesel engine nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) control package that will meet the U.S. Navy's emission control requirements. (NOTE: In 1994, EPA issued a Notice for Proposed Rule Making (NP...

  12. Diesel engine exhaust

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Diesel engine exhaust ; CASRN N.A . Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  13. Fuel for diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, M.

    1983-09-20

    A fuel is disclosed for a diesel engine which comprises a mixture of (A) an alcohol, (B) gas oil and (C) castor oil, wherein the contents of the respective components satisfy requirements represented by the following formulae: 0% by volume < A 80% by volume, 10% by volume B < 50% by volume, and 10% by volume C < 50% by volume.

  14. Diesel Emissions Quantifier (DEQ)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    .The Diesel Emissions Quantifier (Quantifier) is an interactive tool to estimate emission reductions and cost effectiveness. Publications EPA-420-F-13-008a (420f13008a), EPA-420-B-10-035 (420b10023), EPA-420-B-10-034 (420b10034)

  15. Chinese Soot on a Vietnamese Soup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, X.

    2015-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is an aerosol emitted as soot during biomass burning and fossil fuels combustion together with other carbonaceous aerosols such as organic carbon (OC) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). While the impacts of BC on health and climate have been studied for many years, studies about its deposition and impact on marine ecosystems are scares. This is rather surprising considering that a large fraction of atmospheric BC deposits on the surface of the ocean via dry or wet deposition. On a global scale, deposition on the ocean is about 45 Tg C per year, with higher fluxes in the northern hemisphere and in inter-tropical regions, following the occurrence of the hot-spots of concentration. In the present study conducted on shore, in Haiphong and Halong cities, North Vietnam, we measured the seasonal variations of atmospheric BC, OC and PAHs during a complete annual cycle. The presentation will discuss the atmospheric results in terms of seasonal variability and sources. Inputs to the marine system are higher during the dry season, concomitantly with the arrival of air masses enriched in BC coming from the North. However, the carbon fingerprint can significantly differ at shorter time periods depending on the air mass pathway and speed. Our work leads to the characterization and the determination of the relative contribution of more specific sources like local traffic, which includes tourism and fishing boats, coal dust emitted from the nearby mine, and long-range transported aerosols. This variable input of carbonaceous aerosols might have consequences for the cycling and the repartition of carbon and nutrients in the marine ecosystem of Halong Bay.

  16. Effects of biodiesel, engine load and diesel particulate filter on nonvolatile particle number size distributions in heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Young, Li-Hao; Liou, Yi-Jyun; Cheng, Man-Ting; Lu, Jau-Huai; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Tsai, Ying I; Wang, Lin-Chi; Chen, Chung-Bang; Lai, Jim-Shoung

    2012-01-15

    Diesel engine exhaust contains large numbers of submicrometer particles that degrade air quality and human health. This study examines the number emission characteristics of 10-1000 nm nonvolatile particles from a heavy-duty diesel engine, operating with various waste cooking oil biodiesel blends (B2, B10 and B20), engine loads (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%) and a diesel oxidation catalyst plus diesel particulate filter (DOC+DPF) under steady modes. For a given load, the total particle number concentrations (N(TOT)) decrease slightly, while the mode diameters show negligible changes with increasing biodiesel blends. For a given biodiesel blend, both the N(TOT) and mode diameters increase modestly with increasing load of above 25%. The N(TOT) at idle are highest and their size distributions are strongly affected by condensation and possible nucleation of semivolatile materials. Nonvolatile cores of diameters less than 16 nm are only observed at idle mode. The DOC+DPF shows remarkable filtration efficiency for both the core and soot particles, irrespective of the biodiesel blend and engine load under study. The N(TOT) post the DOC+DPF are comparable to typical ambient levels of ≈ 10(4)cm(-3). This implies that, without concurrent reductions of semivolatile materials, the formation of semivolatile nucleation mode particles post the after treatment is highly favored.

  17. Measurement of naphthalene uptake by combustion soot particles.

    PubMed

    Liscinsky, David S; Yu, Zhenhong; True, Bruce; Peck, Jay; Jennings, Archer C; Wong, Hsi-Wu; Franklin, Jon; Herndon, Scott C; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2013-05-07

    In this study, we designed and constructed an experimental laboratory apparatus to measure the uptake of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by soot particles. Results for the uptake of naphthalene (C10H8) by soot particles typical of those found in the exhaust of an aircraft engine are reported in this paper. The naphthalene concentration in the gas phase and naphthalene attached to the particles were measured simultaneously by a heated flame ionization detector (HFID) and a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF AMS), respectively. The uptake coefficient for naphthalene on soot of (1.11 ± 0.06) × 10(-5) at 293 K was determined by fitting the HFID and AMS measurements of gaseous and particulate naphthalene to a kinetic model of uptake. When the gaseous concentration of naphthalene is kept below the saturation limit during these experiments, the uptake of naphthalene can be considered the dry mass accommodation coefficient.

  18. Effects of dicarboxylic acid coating on the optical properties of soot.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huaxin; Khalizov, Alexei F; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi

    2009-09-28

    Soot is a major component of atmospheric aerosols responsible for absorption of visible solar radiation. Internal mixing of soot with transparent materials can enhance its ability to absorb and scatter light, resulting in a larger role of soot in climate forcing. We have investigated the absorption and scattering of visible light (532 nm) by soot aerosol internally mixed with succinic and glutaric acids using a combination of a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer. The measurements were performed for flame-generated soot aerosol with well-characterized morphology and mixing state in the particle size range from 155 to 320 nm. Thin coatings of dicarboxylic acids on soot aggregates (with a mass fraction of 0.1-0.4) enhance significantly light scattering (up to 3.8 fold) and slightly light absorption (less than 1.2 fold). Cycling the coated soot aerosol through high relative humidity (humidified to 90% RH and then dried to 5% RH) promotes further increase in light absorption and scattering for soot internally mixed with glutaric acid, but not for soot mixed with succinic acid. The larger effect of glutaric acid on light absorption and scattering is caused by the irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates induced by the coating material. Our results indicate that the enhancement in the optical properties of soot by transparent coatings is strongly related to the ability of the coating materials to change the morphology of soot aggregates.

  19. New Nanotech from an Ancient Material: Chemistry Demonstrations Involving Carbon-Based Soot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon soot has been known since antiquity, but has recently been finding new uses as a robust, inexpensive nanomaterial. This paper describes the superhydrophobic properties of carbon soot films prepared by combustion of candle wax or propane gas and introduces some of the optical absorption and fluorescence properties of carbon soot particles.…

  20. Phototransformation rate constants of PAHs associated with soot particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyun; Young, Thomas M; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-01-15

    Photodegradation is a key process governing the residence time and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particles, both in the atmosphere and after deposition. We have measured photodegradation rate constants of PAHs in bulk deposits of soot particles illuminated with simulated sunlight. The photodegradation rate constants at the surface (k(p)(0)), the effective diffusion coefficients (D(eff)), and the light penetration depths (z(0.5)) for PAHs on soot layers of variable thickness were determined by fitting experimental data with a model of coupled photolysis and diffusion. The overall disappearance rates of irradiated low molecular weight PAHs (with 2-3 rings) on soot particles were influenced by fast photodegradation and fast diffusion kinetics, while those of high molecular weight PAHs (with 4 or more rings) were apparently controlled by either the combination of slow photodegradation and slow diffusion kinetics or by very slow diffusion kinetics alone. The value of z(0.5) is more sensitive to the soot layer thickness than the k(p)(0) value. As the thickness of the soot layer increases, the z(0.5) values increase, but the k(p)(0) values are almost constant. The effective diffusion coefficients calculated from dark experiments are generally higher than those from the model fitting method for illumination experiments. Due to the correlation between k(p)(0) and z(0.5) in thinner layers, D(eff) should be estimated by an independent method for better accuracy. Despite some limitations of the model used in this study, the fitted parameters were useful for describing empirical results of photodegradation of soot-associated PAHs.

  1. Investigation of methyl decanoate combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A. S.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, an optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of methyl decanoate (MD) on combustion and emissions. A specific goal of the study was to determine if MD could enable soot-free leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC) – a mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with fuel-air equivalence ratios below approximately two. An ultra-low sulfur diesel certification fuel (CF) was used as the baseline fuel, and experiments were conducted at two fuel-injection pressures with three levels of charge-gas dilution. In addition to conventional pressure-based and engine-out emissions measurements, exhaust laser-induced incandescence, in-cylinder natural luminosity (NL), and in-cylinder chemiluminescence (CL) diagnostics were used to provide detailed insight into combustion processes.

  2. Investigation of methyl decanoate combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, A. S.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, an optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of methyl decanoate (MD) on combustion and emissions. A specific goal of the study was to determine if MD could enable soot-free leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC) – a mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with fuel-air equivalence ratios below approximately two. An ultra-low sulfur diesel certification fuel (CF) was used as the baseline fuel, and experiments were conducted at two fuel-injection pressures with three levels of charge-gas dilution. In addition to conventional pressure-based and engine-out emissions measurements, exhaust laser-induced incandescence, in-cylinder natural luminosity (NL), and in-cylindermore » chemiluminescence (CL) diagnostics were used to provide detailed insight into combustion processes.« less

  3. Dimerization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soot nucleation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; You, Xiaoqing; Wang, Hongmiao; Law, Chung K

    2014-02-27

    A possible pathway of soot nucleation, in which localized π electrons play an important role in binding the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules having multiradical characteristics to form stable polymer molecules through covalent bonds, is studied using density functional and semiempirical methods. Results show that the number of covalent bonds formed in the dimerization of two identical PAHs is determined by the radical character, and the sites to form bonds are related to the aromaticity of individual six-membered ring structure. It is further shown that the binding energy of dimerization increases linearly with the diradical character in the range relevant to soot nucleation.

  4. The Determination of Rate-Limiting Steps during Soot Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-14

    the soot formation process. Alternatively, acetylene could add to a soot particle via a Diels - Alder reaction, such as 12 I I C4 H6 + C2H2 - c - C6H...identified. Kiefer (1991) suggested that the acetylene addition processes may be related to the Diels - Alder reaction of acetylene addition to CPD to form...related to the reverse diels - alder reaction of acetylene addition to CPD to form norbornadiene. Benson and O’Neal (1970) report rates for unimolecular

  5. Effects of Cerium Oxide and Ferrocene Nanoparticles Addition As Fuel-Borne Catalysts on Diesel Engine Particulate Emissions: Environmental and Health Implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2017-04-06

    This study systematically examined the potential impacts of doping CeO2 and Fe(C5H5)2 nanoparticles as fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs) to ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel on the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics of diesel particulate matter (DPM). The FBCs-doped fuels are effective in promoting soot oxidation and reducing the DPM mass emissions, but lead to a significant increase in the total particle counts due to the formation of self-nucleated metallic nanoparticles. Compared to undoped ULSD, the FBCs-doped fuels result in higher concentrations of particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes, higher fractions of organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in particles, show slight alterations in soot nanostructure, reduce soot ignition temperature and activation energy. Exposure of the human-type II cell alveolar epithelial cells (A549) to DPM derived from FBCs-doped fuels shows a decrease in cell viability and alterations in the global gene expression with a broad range of biochemical pathways. The overall variations in DPM characteristics are mainly caused by the catalytic combustion process, and are related to the type, properties and contents of FBCs used in diesel fuel as well as the engine operating conditions. Environmental and health implications of the study are highlighted.

  6. Diesel combustion and emissions formation using multiple 2-D imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Understanding how emissions are formed during diesel combustion is central to developing new engines that can comply with increasingly stringent emission standards while maintaining or improving performance levels. Laser-based planar imaging diagnostics are uniquely capable of providing the temporally and spatially resolved information required for this understanding. Using an optically accessible research engine, a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) imaging diagnostics have been applied to investigators of direct-injection (DI) diesel combustion and emissions formation. These optical measurements have included the following laser-sheet imaging data: Mie scattering to determine liquid-phase fuel distributions, Rayleigh scattering for quantitative vapor-phase-fuel/air mixture images, laser induced incandescence (LII) for relative soot concentrations, simultaneous LII and Rayleigh scattering for relative soot particle-size distributions, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to obtain early PAH (polyaromatic hydrocarbon) distributions, PLIF images of the OH radical that show the diffusion flame structure, and PLIF images of the NO radical showing the onset of NO{sub x} production. In addition, natural-emission chemiluminescence images were obtained to investigate autoignition. The experimental setup is described, and the image data showing the most relevant results are presented. Then the conceptual model of diesel combustion is summarized in a series of idealized schematics depicting the temporal and spatial evolution of a reacting diesel fuel jet during the time period investigated. Finally, recent PLIF images of the NO distribution are presented and shown to support the timing and location of NO formation hypothesized from the conceptual model.

  7. Volatile nanoparticle formation and growth within a diluting diesel car exhaust.

    PubMed

    Uhrner, Ulrich; Zallinger, Michael; von Löwis, Sibylle; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wehner, Birgit; Stratmann, Frank; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2011-04-01

    A major source of particle number emissions is road traffic. However, scientific knowledge concerning secondary particle formation and growth of ultrafine particles within vehicle exhaust plumes is still very limited. Volatile nanoparticle formation and subsequent growth conditions were analyzed here to gain a better understanding of "real-world" dilution conditions. Coupled computational fluid dynamics and aerosol microphysics models together with measured size distributions within the exhaust plume of a diesel car were used. The impact of soot particles on nucleation, acting as a condensational sink, and the possible role of low-volatile organic components in growth were assessed. A prescribed reduction of soot particle emissions by 2 orders of magnitude (to capture the effect of a diesel particle filter) resulted in concentrations of nucleation-mode particles within the exhaust plume that were approximately 1 order of magnitude larger. Simulations for simplified sulfuric acid-water vapor gas-oil containing nucleation-mode particles show that the largest particle growth is located in a recirculation zone in the wake of the car. Growth of particles within the vehicle exhaust plume up to detectable size depends crucially on the relationship between the mass rate of gaseous precursor emissions and rapid dilution. Chassis dynamometer measurements indicate that emissions of possible hydrocarbon precursors are significantly enhanced under high engine load conditions and high engine speed. On the basis of results obtained for a diesel passenger car, the contributions from light diesel vehicles to the observed abundance of measured nucleation-mode particles near busy roads might be attributable to the impact of two different time scales: (1) a short one within the plume, marked by sufficient precursor emissions and rapid dilution; and (2) a second and comparatively long time scale resulting from the mix of different precursor sources and the impact of atmospheric

  8. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  9. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  10. Acoustic modelling and testing of diesel particulate filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Sabry; Åbom, Mats

    2005-11-01

    The use of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) on automobiles to reduce the harmful effects of diesel exhaust gases is becoming a standard in many countries. Although the main purpose of a DPF is to reduce harmful emission of soot particles it also affects the acoustic emission. This paper presents a first attempt to describe the acoustic behavior of DPFs and to present models which allow the acoustic two-port to be calculated. The simplest model neglects wave propagation and treats the filter as an equivalent acoustic resistance modeled via a lumped impedance element. This simple model gives a constant frequency-independent transmission loss and agrees within 1 dB with measured data on a typical filter (length 250 mm) up to 200-300 Hz (at 20 °C). In the second model, the ceramic filter monolith is described as a system of coupled porous channels carrying plane waves. The coupling between the channels through the porous walls is described via Darcy's law. This model gives a frequency-dependent transmission loss and agrees well with measured data in the entire plane wave range.

  11. Diesel developments for rail traction

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1995-03-01

    The latest developments in diesel rail traction systems are playing an important role in providing economical passenger transportation, especially in Europe. A new generation of diesel-hydraulic and diesel-electric traction systems - featuring reduced weight and using electronic control systems for easier operation, lower engine emissions and reduced fuel consumption - are being introduced into public and private railway networks worldwide. This paper reviews the specifications of diesel based locomotives and trains being currently supplied in Germany, China, Netherlands, Switzerland, and USA. 6 figs.

  12. Kinetics of Elementary Processes Relevant to Incipient Soot Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M C; Heaven, M C

    2008-04-30

    Soot formation and abatement processes are some of the most important and challenging problems in hydrocarbon combustion. The key reactions involved in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), the precursors to soot, remain elusive. Small aromatic species such as C5H5, C6H6 and their derivatives are believed to play a pivotal role in incipient soot formation. The goal of this project is to establish a kinetic database for elementary reactions relevant to soot formation in its incipient stages. In the past year, we have completed by CRDS the kinetics for the formation and decomposition of C6H5C2H2O2 in the C6H5C2H2 +O2 reaction and the formation of C10H7O2 in the C10H7 + O2 reaction by directly monitoring C6H5C2H2O2 and C10H7O2 radicals in the visible region; their mechanisms have been elucidated computationally by quantum-chemical calculations. The O + C2H5OH reaction has been studied experimentally and computationally and the OH + HNCN reaction has been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. In addition, a new pulsed slit molecular beam system has been constructed and tested for spectroscopic studies of aromatic radicals and their derivatives by the cavity ringdown technique (CRDS).

  13. Soot climate forcing via snow and ice albedos

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2004-01-01

    Plausible estimates for the effect of soot on snow and ice albedos (1.5% in the Arctic and 3% in Northern Hemisphere land areas) yield a climate forcing of +0.3 W/m2 in the Northern Hemisphere. The “efficacy” of this forcing is ∼2, i.e., for a given forcing it is twice as effective as CO2 in altering global surface air temperature. This indirect soot forcing may have contributed to global warming of the past century, including the trend toward early springs in the Northern Hemisphere, thinning Arctic sea ice, and melting land ice and permafrost. If, as we suggest, melting ice and sea level rise define the level of dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system, then reducing soot emissions, thus restoring snow albedos to pristine high values, would have the double benefit of reducing global warming and raising the global temperature level at which dangerous anthropogenic interference occurs. However, soot contributions to climate change do not alter the conclusion that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have been the main cause of recent global warming and will be the predominant climate forcing in the future. PMID:14699053

  14. Copper catalysts for soot oxidation: alumina versus perovskite supports.

    PubMed

    López-Suárez, F E; Bueno-López, A; Illán-Gómez, M J; Adamski, A; Ura, B; Trawczynski, J

    2008-10-15

    Copper catalysts prepared using four supports (Mg- and Sr-modified Al2O3 and MgTiO3 and SrTiO3 perovskites) have been tested for soot oxidation by 02 and NOx/O2. Among the catalysts studied, Cu/SrTiO3 is the most active for soot oxidation by NOx/O2 and the support affects positively copper activity. With this catalyst, and under the experimental conditions used, the soot combustion by NOx/O2 presents a considerable rate from 500 degrees C (100 degrees C below the uncatalysed reaction). The Cu/ SrTiO3 catalyst is also the most effective for NOx chemisorption around 425 degrees C. The best activity of Cu/SrTiO3 can be attributed to the improved redox properties of copper originated by Cu-support interactions. This seems to be related to the presence of weakly bound oxygen on this sample. The copper species present in the catalyst Cu/SrTiO3 can be reduced more easily than those in other supports, and for this reason, this catalyst seems to be the most effective to convert NO into NO2, which explains its highest activity for soot oxidation.

  15. Soot Combustion over Nanostructured Ceria with Different Morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Niu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liqiang; Yuan, Fulong; Zhu, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, nano-structure ceria with three different morphologies (nanorod, nanoparticle and flake) have been prepared by hydrothermal and solvothermal methods. The ceria samples were deeply characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, H2-TPR, XPS and in-situ DRIFTS, and tested for soot combustion in absence/presence NO atmospheres under loose and tight contact conditions. The prepared ceria samples exhibit excellent catalytic activities, especially, the CeO2 with nanorod (Ce-R) shows the best catalytic activity, for which the peak temperature of soot combustion (Tm) is about 500 and 368 °C in loose and tight contact conditions, respectively. The catalytic activity for Ce-R is higher than that of the reported CeO2 catalysts and reaches a level that of precious metals. The characterization results reveal that the maximal amounts of adsorbed oxygen species on the surface of the nanostructure Ce-R catalyst should be the crucial role to decide the catalytic soot performance. High BET surface area may also be a positive effect on soot oxidation activity under loose contact conditions. PMID:27353143

  16. EFFECT OF SOOT AND COPPER COMBUSTOR DEPOSITS ON DIOXIN EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of residual soot and copper combustor deposits on the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) during the combustion of a chlorinated waste. In a bench-scale set...

  17. Soot and short-lived pollutants provide political opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, David G.; Zaelke, Durwood; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    2015-09-01

    Cutting levels of soot and other short-lived pollutants delivers tangible benefits and helps governments to build confidence that collective action on climate change is feasible. After the Paris climate meeting this December, actually reducing these pollutants will be essential to the credibility of the diplomatic process.

  18. Investigation of Fuel Additive Effects on Sooting Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-28

    Ndubizu, C. C., and B. T. Zinn : Effects of Metallic Aditive Upon Soot Formation in Polymer Diffusion Flames. Combust, Flame 46, 301-314 (1982). 3.4...Plenum Press, New York, p. 143 (1981). 3.28 Wersborg, B. L., .1. B. Howard , and G. C. Williams: Physical Mechanisms in Carbon 3 Formation in Flames

  19. Combustion Module-1 with Laminar Soot Process (LSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Technicians install the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment into the combustion chamber of Combustion Module-1. CM-1 was one of the most complex and technologically sophisticated pieces of hardware ever to be included as a part of a Spacelab mission.

  20. Soot Combustion over Nanostructured Ceria with Different Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Niu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liqiang; Yuan, Fulong; Zhu, Yujun

    2016-06-01

    In this study, nano-structure ceria with three different morphologies (nanorod, nanoparticle and flake) have been prepared by hydrothermal and solvothermal methods. The ceria samples were deeply characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, H2-TPR, XPS and in-situ DRIFTS, and tested for soot combustion in absence/presence NO atmospheres under loose and tight contact conditions. The prepared ceria samples exhibit excellent catalytic activities, especially, the CeO2 with nanorod (Ce-R) shows the best catalytic activity, for which the peak temperature of soot combustion (Tm) is about 500 and 368 °C in loose and tight contact conditions, respectively. The catalytic activity for Ce-R is higher than that of the reported CeO2 catalysts and reaches a level that of precious metals. The characterization results reveal that the maximal amounts of adsorbed oxygen species on the surface of the nanostructure Ce-R catalyst should be the crucial role to decide the catalytic soot performance. High BET surface area may also be a positive effect on soot oxidation activity under loose contact conditions.

  1. Soot Combustion over Nanostructured Ceria with Different Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Niu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liqiang; Yuan, Fulong; Zhu, Yujun

    2016-06-29

    In this study, nano-structure ceria with three different morphologies (nanorod, nanoparticle and flake) have been prepared by hydrothermal and solvothermal methods. The ceria samples were deeply characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, H2-TPR, XPS and in-situ DRIFTS, and tested for soot combustion in absence/presence NO atmospheres under loose and tight contact conditions. The prepared ceria samples exhibit excellent catalytic activities, especially, the CeO2 with nanorod (Ce-R) shows the best catalytic activity, for which the peak temperature of soot combustion (Tm) is about 500 and 368 °C in loose and tight contact conditions, respectively. The catalytic activity for Ce-R is higher than that of the reported CeO2 catalysts and reaches a level that of precious metals. The characterization results reveal that the maximal amounts of adsorbed oxygen species on the surface of the nanostructure Ce-R catalyst should be the crucial role to decide the catalytic soot performance. High BET surface area may also be a positive effect on soot oxidation activity under loose contact conditions.

  2. Laser-saturated fluorescence measurements in laminar sooting diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Changlie

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is known to be one of the most important intermediate species in the combustion processes. The hydroxyl radical has also been considered a dominant oxidizer of soot particles in flames. In this investigation the hydroxyl concentration profiles in sooting diffusion flames were measured by the laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) method. The temperature distributions in the flames were measured by the two-line LSF technique and by thermocouple. In the sooting region the OH fluorescence was too weak to make accurate temperature measurements. The hydroxyl fluorescence profiles for all four flames presented herein show that the OH fluorescence intensities peaked near the flame front. The OH fluorescence intensity dropped sharply toward the dark region of the flame and continued declining to the sooting region. The OH fluorescence profiles also indicate that the OH fluorescence decreased with increasing height in the flames for all flames investigated. Varying the oxidizer composition resulted in a corresponding variation in the maximum OH concentration and the flame temperature. Furthermore, it appears that the maximum OH concentration for each flame increased with increasing flame temperature.

  3. A numerical study of soot aggregate formation in a laminar coflow diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Thomson, M.J.; Guo, H.; Liu, F.; Smallwood, G.J.

    2009-03-15

    Soot aggregate formation in a two-dimensional laminar coflow ethylene/air diffusion flame is studied with a pyrene-based soot model, a detailed sectional aerosol dynamics model, and a detailed radiation model. The chemical kinetic mechanism describes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation up to pyrene, the dimerization of which is assumed to lead to soot nucleation. The growth and oxidation of soot particles are characterized by the HACA surface mechanism and pyrene-soot surface condensation. The mass range of the solid soot phase is divided into thirty-five discrete sections and two equations are solved in each section to model the formation of the fractal-like soot aggregates. The coagulation model is improved by implementing the aggregate coagulation efficiency. Several physical processes that may cause sub-unitary aggregate coagulation efficiency are discussed. Their effects on aggregate structure are numerically investigated. The average number of primary soot particles per soot aggregate n{sub p} is found to be a strong function of the aggregate coagulation efficiency. Compared to the available experimental data, n{sub p} is well reproduced with a constant 20% aggregate coagulation efficiency. The predicted axial velocity, OH mole fraction, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} mole fraction are validated against experimental data in the literature. Reasonable agreements are obtained. Finally, a sensitivity study of the effects of particle coalescence on soot volume fraction and soot aggregate nanostructure is conducted using a coalescence cutoff diameter method. (author)

  4. Soot topography in a planar diffusion flame wrapped by a line vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cetegen, B.M.; Basu, S.

    2006-09-15

    An experimental study of the interaction of a planar diffusion flame with a line vortex is presented. A planar diffusion flame is established between two coflowing, equal velocity streams of acetylene diluted with nitrogen and air. A line vortex is generated on demand by momentarily pulsing one of the flow streams by way of electromagnetic actuation of a piston in the flow apparatus. The flame-vortex interactions are diagnosed by planar laser-induced incandescence for soot yield and by particle image velocimetry for vortex flow characterization. The results show that soot formation and distribution are influenced by the reactant streams from which vortices are initiated. The vortices interacting with the flame from the air side produce more soot and soot is distributed in and around the vortex core in diffuse layers. In contrast, topography of soot in vortices interacting from the fuel side is such that soot is confined to thinner layers around the vortex core which does not contain any soot. The flame curvature is found to influence the local soot production with the flame regions convex to the fuel side containing more soot locally. It is also found that the overall soot yield is less sensitive to the vortex strength and is of lower magnitude when vortex is spun from the fuel side. The knowledge of this type of asymmetry in soot yield in flame-vortex interactions is useful for combustion engineering and design of practical devices. (author)

  5. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  6. Structural Effects of Biodiesel on Soot Volume Fraction in a Laminar Co-Flow Diffusion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Jason

    An experimental study was performed to determine the structural effects of biodiesel on soot volume fraction in a laminar co-flow diffusion flame. These include the effects of the ester function group, the inclusion of a double bond, and its positional effect. The soot volume fraction and temperature profiles of a biodiesel surrogate, n-Decane, 1-Decene, and 5-Decene fuels were measured. Improvements were made to existing laser extinction and rapid thermocouple insertion apparatus and were used to measure soot volume fraction and temperature profiles respectively. Flow rates of each fuel were determined in order to keep the temperature effects on soot negligible. Using n-Decane as a baseline, the double bond increased soot production and was further increased with a more centrally located double bond. The ester function group containing oxygen decreased soot production. The order of most to least sooting fuels were as follows 5-Decene > 1-Decene > n-Decane > Biodiesel Surrogate.

  7. A priori analysis of a LES subfilter model for soot-turbulence-chemistry interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Jeffry K.; Mueller, Michael E.

    2016-11-01

    In a turbulent flame, soot interacts with turbulence and combustion chemistry at the smallest scales. An existing LES subfilter model proposes that soot-turbulence interactions are independent of chemistry due to the time scale separation between slow soot formation and rapid heat-releasing reactions. However, interactions between soot, turbulence, and chemistry occur even after the nucleation of soot from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dimers. In fact, the interplay of soot and gas-phase chemistry may be intensified during oxidation and surface growth. To capture these effects, a dependence on the local mixture fraction has been introduced into the subfilter model. This modified model is evaluated a priori using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) database of soot evolution in a turbulent non-premixed n-heptane/air jet flame.

  8. Soot Particle Studies - Instrument Inter-Comparison – Project Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.; Sedlacek, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Ahern, A.; Wrobel, W.; Slowik, J. G.; Olfert, J.; Lack, D. A.; Massoli, P.; Cappa, C. D.; Schwarz, J.; Spackman, J. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Trimborn, A.; Jayne, J. T.; Freedman, A.; Williams, L. R.; Ng, N. L.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M.; Brem, B.; Kok, G.; Subramanian, R.; Freitag, S.; Clarke, A.; Thornhill, D.; Marr, L.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.

    2010-03-06

    An inter-comparison study of instruments designed to measure the microphysical and optical properties of soot particles was completed. The following mass-based instruments were tested: Couette Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyzer (CPMA), Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer - Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (AMS-SMPS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) and Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS2000CE). Optical instruments measured absorption (photoacoustic, interferometric, and filter-based), scattering (in situ), and extinction (light attenuation within an optical cavity). The study covered an experimental matrix consisting of 318 runs that systematically tested the performance of instruments across a range of parameters including: fuel equivalence ratio (1.8 {le} {phi} {le} 5), particle shape (mass-mobility exponent (D{sub f m}), 2.0 {le} D{sub f m} {le} 3.0), particle mobility size (30 {le} d{sub m} {le} 300 nm), black carbon mass (0.07 {le} m{sub BC} {le} 4.2 fg) and particle chemical composition. In selected runs, particles were coated with sulfuric acid or dioctyl sebacate (DOS) (0.5 {le} {Delta}r{sub ve} {le} 201 nm) where {Delta}r{sub ve} is the change in the volume equivalent radius due to the coating material. The effect of non-absorbing coatings on instrument response was determined. Changes in the morphology of fractal soot particles were monitored during coating and denuding processes and the effect of particle shape on instrument response was determined. The combination of optical and mass based measurements was used to determine the mass specific absorption coefficient for denuded soot particles. The single scattering albedo of the particles was also measured. An overview of the experiments and sample results are presented.

  9. Effect of oxygenated fuels on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of diesel particulate emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-12-16

    A systematic study was conducted to make a comparative evaluation of the effects of blending five different oxygenates (diglyme (DGM), palm oil methyl ester (PME), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), diethyl adipate (DEA), and butanol (Bu)) with ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) at 2% and 4% oxygen levels on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of particulate emissions from a nonroad diesel engine. All blended fuels led to an overall decrease in the particulate mass concentration and elemental carbon (EC) emissions, which was strongly associated with the oxygen content in fuels and the specific type of fuels used. In general, the proportion of particulate-bound organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) increased while using oxygenated fuel blends. Compared to ULSD, all fuel blends showed different emission factors of particle-phase PAHs and n-alkanes, slight alterations in soot nanostructure, lower soot ignition temperature, and lower activation energy. The total counts of particles (≤ 560 nm diameter) emitted decreased gradually for ULSD blended with DMC, DEA, and Bu, while they increased significantly for other fuel blends. The in vitro toxicity of particulates significantly increased with ULSD blended with DMC and DEA, while it decreased when ULSD was blended with PME, DGM, and Bu.

  10. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  11. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  12. Extremely slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and soot-like materials: evidence by supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Hawthorne, Steven B; Koelmans, Albert A

    2005-10-15

    Combustion-derived PAHs are strongly sorbed to their particulate carrier (i.e., soot, charcoal), and therefore, very slow desorption kinetics of the chemicals might be anticipated. Measurements are however lacking, because conventional methods (Tenax, XAD, gas-purging) fail to accurately determine desorption kinetics due to practical problems. In this study, we used a mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method, which mimics desorption into water and circumvents these problems, to quantify desorption kinetics of 13 native PAHs from pure charcoal, coal, and four types of soot. The results show that generally only very small PAH fractions are released. Desorption behavior was, however, not related to common sorbent/sorbate characteristics. Two-site model-derived "fast desorbing fractions" were <0.01 in the majority of cases, and for the dominant "slow sites", the calculated rate constants for desorption into water measured from 10(-7) to 10(-5) h(-1). These data suggest that desorption of coal and combustion-derived PAHs can be even slower than the "very slow" desorption observed in sediments. Estimated time scales required for removal of pyrogenic PAHs from these extremely slow sites into water amount to several millennia. Our results imply reduced chemical risks for soot and soot-like materials, casting doubts on current risk assessment procedures and environmental quality standards of pyrogenic PAHs.

  13. Extremely slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and soot-like materials: evidence by supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Michiel T.O. Jonker; Steven B. Hawthorne; Albert A. Koelmans

    2005-10-15

    Combustion-derived PAHs are strongly sorbed to their particulate carrier (i.e., soot, charcoal), and therefore, very slow desorption kinetics of the chemicals might be anticipated. Measurements are however lacking, because conventional methods (Tenax, XAD, gas-purging) fail to accurately determine desorption kinetics due to practical problems. In this study, we used a mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method, which mimics desorption into water and circumvents these problems, to quantify desorption kinetics of 13 native PAHs from pure charcoal, coal, and four types of soot. The results show that generally only very small PAH fractions are released. Desorption behavior was, however, not related to common sorbent/sorbate characteristics. Two-site model-derived 'fast desorbing fractions' were {lt}0.01 in the majority of cases, and for the dominant 'slow sites', the calculated rate constants for desorption into water measured from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -5} h{sup -1}. These data suggest that desorption of coal and combustion-derived PAHs can be even slower than the 'very slow' desorption observed in sediments. Estimated time scales required for removal of pyrogenic PAHs from these extremely slow sites into water amount to several millennia. Our results imply reduced chemical risks for soot and soot-like materials, casting doubts on current risk assessment procedures and environmental quality standards of pyrogenic PAHs. 41 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  15. Diesel Fundamentals. Teacher Edition (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elton; And Others

    This module is one of a series of teaching guides that cover diesel mechanics. The module contains 4 sections and 19 units. Section A--Orientation includes the following units: introduction to diesel mechanics and shop safety; basic shop tools; test equipment and service tools; fasteners; bearings; and seals. Section B--Engine Principles and…

  16. 'Vegetable' substitutes for diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-22

    Research programs in the US, Brazil, South Africa and the Philippines on efforts to find a vegetable oil substitute for diesel fuel are reported. A narrowing price gap with diesel fuel and a favourable energy balance improve the prospects for such fuels. Much of the current work is centered on blends, rather than the use of the pure oil.

  17. Reformulated diesel fuel and method

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-08-22

    A method for mathematically identifying at least one diesel fuel suitable for combustion in an automotive diesel engine with significantly reduced emissions and producible from known petroleum blendstocks using known refining processes, including the use of cetane additives (ignition improvers) and oxygenated compounds.

  18. Measurements of soot, OH, and PAH concentrations in turbulent ethylene/air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Young; Turns, Stephen R.; Santoro, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents results from an investigation of soot formation in turbulent, non-premixed, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/air jet flames. Tests were conducted using a H{sub 2}-piloted burner with fuel issuing from a 2.18 mm i.d. tube into quiescent ambient air. A range of test conditions was studied using the initial jet velocity (16.2-94.1 m/s) as a parameter. Fuel-jet Reynolds numbers ranged from 4000 to 23,200. Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) was employed to determine soot volume fractions, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to measure relative hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations. Extensive information on the structure of the soot and OH fields was obtained from two-dimensional imaging experiments. Quantitative measurements were obtained by employing the LII and LIF techniques independently. Imaging results for soot, OH, and PAH show the existence of three soot formation/oxidation regions: a rapid soot growth region, in which OH and soot particles lie in distinctly different radial locations; a mixing-dominated region controlled by large-scale motion; and a soot-oxidation region in which the OH and soot fields overlap spatially, resulting in the rapid oxidation of soot particles. Detailed quantitative analyzes of soot volume fractions and OH and soot zone thicknesses were performed along with the temperature measurement using the N{sub 2}-CARS system. Measurements of OH and soot zone thicknesses show that the soot zone thickness increases linearly with axial distance in the soot formation region, whereas the OH zone thickness is nearly constant in this region. The OH zone thickness then rapidly increases with downstream distance and approximately doubles in the soot-oxidation region. Probability density functions also were obtained for soot volume fractions and OH concentrations. These probability density functions clearly define the spatial relationships among the OH, PAH concentrations, the

  19. Role of organic carbon in heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with soot.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2013-04-02

    A large uncertainty among the reported uptake coefficients of NO2 on soot highlights the importance of the composition of soot in this reaction. Soot samples with different fractions of organic carbon (OC) were prepared by combusting n-hexane under controlled conditions. The heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on soot was investigated using a flow tube reactor at ambient pressure. The soot with the highest fuel/oxygen ratio showed the largest uptake coefficient (γ(initial)) of NO2 and yield of HONO (yHONO). Compared to fresh soot samples, preheated samples exhibited a great decrease in uptake coefficient of NO2 and HONO yield due to the removal of OC from soot. Ozonized soot also showed a lower reactivity toward NO2 than fresh soot, which can be ascribed to the consumption of OC with a reduced state (OCR). A linear dependence of the NO2 uptake coefficient and yields of HONO and NO on the OCR content of the soot was established, with γ(initial)(NO2) = (1.54 ± 1.39) × 10(-6) + (1.96 ± 0.35) × 10(-7) × OCR, yHONO = (11.6 ± 16.1) + (1.3 ± 0.40) × OCR, and yNO = (13.1 ± 1.9) - (0.2 ± 0.05) × OCR, respectively.

  20. The effect of temperature on soot properties in premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Alfe, M.; Apicella, B.; Tregrossi, A.; Ciajolo, A.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2010-10-15

    The effect of flame temperature on soot properties was studied in premixed methane/oxygen flames burning at a constant mixture composition (C/O = 0.60, {phi} = 2.4) and different cold-gas flow velocities (4 and 5 cm s{sup -1}). Temperature and concentration profiles of stable gases and condensed phases combustion products were measured along the flame axis. It was found that the high flame temperature conditions cause a larger decomposition of methane into hydrogen and C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, thereby reducing the formation of benzene and condensed phases including condensed species and soot. Soot properties were studied by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and H/C elemental analysis. A description of soot nanostructural organization was also performed by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Different properties and nanostructures were found to develop in the soot, depending on the temperature and on soot aging associated. Soot dehydrogenation occurred to a larger extent in the high flame temperature conditions. As soot dehydrogenates the mass absorption coefficients of soot exhibited an increasing trend along the flame axis. However, mature soot retained a relatively high H/C ratio and low absorption coefficients with respect to other less hydrogenated fuels even in high temperature conditions. This indicates that the aromatization/dehydrogenation of soot in premixed flames is more dependent on the fuel characteristics rather than on the flame temperature. Generally, it was assessed that mature soot produced from diverse hydrocarbon fuels with similar flame temperatures and flame types possess a different chemical composition and structure. To this regard the H/C atomic ratio and mass absorption coefficients appeared to be signatures of soot properties and structural evolution. (author)

  1. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis of detailed soot particle size distribution in laminar premixed ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jasdeep; Patterson, Robert I.A.; Kraft, Markus; Wang, Hai

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the prediction of a soot model [J. Appel, H. Bockhorn, M. Frenklach, Combust. Flame 121 (2000) 122-136] is compared to a recently published set of highly detailed soot particle size distributions [B. Zhao, Z. Yang, Z. Li, M.V. Johnston, H. Wang, Proc. Combust. Inst. 30 (2005)]. A stochastic approach is used to obtain soot particle size distributions (PSDs). The key features of the measured and simulated particle size distributions are identified and used as a simple way of comparing PSDs. The sensitivity of the soot PSDs to the parameters defining parts of the soot model, such as soot inception, particle and PAH collision efficiency and enhancement, and surface activity is investigated. Incepting soot particle size is found to have a very significant effect on the small-size end of the PSDs, especially the position of the trough for a bimodal soot PSDs. A new model for the decay in the surface activity is proposed in which the activity of the soot particle depends only on the history of that particle and the local temperature in the flame. This is a first attempt to use local flame variables to define the surface aging which has major impact on the prediction of the large-size end of the PSDs. Using these modifications to the soot model it is possible to improve the agreement between some of the points of interest in the simulated and measured PSDs. The paper achieves the task to help advance the soot models to predict soot PSD in addition to soot volume fraction and number density, which has been the focus of the literature. (author)

  2. Evaluation of principal cannabinoids in airborne particulates.

    PubMed

    Balducci, C; Nervegna, G; Cecinato, A

    2009-05-08

    The determination of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), cannabidiol (CND) and cannabinol (CNB), primary active components in cannabis preparation, was carried out on airborne particulates by applying a specific procedure consisting of soot extraction by ultrasonic bath, purification by solvent partitioning, derivatization with N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide, and separation/detection through gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The optimized procedure was found suitable for measuring the three psychotropic substances at concentrations ranging from ca. 0.001 to ca. 5.0 ng cm(-3) of air, with recoveries always higher than 82%, accuracy >7.3% and precision >90%. Application of the procedure performed on field in Rome and Bari, Italy, demonstrated that all three compounds contaminate the air in Italian cities whereas in Algiers, Algeria, only cannabinol, the most stable in the atmosphere, exceeded the limit of quantification of the method. The relative percentages of the three cannabinoids in general reproduced those typical of the Cannabis sativa plant and were very different from those found in human blood, urine and sweat.

  3. The single scattering properties of hygroscopic soot aggregates with water coated monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, W.; Tianhai, C.; Hao, C.; Lijuan, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols, such as soot, have modified the Earth's radiation balance by scattering and absorbing solar and long-wave radiative transmission, which have largely influenced the global climate change since the industrial era. Based on transmission electron microscope images (TEM), soot particles are shown as the complex, fractal-like aggregate structures. In humid atmospheric environments, these soot aggregates tend to acquire a water coating, which introduces further complexity to the problem of determining the optical properties of the aggregates. The hygroscopic growth of soot aggregates is important for the aging of these absorbing aerosols, which can significantly influence the optical properties of these kinds of soot particles. In this paper, according to the specific volume fractions of soot core in the water coated soot particle, the monomers of fractal soot aggregates are modeled as semi-external mixtures (physical contact) with constant radius of soot core and variable size of water coating. The single scattering properties of these hygroscopic soot particles, such as phase function, the cross sections of extinction, absorption and scatting, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (ASY), are calculated using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The morphological effects are compared with different monomer numbers and fractal dimension of the soot aggregates, as well as different size of water coating for these spherical monomers. The results have shown that the extinction and absorption cross sections are decreased for the soot aggregates with more thick water coating on monomers, but the single scattering albedo is increased for the larger water coating. It is found that the SSA of aged soot aggregates with hygroscopic grown are remarkably (~50% for volume fraction of soot aggregates is 0.5) larger than fresh soot particles without the consideration of water coating, due to the size of water coating and the

  4. Shock tube study of the fuel structure effects on the chemical kinetic mechanisms responsible for soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.

    1983-01-01

    Soot formation in toluene-, benzene-, and acetylene-oxygen-argon mixtures was investigated to study soot formation in a combustion environment. High concentrations of oxygen completely suppress soot formation. The addition of oxygen at relatively low concentrations uniformly suppresses soot formation at high pressures, while at relatively lower pressures it suppresses soot formation at higher temperatures while promoting soot production at lower temperatures. The observed behavior indicates that oxidation reactions compete with ring fragmentation. The main conclusion to be drawn from the results is that the soot formation mechanism is probably the same for the pyrolysis and oxidation of hydrocarbons. That is, the addition of oxygen does not alter the soot route but rather promotes or inhibits this route by means of competitive reactions. An approach to empirical modeling of soot formation during pyrolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons is also presented.

  5. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering interactions between flow and soot properties within laminar diffusion flames. Laminar diffusion flames were considered because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for theoretical and experimental studies than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. In particular, understanding the transport and chemical reaction processes of laminar flames is a necessary precursor to understanding these processes in practical turbulent flames and many aspects of laminar diffusion flames have direct relevance to turbulent diffusion flames through application of the widely recognized laminar flamelet concept of turbulent diffusion flames. The investigation was divided into three phases, considering the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in still air, the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, and the hydrodynamic suppression of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames.

  6. Temperature and velocity profiles in sooting free boundary layer flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ang, J. A.; Pagni, P. J.; Mataga, T. G.; Margle, J. M.; Lyons, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and velocity profiles are presented for cyclohexane, n-heptane, and iso-octane free, laminar, boundary layer, sooting, diffusion flames. Temperatures are measured with 3 mil Pt/Pt-13 percent Rh thermocouples. Corrected gas temperatures are derived by performing an energy balance of convection to and radiation from the thermocouple bead incorporating the variation of air conductivity and platinum emissivity with temperature. Velocities are measured using laser doppler velocimetry techniques. Profiles are compared with previously reported analytic temperature and velocity fields. Comparison of theoretical and experimental temperature profiles suggests improvement in the analytical treatment is needed, which accounts more accurately for the local soot radiation. The velocity profiles are in good agreement, with the departure of the theory from observation partially due to the small fluctuations inherent in these free flows.

  7. "The black bronchoscopy": a case of airway soot deposition.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla; Guimarães, Miguel; Antunes, Ana; Oliveira, Ana; Neves, Sofia; Almeida, José; Moura E Sá, João

    2013-07-01

    The term "black bronchoscopy" is used to describe the black pigmentation of the airways. It is a rare condition with multiple etiologies. We describe a case of a "black bronchoscopy" due to severe soot deposition as a result of smoke inhalation during a household fire in a 71-year-old woman. Early flexible bronchoscopy allowed for a precise diagnosis of severe inhalation injury, and bronchial lavage was carried out to remove soot casts to reduce complications. Any patient suspected of having smoke inhalation injury should undergo early bronchoscopy to allow for a precise diagnosis, staging, and more aggressive treatment measures as the mortality among patients exposed to smoke with inhalation airway injury is high.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Sooting Propensity of Ethanol at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishal

    The effects of pressure on the combustion properties of ethanol were investigated. One-dimensional analysis was employed to evaluate the fundamental combustion properties of ethanol as a function of equivalence ratio and pressure. Two mechanisms were used in the one-dimensional simulation. The predicted results displayed good agreement with experimental data. Further, a state of the art computational framework was used to simulate the two-dimensional, axisymmetric, co-flow laminar diffusion flames of ethanol. The framework is a highly-scalable combustion modelling tool designed specifically for use on large multi-processor parallel computer systems. The flame structure predictions were obtained for ethanol. The soot volume fraction had an annular structure and maximum concentrations occured in the annular region. In agreement with the past theoretical and numerical measurements for other gaseous fuels, the current work showed a constant flame height and an increasing trend of soot yield with increasing pressure.

  9. Lanthanum-promoted copper-based hydrotalcites derived mixed oxides for NO{sub x} adsorption, soot combustion and simultaneous NO{sub x}-soot removal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongpeng; Yan, Xiaotong; Bi, Xinlin; Wang, Liguo; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Jiang, Zheng; Xiao, Tiancun; Umar, Ahmad; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The addition of La in Cu-based oxides increased the types of active oxygen. • NO{sub x} adsorption, soot oxidation and simultaneous NO{sub x}-soot removal were enhanced. • The possible catalytic mechanism was studied via in situ FTIR analysis. • Soot oxidation was promoted by the NO{sub 2} intermediate. - Abstract: La-promoted Cu-based hydrotalcites derived mixed oxides were prepared and their catalytic activities for NO{sub x} adsorption, soot oxidation, and simultaneous NO{sub x}-soot removal were investigated. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, DTG, BET, FTIR, H2-TPR, TPD and TPO techniques. The oxides catalysts exhibited mesoporous properties with specific surface area of 45–160 m{sup 2}/g. The incorporation of La and Cu decreased the amount of basic sites due to the large decrease in surface areas. Under O{sub 2} atmosphere, La incorporation is dominant for soot oxidation activity, while Cu favors high selectivity to CO{sub 2} formation. A synergetic effect between La and Cu for catalyzed soot oxidation lies in the improved redox property and suitable basicity. The presence of NO in O{sub 2} significantly promoted soot oxidation on the catalysts with the ignition temperature decreased to about 300 °C. In O{sub 2}/NO atmosphere, NO{sub 2} acts as an intermediate which oxidizes soot to CO{sub 2} at a lower temperature with itself reduced to NO or N{sub 2}, contributing to the high catalytic performance in simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and soot.

  10. Effects of Fuel Specification and Additives on Soot Formation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    develop models destined for gas turbine design. Present knowledge of these effects is limited to systems which are either too simple to adequately...information essential. To answer these technical questions, a multifaceted study was undertaken to 0) test candidate model laboratory combustors in the...effectiveness of the ASTM smoke point in predict- ing sooting behavior in complex flows. Two candidate model laboratory combustors were used -- a swirl

  11. Investigation of Fuel Additive Effects on Sooting Flames.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-31

    reduction. ,-. R86-956545-F INTRODUCT ION Particulate soot is a combustion product whose occurrence is highly U undesirable in almost all instances...density, N, from the absolute 0 scattered light intensity at one angle, and the volume fraction, fv, from the calculated product , ffi (D 3 /6)N...far the preponderant combustion product . Based on this and similar reasoning, [MOH+ was concluded to be the critical species. The reason for this is

  12. Non-corrosive creosote and soot removing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackowiak, L.S.; Ellison, F.E.; Fidler, J.W.; Tucker, N.G.; Varma, G.M.N.

    1984-11-06

    A metallic chloride based creosote and soot removing composition including a phosphate corrosion inhibitor to reduce the corrosive attack on metal flue pipes is provided. The composition includes between about 15-60% metallic chloride, 20-60% trisodium phosphate dodecylhydrate, 15-60% anti-cake agents, such as non-swelling clay, sodium sulfate and tricalcium phosphate and 2-10% combustion initiator, such as wood flour.

  13. Bioavailability of PAHs: effects of soot carbon and PAH source.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Waverly A; Cope, W Gregory; Shea, Damian

    2004-04-01

    The bioavailability of 38 individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds was determined through calculation of biota-sediment-accumulation factors (BSAF). BSAF values were calculated from individual PAH concentrations in freshwater mussel, marine clam, and sediment obtained from field and laboratory bioaccumulation studies. Sediment that was amended with different types of soot carbon (SC) was used in some of the bioaccumulation experiments. BSAF values for petrogenic PAH were greater than those for pyrogenic PAH (e.g., 1.57 +/- 0.53 vs 0.25 +/- 0.23, respectively), indicating that petrogenic PAH are more bioavailable than pyrogenic PAH (p < 0.05). This trend was consistent among marine and freshwater sites. Increased SC content of sediment resulted in a linear decrease in the bioavailability of pyrogenic PAHs (r2 = 0.85). The effect of increasing SC content on petrogenic PAH was negligible. SC was considered as an additional sorptive phase when calculating BSAF values, and using PAH-SC partition coefficients from the literature, we obtained unreasonably large BSAF values for all petrogenic PAH and some pyrogenic PAH. This led us to conclude that a quantitative model to assess bioavailability through a combination of organic carbon and soot carbon sorption is not applicable among field sites with a wide range of soot carbon fractions and PAH sources, at least given our current knowledge of PAH-SC partitioning. Our data offer evidence that many factors including analysis of a full suite of PAH analytes, PAH hydrophobicity, sediment organic carbon content, sediment soot carbon content, and PAH source are importantto adequately assess PAH bioavailability in the environment.

  14. Chromatic variation of soot soiling: a possible marker for gunshot wounds in burnt bone.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Merli, Daniele; Brandone, Alberto; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Soot soiling is a crucial forensic parameter around gunshot lesions. Carbonization, however, can severely alter human tissues and mimic such clues. This study aims at evaluating the survival of soot soiling even after carbonization in bone. A total of 36 bovine ribs (half fleshed and half defleshed) were shot with two types of bullet (both 9-mm; full metal-jacketed and unjacketed) with a near-contact range. With unjacketed bullets, the shot left in every case a clear, black, and roughly round soot stain around the entrance wound, whereas full metal-jacketed bullets left no signs of soot. Every specimen then underwent calcination in an oven at 800°C. The analysis of the charred samples clearly showed the survival of the soot soiling in both fleshed and bony samples, with a clear correspondence with the former position, but with a different color (yellow). Thus, soot soiling may survive, although with a different color, even after charring.

  15. Investigation of Sooting in Microgravity Droplet Combustion: Fuel-Dependent Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzello, Samuel L.; Hua, Ming; Choi, Mun Young

    1999-01-01

    Kumagai and coworkers first performed microgravity droplet combustion experiments [Kumagai, 1957]. The primary goal of these early experiments were to validate simple 'd(sup 2)-law models [Spalding, 1954, Godsave, 1954] Inherent in the 'd(sup 2) -law' formulation and in the scope of the experimental observation is the neglect of sooting behavior. In fact, the influence of sooting has not received much attention until more recent works [Choi et al., 1990; Jackson et al., 1991; Jackson and Avedisian, 1994; Choi and Lee, 1996; Jackson and Avedisian, 1996; Lee et al., 1998]:. Choi and Lee measured soot volume fraction for microgravity droplet flames using full-field light extinction and subsequent tomographic inversion [Choi and Lee, 1996]. In this investigation, soot concentrations were measured for heptane droplets and it was reported that soot concentrations were considerably higher in microgravity compared to the normal gravity flame. It was reasoned that the absence of buoyancy and the effects of thermophoresis resulted in the higher soot concentrations. Lee et al. [1998] performed soot measurement experiments by varying the initial droplet diameter and found marked influence of sooting on the droplet burning behavior. There is growing sentiment that sooting in droplet combustion must no longer be neglected and that "perhaps one of the most important outstanding contributions of (micro)g droplet combustion is the observation that in the absence of asymmetrical forced and natural convection, a soot shell is formed between the droplet surface and the flame, exerting an influence on the droplet combustion response far greater than previously recognized." [Law and Faeth, 1994]. One of the methods that we are exploring to control the degree of sooting in microgravity is to use different fuels. The effect of fuel structure on sooting propensity has been investigated for over-ventilated concentric coflowing buoyant diffusion flames. (Glassman, 1996]. In these

  16. Single-Mach and double-Mach reflection - Its representation in Ernst Mach's historical soot method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehl, P.

    In 1875 Ernst Mach discovered the effect of irregular interaction of shock waves, the so-called single Mach reflection (SMR), which for symmetric geometry is characterized by two triple points. He recorded their two trajectories on a soot-covered glass plate. Appearing as two mirror-symmetric V-branches, they form the well-known Mach soot funnel. Combining this soot method with the schlieren technique facilitates the interpretation of soot-recorded interaction phenomena as well as allows to resolve the soot removal mechanism in time. Increasing the dynamic recording range of the soot layer in terms of reflected shock pressures even renders visualization of double-Mach reflection (DMR) which, in the case of symmetric shock interaction, is characterized by a second concentric, external 'double-Mach funnel'. At transition of DMR to SMR it merges into the ordinary 'single-Mach funnel'.

  17. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: are organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-09-01

    A high concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere when the exhaust cools and dilutes has hazardous health effects and it impairs the visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulfur content (FSC) fuel, under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested. Based on the measured gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrier-free heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between the GSA and a semi-volatile organic vapour combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur due to the similar organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) × 1012 cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had an opposite trend on the NUP formation, and the maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, the model predicted that the NUP formation ceased if the GSA concentration in the raw exhaust was less than 1010 cm-3, which was the case when biofuel was used.

  18. COSMIC: Carbon Monoxide and Soot in Microgravity Inverse Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, L. G.; Fernandez, M. G.; Mulholland, G. W.; Davis, R. W.; Moore, E. F.; Steel, E. B.; Scott, J. H. J.

    2001-01-01

    Almost seventy percent of deaths in accidental fires are caused by inhalation of toxins such as carbon monoxide (CO) and smoke (soot) that form during underventilated burning. The COSMIC project examines the formation mechanisms of CO and soot during underventilated combustion, achieved presently using laminar, inverse diffusion flames (IDFs) formed between an air jet and surrounding fuel. A major hypothesis of the project is that the IDF mimics underventilated combustion because carbon-containing species that form on the fuel side of the flame (such as CO and soot) can escape without passing through an oxidizing flame tip. An IDF literature review was presented at the last microgravity workshop, and a few additional IDF papers have appeared since that meeting. The COSMIC project is entering the third year of its four-year funding cycle. The first two years have been devoted to designing and constructing a rig for use in the NASA 2.2-second drop tower. A few computations and laboratory experiments have been performed. The goals of this paper are to discuss the use of numerical simulation during burner design, to present computational and experimental results that support the hypothesis that IDFs are similar to underventilated flames, and to delineate future plans.

  19. Performance of a newly designed continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS).

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kondo, Yutaka; Sahu, Lokesh K; Imaru, Junichi; Fukushima, Nobuhiko; Kano, Minoru

    2008-10-01

    We designed a continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS) for fully automated, high-sensitivity, continuous measurement of light absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosols. The instrument monitors changes in transmittance across an automatically advancing quartz fiber filter tape using an LED at a 565 nm wavelength. To achieve measurements with high sensitivity and a lower detectable light absorption coefficient, COSMOS uses a double-convex lens and optical bundle pipes to maintain high light intensity and signal data are obtained at 1000 Hz. In addition, sampling flow rate and optical unit temperature are actively controlled. The inlet line for COSMOS is heated to 400 degrees C to effectively volatilize non-refractory aerosol components that are internally mixed with BC. In its current form, COSMOS provides BC light absorption measurements with a detection limit of 0.45 Mm(-1) (0.045 microg m(-3) for soot) for 10 min. The unit-to-unit variability is estimated to be within +/- 1%, demonstrating its high reproducibility. The absorption coefficients determined by COSMOS agreed with those by a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) to within 1% (r2 = 0.97). The precision (+/- 0.60 Mm(-1)) for 10 min integrated data was better than that of PSAP and an aethalometer under our operating conditions. These results showed that COSMOS achieved both an improved detection limit and higher precision for the filter-based light absorption measurements of BC compared to the existing methods.

  20. Multicomponent droplet combustion and soot formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Most practical fuels which are burned in combustion-powered devices, stationary power plants, and incinerators are multicomponent in nature. The differing properties of fuels effects the combustion behavior of the blend. Blending can be useful to achieve desired ends, such as increasing burning rates and reducing extinction diameter and soot formation. Of these, particulate emissions is one of the most important concerns because of its impact on the environment. It is also the least understood and most complicated aspect of droplet combustion. Because of this fact, a well characterized flow field and simplified flame shape can improve the understanding of soot formation during droplet combustion. The simplest flame shape to analyze for a droplet, while still maintaining the integrity of the droplet geometry with its inherent unsteadiness, is spherical with its associated one-dimensional flow field. This project will concern soot formation in microgravity droplet flames and some parameters that effect it. Because the project has not yet begun, this paper will briefly review some related results on this subject.

  1. Optical properties of the semi-external mixture composed of sulfate particle and different quantities of soot aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The effects of soot aggregate quantities on the optical properties of their semi-external mixture with sulfate host particle were investigated. In this study, the individual soot-containing mixtures were simulated as sulfate host point-contact attached to a specified amount of soot aggregates with the same monomer numbers and fractal parameters. The total numbers and volumes of soot monomers were also constant. Optical properties of this type of aerosol mixture were calculated using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method (STM). The random-orientation averaging results indicated that the optical properties of the soot-containing mixtures may be influenced by the soot aggregate quantities. In these simulations, the absorption Ångström exponent (AÅE) values ranged from 0.9 to 1.1, which agree with the observations. The relative deviations of scattering Ångström exponent (SÅE) values between different numbers of soot aggregates attached to the surface of a sulfate host were upwards of ~11%. The results showed that the greater number of attached soot aggregates may lead to smaller SÅE values in the soot-containing mixtures. For most cases of simulated mixtures, a more compact morphology of soot aggregates, larger soot monomer radii and smaller soot volume fractions (Fsoot) may also generate smaller SÅE values. Moreover, in the visible range, the simulated scattering cross sections of soot-containing mixtures with two, three, four, and six soot aggregates (Df=1.8) were ~5%, ~10%, ~15%, and ~30% larger than those with only one soot aggregate, respectively, on the condition that volumes of soot and sulfate are comparable. However, these relative deviations between different numbers of attached soot aggregates on the scattering cross sections of mixtures may be weakened for larger volume of non-absorbing sulfate particle (<5% for the cases of Fsoot=1/10, sulfate volume is 9 times of soot).

  2. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-05-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying either nitrogen or argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed at a supersaturation of 1%, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings led to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  3. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-10-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying nitrogen, respectively argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings lead to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume, that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  4. Effects of coating of dicarboxylic acids on the mass-mobility relationship of soot particles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huaxin; Khalizov, Alexei F; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi

    2009-04-15

    Atandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) and a differential mobility analyzer-aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA-APM) have been employed to study morphology and hygroscopicity of soot aerosol internally mixed with dicarboxylic acids. The effective densities, fractal dimensions, and dynamic shape factors of soot particles before and after coating with succinic and glutaric acids are determined. Coating of soot with succinic acid results in a significant increase in the particle mobility diameter, mass, and effective density, but these properties recover to their initial values once succinic acid is removed by heating, suggesting that no restructuring of the soot core occurs. This conclusion is also supported from the observation of similar fractal dimensions and dynamic shape factors for fresh and coated/heated soot aggregates. Also, no change is observed when succinic acid-coated aggregates are cycled through elevated relative humidity (5% to 90% to 5% RH) below the succinic acid deliquescence point. When soot is coated with glutaric acid, the particle mass increases, but the mobility diameter shrinks by 10-40%. Cycling the soot aerosol coated with glutaric acid through elevated relative humidity leads to an additional mass increase, indicating that condensed water remains within the coating even at low RH. The fractal dimension of soot particles increases after coating and remains high when glutaric acid is removed by heating. The dynamic shape factor of glutaric acid-coated and heated soot is significantly lower than that of fresh soot, suggesting a significant restructuring of the soot agglomerates by glutaric acid. The results imply that internal mixing of soot aerosol during atmospheric aging leads to changes in hygroscopicity, morphology, and effective density, which likely modify their effects on direct and indirect climate forcing and deposition in the human respiratory system.

  5. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  6. Effects of an iron-based fuel-borne catalyst and a diesel particle filter on exhaust toxicity in lung cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Sandro; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Heeb, Norbert V; Mayer, Andreas; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Metal-containing fuel additives catalyzing soot combustion in diesel particle filters are used in a widespread manner, and with the growing popularity of diesel vehicles, their application is expected to increase in the near future. Detailed investigation into how such additives affect exhaust toxicity is therefore necessary and has to be performed before epidemiological evidence points towards adverse effects of their application. The present study investigates how the addition of an iron-based fuel additive (Satacen®3, 40 ppm Fe) to low-sulfur diesel affects the in vitro cytotoxic, oxidative, (pro-)inflammatory, and mutagenic activity of the exhaust of a passenger car operated under constant, low-load conditions by exposing a three-dimensional model of the human airway epithelium to complete exhaust at the air-liquid interface. We could show that the use of the iron catalyst without and with filter technology has positive as well as negative effects on exhaust toxicity compared to exhaust with no additives: it decreases the oxidative and, compared to a non-catalyzed diesel particle filter, the mutagenic potential of diesel exhaust, but increases (pro-)inflammatory effects. The presence of a diesel particle filter also influences the impact of Satacen®3 on exhaust toxicity, and the proper choice of the filter type to be used is of importance with regards to exhaust toxicity. Figure ᅟ.

  7. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  9. Soot Reference Materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Popovicheva, O.; Allan, J.; Bernardoni, V.; Cao, J.; Cavalli, F.; Cozic, J.; Diapouli, E.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Genberg, P. J.; Gonzalez, C.; Gysel, M.; John, A.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Kuhlbusch, T. A. J.; Laborde, M.; Lack, D.; Müller, T.; Niessner, R.; Petzold, A.; Piazzalunga, A.; Putaud, J. P.; Schwarz, J.; Sheridan, P.; Subramanian, R.; Swietlicki, E.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.; Viana, M.

    2012-03-01

    Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot. The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs) was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of single-particle sootphotometer (SP2) users identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA) to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop produced recommendations for the development of new SRMs that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  10. Reduction of soot emissions by iron pentacarbonyl in isooctane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.B.; Masiello, K.A.; Hahn, D.W.

    2008-07-15

    Light-scattering measurements, in situ laser-induced fluorescence, and thermophoretic sampling with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, were performed in laboratory isooctane diffusion flames seeded with 4000 ppm iron pentacarbonyl. These measurements allowed the determination of the evolution of the size, number density, and volume fraction of soot particles through the flame. Comparison to unseeded flame data provided a detailed assessment of the effects of iron addition on soot particle inception, growth, and oxidation processes. Iron was found to produce a minor soot-enhancing effect at early residence times, while subsequent soot particle growth was largely unaffected. It is concluded that primarily elemental iron is incorporated within the soot particles during particle inception and growth. However, iron addition was found to enhance the rate of soot oxidation during the soot burnout regime, yielding a two-thirds reduction in overall soot emissions. In situ spectroscopic measurements probed the transient nature of elemental iron throughout the flame, revealing significant loss of elemental iron, presumably to iron oxides, with increasing flame residence, suggesting catalysis of soot oxidation via iron oxide species. (author)

  11. Laminar Soot Processes (Lsp) Experiment: Findings From Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. H.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Xu, F.

    2003-01-01

    Processes of soot formation and oxidation must be understood in order to achieve reliable computational combustion calculations for nonpremixed (diffusion) flames involving hydrocarbon fuels. Motivated by this observation, the present investigation extended earlier work on soot formation and oxidation in laminar jet ethylene/air and methane/oxygen premixed and acetylene-nitrogen/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure in this laboratory, emphasizing soot surface growth and early soot surface oxidation in laminar diffusion flames fueled with a variety of hydrocarbons at pressures in the range 0.1 - 1.0 atm.

  12. Climate Effects and Efficacy of Dust and Soot in Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, C. S.; Flanner, M. G.; Randerson, J. T.; Mahowald, N. M.; Rasch, P. J.; Yoshioka, M.; Painter, T.

    2006-12-01

    Dust and industrial and biomass burning emissions from low and mid-latitudes dominate the absorbing impurities trapped in snow at mid- and high-latitudes. We study the effects of dust and smoke on global and regional climate using a general circulation model driven by observed and predicted aerosol emissions determined from satellite and in situ observations. The model has sophisticated treatments of aerosol and snowpack radiative and thermodynamic processes that compare well with observations of snow albedo evolution and impurity concentration. This presentation focuses on the individual and combined contributions of present day dust and soot to snow-albedo forcing and on the global temperature and snowpack responses. Results are emphasized near India and East Asia, where the anthropogenic aerosol forcing of surface albedo and hydrology is greatest. We find that dust and black carbon (BC) aerosols have climate change efficacies (surface temperature change per unit forcing) about 3--4 times greater than CO2, making them the most efficacious forcing agents known. We estimate present day dust and soot snowpack-forcing of ~ 0.050 W m-2 warms global climate by ~ 0.16 °K. Anthropogenic soot from fossil fuel sources causes more than 50% of this warming, and biomass burning can account for up to 30% in strong tropical or boreal burn years. The greatest forcings occur in the Tarim/Mongol region (due to dust), northeastern China (due to soot), and the Tibetan Plateau (both). Dirty springtime snow in these regions can darken albedo by more than 0.1 and increase surface absorption by more than 20 W m-2. These results have implications for the strength of the Asian Monsoon, which is negatively correlated with antecedent snow cover in non-ENSO years. Dust and soot have such strong efficacies because they increase spring melt rates thus reduce summer snow cover. In some regions and seasons, dirty snow reduces snowpack depth and cover by 50%, triggering strong snow and sea

  13. Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C.; Anderson, J.A.; Howden, Kenneth C.

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on

  14. Catalytic combustion of soot particulates over rare-earth substituted Ln2Sn2O7 pyrochlores (Ln=La, Nd and Sm).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongpeng; Zhu, Hongjian; Ai, Lijie; Liu, Xuhui; Lv, Min; Wang, Liguo; Ma, Zhenmin; Zhang, Zhaoliang

    2016-09-15

    Catalytic combustion is one of the most promising methods for diesel soot removal. Ln2Sn2O7 pyrochlores substituted with different rare-earth (RE) elements (Ln=La, Nd and Sm) were prepared through co-precipitation method for catalytic combustion of soot particulates. The structural, textural and redox properties, together with the oxygen vacancy of the catalysts were investigated systematically. Their catalytic activities were evaluated by both temperature-programmed oxidation and isothermal reaction techniques. With the increasing in RE ionic radius (r), the SnO bond strength in Ln2Sn2O7 pyrochlores evaluated from the stretching IR band was decreased, resulting in the improved reducibility and enhanced oxygen vacancies of catalysts. The increase of oxygen vacancy concentration was further confirmed by photoluminescence (PL) investigations wherein upon excitation with UV radiation, the pyrochlores nanoparticles exhibited strong and sharp transition at 408nm attributed to oxygen vacancies. Catalytic combustion and isothermal reactions revealed that the ignition activity (ignition temperature, T5) and the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency, TOF) were shown to depend correlatedly on redox properties and oxygen vacancy concentrations, both of which were influenced by the substitution of different RE elements. Among the pyrochlore oxides, the as-synthesized La2Sn2O7 sample displayed relatively the highest ignition activity and the largest intrinsic activity with TOF of 2.33×10(-3)s(-1).

  15. Testing Ceramics for Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Adaptation of diesel engine allows prestressed ceramic materials evaluated under realistic pressure, temperature, and stress without introducing extraneous stress. Ceramic specimen part of prechamber of research engine. Specimen held in place by clamp, introduces required axial compressive stress. Specimen -- cylindrical shell -- surrounded by chamber vented or pressurized to introduce requisite radial stress in ceramic. Pressure chamber also serves as safety shield in case speimen disintegrates. Materials under consideration as cylinder liners for diesel engines.

  16. Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot: The roles of relative humidity and surface composition of soot in surface sulfate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2017-03-01

    The conversion of SO2 to sulfates on the surface of soot is still poorly understood. Soot samples with different fractions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and oxygen-containing groups were prepared by combusting n-hexane under well-controlled conditions. The heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot was investigated using in situ attenuated total internal reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, ion chromatography (IC) and a flow tube reactor at the ambient pressure and relative humidity (RH). Water promoted SO2 adsorption and sulfate formation at the RH range from 6% to 70%, while exceeded water condensed on soot was unfavorable for sulfate formation due to inhibition of SO2 adsorption when RH was higher than 80%. The surface composition of soot, which was governed by combustion conditions, also played an important role in the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot. This effect was found to greatly depend on RH. At low RH of 6%, soot with the highest fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.162 exhibited a maximum uptake capacity for SO2 because it contained a large amount of aromatic Csbnd H groups, which acted as active sites for SO2 adsorption. At RH of 54%, soot produced with a fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.134 showed the highest reactivity toward SO2 because it contained appropriate amounts of aromatic Csbnd H groups and oxygen-containing groups, subsequently leading to the optimal surface concentrations of both SO2 and water. These results suggest that variation in the surface composition of soot from different sources and/or resulting from chemical aging in the atmosphere likely affects the conversion of SO2 to sulfates.

  17. Soot volume fraction measurement in low-pressure methane flames by combining laser-induced incandescence and cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Effect of pressure on soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.; Lefort, B.; Lemaire, R.; Therssen, E.; Pauwels, J.F.

    2008-10-15

    Soot volume fraction (f{sub v}) profiles are recorded in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flat flames using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are performed from 20 to 28 kPa in flames having the same equivalence ratio (2.32). Calibration is performed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and indicates a very weak soot volume fraction (0.066 ppb at 21.33 kPa and 0.8 ppb at 26.66 kPa in the burnt gases). Soot volume fraction is found to increase continuously after a given distance above the burner (HAB) and tends to level off in the burnt gases. The reaction time resolution available in low-pressure flames makes it possible to examine the early steps of soot formation. The variation of the LII signal with laser energy before the LII ''plateau'' region is much weaker at the beginning of soot formation than after a given reaction time. The LII time decays are nearly constant within the first millimetres, whereas an increase in the decay, correlated with the growth of the primary soot particle, is observed later. The growth of soot volume fraction is then analysed by considering the variation of the derivative function df{sub v}/dt with f{sub v}. Three regimes having respectively a positive slope, a constant slope, and a negative slope are observed and are interpreted with respect to the soot inception process. Finally, a very important sensitivity of f{sub v} with pressure P (at 30 mm HAB) is observed, leading to a power law, f{sub v}=KP{sup 11}, confirmed by extinction measurements (by CRDS). The observed dependence of f{sub v} with pressure could be a result of the prominence of the early soot inception process in the investigated low-pressure flames. (author)

  18. A perspective on the range of gasoline compression ignition combustion strategies for high engine efficiency and low NOx and soot emissions: Effects of in-cylinder fuel stratification

    DOE PAGES

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott J.; Wagner, Robert M.

    2016-01-14

    Many research studies have shown that low temperature combustion in compression ignition engines has the ability to yield ultra-low NOx and soot emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency. To achieve low temperature combustion, sufficient mixing time between the fuel and air in a globally dilute environment is required, thereby avoiding fuel-rich regions and reducing peak combustion temperatures, which significantly reduces soot and NOx formation, respectively. It has been demonstrated that achieving low temperature combustion with diesel fuel over a wide range of conditions is difficult because of its properties, namely, low volatility and high chemical reactivity. On the contrary, gasolinemore » has a high volatility and low chemical reactivity, meaning it is easier to achieve the amount of premixing time required prior to autoignition to achieve low temperature combustion. In order to achieve low temperature combustion while meeting other constraints, such as low pressure rise rates and maintaining control over the timing of combustion, in-cylinder fuel stratification has been widely investigated for gasoline low temperature combustion engines. The level of fuel stratification is, in reality, a continuum ranging from fully premixed (i.e. homogeneous charge of fuel and air) to heavily stratified, heterogeneous operation, such as diesel combustion. However, to illustrate the impact of fuel stratification on gasoline compression ignition, the authors have identified three representative operating strategies: partial, moderate, and heavy fuel stratification. Thus, this article provides an overview and perspective of the current research efforts to develop engine operating strategies for achieving gasoline low temperature combustion in a compression ignition engine via fuel stratification. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics modeling of the in-cylinder processes during the closed valve portion of the cycle was used to illustrate the opportunities

  19. A perspective on the range of gasoline compression ignition combustion strategies for high engine efficiency and low NOx and soot emissions: Effects of in-cylinder fuel stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott J.; Wagner, Robert M.

    2016-01-14

    Many research studies have shown that low temperature combustion in compression ignition engines has the ability to yield ultra-low NOx and soot emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency. To achieve low temperature combustion, sufficient mixing time between the fuel and air in a globally dilute environment is required, thereby avoiding fuel-rich regions and reducing peak combustion temperatures, which significantly reduces soot and NOx formation, respectively. It has been demonstrated that achieving low temperature combustion with diesel fuel over a wide range of conditions is difficult because of its properties, namely, low volatility and high chemical reactivity. On the contrary, gasoline has a high volatility and low chemical reactivity, meaning it is easier to achieve the amount of premixing time required prior to autoignition to achieve low temperature combustion. In order to achieve low temperature combustion while meeting other constraints, such as low pressure rise rates and maintaining control over the timing of combustion, in-cylinder fuel stratification has been widely investigated for gasoline low temperature combustion engines. The level of fuel stratification is, in reality, a continuum ranging from fully premixed (i.e. homogeneous charge of fuel and air) to heavily stratified, heterogeneous operation, such as diesel combustion. However, to illustrate the impact of fuel stratification on gasoline compression ignition, the authors have identified three representative operating strategies: partial, moderate, and heavy fuel stratification. Thus, this article provides an overview and perspective of the current research efforts to develop engine operating strategies for achieving gasoline low temperature combustion in a compression ignition engine via fuel stratification. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics modeling of the in-cylinder processes during the closed valve portion of the cycle was used to illustrate the opportunities and

  20. Experimental Investigation of Nascent Soot Physical Properties and The Influence on Particle Morphology and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb, Sydnie Marie

    Soot released to the atmosphere is a dangerous pollutant for human health and the environment. Understanding the physical properties and surface properties of these particles is important to properly explaining the growth of soot particles in flames as well as their interactions with other particles and gases in the environment. Particles below 15 nm in diameter, nascent soot particles, dominate the early growth stages of soot formation; previously these particles were characterized as hard graphitic spheres. New evidence derived from the current dissertation work, to a large extent, challenges this prior characterization. This dissertation study begins by revisiting the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) as a tool to investigate the structural properties of nascent soot. The impact of tip artifacts, which are known to complicate measurements of features below 10 nm in diameter, are carefully considered so as to provide a concise interpretation of the morphology of nascent soot as seen by AFM. The results of the AFM morphology collaborate with earlier photo- and thermal-fragmentation particle mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that nascent soot is not a graphitized carbon material and that they are not spherical. Furthermore, phase mode imaging is introduced as a method to investigate the physical properties of nascent soot particles in a greater detail and finer resolution. The helium ion microscope (HIM) has been identified as a useful technique for the imaging of nascent soot. Using this imaging method nascent soot particles were imaged with a high resolution that had not been obtained by prior techniques. The increased contrast provides a closer look at the nascent soot particles and further suggested that these particles are not as structurally homogeneous as previously thought. Geometric shape analysis was performed to characterize the particles in terms of sphericity, circularity, and fractal dimension. The geometric analysis

  1. Electron microscopic study of soot particulate matter emissions from aircraft turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Liati, Anthi; Brem, Benjamin T; Durdina, Lukas; Vögtli, Melanie; Dasilva, Yadira Arroyo Rojas; Eggenschwiler, Panayotis Dimopoulos; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-16

    The microscopic characteristics of soot particulate matter (PM) in gas turbine exhaust are critical for an accurate assessment of the potential impacts of the aviation industry on the environment and human health. The morphology and internal structure of soot particles emitted from a CFM 56-7B26/3 turbofan engine were analyzed in an electron microscopic study, down to the nanoscale, for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65%, and ∼ 7% static engine thrust as a proxy for takeoff, cruising, and taxiing, respectively. Sampling was performed directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with a state-of-the-art sampling system designed for nonvolatile particulate matter. The electron microscopy results reveal that ∼ 100% thrust produces the highest amount of soot, the highest soot particle volume, and the largest and most crystalline primary soot particles with the lowest oxidative reactivity. The opposite is the case for soot produced during taxiing, where primary soot particles are smallest and most reactive and the soot amount and volume are lowest. The microscopic characteristics of cruising condition soot resemble the ones of the ∼ 100% thrust conditions, but they are more moderate. Real time online measurements of number and mass concentration show also a clear correlation with engine thrust level, comparable with the TEM study. The results of the present work, in particular the small size of primary soot particles present in the exhaust (modes of 24, 20, and 13 nm in diameter for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65% and ∼ 7% engine thrust, respectively) could be a concern for human health and the environment and merit further study. This work further emphasizes the significance of the detailed morphological characteristics of soot for assessing environmental impacts.

  2. Aging of Soot Particles: Remote Marine Free-tropospheric Aerosol at the Pico Mountain Observatory, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; kumar, S.; Dziobak, M.; Fialho, P. J.; Dzepina, K.; Hueber, J.; Helmig, D.; Kramer, L. J.; Sharma, N.; Olsen, S. C.; Owen, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Soot particles, often referred to as black carbon, are aggregates of carbonaceous monomers that strongly absorb light, significantly impacting the environment, Earth's radiation balance, atmospheric chemistry and properties of clouds. Soot can be transported over long distances, thus affecting global climate. During transport, soot aggregates undergo chemical and morphological changes such as oxidation, mixing, coating and restructuring. These changes have a significant impact on soot's light absorption and scattering efficiencies, and therefore on soot's effects on climate. Free tropospheric aerosols are being studied at the Pico Mountain Observatory, located near the top of the Pico Volcano in the Azores, Portugal (38.47°N, 28.40°W, 2225m asl). Typically above the marine boundary layer, this is an ideal site to study aerosol transported over long distances across the ocean, often from North America and sometimes from Africa and Europe. We studied the morphology and mixing state of individual soot particles using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We also measured the optical properties of aerosols using light scattering data from a 3-wavelength nephelometer, and black carbon mass equivalent concentrations using a 7-wavelength aethalometer. In this presentation, we focus on samples collected during two events in July 2012. Back trajectory analysis shows that in both periods the air masses reaching Pico were traveling from west to east, apparently originating in North America. Soot particles were classified into four categories based on their coating and mixing state. We investigated the morphology of soot particles in the four categories, using various descriptors (e.g. aspect ratio, roundness and convexity), monomer size and fractal dimension. Most of the soot particles were coated. Bare or very thinly coated soot, exhibited very compacted structures and high convexity. The results of this study have implications on how soot particles

  3. An Experimental Investigation of the Laminar Flamelet Concept for Soot Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diez, F. J.; Aalburg, C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Faeth, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    The soot properties of round, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit during three flights of the Space Shuttle Columbia, (Flights STS-83, 94 and 107). Experimental conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K and ambient pressures of 35-100 kPa. Measurements included soot volume fraction distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, and soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging. Flowfield modeling based on the work of Spalding is presented. The present work explores whether soot properties of these flames are universal functions of mixture fraction, i.e., whether they satisfy soot state relationships. Measurements are presented, including radiative emissions and distributions of soot temperature and soot volume fraction. It is shown that most of the volume of these flames is bounded by the dividing streamline and thus should follow residence time state relationships. Most streamlines from the fuel supply to the surroundings are found to exhibit nearly the same maximum soot volume fraction and temperature. The radiation intensity along internal streamlines also is found to have relatively uniform values. Finally, soot state relationships were observed, i.e., soot volume fraction was found to correlate with estimated mixture fraction for each fuel/pressure selection. These results support the existence of soot property state relationships for steady nonbuoyant laminar diffusion flames, and thus in a large class of practical turbulent diffusion flames through the application of the laminar flamelet concept.

  4. Soot reference materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Popovicheva, O.; Allan, J.; Bernardoni, V.; Cao, J.; Cavalli, F.; Cozic, J.; Diapouli, E.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Genberg, P. J.; Gonzalez, C.; Gysel, M.; John, A.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Kuhlbusch, T. A. J.; Laborde, M.; Lack, D.; Müller, T.; Niessner, R.; Petzold, A.; Piazzalunga, A.; Putaud, J. P.; Schwarz, J.; Sheridan, P.; Subramanian, R.; Swietlicki, E.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.; Viana, M.

    2012-08-01

    Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure the properties of soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot. The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs) was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of soot SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of users of the single-particle soot-photometer (SP2), an instrument using laser-induced incandescence, identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA) to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop, and subsequent, interactive discussions, produced a number of recommendations for the development of new SRMs, and their implementation, that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  5. Characterization of soot properties in two-meter JP-8 pool fires.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Jensen, Kirk A.; Blevins, Linda Gail

    2005-02-01

    The thermal hazard posed by large hydrocarbon fires is dominated by the radiative emission from high temperature soot. Since the optical properties of soot, especially in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, as well as its morphological properties, are not well known, efforts are underway to characterize these properties. Measurements of these soot properties in large fires are important for heat transfer calculations, for interpretation of laser-based diagnostics, and for developing soot property models for fire field models. This research uses extractive measurement diagnostics to characterize soot optical properties, morphology, and composition in 2 m pool fires. For measurement of the extinction coefficient, soot extracted from the flame zone is transported to a transmission cell where measurements are made using both visible and infrared lasers. Soot morphological properties are obtained by analysis via transmission electron microscopy of soot samples obtained thermophoretically within the flame zone, in the overfire region, and in the transmission cell. Soot composition, including carbon-to-hydrogen ratio and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration, is obtained by analysis of soot collected on filters. Average dimensionless extinction coefficients of 8.4 {+-} 1.2 at 635 nm and 8.7 {+-} 1.1 at 1310 nm agree well with recent measurements in the overfire region of JP-8 and other fuels in lab-scale burners and fires. Average soot primary particle diameters, radius of gyration, and fractal dimensions agree with these recent studies. Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory of scattering applied to the measured fractal parameters shows qualitative agreement with the trends in measured dimensionless extinction coefficients. Results of the density and chemistry are detailed in the report.

  6. Particle emissions from diesel passenger cars equipped with a particle trap in comparison to other technologies.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Martin; Forss, Anna-Maria; Lehmann, Urs

    2006-04-01

    Tail pipe particle emissions of passenger cars, with different engine and aftertreatment technologies, were determined with special focus on diesel engines equipped with a particle filter. The particle number measurements were performed, during transient tests, using a condensation particle counter. The measurement procedure complied with the draft Swiss ordinance, which is based on the findings of the UN/ECE particulate measurement program. In addition, particle mass emissions were measured by the legislated and a modified filter method. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of diesel particle filters (DPFs) in curtailing nonvolatile particle emissions over the entire size range. Higher emissions were observed during short periods of DPF regeneration and immediately afterward, when a soot cake has not yet formed on the filter surface. The gasoline vehicles exhibited higher emissions than the DPF equipped diesel vehicles but with a large variation depending on the technology and driving conditions. Although particle measurements were carried out during DPF regeneration, it was impossible to quantify their contribution to the overall emissions, due to the wide variation in intensity and frequency of regeneration. The numbers counting method demonstrated its clear superiority in sensitivity to the mass measurement. The results strongly suggest the application of the particle number counting to quantify future low tailpipe emissions.

  7. NEW CORDIERITE DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS FOR CATALYZED AND NON-CATALYZED APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, G; Cutler, W; Tao, T Chiffey, A; Phillips, P; Twigg, M; Walker, A

    2003-08-24

    Cordierite diesel particulate filters provide an economical approach to diesel emissions control. However, further reduction in the pressure drop of catalyzed and non-catalyzed cordierite filters is desirable. In order to derive a fundamental understanding of the relationship between clean and sootloaded pressure drop and the pore microstructure of the ceramic, and to optimize the microstructure for filter performance, cordierite filters have been fabricated spanning an extended range in porosity, pore size distribution, and pore connectivity. Analysis of the results has been applied to the development of several new cordierite diesel particulate filters that possess a unique combination of high filtration efficiency, high strength, and very low clean and soot-loaded pressure drop. Furthermore, catalyst systems have been developed that result in a minimal pressure drop increase of the catalyzed filter. Optimization of porosity and cell geometry has enabled fabrication o f filters with either high or low thermal mass appropriate to the regeneration strategy employed for a given engine management system.

  8. Industrial fermentation of renewable diesel fuels.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Patrick J; Gardner, Timothy S

    2011-06-01

    In commodity chemicals, cost drives everything. A working class family of four drives up to the gas pumps and faces a choice of a renewable diesel or petroleum diesel. Renewable diesel costs $0.50 more per gallon. Which fuel do they pick? Petroleum diesel will be the winner every time, unless the renewable fuel can achieve cost and performance parity with petrol. Nascent producers of advanced biofuels, including Amyris, LS9, Neste and Solazyme, aim to deliver renewable diesel fuels that not only meet the cost challenge, but also exceed the storage, transport, engine performance and emissions properties of petroleum diesel.

  9. 40 CFR 80.522 - May used motor oil be dispensed into diesel motor vehicles or nonroad diesel engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Motor... later nonroad diesel engines (not including locomotive or marine diesel engines), unless both of...

  10. Nitric Acid Uptake and Decomposition on Black Carbon (Soot) Surfaces: Its Implications for the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, W.; Leu, M. T.

    1998-01-01

    Black carbon particles (soot) are formed as a result of incomplete combustion processes and are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. The lower troposphere contains plenty of soot particles whose principal sources are fossil fuel and biomass combustion at the ground level.

  11. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  12. Susceptibility to Inhaled Flame-Generated Ultrafine Soot in Neonatal and Adult Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jackie K. W.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Anderson, Donald S.; Abid, Aamir D.; Wallis, Christopher D.; Dickinson, Dale A.; Kumfer, Benjamin M.; Kennedy, Ian M.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2011-01-01

    Over a quarter of the U.S. population is exposed to harmful levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) pollution, which has been linked to development and exacerbation of respiratory diseases leading to morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations. Young children are especially susceptible to PM and can experience altered anatomic, physiologic, and biological responses. Current studies of ambient PM are confounded by the complex mixture of soot, metals, allergens, and organics present in the complex mixture as well as seasonal and temporal variance. We have developed a laboratory-based PM devoid of metals and allergens that can be replicated to study health effects of specific PM components in animal models. We exposed 7-day-old postnatal and adult rats to a single 6-h exposure of fuel-rich ultrafine premixed flame particles (PFPs) or filtered air. These particles are high in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons content. Pulmonary cytotoxicity, gene, and protein expression were evaluated at 2 and 24 h postexposure. Neonates were more susceptible to PFP, exhibiting increased lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and ethidium homodimer-1 cellular staining in the lung in situ as an index of cytotoxicity. Basal gene expression between neonates and adults differed for a significant number of antioxidant, oxidative stress, and proliferation genes and was further altered by PFP exposure. PFP diminishes proliferation marker PCNA gene and protein expression in neonates but not adults. We conclude that neonates have an impaired ability to respond to environmental exposures that increases lung cytotoxicity and results in enhanced susceptibility to PFP, which may lead to abnormal airway growth. PMID:21914721

  13. Susceptibility to inhaled flame-generated ultrafine soot in neonatal and adult rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jackie K W; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Anderson, Donald S; Abid, Aamir D; Wallis, Christopher D; Dickinson, Dale A; Kumfer, Benjamin M; Kennedy, Ian M; Wexler, Anthony S; Van Winkle, Laura S

    2011-12-01

    Over a quarter of the U.S. population is exposed to harmful levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) pollution, which has been linked to development and exacerbation of respiratory diseases leading to morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations. Young children are especially susceptible to PM and can experience altered anatomic, physiologic, and biological responses. Current studies of ambient PM are confounded by the complex mixture of soot, metals, allergens, and organics present in the complex mixture as well as seasonal and temporal variance. We have developed a laboratory-based PM devoid of metals and allergens that can be replicated to study health effects of specific PM components in animal models. We exposed 7-day-old postnatal and adult rats to a single 6-h exposure of fuel-rich ultrafine premixed flame particles (PFPs) or filtered air. These particles are high in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons content. Pulmonary cytotoxicity, gene, and protein expression were evaluated at 2 and 24 h postexposure. Neonates were more susceptible to PFP, exhibiting increased lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and ethidium homodimer-1 cellular staining in the lung in situ as an index of cytotoxicity. Basal gene expression between neonates and adults differed for a significant number of antioxidant, oxidative stress, and proliferation genes and was further altered by PFP exposure. PFP diminishes proliferation marker PCNA gene and protein expression in neonates but not adults. We conclude that neonates have an impaired ability to respond to environmental exposures that increases lung cytotoxicity and results in enhanced susceptibility to PFP, which may lead to abnormal airway growth.

  14. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  15. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  16. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  17. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  18. Processing of soot in an urban environment: case study from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Zuberi, B.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Iedema, M. J.; Cowin, J. P.; Gaspar, D. J.; Wang, C.; Laskin, A.

    2005-08-01

    Chemical composition, size, and mixing state of atmospheric particles are critical in determining their effects on the environment. There is growing evidence that soot aerosols play a particularly important role in both climate and human health, but still relatively little is known of their physical and chemical nature. In addition, the atmospheric residence times and removal mechanisms for soot are neither well understood nor adequately represented in regional and global climate models. To investigate the effect of locality and residence time on properties of soot and mixing state in a polluted urban environment, particles of diameter 0.2-2.0 µm were collected in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MCMA-2003 field campaign from various sites within the city. Individual particle analysis by different electron microscopy methods coupled with energy dispersed X-ray spectroscopy, and secondary ionization mass spectrometry show that freshly-emitted soot particles become rapidly processed in the MCMA. Whereas fresh particulate emissions from mixed-traffic are almost entirely carbonaceous, consisting of soot aggregates with liquid coatings suggestive of unburned lubricating oil and water, ambient soot particles which have been processed for less than a few hours are heavily internally mixed, primarily with ammonium sulfate. Single particle analysis suggests that this mixing occurs through several mechanisms that require further investigation. In light of previously published results, the internally-mixed nature of processed soot particles is expected to affect heterogeneous chemistry on the soot

  19. Processing of soot in an urban environment: case study from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Zuberi, B.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Iedema, M. J.; Cowin, J. P.; Gaspar, D. J.; Wang, C.; Laskin, A.

    2005-11-01

    Chemical composition, size, and mixing state of atmospheric particles are critical in determining their effects on the environment. There is growing evidence that soot aerosols play a particularly important role in both climate and human health, but still relatively little is known of their physical and chemical nature. In addition, the atmospheric residence times and removal mechanisms for soot are neither well understood nor adequately represented in regional and global climate models. To investigate the effect of locality and residence time on properties of soot and mixing state in a polluted urban environment, particles of diameter 0.2-2.0 μm were collected in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MCMA-2003 Field Campaign from various sites within the city. Individual particle analysis by different electron microscopy methods coupled with energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy, and secondary ionization mass spectrometry show that freshly-emitted soot particles become rapidly processed in the MCMA. Whereas fresh particulate emissions from mixed-traffic are almost entirely carbonaceous, consisting of soot aggregates with liquid coatings suggestive of unburned lubricating oil and water, ambient soot particles which have been processed for less than a few hours are heavily internally mixed, primarily with ammonium sulfate. Single particle analysis suggests that this mixing occurs through several mechanisms that require further investigation. In light of previously published results, the internally-mixed nature of processed soot particles is expected to affect heterogeneous chemistry on the soot surface, including interaction with water during wet-removal.

  20. A NIST Kinetic Data Base for PAH Reaction and Soot Particle Inception During Combusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    13 D. Kinetic Modeling of Heptane Combustion 62 and PAH Formation E. Ring Expansion...that can be competitive with oxidation and the unsaturated compounds are the precursors to soot models . It extends the application of combustion...soot particles and then through kinetic modeling extract rate constants that can now be used to simulate the process. The elements of the

  1. Carbon Nanostructure: Its Evolution During its Impact Upon Soot Growth and Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed work is a ground-based study to define and quantify soot nanostructural changes in response to growth conditions, thermal and oxidative treatments and to quantify their impact upon further oxidation and growth of highly ordered carbon materials. Experimental data relating soot oxidation rates to multiple oxidizing species concentrations will directly test for additive or synergistic soot oxidation rates. Such validation is central for assessing the applicability of individual soot oxidation rates and designing oxidative strategies for controlling soot loadings in and emissions from turbulent combustion processes. Through these experiments, new insights into soot nanostructure evolution during and its impact upon oxidation by O2 and OH will be realized. It is expected that the results of this effort will spawn new research directions in future microgravity and 1g environments. Issues raised by positive or even negative demonstration of the hypotheses of this proposal have direct bearing on modelling and controlling soot formation and its destruction in nearly every combustion process producing soot.

  2. Soot surface temperature measurements in pure and diluted flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Berry Yelverton, T.L.; Roberts, W.L.

    2008-10-15

    Soot surface temperature was measured in laminar jet diffusion flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures. The soot surface temperature was measured in flames at one, two, four, and eight atmospheres with both pure and diluted (using helium, argon, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide individually) ethylene fuels with a calibrated two-color soot pyrometry technique. These two dimensional temperature profiles of the soot aid in the analysis and understanding of soot production, leading to possible methods for reducing soot emission. Each flame investigated was at its smoke point, i.e., at the fuel flow rate where the overall soot production and oxidation rates are equal. The smoke point was chosen because it was desirable to have similar soot loadings for each flame. A second set of measurements were also taken where the fuel flow rate was held constant to compare with earlier work. These measurements show that overall flame temperature decreases with increasing pressure, with increasing pressure the position of peak temperature shifts to the tip of the flame, and the temperatures measured were approximately 10% lower than those calculated assuming equilibrium and neglecting radiation. (author)

  3. Large eddy simulation of soot formation in a turbulent non-premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    El-Asrag, Hossam; Menon, Suresh

    2009-02-15

    A recently developed subgrid model for soot dynamics [H. El-Asrag, T. Lu, C.K. Law, S. Menon, Combust. Flame 150 (2007) 108-126] is used to study the soot formation in a non-premixed turbulent flame. The model allows coupling between reaction, diffusion and soot (including soot diffusion and thermophoretic forces) processes in the subgrid domain without requiring ad hoc filtering or model parameter adjustments. The combined model includes the entire process, from the initial phase, when the soot nucleus diameter is much smaller than the mean free path, to the final phase, after coagulation and aggregation, where it can be considered in the continuum regime. A relatively detailed but reduced kinetics for ethylene-air is used to simulate an experimentally studied non-premixed ethylene/air jet diffusion flame. Acetylene is used as a soot precursor species. The soot volume fraction order of magnitude, the location of its maxima, and the soot particle size distribution are all captured reasonably. Along the centerline, an initial region dominated by nucleation and surface growth is established followed by an oxidation region. The diffusion effect is found to be most important in the nucleation regime, while the thermophoretic forces become more influential downstream of the potential core in the oxidation zone. The particle size distribution shows a log-normal distribution in the nucleation region, and a more Gaussian like distribution further downstream. Limitations of the current approach and possible solution strategies are also discussed. (author)

  4. Soot particles at an elevated site in eastern China during the passage of a strong cyclone.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Zhang, Daizhou

    2012-07-15

    Atmospheric particles larger than 0.2 μm were collected at the top of Mt. Tai (36.25°N, 117.10°E, 1534 m a.s.l.) in eastern China in May 2008 during the passage of a strong cyclone. The particles were analyzed with electron microscopes and characterized by morphology, equivalent diameter and elemental composition. Soot particles with coating (coated soot particles) and those without apparent coating (naked soot particles) were predominant in the diameter range smaller than 0.6 μm in all samples. The number-size distribution of the relative abundance of naked soot particles in the prefrontal air was similar to that in the postfrontal air and their size modes were around 0.2-0.3 μm. However, the distribution of inclusions of coated soot particles showed a mode in the range of 0.1-0.3 μm. The coating degree of coated soot particles, which was defined by the ratio of the diameter of inclusion to the diameter of particle body, showed a mode around 0.5 with the range of 0.3-0.6. These results indicate that the status of soot particles in the prefrontal and postfrontal air was similar although air pollution levels were dramatically different. In addition, the relative abundance of accumulation mode particles increased with the decrease of soot particles after the front passage.

  5. CoFlame: A refined and validated numerical algorithm for modeling sooting laminar coflow diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaves, Nick A.; Zhang, Qingan; Liu, Fengshan; Guo, Hongsheng; Dworkin, Seth B.; Thomson, Murray J.

    2016-10-01

    Mitigation of soot emissions from combustion devices is a global concern. For example, recent EURO 6 regulations for vehicles have placed stringent limits on soot emissions. In order to allow design engineers to achieve the goal of reduced soot emissions, they must have the tools to so. Due to the complex nature of soot formation, which includes growth and oxidation, detailed numerical models are required to gain fundamental insights into the mechanisms of soot formation. A detailed description of the CoFlame FORTRAN code which models sooting laminar coflow diffusion flames is given. The code solves axial and radial velocity, temperature, species conservation, and soot aggregate and primary particle number density equations. The sectional particle dynamics model includes nucleation, PAH condensation and HACA surface growth, surface oxidation, coagulation, fragmentation, particle diffusion, and thermophoresis. The code utilizes a distributed memory parallelization scheme with strip-domain decomposition. The public release of the CoFlame code, which has been refined in terms of coding structure, to the research community accompanies this paper. CoFlame is validated against experimental data for reattachment length in an axi-symmetric pipe with a sudden expansion, and ethylene-air and methane-air diffusion flames for multiple soot morphological parameters and gas-phase species. Finally, the parallel performance and computational costs of the code is investigated.

  6. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980–2012 relative to the period 1850–1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas. PMID:26750586

  7. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980–2012 relative to the period 1850–1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas.

  8. Development of an on-line exposure system to determine freshly produced diesel engine emission-induced cellular effects.

    PubMed

    Oostingh, Gertie J; Papaioannou, Eleni; Chasapidis, Leonidas; Akritidis, Theofylaktos; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G; Duschl, Albert

    2013-09-01

    Diesel engine emission particle filters are often placed at exhaust outlets to remove particles from the exhaust. The use of filters results in the exposure to a reduced number of nanometer-sized particles, which might be more harmful than the exposure to a larger number of micrometer-sized particles. An in vitro exposure system was established to expose human alveolar epithelial cells to freshly generated exhaust. Computer simulations were used to determine the optimal flow characteristics and ensure equal exposure conditions for each well of a 6-well plate. A selective particle size sampler was used to continuously deliver diesel soot particles with different particle size distributions to cells in culture. To determine, whether the system could be used for cellular assays, alterations in cytokine production and cell viability of human alveolar A549 cells were determined after 3h on-line exposure followed by a 21-h conventional incubation period. Data indicated that complete diesel engine emission slightly affected pre-stimulated cells, but naive cells were not affected. The fractions containing large or small particles never affected the cells. The experimental set-up allowed a reliable exposure of the cells to the complete exhaust fraction or to the fractions containing either large or small diesel engine emission particles.

  9. Carbon Monoxide and Soot Formation in Inverse Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, L. G.; Mulholland, G. W.; Davis, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to study carbon monoxide (CO) and soot formation in laminar, inverse diffusion flames (IDFs). The IDF is used because it is a special case of underventilated combustion. The microgravity environment is crucial for this study because buoyancy-induced instabilities impede systematic variation of IDF operating conditions in normal gravity. The project described in this paper is just beginning, and no results are available. Hence, the goals of this paper are to establish the motivation for the research, to review the IDF literature, and to briefly introduce the experimental and computational plan for the research.

  10. Cytotoxic and mutagenic effects, particle size and concentration analysis of diesel engine emissions using biodiesel and petrol diesel as fuel.

    PubMed

    Bünger, J; Krahl, J; Baum, K; Schröder, O; Müller, M; Westphal, G; Ruhnau, P; Schulz, T G; Hallier, E

    2000-10-01

    Diesel engine exhaust particles (DEP) contribute substantially to ambient air pollution. They cause acute and chronic adverse health effects in humans. Biodiesel (rapeseed oil methyl ester. RME) is used as a "green fuel" in several countries. For a preliminary assessment of environmental and health effects of RME, the particulate-associated emissions from the DEP of RME and common fossil diesel fuel (DF) and their in vitro cytotoxic and mutagenic effects were compared. A test tractor was fuelled with RME and DF and driven in a European standard test cycle (ECE R49) on an engine dynamometer. Particle numbers and size distributions of the exhausts were determined at the load modes "idling" and "rated power". Filter-sampled particles were extracted and their cytotoxic properties tested using the neutral red assay. Mutagenicity was tested using the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome assay. Despite higher total particle emissions, solid particulate matter (soot) in the emissions from RME was lower than in the emissions from DF. While the size distributions and the numbers of emitted particles at "rated power" were nearly identical for the two fuels, at "idling" DF emitted substantially higher numbers of smaller particles than RME. The RME extracts caused fourfold stronger toxic effects on mouse fibroblasts at "idling" but not at "rated power" than DF extracts. The extracts at both load modes were significantly mutagenic in TA98 and TA100. However, extracts of DF showed a fourfold higher mutagenic effect in TA98 (and twofold in TA100) than extracts of RME. These results indicate benefits as well as disadvantages for humans and the environment from the use of RME as a fuel for tractors. The lower mutagenic potency of DEP from RME compared to DEP from DF is probably due to lower emissions of polycyclic aromatic compounds. The higher toxicity is probably caused by carbonyl compounds and unburned fuel, and reduces the benefits of the lower emissions of solid particulate matter

  11. Optical investigation of the combustion behaviour inside the engine operating in HCCI mode and using alternative diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Mancaruso, E.; Vaglieco, B.M.

    2010-04-15

    In order to understand the effect of both the new homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process and the use of biofuel, optical measurements were carried out into a transparent CR diesel engine. Rape seed methyl ester was used and tests with several injection pressures were performed. OH and HCO radical were detected and their evolutions were analyzed during the whole combustion. Moreover, soot concentration was measured by means the two colour pyrometry method. The reduction of particulate emission with biodiesel as compared to the diesel fuel was noted. Moreover, this effect resulted higher increasing the injection pressure. In the case of RME the oxidation of soot depends mainly from O{sub 2} content of fuel and OH is responsible of the NO formation in the chamber as it was observed for NO{sub x} exhaust emission. Moreover, it was investigated the evolution of HCO and CO into the cylinder. HCO was detected at the start of combustion. During the combustion, HCO oxidizes due to the increasing temperature and it produces CO. Both fuels have similar trend, the highest concentrations are detected for low injection pressure. This effect is more evident for the RME fuel. (author)

  12. The use of heterogeneous chemistry for the characterization of functional groups at the gas/particle interface of soot and TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Setyan, A; Sauvain, J-J; Rossi, M J

    2009-08-07

    Six gases [N(CH(3))(3), NH(2)OH, CF(3)COOH, HCl, NO(2) and O(3)] were selected to probe the surface of seven different types of combustion aerosol samples (amorphous carbon, flame soot) and three types of TiO(2) nanoparticles using heterogeneous, i.e. gas-surface reactions. The gas uptake to saturation of the probes was measured under molecular flow conditions in a Knudsen flow reactor and expressed as a density of surface functional groups on a particular aerosol, namely acidic (carboxylic) and basic (conjugated oxides such as pyrone, N-heterocycle and amine) sites, carbonyl (R(1)-C(O)-R(2)) and oxidizable (olefinic, -OH) groups. The limit of detection was generally well below 1% of a formal monolayer of adsorbed probe gas. With few exceptions most investigated aerosol samples interacted with all probe gases to various extents which points to the coexistence of different functional groups on the same aerosol surface such as acidic and basic groups. Generally, the carbonaceous particles displayed significant differences in surface group density: Printex 60 amorphous carbon had the lowest density of surface functional groups throughout, whereas Diesel soot recovered from a Diesel particulate filter had the largest. The presence of basic oxides on carbonaceous aerosol particles was inferred from the ratio of uptakes of CF(3)COOH and HCl owing to the larger stability of the acetate compared to the chloride counterion in the resulting pyrylium salt. Both soots generated from a rich and a lean hexane diffusion flame had a large density of oxidizable groups similar to amorphous carbon FS 101. TiO(2) 15 had the lowest density of functional groups studied for all probe gases among the three TiO(2) nanoparticles despite the smallest size of its primary particles. The technique used enabled the measurement of the uptake probability of the probe gases on the various supported aerosol samples. The initial uptake probability, gamma(0), of the probe gas onto the supported

  13. On Soot Inception in Nonpremixed Flames and the Effects of Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. H.; Liu, S.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A simplified three-step model of soot inception has been employed with high activation energy asymptotics to study soot inception in nonpremixed counterflow systems with emphasis on understanding the effects of hydrodynamics and transport. The resulting scheme yields three zones: (1) a fuel oxidation zone wherein the fuel and oxidizer react to form product as well as a radical R, (e.g., H), (2) a soot/precursor formation zone where the radical R reacts with fuel to form "soot/precursor" S, and (3) a soot/precursor consumption zone where S reacts with the oxidizer to form product. The kinetic scheme, although greatly simplified, allows the coupling between soot inception and flame structure to be assessed. The results yield flame temperature, flame location, and a soot/precursor index S(sub I) as functions of Damkohler number for S formation. The soot/precursor index indicates the amount of S at the boundary of the formation region. The flame temperature indirectly indicates the total amount of S integrated over the formation region because as S is formed less heat release is available. The results show that unlike oxidation reactions, an extinction turning-point behavior does not exist for soot. Instead, the total amount of S slowly decreases with decreasing Damkohler number (increasing strain rate), which is consistent with counterflow flame experiments. When the Lewis number of the radical is decreased from unity, the total S reduces due to reduced residence time for the radical in the soot formation region. Similarly, when the Lewis number of the soot/precursor is increased from unity the amount of S increases for all Damkohler numbers. In addition to studying fuel-air (low stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames, the air-side nitrogen was substituted into the fuel, yielding diluted fuel-oxygen (high stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames with the same flame temperature as the fuel - air flames. The relative flame locations were different however, and

  14. Measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl concentration in near critical equivalence ratio premixed ethylene flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inbody, Michael Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The testing and development of existing global and detailed chemical kinetic models for soot formation requires measurements of soot and radical concentrations in flames. A clearer understanding of soot particle inception relies upon the evaluation and refinement of these models in comparison with such measurements. We present measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl (OH) concentration in sequences of flat premixed atmospheric-pressure C2H4/O2/N2 flames and 80-torr C2H4/O2 flames for a unique range of equivalence ratios bracketting the critical equivalence ratio (phi(sub c)) and extending to more heavily sooting conditions. Soot volume fraction and number density profiles are measured using a laser scattering-extinction apparatus capable of resolving a 0.1 percent absorption. Hydroxyl number density profiles are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) with broadband detection. Temperature profiles are obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements. The relative volume fraction and number density profiles of the richer sooting flames exhibit the expected trends in soot formation. In near-phi(sub c) visibility sooting flames, particle scattering and extinction are not detected, but an LIF signal due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) can be detected upon excitation with an argon-ion laser. A linear correlation between the argon-ion LIF and the soot volume fraction implies a common mechanistic source for the growth of PAH's and soot particles. The peak OH number density in both the atmospheric and 80-torr flames declines with increasing equivalence ratio, but the profile shape remains unchanged in the transition to sooting, implying that the primary reaction pathways for OH remain unchanged over this transition. Chemical kinetic modeling is demonstrated by comparing predictions using two current reaction mechanisms with the atmospheric flame data. The measured and predicted OH number density profiles show good agreement. The predicted benzene

  15. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust. Research report, January 1984-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.

    1990-02-01

    The hypothesis tested in the project was that rats with preexisting experimentally-induced pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of exposure to NO(sub 2) or diesel exhaust. Rats were exposed by inhalation seven hr/day, five day/wk, for 24 months to NO(sub 2) at 9.5 ppm, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/cu m, or to clean air. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of elastase, six weeks before exposures. Nonneoplastic endpoints were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. Nitrogen dioxide exposure of normal rats caused mild epithelial hyperplasia and inflammation in proximal alveoli. Significant interactions between the influences of emphysema and nitrogen dioxide were demonstrated to be additive for four parameters (out of 61 parameters). Diesel-exhaust exposure of normal rats caused progressive, focal inflammation, and epithelial proliferation. The final soot lung burden was only one-third of that in nonemphysematous lungs.

  16. High-Energy-Density Fuel Blending Strategies and Drop Dispersion for Fuel Cost Reduction and Soot Propensity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that low soot propensity of high-energy-density (HED) liquid sooting fuels and cost reduction of a multicomponent energetic fuel can be achieved by doping a less expensive, less sooting liquid fuel with HED is tested through numerical simulations.

  17. Soot formation in the methane oxygen and methane/oxygen/hydrogen flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauerman, L.; Salser, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of using methane, recovered from carbon dioxide by the Sabatier-Senderens reaction, was investigated as a fuel in a reaction control engine. A problem to be avoided is the emission of soot particles. It is thought that such particles would remain in the environment of the spacecraft and, thereby, adversely affect optical sightings and possibly have an effect upon communications. The initial studies were of a practical nature. The first was the influence of the spatial arrangement of the fuel and oxygen injectors on soot formation. In the second study, inhibition of soot formation was considered. Considering the given situation, it was impractical to use an additive. However, since methanol combustion does not produce soot, and methanol can be produced from methane in situ, the possibility that methanol could act as an inhibitor was studied. In the third study, since these are restartable engines, the effect of shutdown on the rapidity of soot formation was studied.

  18. Effect of alcohol addition on shock-initiated formation of soot from benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael; Yuan, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Soot formation in benzene-methanol and benzene-ethanol argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1580-2250 K, pressures 2.0-3.0 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations (2.0-2.7) x 10 to the 17th atoms/cu cm. The results obtained indicate that the addition of alcohol suppresses the formation of soot from benzene at all temperatures, and that the reduction in soot yields is increased with the amount of alcohol added. The analysis of the results indicates that the suppression effect is probably due to the oxidation of soot and soot precursors by OH and the removal of hydrogen atoms by alcohol and water molecules.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving turbulent luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoustre, Vivien; Arias, Paul; Roy, Somesh; Wang, Wei; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Dan; Im, Hong; Lu, Tianfeng; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Sankaran, Ramanan; Trouve, Arnaud

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO2, H2O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  1. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in kerosene and bio-kerosene soot.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Eiroa, Auréa; Leroy, Valérie; Dagaut, Philippe; Bedjanian, Yuri

    2010-03-01

    Here we report a new, efficient and reliable analytical methodology for sensitive and selective quantification of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soot samples. The methodology developed is based on ultrasonic extraction of the soot-bound PAHs into small volumes of acetonitrile, purification of the extracts through C(18) Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) cartridges and analysis by Reverse Phase Liquid Chromatography (RPLC) with UV and fluorimetric detection. For the first time, we report the convenience of adapting the SPE procedure to the nature of the soot samples. As a matter of fact, extracts containing high percentage of unpolar material are recommended to be cleaned with acetone, whereas extracts poor in unpolar compounds can be efficiently cleaned with methanol. The method was satisfactorily applied to kerosene and bio-kerosene soot from atmospheric open diffusion flames (pool fires) and premixed flames achieving Quantification and Detection limits in the range ng mg(-1) soot and recoveries about 90% for most of the PAHs studied.

  2. Wetting and hydration of insoluble soot particles in the upper troposphere.

    PubMed

    Persiantseva, N M; Popovicheva, O B; Shonija, N K

    2004-12-01

    Wettability and hydration are determined for aircraft combustor and laboratory-made soots which are used as surrogates for the insoluble part of aircraft-generated black carbon particles in the upper troposphere (UT). The measured water/ice contact angles on the soot surfaces are in the range 60-80 degrees. Factors influencing the soot wetting show a tremendous dependence on the surface chemical composition and microstructure. Wetting characteristics of soots are directly related to its hydrophilicity. The inverse Kelvin effect is considered as a mechanism of ice nucleation which is facilitated by the soot agglomerated structure with interparticle cavities in which condensation takes place on the insoluble surface with a high water contact angle. Estimations of the critical supersaturations needed for the ice condensation growth of particles are provided to determine which of the wetting characteristics are required for cirrus cloud formation in ice saturated regions of the UT.