Science.gov

Sample records for airborne emissions monitoring

  1. Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.M.

    1993-07-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

  2. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of radiological airborne emissions. This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to written requirements.

  3. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of airborne emissions. The Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions requirements are defined in National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1991a). Reporting of the emissions to the US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE-RL 1988). This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to the requirements of QAMS-004/80, Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (EPA 1983). Title 40 CFR Part 61, Appendix B, Method 114, Quality Assurance Methods (EPA 1991b) specifies the quality assurance requirements and that a program plan should be prepared to meet the requirements of this regulation. This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies NESHAP responsibilities and how the Westinghouse Hanford Company Environmental, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division will verify that the methods are properly implemented.

  4. Assessment of unabated facility emission potentials for evaluating airborne radionuclide monitoring requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Jette, S.J.; Sula, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for 31 emission locations at the US DOE`s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the Hanford Site. Four buildings met Sate and Federal critical for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. The assessments were performed using building radionuclide inventory data obtained in 1995.

  5. Monitoring of chromium species and 11 selected metals in emission and immission of airborne environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krystek, Petra; Ritsema, Rob

    2007-08-01

    Monitoring of chromium species as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and the determination of the total chromium concentration as well as the concentration of 11 selected metals (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Zn) in industrial emission of a foundry and immission studies of the nearby airborne environment were carried out. The samples were taken as industrial exhaust directly by the outlet and as airborne sample in the environment with distances between some hundred meters and 2 km from the industrial factoryE Wherefore two methods of sampling, sample pre-treatment and mass spectrometric measurement were developed and applied. With respect to different sampling duration different volumes of air were sampled and analysed. For the determination of Cr(VI) sampling in impingers (filled with carbonate-buffer) was used. A procedure of selective complex forming and extraction was developed and measured by double focussing sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). For the determination of the total chromium concentration as well as of 11 metals sampling was done by using quartz-filters. After microwave digestion in the medium of aqua regia the samples were analysed by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The maximum concentration of Cr(VI)-species in emission samples was determined as 180 ng/m3 air which is about 2% of total Cr. The lowest concentration of Cr(VI)-species in immission was determined as 0.5 ng/m3 air.

  6. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  7. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  8. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  9. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  10. Development of a real-time monitor for airborne alpha emissions. First quarter report, TTP AL 142003

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, R.E.; Fowler, M.M.

    1994-02-01

    This is the first quarterly report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 for TTP AL 142003, Development of a Real-Time Monitor for Airborne Alpha Emissions. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is developing a new technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of incinerator stacks for low levels of airborne alpha activity. While initially developed for incinerators, this new technology may well find other applications in continuous air monitoring, process monitoring, and monitoring during remediation activities. Referred to as the Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System (LVFTDS), this technology responds directly to the need for fast responding, high sensitivity effluent monitoring systems. With DOE EM-50 funding, LANL has fabricated a bench-top proof of concept detector system and is conducting tests to evaluate its performance. A second- generation prototype is being designed, based on requirements driven by potential field test sites. An industrial partner is being solicited to license the technology. Field trials of a full-scale detector system are planned for FY 95. Accomplishments during the first quarter of FY 94 are chronicled in this report, including budgetary data. A schedule for the remainder of the fiscal year is also provided.

  11. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  12. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  13. A Comparative Study of the Monitoring of a Self Aligning Spherical Journal using Surface Vibration, Airborne Sound and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharjo, P.; Tesfa, B.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    A Self aligning spherical journal bearing is a plain bearing which has spherical surface contact that can be applied in high power industrial machinery. This type of bearing can accommodate a misalignment problem. The journal bearing faults degrade machine performance, decrease life time service and cause unexpected failure which are dangerous for safety issues. Non-intrusive measurements such as surface vibration (SV), airborne sound (AS) and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are appropriate monitoring methods for early stage journal bearing fault in low, medium and high frequency. This paper focuses on the performance comparison using SV, AS and AE measurements in monitoring a self aligning spherical journal bearing for normal and faulty (scratch) conditions. It examines the signals in the time domain and frequency domain and identifies the frequency ranges for each measurement in which significant changes are observed. The results of SV, AS and AE experiments indicate that the spectrum can be used to detect the differences between normal and faulty bearing. The statistic parameter shows that RMS value and peak value for faulty bearing is higher than normal bearing.

  14. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  15. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  16. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  17. Monitoring airborne alpha-emitter contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, P.L.; Koster, J.E.; Conaway, J.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Whitley, C.W.; Steadman, P.A.

    1998-02-01

    Facilities that may produce airborne alpha emitter contamination require a continuous air monitoring (CAM) system. However, these traditional CAMs have difficulty in environments with large quantities of non-radioactive particulates such as dust and salt. Los Alamos has developed an airborne plutonium sensor (APS) for the REBOUND experiment at the Nevada Test Site which detects alpha contamination directly in the air, and so is less vulnerable to the problems associated with counting activity on a filter. In addition, radon compensation is built into the detector by the use of two measurement chambers.

  18. Fugitive emissions monitoring trends

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.H.

    1997-02-01

    New Clean Air Act requirements are pushing facilities to reevaluate their monitoring programs. A description of the fugitive emission guidelines is included in this article, along with ideas about monitoring.

  19. Monitoring marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yuanfu, S.; Quanan, Z.

    1982-06-01

    In order to monitor marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques, some comprehensive test of airborne remote sensing, involving monitoring marine oil pollution, were performed at several bay areas of China. This paper presents some typical results of monitoring marine oil pollution. The features associated with the EM spectrum (visible, thermal infrared, and microwave) response of marine oil spills is briefly analyzed. It has been verified that the airborne oil surveillance systems manifested their advantages for monitoring the oil pollution of bay environments.

  20. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Peters, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary, central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual’s exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-hour monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  1. Airborne Emissions from Si/FeSi Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Ida; Grådahl, Svend; Tranell, Gabriella

    2017-02-01

    The management of airborne emissions from silicon and ferrosilicon production is, in many ways, similar to the management of airborne emissions from other metallurgical industries, but certain challenges are highly branch-specific, for example the dust types generated and the management of NO X emissions by furnace design and operation. A major difficulty in the mission to reduce emissions is that information about emission types and sources as well as abatement and measurement methods is often scarce, incomplete and scattered. The sheer diversity and complexity of the subject presents a hurdle, especially for new professionals in the field. This article focuses on the airborne emissions from Si and FeSi production, including greenhouse gases, nitrogen oxides, airborne particulate matter also known as dust, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals. The aim is to summarize current knowledge in a state-of-the-art overview intended to introduce fresh industry engineers and academic researchers to the technological aspects relevant to the reduction of airborne emissions.

  2. Decadal changes in ozone and precursor emissions in the Los Angeles California region using in-situ airborne and ground-based field observations, roadside monitoring data, and surface network measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Flynn, J. H.; Frost, G. J.; Grossberg, N.; Harley, R. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B. L.; Lueb, R.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ observations from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) surface network show decreases in ozone (O3), nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). Decreases in CO, NOx, and VOCs reflect changes, such as improved catalytic converters and reformulated fuels etc., that have been implemented in response to increasingly strict emissions standards placed upon on-road vehicles in the state of California. Here, we compare changes in emissions ratios of NOx and VOCs to CO determined from surface network data collected since 1994 to changes in emissions ratios from biennial roadside studies conducted in west Los Angeles since 1999 and airborne and ground-based measurements from three independent field campaigns conducted in California in 2002, 2008, and 2010. Using the more extensive in-situ surface network data set, we show that decreasing ozone is positively correlated with decreasing abundances of NOx and VOCs and with decreasing VOC/NOx ratio over time. The changes observed from 1994 to present suggest that reductions in both NOx and VOCs and the VOC/NOx ratio over the years have been effective in reducing ozone in the SoCAB.

  3. Improve emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vining, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Marathon`s Texas City refinery was subject to five separate EPA regulations in addition to a state program for monitoring and repairing fugitive leaks. In this case history, the refinery sought an organizational solution that reduced monitoring costs and kept the facility fully compliant with current state and federal regulations. Equally important, the new monitoring program incorporated flexibility for future emission-reduction requirements. The paper describes the solution, regulatory background, the previous system, leak-threshold consolidation, operator ownership, and projects benefits.

  4. Airborne asbestos fibres monitoring in tunnel excavation.

    PubMed

    Gaggero, Laura; Sanguineti, Elisa; Yus González, Adrián; Militello, Gaia Maria; Scuderi, Alberto; Parisi, Giovanni

    2017-04-03

    Tunnelling across ophiolitic formation with Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) can release fibres into the environment, exposing workers, and the population, if fibres spread outside the tunnel, leading to increased risk of developing asbestos-related disease. Therefore, a careful plan of environmental monitoring is carried out during Terzo Valico tunnel excavation. In the present study, data of 1571 samples of airborne dust, collected between 2014 and 2016 inside the tunnels, and analyzed by SEM-EDS for quantification of workers exposure, are discussed. In particular, the engineering and monitoring management of 100 m tunnelling excavation across a serpentinite lens (Cravasco adit), intercalated within calcschists, is reported. At this chrysotile occurrence, 84% of 128 analyzed samples (from the zone closer to the front rock) were above 2 ff/l. However, thanks to safety measures implemented and tunnel compartmentation in zones, the asbestos fibre concentration did not exceed the Italian standard of occupational exposure (100 ff/l) and 100% of samples collected in the outdoor square were below 1 ff/l. During excavation under normal working conditions, asbestos concentrations were below 2 ff/l in 97.4% of the 668 analyzed samples. Our results showed that air monitoring can objectively confirm the presence of asbestos minerals at a rock front in relative short time and provide information about the nature of the lithology at the front. The present dataset, the engineering measures described and the operative conclusions are liable to support the improvement of legislation on workers exposure to asbestos referred to the tunnelling sector, lacking at present.

  5. Apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores. The apparatus is provided with an air sampler, a surface for capturing airborne spores, a thermal lysis unit to release DPA from bacterial spores, a source of lanthanide ions, and a spectrometer for excitation and detection of the characteristic fluorescence of the aromatic molecules in bacterial spores complexed with lanthanide ions. In accordance with the method: computer-programmed steps allow for automation of the apparatus for the monitoring of airborne bacterial spores.

  6. Monitoring of Airborne Tritium in Vicinity of Radioluminescent Light Manufacturer

    SciTech Connect

    Ilin, M.; Thompson, P.; Rabski, H.

    2005-07-15

    Passive diffusion samplers (PDS) composed of a vial with a solution of distilled water and ethylene glycol have an affinity to capture tritium oxide (tritiated water vapour, HTO) from surrounding air through an orifice in a lid. In order to ascertain the effectiveness of such samplers for tracking changes in the HTO air concentrations attributable to variations in tritium emission rates, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) measured the HTO concentrations in air for one year on a bi-weekly basis at various distances along four directions from an operating radioluminescent light manufacturing facility. The collected data demonstrate that the PDS are low cost and low maintenance means for reliable monitoring of airborne HTO emissions. The data indicate a rapid decrease of atmospheric HTO concentrations with increasing distance from the facility in all directions. A strong correlation (r=0.89) was found between reported releases of HTO from the facility and the HTO air concentrations observed at the monitoring locations. Distribution of HTO around the facility correlated strongly (r=0.99) with local wind distribution.

  7. Performance evaluation of four directional emissivity analytical models with thermal SAIL model and airborne images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huazhong; Liu, Rongyuan; Yan, Guangjian; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Liu, Qiang; Nerry, Françoise

    2015-04-06

    Land surface emissivity is a crucial parameter in the surface status monitoring. This study aims at the evaluation of four directional emissivity models, including two bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models and two gap-frequency-based models. Results showed that the kernel-driven BRDF model could well represent directional emissivity with an error less than 0.002, and was consequently used to retrieve emissivity with an accuracy of about 0.012 from an airborne multi-angular thermal infrared data set. Furthermore, we updated the cavity effect factor relating to multiple scattering inside canopy, which improved the performance of the gap-frequency-based models.

  8. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  9. Basic Information about Air Emissions Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site is about types of air emissions monitoring and the Clean Air Act regulations, including Ambient Air Quality Monitoring, Stationary Source Emissions Monitoring, and Continuous Monitoring Systems.

  10. A Methodology to Monitor Airborne PM10 Dust Particles Using a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Miguel; Gonzalez, Felipe; Erskine, Peter; Cliff, David; Heuff, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the process of coal extraction from surface mines, gases and particles are emitted in the form of fugitive emissions by activities such as hauling, blasting and transportation. As these emissions are diffuse in nature, estimations based upon emission factors and dispersion/advection equations need to be measured directly from the atmosphere. This paper expands upon previous research undertaken to develop a relative methodology to monitor PM10 dust particles produced by mining activities making use of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). A module sensor using a laser particle counter (OPC-N2 from Alphasense, Great Notley, Essex, UK) was tested. An aerodynamic flow experiment was undertaken to determine the position and length of a sampling probe of the sensing module. Flight tests were conducted in order to demonstrate that the sensor provided data which could be used to calculate the emission rate of a source. Emission rates are a critical variable for further predictive dispersion estimates. First, data collected by the airborne module was verified using a 5.0 m tower in which a TSI DRX 8533 (reference dust monitoring device, TSI, Shoreview, MN, USA) and a duplicate of the module sensor were installed. Second, concentration values collected by the monitoring module attached to the UAV (airborne module) obtaining a percentage error of 1.1%. Finally, emission rates from the source were calculated, with airborne data, obtaining errors as low as 1.2%. These errors are low and indicate that the readings collected with the airborne module are comparable to the TSI DRX and could be used to obtain specific emission factors from fugitive emissions for industrial activities. PMID:28216557

  11. A Methodology to Monitor Airborne PM10 Dust Particles Using a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Miguel; Gonzalez, Felipe; Erskine, Peter; Cliff, David; Heuff, Darlene

    2017-02-14

    Throughout the process of coal extraction from surface mines, gases and particles are emitted in the form of fugitive emissions by activities such as hauling, blasting and transportation. As these emissions are diffuse in nature, estimations based upon emission factors and dispersion/advection equations need to be measured directly from the atmosphere. This paper expands upon previous research undertaken to develop a relative methodology to monitor PM10 dust particles produced by mining activities making use of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). A module sensor using a laser particle counter (OPC-N2 from Alphasense, Great Notley, Essex, UK) was tested. An aerodynamic flow experiment was undertaken to determine the position and length of a sampling probe of the sensing module. Flight tests were conducted in order to demonstrate that the sensor provided data which could be used to calculate the emission rate of a source. Emission rates are a critical variable for further predictive dispersion estimates. First, data collected by the airborne module was verified using a 5.0 m tower in which a TSI DRX 8533 (reference dust monitoring device, TSI, Shoreview, MN, USA) and a duplicate of the module sensor were installed. Second, concentration values collected by the monitoring module attached to the UAV (airborne module) obtaining a percentage error of 1.1%. Finally, emission rates from the source were calculated, with airborne data, obtaining errors as low as 1.2%. These errors are low and indicate that the readings collected with the airborne module are comparable to the TSI DRX and could be used to obtain specific emission factors from fugitive emissions for industrial activities.

  12. Air Emissions Monitoring for Permits

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Operating permits document how air pollution sources will demonstrate compliance with emission limits and also how air pollution sources will monitor, either periodically or continuously, their compliance with emission limits and all other requirements.

  13. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  14. Functional requirements document for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Criddle, J.D. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    This document states the functional requirements and procedures for systems making measurements of radioactive airborne emissions from facilities at the Hanford Site. The following issues are addressed in this document: Definition of the program objectives; Selection of the overall approach to collecting the samples; Sampling equipment design; Sampling equipment maintenance, and quality assurance issues. The intent of this document is to assist WHC in demonstrating a high quality of air emission measurements with verified system performance based on documented system design, testing, inspection, and maintenance.

  15. Airborne detection of diffuse carbon dioxide emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerlach, T.M.; Doukas, M.P.; McGee, K.A.; Kessler, R.

    1999-01-01

    We report the first airborne detection of CO2 degassing from diffuse volcanic sources. Airborne measurement of diffuse CO2 degassing offers a rapid alternative for monitoring CO2 emission rates at Mammoth Mountain. CO2 concentrations, temperatures, and barometric pressures were measured at ~2,500 GPS-referenced locations during a one-hour, eleven-orbit survey of air around Mammoth Mountain at ~3 km from the summit and altitudes of 2,895-3,657 m. A volcanic CO2 anomaly 4-5 km across with CO2 levels ~1 ppm above background was revealed downwind of tree-kill areas. It contained a 1-km core with concentrations exceeding background by >3 ppm. Emission rates of ~250 t d-1 are indicated. Orographic winds may play a key role in transporting the diffusely degassed CO2 upslope to elevations where it is lofted into the regional wind system.We report the first airborne detection of CO2 degassing from diffuse volcanic sources. Airborne measurement of diffuse CO2 degassing offers a rapid alternative for monitoring CO2 emission rates at Mammoth Mountain. CO2 concentrations, temperatures, and barometric pressures were measured at approximately 2,500 GPS-referenced locations during a one-hour, eleven-orbit survey of air around Mammoth Mountain at approximately 3 km from the summit and altitudes of 2,895-3,657 m. A volcanic CO2 anomaly 4-5 km across with CO2 levels approximately 1 ppm above background was revealed downwind of tree-kill areas. It contained a 1-km core with concentrations exceeding background by >3 ppm. Emission rates of approximately 250 t d-1 are indicated. Orographic winds may play a key role in transporting the diffusely degassed CO2 upslope to elevations where it is lofted into the regional wind system.

  16. Can airborne ultrasound monitor bubble size in chocolate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, N.; Hazlehurst, T.; Povey, M.; Vieira, J.; Sundara, R.; Sandoz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    Aerated chocolate products consist of solid chocolate with the inclusion of bubbles and are a popular consumer product in many countries. The volume fraction and size distribution of the bubbles has an effect on their sensory properties and manufacturing cost. For these reasons it is important to have an online real time process monitoring system capable of measuring their bubble size distribution. As these products are eaten by consumers it is desirable that the monitoring system is non contact to avoid food contaminations. In this work we assess the feasibility of using an airborne ultrasound system to monitor the bubble size distribution in aerated chocolate bars. The experimental results from the airborne acoustic experiments were compared with theoretical results for known bubble size distributions using COMSOL Multiphysics. This combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to develop a greater understanding of how ultrasound propagates through aerated chocolate and to assess the feasibility of using airborne ultrasound to monitor bubble size distribution in these systems. The results indicated that a smaller bubble size distribution would result in an increase in attenuation through the product.

  17. Constraining isoprene emission factors using airborne flux measurements during CABERNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Jiang, X.; Avise, J. C.; Scott, K.; Jonsson, H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    An aircraft flux study was conducted to assess biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from California ecosystems targeting oak woodlands and isoprene for most transects. The direct eddy covariance approach featured high speed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry onboard a CIRPAS (Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies) Twin Otter aircraft during June 2011 as part of the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects) project. Isoprene fluxes were calculated using wavelet analysis and scaled to surface fluxes using a divergence term obtained by measuring fluxes at multiple altitudes over homogenous oak terrain. By normalization of fluxes to standard temperature and photosynthetically active radiation levels using standard BVOC modeling equations, the resulting emission factors could be directly compared with those used by MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) and BEIGIS (Biogenic Emission Inventory Geographic Information System) models which are the most commonly used BVOC emission models for California. As expected, oak woodlands were found to be the dominant source of isoprene in all areas surrounding and in the Central Valley of California. The airborne fluxes averaged to 2 km spatial resolution matched remarkably well with current oak woodland distributions driving the models and hence the correspondence of modeled and aircraft derived emission factors was also good, although quantitative differences were encountered depending on the region and driving variables used. Fluxes measured from aircraft proved to be useful for the improvement of the accuracy of modeled predictions for isoprene and other important ozone and aerosol precursor compounds. These are the first regional isoprene flux measurements using direct eddy covariance on aircraft.

  18. Monitor for detecting and assessing exposure to airborne nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Johan; Voetz, Matthias; Kiesling, Heinz-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    An important safety aspect of the workplace environment concerns the severity of its air pollution with nanoparticles (NP; <100 nm) and ultrafine particles (UFP; <300 nm). Depending on their size and chemical nature, exposure to these particles through inhalation can be hazardous because of their intrinsic ability to deposit in the deep lung regions and the possibility to subsequently pass into the blood stream. Recommended safety measures in the nanomaterials industry are pragmatic, aiming at exposure minimization in general, and advocating continuous control by monitoring both the workplace air pollution level and the personal exposure to airborne NPs. This article describes the design and operation of the Aerasense NP monitor that enables intelligence gathering in particular with respect to airborne particles in the 10-300 nm size range. The NP monitor provides real time information about their number concentration, average size, and surface areas per unit volume of inhaled air that deposit in the various compartments of the respiratory tract. The monitor's functionality relies on electrical charging of airborne particles and subsequent measurements of the total particle charge concentration under various conditions. Information obtained with the NP monitor in a typical workplace environment has been compared with simultaneously recorded data from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) capable of measuring the particle size distribution in the 11-1086 nm size range. When the toxicological properties of the engineered and/or released particles in the workplace are known, personal exposure monitoring allows a risk assessment to be made for a worker during each workday, when the workplace-produced particles can be distinguished from other (ambient) particles.

  19. Investigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Surface, Airborne, and Satellite on Local to Continental-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Egland, E. T.; Gerilowski, K.; Vigil, S. A.; Buchwitz, M.; Krings, T.; Bovensmann, H.; Krautwurst, S.; Burrows, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    In situ meteorological observations, including 10-m winds (U), in conjunction with greenhouse gas (GHG - methane, carbon dioxide, water vapor) measurements by continuous wave Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) were conducted onboard two specialized platforms: MACLab (Mobile Atmospheric Composition Laboratory in a RV) and AMOG Surveyor (AutoMObile Greenhouse gas) - a converted commuter automobile. AMOG Surveyor data were collected for numerous southern California sources including megacity, geology, fossil fuel industrial, animal husbandry, and landfill operations. MACLab investigated similar sources along with wetlands on a transcontinental scale from California to Florida to Nebraska covering more than 15,000 km. Custom software allowing real-time, multi-parameter data visualization (GHGs, water vapor, temperature, U, etc.) improved plume characterization and was applied to large urban area and regional-scale sources. The capabilities demonstrated permit calculation of source emission strength, as well as enable documenting microclimate variability. GHG transect data were compared with airborne HyperSpectral Imaging data to understand temporal and spatial variability and to ground-truth emission strength derived from airborne imagery. These data also were used to validate satellite GHG products from SCIAMACHY (2003-2005) and GOSAT (2009-2013) that are currently being analyzed to identify significant decadal-scale changes in North American GHG emission patterns resulting from changes in anthropogenic and natural sources. These studies lay the foundation for the joint ESA/NASA COMEX campaign that will map GHG plumes by remote sensing and in situ measurements for a range of strong sources to derive emission strength through inverse plume modeling. COMEX is in support of the future GHG monitoring satellites, such as CarbonSat and HyspIRI. GHG transect data were compared with airborne HyperSpectral Imaging data to understand temporal and spatial variability

  20. Evaluation of three portable samplers for monitoring airborne fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Airborne fungi were monitored at five sample sites with the Burkard portable, the RCS Plus, and the SAS Super 90 air samplers; the Andersen 2-stage impactor was used for comparison. All samplers were calibrated before being used simultaneously to collect 100-liter samples at each site. The Andersen and Burkard samplers retrieved equivalent volumes of airborne fungi; the SAS Super 90 and RCS Plus measurements did not differ from each other but were significantly lower than those obtained with the Andersen or Burkard samplers. Total fungal counts correlated linearly with Cladosporium and Penicillium counts. Alternaria species, although present at all sites, did not correlate with total count or with amounts of any other fungal genera. Sampler and location significantly influenced fungal counts, but no interactions between samplers and locations were found.

  1. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  2. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  3. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  4. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  5. Methane emissions from Alaska in 2012 from CARVE airborne observations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Rachel Y-W; Miller, Charles E; Dinardo, Steven J; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Daube, Bruce C; Henderson, John M; Mountain, Marikate E; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Miller, John B; Bruhwiler, Lori M P; Wofsy, Steven C

    2014-11-25

    We determined methane (CH4) emissions from Alaska using airborne measurements from the Carbon Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Atmospheric sampling was conducted between May and September 2012 and analyzed using a customized version of the polar weather research and forecast model linked to a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (stochastic time-inverted Lagrangian transport model). We estimated growing season CH4 fluxes of 8 ± 2 mg CH4⋅m(-2)⋅d(-1) averaged over all of Alaska, corresponding to fluxes from wetlands of 56(-13)(+22) mg CH4⋅m(-2)⋅d(-1) if we assumed that wetlands are the only source from the land surface (all uncertainties are 95% confidence intervals from a bootstrapping analysis). Fluxes roughly doubled from May to July, then decreased gradually in August and September. Integrated emissions totaled 2.1 ± 0.5 Tg CH4 for Alaska from May to September 2012, close to the average (2.3; a range of 0.7 to 6 Tg CH4) predicted by various land surface models and inversion analyses for the growing season. Methane emissions from boreal Alaska were larger than from the North Slope; the monthly regional flux estimates showed no evidence of enhanced emissions during early spring or late fall, although these bursts may be more localized in time and space than can be detected by our analysis. These results provide an important baseline to which future studies can be compared.

  6. Methane emissions from Alaska in 2012 from CARVE airborne observations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rachel Y.-W.; Miller, Charles E.; Dinardo, Steven J.; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Daube, Bruce C.; Henderson, John M.; Mountain, Marikate E.; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Miller, John B.; Bruhwiler, Lori M. P.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    We determined methane (CH4) emissions from Alaska using airborne measurements from the Carbon Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Atmospheric sampling was conducted between May and September 2012 and analyzed using a customized version of the polar weather research and forecast model linked to a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (stochastic time-inverted Lagrangian transport model). We estimated growing season CH4 fluxes of 8 ± 2 mg CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1 averaged over all of Alaska, corresponding to fluxes from wetlands of 56−13+22 mg CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1 if we assumed that wetlands are the only source from the land surface (all uncertainties are 95% confidence intervals from a bootstrapping analysis). Fluxes roughly doubled from May to July, then decreased gradually in August and September. Integrated emissions totaled 2.1 ± 0.5 Tg CH4 for Alaska from May to September 2012, close to the average (2.3; a range of 0.7 to 6 Tg CH4) predicted by various land surface models and inversion analyses for the growing season. Methane emissions from boreal Alaska were larger than from the North Slope; the monthly regional flux estimates showed no evidence of enhanced emissions during early spring or late fall, although these bursts may be more localized in time and space than can be detected by our analysis. These results provide an important baseline to which future studies can be compared. PMID:25385648

  7. Mapping methane emission sources over California based on airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Guha, A.; Peischl, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Jonsson, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) has created a need to accurately characterize the emission sources of various greenhouse gases (GHGs) and verify the existing state GHG inventory. Methane (CH4) is a major GHG with a global warming potential of 20 times that of CO2 and currently constitutes about 6% of the total statewide GHG emissions on a CO2 equivalent basis. Some of the major methane sources in the state are area sources where methane is biologically produced (e.g. dairies, landfills and waste treatment plants) making bottom-up estimation of emissions a complex process. Other potential sources include fugitive emissions from oil extraction processes and natural gas distribution network, emissions from which are not well-quantified. The lack of adequate field measurement data to verify the inventory and provide independently generated estimates further contributes to the overall uncertainty in the CH4 inventory. In order to gain a better perspective of spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, a real-time measurement instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) was installed in a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements during eight unique flights which covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. The coincident VOC measurements, obtained through a high frequency proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTRMS), aid in CH4 source identification. High mixing ratios of CH4 (> 2000 ppb) are observed consistently in all the flight transects above the Central Valley. These high levels of CH4 are accompanied by high levels of methanol which is an important

  8. Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

    1991-09-01

    Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

  9. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  10. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  11. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  12. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  13. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  14. Airborne Transducer Integrity under Operational Environment for Structural Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Salmanpour, Mohammad Saleh; Sharif Khodaei, Zahra; Aliabadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-12-12

    This paper investigates the robustness of permanently mounted transducers used in airborne structural health monitoring systems, when exposed to the operational environment. Typical airliners operate in a range of conditions, hence, structural health monitoring (SHM) transducer robustness and integrity must be demonstrated for these environments. A set of extreme temperature, altitude and vibration environment test profiles are developed using the existing Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA)/DO-160 test methods. Commercially available transducers and manufactured versions bonded to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials are tested. It was found that the DuraAct transducer is robust to environmental conditions tested, while the other transducer types degrade under the same conditions.

  15. Airborne Transducer Integrity under Operational Environment for Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Salmanpour, Mohammad Saleh; Sharif Khodaei, Zahra; Aliabadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness of permanently mounted transducers used in airborne structural health monitoring systems, when exposed to the operational environment. Typical airliners operate in a range of conditions, hence, structural health monitoring (SHM) transducer robustness and integrity must be demonstrated for these environments. A set of extreme temperature, altitude and vibration environment test profiles are developed using the existing Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA)/DO-160 test methods. Commercially available transducers and manufactured versions bonded to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials are tested. It was found that the DuraAct transducer is robust to environmental conditions tested, while the other transducer types degrade under the same conditions. PMID:27973450

  16. Continuous emission monitor for incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

  17. Continuous emission monitor for incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

  18. Contribution of traffic emissions to indoor airborne VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    The contribution of nearby vehicle traffic to indoor airborne volatile organic compound levels and to personal exposures was examined to determine the importance of this source. Indoor and outdoor levels of selected VOCs, aldehydes, ketones, and ethanol were measured at 10 homes in Toronto, on sidewalks near the traffic source, indoors and in the backyards or balconies of apartments (outdoors). Concurrently, air exchange rates were measured at each home with a perfluorocarbon tracer method. All the residences were within 1 km of urban intersections with traffic counts of more than 20,000 vehicles per day. Average concentrations of hexane, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, benzene and propionaldehyde decreased in the order: street level > indoor > outdoor. These compounds occur in vehicle emissions, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 24 to 88 % suggesting that traffic emissions contributed to indoor pollutant level through the process of air exchange. For other compounds different trends were observed. Indoors concentrations were greater than outdoors for ethylacetate, tetrachlorethane, pinene, limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, naphthalene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and ethanol, for example. These compounds are common in consumer products, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 2 to 44%. The differences in street and backyard (outdoor) concentrations for some compounds were large due to the presence of nearby vehicles at street level sampling sites, indicating that the impact of traffic on human exposures (pedestrians on sidewalks and occupants of vehicles) is potentially large, compared to the impact of general background urban air pollutants.

  19. Evaluation of portable air samplers for monitoring airborne culturable bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Bell-Robinson, D. M.; Groves, T. O.; Stetzenbach, L. D.; Pierson, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Airborne culturable bacteria were monitored at five locations (three in an office/laboratory building and two in a private residence) in a series of experiments designed to compare the efficiency of four air samplers: the Andersen two-stage, Burkard portable, RCS Plus, and SAS Super 90 samplers. A total of 280 samples was collected. The four samplers were operated simultaneously, each sampling 100 L of air with collection on trypticase soy agar. The data were corrected by applying positive hole conversion factors for the Burkard portable, Andersen two-stage, and SAS Super 90 air samplers, and were expressed as log10 values prior to statistical analysis by analysis of variance. The Burkard portable air sampler retrieved the highest number of airborne culturable bacteria at four of the five sampling sites, followed by the SAS Super 90 and the Andersen two-stage impactor. The number of bacteria retrieved by the RCS Plus was significantly less than those retrieved by the other samplers. Among the predominant bacterial genera retrieved by all samplers were Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus.

  20. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  1. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  2. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  3. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  4. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  5. Airborne monitoring to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from incidental particles for environmental health and safety

    PubMed Central

    Peters, TM; Elzey, S; Johnson, R; Park, H; Grassian, VH; Maher, T; O'Shaughnessy, P

    2016-01-01

    Two methods were used to distinguish airborne engineered nanomaterials from other airborne particles in a facility that produces nano-structured lithium titanate metal oxide powder. The first method involved off-line analysis of filter samples collected with conventional respirable samplers at each of seven locations (six near production processes and one outdoors). Throughout most of the facility and outdoors, respirable mass concentrations were low (<0.050 mg m−3) and were attributed to particles other than the nanomaterial (<10% by mass titanium determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). In contrast, in a single area with extensive material handling, mass concentrations were greatest (0.118 mg m−3) and contained up to 39% +/− 11% lithium titanium, indicating the presence of airborne nanomaterial. Analysis of the filter samples collected in this area by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed that the airborne nanomaterial was associated only with spherical aggregates (clusters of fused 10–80 nm nanoparticles) that were larger than 200 nm. This analysis also showed that nanoparticles in this area were the smallest particles of a larger distribution of submicrometer chain agglomerates likely from welding in an adjacent area of the facility. The second method used two, hand-held, direct-reading, battery-operated instruments to obtain a time series of very fine particle number (<300 nm), respirable mass, and total mass concentration, which were then related to activities within the area of extensive material handling. This activity-based monitoring showed that very fine particle number concentrations (<300 nm) had no apparent correlation to worker activities, but that sharp peaks in the respirable and total mass concentration coincided with loading a hopper and replacing nanomaterial collection bags. These findings were consistent with those from the filter-based method in that they

  6. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  7. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  8. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  9. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  10. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  11. HIERARCHIAL BAYESIAN CALIBRATION: AN APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies of the relationship between airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and health, researchers frequently use monitoring data with the most extensive temporal coverage. Such data may come from a monitor that is not a federal reference monitor (FRM), a monitor that is d...

  12. Source Identification Of Airborne Antimony On The Basis Of The Field Monitoring And The Source Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, A.; Sato, K.; Fujitani, Y.; Fujimori, E.; Tanabe, K.; Ohara, T.; Shimoda, M.; Kozawa, K.; Furuta, N.

    2008-12-01

    The results of the long-term monitoring of airborne particulate matter (APM) in Tokyo indicated that APM have been extremely enriched with antimony (Sb) compared to crustal composition. This observation suggests that the airborne Sb is distinctly derived from human activities. According to the material flow analysis, automotive brake abrasion dust and fly ash from waste incinerator were suspected as the significant Sb sources. To clarify the emission sources of the airborne Sb, elemental composition, particle size distribution, and morphological profiles of dust particles collected from two possible emission sources were characterized and compared to the field observation data. Brake abrasion dust samples were generated by using a brake dynamometer. During the abrasion test, particle size distribution was measured by an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer. Concurrently, size- classified dust particles were collected by an Andersen type air sampler. Fly ash samples were collected from several municipal waste incinerators, and the bulk ash samples were re-dispersed into an enclosed chamber. The measurement of particle size distribution and the collection of size-classified ash particles were conducted by the same methodologies as described previously. Field observations of APM were performed at a roadside site and a residential site by using an Andersen type air sampler. Chemical analyses of metallic elements were performed by an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometr. Morphological profiling of the individual particle was conducted by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. High concentration of Sb was detected from both of two possible sources. Particularly, Sb concentrations in a brake abrasion dust were extremely high compared to that in an ambient APM, suggesting that airborne Sb observed at the roadside might have been largely derived from

  13. Space and time resolved monitoring of airborne particulate matter in proximity of a traffic roundabout in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Kai E; Lundkvist, Johanna; Netrval, Julia; Eriksson, Mats; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A; Kessler, Vadim G

    2013-11-01

    Concerns over exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) are on the rise. Currently monitoring of PM is done on the basis of interpolating a mass of PM by volume (μg/m(3)) but has the drawback of not taking the chemical nature of PM into account. Here we propose a method of collecting PM at its emission source and employing automated analysis with scanning electron microscopy associated with EDS-analysis together with light scattering to discern the chemical composition, size distribution, and time and space resolved structure of PM emissions in a heavily trafficated roundabout in Sweden. Multivariate methods (PCA, ANOVA) indicate that the technogenic marker Fe follows roadside dust in spreading from the road, and depending on time and location of collection, a statistically significant difference can be seen, adding a useful tool to the repertoiré of detailed PM monitoring and risk assessment of local emission sources.

  14. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations... furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any EAF equipped with a DEC system...

  15. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations... furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any EAF equipped with a DEC system...

  16. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic...

  17. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic...

  18. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic...

  19. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic...

  20. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic...

  1. Feasibility of airborne detection of laser-induced fluorescence emissions from green terrestrial plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Yungel, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation provides a demonstration of the feasibility of the airborne detection of the laser-induced fluorescence spectral emissions from living terrestrial grasses, shrubs, and trees using existing levels of lidar technology. Airborne studies were performed to ascertain system requirements necessary to detect laser-induced fluorescence from living terrestrial plants, to assess the practical acquisition of useful single-shot laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) waveforms over vegetative canopies, and to determine the comparative suitability of laser system, airborne platform, and terrestrial environmental parameters. The field experiment was conducted on May 3, 1982, over the northern portion of Wallops Island, VA. Attention is given to airborne lidar results and the description of laboratory investigations.

  2. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    The current status of microwave radiometry is provided. The fundamentals of the microwave radiometer are reviewed with particular reference to airborne operations, and the interpretative procedures normally used for the modeling of the apparent temperature are presented. Airborne microwave radiometer measurements were made over selected flight lines in Chickasha, Oklahoma and Weslaco, Texas. Extensive ground measurements of soil moisture were made in support of the aircraft mission over the two locations. In addition, laboratory determination of the complex permittivities of soil samples taken from the flight lines were made with varying moisture contents. The data were analyzed to determine the degree of correlation between measured apparent temperatures and soil moisture content.

  3. Investigating seasonal methane emissions in Northern California using airborne measurements and inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Xi, Xin; Jeong, Seongeun; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Loewenstein, Max; Tadić, Jovan M.; Fischer, Marc L.

    2016-11-01

    Seasonal methane (CH4) emissions in Northern California are evaluated during this study by using airborne measurement data and inverse model simulations. This research applies Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements obtained during January-February 2013, July 2014, and October-November 2014 over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in order to constrain seasonal CH4 emissions in Northern California. The California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) a priori emission inventory was applied in conjunction with the Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model and inverse modeling techniques to optimize CH4 emissions. Comparing model-predicted CH4 mixing ratios with airborne measurements, we find substantial underestimates suggesting that CH4 emissions were likely larger than the year 2008 a priori CALGEM emission inventory in Northern California. Using AJAX measurements to optimize a priori emissions resulted in CH4 flux estimates from the SFBA/SJV of 1.77 ± 0.41, 0.83 ± 0.31, and 1.06 ± 0.39 Tg yr-1 when using winter, summer, and fall flight data, respectively. Averaging seasonal a posteriori emission estimates (weighted by posterior uncertainties) results in SFBA/SJV annual CH4 emissions of 1.28 ± 0.38 Tg yr-1. A posteriori uncertainties are reduced more effectively in the SFBA/SJV region compared to state-wide values indicating that the airborne measurements are most sensitive to emissions in this region. A posteriori estimates during this study suggest that dairy livestock was the source with the largest increase relative to the a priori CALGEM emission inventory during all seasons.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardenheier, R.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques of acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials is described. It is highly sensitive, quasi-nondestructive testing method that indicates the origin and behavior of flaws in such materials when submitted to different load exposures. With the use of sophisticated signal analysis methods it is possible the distinguish between different types of failure mechanisms, such as fiber fracture delamination or fiber pull-out. Imperfections can be detected while monitoring complex composite structures by acoustic emission measurements.

  5. Indoor emissions as a primary source of airborne allergenic fungal particles in classrooms.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Hospodsky, Denina; Dannemiller, Karen C; Nazaroff, William W; Peccia, Jordan

    2015-04-21

    This study quantifies the influence of ventilation and indoor emissions on concentrations and particle sizes of airborne indoor allergenic fungal taxa and further examines geographical variability, each of which may affect personal exposures to allergenic fungi. Quantitative PCR and multiplexed DNA sequencing were employed to count and identify allergenic fungal aerosol particles indoors and outdoors in seven school classrooms in four different countries. Quantitative diversity analysis was combined with building characterization and mass balance modeling to apportion source contributions of indoor allergenic airborne fungal particles. Mass balance calculations indicate that 70% of indoor fungal aerosol particles and 80% of airborne allergenic fungal taxa were associated with indoor emissions; on average, 81% of allergenic fungi from indoor sources originated from occupant-generated emissions. Principal coordinate analysis revealed geographical variations in fungal communities among sites in China, Europe, and North America (p < 0.05, analysis of similarity), demonstrating that geography may also affect personal exposures to allergenic fungi. Indoor emissions including those released with occupancy contribute more substantially to allergenic fungal exposures in classrooms sampled than do outdoor contributions from ventilation. The results suggest that design and maintenance of buildings to control indoor emissions may enable reduced indoor inhalation exposures to fungal allergens.

  6. Inventory of PCBs in Chicago and Opportunities for Reduction in Airborne Emissions and Human Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Caitlin E; Spak, Scott N; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2015-12-01

    Urban areas are important regional sources of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and population-scale airborne exposure, yet a comprehensive bottom-up source inventory of PCB emissions has never been quantified at urban scales in the United States. Here we report a comprehensive parcel level inventory of PCB stocks and emissions for Chicago, Illinois, developed with a transferable method from publicly available data. Chicago's legacy stocks hold 276 ± 147 tonnes ∑PCBs, with 0.2 tonnes added annually. Transformers and building sealants represent the largest legacy categories at 250 and 20 tonnes, respectively. From these stocks, annual emissions rates of 203 kg for ∑PCBs and 3 kg for PCB 11 explain observed concentrations in Chicago air. Sewage sludge drying contributes 25% to emissions, soils 31%, and transformers 21%. Known contaminated sites account for <1% of stocks and 17% of emissions to air. Paint is responsible for 0.00001% of stocks but up to 7% of ∑PCBs emissions. Stocks and emissions are highly concentrated and not correlated with population density or demographics at the neighborhood scale. Results suggest that strategies to further reduce exposure and ecosystem deposition must focus on the largest emissions sources rather than the most contaminated sites or the largest closed source legacy stocks.

  7. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:26437413

  8. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge.

  9. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Potential Impact Categories for Radiological Air Emission Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2012-06-05

    In 2002, the EPA amended 40 CFR 61 Subpart H and 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 to include requirements from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities for major emission points. Additionally, the WDOH amended the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 Radiation protection-air emissions to include ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements for major and minor emission points when new permitting actions are approved. A result of the amended regulations is the requirement to prepare a written technical basis for the radiological air emission sampling and monitoring program. A key component of the technical basis is the Potential Impact Category (PIC) assigned to an emission point. This paper discusses the PIC assignments for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Integrated Laboratory emission units; this revision includes five PIC categories.

  10. Airborne reduced nitrogen: ammonia emissions from agriculture and other sources.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Natalie; Strader, Ross; Davidson, Cliff

    2003-06-01

    Ammonia is a basic gas and one of the most abundant nitrogen-containing compounds in the atmosphere. When emitted, ammonia reacts with oxides of nitrogen and sulfur to form particles, typically in the fine particle size range. Roughly half of the PM(2.5) mass in eastern United States is ammonium sulfate, according to the US EPA. Results from recent studies of PM(2.5) show that these fine particles are typically deposited deep in the lungs and may lead to increased morbidity and/or mortality. Also, these particles are in the size range that will degrade visibility. Ammonia emission inventories are usually constructed by multiplying an activity level by an experimentally determined emission factor for each source category. Typical sources of ammonia include livestock, fertilizer, soils, forest fires and slash burning, industry, vehicles, the oceans, humans, pets, wild animals, and waste disposal and recycling activities. Livestock is the largest source category in the United States, with waste from livestock responsible for about 3x10(9) kg of ammonia in 1995. Volatilization of ammonia from livestock waste is dependent on many parameters, and thus emission factors are difficult to predict. Despite a seasonal variation in these values, the emission factors for general livestock categories are usually annually averaged in current inventories. Activity levels for livestock are from the USDA Census of Agriculture, which does not give information about animal raising practices such as housing types and grazing times, waste handling systems, and approximate animal slurry spreading times or methods. Ammonia emissions in the United States in 1995 from sources other than livestock are much lower; for example, annual emissions are roughly 8x10(8) kg from fertilizer, 7x10(7) kg from industry, 5x10(7) kg from vehicles and 1x10(8) kg from humans. There is considerable uncertainty in the emissions from soil and vegetation, although this category may also be significant

  11. Airborne interferometer for atmospheric emission and solar absorption.

    PubMed

    Keith, D W; Dykema, J A; Hu, H; Lapson, L; Anderson, J G

    2001-10-20

    The interferometer for emission and solar absorption (INTESA) is an infrared spectrometer designed to study radiative transfer in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from a NASA ER-2 aircraft. The Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) operates from 0.7 to 50 mum with a resolution of 0.7 cm(-1). The FTS observes atmospheric thermal emission from multiple angles above and below the aircraft. A heliostat permits measurement of solar absorption spectra. INTESA's calibration system includes three blackbodies to permit in-flight assessment of radiometric error. Results suggest that the in-flight radiometric accuracy is ~0.5 K in the mid-infrared.

  12. Use of Airborne Thermal Imagery to Detect and Monitor Inshore Oil Spill Residues During Darkness Hours.

    PubMed

    GRIERSON

    1998-11-01

    / Trials were conducted using an airborne video system operating in the visible, near-infrared, and thermal wavelengths to detect two known oil spill releases during darkness at a distance of 10 nautical miles from the shore in St. Vincent's Gulf, South Australia. The oil spills consisted of two 20-liter samples released at 2-h intervals, one sample consisted of paraffinic neutral material and the other of automotive diesel oil. A tracking buoy was sent overboard in conjunction with the release of sample 1, and its movement monitored by satellite relay. Both oil residues were overflown by a light aircraft equipped with thermal, visible, and infrared imagers at a period of approximately 1 h after the release of the second oil residue. Trajectories of the oil residue releases were also modeled and the results compared to those obtained by the airborne video and the tracking buoy. Airborne imagery in the thermal wavelengths successfully located and mapped both oil residue samples during nighttime conditions. Results from the trial suggest that the most advantageous technique would be the combined use of the tracking beacon to obtain an approximate location of the oil spill and the airborne imagery to ascertain its extent and characteristics.KEY WORDS: Airborne video; Thermal imagery; Global positioning; Oil-spill monitoring; Tracking beacon

  13. Monitoring radioactive plumes by airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Grasty, R.L.; Hovgaard, J.; Multala, J.

    1996-06-01

    Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer surveys using large volume sodium-iodide detectors are routinely flown throughout the world for mineral exploration and geological mapping. Techniques have now been developed to detect and map man-made sources of radiation. In Canada, airborne gamma-rays surveys have been flown around nuclear reactors to map {sup 41}Ar plumes from nuclear reactors and to calculate the dose rate at ground level. In May 1986, the Finnish Geological survey aircraft flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. As the aircraft flew through the plume, the aircraft became increasingly contaminated. By measuring the final aircraft contamination, the activity of the plume could be separated from the contamination due to the aircraft. Within 1 h of encountering the plume, the aircraft activity was comparable to the maximum levels found in the plume. From an analysis of the gamma-ray spectra, the concentration of {sup 131}I and {sup 140}La within the plume were calculated as a function of time.

  14. Use of experimental airborne infections for monitoring altered host defenses.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, D E

    1982-01-01

    The success or failure of the respiratory system to defend itself against airborne infectious agents largely depends upon the efficiency of the pulmonary defenses to maintain sterility and to dispose of unwanted substances. Both specific and nonspecific host defenses cooperate in the removal and inactivation of such agents. Several studies have shown that these defenses are vulnerable to a wide range of environmental agents and that there is a good relationship between exposure to pollutant and the impaired resistance to pulmonary disease. There are numerous immunological, biochemical and physiological techniques that are routinely used to identify and to characterize individual impairments of these defenses. Based on these effects, various hypotheses are proposed as to what health consequences could be expected from these effects. The ultimate test is whether the host, with its compromised defense mechanisms, is still capable of sustaining the total injury and continuing to defend itself against opportunistic pathogens. This paper describes the use of an experimental airborne infectious disease model capable of predicting subtle changes in host defenses at concentrations below which there are any other overt toxicological effects. Such sensitivity is possible because the model measure not just a single "health" parameter, but instead is capable of reflecting the total responses caused by the test chemical. Images FIGURE 3. PMID:7060549

  15. Development of an airborne hydrocarbon monitoring system based on FTIR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Mattson, Carl B.; Schwindt, Chris J.

    1998-10-01

    The capability to monitor airborne hydrocarbon compounds is essential in order to protect sensitive optical payloads from performance degradation caused by the deposition of surface films. Commonly used hydrocarbon monitoring instrumentation such as flame ionization detectors yield no information about the source or identity of compounds they detect. The Fourier Transform IR Spectrometer (FTIR) with its inherent ability to discriminate a large number of compounds offers a tremendous advantage over other types of instrumentation. The contamination monitoring laboratory at John F. Kennedy Space Center has developed an airborne hydrocarbon monitoring system based on FTIR technology to support the AXAF payload. This system consist of a portable cart suitable for use in Class 1 Division 2 environments. This paper describes the system in detail.

  16. How Cities Breathe: Ground-Referenced, Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Precursor Measurements To Space-Based Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David; Quattrochi, Dale; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John

    2013-01-01

    Methane's (CH4) large global warming potential (Shindell et al., 2012) and likely increasing future emissions due to global warming feedbacks emphasize its importance to anthropogenic greenhouse warming (IPCC, 2007). Furthermore, CH4 regulation has far greater near-term climate change mitigation potential versus carbon dioxide CO2, the other major anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) (Shindell et al., 2009). Uncertainties in CH4 budgets arise from the poor state of knowledge of CH4 sources - in part from a lack of sufficiently accurate assessments of the temporal and spatial emissions and controlling factors of highly variable anthropogenic and natural CH4 surface fluxes (IPCC, 2007) and the lack of global-scale (satellite) data at sufficiently high spatial resolution to resolve sources. Many important methane (and other trace gases) sources arise from urban and mega-urban landscapes where anthropogenic activities are centered - most of humanity lives in urban areas. Studying these complex landscape tapestries is challenged by a wide and varied range of activities at small spatial scale, and difficulty in obtaining up-to-date landuse data in the developed world - a key desire of policy makers towards development of effective regulations. In the developing world, challenges are multiplied with additional political access challenges. As high spatial resolution satellite and airborne data has become available, activity mapping applications have blossomed - i.e., Google maps; however, tap a minute fraction of remote sensing capabilities due to limited (three band) spectral information. Next generation approaches that incorporate high spatial resolution hyperspectral and ultraspectral data will allow detangling of the highly heterogeneous usage megacity patterns by providing diagnostic identification of chemical composition from solids (refs) to gases (refs). To properly enable these next generation technologies for megacity include atmospheric radiative transfer modeling

  17. Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, Michael; Allen, Shannon P.; Archuleta, Debra C.; Brock, Burgandy; Coronado, Melissa A.; Dewart, Jean M.; Eisele, William F. Jr.; Fuehne, David P.; Gadd, Milan S.; Green, Andrew A.; Lujan, Joan J.; MacDonell, Carolyn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-12

    In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

  18. Detection of Unexploded Ordnance Using Airborne LWIR Emissivity Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-25

    glass and wood , are spectrally distinct and would not appear as false alarms. Index Terms— Hyperspectral, Long Wave Infrared, Emissivity, Target...potential false alarms. They included materials made of rubber, cardboard, metal, wood , glass and plastic (Figure 1). 2.2. Laboratory LWIR signature...glass and (c) wood pieces. The upper row displays the pixels that were detected while the lower row displays the intensity of the detection. The

  19. Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data compilation and reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, S.A.; Thomas, S.P.

    1994-02-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling data from radioactie aiborne emissions. These data will be reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants , ``Subpart H, ``National Emissions Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities`` (EPA 1989a). Reporting to US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1988a).

  20. Airborne 131I at a background monitoring site.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E; Fielman, Eileen M; Fielman, Steven E; Gillen, Elizabeth A

    2005-01-01

    As part of an environmental surveillance program, measurements of 131I in samples of atmospheric aerosols were determined in week-long collection periods at 0.3 km and 1.5 km from a municipal-sewage sludge incinerator located in Albany, New York. During an 11-month period when the sampler was temporarily located near the incinerator, sampling canisters of activated charcoal nearly always contained detectable airborne 131I activity (range of 0.1-6.0 mBq m(-3)). In contrast, remote concentrations where the sample was normally located were near or below analytical detection limits, both before and after the 11-month relocation. Activities of wet and dry fallout at both locations were below detection limits. The source of 131I in the aerosols associated with the sewage sludge was likely excreta from patients following medical treatments at local hospitals.

  1. Monitoring land use and degradation using satellite and airborne data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Thomas G.; Blom, Ronald G.; Crippen, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    In July 1990 AVIRIS and AIRSAR data were collected over the Manix Basin Area of the Mojave Desert to study land degradation in an arid area where centerpivot irrigation had been in use. The Manix Basin is located NE of Barstow, California, along Interstate-15 at 34 deg 57 min N 116 deg 35 min W. This region was covered by a series of lakes during the Late Pleistocence and Early Holocene. Beginning in the 1960's, areas were cleared of the native creosote bush-dominated plant community to be used for agricultural purposes. Starting in 1972 fields have been abandoned due to the increased cost of electricity needed to pump the irrigation water, with some fields abandoned as recently as 1988 and 1992. These circumstances provide a time series of abandoned fields which provide the possibility of studying the processes which act on agricultural fields in arid regions when they are abandoned. Ray et al. reported that polarimetric SAR (AIRSAR) could detect that the concentric circular planting furrows plowed on these fields persists for a few years after abandonment and then disappear over time and that wind ripples which form on these fields over time due to wind erosion can be detected with polarimetric radar. Ray et al. used Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) bandpasses to generate NDVI images of the Manix Basin which showed that the fields abandoned for only a few years had higher NDVI's than the undisturbed desert while the fields abandoned for a longer time had NDVI levels lower than that of the undisturbed desert. The purpose of this study is to use a fusion of a time series of satellite data with airborne data to provide a context for the airborne data. The satellite data time series will additionally help to validate the observation and analysis of time-dependent processes observed in the single AVIRIS image of fields abandoned for different periods of time.

  2. Airborne observations of vegetation and implications for biogenic emission characterization.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Amy K; Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Daniel, John S; Langford, Andrew O; Miller, H LeRoy; Eubank, Charles S; Goldan, Paul; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Atlas, Elliot; Hansel, Armin; Wisthaler, Armin

    2003-12-01

    Measuring hydrocarbons from aircraft represents one way to infer biogenic emissions at the surface. The focus of this paper is to show that complementary remote sensing information can be provided by optical measurements of a vegetation index, which is readily measured with high temporal coverage using reflectance data. We examine the similarities between the vegetation index and in situ measurements of the chemicals isoprene, methacrolein, and alpha-pinene to estimate whether the temporal behavior of the in situ measurements of these chemicals could be better understood by the addition of the vegetation index. Data were compared for flights conducted around Houston in August and September 2000. The three independent sets of chemical measurements examined correspond reasonably well with the vegetation index curves for the majority of flight days. While low values of the vegetation index always correspond to low values of the in situ chemical measurements, high values of the index correspond to both high and low values of the chemical measurements. In this sense it represents an upper limit when compared with in situ data (assuming the calibration constant is adequately chosen). This result suggests that while the vegetation index cannot represent a purely predictive quantity for the in situ measurements, it represents a complementary measurement that can be useful in understanding comparisons of various in situ observations, particularly when these observations occur with relatively low temporal frequency. In situ isoprene measurements and the vegetation index were also compared to an isoprene emission inventory to provide additional insight on broad issues relating to the use of vegetation indices in emission database development.

  3. Sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Amaro, C.R.

    1992-07-01

    Results of measurements of the sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu are presented. Four commercially available alpha CAMs (Kurz model 8311, Merlin Gerin Edgar, RADeCO model 452, and Victoreen model 758) and a prototype alpha CAM currently in use at Argonne National Laboratory- West (ANL-W) were tested sampling natural ambient air and laboratory-generated atmospheres laden with either blank dust or dust containing nCi/g concentrations of {sup 239}Pu. Cumulative alpha spectra were stored at 30 or 60 minute intervals during each sampling and were subsequently analyzed using three different commonly used alpha spectrum analysis algorithms. The effect of airborne dust concentration and sample filter porosity on detector resolution and sensitivity for airborne {sup 239}Pu are described.

  4. Sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors for detection of airborne sup 239 Pu

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Amaro, C.R.

    1992-07-01

    Results of measurements of the sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu are presented. Four commercially available alpha CAMs (Kurz model 8311, Merlin Gerin Edgar, RADeCO model 452, and Victoreen model 758) and a prototype alpha CAM currently in use at Argonne National Laboratory- West (ANL-W) were tested sampling natural ambient air and laboratory-generated atmospheres laden with either blank dust or dust containing nCi/g concentrations of {sup 239}Pu. Cumulative alpha spectra were stored at 30 or 60 minute intervals during each sampling and were subsequently analyzed using three different commonly used alpha spectrum analysis algorithms. The effect of airborne dust concentration and sample filter porosity on detector resolution and sensitivity for airborne {sup 239}Pu are described.

  5. Airborne radionuclides of concern and their measurement in monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.W.; Miley, H.S.; Hensley, W.K.; Abel, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting radioanalytical developmental programs with the goal of providing near-real-time analysis technology for airborne signature radionuclides which are indicative of a nuclear weapons test in any of the earth`s environments. If a test were conducted in the atmosphere or above the atmosphere, then the full spectrum of fission and activation products, together with residues from the device would be dispersed in the atmosphere. However, if a nuclear test were conducted underground or under water, the emission could range from a major to a very minor vent, and the material released would likely consist mainly of noble gas radionuclides and the radioiodines. Since many of the noble gases decay to form particulate radionuclides, these may serve as the more sensitive signatures. For example, Ba-140 is a daughter of Xe-140 (13.6 s), and Cs-137 is a daughter of Xe-137 (3.82 min). Both of these have been observed in large amounts relative to other fission products in dynamic venting of U.S. underground nuclear detonations. Large amounts of radionuclides are produced from even a comparatively small nuclear detonation. For example, a 10-KT fission device will produce approximately a megacurie of Ba-140 and of several other radionuclides with half-lives of days to weeks. If such a device were detonated in the atmosphere at midlatitude, it would easily be observable at downwind monitoring sites during its first and subsequent circumnavigations of the earth. Efficient and practical methods for the near-real-time analysis of both particulate and gaseous radionuclides are important to an effective monitoring and attribution program in support of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT); methods for this purpose are being pursued.

  6. Evaluation of Airborne Particle Emissions from Commercial Products Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guannan; Park, Jae Hong; Cena, Lorenzo G.; Shelton, Betsy L.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    The emission of the airborne particles from epoxy resin test sticks with different CNT loadings and two commercial products were characterized while sanding with three grit sizes and three disc sander speeds. The total number concentrations, respirable mass concentrations, and particle size number/mass distributions of the emitted particles were measured using a condensation particle counter, an optical particle counter, and a scanning mobility particle sizer. The emitted particles were sampled on a polycarbonate filter and analyzed using electron microscopy. The highest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 4670 particles/cm3) were produced with coarse sandpaper, 2% (by weight) CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed, whereas the lowest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 92 particles/cm3) were produced with medium sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and slow disc sander speed. Respirable mass concentrations were highest (arithmetic mean = 1.01 mg/m3) for fine sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed and lowest (arithmetic mean = 0.20 mg/m3) for medium sandpaper, 0% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed. For CNT-epoxy samples, airborne particles were primarily micrometer-sized epoxy cores with CNT protrusions. No free CNTs were observed in airborne samples, except for tests conducted with 4% CNT epoxy. The number concentration, mass concentration, and size distribution of airborne particles generated when products containing CNTs are sanded depends on the conditions of sanding and the characteristics of the material being sanded. PMID:23204914

  7. Evaluation of Airborne Particle Emissions from Commercial Products Containing Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guannan; Park, Jae Hong; Cena, Lorenzo G; Shelton, Betsy L; Peters, Thomas M

    2012-10-01

    The emission of the airborne particles from epoxy resin test sticks with different CNT loadings and two commercial products were characterized while sanding with three grit sizes and three disc sander speeds. The total number concentrations, respirable mass concentrations, and particle size number/mass distributions of the emitted particles were measured using a condensation particle counter, an optical particle counter, and a scanning mobility particle sizer. The emitted particles were sampled on a polycarbonate filter and analyzed using electron microscopy. The highest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 4670 particles/cm(3)) were produced with coarse sandpaper, 2% (by weight) CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed, whereas the lowest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 92 particles/cm(3)) were produced with medium sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and slow disc sander speed. Respirable mass concentrations were highest (arithmetic mean = 1.01 mg/m(3)) for fine sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed and lowest (arithmetic mean = 0.20 mg/m(3)) for medium sandpaper, 0% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed. For CNT-epoxy samples, airborne particles were primarily micrometer-sized epoxy cores with CNT protrusions. No free CNTs were observed in airborne samples, except for tests conducted with 4% CNT epoxy. The number concentration, mass concentration, and size distribution of airborne particles generated when products containing CNTs are sanded depends on the conditions of sanding and the characteristics of the material being sanded.

  8. Diacetyl emissions and airborne dust from butter flavorings used in microwave popcorn production.

    PubMed

    Boylstein, Randy; Piacitelli, Chris; Grote, Ardith; Kanwal, Richard; Kullman, Greg; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2006-10-01

    In microwave popcorn workers, exposure to butter flavorings has been associated with fixed obstructive lung disease resembling bronchiolitis obliterans. Inhalation toxicology studies have shown severe respiratory effects in rats exposed to vapors from a paste butter flavoring, and to diacetyl, a diketone found in most butter flavorings. To gain a better understanding of worker exposures, we assessed diacetyl emissions and airborne dust levels from butter flavorings used by several microwave popcorn manufacturing companies. We heated bulk samples of 40 different butter flavorings (liquids, pastes, and powders) to approximately 50 degrees C and used gas chromatography, with a mass selective detector, to measure the relative abundance of volatile organic compounds emitted. Air sampling was conducted for diacetyl and for total and respirable dust during the mixing of powder, liquid, or paste flavorings with heated soybean oil at a microwave popcorn plant. To further examine the potential for respiratory exposures to powders, we measured dust generated during different simulated methods of manual handling of several powder butter flavorings. Powder flavorings were found to give off much lower diacetyl emissions than pastes or liquids. The mean diacetyl emissions from liquids and pastes were 64 and 26 times larger, respectively, than the mean of diacetyl emissions from powders. The median diacetyl emissions from liquids and pastes were 364 and 72 times larger, respectively, than the median of diacetyl emissions from powders. Fourteen of 16 powders had diacetyl emissions that were lower than the diacetyl emissions from any liquid flavoring and from most paste flavorings. However, simulated handling of powder flavorings showed that a substantial amount of the airborne dust generated was of respirable size and could thus pose its own respiratory hazard. Companies that use butter flavorings should consider substituting flavorings with lower diacetyl emissions and the use of

  9. 76 FR 18415 - Continuous Emission Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 75 Continuous Emission Monitoring CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal... units. The owner or operator of an affected unit that combusts wood, refuse, or other material...

  10. Airborne laser ranging system for monitoring regional crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Alternate approaches for making the atmospheric correction without benefit of a ground-based meteorological network are discussed. These include (1) a two-color channel that determines the atmospheric correction by measuring the time delay induced by dispersion between pulses at two optical frequencies; (2) single-color range measurements supported by an onboard temperature sounder, pressure altimeter readings, and surface measurements by a few existing meteorological facilities; and (3) inclusion of the quadratic polynomial coefficients as variables to be solved for along with target coordinates in the reduction of the single-color range data. It is anticipated that the initial Airborne Laser Ranging System (ALRS) experiments will be carried out in Southern California in a region bounded by Santa Barbara on the norht and the Mexican border on the south. The target area will be bounded by the Pacific Ocean to the west and will extend eastward for approximately 400 km. The unique ability of the ALRS to provide a geodetic 'snapshot' of such a large area will make it a valuable geophysical tool.

  11. Ambient monitoring of airborne asbestos in non-occupational environments in Tehran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakooei, Hossein; Meshkani, Mohsen; Azam, Kamal

    2013-12-01

    Airborne asbestos fiber concentrations were monitored in the urban areas of Tehran, Iran during the period of 23 August to 21 September 2012. The airborne fiber concentrations of 110 air samples collected from 15 different sites in five regions of Tehran. The monitoring sites were located 2.5 m above ground nearby the main street and heavy traffic jam. The ambient air samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and phase-contrast optical microscopy (PCM). The geometric means of the airborne asbestos fiber concentrations in the outdoor living areas was 1.6 × 10-2 SEM f ml-1 (1.18 × 10-3 PCM f ml-1). This criteria is considerably higher than those reported for the levels of asbestos in outdoor living areas in the Europe and the non-occupational environment of the Korea. No clear correlation was found between asbestos fiber concentration and the relative humidity and temperature. The SEM and PLM analysis revealed that all samples examined contained only chrysotile asbestos. It can be concluded that several factor such as heavy traffic, cement sheet and pipe consumption of asbestos, and geographical conditions play an important role for the high airborne asbestos levels in the non-occupational environments.

  12. Airborne measurements of the atmospheric emissions from a fuel ethanol refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, J. A.; McKeen, S. A.; Aikin, K. C.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T.; Holloway, J. S.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Lerner, B. M.; Liao, J.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Min, K.-E.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wolfe, G. M.

    2015-05-01

    Ethanol made from corn now constitutes approximately 10% of the fuel used in gasoline vehicles in the U.S. The ethanol is produced in over 200 fuel ethanol refineries across the nation. We report airborne measurements downwind from Decatur, Illinois, where the third largest fuel ethanol refinery in the U.S. is located. Estimated emissions are compared with the total point source emissions in Decatur according to the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI-2011), in which the fuel ethanol refinery represents 68.0% of sulfur dioxide (SO2), 50.5% of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), 67.2% of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and 95.9% of ethanol emissions. Emissions of SO2 and NOx from Decatur agreed with NEI-2011, but emissions of several VOCs were underestimated by factors of 5 (total VOCs) to 30 (ethanol). By combining the NEI-2011 with fuel ethanol production numbers from the Renewable Fuels Association, we calculate emission intensities, defined as the emissions per ethanol mass produced. Emission intensities of SO2 and NOx are higher for plants that use coal as an energy source, including the refinery in Decatur. By comparing with fuel-based emission factors, we find that fuel ethanol refineries have lower NOx, similar VOC, and higher SO2 emissions than from the use of this fuel in vehicles. The VOC emissions from refining could be higher than from vehicles, if the underestimated emissions in NEI-2011 downwind from Decatur extend to other fuel ethanol refineries. Finally, chemical transformations of the emissions from Decatur were observed, including formation of new particles, nitric acid, peroxyacyl nitrates, aldehydes, ozone, and sulfate aerosol.

  13. Greenhouse gases and other airborne pollutants from household stoves in China: a database for emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Smith, K. R.; Ma, Y.; Ye, S.; Jiang, F.; Qi, W.; Liu, P.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, R. A.; Thorneloe, S. A.

    Emissions from household stoves, especially those using solid fuels, can contribute significantly to greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories and have adverse health impacts. Few data are available on emissions from the numerous types of cookstoves used in developing countries. We have systematically measured emissions from 56 fuel/stove combinations in India and China, a large fraction of the combinations in use world-wide. A database was generated containing emission factors of direct and indirect GHGs and other airborne pollutants such as CO 2, CO, CH 4, TNMHC, N 2O, SO 2, NO x, TSP, etc. In this paper, we report on the 28 fuel/stove combinations tested in China. Since fuel and stove parameters were measured simultaneously along with the emissions, the database allows construction of complete carbon balances and analyses of the trade-off of emissions per unit fuel mass and emissions per delivered energy. Results from the analyses show that the total emissions per unit delivered energy were substantially greater from burning the solid fuels than from burning the liquid or gaseous fuels, due to lower thermal and combustion efficiencies for solid-fuel/stove combinations. For a given biomass fuel type, increasing overall stove efficiency tends to increase emissions of products of incomplete combustion. Biomass fuels are typically burned with substantial production of non-CO 2 GHGs with greater radiative forcing, indicating that biomass fuels have the potential to produce net global warming commitments even when grown renewably.

  14. Precipitation correction of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data using monitoring profiles: methodology and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Motschka, Klaus; Slapansky, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Variations of soil moisture content caused by precipitation often complicate the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data. This is particularly the case in repeated surveys designed to monitor the change of near surface abundances of radioactive elements or in large and time-consuming surveys. To counter this precipitation effect we propose a correction method based on repeated survey flights over a monitoring profile. Assuming that the weather and the soil conditions at the monitoring profile are representative for the survey area, the weather dependent effect of soil moisture can be observed and sufficiently corrected.

  15. The development of airborne video system for monitoring of river environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Shigeya; Mizutani, Nobuyuki; Mizukami, Masumi; Koyano, Toshirou

    1996-11-01

    Recently, airborne videography is widely used by many monitoring for environmental resources, such as rivers, forests, ocean, and so on. Although airborne videography has a low resolution than aerial photographs, it can effectively reduce the cost of continuous monitoring of wide area. Furthermore video images can easily be processed with personal computer. This paper introduces an airborne video system for monitoring of Class A river environment. This system consists of two sub-systems. One is the data collection system that is composed of a video camera, a Global Positioning System(GPS) and a personal computer. This sub-system records information of rivers by video images and their corresponding location data. A GPS system is used for calculating location data and navigating the airplane to the destination of monitoring site. Other is a simplified digital video editing system. This system runs on a personal computer with Microsoft Windows 3.1. This system can also be used for management and planning of road environment, marine resources, forest resources and for prevention of disasters. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Traffic monitoring with serial images from airborne cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinartz, Peter; Lachaise, Marie; Schmeer, Elisabeth; Krauss, Thomas; Runge, Hartmut

    The classical means to measure traffic density and velocity depend on local measurements from induction loops and other on site instruments. This information does not give the whole picture of the two-dimensional traffic situation. In order to obtain precise knowledge about the traffic flow of a large area, only airborne cameras or cameras positioned at very high locations (towers, etc.) can provide an up-to-date image of all roads covered. The paper aims at showing the potential of using image time series from these cameras to derive traffic parameters on the basis of single car measurements. To be able to determine precise velocities and other parameters from an image time series, exact geocoding is one of the first requirements for the acquired image data. The methods presented here for determining several traffic parameters for single vehicles and vehicle groups involve recording and evaluating a number of digital or analog aerial images from high altitude and with a large total field of view. Visual and automatic methods for the interpretation of images are compared. It turns out that the recording frequency of the individual images should be at least 1/3 Hz (visual interpretation), but is preferably 3 Hz or more, especially for automatic vehicle tracking. The accuracy and potentials of the methods are analyzed and presented, as well as the usage of a digital road database for improving the tracking algorithm and for integrating the results for further traffic applications. Shortcomings of the methods are given as well as possible improvements regarding methodology and sensor platform.

  17. Airborne Ethane Observations in the Barnett Shale: Quantification of Ethane Flux and Attribution of Methane Emissions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mackenzie L; Kort, Eric A; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Herndon, Scott C; Yacovitch, Tara I

    2015-07-07

    We present high time resolution airborne ethane (C2H6) and methane (CH4) measurements made in March and October 2013 as part of the Barnett Coordinated Campaign over the Barnett Shale formation in Texas. Ethane fluxes are quantified using a downwind flight strategy, a first demonstration of this approach for C2H6. Additionally, ethane-to-methane emissions ratios (C2H6:CH4) of point sources were observationally determined from simultaneous airborne C2H6 and CH4 measurements during a survey flight over the source region. Distinct C2H6:CH4 × 100% molar ratios of 0.0%, 1.8%, and 9.6%, indicative of microbial, low-C2H6 fossil, and high-C2H6 fossil sources, respectively, emerged in observations over the emissions source region of the Barnett Shale. Ethane-to-methane correlations were used in conjunction with C2H6 and CH4 fluxes to quantify the fraction of CH4 emissions derived from fossil and microbial sources. On the basis of two analyses, we find 71-85% of the observed methane emissions quantified in the Barnett Shale are derived from fossil sources. The average ethane flux observed from the studied region of the Barnett Shale was 6.6 ± 0.2 × 10(3) kg hr(-1) and consistent across six days in spring and fall of 2013.

  18. Relating urban airborne particle concentrations to shipping using carbon based elemental emission ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Graham R.; Juwono, Alamsyah M.; Friend, Adrian J.; Cheung, Hing-Cho; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates a novel method for testing the hypothesis that variations in primary and secondary particle number concentration (PNC) in urban air are related to residual fuel oil combustion at a coastal port lying 30 km upwind, by examining the correlation between PNC and airborne particle composition signatures chosen for their sensitivity to the elemental contaminants present in residual fuel oil. Residual fuel oil combustion indicators were chosen by comparing the sensitivity of a range of concentration ratios to airborne emissions originating from the port. The most responsive were combinations of vanadium and sulphur concentration ([S], [V]) expressed as ratios with respect to black carbon concentration ([BC]). These correlated significantly with ship activity at the port and with the fraction of time during which the wind blew from the port. The average [V] when the wind was predominantly from the port was 0.52 ng m-3 (87%) higher than the average for all wind directions and 0.83 ng m-3 (280%) higher than that for the lowest vanadium yielding wind direction considered to approximate the natural background. Shipping was found to be the main source of V impacting urban air quality in Brisbane. However, contrary to the stated hypothesis, increases in PNC related measures did not correlate with ship emission indicators or ship traffic. Hence at this site ship emissions were not found to be a major contributor to PNC compared to other fossil fuel combustion sources such as road traffic, airport and refinery emissions.

  19. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Robert S.; Johnston, Joshua M.; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-01-01

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. PMID:27548174

  20. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert S; Johnston, Joshua M; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-08-18

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context.

  1. Acoustic-emission monitoring of steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, L. J.; Randall, R. L.; Hong, C.

    1982-04-01

    A method for the on-line detection of crack growth in steam turbine rotors based on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is discussed. A systematic study involving a number of tasks was performed to evaluate the potential for the detection and correct identification of crack growth AE signals during various turbine operating conditions. These included acoustic wave propagation and attenuation measurements, background noise characterization, laboratory rotor material tests, monitoring equipment optimization, dynamic stress analysis of the rotor under transient operation and on-line source location and signal characterization. No crack growth was detected during the monitoring periods but there was sufficient information from the combined tasks to estimate the flaw growth detectability during different operating conditions if it occurs. The experience also suggests that AE monitoring can be useful for diagnosis of other turbine problems such as blade rubbing, out-of-balance condition, bearing deterioration, lubricating oil contamination and perhaps boiler exfoliation and blade erosion.

  2. Airborne Dust Monitoring Activities at the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G.; McNamara, D.; Taylor, J.

    2002-12-01

    particles such as dust. Techniques effective for the monitoring of airborne dust are used operationally by NESDIS and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction at the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center, which monitors the presence of airborne volcanic ash, optically similar to airborne dust.

  3. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  4. Use of airborne thermal imagery to detect and monitor inshore oil spill residues during darkness hours

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, I.T.

    1998-11-01

    Trials were conducted using an airborne video system operating in the visible, near-infrared, and thermal wavelengths to detect two known oil spill releases during darkness at a distance of 10 nautical miles from the shore in St. Vincent`s Gulf, South Australia. The oil spills consisted of two 20-liter samples released at 2-h intervals, one sample consisted of paraffinic neutral material and the other of automotive diesel oil. A tracking buoy was sent overboard in conjunction with the release of sample 1, and its movement monitored by satellite relay. Both oil residues were overflown by a light aircraft equipped with thermal, visible, and infrared imagers at a period of approximately 1 h after the release of the second oil residue. Trajectories of the oil residue releases were also modeled and the results compared to those obtained by the airborne video and the tracking buoy. Airborne imagery in the thermal wavelengths successfully located and mapped both oil residue samples during nighttime conditions. Results from the trial suggest that the most advantageous technique would be the combined use of the tracking beacon to obtain an approximate location of the oil spill and the airborne imagery to ascertain its extent and characteristics.

  5. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bin; Miller, Scot M.; Kort, Eric A.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Daube, Bruce C.; Commane, Roisin; Angevine, Wayne M.; Ryerson, Tom B.; Trainer, Michael K.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Tian, Hanqin; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with a lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from the application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements in atmospheric concentration. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the agricultural heartland of California based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a new quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA WP-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in late spring 2010. We coupled the WRF (weather research and forecasting) model, a meso-scale meteorology model, with the STILT (stochastic time-inverted Lagrangian transport) model, a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, to link our in-situ airborne observations to surface emissions. We then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to optimize emission rates. Our results are consistent with the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. The spatial distribution of surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emission inventory (EDGAR 4.0). Our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California in May and June was 3 - 4 times larger than the annual mean given for the state by EDGAR and other inventories, indicating a strong seasonal variation. We estimated the statewide total annual emissions of N2O to be 0.042 ± 0.011 Tg N/year, roughly equivalent to inventory values if we account for seasonal variations using observations obtained in the midwestern United States. This state total N2O

  6. Passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from Oil Fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Thompson, David R.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Frankenberg, Christian; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Fladeland, Matthew; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2016-04-01

    detection limit. This opens new applications of airborne atmospheric remote sensing in the area of anthropogenic top-down emission monitoring as well as for atmospheric CH4 leakage monitoring during accidents like the Elgin blow-out (March 2012) in the North Sea or the recent Aliso Canyon gas leak incident (2015/2016) in California.

  7. Monitoring of airborne particulate matter at mountainous urban sites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Dutta, Tanushree; Park, Wha Me; Hong, Jong-Ki; Jung, Kweon; Brown, Richard J C

    2016-08-01

    Concentrations of various size fractions (TSP, PM10, PM2.5, and PM1.0) of particulate matter (PM) were measured at two mountainous sites, Buk Han (BH) and Gwan AK (GA), along with one ground reference site at Gwang Jin (GJ), located in Seoul, South Korea for the 4 years from 2010 to 2013. The daily average concentrations of TSP, PM10, PM2.5, and PM1.0 at BH were 47.9 ± 32.5, 37.0 ± 24.6, 20.6 ± 12.9, and 15.3 ± 9.53 μg m(-3), respectively. These values were slightly larger than those measured at GA while much lower than those measured at the reference site (GJ). Seasonal variations in PM concentrations were consistent across all locations with a relative increase in concentrations observed in spring and winter. Correlation analysis showed clear differences in PM concentrations between the mountainous sites and the reference site. Analysis of these PM concentrations indicated that the distribution of PM in the mountainous locations was affected by a number of manmade sources from nearby locations, including both traffic and industrial emissions.

  8. Small-angle light scattering by airborne particulates: Environnement S.A. continuous particulate monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Thaury, Claire; Mineau, Jean-Luc; Gaubicher, Bertrand

    2010-08-01

    Airborne particulate matter may have an effect on human health. It is therefore necessary to determine and control in real time the evolution of the concentration and mass of particulates in the ambient air. These parameters can be obtained using optical methods. We propose here a new instrument, 'CPM' (continuous particulate monitor), for the measurement of light scattered by ambient particulates at small angles. This geometry allows simultaneous and separate detections of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 fractions of airborne particulate matter, with no influence of their chemical nature and without using theoretical calculations. The ambient air is collected through a standard sampling head (PM10 inlet according to EN 12341, PM2.5 inlet according to EN 14907; or PM1, TSP inlets, standard US EPA inlets). The analysis of the first measurements demonstrates that this new instrument can detect, for each of the seven defined size ranges, real-time variations of particulate content in the ambient air. The measured concentrations (expressed in number per liter) can be converted into total mass concentrations (expressed in micrograms per cubic meter) of all fractions of airborne particulate matters sampled by the system. Periodic comparison with a beta-attenuation mass monitor (MP101M Beta Gauge Analyzer from Environnement S.A. company) allows the calculation of a calibration factor as a function of the mean particulate density that is used for this conversion. It is then possible to provide real-time relative variations of aerosol mass concentration.

  9. Alien plant monitoring with ultralight airborne imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Calviño-Cancela, María; Méndez-Rial, Roi; Reguera-Salgado, Javier; Martín-Herrero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of invasive plants requires a precise determination of their distribution. Remote sensing techniques constitute a promising alternative to field surveys and hyperspectral sensors (also known as imaging spectrometers, with a large number of spectral bands and high spectral resolution) are especially suitable when very similar categories are to be distinguished (e.g. plant species). A main priority in the development of this technology is to lower its cost and simplify its use, so that its demonstrated aptitude for many environmental applications can be truly realized. With this aim, we have developed a system for hyperspectral imaging (200 spectral bands in the 380-1000 nm range and circa 3 nm spectral resolution) operated on board ultralight aircraft (namely a gyrocopter), which allows a drastic reduction of the running costs and operational complexity of image acquisition, and also increases the spatial resolution of the images (circa 5-8 pixels/m(2) at circa 65 km/h and 300 m height). The detection system proved useful for the species tested (Acacia melanoxylon, Oxalis pes-caprae, and Carpobrotus aff. edulis and acinaciformis), with user's and producer's accuracy always exceeding 90%. The detection accuracy reported corresponds to patches down to 0.125 m(2) (50% of pixels 0.5 × 0.5 m in size), a very small size for many plant species, making it very effective for initial stages of invasive plant spread. In addition, its low operating costs, similar to those of a 4WD ground vehicle, facilitate frequent image acquisition. Acquired images constitute a permanent record of the status of the study area, with great amount of information that can be analyzed in the future for other purposes, thus greatly facilitating the monitoring of natural areas at detailed spatial and temporal scales for improved management.

  10. Alien Plant Monitoring with Ultralight Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Calviño-Cancela, María; Méndez-Rial, Roi; Reguera-Salgado, Javier; Martín-Herrero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of invasive plants requires a precise determination of their distribution. Remote sensing techniques constitute a promising alternative to field surveys and hyperspectral sensors (also known as imaging spectrometers, with a large number of spectral bands and high spectral resolution) are especially suitable when very similar categories are to be distinguished (e.g. plant species). A main priority in the development of this technology is to lower its cost and simplify its use, so that its demonstrated aptitude for many environmental applications can be truly realized. With this aim, we have developed a system for hyperspectral imaging (200 spectral bands in the 380–1000 nm range and circa 3 nm spectral resolution) operated on board ultralight aircraft (namely a gyrocopter), which allows a drastic reduction of the running costs and operational complexity of image acquisition, and also increases the spatial resolution of the images (circa 5–8 pixels/m2 at circa 65 km/h and 300 m height). The detection system proved useful for the species tested (Acacia melanoxylon, Oxalis pes-caprae, and Carpobrotus aff. edulis and acinaciformis), with user’s and producer’s accuracy always exceeding 90%. The detection accuracy reported corresponds to patches down to 0.125 m2 (50% of pixels 0.5×0.5 m in size), a very small size for many plant species, making it very effective for initial stages of invasive plant spread. In addition, its low operating costs, similar to those of a 4WD ground vehicle, facilitate frequent image acquisition. Acquired images constitute a permanent record of the status of the study area, with great amount of information that can be analyzed in the future for other purposes, thus greatly facilitating the monitoring of natural areas at detailed spatial and temporal scales for improved management. PMID:25010601

  11. Laboratory testing of airborne brake wear particle emissions using a dynamometer system under urban city driving cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, Hiroyuki; Oyama, Motoaki; Sasaki, Sousuke

    2016-04-01

    To measure driving-distance-based mass emission factors for airborne brake wear particulate matter (PM; i.e., brake wear particles) related to the non-asbestos organic friction of brake assembly materials (pads and lining), and to characterize the components of brake wear particles, a brake wear dynamometer with a constant-volume sampling system was developed. Only a limited number of studies have investigated brake emissions under urban city driving cycles that correspond to the tailpipe emission test (i.e., JC08 or JE05 mode of Japanese tailpipe emission test cycles). The tests were performed using two passenger cars and one middle-class truck. The observed airborne brake wear particle emissions ranged from 0.04 to 1.4 mg/km/vehicle for PM10 (particles up to 10 μm (in size), and from 0.04 to 1.2 mg/km/vehicle for PM2.5. The proportion of brake wear debris emitted as airborne brake wear particles was 2-21% of the mass of wear. Oxygenated carbonaceous components were included in the airborne PM but not in the original friction material, which indicates that changes in carbon composition occurred during the abrasion process. Furthermore, this study identified the key tracers of brake wear particles (e.g., Fe, Cu, Ba, and Sb) at emission levels comparable to traffic-related atmospheric environments.

  12. Experiment of monitoring thermal discharge drained from nuclear plant through airborne infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Difeng; Pan, Delu; Li, Ning

    2009-07-01

    The State Development and Planning Commission has approved nuclear power projects with the total capacity of 23,000 MW. The plants will be built in Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Guangdong, Shandong, Liaoning and Fujian Province before 2020. However, along with the nuclear power policy of accelerated development in our country, the quantity of nuclear plants and machine sets increases quickly. As a result the environment influence of thermal discharge will be a problem that can't be slid over. So evaluation of the environment influence and engineering simulation must be performed before station design and construction. Further more real-time monitoring of water temperature need to be arranged after fulfillment, reflecting variety of water temperature in time and provided to related managing department. Which will help to ensure the operation of nuclear plant would not result in excess environment breakage. At the end of 2007, an airborne thermal discharge monitoring experiment has been carried out by making use of MAMS, a marine multi-spectral scanner equipped on the China Marine Surveillance Force airplane. And experimental subject was sea area near Qin Shan nuclear plant. This paper introduces the related specification and function of MAMS instrument, and decrypts design and process of the airborne remote sensing experiment. Experiment showed that applying MAMS to monitoring thermal discharge is viable. The remote sensing on a base of thermal infrared monitoring technique told us that thermal discharge of Qin Shan nuclear plant was controlled in a small scope, never breaching national water quality standard.

  13. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, B.; Miller, S.; Kort, E. A.; Santoni, G. W.; Daube, B.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Andrews, A. E.; Nehrkorn, T.; Tian, H.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with an atmospheric lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements of atmospheric concentrations. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the Central Valley of California, based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA P-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in May and June, 2010. We coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model to STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) to link our in-situ observations to surface emissions, and then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to extract optimized emission rates from the inversion. Our results support the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. But the spatial distribution of derived surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emissions inventory (EDGAR 4.0), and our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California during the study period was 3 - 4 times larger than EDGAR and other inventories.

  14. The Ebb and Flow of Airborne Pathogens: Monitoring and Use in Disease Management Decisions.

    PubMed

    Mahaffee, Walter F; Stoll, Rob

    2016-05-01

    Perhaps the earliest form of monitoring the regional spread of plant disease was a group of growers gathering together at the market and discussing what they see in their crops. This type of reporting continues to this day through regional extension blogs, by crop consultants and more formal scouting of sentential plots in the IPM PIPE network (http://www.ipmpipe.org/). As our knowledge of plant disease epidemiology has increased, we have also increased our ability to detect and monitor the presence of pathogens and use this information to make management decisions in commercial production systems. The advent of phylogenetics, next-generation sequencing, and nucleic acid amplification technologies has allowed for development of sensitive and accurate assays for pathogen inoculum detection and quantification. The application of these tools is beginning to change how we manage diseases with airborne inoculum by allowing for the detection of pathogen movement instead of assuming it and by targeting management strategies to the early phases of the epidemic development when there is the greatest opportunity to reduce the rate of disease development. While there are numerous advantages to using data on inoculum presence to aid management decisions, there are limitations in what the data represent that are often unrecognized. In addition, our understanding of where and how to effectively monitor airborne inoculum is limited. There is a strong need to improve our knowledge of the mechanisms that influence inoculum dispersion across scales as particles move from leaf to leaf, and everything in between.

  15. Tropospheric emissions: monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2013-09-01

    TEMPO was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch circa 2018. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (~2 km N/S×4.5 km E/W at 36.5°N, 100°W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the North American component of the global geostationary constellation of pollution monitoring together with European Sentinel-4 and Korean GEMS.

  16. Monitoring hydraulic fracturing with seismic emission volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Tang, Y.; Chen, H.; TAO, K.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have made it possible to access the reservoirs that are not available for massive production in the past. Hydraulic fracturing is designed to enhance rock permeability and reservoir drainage through the creation of fracture networks. Microseismic monitoring has been proven to be an effective and valuable technology to image hydraulic fracture geometry. Based on data acquisition, seismic monitoring techniques have been divided into two categories: downhole and surface monitoring. Surface monitoring is challenging because of the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio of the raw data. We applied the techniques used in earthquake seismology and developed an integrated monitoring system for mapping hydraulic fractures. The system consists of 20 to 30 state-of-the-art broadband seismographs, which are generally about hundreds times more sensible than regular geophones. We have conducted two experiments in two basins with very different geology and formation mechanism in China. In each case, we observed clear microseismic events, which may correspond to the induced seismicity directly associated with fracturing and the triggered ones at pre-existing faults. However, the magnitude of these events is generally larger than magnitude -1, approximately one to two magnitudes larger than those detected by downhole instruments. Spectrum-frequency analysis of the continuous surface recordings indicated high seismic energy associated with injection stages. The seismic energy can be back-projected to a volume that surrounds each injection stage. Imaging seismic emission volume (SEV) appears to be an effective way to map the stimulated reservior volume, as well as natural fractures.

  17. 40 CFR 61.55 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for Mercury § 61.55 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Wastewater treatment plant sludge incineration and drying plants. All the sources for which mercury emissions exceed 1.6 kg (3.5 lb) per 24-hour....54, shall monitor mercury emissions at intervals of at least once per year by use of Method 105...

  18. 40 CFR 61.55 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Mercury § 61.55 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Wastewater treatment plant sludge incineration and drying plants. All the sources for which mercury emissions exceed 1.6 kg (3.5 lb) per 24-hour....54, shall monitor mercury emissions at intervals of at least once per year by use of Method 105...

  19. 40 CFR 60.703 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recovery device in the recovery system: (i) A condenser exit (product side) temperature monitoring device... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations... Processes § 60.703 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an affected...

  20. Ground and Airborne Aerosol Composition Measurements of California Coastal Chaparral Smoke Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, J. S.; Sorooshian, A.; Hersey, S. P.; Metcalf, A. R.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K.; Newman, S.; Akagi, S. K.; Taylor, J.; McMeeking, G.; Coe, H.; Tang, P.; Cocker, D. R., III; Yokelson, R. J.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfire smoke has large local to global pollution impacts. We present aerosol composition data from two fires in southern California. We measured organic aerosol (OA) of nascent and aged (4 h) smoke from the Williams Fire during the 2009 airborne San Luis Obispo Biomass Burning Campaign (SLOBB). The net ΔOA/ΔCO2 decreased by ~20%; however, positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the organic mass spectra supports two factors that enable the OA emissions to be separated into fresh and oxidized OA. The Δfresh BBOA/ΔCO2 had a steeper decline than the ΔOA/ΔCO2 consistent with outgassing of semi-voltile organic compounds (SVOCs) due to dilution, whereas the Δoxidized BBOA/ΔCO2 increased from its initial value, consist with formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We compare these fresh and oxidized mass spectral signatures, along with chaparral smoke samples measured in the Missoula Fire Lab, to ground-based aerosol measurements made during the Station Fire that occurred one month earlier than the Williams Fire during the Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory Campaign (PACO). Night and daytime aerosol smoke emissions were sampled for one week during the Station Fire. Daytime organic aerosol smoke emissions exhibited larger variability both in mass concentration and composition than nighttime smoke emissions. Both levoglucosan and potassium, known biomass burning tracers, were measured and had distinct time series, supporting diversity in the flaming vs. smoldering initial burning conditions. Similar to the Williams Fire, PMF of the Station Fire mass spectra also reveal two biomass burning factors, one that is less oxidized and correlates strongly with levoglucosan measurements and one that is heavily oxidized and correlates in time with the potassium signal. These two campaigns have allowed us to probe fresh and oxidized smoke in both night and daytime conditions, and PMF results have revealed that at least two emission factors are useful to

  1. Analyzing carbon dioxide and methane emissions in California using airborne measurements and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations have increased over the past decades and are linked to global temperature increases and climate change. These changes in climate have been suggested to have varying effects, and uncertain consequences, on agriculture, water supply, weather, sea-level rise, the economy, and energy. To counteract the trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations of GHGs, the state of California has passed the California Global Warming Act of 2006 (AB-32). This requires that by the year 2020, GHG (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4)) emissions will be reduced to 1990 levels. To quantify GHG fluxes, emission inventories are routinely compiled for the State of California (e.g., CH4 emissions from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) Project). The major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the state of California are: transportation, electricity production, oil and gas extraction, cement plants, agriculture, landfills/waste, livestock, and wetlands. However, uncertainties remain in these emission inventories because many factors contributing to these processes are poorly quantified. To alleviate these uncertainties, a synergistic approach of applying air-borne measurements and chemical transport modeling (CTM) efforts to provide a method of quantifying local and regional GHG emissions will be performed during this study. Additionally, in order to further understand the temporal and spatial distributions of GHG fluxes in California and the impact these species have on regional climate, CTM simulations of daily variations and seasonality of total column CO2 and CH4 will be analyzed. To assess the magnitude and spatial variation of GHG emissions and to identify local 'hot spots', airborne measurements of CH4 and CO2 were made by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in January and February 2013 during the Discover-AQ-CA study. High mixing ratios of GHGs were

  2. Tropospheric emissions: Monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Hilton, B. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Newchurch, M. J.; Carr, J. L.; Janz, S. J.; Andraschko, M. R.; Arola, A.; Baker, B. D.; Canova, B. P.; Chan Miller, C.; Cohen, R. C.; Davis, J. E.; Dussault, M. E.; Edwards, D. P.; Fishman, J.; Ghulam, A.; González Abad, G.; Grutter, M.; Herman, J. R.; Houck, J.; Jacob, D. J.; Joiner, J.; Kerridge, B. J.; Kim, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L.; Li, C.; Lindfors, A.; Martin, R. V.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C.; Natraj, V.; Neil, D. O.; Nowlan, C. R.; O`Sullivan, E. J.; Palmer, P. I.; Pierce, R. B.; Pippin, M. R.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Szykman, J. J.; Torres, O.; Veefkind, J. P.; Veihelmann, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Chance, K.

    2017-01-01

    TEMPO was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch between 2018 and 2021. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO observes from Mexico City, Cuba, and the Bahamas to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution ( 2.1 km N/S×4.4 km E/W at 36.5°N, 100°W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry, as well as contributing to carbon cycle knowledge. Measurements are made hourly from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability present in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry that are unobservable from current low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites that measure once per day. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), bromine monoxide (BrO), IO (iodine monoxide), water vapor, aerosols, cloud parameters, ultraviolet radiation, and foliage properties. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides these near-real-time air quality products that will be made publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the North American component of the global geostationary constellation of pollution monitoring

  3. Point source emissions mapping using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Andrew K.; Roberts, Dar A.; Dennison, Philip E.; Bradley, Eliza S.; Funk, Christopher C.

    2012-06-01

    The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) measures reflected solar radiation in the shortwave infrared and has been used to map methane (CH4) using both a radiative transfer technique [1] and a band ratio method [2]. However, these methods are best suited to water bodies with high sunglint and are not well suited for terrestrial scenes. In this study, a cluster-tuned matched filter algorithm originally developed by Funk et al. [3] for synthetic thermal infrared data was used for gas plume detection over more heterogeneous backgrounds. This approach permits mapping of CH4, CO2 (carbon dioxide), and N2O (nitrous oxide) trace gas emissions in multiple AVIRIS scenes for terrestrial and marine targets. At the Coal Oil Point marine seeps offshore of Santa Barbara, CA, strong CH4 anomalies were detected that closely resemble results obtained using the band ratio index. CO2 anomalies were mapped for a fossil-fuel power plant, while multiple N2O and CH4 anomalies were present at the Hyperion wastewater treatment facility in Los Angeles, CA. Nearby, smaller CH4 anomalies were also detected immediately downwind of hydrocarbon storage tanks and centered on a flaring stack at the Inglewood Gas Plant. Improving these detection methods might permit gas detection over large search areas, e.g. identifying fugitive CH4 emissions from damaged natural gas pipelines or hydraulic fracturing. Further, this technique could be applied to other trace gasses with distinct absorption features and to data from planned instruments such as AVIRISng, the NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP), and the visible-shortwave infrared (VSWIR) sensor on the proposed HyspIRI satellite.

  4. Potential Application of Airborne Passive Microwave Observations for Monitoring Inland Flooding Caused by Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Radley, C.D.; LaFontaine, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Inland flooding from tropical cyclones can be a significant factor in storm-related deaths in the United States and other countries. Information collected during NASA tropical cyclone field studies suggest surface water and flooding induced by tropical cyclone precipitation can be detected and therefore monitored using passive microwave airborne radiometers. In particular, the 10.7 GHz frequency of the NASA Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) flown on the NASA ER-2 has demonstrated high resolution detection of anomalous surface water and flooding in numerous situations. This presentation will highlight the analysis of three cases utilizing primarily satellite and airborne radiometer data. Radiometer data from the 1998 Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) are utilized to detect surface water during landfalling Hurricane Georges in both the Dominican Republic and Louisiana. A third case is landfalling Tropical Storm Gert in Eastern Mexico during the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment in 2005. AMPR data are compared to topographic data and vegetation indices to evaluate the significance of the surface water signature visible in the 10.7 GHz information. The results of this study suggest the benefit of an aircraft 10 GHz radiometer to provide real-time observations of surface water conditions as part of a multi-sensor flood monitoring network.

  5. Clean Air Markets - Part 75 Emissions Monitoring Policy Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about monitoring mass sulfur dioxide and mass carbon dioxide emissions, nitrogen oxide emission rate, and heat input by units affected by the Acid Rain Program and the Clean Air Interstate Rule.

  6. 40 CFR Part 75 Emissions Monitoring Policy Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provides guidance on the requirements of 40 CFR Part 75 through a series of questions and answers that can be used by units to monitor mass sulfur dioxide emissions, mass carbon dioxide emissions, nitrogen oxide rate and heat input.

  7. Temperature and emissivity separation and mineral mapping based on airborne TASI hyperspectral thermal infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Yan, Bokun; Dong, Xinfeng; Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Jingfa; Tian, Feng; Wang, Runsheng

    2015-08-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing (8-12 μm) (TIR) has great potential for geologic remote sensing studies. TIR has been successfully used for terrestrial and planetary geologic studies to map surface materials. However, the complexity of the physics and the lack of hyperspectral data make the studies under-investigated. A new generation of commercial hyperspectral infrared sensors, known as Thermal Airborne Spectrographic Imager (TASI), was used for image analysis and mineral mapping in this study. In this paper, a combined method integrating normalized emissivity method (NEM), ratio algorithm (RATIO) and maximum-minimum apparent emissivity difference (MMD), being applied in multispectral data, has been modified and used to determine whether this method is suitable for retrieving emissivity from TASI hyperspectral data. MODTRAN 4 has been used for the atmospheric correction. The retrieved emissivity spectra matched well with the field measured spectra except for bands 1, 2, and 32. Quartz, calcite, diopside/hedenbergite, hornblende and microcline have been mapped by the emissivity image. Mineral mapping results agree with the dominant minerals identified by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction and spectroscopic analyses of field samples. Both of the results indicated that the atmospheric correction method and the combined temperature-emissivitiy method are suitable for TASI image. Carbonate skarnization was first found in the study area by the spatial extent of diopside. Chemical analyses of the skarn samples determined that the Au content was 0.32-1.74 g/t, with an average Au content of 0.73 g/t. This information provides an important resource for prospecting for skarn type gold deposits. It is also suggested that TASI is suitable for prospect and deposit scale exploration.

  8. Geogenic Sources Strongly Contribute to the Mackenzie River Delta's Methane Emissions Derived From Airborne Flux Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, K.; Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Hartmann, J.; Sachs, T.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost-associated wetlands and thawing permafrost emit the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), either as a product of recent microbial activity in the active layer or taliks, or from deeper geogenic sources where pathways through the permafrost exist. Current emission estimates vary strongly between different models and there is still disagreement between bottom-up estimates from local field studies and top-down estimates from atmospheric measurements. We use airborne flux data from two campaigns in the Mackenzie River Delta, Canada, in July 2012 and 2013 to directly quantify permafrost CH4 emissions on the regional scale, to analyse the regional pattern of CH4 fluxes and to estimate the contribution of geogenic emissions to the overall CH4 budget of the delta. CH4 fluxes were calculated with a time-frequency resolved version of the eddy covariance technique, resulting in a gridded 100 m x 100 m resolution flux map within the footprints of the flight tracks. We distinguish geogenic gas seeps from biogenic sources by their strength and show that they contribute strongly to the annual CH4 budget of the delta. Our study provides the first estimate of annual CH4 release from the Mackenzie River Delta and the adjacent coastal plain. We show that one percent of the covered area contains the strongest geogenic seeps which contribute disproportionately to the annual emission estimate. Our results show that geogenic CH4 emissions might need more attention, especially in areas where permafrost is vulnerable to thawing sufficiently to create pathways for geogenic gas migration. The presented map can be used as a baseline for future CH4 flux studies in the Mackenzie River Delta.

  9. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David; Al-Saadi, Jay; Janz, Scott

    2015-01-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 percent. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will

  10. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-06-01

    TEMPO, selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest-cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 %. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well-proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement

  11. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.; Tempo Science Team

    2013-05-01

    TEMPO has been selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (Mexico City is measured at 1.6 km N/S by 4.5 km E/W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary

  12. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Janz, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    TEMPO is a proposed concept to measure pollution for greater North America using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (9 km2). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007

  13. Quantification of methane emission rates from coal mine ventilation shafts using airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krings, T.; Gerilowski, K.; Buchwitz, M.; Hartmann, J.; Sachs, T.; Erzinger, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of emissions of the greenhouse gas methane is essential for attributing the roles of anthropogenic activity and natural phenomena in global climate change. Our current measurement systems and networks, whilst having improved during the last decades, are deficient in many respects. For example, the emissions from localised and point sources such as landfills or fossil fuel exploration sites are not readily assessed. A tool developed to better understand point sources of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane is the optical remote sensing instrument MAMAP (Methane airborne MAPper), operated from aircraft. After a recent instrument modification, retrievals of the column-averaged dry air mole fractions for methane XCH4 (or for carbon dioxide XCO2) derived from MAMAP data have a precision of about 0.4% or better and thus can be used to infer emission rate estimates using an optimal estimation inverse Gaussian plume model or a simple integral approach. CH4 emissions from two coal mine ventilation shafts in western Germany surveyed during the AIRMETH 2011 measurement campaign are used as examples to demonstrate and assess the value of MAMAP data for quantifying CH4 from point sources. While the knowledge of the wind is an important input parameter in the retrieval of emissions from point sources and is generally extracted from models, additional information from a turbulence probe operated on-board the same aircraft was utilised to enhance the quality of the emission estimates. Although flight patterns were optimised for remote sensing measurements, data from an in situ analyser for CH4 were found to be in good agreement with retrieved dry columns of CH4 from MAMAP and could be used to investigate and refine underlying assumptions for the inversion procedures. With respect to the total emissions of the mine at the time of the overflight, the inferred emission rate of 50.4 kt CH4 yr-1 has a difference of less than 1% compared to officially

  14. Unmanned Airborne Platforms for Validation of Volcanic Emission Composition and Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, D. C.; Diaz, J. A.; Bland, G.; Fladeland, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing realization that current remote sensing retrieval and transport models to detect, characterize, and track airborne volcanic emissions will be much improved fundamentally, and in their application, by the acquisition of in situ validation data. This issue was highlighted by the need for operational estimates of airborne ash concentrations during the 2010 eruption at Eyjafjallajökull-Fimmvörduháls in Iceland. In response, important campaigns were mounted in Europe to conduct airborne in situ observations with manned aircraft to validate ash concentration estimates based on remote sensing data. This effort had immediate application providing crucial accuracy and precision estimates for predicting locations, trajectories, and concentrations of the drifting ash to mitigate the severe economic impacts caused by the continent-wide grounding of aircraft. Manned flying laboratories, however, sustain serious risks if flown into the areas of volcanic plumes and drifting clouds that are of the highest interest, namely the zones of most concentrated ash and gas, which are often opaque to upwelling radiation at the longer infrared wavelengths (e.g., 8-12μm), where ash and gas can be most readily detected. Unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs), of course, can provide volcanic aerosol and gas sampling and measurement platforms with no risk to flight crews, and can penetrate the most ash-concentrated zones of plumes and drifting clouds. Current interest has been high in developing and testing small UAVs (e.g., NASA, University of Costa Rica, University of Düsseldorf; INGV-Catania and Rome, and others) for proximal sulfur dioxide and solid aerosol observations and sampling in relatively quiescently erupting plumes as a first step toward more far ranging and higher altitude deployments into drifting volcanic ash clouds at regional scales. Nevertheless, in the aftermath of the Icelandic crisis, ash and gas concentrations from analysis of

  15. Comprehensive monitoring of the occurrence of 22 drugs of abuse and transformation products in airborne particulate matter in the city of Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Nicola; Postigo, Cristina; López de Alda, Miren; Viana, Mar; Rodríguez, Aureli; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; Barceló, Damià

    2015-11-01

    In recent years monitoring the presence of psychotropic compounds in wastewater has been proposed as a tool to estimate community drug use. Measurement of drugs of abuse (DAs) in airborne particulate is currently being explored as an additional tool to evaluate drug use patterns in time and space, and identify potential emission sources. In this study, we comprehensively monitor the occurrence of 22 licit and illicit DAs and transformation products, belonging to 6 different chemical groups, in airborne particulate matter (PM10) in the city of Barcelona. In order to study spatial and temporal variations, samples were collected from 12 different selected locations on one weekday (Wednesday) and one weekend day (Saturday), during five consecutive weeks. A previously developed analytical methodology, based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) determination, was adapted for analysis of the target compounds with satisfactory performance, ensuring reliability of results. Among the investigated compounds, cannabinol (CBN), cocaine (COC), and methamphetamine (MA) were found to be the most ubiquitous and abundant compounds in PM10 with concentrations ranging from 0.7pg/m(3) (MA) to 6020pg/m(3) (CBN). Significant differences in total DA concentrations in PM10 were observed across sampling days and locations. DA emissions were identified in highly densely populated areas, where popular commercial and nightlife zones are located. Psychoactive effects due to inhalation of measured concentrations are probably negligible; however, potential health effects due to chronic exposure have not been explored yet.

  16. Changing regional emissions of airborne pollutants reflected in the chemistry of snowpacks and wetfall in the Rocky Mountain region, USA, 1993–2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Miller, Debra C.; Morris, Kristi H.; McMurray, Jill A.; Port, Garrett M.; Caruso, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Wintertime precipitation sample data from 55 Snowpack sites and 17 National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)/National Trends Network Wetfall sites in the Rocky Mountain region were examined to identify long-term trends in chemical concentration, deposition, and precipitation using Regional and Seasonal Kendall tests. The Natural Resources Conservation Service snow-telemetry (SNOTEL) network provided snow-water-equivalent data from 33 sites located near Snowpack- and NADP Wetfall-sampling sites for further comparisons. Concentration and deposition of ammonium, calcium, nitrate, and sulfate were tested for trends for the period 1993–2012. Precipitation trends were compared between the three monitoring networks for the winter seasons and downward trends were observed for both Snowpack and SNOTEL networks, but not for the NADP Wetfall network. The dry-deposition fraction of total atmospheric deposition, relative to wet deposition, was shown to be considerable in the region. Potential sources of regional airborne pollutant emissions were identified from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2011 National Emissions Inventory, and from long-term emissions data for the period 1996–2013. Changes in the emissions of ammonia, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur dioxide were reflected in significant trends in snowpack and wetfall chemistry. In general, ammonia emissions in the western USA showed a gradual increase over the past decade, while ammonium concentrations and deposition in snowpacks and wetfall showed upward trends. Emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide declined while regional trends in snowpack and wetfall concentrations and deposition of nitrate and sulfate were downward.

  17. Continuous emission monitoring and accounting automated systems at an HPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Ionkin, I. L.; Kondrateva, O. E.; Borovkova, A. M.; Seregin, V. A.; Morozov, I. V.

    2015-03-01

    Environmental and industrial emission monitoring at HPP's is a very urgent task today. Industrial monitoring assumes monitoring of emissions of harmful pollutants and optimization of fuel combustion technological processes at HPP's. Environmental monitoring is a system to assess ambient air quality with respect to a number of separate sources of harmful substances in pollution of atmospheric air of the area. Works on creating an industrial monitoring system are carried out at the National Research University Moscow Power Engineering Institute (MPEI) on the basis of the MPEI combined heat and power plant, and environmental monitoring stations are installed in Lefortovo raion, where the CHPP is located.

  18. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2015 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve

    2016-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). The operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Radionuclide assessment of airborne particulates in 2015 found the gross alpha and gross beta values of dust collected from the filters at the monitoring stations are consistent with background conditions. The meteorological and particle monitoring indicate that conditions for wind-borne contaminant movement exist at the Clean Slate sites and that, although the transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil by suspension has not been detected, movement by saltation is occurring.

  19. Effluent emissions monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.W.

    1993-05-01

    There are numerous regulatory requirements controlling the effluent emissions monitoring at a U.S. Department of Energy site. This paper defines how these regulatory effluent emissions monitoring requirements and the Quality Assurance oversight of these requirements were implemented by Westinghouse Hanford Company, the operations contractor, at the DOE Hanford Site.

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  1. Airborne studies of aerosol emissions from savanna fires in southern Africa: 2. Aerosol chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Andreae, T. W.; Annegarn, H.; Beer, J.; Cachier, H.; Le Canut, P.; Elbert, W.; Maenhaut, W.; Salma, I.; Wienhold, F. G.; Zenker, T.

    1998-12-01

    We investigated smoke emissions from fires in savanna, forest, and agricultural ecosystems by airborne sampling of plumes close to prescribed burns and incidental fires in southern Africa. Aerosol samples were collected on glass fiber filters and on stacked filter units, consisting of a Nuclepore prefilter for particles larger than ˜1-2 μm and a Teflon second filter stage for the submicron fraction. The samples were analyzed for soluble ionic components, organic carbon, and black carbon. Onboard the research aircraft, particle number and volume distributions as a function of size were determined with a laser-optical particle counter and the black carbon content of the aerosol with an aethalometer. We determined the emission ratios (relative to CO2 and CO) and emission factors (relative to the amount of biomass burnt) for the various aerosol constituents. The smoke aerosols were rich in organic and black carbon, the latter representing 10-30% of the aerosol mass. K+ and NH4+ were the dominant cationic species in the smoke of most fires, while Cl- and SO42- were the most important anions. The aerosols were unusually rich in Cl-, probably due to the high Cl content of the semiarid vegetation. Comparison of the element budget of the fuel before and after the fires shows that the fraction of the elements released during combustion is highly variable between elements. In the case of the halogen elements, almost the entire amount released during the fire is present in the aerosol phase, while in the case of C, N, and S, only a small proportion ends up as particulate matter. This suggests that the latter elements are present predominantly as gaseous species in the fresh fire plumes studied here.

  2. Mercury emissions from burning of biomass from temperate North American forests: laboratory and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedli, H. R.; Radke, L. F.; Lu, J. Y.; Banic, C. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; MacPherson, J. I.

    The emission of mercury from biomass burning was investigated in laboratory experiments and the results confirmed in airborne measurements on a wildfire near Hearst, Ont. Mercury contained in vegetation (live, dead, coniferous, deciduous) was essentially completely released in laboratory burns in the form of gaseous elemental mercury and mercury contained in particles. Replicate burns of dry Ponderosa needles indicated a linear relationship between emitted mercury and fuel mass loss. Regionally collected fuels showed the same behavior as the replicate burns, i.e. essentially total removal of mercury. Mercury released from fuel could be accounted for as gaseous and particulate mercury in the smoke. The mercury content of regionally collected fuels varied between 14 and 70 ng/g on a dry mass (dm) basis. The smoke plume from a small wildfire was investigated with a research aircraft yielding a mean output of 0.15±0.02 ng/m 3 of elemental mercury for each ppm of CO 2 emitted. The particulate mercury determined by sampling at specific points in the plume was <0.083 ng/m 3 compared to elemental mercury of 0.56 ng/m 3 for the same air, supporting the conclusion that most of the mercury was emitted in the gaseous elemental form. Emission factors for the high/low mercury content samples of the laboratory burns were 14-71×10 -6 and 112×10 -6 g Hg/kg (dm) fuel for the wildfire. The difference is believed to be the contribution of mercury released from fire-heated soil. Mercury budgets extrapolated from this single wildfire gave upper emission limits of 66 t/yr for temperate/boreal forests. This large source estimate must be refined and included in future regional and global models. Forests are sinks for mercury already in the atmosphere, thus the wildfire "source" is part of the overall cycling of mercury originating from other sources.

  3. HONO emission and production determined from airborne measurements over the Southeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Brown, S. S.; Min, K.-E.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Veres, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The sources and distribution of tropospheric nitrous acid (HONO) were examined using airborne measurements over the Southeast U.S. during the Southeast Nexus Experiment in June and July 2013. HONO was measured once per second using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer on the NOAA WP-3D aircraft to assess sources that affect HONO abundance throughout the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The aircraft flew at altitudes between 0.12 and 6.4 km above ground level on 18 research flights that were conducted both day and night, sampling emissions from urban and power plant sources that were transported in the PBL. At night, HONO mixing ratios were greatest in plumes from agricultural burning, where they exceeded 4 ppbv and accounted for 2-14% of the reactive nitrogen emitted by the fires. The HONO to carbon monoxide ratio in these plumes from flaming stage fires ranged from 0.13 to 0.52%. Direct HONO emissions from coal-fired power plants were quantified using measurements at night, when HONO loss by photolysis was absent. These direct emissions were often correlated with total reactive nitrogen with enhancement ratios that ranged from 0 to 0.4%. HONO enhancements in power plant plumes measured during the day were compared with a Lagrangian plume dispersion model, showing that HONO produced solely from the gas phase reaction of OH with NO explained the observations. Outside of recently emitted plumes from known combustion sources, HONO mixing ratios measured several hundred meters above ground level were indistinguishable from zero within the 15 parts per trillion by volume measurement uncertainty. The results reported here do not support the existence of a ubiquitous unknown HONO source that produces significant HONO concentrations in the lower troposphere.

  4. Quantitative structural health monitoring using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Lee, Chee Kin; Scholey, Jonathan J.; Friswell, Michael I.; Wisnom, Michael R.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2006-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is potentially a highly suitable technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications due to its ability to achieve high sensitivity from a sparse array of sensors. For AE to be deployed as part of an SHM system it is essential that its capability is understood. This is the motivation for developing a forward model, referred to as QAE-Forward, of the complete AE process in real structures which is described in the first part of this paper. QAE-Forward is based around a modular and expandable architecture of frequency domain transfer functions to describe various aspects of the AE process, such as AE signal generation, wave propagation and signal detection. The intention is to build additional functionality into QAE-Forward as further data becomes available, whether this is through new analytic tools, numerical models or experimental measurements. QAE-Forward currently contains functions that implement (1) the excitation of multimodal guided waves by arbitrarily orientated point sources, (2) multi-modal wave propagation through generally anisotropic multi-layered media, and (3) the detection of waves by circular transducers of finite size. Results from the current implementation of QAE-Forward are compared to experimental data obtained from Hsu-Neilson tests on aluminum plate and good agreement is obtained. The paper then describes an experimental technique and a finite element modeling technique to obtain quantitative AE data from fatigue crack growth that will feed into QAE-Forward.

  5. Urban land use monitoring from computer-implemented processing of airborne multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, W. J.; Mausel, P. W.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    Machine processing techniques were applied to multispectral data obtained from airborne scanners at an elevation of 600 meters over central Indianapolis in August, 1972. Computer analysis of these spectral data indicate that roads (two types), roof tops (three types), dense grass (two types), sparse grass (two types), trees, bare soil, and water (two types) can be accurately identified. Using computers, it is possible to determine land uses from analysis of type, size, shape, and spatial associations of earth surface images identified from multispectral data. Land use data developed through machine processing techniques can be programmed to monitor land use changes, simulate land use conditions, and provide impact statistics that are required to analyze stresses placed on spatial systems.

  6. Associations between immune function in yearling beef cattle and airborne emissions of sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and VOCs from oil and natural gas facilities.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Daniel G; Waldner, Cheryl L; Wickstrom, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Researchers assessed the associations between airborne emissions from oil and gas field facilities and the structure and function of the immune system of yearling beef cattle in 27 herds during spring 2002. They evaluated the immune systems of these animals by enumerating B lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte subtypes (CD4, CD8, gammadelta, and WC1) in peripheral circulation and by measuring systemic antibody production in response to vaccination. Researchers prospectively measured exposure to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by using air-quality data from passive monitors installed in pastures and wintering areas. They estimated the mean exposure of each animal over the 6-month period before the start of sample collection. The researchers used mixed models, which adjusted for clustering by herd and accounted for known risk factors, to examine potential associations between exposure to airborne sulfur dioxide, VOCs (measured as concentrations of benzene and toluene) and hydrogen sulfide, as well as proximity to emission sources (well-site density), and the immune system outcomes. Increasing exposure to VOCs measured as toluene was associated with significant CD4 T lymphocytopenia. The number of CD4 T lymphocytes was 30% lower in cattle exposed to VOCs measured as toluene in the highest quartile (> 0.823 microg/m3) than in cattle exposed in the lowest quartile (< 0.406 microg/m3).

  7. Ship emissions of SO2 and NO2: DOAS measurements from airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, N.; Mellqvist, J.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Balzani, J.

    2012-05-01

    A unique methodology to measure gas fluxes of SO2 and NO2 from ships using optical remote sensing is described and demonstrated in a feasibility study. The measurement system is based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy using reflected skylight from the water surface as light source. A grating spectrometer records spectra around 311 nm and 440 nm, respectively, with the telescope pointed downward at a 30° angle from the horizon. The mass column values of SO2 and NO2 are retrieved from each spectrum and integrated across the plume. A simple geometric approximation is used to calculate the optical path. To obtain the total emission in kg h-1 the resulting total mass across the plume is multiplied with the apparent wind, i.e. a dilution factor corresponding to the vector between the wind and the ship speed. The system was tested in two feasibility studies in the Baltic Sea and Kattegat, from a CASA-212 airplane in 2008 and in the North Sea outside Rotterdam from a Dauphin helicopter in an EU campaign in 2009. In the Baltic Sea the average SO2 emission out of 22 ships was (54 ± 13) kg h-1, and the average NO2 emission was (33 ± 8) kg h-1, out of 13 ships. In the North Sea the average SO2 emission out of 21 ships was (42 ± 11) kg h-1, NO2 was not measured here. The detection limit of the system made it possible to detect SO2 in the ship plumes in 60% of the measurements when the described method was used. A comparison exercise was carried out by conducting airborne optical measurements on a passenger ferry in parallel with onboard measurements. The comparison shows agreement of (-30 ± 14)% and (-41 ± 11)%, respectively, for two days, with equal measurement precision of about 20%. This gives an idea of the measurement uncertainty caused by errors in the simple geometric approximation for the optical light path neglecting scattering of the light in ocean waves and direct and multiple scattering in the exhaust plume under various conditions. A tentative

  8. Great Lakes Hyperspectral Water Quality Instrument Suite for Airborne Monitoring of Algal Blooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John; Leshkevich, George; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Flatico, Joseph; Prokop, Norman; Kojima, Jun; Anderson, Robert; Demers, James; Krasowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center and NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab are collaborating to utilize an airborne hyperspectral imaging sensor suite to monitor Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in the western basin of Lake Erie. The HABs are very dynamic events as they form, spread and then disappear within a 4 to 8 week time period in late summer. They are a concern for human health, fish and wildlife because they can contain blue green toxic algae. Because of this toxicity there is a need for the blooms to be continually monitored. This situation is well suited for aircraft based monitoring because the blooms are a very dynamic event and they can spread over a large area. High resolution satellite data is not suitable by itself because it will not give the temporal resolution due to the infrequent overpasses of the quickly changing blooms. A custom designed hyperspectral imager and a point spectrometer mounted on aT 34 aircraft have been used to obtain data on an algal bloom that formed in the western basin of Lake Erie during September 2006. The sensor suite and operations will be described and preliminary hyperspectral data of this event will be presented

  9. The use of an experimental room for monitoring of airborne concentrations of microorganisms, glass fibers, and total particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, M.P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental room was used as a microcosm for studies of airborne particles and microorganisms in indoor environments. The interior of the room measures 4 by 4 by 2.2 m high and has a hardwood floor and the walls and ceiling are sheetrocked and coated with interior latex paint. Exterior walls are 11.4-cm thick plywood panels consisting of two outer sections of plywood insulated with fiber glass batts. The ceiling is of similar construction with 17.1-cm thick panels. Attached to the room entrance is an anteroom equipped with a HEPA-filtered air shower to reduce mixing of air resulting from entering and exiting during experiments. The room is equipped with a computer-controlled heating, ventilation, and cooling system. Temperature, relative humidity, air flow, and room pressure can be continuously monitored by probes located in the room and air handling system components. Several research projects have been conducted using this room including monitoring the potential for airborne glass fibers released from rigid fibrous ductboard, comparisons of commercially available samplers for monitoring of airborne fungal spores, and a study on the efficacy of vacuum bags to minimize dispersal of particles, including fungal spores from fungal-contaminated carpet. During studies designed to monitor airborne fiberglass, air samples were taken in the room serviced by new rigid fibrous glass ductwork, and the results were compared to those obtained in the room with bare metal ductwork installed. Monitoring of airborne fungal spores using the Andersen six-stage sampler, the high flow Spiral Biotech sampler, the Biotest RCS Plus sampler, and the Burkard spore trap sampler was performed following the release of Penicillium spores into the room through the supply register. Dispersal of carpet-associated particles and fungal spores was measured after vacuuming using conventional cellulose vacuum bags in comparison to recently developed bags.

  10. Airborne Measurements of Gas Emissions during the 2009 Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C. A.; Kelly, P. J.; Doukas, M. P.; Pfeffer, M. A.; Evans, W. C.; McGimsey, R. G.; Neal, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    Multi-component measurements of gas emissions were critical for assessing volcanic processes and thus hazard prior to and during the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, which began in March 2009. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions were elevated at least six months prior to the onset of the eruption, with emission rates on the order of 1,800 tonnes per day (t/d) in October and November 2008. At that time, sulfur dioxide (SO2), the most commonly monitored volcanic gas, was below the detection limit. From January to early March 2009 there was a marked increase in melting of ice from the summit region, increased seismicity, and a dramatic increase in CO2 emissions (up to 10,000 t/d). In contrast, SO2 emissions, first detected in late January, remained low (< 300 t/d). During this period, CO2/SO2 molar ratios reached their highest levels, ranging from 48 to 305. SO2 scrubbing in the volcanic edifice could explain the high CO2/SO2 ratios, yet water samples taken from the Drift River, where meltwater from the summit region drained, did not show sulphate concentrations consistent with scrubbing 1,000s of t/d SO2. We hypothesize that the initially high CO2/SO2 ratios were mainly related to the degassing of deep magma because volatile/melt solubility relationships dictate that magma at higher pressure will exsolve a volatile fluid phase with higher CO2/SO2 than magma at lower pressure. Immediately following the first small explosion on March 15, the SO2 emission rate increased to 5,200 t/d and the molar CO2/SO2 ratio dropped to 3.9. From the middle of March through early June, we measured CO2 emission rates between 6,000 and 30,000 t/d, SO2 emission rates from 1,500 to 14,000 t/d, and molar CO2/SO2 ratios between ~2 and 7. Emission rates of both gases varied by as much as 10,000 t/d between measurements made only a few days apart. Also, some large decreases in SO2 emissions were not accompanied by decreases in CO2 emissions, which suggests that multiple reservoirs may

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TEST OF DIOXIN EMISSION MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of four dioxin emission monitors including two long-term sampling devices, the DMS (DioxinMonitoringSystem) and AMESA (Adsorption Method for Sampling Dioxins and Furans), and two semi-real-time continuous monitors, RIMMPA-TOFMS (Resonance Ionization with Multi-Mir...

  12. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range.

  14. Airborne Ethane Observations over the Barnett and Bakken Shale Formations: Quantification of Ethane Fluxes and Attribution of Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The largest emissions sources of methane, a potent greenhouse gas and the primary component of natural gas, are the fossil fuel sector and microbial processes that occur in agricultural settings, landfills, and wetlands. Attribution of methane to these different source sectors has proven difficult, as evidenced by persistent disagreement between the annual emissions estimated from atmospheric observations (top-down) and from inventories (bottom-up). Given the rapidly changing natural gas infrastructure in North America, and the implications of associated rapid changes in emissions of methane for climate, it is crucial we improve our ability to quantify and understand current and future methane emissions. Here, we present evidence that continuous in-situ airborne observations of ethane, which is a tracer for fossil fuel emissions, are a new and useful tool for attribution of methane emissions to specific source sectors. Additionally, with these new airborne observations we present the first tightly constrained ethane emissions estimates of oil and gas production fields using the well-known mass balance method. The ratios of ethane-to-methane (C2H6:CH4) of specific methane emissions sources were studied over regions of high oil and gas production from the Barnett, TX and Bakken, ND shale plays, using continuous (1Hz frequency) airborne ethane measurements paired with simultaneous methane measurements. Despite the complex mixture of sources in the Barnett region, the methane emissions were well-characterized by distinct C2H6:CH4 relationships indicative of a high-ethane fossil fuel source (e.g., "wet" gas), a low-ethane fossil fuel source (e.g., "dry" gas), and an ethane-free, or microbial source. The defined set of C2H6:CH4 that characterized the emissions input to the atmosphere was used in conjunction with the total ethane and methane fluxes to place bounds on the fraction of methane emissions attributable to each source. Additionally, substantial ethane fluxes

  15. Monitoring Strategies for REDD+: Integrating Field, Airborne, and Satellite Observations of Amazon Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas; Souza, Carlos, Jr.; Souza, Carlos, Jr.; Keller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale tropical forest monitoring efforts in support of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation plus enhancing forest carbon stocks) confront a range of challenges. REDD+ activities typically have short reporting time scales, diverse data needs, and low tolerance for uncertainties. Meeting these challenges will require innovative use of remote sensing data, including integrating data at different spatial and temporal resolutions. The global scientific community is engaged in developing, evaluating, and applying new methods for regional to global scale forest monitoring. Pilot REDD+ activities are underway across the tropics with support from a range of national and international groups, including SilvaCarbon, an interagency effort to coordinate US expertise on forest monitoring and resource management. Early actions on REDD+ have exposed some of the inherent tradeoffs that arise from the use of incomplete or inaccurate data to quantify forest area changes and related carbon emissions. Here, we summarize recent advances in forest monitoring to identify and target the main sources of uncertainty in estimates of forest area changes, aboveground carbon stocks, and Amazon forest carbon emissions.

  16. Monitoring the progress of emission inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.A. Jr.; Solomon, D.; Husk, M.; Irving, B.; Kruger, D.; Levin. L.

    2006-12-15

    This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.

  17. Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Plumes from Combined Ground-Airborne Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Jamey; Mitchell, Taylor; Honeycutt, Wes; Materer, Nicholas; Ley, Tyler; Clark, Peter

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid ground-airborne sensing network for real-time plume monitoring of CO2 and CH4 for carbon sequestration is investigated. Conventional soil gas monitoring has difficulty in distinguishing gas flux signals from leakage with those associated with meteorologically driven changes. A low-cost, lightweight sensor system has been developed and implemented onboard a small unmanned aircraft and is combined with a large-scale ground network that measures gas concentration. These are combined with other atmospheric diagnostics, including thermodynamic data and velocity from ultrasonic anemometers and multi-hole probes. To characterize the system behavior and verify its effectiveness, field tests have been conducted with simulated discharges of CO2 and CH4 from compressed gas tanks to mimic leaks and generate gaseous plumes, as well as field tests over the Farnsworth CO2-EOR site in the Anadarko Basin. Since the sensor response time is a function of vehicle airspeed, dynamic calibration models are required to determine accurate location of gas concentration in space and time. Comparisons are made between the two tests and results compared with historical models combining both flight and atmospheric dynamics. Supported by Department of Energy Award DE-FE0012173.

  18. Assessing airborne pollution effects on bryophytes: lessons learned through long-term integrated monitoring in Austria.

    PubMed

    Zechmeister, H G; Dirnböck, T; Hülber, K; Mirtl, M

    2007-06-01

    The study uses measured and calculated data on airborne pollutants, particularly nitrogen (ranges between 28 to 43kgN*ha(-1)*yr(-1)) and sulphur (10 to 18kgSO(4)-S*ha(-1)*yr(-1)), in order to assess their long-term (1992 to 2005) effects on bryophytes at the UN-ECE Integrated Monitoring site 'Zöbelboden' in Austria. Bryophytes were used as reaction indicators on 20 epiphytic plots using the IM monitoring method and on 14 terrestrial plots using standardised photography. The plots were recorded in the years 1992, 1993, 1998, and 2004/2005. Most species remained stable in terms of their overall population size during the observed period, even though there were rapid turnover rates of a large percentage of species on all investigated plots. Only a few bryophytes (Hypnum cupressiforme, Leucodon sciuroides) responded unambiguously to N and S deposition. Nitrogen deposition had a weak but significant effect on the distribution of bryophyte communities. However, the time shifts in bryophyte communities did not depend on total deposition of N and S.

  19. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90

  20. Locomotive emissions monitoring program annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The report is to include data on the traffic moved and the fuel consumed, estimates of the consequent emissions of certain exhaust gases, and information on any improvements in equipment or operating practices that will lead to reduced emissions. This is the first such annual report.

  1. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles: airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouche, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Bourianne, T.; Gomes, L.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2014-02-01

    yields, we were able to predict ~50% of the measured organics. These airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment show that urban emissions contribute to the formation of OA and have an impact on aerosol composition on a regional scale.

  2. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or operator of any lead-acid battery manufacturing facility subject to the provisions of this subpart...

  3. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or operator of any lead-acid battery manufacturing facility subject to the provisions of this subpart...

  4. 40 CFR 60.314 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.314 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or... measurement device shall be installed in the gas stream immediately before and after the catalyst bed....

  5. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  6. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  7. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  8. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  9. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  10. A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2002-01-01

    The first quarter of this project to develop a Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy mercury continuous emission monitor involved acquisition and verification of the laser system to be used, initial cavity design, and initial software development for signal processing and data acquisition.

  11. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Air Oxidation Unit Processes § 60.613 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or... from each air oxidation reactor within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of...

  12. Air Monitoring, Measuring, and Emissions Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Measurement research is advancing the ability to determine the composition of sources of air pollution, conduct exposure assessments, improve monitoring capabilities and support public health research.

  13. Pisces field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 117 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 117. Site 117 is a 1 MW selective catalytic reduction (SCR) pilot plant. The host boiler is an 850 MW boiler which burned a residual fuel oil. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report.

  14. Airborne observations of mercury emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area during the 2013 NOMADSS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, L. E.; Ambrose, J. L.; Jaffe, D. A.; Knote, C.; Jaeglé, L.; Selin, N. E.; Campos, T.; Flocke, F. M.; Reeves, M.; Stechman, D.; Stell, M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Mauldin, R. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area significantly enhance ambient mercury (Hg) concentrations and lead to increased levels of atmospheric Hg deposition within the Lake Michigan Basin. We use airborne observations collected over Lake Michigan during the 2013 Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury, and Aerosol Distributions, Sources, and Sinks (NOMADSS) campaign to quantify the outflow of total Hg (THg) emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area. We use concurrent airborne measurements of THg, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) to calculate measured enhancement ratios and to characterize Chicago/Gary emissions with respect to the 2011 U.S. EPA National Emissions Inventory. We determine the observed THg/CO enhancement ratio in outflow from Chicago/Gary to be 0.21 ± 0.09 × 10-6 mol mol-1 (ppqv/ppbv), which is comparable to observations reported for other major U.S. urban/industrial areas. We also employ the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport and dispersion model to simulate air mass transport during plume encounters and to compare our observations to inventoried emission ratios. We find that our observed THg/CO enhancement ratios are 63-67% greater than the transport-corrected emission ratios for the Chicago/Gary area. Our results suggest that there are many small emission sources that are not fully accounted for within the inventory, and/or that the re-emission of legacy Hg is a significant source of THg to the atmosphere in this region.

  15. Airborne imaging sensors for environmental monitoring & surveillance in support of oil spills & recovery efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Jones, James; Frystacky, Heather; Coppin, Gaelle; Leavaux, Florian; Neyt, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Collection of pushbroom sensor imagery from a mobile platform requires corrections using inertial measurement units (IMU's) and DGPS in order to create useable imagery for environmental monitoring and surveillance of shorelines in freshwater systems, coastal littoral zones and harbor areas. This paper describes a suite of imaging systems used during collection of hyperspectral imagery in northern Florida panhandle and Gulf of Mexico airborne missions to detect weathered oil in coastal littoral zones. Underlying concepts of pushbroom imagery, the needed corrections for directional changes using DGPS and corrections for platform yaw, pitch, and roll using IMU data is described as well as the development and application of optimal band and spectral regions associated with weathered oil. Pushbroom sensor and frame camera data collected in response to the recent Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster is presented as the scenario documenting environmental monitoring and surveillance techniques using mobile sensing platforms. Data was acquired during the months of February, March, April and May of 2011. The low altitude airborne systems include a temperature stabilized hyperspectral imaging system capable of up to 1024 spectral channels and 1376 spatial across track pixels flown from 3,000 to 4,500 feet altitudes. The hyperspectral imaging system is collocated with a full resolution high definition video recorder for simultaneous HD video imagery, a 12.3 megapixel digital, a mapping camera using 9 inch film types that yields scanned aerial imagery with approximately 22,200 by 22,200 pixel multispectral imagery (~255 megapixel RGB multispectral images in order to conduct for spectral-spatial sharpening of fused multispectral, hyperspectral imagery. Two high spectral (252 channels) and radiometric sensitivity solid state spectrographs are used for collecting upwelling radiance (sub-meter pixels) with downwelling irradiance fiber optic attachment. These sensors are utilized for

  16. Optimized Field Sampling and Monitoring of Airborne Hazardous Transport Plumes; A Geostatistical Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, DI-WEN

    2001-11-21

    Airborne hazardous plumes inadvertently released during nuclear/chemical/biological incidents are mostly of unknown composition and concentration until measurements are taken of post-accident ground concentrations from plume-ground deposition of constituents. Unfortunately, measurements often are days post-incident and rely on hazardous manned air-vehicle measurements. Before this happens, computational plume migration models are the only source of information on the plume characteristics, constituents, concentrations, directions of travel, ground deposition, etc. A mobile ''lighter than air'' (LTA) system is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will be part of the first response in emergency conditions. These interactive and remote unmanned air vehicles will carry light-weight detectors and weather instrumentation to measure the conditions during and after plume release. This requires a cooperative computationally organized, GPS-controlled set of LTA's that self-coordinate around the objectives in an emergency situation in restricted time frames. A critical step before an optimum and cost-effective field sampling and monitoring program proceeds is the collection of data that provides statistically significant information, collected in a reliable and expeditious manner. Efficient aerial arrangements of the detectors taking the data (for active airborne release conditions) are necessary for plume identification, computational 3-dimensional reconstruction, and source distribution functions. This report describes the application of stochastic or geostatistical simulations to delineate the plume for guiding subsequent sampling and monitoring designs. A case study is presented of building digital plume images, based on existing ''hard'' experimental data and ''soft'' preliminary transport modeling results of Prairie Grass Trials Site. Markov Bayes Simulation, a coupled Bayesian/geostatistical methodology, quantitatively combines soft information

  17. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  18. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  19. 40 CFR 60.464 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Coil Surface Coating § 60.464 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Where compliance with the numerical limit specified in § 60.462(a) (1) or (2) is achieved through the use of low VOC-content coatings without the use of emission control devices or through the use of higher VOC-content coatings...

  20. Integrated Active Fire Retrievals and Biomass Burning Emissions Using Complementary Near-Coincident Ground, Airborne and Spaceborne Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellicott, Evan; Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Ottmar, Roger D.; Clements, Craig; Hall, Dianne; Ambrosia, Vincent; Kremens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ground, airborne and spaceborne data were collected for a 450 ha prescribed fire implemented on 18 October 2011 at the Henry W. Coe State Park in California. The integration of various data elements allowed near coincident active fire retrievals to be estimated. The Autonomous Modular Sensor-Wildfire (AMS) airborne multispectral imaging system was used as a bridge between ground and spaceborne data sets providing high quality reference information to support satellite fire retrieval error analyses and fire emissions estimates. We found excellent agreement between peak fire radiant heat flux data (less than 1% error) derived from near-coincident ground radiometers and AMS. Both MODIS and GOES imager active fire products were negatively influenced by the presence of thick smoke, which was misclassified as cloud by their algorithms, leading to the omission of fire pixels beneath the smoke, and resulting in the underestimation of their retrieved fire radiative power (FRP) values for the burn plot, compared to the reference airborne data. Agreement between airborne and spaceborne FRP data improved significantly after correction for omission errors and atmospheric attenuation, resulting in as low as 5 difference between AquaMODIS and AMS. Use of in situ fuel and fire energy estimates in combination with a collection of AMS, MODIS, and GOES FRP retrievals provided a fuel consumption factor of 0.261 kg per MJ, total energy release of 14.5 x 10(exp 6) MJ, and total fuel consumption of 3.8 x 10(exp 6) kg. Fire emissions were calculated using two separate techniques, resulting in as low as 15 difference for various species

  1. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles; airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouch, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2013-09-01

    The MEGAPOLI experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) giving detailed information of the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of BC, measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), black carbon and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy). Plotting the equivalent ratios for the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) resolved species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in Mexico city, Mexico and in New England, USA. Using the measured VOCs species together with recent organic aerosol formation yields we predicted ~ 50% of the measured organics. These airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment show that urban emissions contribute to the formation of OA

  2. Airborne Observations of Mercury Emissions from the Chicago/Gary Urban/Industrial Area during the 2013 NOMADSS Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, L.; Ambrose, J. L., II; Jaffe, D. A.; Knote, C. J.; Jaegle, L.; Selin, N. E.; Campos, T. L.; Flocke, F. M.; Reeves, J. M.; Stechman, D. M.; Stell, M. H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area significantly enhance ambient mercury (Hg) concentrations and lead to increased levels of atmospheric mercury deposition within the Lake Michigan Basin (Gratz et al., 2013a; Gratz et al., 2013b; Landis and Keeler, 2002; Landis et al., 2002; Vette et al., 2002). In this study we use airborne observations of total atmospheric Hg (THg) collected over Lake Michigan during summer 2013 as part of the Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury, and Aerosol Distributions, Sources, and Sinks (NOMADSS) field campaign to quantify the outflow of total atmospheric Hg from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area. We use concurrent airborne measurements of THg, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) to calculate measured enhancement ratios (ER) and thus characterize Chicago/Gary emissions. We determine the observed THg/CO ER in outflow from Chicago/Gary to be 2.11x10-7 mol mol-1, which is comparable to values reported in the literature for other major U.S. urban/industrial areas (Radke et al., 2007; Talbot et al., 2008; Weiss-Penzias et al., 2013). We also employ the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport and dispersion model to simulate air mass transport during plume encounters. We convolve the emissions of each species from the 2011 U.S. EPA National Emissions Inventory (NEI) with the FLEXPART-modeled air mass transport to compare our observations to inventoried emission ratios (EmR). We find that the inventoried THg/CO EmRs are biased low by -63% to -67% compared to the observed ERs for the Chicago/Gary area. This suggests that there are many small emission sources that are not fully accounted for within the inventory, and/or that the re-emission of legacy Hg is a significant source of THg to the atmosphere in this region.

  3. Bioaerosol emissions and detection of airborne antibiotic resistance genes from a wastewater treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Liantong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Xu, Caijia; Dong, Liming; Yao, Maosheng

    2016-01-01

    Air samples from twelve sampling sites (including seven intra-plant sites, one upwind site and four downwind sites) from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing were collected using a Reuter Centrifugal Sampler High Flow (RCS); and their microbial fractions were studied using culturing and high throughput gene sequence. In addition, the viable (fluorescent) bioaerosol concentrations for 7 intra-plant sites were also monitored for 30 min each using an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS). Both air and water samples collected from the plant were investigated for possible bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and integrons using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the air near sludge thickening basin was detected to have the highest level of culturable bacterial aerosols (up to 1697 CFU/m3) and fungal aerosols (up to 930 CFU/m3). For most sampling sites, fluorescent peaks were observed at around 3-4 μm, except the office building with a peak at 1.5 μm, with a number concentration level up to 1233-6533 Particles/m3. About 300 unique bacterial species, including human opportunistic pathogens, such as Comamonas Testosteroni and Moraxella Osloensis, were detected from the air samples collected over the biological reaction basin. In addition, we have detected the sul2 gene resistant to cotrimoxazole (also known as septra, bactrim and TMP-SMX) and class 1 integrase gene from the air samples collected from the screen room and the biological reaction basin. Overall, the screen room, sludge thickening basin and biological reaction basin imposed significant microbial exposure risks, including those from airborne antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. 40 CFR 60.45 - Emissions and fuel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system (COMS) for measuring opacity and a CEMS for measuring SO2 emissions, NOX... initiate investigation of the relevant equipment and control systems within 24 hours of the first discovery... tests, elect to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to...

  5. ETV TEST OF PCDD/F EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and furan (PCDD/F) emission monitors were tested under the EPA Environmental Technology and Verification (ETV) program. Two long-term sampling devices, the DioxinMonitoringSystem and Adsorption Method for Sampling Dioxins and Furans, and two sem...

  6. 40 CFR 60.703 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations. 60.703 Section 60.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., temperature monitoring devices shall be installed in the gas stream immediately before and after the...

  7. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 112 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 112. Site 112 is a tangentially fired boiler firing residual oil. Site 112 employs electrostatic precipitators and a flue gas desulfurization system for particulate and SO{sub 2} control. Sampling at Site 112 was performed in July and August of 1992 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mercury. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report (EPRI TR-104614).

  8. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 21 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 21. Site 21 is a pilot-scale electrostatic precipitator and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The flue gas for the pilot unit is provided by an adjacent power plant boiler which bums a medium-sulfur bituminous, coal. The primary objective in the Site 21 sampling and analytical program was to quantify the various components of variance in the measurement of trace chemical species. In addition to the replicate sample trains typically conducted at previous PISCES field measurements, duplicate analyses and duplicate (simultaneous) sample trains were also conducted. This enabled the variance due to sampling, analytical, and process conditions to be estimated. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report.

  9. Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Andrés; Amo de Paz, Guillermo; Rastrojo, Alberto; García, Ana M; Alcamí, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bustillo, A Montserrat; Moreno, Diego A

    2016-03-01

    The first part of this review ("Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios") describes the current knowledge on the major biological particles present in the air regarding their global distribution, concentrations, ratios and influence of meteorological factors in an attempt to provide a framework for monitoring their biodiversity and variability in such a singular environment as the atmosphere. Viruses, bacteria, fungi, pollen and fragments thereof are the most abundant microscopic biological particles in the air outdoors. Some of them can cause allergy and severe diseases in humans, other animals and plants, with the subsequent economic impact. Despite the harsh conditions, they can be found from land and sea surfaces to beyond the troposphere and have been proposed to play a role also in weather conditions and climate change by acting as nucleation particles and inducing water vapour condensation. In regards to their global distribution, marine environments act mostly as a source for bacteria while continents additionally provide fungal and pollen elements. Within terrestrial environments, their abundances and diversity seem to be influenced by the land-use type (rural, urban, coastal) and their particularities. Temporal variability has been observed for all these organisms, mostly triggered by global changes in temperature, relative humidity, et cetera. Local fluctuations in meteorological factors may also result in pronounced changes in the airbiota. Although biological particles can be transported several hundreds of meters from the original source, and even intercontinentally, the time and final distance travelled are strongly influenced by factors such as wind speed and direction. [Int Microbiol 2016; 19(1):1-1 3].

  10. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  11. First Airborne PTR-ToF-MS Measurements of VOCs in a Biomass Burning Plume: Primary Emissions and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Mikoviny, Tomas; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert; Weinheimer, Andrew; Fried, Alan; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-04-01

    The NASA DISCOVER-AQ mission saw the first airborne deployment of a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). The newly developed instrument records full mass spectra at 10 Hz and resolves pure hydrocarbons from their oxygenated isobars (e.g. isoprene and furan). Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at high spatio-temporal resolution (0.1 s or 10 m) improve our capabilities in characterizing primary emissions from fires and in studying chemical transformations in aging plumes. A biomass-burning plume from a forest understory fire was intercepted by the NASA P-3B near Dublin, GA, USA on September 29, 2013. VOCs were measured at high time resolution along with CO, CO2, NOx, O3, HCHO, aerosols and other air quality and meteorological parameters. Repeated measurements in the immediate proximity of the fire were used to determine VOC emission ratios and their temporal variations. Repeated longitudinal and transversal plume transects were carried out to study plume aging within the first hour of emission. We will discuss the observed OH-NOx-VOC chemistry (including O3 formation), the observed changes in the elemental composition of VOCs (e.g. O:C ratios) and the observed formation of SOA.

  12. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... alarm system that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loading is detected over the alarm... temperature and humidity according to the procedures identified in the site-specific monitoring plan required... (c) of this section and the alarm on the bag leak detection system does not sound, the owner...

  13. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alarm system that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loading is detected over the alarm... temperature and humidity according to the procedures identified in the site-specific monitoring plan required... (c) of this section and the alarm on the bag leak detection system does not sound, the owner...

  14. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alarm system that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loading is detected over the alarm... temperature and humidity according to the procedures identified in the site-specific monitoring plan required... (c) of this section and the alarm on the bag leak detection system does not sound, the owner...

  15. [Emission of electromagnetic radiation from selected computer monitors].

    PubMed

    Zyss, T

    1995-01-01

    The emission of electromagnetic fields from computer monitors was analysed. The data were compared with the permissible exposure level. EM radiation of chromatic monitors is higher than that of monochromatic ones. The radiation of magnetic fraction is insignificant. Both electric and magnetic fractions of EM radiation, 50 cm away from the monitor, are very low and do not exceed permissible values. It was observed that screen filters were effective in suppressing EM emission only at a short (up to 30 cm) distance from the monitor. At a distance of 50 cm they proved to be ineffective. Metallic-net filters were more effective than glass filters in suppressing EM radiation. It seems that EM fields generated by computer monitors are not harmful to computer operators if the distance is kept in safe limits.

  16. First results from the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Grefenstette, B.; Hazelton, B. J.; Martinez-McKinney, F.; Zhang, Z.; Lowell, A.; Kelley, N. A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Ulrich, W.; Rassoul, H.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Cramer, E.; Shao, X.; Ho, C.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Blakeslee, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) had its first flights in August and September 2009 on the NSF/NCAR Gulfstream GV research aircraft. It flew over and around thunderstorm cells, mostly in Florida, at 13-14 km altitude to search for signatures of relativistic runaway on all timescales. ADELE is designed for extremely high dynamic range, with about six orders of magnitude between the smallest events that can be seen above background and the saturation of its smallest gamma detectors. Crude directional capability and good energy resolution in the NaI detectors allow discrimination among incoming positrons, electrons, and gamma-rays in some cases. Preliminary results show a rich variety of behavior, including the first terrestrial gamma-ray flash (TGF) detected from aircraft altitudes, two brief (100 ms) episodes in which the aircraft flew through a cloud of positrons accompanied by bursts of radio noise, and a 2-second episode in which the aircraft flew through an intense beam of electrons or gammas, accompanied by a spike in the local concentration of ice crystals. Instrumental modeling, not yet performed as of this writing, will help determine the composition of the beam. The latter event was cut off abruptly (dropping off in less than a millisecond), presumably by the discharge of the associated electric field. All the phenomena above took place in a single 2-minute pass by a storm. Other passes and other storms frequently showed signs of relativistic runaway: minute-long increases in high-energy radiation, possibly consistent with the time it takes the plane to fly past a static structure. But TGFs were scarce, despite many lightning flashes near the flight path, suggesting that the bright TGFs seen from space are not the dominant mechanism for lightning initiation. In addition to the data from ADELE itself, we will present correlated lightning data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Sferic Array (LASA), the Duke University

  17. Investigating Seasonal Emissions of Carbon Dioxide and Methane in Northern California Using Airborne Measurements and Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Xi, X.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Potter, C. S.; Tanaka, T.; Tadic, J.; Loewenstein, M.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.; Gurney, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations have increased over the past decades and are linked to increasing global surface temperatures and climate change. To counteract the trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations of GHGs, the state of California has passed the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB-32). This requires that by 2020, GHG (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4)) emissions will be reduced to 1990 levels. Currently, California emits ~500 Tg yr-1 of CO2eq GHGs, with CO2 and CH4 contributing ~90% of the total. To quantify the success of AB-32, GHG emission rates must be more thoroughly quantified in California. Presently, uncertainties remain in the existing "bottom-up" emission inventories in California due to many contributing factors not being fully understood. To help alleviate these uncertainties, we have analyzed airborne GHG measurements and applied inverse modeling techniques to quantify GHG spatiotemporal concentration patterns and "top-down" emission rates. To assess the magnitude/spatial variation of GHGs, and to identify local emission "hot spots", airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4 were made by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) in the boundary layer of the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in Jan.-Feb. 2013 and July-Aug. 2014. To quantify/constrain GHG emissions we applied the WRF-STILT model and inverse modeling techniques, in conjunction with AJAX data, to estimate "top-down" SFBA/SJV GHG emission rates. Model simulations utilized source apportioned a priori CO2 and CH4 emission inventories from the Vulcan Project (including NASA Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach (NASA-CASA) model CO2 biosphere fluxes) and the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) Project, respectively. Results from the evaluation of a priori and posterior GHG concentrations/emissions in northern California using AJAX data, along with the analysis of CO2 and CH4 concentration spatiotemporal

  18. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  20. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  1. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  2. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  4. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  5. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  6. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  7. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  9. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  10. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  11. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  12. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  13. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  14. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  15. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  16. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  17. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  18. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  19. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, William L.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    1998-07-07

    The instant invention discloses method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, and sampling probes, in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream.

  20. Continuous monitoring of total hydrocarbon emissions from sludge incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bostian, H.E.; Crumpler, E.P.; Koch, P.D.; Chehaske, J.T.; Hagele, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Water (OW) drafted risk-based sludge regulations (for incineration and a variety of other options) under Section 405d of the Clean Water Act. Under consideration for the final regulation is a provision for continuously monitoring total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions as a method of controlling organic emissions from sludge incineration. The monitoring would have to demonstrate that the THC stack emissions were not exceeding a concentration limit. Continuous analyzers for THC, CO, and oxygen (O2) were installed and operated at two facilities, both of which employed multiple-hearth furnaces (MHFs) to incinerate wastewater sludge. In addition, EPA requested an evaluation of the use of these monitors to assist with incinerator operation.

  1. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, W.L.; Renzi, R.F.

    1998-07-07

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, sampling probes, and in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream. 6 figs.

  2. Challenges in the development of sensors for monitoring automobile emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.; Pham, A.Q.

    1997-02-20

    A new generation of on-board automotive sensors are needed for diagnosis and control of engines and catalytic converters. With regard to catalytic converters, the intent of these regulations is to ensure that the vehicle operator is informed when emission control system are no longer performing adequately. In order to be commercialized, sensors for emission control must meet certain criteria, including low cost, reliability, and manufacturability. We have been developing solid state electrochemical sensors for emission control. Most recently, our work has focused on the development of hydrocarbon sensors for monitoring catalytic converter performance. Previous work was concerned with the development of an oxygen sensor having appropriate sensitivity for lean-burn engines. Operational limits for oxygen sensors have been defined and new materials have been developed for hydrocarbon sensors. Technical results are presented here as well as challenges to be met in the development of materials and designs for new chemical sensors for monitoring automotive emissions.

  3. Techniques for Estimating Emissions Factors from Forest Burning: ARCTAS and SEAC4RS Airborne Measurements Indicate Which Fires Produce Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of emission factors from biomass burning are prone to large errors since they ignore the interplay of mixing and varying pre-fire background CO2 levels. Such complications severely affected our studies of 446 forest fire plume samples measured in the Western US by the science teams of NASA's SEAC4RS and ARCTAS airborne missions. Consequently we propose a Mixed Effects Regression Emission Technique (MERET) to check techniques like the Normalized Emission Ratio Method (NERM), where use of sequential observations cannot disentangle emissions and mixing. We also evaluate a simpler "consensus" technique. All techniques relate emissions to fuel burned using C(sub burn) = delta C(sub tot) added to the fire plume, where C(sub tot) approximately equals (CO2 + CO). Mixed-effects regression can estimate pre-fire background values of Ctot (indexed by observation j) simultaneously with emissions factors indexed by individual species i, delta epsilon lambda tau alpha-x(sub i)/(C(sub burn))i,j., MERET and "consensus" require more than two emissions indicators. Our studies excluded samples where exogenous CO or CH4 might have been fed into a fire plume, mimicking emission. We sought to let the data on 13 gases and particulate properties suggest clusters of variables and plume types, using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). While samples were mixtures, the NMF unmixing suggested purer burn types. Particulate properties (bscat, babs, SSA, AAE) and gas-phase emissions were interrelated. Finally, we sought a simple categorization useful for modeling ozone production in plumes. Two kinds of fires produced high ozone: those with large fuel nitrogen as evidenced by remnant CH3CN in the plumes, and also those from very intense large burns. Fire types with optimal ratios of delta-NOy/delta- HCHO associate with the highest additional ozone per unit Cburn, Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx binding to reactive organics. Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx

  4. Techniques for Estimating Emissions Factors from Forest Burning: ARCTAS and SEAC4RS Airborne Measurements Indicate which Fires Produce Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of emission factors from biomass burning are prone to large errors since they ignore the interplay of mixing and varying pre-fire background CO2 levels. Such complications severely affected our studies of 446 forest fire plume samples measured in the Western US by the science teams of NASA's SEAC4RS and ARCTAS airborne missions. Consequently we propose a Mixed Effects Regression Emission Technique (MERET) to check techniques like the Normalized Emission Ratio Method (NERM), where use of sequential observations cannot disentangle emissions and mixing. We also evaluate a simpler "consensus" technique. All techniques relate emissions to fuel burned using C(burn) = delta C(tot) added to the fire plume, where C(tot) approximately equals (CO2 = CO). Mixed-effects regression can estimate pre-fire background values of C(tot) (indexed by observation j) simultaneously with emissions factors indexed by individual species i, delta, epsilon lambda tau alpha-x(sub I)/C(sub burn))I,j. MERET and "consensus" require more than emissions indicators. Our studies excluded samples where exogenous CO or CH4 might have been fed into a fire plume, mimicking emission. We sought to let the data on 13 gases and particulate properties suggest clusters of variables and plume types, using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). While samples were mixtures, the NMF unmixing suggested purer burn types. Particulate properties (b scant, b abs, SSA, AAE) and gas-phase emissions were interrelated. Finally, we sought a simple categorization useful for modeling ozone production in plumes. Two kinds of fires produced high ozone: those with large fuel nitrogen as evidenced by remnant CH3CN in the plumes, and also those from very intense large burns. Fire types with optimal ratios of delta-NOy/delta- HCHO associate with the highest additional ozone per unit Cburn, Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx binding to reactive organics. Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx binding to

  5. The Hintereisferner - eight years of experience in method development for glacier monitoring with airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, M.; Höfle, B.; Pfeifer, N.; Rutzinger, M.; Sailer, R.; Stötter, J.; Geist, T.

    2009-04-01

    Topographic data acquisition with LiDAR technology, airborne or terrestrial, has become the state-of-the-art procedure for Earth surface surveying. For glacier monitoring different remote sensing technologies are used for many years. With the advent of airborne LiDAR a paradigm shift in glacier monitoring has taken place. Eight years ago pioneer work within glacier surface surveying and monitoring has been carried out at the Institute of Geography (Innsbruck) within the OMEGA (Development of Operational Monitoring System for European Glacial Areas) project by using airborne LiDAR. Since 2001, 16 single airborne LiDAR campaigns have been carried out by collecting data of Hintereisferner, Kesselwandferner and adjacent small glaciers as well as their surrounding areas (Ötztal Alps, Tyrol, Austria). We present the main results of this period of glacier monitoring based on LiDAR data. One major task was to set up a geo-database system to manage the huge amount of LiDAR data, offering the opportunity to compute various point features and different rasterized data sets using this LiDAR data management and analysis system. In this context some basic routines were developed (e.g. a tool for intensity calibration, for derive intensity and point density images, and for modeling the locations of laser shot dropouts). In addition, tools for the analysis of the glacier surface have been developed: (a) a glacier delineation tool, using intensity and roughness information, (b) tools to compute and visualize the volume and elevation changes using multitemporal data, (c) a tool to calculate the ice flow velocity at the glacier surface, (d) a classification tool to detect crevasses, snow, firn, ice and debris covered ice areas, using calibrated intensity data, roughness information and modeled laser shot dropouts. For the analysis of glacial geomorphologic processes (i) a routine for the delineation of moraine ridges and rock glaciers works on the basis of break lines, (ii) a

  6. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    biological particles (1–10) are important in the transmission of diseases (11, 12) of humans (e.g., tuberculosis , influenza), farm animals (e.g...the air. Bacteria, rickettsia, viruses, protein toxins, and some neurotoxins produced by microbes have been feared as potential airborne biological

  7. Daytime CO2 urban surface fluxes from airborne measurements, eddy-covariance observations and emissions inventory in Greater London.

    PubMed

    Font, A; Grimmond, C S B; Kotthaus, S; Morguí, J-A; Stockdale, C; O'Connor, E; Priestman, M; Barratt, B

    2015-01-01

    Airborne measurements within the urban mixing layer (360 m) over Greater London are used to quantify CO(2) emissions at the meso-scale. Daytime CO(2) fluxes, calculated by the Integrative Mass Boundary Layer (IMBL) method, ranged from 46 to 104 μmol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1) for four days in October 2011. The day-to-day variability of IMBL fluxes is at the same order of magnitude as for surface eddy-covariance fluxes observed in central London. Compared to fluxes derived from emissions inventory, the IMBL method gives both lower (by 37%) and higher (by 19%) estimates. The sources of uncertainty of applying the IMBL method in urban areas are discussed and guidance for future studies is given.

  8. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems and is this requirement enforceable? 62... with my continuous emission monitoring systems and is this requirement enforceable? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make sure...

  9. Application of airborne infrared technology to monitor building heat loss. [Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, F. J.; Sampson, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The application of airborne infrared technology to the requirements for energy conservation in buildings was studied. Quantitative airborne data of the City of Ypsilanti, Michigan, were collected and processed to identify roof temperatures. A thermal scanner was flown at an altitude of 1,200 feet with two thermal bands 8.2-9.3 micrometers and 10.4-12.5 micrometers recorded by an analog system. Calibration was achieved by standard hot and cold plates. Using a thermal model to interpret ceiling insulation status, environmental factors were found to influence the relation between roof temperature and insulation. These include interior and sky temperatures, roofing materials, and the pitch and orientation of the roof. A follow-up mail survey established the ability to identify insulated and uninsulated houses from the airborne infrared data.

  10. 40 CFR 60.284 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... atmosphere from any lime kiln, recovery furnace, digester system, brown stock washer system, multiple-effect... lime kiln or smelt dissolving tank using a scrubber emission control device: (i) A monitoring device... each operating day for the recovery furnace and lime kiln. These 12-hour averages shall correspond...

  11. 40 CFR 60.284 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... atmosphere from any lime kiln, recovery furnace, digester system, brown stock washer system, multiple-effect... lime kiln or smelt dissolving tank using a scrubber emission control device: (i) A monitoring device... each operating day for the recovery furnace and lime kiln. These 12-hour averages shall correspond...

  12. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit... and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius... device in the firebox equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of...

  13. 40 CFR 60.703 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit specified under § 60.702(a... ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or ±0.5 °C, whichever is... equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being...

  14. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit... and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius... device in the firebox equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of...

  15. 40 CFR 60.703 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit specified under § 60.702(a... ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or ±0.5 °C, whichever is... equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being...

  16. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit... and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius... device in the firebox equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of...

  17. 40 CFR 60.273a - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Furnaces and Argon-Oxygen Decarburization Vessels Constructed After August 17, 1983 § 60.273a Emission... conducted at least once per day for at least three 6-minute periods when the furnace is operating in the... specified in § 60.272a(a). (d) A furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any...

  18. 40 CFR 60.273a - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Furnaces and Argon-Oxygen Decarburization Vessels Constructed After August 17, 1983 § 60.273a Emission... conducted at least once per day for at least three 6-minute periods when the furnace is operating in the... specified in § 60.272a(a). (d) A furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any...

  19. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Lead-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or operator of any lead-acid battery manufacturing facility subject to the provisions of this subpart...

  20. 40 CFR 60.734 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Calciners and Dryers in Mineral Industries § 60.734 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) With the... calciner, a feldspar rotary dryer, a fire clay rotary dryer, an industrial sand fluid bed dryer, a kaolin rotary calciner, a perlite rotary dryer, a roofing granules fluid bed dryer, a roofing granules...

  1. 40 CFR 60.734 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Calciners and Dryers in Mineral Industries § 60.734 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) With the... calciner, a feldspar rotary dryer, a fire clay rotary dryer, an industrial sand fluid bed dryer, a kaolin rotary calciner, a perlite rotary dryer, a roofing granules fluid bed dryer, a roofing granules...

  2. 40 CFR 60.734 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Calciners and Dryers in Mineral Industries § 60.734 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) With the... calciner, a feldspar rotary dryer, a fire clay rotary dryer, an industrial sand fluid bed dryer, a kaolin rotary calciner, a perlite rotary dryer, a roofing granules fluid bed dryer, a roofing granules...

  3. 40 CFR 60.734 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Calciners and Dryers in Mineral Industries § 60.734 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) With the... calciner, a feldspar rotary dryer, a fire clay rotary dryer, an industrial sand fluid bed dryer, a kaolin rotary calciner, a perlite rotary dryer, a roofing granules fluid bed dryer, a roofing granules...

  4. 40 CFR 60.734 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Calciners and Dryers in Mineral Industries § 60.734 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) With the... calciner, a feldspar rotary dryer, a fire clay rotary dryer, an industrial sand fluid bed dryer, a kaolin rotary calciner, a perlite rotary dryer, a roofing granules fluid bed dryer, a roofing granules...

  5. 40 CFR 63.848 - Emission monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must represent a complete operating cycle. (b) POM emissions from Soderberg potlines. Using the... operating cycle. The primary control system must be sampled over an 8-hour period, unless site-specific... alternative monitoring method. All runs must represent a full process cycle. (4) The owner or operator...

  6. Standoff Stack Emissions Monitoring Using Short Range Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravel, Jean-Francois Y.; Babin, Francois; Allard, Martin

    2016-06-01

    There are well documented methods for stack emissions monitoring. These are all based on stack sampling through sampling ports in well defined conditions. Once sampled, the molecules are quantified in instruments that often use optical techniques. Unfortunately sampling ports are not found on all stacks/ducts or the use of the sampling ports cannot be planned efficiently because of operational constraints or the emissions monitoring equipment cannot be driven to a remote stack/duct. Emissions monitoring using many of the same optical techniques, but at a standoff distance, through the atmosphere, using short range high spatial resolution lidar techniques was thus attempted. Standoff absorption and Raman will be discussed and results from a field campaign will be presented along with short descriptions of the apparatus. In the first phase of these tests, the molecules that were targeted were NO and O2. Spatially resolved optical measurements allow for standoff identification and quantification of molecules, much like the standardized methods, except for the fact that it is not done in the stack, but in the plume formed by the emissions from the stack. The pros and cons will also be discussed, and in particular the problem of mass emission estimates that require the knowledge of the flow rate and the distribution of molecular concentration in the plane of measurement.

  7. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  8. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station

  9. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Goff, David R.; Notestein, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interferring blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  10. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Goff, D.R.; Notestein, J.E.

    1985-01-04

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interfering blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  11. Monitoring Surface Climate With its Emissivity Derived From Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu

    2012-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared (IR) spectral emissivity data have been shown to be significant for atmospheric research and monitoring the Earth fs environment. Long-term and large-scale observations needed for global monitoring and research can be supplied by satellite-based remote sensing. Presented here is the global surface IR emissivity data retrieved from the last 5 years of Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) measurements observed from the MetOp-A satellite. Monthly mean surface properties (i.e., skin temperature T(sub s) and emissivity spectra epsilon(sub v) with a spatial resolution of 0.5x0.5-degrees latitude-longitude are produced to monitor seasonal and inter-annual variations. We demonstrate that surface epsilon(sub v) and T(sub s) retrieved with IASI measurements can be used to assist in monitoring surface weather and surface climate change. Surface epsilon(sub v) together with T(sub s) from current and future operational satellites can be utilized as a means of long-term and large-scale monitoring of Earth 's surface weather environment and associated changes.

  12. 40 CFR 75.13 - Specific provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring CO... provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions. (a) CO 2 continuous emission monitoring system. If the owner or...” shall apply rather than “SO2 mass emissions.” (b) Determination of CO 2 emissions using appendix G...

  13. 40 CFR 75.13 - Specific provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring CO... provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions. (a) CO 2 continuous emission monitoring system. If the owner or...” shall apply rather than “SO2 mass emissions.” (b) Determination of CO 2 emissions using appendix G...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  16. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  18. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  20. Airborne particle emission of a commercial 3D printer: the effect of filament material and printing temperature.

    PubMed

    Stabile, L; Scungio, M; Buonanno, G; Arpino, F; Ficco, G

    2017-03-01

    The knowledge of exposure to the airborne particle emitted from three-dimensional (3D) printing activities is becoming a crucial issue due to the relevant spreading of such devices in recent years. To this end, a low-cost desktop 3D printer based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) principle was used. Particle number, alveolar-deposited surface area, and mass concentrations were measured continuously during printing processes to evaluate particle emission rates (ERs) and factors. Particle number distribution measurements were also performed to characterize the size of the emitted particles. Ten different materials and different extrusion temperatures were considered in the survey. Results showed that all the investigated materials emit particles in the ultrafine range (with a mode in the 10-30-nm range), whereas no emission of super-micron particles was detected for all the materials under investigation. The emission was affected strongly by the extrusion temperature. In fact, the ERs increase as the extrusion temperature increases. Emission rates up to 1×10(12)  particles min(-1) were calculated. Such high ERs were estimated to cause large alveolar surface area dose in workers when 3D activities run. In fact, a 40-min-long 3D printing was found to cause doses up to 200 mm(2) .

  1. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Monitoring § 60.2941 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 12 months after...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  3. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon monoxide and for oxygen. You must..., evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring...

  4. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon monoxide and for oxygen. You must..., evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring...

  5. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Monitoring § 60.2941 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 12 months after...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  8. Monitoring cotton root rot infection in fungicide-treated cotton fields using airborne imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the authorization for use of Topguard fungicide (Section 18 exemption) on cotton in Texas to control cotton root rot in 2012 and 2013, many cotton growers used this product to treat their fields historically infected with the disease. The objectives of this study were to use airborne multispect...

  9. Using airborne multispectral imagery to monitor cotton root rot expansion within a growing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot is a serious and destructive disease that affects cotton production in the southwestern United States. Accurate delineation of cotton root rot infestations is important for cost-effective management of the disease. The objective of this study was to use airborne multispectral imagery...

  10. On the use of airborne LiDAR for braided river monitoring and water surface delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, M.; Höfle, B.; Pfeifer, N.; Rutzinger, M.; Stötter, J.

    2009-04-01

    Airborne LiDAR is an established technology for Earth surface surveying. With LiDAR data sets it is possible to derive maps with different land use classes, which are important for hydraulic simulations. We present a 3D point cloud based method for automatic water surface delineation using single as well as multitemporal LiDAR data sets. With the developed method it is possible to detect the location of the water surface with high planimetric accuracy. The multitemporal analysis of different LiDAR data sets makes it possible to visualize, monitor and quantify the changes of the flow path of braided rivers as well as derived water surface land use classes. The reflection properties from laser beams (1064 nm wavelength) on water surfaces are characterized by strong absorption or specular reflection resulting in a dominance of low signal amplitude values and a high number of laser shot dropouts (i.e. non-recorded laser echoes). The occurrence of dropouts is driven by (i) the incidence angle, (ii) the surface reflectance and (iii) the roughness of the water body. The input data of the presented delineation method are the modeled dropouts and the point cloud attributes of geometry and signal amplitude. A terrestrial orthophoto is used to explore the point cloud in order to find proper information about the geometry and amplitude attributes that are characteristic for water surfaces. The delineation method is divided into five major steps. (a) We compute calibrated amplitude values by reducing the atmospheric, topographic influences and the scan geometry for each laser echo. (b) Then, the dropouts are modeled by using the information from the time stamps, the pulse repetition frequency, the inertial measurement unit and the GPS information of the laser shots and the airplane. The next step is to calculate the standard deviation of the heights for all reflections and all modeled dropouts (c) in a specific radius around the points. (d) We compute the amplitude ratio

  11. Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Emissions From the Alberta Oil Sands Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.; McNaughton, C. S.; Freitag, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Alberta oil sands contain a vast reservoir of fossil hydrocarbons. The extremely viscous bitumen requires significant energy to extract and upgrade to make a fluid product suitable for pipelines and further refinement. The mining and upgrading process constitute a large industrial complex in an otherwise sparsely populated area of Canada. During the ARCTAS project in June/July 2008, while studying forest fire plumes, the NASA DC-8 and P-3B flew through the plume a total of 5 times. Once was a coordinated visit by both aircraft; the other 3 were fortuitous passes downwind. One study has been published about gas emissions from the complex. Here we concentrate on aerosol emissions and aging. As previously reported, there appear to be at least 2 types of plumes produced. One is an industrial-type plume with vast numbers of ultrafine particles, SO2, sulfate, black carbon (BC), CO, and NO2. The other, probably from the mining, has more organic aerosol and BC together with dust-like aerosols at 3 μm and a 1 μm mode of unknown origin. The DC-8 crossed the plume about 10 km downwind of the industrial site, giving time for the boundary layer to mix and enabling a very crude flux calculation suggesting that sulfate and organic aerosols were each produced at about 500 g/s (estimated errors are a factor of 2, chiefly due to concerns about vertical mixing). Since this was a single flight during a project dedicated to other purposes and operating conditions and weather may change fluxes considerably, this may not be a typical flux. As the plume progresses downwind, the ultrafine particles grow to sizes effective as cloud condensation nucei (CCN), SO2 is converted to sulfate, and organic aerosol is produced. During fair weather in the summer, as was the case during these flights, cloud convection pumps aerosol above the mixed layer. While the aerosol plume is difficult to detect from space, NO2 is measured by the OMI instrument an the Aura satellite and the oil sands plume

  12. Use of the selective agar medium CREAD for monitoring the level of airborne spoilage moulds in cheese production.

    PubMed

    Kure, Cathrine Finne; Borch, Elisabeth; Karlsson, Ingela; Homleid, Jens Petter; Langsrud, Solveig

    2008-02-29

    It was investigated if a selective medium for common cheese spoiling moulds (CREAD) could give more relevant information than a general mould medium in hygienic air-sampling in cheese factories. A total of 126 air-samples were taken in six Nordic cheese factories using the general mould medium DG18 and CREAD. The level and genera of air-borne mould was determined. Identification to species-level was performed for a selection of samples. In five cheese factories the mycobiota was dominated by Penicillium spp. and in one cheese factory by Cladosporium spp. The concentration of air-borne moulds varied between the cheese factories ranging from 1 to 270 cfu/m3 on DG18 with a median value of 17. The number of mould colonies was in general lower at CREAD. Identification indicated that CREAD supported growth of common spoilage moulds for cheese, such as Penicillium palitans and P. commune. The mycobiota on DG18 also consisted of moulds not commonly associated with spoilage of cheese, such as Cladosporium spp., P. brevicompactum and P. chrysogenum. Contamination of cheese with mould is periodically a problem in production of semi-hard cheese and the level of air-borne mould is therefore routinely monitored in cheese factories. A clear correlation between the total number of moulds in air and mould growth on products is not always found. The conclusion from the investigation is that it is recommended to use a selective medium for cheese spoilage moulds, such as CREAD in hygienic monitoring.

  13. Review of airborne emissions from agricultural fumigants: design and uncertainty considerations for the use of the integrated horizontal flux method.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D A; Ajwa, H A

    2011-01-01

    Ground-level area sources, such as those associated with the use of agricultural fumigants, waste disposal sites, wastewater lagoons, and other applications, present a challenge in terms of characterizing atmospheric flux as a function of time. Studies are costly in terms of field activities and laboratory analysis. The optimization of field study design, therefore, is essential to conduct cost-effective research. The collection of on-field profile data for airborne concentration, wind speed, and wind direction can be used in conjunction with the integrated horizontal flux (IHF) method to empirically compute complex source terms as a function of time. This paper focuses on complicating factors and field study design issues for the use of the IHF method. Insights and examples are drawn from five field research studies. The methods and results of characterizing the uncertainty and method precision in the emission fitting for the IHF method also are presented.

  14. Monitoring and Modeling Crop Health and Water Use via in-situ, Airborne and Space-based Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The accurate retrieval of plant water use, health and function together with soil state and condition, represent key objectives in the management and monitoring of large-scale agricultural production. In regions of water shortage or stress, understanding the sustainable use of available water supplies is critical. Unfortunately, this need is all too often limited by a lack of reliable observations. Techniques that balance the demand for reliable ground-based data with the rapid retrieval of spatially distributed crop characteristics represent a needed line of research. Data from in-situ monitoring coupled with advances in satellite retrievals of key land surface variables, provide the information necessary to characterize many crop health and water use features, including evaporation, leaf-chlorophyll and other common vegetation indices. With developments in UAV and quadcopter solutions, the opportunity to bridge the spatio-temporal gap between satellite and ground based sensing now exists, along with the capacity for customized retrievals of crop information. While there remain challenges in the routine application of autonomous airborne systems, the state of current technology and sensor developments provide the capacity to explore the operational potential. While this presentation will focus on the multi-scale estimation of crop-water use and crop-health characteristics from satellite-based sensors, the retrieval of high resolution spatially distributed information from near-surface airborne and ground-based systems will also be examined.

  15. Using acoustic emission signals for monitoring of production processes.

    PubMed

    Tönshoff, H K; Jung, M; Männel, S; Rietz, W

    2000-07-01

    The systems for in-process quality assurance offer the possibility of estimating the workpiece quality during machining. Especially for finishing processes like grinding or turning of hardened steels, it is important to control the process continuously in order to avoid rejects and refinishing. This paper describes the use of on-line monitoring systems with process-integrated measurement of acoustic emission to evaluate hard turning and grinding processes. The correlation between acoustic emission signals and subsurface integrity is determined to analyse the progression of the processes and the workpiece quality.

  16. Vacuum cleaner emissions as a source of indoor exposure to airborne particles and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D; He, Congrong; Duchaine, Caroline; Morawska, Lidia

    2012-01-03

    Vacuuming can be a source of indoor exposure to biological and nonbiological aerosols, although there are few data that describe the magnitude of emissions from the vacuum cleaner itself. We therefore sought to quantify emission rates of particles and bacteria from a large group of vacuum cleaners and investigate their potential determinants, including temperature, dust bags, exhaust filters, price, and age. Emissions of particles between 0.009 and 20 μm and bacteria were measured from 21 vacuums. Ultrafine (<100 nm) particle emission rates ranged from 4.0 × 10(6) to 1.1 × 10(11) particles min(-1). Emission of 0.54-20 μm particles ranged from 4.0 × 10(4) to 1.2 × 10(9) particles min(-1). PM(2.5) emissions were between 2.4 × 10(-1) and 5.4 × 10(3) μg min(-1). Bacteria emissions ranged from 0 to 7.4 × 10(5) bacteria min(-1) and were poorly correlated with dust bag bacteria content and particle emissions. Large variability in emission of all parameters was observed across the 21 vacuums, which was largely not attributable to the range of determinant factors we assessed. Vacuum cleaner emissions contribute to indoor exposure to nonbiological and biological aerosols when vacuuming, and this may vary markedly depending on the vacuum used.

  17. A new monitoring method using solid sorbent media for evaluation of airborne cyclophosphamide and other antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Larson, Rodney R; Khazaeli, M B; Dillon, H Kenneth

    2003-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide is a known human carcinogen. In July 1999, in a report at a conference on cytotoxic drugs in Sweden, it was indicated that cyclophosphamide (CP) was not effectively controlled by high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters.((1)) This then raised a concern that the existing air monitoring methods, which utilize polytetrafluoroethylene (a.k.a. PTFE, or Teflon) or glass fiber filters for evaluation of antineoplastics such as CP in air may also be ineffective for collection and quantification of such agents. It was decided that further evaluation of the existing filter method for monitoring antineoplastics in air be conducted. This evaluation determined that the filter method of monitoring was minimally effective for some antineoplastic agents, and that an alternate method of monitoring should be sought. The method subsequently developed utilizes a solid sorbent tube, Anasorb 708, a methacrylic acid polymer. Evaluation of this sorbent tube for adsorption and desorption properties found it had a greater than 90 percent recovery for both CP and ifosfamide. Other agents evaluated included 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel. All three agents were able to be detected and measured by use of Anasorb 708 solid sorbent tube. Validation of the method was then conducted with air pulled through the tubes via attachment to an air manifold system at air flows ranging from 1.5 to approximately 4.0 liters per minute for up to 24 hours. This evaluation did validate the Anasorb 708 tube as an effective media for collection of airborne concentrations of CP from less than 1 microgram up to approximately 2 mg (2000 microgram) per tube. This corresponds to a concentration range of approximately 0.7 microgram/m(3) (0.0007 mg/m(3)) to 0.7 mg/m(3) in a 5.76 m(3) volume of air. This method can provide accurate information on airborne concentrations of CP for purposes of conducting risk assessments or evaluation of risk management methods.

  18. The future of airborne sulfur-containing particles in the absence of fossil fuel sulfur dioxide emissions

    PubMed Central

    Perraud, Véronique; Horne, Jeremy R.; Martinez, Andrew S.; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Meinardi, Simone; Dawson, Matthew L.; Wingen, Lisa M.; Dabdub, Donald; Blake, Donald R.; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed from oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted during fossil fuel combustion, is a major precursor of new airborne particles, which have well-documented detrimental effects on health, air quality, and climate. Another precursor is methanesulfonic acid (MSA), produced simultaneously with SO2 during the atmospheric oxidation of organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as dimethyl sulfide. In the present work, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine how contributions of H2SO4 and MSA to particle formation will change in a large coastal urban area as anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of SO2 decline. The 3-dimensional University of California Irvine–California Institute of Technology airshed model is used to compare atmospheric concentrations of gas phase MSA, H2SO4, and SO2 under current emissions of fossil fuel-associated SO2 and a best-case futuristic scenario with zero fossil fuel sulfur emissions. Model additions include results from (i) quantum chemical calculations that clarify the previously uncertain gas phase mechanism of formation of MSA and (ii) a combination of published and experimental estimates of OSC emissions, such as those from marine, agricultural, and urban processes, which include pet waste and human breath. Results show that in the zero anthropogenic SO2 emissions case, particle formation potential from H2SO4 will drop by about two orders of magnitude compared with the current situation. However, particles will continue to be generated from the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic sources of OSCs, with contributions from MSA and H2SO4 of a similar order of magnitude. This could be particularly important in agricultural areas where there are significant sources of OSCs. PMID:26483454

  19. The future of airborne sulfur-containing particles in the absence of fossil fuel sulfur dioxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Perraud, Véronique; Horne, Jeremy R; Martinez, Andrew S; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Meinardi, Simone; Dawson, Matthew L; Wingen, Lisa M; Dabdub, Donald; Blake, Donald R; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-11-03

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed from oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted during fossil fuel combustion, is a major precursor of new airborne particles, which have well-documented detrimental effects on health, air quality, and climate. Another precursor is methanesulfonic acid (MSA), produced simultaneously with SO2 during the atmospheric oxidation of organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as dimethyl sulfide. In the present work, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine how contributions of H2SO4 and MSA to particle formation will change in a large coastal urban area as anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of SO2 decline. The 3-dimensional University of California Irvine-California Institute of Technology airshed model is used to compare atmospheric concentrations of gas phase MSA, H2SO4, and SO2 under current emissions of fossil fuel-associated SO2 and a best-case futuristic scenario with zero fossil fuel sulfur emissions. Model additions include results from (i) quantum chemical calculations that clarify the previously uncertain gas phase mechanism of formation of MSA and (ii) a combination of published and experimental estimates of OSC emissions, such as those from marine, agricultural, and urban processes, which include pet waste and human breath. Results show that in the zero anthropogenic SO2 emissions case, particle formation potential from H2SO4 will drop by about two orders of magnitude compared with the current situation. However, particles will continue to be generated from the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic sources of OSCs, with contributions from MSA and H2SO4 of a similar order of magnitude. This could be particularly important in agricultural areas where there are significant sources of OSCs.

  20. Airborne Measurements of the Atmospheric Emissions from a Fuel Ethanol Refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gouw, J. A.; McKeen, S. A.; Aikin, K. C.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Holloway, J. S.; Lerner, B. M.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Liao, J.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Min, K. E.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wolfe, G. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol made from corn now constitutes approximately 10% of the fuel used in gasoline vehicles in the United States. The ethanol is produced in over 200 fuel ethanol refineries across the country. In this work, we report measurements of the atmospheric emissions from the third largest fuel ethanol refinery in the U.S. located in Decatur, Illinois. Measurements were made from the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft during the NOAA Southeast Nexus (SENEX) campaign in the summer of 2013, which was part of the larger Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS). Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) agreed with reported emissions in the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI-2011). In contrast, emissions of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including ethanol, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were underestimated by an order of magnitude in the NEI-2011. By combining data from the NEI-2011 and fuel ethanol production numbers from the Renewable Fuels Association, we calculate emission intensities for SO2, NOx and VOCs, defined as the emissions per volume of fuel produced. These emission intensities can be readily compared to fuel-based emission factors from gasoline vehicles and the relative contributions made by fuel refining and fuel use to overall emissions will be quantified. Emission intensities of SO2 and NOx are particularly high for those fuel ethanol refineries that use coal as an energy source, including the plant in Decatur studied in this work. Finally, by comparing the measurements at different distances downwind, chemical transformation of the emissions could be observed, including the formation of new particles, peroxyacyl nitrates, ozone and sulfate aerosol.

  1. Classification And Monitoring Of Salt Marsh Habitats With Multi-Polarimetric Airborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair

    2013-12-01

    Within the Copernicus programme there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application of Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh vegetation habitats can be identified from polarimetric SAR remotely sensed data. Multi- frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by (1) using both supervised and unsupervised classification routines, using several polarimetric SAR data layers as backscatter intensity, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition products, and by (2) statistical analysis by regression of these different SAR data layers and botanical parameters acquired from recent ecological fieldwork.

  2. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details

    SciTech Connect

    Kosnik, D. E.; Corr, D. J.; Hopwood, T.

    2011-06-23

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT ANR PIPELINE COMPANY PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of a gaseous-emissions monitoring system for large, natural-gas-fired internal combustion engines. The device tested is the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR ...

  5. Monitoring airborne molecular contamination: a quantitative and qualitative comparison of real-time and grab-sampling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupp, Aaron M.; Rodier, Dan; Rowley, Steven

    2007-03-01

    Monitoring and controlling Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) has become essential in deep ultraviolet (DUV) photolithography for both optimizing yields and protecting tool optics. A variety of technologies have been employed for both real-time and grab-sample monitoring. Real-time monitoring has the advantage of quickly identifying "spikes" and upset conditions, while 2 - 24 hour plus grab sampling allows for extremely low detection limits by concentrating the mass of the target contaminant over a period of time. Employing a combination of both monitoring techniques affords the highest degree of control, lowest detection limits, and the most detailed data possible in terms of speciation. As happens with many technologies, there can be concern regarding the accuracy and agreement between real-time and grab-sample methods. This study utilizes side by side comparisons of two different real-time monitors operating in parallel with both liquid impingers and dry sorbent tubes to measure NIST traceable gas standards as well as real world samples. By measuring in parallel, a truly valid comparison is made between methods while verifying the results against a certified standard. The final outcome for this investigation is that a dry sorbent tube grab-sample technique produced results that agreed in terms of accuracy with NIST traceable standards as well as the two real-time techniques Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Pulsed Fluorescence Detection (PFD) while a traditional liquid impinger technique showed discrepancies.

  6. Estimating National-scale Emissions using Dense Monitoring Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Grant, A.; Young, D.; Oram, D.; Sturges, W. T.; Moncrieff, J. B.; O'Doherty, S.

    2014-12-01

    The UK's DECC (Deriving Emissions linked to Climate Change) network consists of four greenhouse gas measurement stations that are situated to constrain emissions from the UK and Northwest Europe. These four stations are located in Mace Head (West Coast of Ireland), and on telecommunication towers at Ridge Hill (Western England), Tacolneston (Eastern England) and Angus (Eastern Scotland). With the exception of Angus, which currently only measures carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), the remaining sites are additionally equipped to monitor nitrous oxide (N2O). We present an analysis of the network's CH4 and N2O observations from 2011-2013 and compare derived top-down regional emissions with bottom-up inventories, including a recently produced high-resolution inventory (UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory). As countries are moving toward national-level emissions estimation, we also address some of the considerations that need to be made when designing these national networks. One of the novel aspects of this work is that we use a hierarchical Bayesian inversion framework. This methodology, which has newly been applied to greenhouse gas emissions estimation, is designed to estimate temporally and spatially varying model-measurement uncertainties and correlation scales, in addition to fluxes. Through this analysis, we demonstrate the importance of characterizing these covariance parameters in order to properly use data from high-density monitoring networks. This UK case study highlights the ways in which this new inverse framework can be used to address some of the limitations of traditional Bayesian inverse methods.

  7. Quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from coal fires using airborne and ground-based methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, M.A.; Radke, L.F.; Heffern, E.L.; O'Keefe, J. M. K.; Smeltzer, C.D.; Hower, J.C.; Hower, J.M.; Prakash, A.; Kolker, A.; Eatwell, R.J.; ter, Schure A.; Queen, G.; Aggen, K.L.; Stracher, G.B.; Henke, K.R.; Olea, R.A.; Roman-Colon, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Coal fires occur in all coal-bearing regions of the world and number, conservatively, in the thousands. These fires emit a variety of compounds including greenhouse gases. However, the magnitude of the contribution of combustion gases from coal fires to the environment is highly uncertain, because adequate data and methods for assessing emissions are lacking. This study demonstrates the ability to estimate CO2 and CH4 emissions for the Welch Ranch coal fire, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, using two independent methods: (a) heat flux calculated from aerial thermal infrared imaging (3.7-4.4td-1 of CO2 equivalent emissions) and (b) direct, ground-based measurements (7.3-9.5td-1 of CO2 equivalent emissions). Both approaches offer the potential for conducting inventories of coal fires to assess their gas emissions and to evaluate and prioritize fires for mitigation. ?? 2011.

  8. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  9. Monitoring damage growth in titanium matrix composites using acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Prosser, W. H.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the acoustic emission (AE) technique to locate and monitor damage growth in titanium matrix composites (TMC) was investigated. Damage growth was studied using several optical techniques including a long focal length, high magnification microscope system with image acquisition capabilities. Fracture surface examinations were conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AE technique was used to locate damage based on the arrival times of AE events between two sensors. Using model specimens exhibiting a dominant failure mechanism, correlations were established between the observed damage growth mechanisms and the AE results in terms of the events amplitude. These correlations were used to monitor the damage growth process in laminates exhibiting multiple modes of damage. Results revealed that the AE technique is a viable and effective tool to monitor damage growth in TMC.

  10. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide..., maintain, and operate a continuous emission monitoring system for nitrogen oxides. Install the...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate pollutant...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA to Part 60 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate pollutant...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  5. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... following methods in appendix A of this part to measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide) 1. Nitrogen Oxides (Class... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA to Part 60 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  8. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  9. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class... minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems, as appropriate, and...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class... minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems, as appropriate, and...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide... to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide... to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class... minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems, as appropriate, and...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide... to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  15. Implications of ammonia emissions from post-combustion carbon capture for airborne particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinhyok; McCoy, Sean T; Adams, Peter J

    2015-04-21

    Amine scrubbing, a mature post-combustion carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, could increase ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) due to its ammonia emissions. To capture 2.0 Gt CO2/year, for example, it could emit 32 Gg NH3/year in the United States given current design targets or 15 times higher (480 Gg NH3/year) at rates typical of current pilot plants. Employing a chemical transport model, we found that the latter emission rate would cause an increase of 2.0 μg PM2.5/m(3) in nonattainment areas during wintertime, which would be troublesome for PM2.5-burdened areas, and much lower increases during other seasons. Wintertime PM2.5 increases in nonattainment areas were fairly linear at a rate of 3.4 μg PM2.5/m(3) per 1 Tg NH3, allowing these results to be applied to other CCS emissions scenarios. The PM2.5 impacts are modestly uncertain (±20%) depending on future emissions of SO2, NOx, and NH3. The public health costs of CCS NH3 emissions were valued at $31-68 per tonne CO2 captured, comparable to the social cost of carbon itself. Because the costs of solvent loss to CCS operators are lower than the social costs of CCS ammonia, there is a regulatory interest to limit ammonia emissions from CCS.

  16. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  17. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  18. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  19. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  20. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  2. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  3. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  5. Evaluation of airborne image data and LIDAR main stem data for monitoring physical resources within the Colorado River ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.; Rosiek, Mark R.; Galuszka, Donna M.

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated near-infrared LIDAR data acquired over the main-stem channel at four long-term monitoring sites within the Colorado River ecosystem (CRE) to determine the ability of these data to provide reliable indications in changes in water elevation over time. Our results indicate that there is a good correlation between the LIDAR water-surface elevations and ground measurements of water-edge elevation, but there are also inherent errors in the LIDAR data. The elevation errors amount to about 50 cm and therefore temporal changes in water-surface elevation that exceed this value by the majority of data at a particular location can be deemed significant or real. This study also evaluated airborne image data for producing photogrammetric elevation data and for automated mapping of sand bars and debris flows within the CRE. The photogrammetric analyses show that spatial resolutions of ≤ 10 cm are required to produce vertical accuracies

  6. Airborne monitoring of crop canopy temperatures for irrigation scheduling and yield prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Goettelman, R. C.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Lapado, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Airborne and ground measurements were made on April 1 and 29, 1976, over a USDA test site consisting mostly of wheat in various stages of water stress, but also including alfalfa and bare soil. These measurements were made to evaluate the feasibility of measuring crop temperatures from aircraft so that a parameter termed stress degree day, SDD, could be computed. Ground studies have shown that SDD is a valuable indicator of a crop's water needs, and that it can be related to irrigation scheduling and yield. The aircraft measurement program required predawn and afternoon flights coincident with minimum and maximum crop temperatures. Airborne measurements were made with an infrared line scanner and with color IR photography. The scanner data were registered, subtracted, and color-coded to yield pseudo-colored temperature-difference images. Pseudo-colored images reading directly in daily SDD increments were also produced. These maps enable a user to assess plant water status and thus determine irrigation needs and crop yield potentials.

  7. Fatigue crack monitoring with coupled piezoelectric film acoustic emission sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changjiang

    Fatigue-induced cracking is a commonly seen problem in civil infrastructures reaching their original design life. A number of high-profile accidents have been reported in the past that involved fatigue damage in structures. Such incidences often happen without prior warnings due to lack of proper crack monitoring technique. In order to detect and monitor the fatigue crack, acoustic emission (AE) technique, has been receiving growing interests recently. AE can provide continuous and real-time monitoring data on damage progression in structures. Piezoelectric film AE sensor measures stress-wave induced strain in ultrasonic frequency range and its feasibility for AE signal monitoring has been demonstrated recently. However, extensive work in AE monitoring system development based on piezoelectric film AE sensor and sensor characterization on full-scale structures with fatigue cracks, have not been done. A lack of theoretical formulations for understanding the AE signals also hinders the use of piezoelectric film AE sensors. Additionally, crack detection and source localization with AE signals is a very important area yet to be explored for this new type of AE sensor. This dissertation presents the results of both analytical and experimental study on the signal characteristics of surface stress-wave induced AE strain signals measured by piezoelectric film AE sensors in near-field and an AE source localization method based on sensor couple theory. Based on moment tensor theory, generalized expression for AE strain signal is formulated. A special case involving the response of piezoelectric film AE sensor to surface load is also studied, which could potentially be used for sensor calibration of this type of sensor. A new concept of sensor couple theory based AE source localization technique is proposed and validated with both simulated and experimental data from fatigue test and field monitoring. Two series of fatigue tests were conducted to perform fatigue crack

  8. Bayesian estimation of airborne fugitive emissions using a Gaussian plume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Bamdad; Stockie, John M.

    2016-09-01

    A new method is proposed for estimating the rate of fugitive emissions of particulate matter from multiple time-dependent sources via measurements of deposition and concentration. We cast this source inversion problem within the Bayesian framework, and use a forward model based on a Gaussian plume solution. We present three alternate models for constructing the prior distribution on the emission rates as functions of time. Next, we present an industrial case study in which our framework is applied to estimate the rate of fugitive emissions of lead particulates from a smelter in Trail, British Columbia, Canada. The Bayesian framework not only provides an approximate solution to the inverse problem, but also quantifies the uncertainty in the solution. Using this information we perform an uncertainty propagation study in order to assess the impact of the estimated sources on the area surrounding the industrial site.

  9. Methodology for Airborne Quantification of NOx fluxes over Central London and Comparison to Emission Inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, A. R.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Purvis, R.; Carslaw, D.; Misztal, P. K.; Metzger, S.; Beevers, S.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hewitt, C. N.; Shaw, M.; Karl, T.; Davison, B.

    2015-12-01

    The emission of pollutants is a major problem in today's cities. Emission inventories are a key tool for air quality management, with the United Kingdom's National and London Atmospheric Emission Inventories (NAEI & LAEI) being good examples. Assessing the validity of such inventoried is important. Here we report on the technical methodology of matching flux measurements of NOx over a city to inventory estimates. We used an eddy covariance technique to directly measure NOx fluxes from central London on an aircraft flown at low altitude. NOx mixing ratios were measured at 10 Hz time resolution using chemiluminescence (to measure NO) and highly specific photolytic conversion of NO2 to NO (to measure NO2). Wavelet transformation was used to calculate instantaneous fluxes along the flight track for each flight leg. The transformation allows for both frequency and time information to be extracted from a signal, where we quantify the covariance between the de-trended vertical wind and concentration to derive a flux. Comparison between the calculated fluxes and emission inventory data was achieved using a footprint model, which accounts for contributing source. Using both a backwards lagrangian model and cross-wind dispersion function, we find the footprint extent ranges from 5 to 11 Km in distance from the sample point. We then calculate a relative weighting matrix for each emission inventory within the calculated footprint. The inventories are split into their contributing source sectors with each scaled using up to date emission factors, giving a month; day and hourly scaled estimate which is then compared to the measurement.

  10. Airborne studies of the emissions from the volcanic eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, P V; Radke, L F; Eltgroth, M W; Hegg, D A

    1981-02-20

    The concentrations of particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter in the ash emissions from Mount St. Helens have been more than 1000 times greater than those in the ambient air. Mass loadings of particles less than 2 micrometers in diameter were generally several hundred micrograms per cubic meter. In the ash clouds, produced by the large eruption on 18 May 1980, the concentrations of several trace gases generally were low. In other emissions, significant, but variable, concentrations of sulfur gases were measured. The 18 May eruption produced nuées ardentes, lightning flashes, and volcanic hail.

  11. Airborne studies of the emissions from the volcanic eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, P.V.; Radke, L.F.; Eltgroth, M.W.; Hegg, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter in the ash emissions from Mount St. Helens have been more than 1000 times greater than those in the ambient air. Mass loadings of particles less than 2 micrometers in diameter were generally several hundred micrograms per cubic meter. In the ash clouds, produced by the large eruption on 18 May 1980, the concentrations of several trace gases generally were low. In other emissions, significant, but variable, concentrations of sulfur gases were measured. The 18 May eruption produced nuees ardentes, lightning flashes, and volcanic hail.

  12. Quantification of methane emission rates from coal mine ventilation shafts using airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krings, T.; Gerilowski, K.; Buchwitz, M.; Hartmann, J.; Sachs, T.; Erzinger, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2012-10-01

    The quantification of emissions of the greenhouse gas methane is essential for attributing the roles of anthropogenic activity and natural phenomena in global climate change. Our current measurement systems and networks whilst having improved during the last decades, are deficient in many respects. For example, the emissions from localised and point sources such as landfills or fossil fuel exploration sites are not readily assessed. A tool developed to better understand point sources of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane is the optical remote sensing instrument MAMAP, operated from aircraft. After a recent instrument modification, retrievals of the column averaged dry air mole fractions for methane XCH4 (or for carbon dioxide XCO2) derived from MAMAP data, have a precision of about 0.4% or better and thus can be used to infer emission rate estimates using an optimal estimation inverse Gaussian plume model or a simple integral approach. CH4 emissions from two coal mine ventilation shafts in Western Germany surveyed during the AIRMETH 2011 measurement campaign are used as examples to demonstrate and assess the value of MAMAP data for quantifying CH4 from point sources. While the knowledge of the wind is an important input parameter in the retrieval of emissions from point sources and is generally extracted from models, additional information from a turbulence probe operated on-board the same aircraft was utilised to enhance the quality of the emission estimates. Although flight patterns were optimised for remote sensing measurements, data from an in-situ analyser for CH4 were found to be in good agreement with retrieved dry columns of CH4 from MAMAP and could be used to investigate and refine underlying assumptions for the inversion procedures. With respect to the total emissions of the mine at the time of the overflight, the inferred emission rate of 50.4 kt CH4 yr-1 has a difference of less than 1% compared to officially reported values by the mine

  13. Monitoring, reporting and verifying emissions in the climate economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellassen, Valentin; Stephan, Nicolas; Afriat, Marion; Alberola, Emilie; Barker, Alexandra; Chang, Jean-Pierre; Chiquet, Caspar; Cochran, Ian; Deheza, Mariana; Dimopoulos, Christopher; Foucherot, Claudine; Jacquier, Guillaume; Morel, Romain; Robinson, Roderick; Shishlov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) of greenhouse-gas emissions is the cornerstone of carbon pricing and management mechanisms. Here we consider peer-reviewed articles and 'grey literature' related to existing MRV requirements and their costs. A substantial part of the literature is the regulatory texts of the 15 most important carbon pricing and management mechanisms currently implemented. Based on a comparison of key criteria such as the scope, cost, uncertainty and flexibility of procedures, we conclude that conventional wisdom on MRV is not often promoted in existing carbon pricing mechanisms. Quantification of emissions uncertainty and incentives to reduce this uncertainty are usually only partially applied, if at all. Further, the time and resources spent on small sources of emissions would be expected to be limited. Although provisions aiming at an effort proportionate to the amount of emissions at stake -- 'materiality' -- are widespread, they are largely outweighed by economies of scale: in all schemes, MRV costs per tonne are primarily driven by the size of the source.

  14. COCA: deriving urban emissions and the carbon exchange of a forested region using airborne CO2 and CO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiss, H.; Schmitgen, S.; Ciais, P.; Neininger, B.; Baeumle, M.; Brunet, Y.; Kley, D.

    2002-05-01

    A crucial challenge in measuring the partitioning of sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 is the separation of regional anthropogenic CO2 sources from biogenic activity. The aim of the COCA project is to quantify the fossil fuel and biogenic CO2 fractions using continuous airborne CO2 and CO measurements, where CO acts as a tracer for anthropogenic CO2. At first part of the project COCA an attempt was made to measure daytime biogenic CO2 fluxes over a forest area (about 15 by 30 km size). The campaign took place around the CARBOEUROFLUX site ``Le Bray'' (Pinus pinaster) close to Bordeaux in France end of June 2001 Based on continuous airborne CO2, H2O and CO flux and concentration measurements a Lagrangian budgeting approach was chosen to measure regional CO2 deposition fluxes. The objective is to determine the CO2 uptake of the extended forest area from the CO2/CO gradients up- and downwind of the ecosystem, using CO as air mass tracer and such estimating the influence of anthropogenic CO2 advected into the area First results of the summer flight on June 23rd will be shown, where fair wind speeds (~5 m/s) and a low CBL height led to the observation of a clear decrease in CO2 at the downwind flight stacks with basically constant CO concentrations. For other summer flights with very low wind speeds, local effects dominate the observations leading to a larger variability in the observations. Both, correlations and anti-correlations of CO2 with the anthropogenic tracer CO have been observed. Positive correlations indicate fresh plumes of anthropogenic CO2. Negative correlations are indicative of entrainment of free tropospheric air, that was marked by relatively higher CO2 and lower CO concentrations than the average CBL concentrations. During a second campaign the variance of anthropogenic CO and CO2 emissions of a large city unaffected by biogenic processes has been studied. This campaign was carried out on February 16 and 17, 2002 over the Paris metropolitan area

  15. How to select a continuous emission monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Radigan, M.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Selecting a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) involves more than picking an analyzer. Successful CEMS interface sampling and data-management systems to produce accurate, reliable reports required by regulatory agencies. Following objective guidelines removes some of the misery from CEMS shopping. However, prospective CEMS buyers should do their homework and develop well-thought-out, detailed specification for the processes' sampling criteria. Fine tuning the analyzer/data management system can eliminate maintenance costs and keep the facility operating within its permit restrictions.

  16. Lidar for monitoring methane emission in Siberian permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkanich, A. S.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Sidorov, I.; Elizarov, V. V.; Mak, A. A.; Kascheev, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Identifying methane anomalies responsible for the temperature increase, by hiking trails in the Arctic requires great human labor .According to the tentative forecast by the year 2100 Arctic permafrost will greatly deteriorate, which will have numerous consequences. Indeed, release of less than 0.1% of the organic carbon stored in the upper 100-meter permafrost level (approximately 10000 ppm of carbon in the CH4 form) can double concentration of atmospheric methane, which is roughly 20 times more potent greenhouse gas than the CO2. Necessary to create a Raman lidar for monitoring of emissions of methane hydrate from the permafrost.

  17. Airborne Measurements of Emissions from Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Activities in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Roiger, A.; Raut, J.; Rose, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Reiter, A.; Thomas, J. L.; Marelle, L.; Law, K.; Schlager, H.

    2013-12-01

    A rapid decline of Arctic sea ice is expected to promote hydrocarbon extraction in the Arctic, which in turn will increase emissions of atmospheric pollutants. To investigate impacts of different pollution sources on the Arctic atmosphere, an aircraft campaign based in northern Norway was conducted in July 2012, as a part of the EU ACCESS (Arctic Climate Change Economy and Society) project. One of the flights focused on measuring emissions from various oil/gas exploration and production facilities ~110 km south of the Arctic Circle in the Norwegian Sea. Fresh and aged (from 5 minutes to 2.5 hours old) exhaust plumes from oil/gas production platforms, drilling rigs and tankers were probed with extensive aerosol and trace gas instrumentations. It was found that different types of facilities emit plumes with distinct chemical compositions. For example, tanker plumes were characterized by high SO2 concentration and high fraction of non-volatile particles while plumes from oil/gas production platforms showed significant increase in the nucleation mode particle concentration. Drilling rigs were found to be high black carbon emitters. In addition to the fresh plumes, relatively aged plumes (1.5 - 2.5 hours old) from a facility under development were measured. Even in these aged plumes, total particle concentrations were more than 6 times higher than the background concentration. Therefore, emissions from oil and gas activities are expected to have a significant impact on local air quality and atmospheric composition. With the aid of FLEXPART-WRF (a Lagrangian dispersion model) simulations, the results of this study will be used to validate and improve current emission inventories. In the future, these improved emission inventories can be used in regional and global chemical transport models to more accurately predict future Arctic air pollution.

  18. Airborne Measurements and Emission Estimates of Greenhouse Gases and Other Trace Constituents From the 2013 California Yosemite Rim Wildfire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Singh, H. B.; Tanaka, T.; Roby, M. C.; Hamill, P.; Clements, C. B.; Lareau, N.; Contezac, J.; Blake, D. R.; Simpson, I. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Diskin, G. S.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Choi, Y.; Ryerson, T. B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Loewenstein, M.; Gore, W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents airborne measurements of multiple atmospheric trace constituents including greenhouse gases (such as CO2, CH4, O3) and biomass burning tracers (such as CO, CH3CN) downwind of an exceptionally large wildfire. In summer 2013, the Rim wildfire, ignited just west of the Yosemite National Park, California, and burned over 250,000 acres of the forest during the 2-month period (17 August to 24 October) before it was extinguished. The Rim wildfire plume was intercepted by flights carried out by the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) on 29 August and the NASA DC-8, as part of SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys), on 26 and 27 August during its intense, primary burning period. AJAX revisited the wildfire on 10 September when the conditions were increasingly smoldering, with slower growth. The more extensive payload of the DC-8 helped to bridge key measurements that were not available as part of AJAX (e. g. CO). Data analyses are presented in terms of emission ratios (ER), emission factors (EF) and combustion efficiency and are compared with previous wildfire studies. ERs were 8.0 ppb CH4/(ppm CO2) on 26 August, 6.5 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)1 on 29 August and 18.3 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)1 on 10 September 2013. The increase in CH4 ER from 6.5 to 8.0 ppb CH4/(ppm CO2) during the primary burning period to 18.3 ppb CH4/(ppm CO2) during the fire's slower growth period likely indicates enhanced CH4 emissions from increased smoldering combustion relative to flaming combustion. Given the magnitude of the Rim wildfire, the impacts it had on regional air quality and the limited sampling of wildfire emissions in the western United States to date, this study provides a valuable dataset to support forestry and regional air quality management, including observations of ERs of a wide number of species from the Rim wildfire.

  19. Airborne measurements and emission estimates of greenhouse gases and other trace constituents from the 2013 California Yosemite Rim wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Singh, H. B.; Tanaka, T.; Roby, M. C.; Hamill, P.; Clements, C. B.; Lareau, N.; Contezac, J.; Blake, D. R.; Simpson, I. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Diskin, G. S.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Choi, Y.; Ryerson, T. B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Loewenstein, M.; Gore, W.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents airborne measurements of multiple atmospheric trace constituents including greenhouse gases (such as CO2, CH4, O3) and biomass burning tracers (such as CO, CH3CN) downwind of an exceptionally large wildfire. In summer 2013, the Rim wildfire, ignited just west of the Yosemite National Park, California, and burned over 250,000 acres of the forest during the 2-month period (17 August to 24 October) before it was extinguished. The Rim wildfire plume was intercepted by flights carried out by the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) on 29 August and the NASA DC-8, as part of SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys), on 26 and 27 August during its intense, primary burning period. AJAX revisited the wildfire on 10 September when the conditions were increasingly smoldering, with slower growth. The more extensive payload of the DC-8 helped to bridge key measurements that were not available as part of AJAX (e. g. CO). Data analyses are presented in terms of emission ratios (ER), emission factors (EF) and combustion efficiency and are compared with previous wildfire studies. ERs were 8.0 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 on 26 August, 6.5 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 on 29 August and 18.3 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 on 10 September 2013. The increase in CH4 ER from 6.5 to 8.0 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 during the primary burning period to 18.3 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 during the fire's slower growth period likely indicates enhanced CH4 emissions from increased smoldering combustion relative to flaming combustion. Given the magnitude of the Rim wildfire, the impacts it had on regional air quality and the limited sampling of wildfire emissions in the western United States to date, this study provides a valuable dataset to support forestry and regional air quality management, including observations of ERs of a wide number of species from the Rim wildfire.

  20. Laser measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. [airborne oil spill monitoring application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Kincaid, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial dual-channel laser system has been developed for the measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. An empty wedge-shaped sample cell is first translated laterally through a He-Ne laser beam to measure the differential thickness using interference fringes in reflection. The wedge cell is carefully filled with the oil sample and translated through the coaxially positioned dye laser beam for the differential attenuation or extinction measurement. Optional use of the instrumentation as a single-channel extinction measurement system and also as a refractometer is detailed. The system and calibration techniques were applied to the measurement of two crude oils whose extinction values were required to complete the analysis of airborne laser data gathered over four controlled spills.

  1. Airborne Electromagnetic Surveys for Baseline Permafrost Mapping and Potential Long-Term Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Walvoord, M. A.; Cannia, J. C.; Voss, C. I.

    2010-12-01

    Concerns over the impacts of climate change have recently energized research on permafrost and the potential impacts that thawing permafrost may have on groundwater flow, infrastructure, ecosystems, and contaminant transport. There is typically little known at watershed or regional scales about the three-dimensional distribution of permafrost, including its thickness and the distribution of taliks (unfrozen zones), and other permafrost features thereby impeding the assessment of consequences of permafrost degradation. Airborne remote sensing methods for mapping permafrost are attractive, particularly in arctic and subarctic studies where ground access is difficult and ecosystems are fragile. As part of its Climate Effect Network (CEN) research and observation effort in the Yukon River Basin, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has initiated an effort to map permafrost using airborne geophysics to complement hydrologic and biogeochemical studies in the study area. Interpretation of airborne geophysical data will be integrated with other remotely sensed data to supply critical hydrogeologic information needed for refining groundwater flow models in the Yukon Flats Basin. Airborne surveys also provide baseline data for estimating 3D permafrost distribution that can be compared to future permafrost surveys to estimate a volumetric change over time. In June 2010, the USGS conducted a helicopter frequency domain electromagnetic (HFEM) survey in the area of Fort Yukon, Alaska to map permafrost distribution. Flight line data processing has been completed that includes data leveling and a simple transformation to resistivity-depth along the flight lines. Preliminary resistivity-depth images from the survey can be qualitatively compared with known permafrost features and used to establish new permafrost features. Electrical properties of earth materials are impacted by temperature and the presence of ice causing them to become substantially more resistive when frozen. The area

  2. New specific indicators for qPCR monitoring of airborne microorganisms emitted by composting plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Olivier; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Wéry, Nathalie

    2011-09-01

    Bioaerosols emitted from composting plants are an issue because of their potential harmful impact on public or workers' health. There is a major lack of knowledge concerning the dispersal of airborne microorganisms emitted by composting plants and the consequent potential exposure of nearby residents. This inadequate knowledge is partly due to the fact that there is currently no method for specifically tracing these microorganisms in the air. The objective of this study was to validate the use of microbial groups as indicators of composting bioaerosols by comparing their concentration in air samples, whether impacted by composting activity or not. Three potential microbial indicators were chosen among the core species of composting bioaerosols. They belong to the genus Saccharopolyspora, to the Thermoactinomycetaceae and to the fungus Thermomyces. Quantitative PCR systems using TaqMan probes were designed to quantify each of the three phylotypes in air samples collected outdoors in natural environments and at composting plants. Compost-turning operations at industrial plants resulted in an increase in the concentration of the three phylotypes of at least 2 orders of magnitude when compared to the concentration measured in control samples collected upwind, and of at least 1 order of magnitude compared to the background concentration measured in natural environments unaffected by industrial activity. In conclusion, these three thermophilic phylotypes can be used as indicators of airborne microorganisms emitted by industrial composting plants. They may be particularly relevant in studying the dispersal of bioaerosols around composting plants and the exposure of nearby residents. This is the first time that indicators of compost bioaerosols have been validated by comparing their concentrations in impacted samples to their background levels in natural environments.

  3. Mapping and Monitoring Delmarva Fox Squirrel Habitat Using an Airborne LiDAR Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Ross; Ratnaswamy, Mary; Keller, Cherry

    2004-01-01

    Twenty five hundred thirty nine kilometers of airborne laser profiling and videography data were acquired over the state of Delaware during the summer of 2000. The laser ranging measurements and video from approximately one-half of that data set (1304 km) were analyzed to identify and locate forested sites that might potentially support populations of Delmarva fox squirrel (DFS, Sciurus niger cinereus). The DFS is an endangered species previously endemic to tall, dense, mature forests with open understories on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay. The airborne LiDAR employed in this study can measure forest canopy height and canopy closure, but cannot measure or infer understory canopy conditions. Hence the LiDAR must be viewed as a tool to map potential, not actual, habitat. Fifty-three potentially suitable DFS sites were identified in the 1304 km of flight transect data. Each of the 53 sites met the following criteria according to the LiDAR and video record: (1 ) at least 120m of contiguous forest; (2) an average canopy height greater than 20m; (3) an average canopy closure of >80%; and (4) no roofs, impervious surface (e.g., asphalt, concrete), and/or open water anywhere along the 120m length of the laser segment. Thirty-two of the 53 sites were visited on the ground and measurements taken for a DFS habitat suitability model. Seventy eight percent of the sites (25 of 32) were judged by the model to be suited to supporting a DFS population. Twenty-eight of the 32 sites visited in the field were in forest cover types (hardwood, mixed wood, conifer, wetlands) according to a land cover GIS map. Of these, 23 (82%) were suited to support DFS. The remaining 4 sites were located in nonforest cover types - agricultural or residential areas. Two of the four, or 50% were suited to the DFS. All of the LiDAR flight data, 2539 km, were analyzed to

  4. Ship emissions of SO2 and NO2: DOAS measurements from airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, N.; Mellqvist, J.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Balzani, J.

    2011-10-01

    A unique methodology to measure gas fluxes of SO2 and NO2 from ships has been developed in a Swedish national project using optical remote sensing. The measurement system is based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy using reflected skylight from the water surface as light source. A grating spectrometer records spectra around 311 nm and 440 nm, respectively, with the telescope pointed downward at a 30° angle from the horizon. The mass column values of SO2 and NO2 are retrieved from each spectrum and integrated across the plume. To obtain the total emission in kg h-1 the resulting total mass across the plume is multiplied with the apparent wind, i.e. a dilution factor corresponding to the vector between the wind and the ship speed. The system was tested in two feasibility studies in the Baltic Sea and Kattegat, from a CASA-212 airplane in 2008 and in the North Sea outside Rotterdam from a Dauphin helicopter in an EU campaign in 2009. In the Baltic Sea the average SO2 emission out of 22 ships was (54 ± 13) kg h-1, and the average NO2 emission was (33 ± 8) kg h-1, out of 13 ships. In the North Sea the average SO2 emission out of 21 ships was (42 ± 11) kg h-1, NO2 was not measured here. The system was able to detect plumes of SO2 in 60% of the measurements when the described method was used. The optical measurement carried out on a passenger ferry on two consecutive days was compared to onboard emission data obtained from analysed fuel content and power consumption. The comparison shows agreement of (-30 ± 14) % and (-41 ± 11) %, respectively, for two days, with equal measurement precision of about 20%, this indicates the presence of systematic error sources that are yet unaccounted for when deriving the flux. Two such error sources are the difficulty in estimating the optical path of the ocean scattered light due to waves, and direct and multiple scattering in the exhaust plume. Rough estimates of these sources have been accounted for in the total

  5. Off-site population radiological dose and risk assessment for potential airborne emissions from the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, H.I.; Biwer, B.M.; Blunt, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Radiological doses and health risks to the population around the Weldon Spring site from potential airborne emissions during remedial action at the chemical plant area of the site have been assessed with the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 computer code. Two treatment options are being considered for waste produced by site cleanup activities: chemical stabilization/solidification and vitrification. Over the entire cleanup period of 7 years, the collective dose received by the people who live within 80 km (50 mi) of the site (about 3 million persons) is estimated to be about 34 person-rem for the chemical stabilization/ solidification option and 32 person-rem for the vitrification option. By comparison, the same population is expected to receive about 6 {times} 10{sup 6} person-rem from natural background radiation during that time. If only the population within a reasonable radius of impact is considered (about 10,700 persons live within 5 km [3 mi] of the site), the remedial action activities are estimated to result in about 5 person-rem over the entire cleanup period; the same population is expected to receive about 20,000 person-rem from natural background radiation during that time. Because the doses are low, no cancers or genetic effects are expected to occur among the population around the Weldon Spring site as a result of exposures resulting from potential radioactive releases to the atmosphere during remediation of the chemicalplant area.

  6. Off-site population radiological dose and risk assessment for potential airborne emissions from the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, H.I.; Biwer, B.M.; Blunt, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Radiological doses and health risks to the population around the Weldon Spring site from potential airborne emissions during remedial action at the chemical plant area of the site have been assessed with the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 computer code. Two treatment options are being considered for waste produced by site cleanup activities: chemical stabilization/solidification and vitrification. Over the entire cleanup period of 7 years, the collective dose received by the people who live within 80 km (50 mi) of the site (about 3 million persons) is estimated to be about 34 person-rem for the chemical stabilization/ solidification option and 32 person-rem for the vitrification option. By comparison, the same population is expected to receive about 6 [times] 10[sup 6] person-rem from natural background radiation during that time. If only the population within a reasonable radius of impact is considered (about 10,700 persons live within 5 km [3 mi] of the site), the remedial action activities are estimated to result in about 5 person-rem over the entire cleanup period; the same population is expected to receive about 20,000 person-rem from natural background radiation during that time. Because the doses are low, no cancers or genetic effects are expected to occur among the population around the Weldon Spring site as a result of exposures resulting from potential radioactive releases to the atmosphere during remediation of the chemicalplant area.

  7. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  8. Remote sensing of large scale methane emission sources with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields and validation through airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, K.; Krautwurst, S.; Kolyer, R.; Jonsson, H.; Krings, T.; Horstjann, M.; Leifer, I.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Fladeland, M. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    During three flights performed with the MAMAP (Methane Airborne MAPper) airborne remote sensing instrument in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - large scale methane plumes were detected over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields in the period between June 3 and 13, 2014. MAMAP was installed for these flights aboard of the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operate by the Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5 hole turbulence probe as well as a atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point and other atmospheric parameters. Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer will be used for validation of MAMAP remotely sensed data by acquiring vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at a fixed downwind distance. Precise airborne wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground based wind data from the nearby airport will be used to estimate emission rates from the remote sensed and in-situ measured data. Remote sensed and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for the three flights will be presented.

  9. Multiplexing Technology for Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William; Percy, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of damage mechanisms such as cracks and delaminations generate acoustic waves, which propagate through a structure. These waves can be detected and analyzed to provide the location and severity of damage as part of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. This methodology of damage detection is commonly known as acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and is widely used on a variety of applications on civil structures. AE has been widely considered for SHM of aerospace vehicles. Numerous successful ground and flight test demonstrations have been performed, which show the viability of the technology for damage monitoring in aerospace structures. However, one significant current limitation for application of AE techniques on aerospace vehicles is the large size, mass, and power requirements for the necessary monitoring instrumentation. To address this issue, a prototype multiplexing approach has been developed and demonstrated in this study, which reduces the amount of AE monitoring instrumentation required. Typical time division multiplexing techniques that are commonly used to monitor strain, pressure and temperature sensors are not applicable to AE monitoring because of the asynchronous and widely varying rates of AE signal occurrence. Thus, an event based multiplexing technique was developed. In the initial prototype circuit, inputs from eight sensors in a linear array were multiplexed into two data acquisition channels. The multiplexer rapidly switches, in less than one microsecond, allowing the signals from two sensors to be acquired by a digitizer. The two acquired signals are from the sensors on either side of the trigger sensor. This enables the capture of the first arrival of the waves, which cannot be accomplished with the signal from the trigger sensor. The propagation delay to the slightly more distant neighboring sensors makes this possible. The arrival time from this first arrival provides a more accurate source location

  10. Leak detection by acoustic emission monitoring. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Bernard; Winder, A. A.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of detecting leaks from underground storage tanks or pipelines using acoustic emissions. An extensive technical literature review established that distinguishable acoustic emission signals will be generated when a storage tank is subjected to deformation stresses. A parametric analysis was performed which indicated that leak rates less than 0.1 gallons per hour can be detected for leak sizes less than 1/32 inch with 99% probability if the transient signals were sensed with an array of accelerometers (cemented to the tank or via acoustic waveguides), each having a sensitivity greater than 250 mv/g over a frequency range of 0.1 to 4000 Hz, and processed in a multi-channel Fourier spectrum analyzer with automatic threshold detection. An acoustic transient or energy release processor could conceivably detect the onset of the leak at the moment of fracture of the tank wall. The primary limitations to realizing reliable and robust acoustic emission monitoring of underground fluid leaks are the various masking noise sources prevalent at Air Force bases, which are attributed to aircraft, motor traffic, pump station operation, and ground tremors.

  11. Implementation of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The updated status of TEMPO, as it proceeds from formulation phase into implementation phase is presented. TEMPO, the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. GEO-CAPE is not planned for implementation this decade. However, instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form parts of a global GEO constellation for pollution monitoring later this decade, with a major focus on intercontinental

  12. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits specified in... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment...

  13. Landslide Investigation by Repeat Airborne LiDAR and Ground Monitoring in the Western Suburb of Sapporo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, M.; Marutani, T.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents landslide investigation using the combination of airborne LiDAR and ground monitoring data. The study site is located on the Teine Landslide (width: 2 km, Length: 6.5 km) in the western suburb of Sapporo city in Hokkaido Island, Japan, which collapsed more than 50,000 years ago. Since then streams have been developing and incising the landslide mass consisted of rock debris and volcanic deposits, presently causing a series of small deep-seated landslides along the banks. Because Sapporo is the economic center of Hokkaido and the suburb is expanding at the toe of the Teine slide, it is important to understand the behaviors of these active slopes to protect residents and infrastructures from unexpected disasters possibly triggered by an intense storm or earthquake. The LiDAR data for the area was first obtained by a manned helicopter in August 2010, and another survey by an unmanned helicopter is planned in autumn 2014 to estimate their activities from changes in the ground surfaces during the period from 2010 to 2014. Ground water level and landslide mass movements have also been monitored on site by using the coring holes for sampling since 2013. The combination of the data sets can make up the deficits of these methods, e.g., errors created through data processing for LiDAR survey and spatially limited information for ground monitoring, enabling to provide a solid three dimensional view of the slope movements. The notion obtained can be utilized to predict their future behaviors as well as to discover active but hiding landslides nearby. This study also showed that repeat monitoring of sites is a way of utilizing UAVs, particularly in terms of cost and convenience.

  14. Monitoring personal, indoor, and outdoor exposures to metals in airborne particulate matter: Risk of contamination during sampling, handling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Pat E.; Wheeler, Amanda J.; Hassan, Nouri M.; Filiatreault, Alain; Lanouette, Monique

    Rigorous sampling and quality assurance protocols are required for the reliable measurement of personal, indoor and outdoor exposures to metals in fine particulate matter (PM 2.5). Testing of five co-located replicate air samplers assisted in identifying and quantifying sources of contamination of filters in the laboratory and in the field. A field pilot study was conducted in Windsor, Ont., Canada to ascertain the actual range of metal content that may be obtained on filter samples using low-flow (4 L min -1) 24-h monitoring of personal, indoor and outdoor air. Laboratory filter blanks and NIST certified reference materials were used to assess contamination, instrument performance, accuracy and precision of the metals determination. The results show that there is a high risk of introducing metal contamination during all stages of sampling, handling and analysis, and that sources and magnitude of contamination vary widely from element to element. Due to the very small particle masses collected on low-flow 24-h filter samples (median 0.107 mg for a sample volume of approximately 6 m 3) the contribution of metals from contamination commonly exceeds the content of the airborne particles being sampled. Thus, the use of field blanks to ascertain the magnitude and variability of contamination is critical to determine whether or not a given element should be reported. The results of this study were incorporated into standard operating procedures for a large multiyear personal, indoor and outdoor air monitoring campaign in Windsor.

  15. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-10-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R2=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible.

  16. The dynamic monitoring of warm-water discharge based on the airborne high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Honglan; Xie, Feng; Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Zhihui; Zhang, Changxing; Yang, Gui; Wang, Jianyu

    2016-04-01

    The cooling water discharged from the coastal plants flow into the sea continuously, whose temperature is higher than original sea surface temperature (SST). The fact will have non-negligible influence on the marine environment in and around where the plants site. Hence, it's significant to monitor the temporal and spatial variation of the warm-water discharge for the assessment of the effect of the plant on its surrounding marine environment. The paper describes an approach for the dynamic monitoring of the warm-water discharge of coastal plants based on the airborne high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing technology. Firstly, the geometric correction was carried out for the thermal infrared remote sensing images acquired on the aircraft. Secondly, the atmospheric correction method was used to retrieve the sea surface temperature of the images. Thirdly, the temperature-rising districts caused by the warm-water discharge were extracted. Lastly, the temporal and spatial variations of the warm-water discharge were analyzed through the geographic information system (GIS) technology. The approach was applied to Qinshan nuclear power plant (NPP), in Zhejiang Province, China. In considering with the tide states, the diffusion, distribution and temperature-rising values of the warm-water discharged from the plant were calculated and analyzed, which are useful to the marine environment assessment.

  17. A multiwire secondary emission profile monitor for small emittance beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chehab, R.; Bonnard, J.; Humbert, G.; Leblond, B.; Saury, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    A secondary emission monitor using two multiwire grids separated by a positively biased collector has been constructed and tested with a 1 GeV electron beam at the Orsay Linac. The monitor installed just before the electron-positron converter has 8 gold-plated-tungsten wires of 0.1 mm diameter equally spaced 0.2 mm apart in each plane. Each wire is connected with an integrator using a low-bias current operational amplifier. The wire planes and the collector are moved into the beam by a stepping motor : that allows beam-position verification. We measured narrow profiles for 1 Amp peak current pulses of 30 nanoseconds width. Profiles are displayed on a scope and allow emittance determination by the three gradient method. Such a monitor is very useful to control the electron beam position and dimensions on the converter, because the positron source dimensions are rather bigger than those of the incident beam and the geometrical acceptance of the positron Linac is limited.

  18. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where you monitor sulfur dioxide and...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  20. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  3. Apparatus and methods for monitoring the concentrations of hazardous airborne substances, especially lead

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2004-07-13

    Air is sampled at a rate in excess of 100 L/min, preferably at 200-300 L/min, so as to collect therefrom a substantial fraction, i.e., at least 20%, preferably 60-100%, of airborne particulates. A substance of interest (analyte), such as lead, is rapidly solubilized from the the collected particulates into a sample of liquid extractant, and the concentration of the analyte in the extractant sample is determined. The high-rate air sampling and particulate collection may be effected with a high-throughput filter cartridge or with a recently developed portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler. Rapid solubilization of lead is achieved by a liquid extractant comprising 0.1-1 M of acetic acid or acetate, preferably at a pH of 5 or less and preferably with inclusion of 1-10% of hydrogen peroxide. Rapid determination of the lead content in the liquid extractant may be effected with a colorimetric or an electroanalytical analyzer.

  4. GLORI: A GNSS-R Dual Polarization Airborne Instrument for Land Surface Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal; Egido, Alejandro; Darrozes, José; Al-Yaari, Amen; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Baup, Frédéric; Dayau, Sylvia; Fieuzal, Remy; Frison, Pierre-Louis; Guyon, Dominique; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-05-20

    Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) has emerged as a remote sensing tool, which is complementary to traditional monostatic radars, for the retrieval of geophysical parameters related to surface properties. In the present paper, we describe a new polarimetric GNSS-R system, referred to as the GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument (GLORI), dedicated to the study of land surfaces (soil moisture, vegetation water content, forest biomass) and inland water bodies. This system was installed as a permanent payload on a French ATR42 research aircraft, from which simultaneous measurements can be carried out using other instruments, when required. Following initial laboratory qualifications, two airborne campaigns involving nine flights were performed in 2014 and 2015 in the Southwest of France, over various types of land cover, including agricultural fields and forests. Some of these flights were made concurrently with in situ ground truth campaigns. Various preliminary applications for the characterisation of agricultural and forest areas are presented. Initial analysis of the data shows that the performance of the GLORI instrument is well within specifications, with a cross-polarization isolation better than -15 dB at all elevations above 45°, a relative polarimetric calibration accuracy better than 0.5 dB, and an apparent reflectivity sensitivity better than -30 dB, thus demonstrating its strong potential for the retrieval of land surface characteristics.

  5. GLORI: A GNSS-R Dual Polarization Airborne Instrument for Land Surface Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal; Egido, Alejandro; Darrozes, José; Al-Yaari, Amen; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Baup, Frédéric; Dayau, Sylvia; Fieuzal, Remy; Frison, Pierre-Louis; Guyon, Dominique; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) has emerged as a remote sensing tool, which is complementary to traditional monostatic radars, for the retrieval of geophysical parameters related to surface properties. In the present paper, we describe a new polarimetric GNSS-R system, referred to as the GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument (GLORI), dedicated to the study of land surfaces (soil moisture, vegetation water content, forest biomass) and inland water bodies. This system was installed as a permanent payload on a French ATR42 research aircraft, from which simultaneous measurements can be carried out using other instruments, when required. Following initial laboratory qualifications, two airborne campaigns involving nine flights were performed in 2014 and 2015 in the Southwest of France, over various types of land cover, including agricultural fields and forests. Some of these flights were made concurrently with in situ ground truth campaigns. Various preliminary applications for the characterisation of agricultural and forest areas are presented. Initial analysis of the data shows that the performance of the GLORI instrument is well within specifications, with a cross-polarization isolation better than −15 dB at all elevations above 45°, a relative polarimetric calibration accuracy better than 0.5 dB, and an apparent reflectivity sensitivity better than −30 dB, thus demonstrating its strong potential for the retrieval of land surface characteristics. PMID:27213393

  6. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Nikoloch, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  7. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  8. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-04-01

    Accurate reporting of mercury concentration requires a detailed model that includes experimental parameters that vary, such as: pressure, temperature, concentration, absorption cross-section, and isotopic structure etc. During this quarter a theoretical model has been developed to model the 253.7 nm mercury transition. In addition, while testing the interferent species SO{sub 2}, SRD was able to determine the absorption cross-section experimentally and add this to the theoretical model. Assuming that the baseline losses are due to the mirror reflectivity and SO{sub 2}, SRD can now determine the concentrations of both mercury and SO{sub 2} from the data taken. For the CRD instrument to perform as a continuous emission monitor it will be required to monitor mercury concentrations over extended periods of time. The stability of monitoring mercury concentrations over time with the CRD apparatus was tested during the past quarter. During a test which monitored the mercury concentration every 2 seconds it was found that the standard deviation, of a signal from about 1.25 ppb Hg, was only 30 ppt. SRD continued interferent gas testing during this past quarter. This included creating a simulated flue gas composed of the gases tested individually by SRD. The detection limits for mercury, although dependent on the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the simulated gas matrix, remained well below the ppb range. It was determined that for the gases tested the only measurable changes in the baseline level occurred for SO{sub 2} and mercury. Speciation studies continued with mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}). This included checking for spectral speciation with both Hg and HgCl{sub 2} present in the CRD cavity. There was no observable spectral shift. Also a pyrolysis oven was incorporated into the gas delivery system both for tests with HgCl{sub 2} as well as atomization of the entire gas stream. The pyrolysis tests conducted have been inconclusive thus far.

  9. Monitoring of workers exposure to low levels of airborne monomers in a polystyrene production plant.

    PubMed

    Samimi, B; Falbo, L

    1982-11-01

    Exposure of workers to sub-ppm levels of airborne monomers, namely ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, styrene, alpha-methylstyrene, and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, in a polystyrene production plant was measured in the same sample on a single gas chromatographic column. The best separation and sensitivity were obtained with a 3 m X 3.175 mm stainless steel column packed with 10% FFAP on Chromosorb and a temperature programmed from 70 degrees C to 110 degrees C. A total of 106 air samples were collected on 150 mg charcoal tubes from the breathing zone of workers, from areas near reactors, and from places where monomers were unloaded from trucks and tank cars. Samples were analyzed in a manner similar to the method recommended by NIOSH. The mean TWA concentrations in a worker's breathing zone were 89, 66, 49, 120, 41 and 1 ppb for ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, styrene, alpha-methylstyrene, and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, respectively. The highest TWA breathing zone concentration was 14.8 ppm for styrene, which occurred during unloading and sampling of the monomer for a quality check. The mean TWA concentration of monomers in the air of the workplace were 1.1 ppm, 169, 36, 54, 10, and 30 ppb for the same 6 compounds mentioned above. The highest area TWA concentration was 57 ppm for ethyl acrylate, which occurred outdoors at the truck and tank car unloading site. It was concluded that use of two separate local exhaust ventilating systems in this polymerization process were effective in maintaining negative pressure within the reactors under all circumstances of use. These engineering controls and care in handling monomers have resulted in a relatively safe working environment.

  10. Monitoring of workers exposure to low levels of airborne monomers in a polystyrene production plant

    SciTech Connect

    Samimi, B.; Falbo, L.

    1982-11-01

    Exposure of workers to sub-ppm levels of airborne monomers, namely ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, styrene, ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene, and 20 ethylhexyl acrylate, in a polystyrene production plant was measured in the same sample on a single gas chromatographic column. The best separation and sensitivity were obtained with a 3 m x 3.175 mm stainless steel column packed with 10% FFAP on Chromosorb and a temperature programmed from 70/sup 0/C to 110/sup 0/C. A total of 106 air samples were collected on 150 mg charcoal tubes from the breathing zone of workers, from areas near reactors, and from places where monomers were unloaded from trucks and tank cars. Samples were analyzed in a manner similar to the method recommended by NIOSH. The mean TWA concentrations in a worker's breathing zone were 89, 66, 49, 120, 41, 1 ppb for ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, styrene, ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene, and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, respectively. The highest TWA breathing zone concentration was 14.8 ppm for styrene, which occurred during unloading and sampling of the monomer for a quality check. The mean TWA concentration of monomers in the air of the workplace were 1.1 ppm, 169,36,54,10, and 30 ppb for the same 6 compounds mentioned above. The highest area TWA concentration was 57 ppm for ethyl acrylate, which occurred outdoors at the truck and tank car unloading site. It was concluded that use of two separate local exhaust ventilating systems in this polymerization process were effecive in maintaining negative pressure within the reactors under all circumstances of use. These engineering controls and care in handling monomers have resulted in a relatively safe working environment.

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  12. [Status and needs research for on-line monitoring of VOCs emissions from stationary sources].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Gang; Zhong, Qi; Zhao, Jin-Bao; Yang, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Based on atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution control requirements during the twelfth-five year plan and the current status of monitoring and management in the world, instrumental architecture and technical characteristics of continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) for VOCs emission from stationary sources are investigated and researched. Technological development needs of VOCs emission on-line monitoring techniques for stationary sources in China are proposed from the system sampling pretreatment technology and analytical measurement techniques.

  13. 1997 Performance Testing of Multi-Metal Continuous Emissions Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sky +, Inc.

    1998-09-01

    Five prototype and two commercially available multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in September 1997 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The seven CEMs were tested side by side in a long section of duct following the secondary combustion chamber of the RKIS. Two different concentrations of six toxic metals were introduced into the incinerator-approximately 15 and 75 µg/dscm of arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury (We also tested for antimony but we are not reporting on it here because EPA recently dropped antimony from the list of metals addressed by the draft MACT rule). These concentrations were chosen to be close to emission standards in the draft MACT rule and the estimated Method Detection Limit (MDL) required of a CEM for regulatory compliance purposes. Results from this test show that no CEMs currently meet the performance specifications in the EPA draft MACT rule for hazardous waste incinerators. Only one of the CEMs tested was able to measure all six metals at the concentrations tested. Even so, the relative accuracy of this CEM varied between 35% and 100%, not 20% or less as required in the EPA performance specification. As a result, we conclude that no CEM is ready for long-term performance validation for compliance monitoring applications. Because sampling and measuring Hg is a recurring problem for multi-metal CEMs as well as Hg CEMs, we recommended that developers participate in a 1998 DOE-sponsored workshop to solve these and other common CEM measurement issues.

  14. Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon

  15. Accumulation of organic air constituents by plant surfaces. Spruce needles for monitoring airborne chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Reischl, A.; Thoma, H.; Reissinger, M.; Hutzinger, O. )

    1988-10-01

    The needles of the spruce (Picea abies) were used to monitor ambient air for organic trace substances. Analyses of spruce needles in an industrialized area demonstrated that the concentrations of these substances were much higher than those in a nonindustrialized area.

  16. The ebb and flow of airborne pathogens: Monitoring and use in disease management decisions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perhaps the earliest form of monitoring the regional spread of plant disease was a group of growers gathering together at the market and discussing what they see in their crops. This type of reporting continues to this day through regional extension blogs, by crop consultants and more formal scoutin...

  17. Fiber optic acoustic emission sensors for harsh environment health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinski, Jason W.; Duke, John C., Jr.; Horne, Michael R.

    2001-07-01

    Optical fiber sensors are rapidly emerging as viable alternatives to piezoelectric devices as effective means of detecting and quantifying acoustic emission (AE). Compared to traditional piezoelectric-based sensors, optical fiber sensors offer much smaller size, reduced weight, ability to operate at temperatures up to 2000 degree(s)C, immunity to electromagnetic interference, resistance to corrosive environments, inherent safety within flammable environments, and the ability to multiplex multiple sensors on a single fiber. The authors have investigated low-profile fiber optic-based AE sensors for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) systems. In particular, broadband and resonant type optical fiber sensors were developed for monitoring acoustic emission for NDE of pressurized composite vessels and commercial airframe structures. The authors developed an in-plane, broadband sensor design based on optical strain gage technology. In addition, an out-of-plane, resonant sensor was developed using micromachining techniques. The sensors have been evaluated for performance using swept frequency and impulse excitation techniques and compared to conventional piezoelectric transducers. Further, application experiments were conducted using these sensors on both aluminum lap-joints and composite fracture coupons, with collocated piezoelectric transducers. The results indicate that optical fiber AE sensors can be used as transducers sensitive to acoustic events and the indication of imminent failure of a structure, making these sensors useful in many applications where conventional piezoelectric transducers are not well suited.

  18. Remotely sensed blue and red fluorescence emission for monitoring vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, I.; Guyot, G.; Goulas, Y.

    For monitoring plant canopies, fluorescence signals emitted by plants underlaser or daylight excitation appear to be a promising tool among the various remote sensing techniques available. Chlorophyll fluorenscece is a nature emission exhibiting a broad inverse relation with the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of green plants. Besides this specific red fluorescence, a second emission with a comparable intensity is observed in the blue region of the spectrum, when the vegetation is excited by near-UV radiation. The origin of blue fluorescence is still under discussion, but increasing evidence is found to associate it with non-photosynthetic parts of the plant tissue including cellular wall components or precursors, skin waxes and vacuolar metabolites. Experimental results show that the blue fluorescence signal depends on the type of vegetation and is highly affected by stress. For a better characterization of vegetation, blue and red fluorescence should be considered simultaneously because they contain complementary information and are highly specific to vegetation. Two approaches, which are currently considered feasible for the remote detection of fluorescence signals, are analyzed and discussed: laser induced fluorescence (active remote sensing) and solar stimulated fluorescence (passive remote sensing).

  19. Airborne Hyperspectral Sensing of Monitoring Harmful Algal Blooms in the Great Lakes Region: System Calibration and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John; Anderson, Robert; Avouris, Dulcinea; Becker, RIchard; Churnside, James; Cline, Michael; Demers, James; Leshkevich, George; Liou, Larry; Luvall, Jeffrey; Ortiz, Joseph; Royce, Anthony; Ruberg, Steve; Sawtell, Reid; Sayers, Michael; Schiller, Stephen; Shuchman, Robert; Simic, Anita; Stuart, Dack; Sullivan, Glenn; Tavernelli, Paul; Tokars, Roger; Vander Woude, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie have been prominent in recent years. The bloom in 2014 reached a severe level causing the State of Ohio to declare a state of emergency. At that time NASA Glenn Research Center was requested by stakeholders to help monitor the blooms in Lake Erie. Glenn conducted flights twice a week in August and September and assembled and distributed the HAB information to the shoreline water resource managers using its hyperspectral imaging sensor (in development since 2006), the S??3 Viking aircraft, and funding resources from the NASA Headquarters Earth Science Division. Since then, the State of Ohio, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have elevated their funding and activities for observing, monitoring, and addressing the root cause of HABs. Also, the communities and stakeholders have persistently requested NASA Glenn??s participation in HAB observation. Abundant field campaigns and sample analyses have been funded by Ohio and NOAA, which provided a great opportunity for NASA to advance science and airborne hyperspectral remote sensing economically. Capitalizing on this opportunity to advance the science of algal blooms and remote sensing, NASA Glenn conducted the Airborne Hyperspectral Observation of harmful algal blooms campaign in 2015 that was, in many respects, twice as large as the 2014 campaign. Focusing mostly on Lake Erie, but also including other small inland lakes and the Ohio River, the campaign was conducted in partnership with a large number of partners specializing in marine science and remote sensing. Airborne hyperspectral observation of HABs holds promise to distinguish potential HABs from nuisance blooms, determine their concentrations, and delineate their movement in an augmented spatial and temporal resolution and under clouds??all of which are excellent complements to satellite observations. Working with collaborators at several Ohio and Michigan

  20. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  1. Structural health condition monitoring of rails using acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazer, Pinar

    In-service rails can develop several types of structural defects due to fatigue and wear caused by rolling stock passing over them. Most rail defects will develop gradually over time thus permitting inspection engineers to detect them in time before final failure occurs. In the UK, certain types of severe rail defects such as tache ovales, require the fitting of emergency clamps and the imposing of an Emergency Speed Restriction (ESR) until the defects are removed. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques can be applied for the detection and continuous monitoring of defect growth therefore removing the need of imposing strict ESRs. The work reported herewith aims to develop a sound methodology for the application of AE in order to detect and subsequently monitor damage evolution in rails. To validate the potential of the AE technique, tests have been carried out under laboratory conditions on three and four-point bending samples manufactured from 260 grade rail steel. Further tests, simulating the background noise conditions caused by passing rolling stock have been carried out using special experimental setups. The crack growth events have been simulated using a pencil tip break..

  2. Monitoring of volcanic emissions of SO2 and ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, Nicolas; Clarisse, Lieven; Brenot, Hugues; van Gent, Jeroen; Campion, Robin; van der A, Ronald; Valks, Pieter; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Van Roozendael, Michel; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy; Tait, Steve; Ferrucci, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can emit large quantities of fine particles (ash) into the atmosphere as well as several trace gases, such as water vapour, carbon dioxide, sulphur species (SO2, H2S) and halogens (HCl, HBr, HF). These volcanic ejecta can have a considerable impact on the atmosphere, human health and society. Volcanic ash in particular is known to be a major threat for aviation, especially after dispersion over long distances (>1000 km) from the erupting volcano. In this respect, the continuous monitoring of volcanic ash from space is playing an essential role for the mitigation of aviation hazards. Compared to ash, SO2 is less critical for aviation safety, but is much easier to measure. Therefore, SO2 observations are often use as a marker of volcanic ash in the atmosphere. Moreover, SO2 yields information on the processes occurring in the magmatic system and is used as a proxy for the eruptive rate. In this presentation we give an overview of recent developments of the Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The focus is on the near-real time detection and monitoring of volcanic plumes of ash and SO2 using polar-orbiting instruments GOME-2, OMI, IASI and AIRS. The second part of the talk is dedicated to the determination of volcanic SO2 fluxes from satellite measurements. We review different techniques and investigate the temporal evolution of the total emissions of SO2 for recent volcanic events.

  3. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form

  4. Husbandry Trace Gas Emissions from a Dairy Complex By Mobile in Situ and Airborne and Spaceborne Remote Sensing: A Comex Campaign Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Bovensmann, H.; Buckland, K. N.; Burrows, J. P.; Frash, J.; Gerilowski, K.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kolyer, R.; Krautwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Leen, J. B.; Hu, C.; Melton, C.; Vigil, S. A.; Yates, E. L.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field study reviews on the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) found significant underestimation from fossil fuel industry and husbandry. The 2014 COMEX campaign seeks to develop methods to derive CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from remote sensing data by combining hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages synergies between high spatial resolution HSI column abundance maps and moderate spectral/spatial resolution NIS. Airborne husbandry data were collected for the Chino dairy complex (East Los Angeles Basin) by NIS-MAMAP, HSI-Mako thermal-infrared (TIR); AVIRIS NG shortwave IR (SWIR), with in situ surface mobile-AMOG Surveyor (AutoMObile greenhouse Gas)-and airborne in situ from a Twin Otter and the AlphaJet. AMOG Surveyor uses in situ Integrated Cavity Off Axis Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, H2O, H2S and NH3 at 5-10 Hz, 2D winds, and thermal anomaly in an adapted commuter car. OA-ICOS provides high precision and accuracy with excellent stability. NH3 and CH4 emissions were correlated at dairy size-scales but not sub-dairy scales in surface and Mako data, showing fine-scale structure and large variations between the numerous dairies in the complex (herd ~200,000-250,000) embedded in an urban setting. Emissions hotspots were consistent between surface and airborne surveys. In June, surface and MAMAP data showed a weak overall plume, while surface and Mako data showed a stronger plume in late (hotter) July. Multiple surface plume transects using NH3 fingerprinting showed East and then NE advection out of the LA Basin consistent with airborne data. Long-term trends were investigated in satellite data. This study shows the value of synergistically combined NH3 and CH4 remote sensing data to the task of CH4 source attribution using airborne and space-based remote sensing (IASI for NH3) and top of atmosphere sensitivity calculations for Sentinel V and Carbon Sat (CH4).

  5. Initial Development of a Continuous Emission Monitor for Dioxins

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Coggiola; Harald Oser; Gregory W. Faris; David R. Crosley

    2002-03-30

    Under contract DE-AC26-98FT-40370, SRI International has completed the third phase of a planned three-phase effort to develop a laboratory prototype continuous emission monitor (CEM) for dioxins and furans generated during the incineration of waste materials at DOE remediation sites. The project was initiated on July 29, 1998 with the technical effort completed in October 2001. During this research effort, SRI has made numerous improvements in our jet-REMPI instrument. These improvements have involved characterization and optimization of the molecular cooling in the gas jet, implementation of a custom-fabricated, four pulsed valve assembly, new data acquisition and display software, and preliminary development of a wavelength and mass calibration approach. We have also measured the REMPI excitation spectra of numerous organic compounds that are likely to be present in the exhaust stream of a waste incinerator. These spectra must be well characterized in the laboratory to understand any potential interferences that might arise when monitoring for dioxin and furan congeners. Our results to date continue to validate the original concept of using jet-REMPI as the detection method in a dioxin CEM. Using only commercial components with minor modifications, we have already demonstrated a detection sensitivity in the low ppt range with sufficient chemical specificity to separately detect two closely related congeners of dichlorodibenzodioxin present in a mixture. To demonstrate the utility of this methodology outside of the controlled conditions of the laboratory, we performed a series of pseudo-field experiments at the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. The instrument used for those studies was built by SRI under contract with US EPA, and was an exact duplicate of the SRI system. This duplication allowed the experiments to be conducted without transporting the SRI system to the EPA site. Using the

  6. Painting the world REDD: addressing scientific barriers to monitoring emissions from tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asner, Gregory P.

    2011-06-01

    trading table, and at these state-level geographic scales, the science and technology are proving to be the most robust and accurate. Scientific innovation, combined with appropriate up-scaling from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, will likely prove most effective in bringing REDD+ to fruition. References Asner G P 2009 Tropical forest carbon assessment: integrating satellite and airborne mapping approaches Environ. Res. Lett. 4 034009 Herold M 2009 An assessment of national forest monitoring capabilities in tropical non-Annex I countries: Recommendations for capacity building (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena and GOFC-GOLD Land Cover Project Office) (available at: http://unfccc.int/files/methods_science/redd/country_specific_information/application/pdf/redd_nat_capacity_report_herold_july09_publ.pdf) Parker C, Mitchell A, Trivedi M and Mardas N 2008 The little REDD book: a guide to governmental and non-governmental proposals for reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (GlobalCanopy Programme) (available at: http://www.globalcanopy.org/materials/little-redd-book) Pelletier J, Ramankutty N and Potvin C 2011 Diagnosing the uncertainty and detectability of emission reductions for REDD+ under current capabilities: an example for Panama Environ. Res. Lett. 6 024005 UNFCCC 2009 Methodological guidance for activities relating to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancements of forest carbon stocks in developing countries United National Framework Convention on Climate Change Decision 4/CP.15 (available at: http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2009/cop15/eng/11a01.pdf#page=11)

  7. Monitoring airborne fungal spores in an experimental indoor environment to evaluate sampling methods and the effects of human activity on air sampling.

    PubMed Central

    Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1993-01-01

    Aerobiological monitoring was conducted in an experimental room to aid in the development of standardized sampling protocols for airborne microorganisms in the indoor environment. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the relative efficiencies of selected sampling methods for the retrieval of airborne fungal spores and to determine the effect of human activity on air sampling. Dry aerosols containing known concentrations of Penicillium chrysogenum spores were generated, and air samples were taken by using Andersen six-stage, Surface Air System, Burkard, and depositional samplers. The Andersen and Burkard samplers retrieved the highest numbers of spores compared with the measurement standard, an aerodynamic particle sizer located inside the room. Data from paired samplers demonstrated that the Andersen sampler had the highest levels of sensitivity and repeatability. With a carpet as the source of P. chrysogenum spores, the effects of human activity (walking or vacuuming near the sampling site) on air sampling were also examined. Air samples were taken under undisturbed conditions and after human activity in the room. Human activity resulted in retrieval of significantly higher concentrations of airborne spores. Surface sampling of the carpet revealed moderate to heavy contamination despite relatively low airborne counts. Therefore, in certain situations, air sampling without concomitant surface sampling may not adequately reflect the level of microbial contamination in indoor environments. PMID:8439150

  8. Evaluation of airborne thermal-infrared image data for monitoring aquatic habitats and cultural resources within the Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined thermal-infrared (TIR) image data acquired using the airborne Advanced Thematic Mapper (ATM) sensor in the afternoon of July 25th, 2000 over a portion of the Colorado River corridor to determine the capability of these 100-cm resolution data to address some biologic and cultural resource requirements for GCMRC. The requirements investigated included the mapping of warm backwaters that may serve as fish habitats and the detection (and monitoring) of archaeological structures and natural springs that occur on land. This report reviews the procedure for calibration of the airborne TIR data to obtain surface water temperatures and shows the results for various river reaches within the acquired river corridor. With respect to mapping warm backwater areas, our results show that TIR data need to be acquired with a gain setting that optimizes the range of temperatures found within the water to increase sensitivity of the resulting data to a level of 0.1 °C and to reduce scan-line noise. Data acquired within a two-hour window around maximum solar heating (1:30 PM) is recommended to provide maximum solar heating of the water and to minimize cooling effects of late-afternoon shadows. Ground-truth data within the temperature range of the warm backwaters are necessary for calibration of the TIR data. The ground-truth data need to be collected with good locational accuracy. The derived water-temperature data provide the capability for rapid, wide-area mapping of warm-water fish habitats using a threshold temperature for such habitats. The collected daytime TIR data were ineffective in mapping (detecting) both archaeological structures and natural springs (seeps). The inability of the daytime TIR data to detect archaeological structures is attributed to the low thermal sensitivity (0.3 °C) of the collected data. The detection of subtle thermal differences between geologic materials requires sensitivities of at least 0.1 °C, which can be obtained by most TIR

  9. Procedure 5 - Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Promulgated quality assurance procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  10. Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Promulgated quality assurance Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  11. A comparison of emerging gamma detector technologies for airborne radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. J.; Aitken-Smith, P.; Beeke, S.; Collins, S. M.; Regan, P. H.; Shearman, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of new and emerging gamma detector technologies that have the potential to improve in-situ dose and radioactivity-in-air measurements for national monitoring networks. Five detectors were chosen for investigation; LaBr3(Ce), CeBr3, SiPM-CsI(Tl), Cd(Zn)Te and electromechanically-cooled HPGe. These detectors represent the full range of the price-performance matrix. Comparisons have been made of energy resolution, detection efficiency and minimum detectable activity by exposing each detector to a mixed radionuclide source drop-deposited across a filter. Other factors, such as internal radioactivity, linearity, size and cost have also been considered.

  12. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  13. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  15. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  16. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  17. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  18. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  19. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  20. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  1. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 51 - Minimum Emission Monitoring Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in paragraph 2.1 of this appendix, shall be monitored for opacity, nitrogen oxides emissions, sulfur... nitrogen oxides emissions. 1.2 Exemptions. The States may include provisions within their regulations to... continuous monitoring system for the measurement of nitrogen oxides which meets the performance...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 51 - Minimum Emission Monitoring Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in paragraph 2.1 of this appendix, shall be monitored for opacity, nitrogen oxides emissions, sulfur... nitrogen oxides emissions. 1.2 Exemptions. The States may include provisions within their regulations to... continuous monitoring system for the measurement of nitrogen oxides which meets the performance...

  5. 40 CFR 60.46c - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.46c Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... the inlet to the steam generating unit and analyzed for sulfur content and heat content according...

  6. 40 CFR 60.46c - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.46c Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... the inlet to the steam generating unit and analyzed for sulfur content and heat content according...

  7. 40 CFR 60.46c - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.46c Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... the inlet to the steam generating unit and analyzed for sulfur content and heat content according...

  8. 40 CFR 60.47b - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.47b Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... generating unit and analyzing them for sulfur and heat content according to Method 19 of appendix A of...

  9. 40 CFR 60.47b - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.47b Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... generating unit and analyzing them for sulfur and heat content according to Method 19 of appendix A of...

  10. 40 CFR 60.47b - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.47b Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... generating unit and analyzing them for sulfur and heat content according to Method 19 of appendix A of...

  11. 40 CFR 60.46c - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.46c Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... the inlet to the steam generating unit and analyzed for sulfur content and heat content according...

  12. 40 CFR 60.47b - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.47b Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... generating unit and analyzing them for sulfur and heat content according to Method 19 of appendix A of...

  13. 40 CFR 60.47b - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.47b Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... generating unit and analyzing them for sulfur and heat content according to Method 19 of appendix A of...

  14. 40 CFR 60.46c - Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units § 60.46c Emission monitoring for sulfur dioxide... the inlet to the steam generating unit and analyzed for sulfur content and heat content according...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from...

  16. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from...

  17. 40 CFR 60.3041 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection... collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection requirement enforceable? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic...

  18. 40 CFR 60.2942 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection... with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection requirement enforceable? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... 16, 2006 Monitoring § 60.2940 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are... emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete your initial...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1750 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems and is the data collection... I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems and is the data collection requirement enforceable? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... 16, 2006 Monitoring § 60.2940 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are... emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete your initial...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen (or carbon dioxide) data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen (or carbon dioxide) level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and...

  3. Flux Of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL): Synergy of airborne and surface measures of carbon emission and isotopologue content from tundra landscape in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E.; Sayres, D. S.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic tundra, recognized as a potential major source of new atmospheric carbon, is characterized by low topographic relief and small-scale heterogeneity consisting of small lakes and intervening tundra vegetation. This fits well the flux-fragment method (FFM) of analysis of data from low-flying aircraft. The FFM draws on 1)airborne eddy-covariance flux measurements, 2)a classified surface-characteristics map (e.g. open water vs tundra), 3)a footprint model, and 4)companion surface-based eddy-covariance flux measurements. The FOCAL, a collaboration among Harvard University's Anderson Group, NOAA's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD), and Aurora Flight Sciences, Inc., made coordinated flights in 2013 August with a collaborating surface site. The FOCAL gathers not only flux data for CH4 and CO2 but also the corresponding carbon-isotopologue content of these gases. The surface site provides a continuous sample of carbon flux from interstitial tundra over time throughout the period of the campaign. The FFM draws samples from the aircraft data over many instances of tundra and also open water. From this we will determine how representative the surface site is of the larger area (100 km linear scale), and how much the open water differs from the tundra as a source of carbon.

  4. Geoscientific process monitoring with positron emission tomography (GeoPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulenkampff, Johannes; Gründig, Marion; Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Transport processes in geomaterials can be observed with input-output experiments, which yield no direct information on the impact of heterogeneities, or they can be assessed by model simulations based on structural imaging using µ-CT. Positron emission tomography (PET) provides an alternative experimental observation method which directly and quantitatively yields the spatio-temporal distribution of tracer concentration. Process observation with PET benefits from its extremely high sensitivity together with a resolution that is acceptable in relation to standard drill core sizes. We strongly recommend applying high-resolution PET scanners in order to achieve a resolution on the order of 1 mm. We discuss the particularities of PET applications in geoscientific experiments (GeoPET), which essentially are due to high material density. Although PET is rather insensitive to matrix effects, mass attenuation and Compton scattering have to be corrected thoroughly in order to derive quantitative values. Examples of process monitoring of advection and diffusion processes with GeoPET illustrate the procedure and the experimental conditions, as well as the benefits and limits of the method.

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of high speed grinding of silicon nitride

    PubMed

    Hwang; Whitenton; Hsu; Blessing; Evans

    2000-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of a machining process offers real-time sensory input which could provide tool condition and part quality information that is critical to effective process control. However, the choice of sensor, its placement, and how to process the data and extract useful information are challenging application-specific questions which researchers must consider. Here we report an effort to resolve these questions for the case of high speed grinding of silicon nitride using an electroplated single-layered diamond wheel. A grinding experiment was conducted at a wheel speed of 149 m s-1 and continued until the end of the useful wheel life. AE signal data were then collected for each complete pass at given grinding times throughout the useful wheel life. We found that the amplitude of the AE signal monotonically increases with wheel wear, as do grinding forces and energy. Furthermore, the signal power contained in the AE signal proportionally increases with the associated grinding power, which suggests that the AE signal could provide quantitative information of wheel wear in high-speed grinding, and could also be used to determine when the grinding wheel needs replacement.

  6. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  7. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Allendorf; D. K. Ottesen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1998-11-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom of line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  8. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  9. Airborne Effluent Monitoring System Certification for New Canister Storage Building Ventilation Exhaust Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1999-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted three of the six tests needed to verify that the effluent monitoring system for the new Canister Storage Building ventilation exhaust stack meets applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the location for the air-sampling probe and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering the location for the air-sampling probe ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample-transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in this report. The tests reported here cover the contaminant tracer uniformity and particle delivery performance criteria. These criteria were successfully met. The other three tests were conducted by the start-up staff of Duke Engineering and Services Hanford Inc. (DESH) and reported elsewhere. The Canister Storage Building is located in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The new air-exhaust system was built under the W379 Project. The air sampling system features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and a filter holder to collect the sample.

  10. A New Method To Monitor Airborne Inoculum of the Fungal Plant Pathogens Mycosphaerella brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, R.; Wakeham, A. J.; Byrne, K. G.; Meyer, U. M.; Dewey, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a new microtiter immunospore trapping device (MTIST device) that uses a suction system to directly trap air particulates by impaction in microtiter wells. This device can be used for rapid detection and immunoquantification of ascospores of Mycosphaerella brassicicola and conidia of Botrytis cinerea by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) under controlled environmental conditions. For ascospores of M. brassicicola correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.943 and 0.9514 were observed for the number of MTIST device-impacted ascospores per microtiter well and the absorbance values determined by ELISA, respectively. These values were not affected when a mixed fungal spore population was used. There was a relationship between the number of MTIST device-trapped ascospores of M. brassicicola per liter of air sampled and the amount of disease expressed on exposed plants of Brassica oleracea (Brussels sprouts). Similarly, when the MTIST device was used to trap conidia of B. cinerea, a correlation coefficient of 0.8797 was obtained for the absorbance values generated by the ELISA and the observed number of conidia per microtiter well. The relative collection efficiency of the MTIST device in controlled plant growth chambers with limited airflow was 1.7 times greater than the relative collection efficiency of a Burkard 7-day volumetric spore trap for collection of M. brassicicola ascospores. The MTIST device can be used to rapidly differentiate, determine, and accurately quantify target organisms in a microflora. The MTIST device is a portable, robust, inexpensive system that can be used to perform multiple tests in a single sampling period, and it should be useful for monitoring airborne particulates and microorganisms in a range of environments. PMID:10877797

  11. A real time sorbent based air monitoring system for determining low level airborne exposure levels to Lewisite

    SciTech Connect

    Lattin, F.G.; Paul, D.G.; Jakubowski, E.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Real Time Analytical Platform (RTAP) is designed to provide mobile, real-time monitoring support to ensure protection of worker safety in areas where military unique compounds are used and stored, and at disposal sites. Quantitative analysis of low-level vapor concentrations in air is accomplished through sorbent-based collection with subsequent thermal desorption into a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a variety of detectors. The monitoring system is characterized by its sensitivity (ability to measure at low concentrations), selectivity (ability to filter out interferences), dynamic range and linearity, real time mode (versus methods requiring extensive sample preparation procedures), and ability to interface with complimentary GC detectors. This presentation describes an RTAP analytical method for analyzing lewisite, an arsenical compound, that consists of a GC screening technique with an Electron Capture Detector (ECD), and a confirmation technique using an Atomic Emission Detector (AED). Included in the presentation is a description of quality assurance objectives in the monitoring system, and an assessment of method accuracy, precision and detection levels.

  12. Daytime CO2 Urban-Regional Scale Surface Fluxes from Airborne Measurements, Eddy-Covariance Observations and Emissions Inventories in Greater London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, A. M.; Grimmond, S. B.; Morgui, J. A.; Kotthaus, S.; Priestman, M.; Barratt, B.

    2014-12-01

    As the global population becomes increasingly urbanized, spatially concentrated centres of anthropogenic CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHG) arise. While mitigation measures exist at national and international scales, their implementation will be more effective if linked to the urban-scale of the sources. Routine top-down approaches that quantify emissions of GHG from cities and megacities are needed to understand the dynamics of the urban carbon cycle to eventually define relevant policy decisions. London is the biggest urban conurbation in Western Europe with more than 8 million inhabitants. It emitted roughly 45000 ktn CO2 in 20101. To understand the carbon dynamics and quantify anthropogenic emissions from London, airborne surveys of atmospheric CO2, O3, particles and meteorological variables were carried out over the city, onboard the NERC-ARSF Dornier-228 UK research aircraft. We applied an Integrative Mass Boundary Layer method (IMBL) using airborne CO2 observations obtained in horizontal transects crossing London at 360 m at different times of the day and by sampling upwind-downwind profiles. IMBL CO2 fluxes were compared to an emissions inventory and neighbourhood-scale eddy-covariance fluxes in central London. Daytime fluxes in October 2011 from the IMBL calculations ranged from 46 to 104 μmolCO2 m-2 s-1 and covered 30-70% of the urban region. The IMBL CO2 fluxes were the same order of magnitude as observed eddy-covariance fluxes and were statistically comparable to the emission inventory for the same footprint area. A sensitivity analysis suggested that horizontal variability of the CO2 field in the urban mixing layer is the most critical factor affecting IMBL fluxes. The determination of the boundary height and vertical wind speed had more impact on fluxes calculated from upwind-downwind profiles. Furthermore, low-altitude airborne measurements of CO2 provide the advantage of direct observation of the CO2 urban dome of a megacity and relate the

  13. The use of acoustic emission for bearing condition monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, A. W.; Quiney, Z.; Ganji, A.; Murray, B.

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports research currently in progress at Swansea University in collaboration with SKF Engineering & Research Centre as part of a continuing investigation into high frequency Acoustic Emission. The primary concerns are experimentally producing subsurface cracks, the type of which would occur in a service failure of a ball bearing, within a steel ball and to closely monitor the properties of this AE from crack initiation to the formation of a ball on the ball surface. It is worth noting that there is evidence that the frequency content of the AE changes during this period, although this has yet to be proved consistent or even fully explained. Conclusive evidence could lead to a system which detects such cracks in a bearing operating in real life conditions, advantageous for many reasons including safety, downtime and maintenance and associated costs. The results from two experimental procedures are presented, one of which loads a single ball held stationary in a test rig to induce subsurface cracks, which are in turn detected by a pair of broadband AE sensors and recorded via a Labview based software system. This approach not only allows detailed analysis of the AE waveforms but also approximate AE source location from the time difference between two sensors. The second experimental procedure details an adaptation of a four-ball lubricant tester in an attempt to produce naturally occurring subsurface cracks from rolling contact whilst minimising the AE arising from surface wear. This thought behind this experiment is reinforced with 3D computational modelling of the rotating system.

  14. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  15. Satellite monitoring of trace gas and aerosol emissions during wildfires in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Peculiarities of the formation of carbon gas and fine aerosol emissions into the atmosphere during wildfires are analyzed. A prompt satellite monitoring system and technique for the assessment of burnt areas and volumes of CO2, CO, and PM2.5 emissions from wildfires are described. The results of satellite monitoring of the Russian Federation and some Russian regions for different months over 2010-2014 are given; burnt areas and volumes of carbon gas and aerosol emissions throughout the entire territory are assessed. The peculiarities of seasonal frequencies of wildfires and volumes of hazardous gas and fine aerosol emissions in the regions under study are identified.

  16. Directly attributing methane emissions to point source locations using the next generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, A. K.; Thompson, D. R.; Frankenberg, C.; Aubrey, A. D.; Bue, B. D.; Green, R. O.; Kort, E. A.; Eastwood, M. L.; Helmlinger, M. C.; Nolte, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers like the next generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG) are well suited for identifying methane point sources by covering large regions with the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve emissions. A controlled release experiment at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) showed detectable methane plumes at multiple flux rates and flight altitudes. Images of plumes agreed with wind direction measured at ground stations and were consistently present for fluxes as low as 0.09 kt/year (14.16 cubic meters per hour; 500 standard cubic feet per hour, scfh). In some cases plumes were detected as low as 0.02 kt/year (3.40 cubic meters per hour; 120 scfh), indicating that AVIRIS-NG has the capability of detecting a number of fugitive methane source categories for natural gas fields. Following the RMOTC campaign, real time detection and geolocation of methane plumes has been implemented using an operator interface that overlays plumes on a true color image acquired by AVIRIS-NG. This has facilitated surveys over existing oil and gas fields to identify and attribute methane emissions to individual point source locations, including well pads known to use hydraulic fracturing and natural gas pipelines. An imaging spectrometer built exclusively for detection, quantification, and attribution of methane plumes would have improved sensitivity compared to AVIRIS-NG. The Airborne Methane Plume Spectrometer (AMPS) instrument concept is mature, ready for development, and would provide a spectral resolution of 1 nm and a detection threshold of approximately 0.28 cubic meters per hour (10 scfh). By offering the potential to identify point source locations, airborne imaging spectrometers could have particular utility for resolving the large uncertainties associated with anthropogenic emissions, including industrial point source emissions and fugitive methane from the oil and gas industry. Fig.1: True color image subset with

  17. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate poollutant...

  18. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate poollutant...

  19. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate poollutant...

  20. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 62.15185 Section 62.15185 Protection of Environment... make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen...

  1. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  2. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  3. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  4. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  5. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1240 Section 60.1240 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1240 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your...

  6. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 62.15185 Section 62.15185 Protection of Environment... make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1730 Section 60.1730 Protection of Environment... continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon...

  8. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  9. Ionisation Chambers and Secondary Emission Monitors at the PROSCAN Beam Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölling, Rudolf

    2006-11-01

    PROSCAN, the dedicated new medical facility at PSI using proton beams for the treatment of deep seated tumours and eye melanoma, is now in the commissioning phase. Air filled ionisation chambers in several configurations are used as current monitors, profile monitors, halo, position and loss monitors at the PROSCAN beam lines. Similar monitors based on secondary emission are used for profile and current measurements in the regime where saturation deteriorates the accuracy of the ionisation chambers.

  10. Accumulation of airborne trace elements in mosses, lichens and synthetic materials exposed at urban monitoring stations: towards a harmonisation of the moss-bag technique.

    PubMed

    Giordano, S; Adamo, P; Spagnuolo, V; Tretiach, M; Bargagli, R

    2013-01-01

    Mosses, lichens and cellulose filters were exposed for 17 weeks at four urban monitoring stations in Naples (S Italy) to assess the accumulation of airborne Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn. In each site, the element accumulation was significantly higher in the moss Hypnum cupressiforme than in the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. Acid washed mosses accumulated the highest amount of trace elements, but the differences in element concentrations among the moss samples exposed after water washing and different devitalisation treatments (acid washing, oven drying and water boiling) and between the lichen samples exposed with and without the nylon bag were not statistically significant. The cellulose filters showed the lowest accumulation capability. The reciprocal ordination of sites and exposed materials showed an increasing contamination gradient (especially for Pb, Cu and Zn) from the background site to the trafficked city streets; this pattern was undetectable from PM(10) data recorded by the automatic monitoring devices operating in the four exposure sites. The element profile in exposed materials did not change substantially throughout the urban area and particles of polluted urban soils seem the main source of airborne metals in Naples. Through a comprehensive evaluation of the results from this and previous studies, a protocol is suggested for the moss-bag monitoring of trace element deposition in urban environments.

  11. Embedded and conventional ultrasonic sensors for monitoring acoustic emission during thermal fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is widely used for monitoring pressure vessels, pipes, critical infrastructure, as well as land, sea and air vehicles. It is one of dominant approaches to explore material degradation under fatigue and events leading to material fracture. Addressing a recent interest in structural health monitoring of space vehicles, a need has emerged to evaluate material deterioration due to thermal fatigue during spacecraft atmospheric reentry. Thermal fatigue experiments were conducted, in which aluminum plates were subjected to localized heating and acoustic emission was monitoring by embedded and conventional acoustic emission sensors positioned at various distances from a heat source. At the same time, surface temperature of aluminum plates was monitored using an IR camera. Acoustic emission counts collected by embedded sensors were compared to counts measured with conventional acoustic emission sensors. Both types of sensors show noticeable increase of acoustic emission activity as localized heating source was applied to aluminum plates. Experimental data demonstrate correlation between temperature increase on the surface of the plates and increase in measured acoustic emission activity. It is concluded that under particular conditions, embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors can be used for acoustic emission monitoring of thermally-induced structural degradation.

  12. Airborne passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from oil fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Kolyer, Richard W.; Thompson, David R.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    On several flights performed over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields in California between June 3 and September 4, 2014, in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) detected large-scale, high-concentration, methane plumes. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5-hole turbulence probe and an atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Some of the flights were accompanied by the next generation of the Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft (operated by Twin Otter International). Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer were used for validation of the MAMAP and AVIRIS-NG remotely sensed data. The in-situ measurements were acquired in vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at fixed distances downwind of the sources. Emission rates are estimated from both the remote and in-situ data using wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground-based wind data from the nearby airport. Remote sensing and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for selected flights will be presented.

  13. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  14. 40 CFR 60.4385 - How are excess emissions and monitoring downtime defined for SO2?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Reporting § 60.4385 How are excess emissions and monitoring... and hour of any sample for which the sulfur content of the fuel being fired in the combustion...

  15. Flowering phenology and potential pollen emission of three Artemisia species in relation to airborne pollen data in Poznań (Western Poland).

    PubMed

    Bogawski, Paweł; Grewling, Łukasz; Frątczak, Agata

    Artemisia pollen is an important allergen in Europe. In Poznań (Western Poland), three Artemisia species, A. vulgaris, A. campestris and A. absinthium, are widely distributed. However, the contributions of these species to the total airborne pollen are unknown. The aim of the study was to determine the flowering phenology and pollen production of the three abovementioned species and to construct a model of potential Artemisia pollen emission in the study area. Phenological observations were conducted in 2012 at six sites in Poznań using a BBCH phenological scale. Pollen production was estimated by counting the pollen grains per flower and recalculating the totals per inflorescence, plant and population in the study area. Airborne pollen concentrations were obtained using a Hirst-type volumetric trap located in the study area. Artemisia vulgaris began to flower the earliest, followed by A. absinthium and then A. campestris. The flowering of A. vulgaris corresponded to the first peak in the airborne pollen level, and the flowering of A. campestris coincided with the second pollen peak. The highest amounts of pollen per single plant were produced by A. vulgaris and A. absinthium. A. campestris produced considerably less pollen, however, due to its common occurrence, it contributed markedly (30 %) to the summation of total of recorded pollen. A. vulgaris is the most important pollen source in Poznań, but the roles of two other Artemisia species cannot be ignored. In particular, A. campestris should be considered as an important pollen contributor and likely might be one of the main causes of allergic reactions during late summer.

  16. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1260 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems and is the data collection... monitoring systems and is the data collection requirement enforceable? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make sure the averages for sulfur...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  12. 40 CFR 75.11 - Specific provisions for monitoring SO2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emissions. 75.11 Section 75.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... monitoring SO2 emissions. (a) Coal-fired units. The owner or operator shall meet the general operating... affected coal-fired unit while the unit is combusting coal and/or any other fuel, except as provided...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are the data from the continuous... used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits specified...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... the applicable emission limits specified in tables 2, 3, 4, and 5 of this subpart. To...

  15. 40 CFR 60.106a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for sulfur recovery plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for sulfur recovery plants. 60.106a Section 60.106a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Commenced After May 14, 2007 § 60.106a Monitoring of emissions and operations for sulfur recovery plants. (a) The owner or operator of a sulfur recovery plant that is subject to the emissions limits in §...

  16. 40 CFR 60.106a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for sulfur recovery plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for sulfur recovery plants. 60.106a Section 60.106a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Commenced After May 14, 2007 § 60.106a Monitoring of emissions and operations for sulfur recovery plants. (a) The owner or operator of a sulfur recovery plant that is subject to the emissions limits in §...

  17. 40 CFR 60.106a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for sulfur recovery plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for sulfur recovery plants. 60.106a Section 60.106a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Commenced After May 14, 2007 § 60.106a Monitoring of emissions and operations for sulfur recovery plants. (a) The owner or operator of a sulfur recovery plant that is subject to the emissions limits in §...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on...

  19. Real-Time Monitoring of Alpha Emissions. Final report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, R.; Fowler, M.; Wouters, J.

    1994-12-31

    A technology is being developed for on-line, real-time monitoring of mixed and low-level incinerator stacks for levels of airborne alpha activity. The Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System uses a detector composed of multiple parallel plates of scintillating material fabricated so that the entire stack gas stream flows directly through the inter-plate volume. This report is largely a compilation of 3 reports on background reduction, once-through flow tests, and the aeronautical/mechanical engineering work. The full text of each report is included as an appendix.

  20. Development and calibration of a real-time airborne radioactivity monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, R; Morant, J J; Salvadó, M

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry in an automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network can help to identify and characterize abnormal radioactivity increases quickly. For this reason, a Real-time Airborne Radioactivity Monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors (RARM-D2) was developed. The two scintillation detectors in the RARM-D2 are strategically shielded with Pb to permit the separate measurement of the airborne isotopes with respect to the deposited isotopes.In this paper, we describe the main aspects of the development and calibration of the RARM-D2 when using NaI(Tl) or LaBr3(Ce) detectors. The calibration of the monitor was performed experimentally with the exception of the efficiency curve, which was set using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with the EGS5 code system. Prior to setting the efficiency curve, the effect of the radioactive source term size on the efficiency calculations was studied for the gamma-rays from (137)Cs. Finally, to study the measurement capabilities of the RARM-D2, the minimum detectable activity concentrations for (131)I and (137)Cs were calculated for typical spectra at different integration times.